Science.gov

Sample records for diverse galaxy structures

  1. Diverse structural evolution at z > 1 in cosmologically simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory F.; Lotz, Jennifer; Moody, Christopher; Peth, Michael; Freeman, Peter; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel; Dekel, Avishai

    2015-08-01

    From mock Hubble Space Telescope images, we quantify non-parametric statistics of galaxy morphology, thereby predicting the emergence of relationships among stellar mass, star formation, and observed rest-frame optical structure at 1 < z < 3. We measure automated diagnostics of galaxy morphology in cosmological simulations of the formation of 22 central galaxies with 9.3 < log10M*/M⊙ < 10.7. These high-spatial-resolution zoom-in calculations enable accurate modelling of the rest-frame UV and optical morphology. Even with small numbers of galaxies, we find that structural evolution is neither universal nor monotonic: galaxy interactions can trigger either bulge or disc formation, and optically bulge-dominated galaxies at this mass may not remain so forever. Simulated galaxies with M* > 1010M⊙ contain relatively more disc-dominated light profiles than those with lower mass, reflecting significant disc brightening in some haloes at 1 < z < 2. By this epoch, simulated galaxies with specific star formation rates below 10- 9.7 yr- 1 are more likely than normal star-formers to have a broader mix of structural types, especially at M* > 1010 M⊙. We analyse a cosmological major merger at z ˜ 1.5 and find that the newly proposed Multimode-Intensity-Deviation (MID) morphology diagnostics trace later merger stages while Gini-M20 trace earlier ones. MID is sensitive also to clumpy star-forming discs. The observability time of typical MID-enhanced events in our simulation sample is <100 Myr. A larger sample of cosmological assembly histories may be required to calibrate such diagnostics in the face of their sensitivity to viewing angle, segmentation algorithm, and various phenomena such as clumpy star formation and minor mergers.

  2. Galaxy tools to study genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intra-species genetic variation can be used to investigate population structure, selection, and gene flow in non-model vertebrates; and due to the plummeting costs for genome sequencing, it is now possible for small labs to obtain full-genome variation data from their species of interest. However, those labs may not have easy access to, and familiarity with, computational tools to analyze those data. Results We have created a suite of tools for the Galaxy web server aimed at handling nucleotide and amino-acid polymorphisms discovered by full-genome sequencing of several individuals of the same species, or using a SNP genotyping microarray. In addition to providing user-friendly tools, a main goal is to make published analyses reproducible. While most of the examples discussed in this paper deal with nuclear-genome diversity in non-human vertebrates, we also illustrate the application of the tools to fungal genomes, human biomedical data, and mitochondrial sequences. Conclusions This project illustrates that a small group can design, implement, test, document, and distribute a Galaxy tool collection to meet the needs of a particular community of biologists. PMID:24377391

  3. The Alignment of Galaxy Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernacka, M.; Panko, E.; Bajan, K.; Godłowski, W.; Flin, P.

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the orientation of the sample of ACO galaxy clusters. We examined the alignment in a subsample of 1056 galaxy structures taken from the Panko-Flin (2006) Catalog with known BM morphological types. We were looking for a correlation between the orientation of the cluster and the positions of neighboring clusters. The Binggeli effect (the excess of small values of the Δθ angles between the direction toward neighboring clusters and the cluster position angle) is observed, having a range up to about 45 h-1 Mpc. The strongest effect was found for elongated BM type I clusters. This is probably connected with the origins of the supergiant galaxy and with cluster formation along a long filament or plane in a supercluster.

  4. Galaxy Structure in the Far-Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Violet; Conselice, Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Gusbar, Courtney; Katona, Anthony; Villari, Joseph; Madore, Barry F.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy structure comparisons as a function of redshift for the purpose of evolution studies are complicated by the fact that a given galaxy can have a significantly different morphological appearance when viewed in different wavelengths. Using CAS parameters to measure galaxy structure (concentration, asymmetry, and clumpiness), we quantify this band-pass shifting effect in the far-UV as compared to multiple rest-frame wavelengths ranging up to the near-infrared. Our study includes 2073 nearby galaxies observed by GALEX (Galaxy Evolution Explorer) in the FUV and/or NUV. Through this, we provide corrective terms that can be applied to CAS measurements of higher redshift galaxies. We also find an interesting result that elliptical galaxies appear significantly more late-type in the far-UV, with CAS parameters more similar to spiral galaxies observed at red optical wavelengths. We attribute this to ongoing star formation in extended disks. Funded by a grant through NASA.

  5. nIFTY galaxy cluster simulations - III. The similarity and diversity of galaxies and subhaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Knebe, Alexander; Pearce, Frazer R.; Power, Chris; Yepes, Gustavo; Cui, Weiguang; Cunnama, Daniel; Kay, Scott T.; Sembolini, Federico; Beck, Alexander M.; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Giuseppe; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Saro, Alexandro; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-05-01

    We examine subhaloes and galaxies residing in a simulated Λ cold dark matter galaxy cluster (M^crit_{200}=1.1× 10^{15} h^{-1} M_{⊙}) produced by hydrodynamical codes ranging from classic smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), newer SPH codes, adaptive and moving mesh codes. These codes use subgrid models to capture galaxy formation physics. We compare how well these codes reproduce the same subhaloes/galaxies in gravity-only, non-radiative hydrodynamics and full feedback physics runs by looking at the overall subhalo/galaxy distribution and on an individual object basis. We find that the subhalo population is reproduced to within ≲10 per cent for both dark matter only and non-radiative runs, with individual objects showing code-to-code scatter of ≲0.1 dex, although the gas in non-radiative simulations shows significant scatter. Including feedback physics significantly increases the diversity. Subhalo mass and Vmax distributions vary by ≈20 per cent. The galaxy populations also show striking code-to-code variations. Although the Tully-Fisher relation is similar in almost all codes, the number of galaxies with 109 h- 1 M⊙ ≲ M* ≲ 1012 h- 1 M⊙ can differ by a factor of 4. Individual galaxies show code-to-code scatter of ˜0.5 dex in stellar mass. Moreover, systematic differences exist, with some codes producing galaxies 70 per cent smaller than others. The diversity partially arises from the inclusion/absence of active galactic nucleus feedback. Our results combined with our companion papers demonstrate that subgrid physics is not just subject to fine-tuning, but the complexity of building galaxies in all environments remains a challenge. We argue that even basic galaxy properties, such as stellar mass to halo mass, should be treated with errors bars of ˜0.2-0.4 dex.

  6. Morphology and Structures of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Mira; Ann, HongBae

    2015-08-01

    We performed an analysis of the structure of nearby dwarf galaxies based on a 2-dimensional decomposition of galaxy images using GALFIT. The present sample consists of ~1,100 dwarf galaxies with redshift less than z = 0.01, which is is derived from the morphology catalog of the Visually classified galaxies in the local universe (Ann, Seo, and Ha 2015). In this catalog, dwarf galaxies are divided into 5 subtypes: dS0, dE, dSph, dEbc, dEblue with distinction of the presence of nucleation in dE, dSph, and dS0. We found that dSph and dEblue galaxies are fainter than other subtypes of dwarf galaxies. In most cases, single component, represented by the Sersic profile with n=1~1.5, well describes the luminosity distribution of dwarf galaxies in the present sample. However, a significant fraction of dS0, dEbc, and dEbue galaxies show sub-structures such as spiral arms and rings. We will discuss the morphology dependent evolutionary history of the local dwarf galaxies.

  7. Bayesian anatomy of galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ilsang

    In this thesis I develop Bayesian approach to model galaxy surface brightness and apply it to a bulge-disc decomposition analysis of galaxies in near-infrared band, from Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). The thesis has three main parts. First part is a technical development of Bayesian galaxy image decomposition package GALPHAT based on Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. I implement a fast and accurate galaxy model image generation algorithm to reduce computation time and make Bayesian approach feasible for real science analysis using large ensemble of galaxies. I perform a benchmark test of G ALPHAT and demonstrate significant improvement in parameter estimation with a correct statistical confidence. Second part is a performance test for full Bayesian application to galaxy bulge-disc decomposition analysis including not only the parameter estimation but also the model comparison to classify different galaxy population. The test demonstrates that GALPHAT has enough statistical power to make a reliable model inference using galaxy photometric survey data. Bayesian prior update is also tested for parameter estimation and Bayes factor model comparison and it shows that informative prior significantly improves the model inference in every aspects. Last part is a Bayesian bulge-disc decomposition analysis using 2MASS Ks-band selected samples. I characterise the luminosity distributions in spheroids, bulges and discs separately in the local Universe and study the galaxy morphology correlation, by full utilizing the ensemble parameter posterior of the entire galaxy samples. It shows that to avoid a biased inference, the parameter covariance and model degeneracy has to be carefully characterized by the full probability distribution.

  8. Particle fuel diversion structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eshleman, R. D.

    1985-07-30

    A particle fuel burning furnace has an upper combustion chamber for holding a pile of particle fuel and burning the same from the bottom thereof. The furnace also includes a lower combustion chamber for after-burning combustible gases given off by the burning of solid fuel in the upper chamber and a series of spaced apart vertically-extending passageways arranged in a row and interconnecting the upper and lower chambers for communicating the combustible gases from the upper to the lower chamber. A first improved feature relates to a particle fuel delivery control device which operates an auger for filling the upper chamber with particle fuel to a desired level. A beam of light is transmitted and reflected between a photoelectric cell and reflector respectively of the device. When the particle fuel pile has grown in height during filling to the desired level the light beam is interrupted and filling is terminated. A second improved feature relates to a particle fuel diversion structure positioned in spaced relationship above and overlying the row of passageways. The structure forms a horizontal slot which extends laterally from the passageways which prevents particles of fuel from falling through the passageways and relocates the flame which burns the particle fuel pile from the bottom to a region away from the passageways.

  9. Structure, Dynamics and Environment of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Francoise; Terlevich, Roberto

    This contribution presents a summary of the discussion on structure, dynamics and environment of Galaxies, held on Friday May 26 evening, after the Sherry/Coffee interval and the oral presentation of two dozen posters papers.

  10. Measuring Structural Parameters Through Stacking Galaxy Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yubin; Zheng, Xian Zhong; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Peng; Wen, Zhang Zheng; Guo, Kexin; An, Fang Xia

    2016-12-01

    It remains challenging to detect the low surface brightness structures of faint high-z galaxies, which are key to understanding the structural evolution of galaxies. The technique of image stacking allows us to measure the averaged light profile beneath the detection limit and probe the extended structure of a group of galaxies. We carry out simulations to examine the recovery of the averaged surface brightness profile through stacking model Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys images of a set of galaxies as functions of the Sérsic index (n), effective radius (R e) and axis ratio (AR). The Sérsic profile best fitting the radial profile of the stacked image is taken as the recovered profile, in comparison with the intrinsic mean profile of the model galaxies. Our results show that, in general, the structural parameters of the mean profile can be properly determined through stacking, though systematic biases need to be corrected when spreads of R e and AR are counted. We find that the Sérsic index is slightly overestimated and R e is underestimated at {AR}\\lt 0.5 because the stacked image appears to be more compact due to the presence of inclined galaxies; the spread of R e biases the stacked profile to have a higher Sérsic index. We stress that the measurements of structural parameters through stacking should take these biases into account. We estimate the biases in the recovered structural parameters from stacks of galaxies when the samples have distributions of {R}{{e}}, AR and n seen in local galaxies.

  11. FIRST RESULTS FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY: THE STRIKING DIVERSITY OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z > 1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Nelson, Erica; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Bezanson, Rachel; Lundgren, Britt; Brammer, Gabriel; Fumagalli, Mattia; Franx, Marijn; Patel, Shannon; Labbe, Ivo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Kriek, Mariska; Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Erb, Dawn K.; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha; Illingworth, Garth D.; Magee, Dan; and others

    2011-12-10

    We present first results from the 3D-HST program, a near-IR spectroscopic survey performed with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the HST. We have used 3D-HST spectra to measure redshifts and H{alpha} equivalent widths (EW{sub H{alpha}}) for a complete, stellar mass-limited sample of 34 galaxies at 1 < z < 1.5 with M{sub star} > 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} in the COSMOS, GOODS, and AEGIS fields. We find that a substantial fraction of massive galaxies at this epoch are forming stars at a high rate: the fraction of galaxies with EW{sub H{alpha}} >10 A is 59%, compared to 10% among Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies of similar masses at z = 0.1. Galaxies with weak H{alpha} emission show absorption lines typical of 2-4 Gyr old stellar populations. The structural parameters of the galaxies, derived from the associated WFC3 F140W imaging data, correlate with the presence of H{alpha}; quiescent galaxies are compact with high Sersic index and high inferred velocity dispersion, whereas star-forming galaxies are typically large two-armed spiral galaxies, with low Sersic index. Some of these star-forming galaxies might be progenitors of the most massive S0 and Sa galaxies. Our results challenge the idea that galaxies at fixed mass form a homogeneous population with small scatter in their properties. Instead, we find that massive galaxies form a highly diverse population at z > 1, in marked contrast to the local universe.

  12. The Spiral Structure of AGN Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, J.; Barrows, R. S.; Hughes, J. A.; Schilling, A.; Davis, B.; Shields, D.; Madey, A.; Kennefick, D.; Lacy, C.; Seigar, M.

    2014-03-01

    Recent work has uncovered a correlation between the black hole mass, M, in the centers of local spiral galaxies and the pitch angles, P, of their spiral arms. We propose to test this M-P correlation at moderate to high redshifts, using a sample of active galaxies selected from the Great Observatories Origins Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey showing evidence for spiral structure in their host galaxies. The mass of the central black holes are estimated using the Hβ or Mg II lines in existing spectra using luminosity-radius scaling relations. Pitch angles are measured using an iterative 2D FFT algorithm. The aim is to establish this M-P relation beyond our local epoch, test for evolution in its form, and eventually to compute a BH mass function for late-type galaxies out to moderate redshifts.

  13. Diverse stellar haloes in nearby Milky Way mass disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmsen, Benjamin; Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Radburn-Smith, David J.; Holwerda, Benne W.

    2017-04-01

    We have examined the resolved stellar populations at large galactocentric distances along the minor axis (from 10 kpc up to between 40 and 75 kpc), with limited major axis coverage, of six nearby highly inclined Milky Way (MW) mass disc galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope data from the Galaxy haloes, Outer discs, Substructure, Thick discs, and Star clusters (GHOSTS) survey. We select red giant branch stars to derive stellar halo density profiles. The projected minor axis density profiles can be approximated by power laws with projected slopes of -2 to -3.7 and a diversity of stellar halo masses of 1-6 × 109 M⊙, or 2-14 per cent of the total galaxy stellar masses. The typical intrinsic scatter around a smooth power-law fit is 0.05-0.1 dex owing to substructure. By comparing the minor and major axis profiles, we infer projected axis ratios c/a at ∼25 kpc between 0.4and0.75. The GHOSTS stellar haloes are diverse, lying between the extremes charted out by the (rather atypical) haloes of the MW and M31. We find a strong correlation between the stellar halo metallicities and the stellar halo masses. We compare our results with cosmological models, finding good agreement between our observations and accretion-only models where the stellar haloes are formed by the disruption of dwarf satellites. In particular, the strong observed correlation between stellar halo metallicity and mass is naturally reproduced. Low-resolution hydrodynamical models have unrealistically high stellar halo masses. Current high-resolution hydrodynamical models appear to predict stellar halo masses somewhat higher than observed but with reasonable metallicities, metallicity gradients, and density profiles.

  14. The Origin of the Diversity of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revaz, Yves; Jablonka, Pascale

    2010-06-01

    We present a large sample of 166 fully self-consistent hydrodynamical N-body/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies [1]. It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. Using the recent data of the ESO Large Programme DART, we have constrained the star formation history of four Milky Way dSphs, Sextans, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax. For the first time, [Mg/Fe] vs [Fe/H] diagrams derived from high-resolution spectroscopy of hundreds of individual stars are confronted with model predictions. Global relations of dSph are successfully reproduced. Our study shows that the total initial mass of these systems is the main driver of their evolution and explains the diversity in luminosity and metallicity observed in the Local Group dSphs.

  15. Dynamically hot galaxies. I - Structural properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Ralf; Burstein, David; Faber, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    Results are reported from an analysis of the structural properties of dynamically hot galaxies which combines central velocity dispersion, effective surface brightness, and effective radius into a new 3-space (k), in which the axes are parameters that are physically meaningful. Hot galaxies are found to divide into groups in k-space that closely parallel conventional morphological classifications, namely, luminous ellipticals, compacts, bulges, bright dwarfs, and dwarf spheroidals. A major sequence is defined by luminous ellipticals, bulges, and most compacts, which together constitute a smooth continuum in k-space. Several properties vary smoothly with mass along this continuum, including bulge-to-disk ratio, radio properties, rotation, degree of velocity anisotropy, and 'unrelaxed'. A second major sequence is comprised of dwarf ellipticals and dwarf spheroidals. It is suggested that mass loss is a major factor in hot dwarf galaxies, but the dwarf sequence cannot be simply a mass-loss sequence, as it has the wrong direction in k-space.

  16. AEGIS: The Diversity of Bright Near-IR Selected Distant RedGalaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Conselice, C.J.; Newman, J.A.; Georgakakis, A.; Almaini, O.; Coil, A.L.; Cooper, M.C.; Eisenhardt, P.; Foucaud, S.; Koekemoer, A.; Lotz, J.; Noeske, K.; Weiner, B.; Willmer, C.N.A

    2006-10-13

    We use deep and wide near infrared (NIR) imaging from the Palomar telescope combined with DEEP2 spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Chandra Space Telescope imaging to investigate the nature of galaxies that are red in NIR colors. We locate these 'distant red galaxies' (DRGs) through the color cut (J - K){sub vega} > 2.3 over 0.7 deg{sup 2}, where we find 1010 DRG candidates down to K{sub s} = 20.5. We combine 95 high quality spectroscopic redshifts with photometric redshifts from BRIJK photometry to determine the redshift and stellar mass distributions for these systems, and morphological/structural and X-ray properties for 107 DRGs in the Extended Groth Strip. We find that many bright (J - K){sub vega} > 2.3 galaxies with K{sub s} < 20.5 are at redshifts z < 2, with 64% between 1 < z < 2. The stellar mass distributions for these galaxies is broad, ranging from 10{sup 9} - 10{sup 12} M{sub {circle_dot}} , but with most z > 2 systems massive with M{sub *} > 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}}. HST imaging shows that the structural properties and morphologies of DRGs are also diverse, with the majority elliptical/compact (57%), and the remainder edge-on spirals (7%), and peculiar galaxies (29%). The DRGs at z < 1.4 with high quality spectroscopic redshifts are generally compact, with small half-light radii, and span a range in rest-frame optical properties. The spectral energy distributions for these objects differ from higher redshift DRGs: they are bluer by one magnitude in observed (I - J) color. A pure IR color selection of high redshift populations is not sufficient to identify unique populations, and other colors, or spectroscopic redshifts are needed to produce homogeneous samples.

  17. Structure and Morphology of RESOLVE Galaxies in Relation to Environment, Gas, and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Hood, Callie; Snyder, Elaine M.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; RESOLVE Team

    2017-01-01

    We examine the structure and morphology of galaxies in the RESOLVE (REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE) survey, a census of >1500 galaxies with baryonic mass >~10^9 Msun spanning multiple environments across >50,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web. We investigate the statistical distribution of basic structural parameters as well as tidal streams and compact cores identified by image decomposition. Our results offer clues to the drivers of diversity in star formation and gas properties, particularly the unexpected phenomenon of red, gas depleted dwarf galaxies that are not satellites. RESOLVE was supported by NSF award AST-0955368.

  18. Why do high-redshift galaxies show diverse gas-phase metallicity gradients?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiangcheng; Hopkins, Philip F.; Feldmann, Robert; Torrey, Paul; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2017-01-01

    Recent spatially resolved observations of galaxies at z ˜ 0.6-3 reveal that high-redshift galaxies show complex kinematics and a broad distribution of gas-phase metallicity gradients. To understand these results, we use a suite of high-resolution cosmological zoom-in simulations from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project, which include physically motivated models of the multi-phase ISM, star formation, and stellar feedback. Our simulations reproduce the observed diversity of kinematic properties and metallicity gradients, broadly consistent with observations at z ˜ 0-3. Strong negative metallicity gradients only appear in galaxies with a rotating disk, but not all rotationally supported galaxies have significant gradients. Strongly perturbed galaxies with little rotation always have flat gradients. The kinematic properties and metallicity gradient of a high-redshift galaxy can vary significantly on short time-scales, associated with starburst episodes. Feedback from a starburst can destroy the gas disk, drive strong outflows, and flatten a pre-existing negative metallicity gradient. The time variability of a single galaxy is statistically similar to the entire simulated sample, indicating that the observed metallicity gradients in high-redshift galaxies reflect the instantaneous state of the galaxy rather than the accretion and growth history on cosmological time-scales. We find weak dependence of metallicity gradient on stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR). Low-mass galaxies and galaxies with high sSFR tend to have flat gradients, likely due to the fact that feedback is more efficient in these galaxies. We argue that it is important to resolve feedback on small scales in order to produce the diverse metallicity gradients observed.

  19. The HORIZON-AGN simulation: morphological diversity of galaxies promoted by AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien; Pichon, Christophe; Devriendt, Julien; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Welker, Charlotte; Volonteri, Marta

    2016-12-01

    The interplay between cosmic gas accretion on to galaxies and galaxy mergers drives the observed morphological diversity of galaxies. By comparing the state-of-the-art hydrodynamical cosmological simulations HORIZON-AGN and HORIZON-NOAGN, we unambiguously identify the critical role of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in setting up the correct galaxy morphology for the massive end of the population. With AGN feedback, typical kinematic and morpho-metric properties of galaxy populations as well as the galaxy-halo mass relation are in much better agreement with observations. Only AGN feedback allows massive galaxies at the centre of groups and clusters to become ellipticals, while without AGN feedback those galaxies reform discs. It is the merger-enhanced AGN activity that is able to freeze the morphological type of the post-merger remnant by durably quenching its quiescent star formation. Hence morphology is shown to be driven not only by mass but also by the nature of cosmic accretion: at constant galaxy mass, ellipticals are galaxies that are mainly assembled through mergers, while discs are preferentially built from the in situ star formation fed by smooth cosmic gas infall.

  20. The void galaxy survey: photometry, structure and identity of void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beygu, B.; Peletier, R. F.; Hulst, J. M. van der; Jarrett, T. H.; Kreckel, K.; Weygaert, R. van de; van Gorkom, J. H.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse photometry from deep B-band images of 59 void galaxies in the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), together with their near-infrared 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm Spitzer photometry. The VGS galaxies constitute a sample of void galaxies that were selected by a geometric-topological procedure from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 data release, and which populate the deep interior of voids. Our void galaxies span a range of absolute B-magnitude from MB = -15.5 to -20, while at the 3.6 μm band their magnitudes range from M3.6 = -18 to -24. Their B-[3.6] colour and structural parameters indicate these are star-forming galaxies. A good reflection of the old stellar population, the near-infrared band photometry also provide a robust estimate of the stellar mass, which for the VGS galaxies we confirm to be smaller than 3 × 1010 M⊙. In terms of the structural parameters and morphology, our findings align with other studies in that our VGS galaxy sample consists mostly of small late-type galaxies. Most of them are similar to Sd-Sm galaxies, although a few are irregularly shaped galaxies. The sample even includes two early-type galaxies, one of which is an AGN. Their Sérsic indices are nearly all smaller than n = 2 in both bands and they also have small half-light radii. In all, we conclude that the principal impact of the void environment on the galaxies populating them mostly concerns their low stellar mass and small size.

  1. The Galaxy in Context: Structural, Kinematic, and Integrated Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-09-01

    Our Galaxy, the Milky Way, is a benchmark for understanding disk galaxies. It is the only galaxy whose formation history can be studied using the full distribution of stars from faint dwarfs to supergiants. The oldest components provide us with unique insight into how galaxies form and evolve over billions of years. The Galaxy is a luminous (L⋆) barred spiral with a central box/peanut bulge, a dominant disk, and a diffuse stellar halo. Based on global properties, it falls in the sparsely populated “green valley” region of the galaxy color-magnitude diagram. Here we review the key integrated, structural and kinematic parameters of the Galaxy, and point to uncertainties as well as directions for future progress. Galactic studies will continue to play a fundamental role far into the future because there are measurements that can only be made in the near field and much of contemporary astrophysics depends on such observations.

  2. Multicolor CCD photometry of six lenticular and spiral galaxies. Structure of the galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. S.

    2006-03-01

    The results of multicolor surface photometry of the S0 galaxies NGC 524, NGC 1138, and NGC 7280 and the spiral galaxies NGC 532, NGC 783, and NGC 1589 are reported. U BV RI observations were acquired with the 1.5-m telescope of the Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan), while JHK data were taken from the 2MASS catalog. The overall structure of the galaxies is analyzed and the galaxy images decomposed into bulge and disk components. The parameters of the galaxy components—rings, bars, spiral arms, and dust lanes—are determined. The bulge/disk decompositions based on averaged one-dimensional photometric profiles yield incorrect parameters for the bulges of the S0-Sa galaxies with bars and/or rings, whose inner regions are dominated by the radiation of the bulge.

  3. Structural diversity in lithium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yangzheng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Cohen, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium-carbon binary system possesses a broad range of chemical compounds, which exhibit fascinating chemical bonding characteristics, which give rise to diverse and technologically important properties. While lithium carbides with various compositions have been studied or suggested previously, the crystal structures of these compounds are far from well understood. In this work, we present the first comprehensive survey of all ground state (GS) structures of lithium carbides over a broad range of thermodynamic conditions, using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) crystal structure searching methods. Thorough searches were performed for 29 stoichiometries ranging from Li12C to LiC12 at 0 and 40 GPa. Based on formation enthalpies from optimized van der Waals density functional calculations, three thermodynamically stable phases (Li4C3 , Li2C2 , and LiC12) were identified at 0 GPa, and seven thermodynamically stable phases (Li8C , Li6C , Li4C , Li8C3 , Li2C , Li3C4 , and Li2C3 ) were predicted at 40 GPa. A rich diversity of carbon bonding, including monomers, dimers, trimers, nanoribbons, sheets, and frameworks, was found within these structures, and the dimensionality of carbon connectivity existing within each phase increases with increasing carbon concentration. We find that the well-known composition LiC6 is actually a metastable one. We also find a unique coexistence of carbon monomers and dimers within the predicted thermodynamically stable phase Li8C3 , and different widths of carbon nanoribbons coexist in a metastable phase of Li2C2 (Imm2). Interesting mixed sp2-sp3 carbon frameworks are predicted in metastable phases with composition LiC6.

  4. Outer spiral structure in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsis, P. A.

    2017-03-01

    In several grand design barred-spiral galaxies it is observed a second, fainter, outer set of spiral arms. Typical examples of objects of this morphology can be considered NGC 1566 and NGC 5248. I suggest that such an overall structure can be the result of two dynamical mechanisms acting in the disc. The bar and both spiral systems rotate with the same pattern speed. The inner spiral is reinforced by regular orbits trapped around the stable, elliptical, periodic orbits of the central family, while the outer system of spiral arms is supported by chaotic orbits. Chaotic orbits are also responsible for a rhomboidal area surrounding the inner barred-spiral region. In general there is a discontinuity between the two spiral structures at the corotation region.

  5. Galaxies Grow Their Bulges and Black Holes in Diverse Ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Eric F.; Monachesi, Antonela; Harmsen, Benjamin; de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Radburn-Smith, David J.; D’Souza, Richard; Holwerda, Benne W.

    2017-03-01

    Galaxies with Milky Way–like stellar masses have a wide range of bulge and black hole masses; in turn, these correlate with other properties such as star formation history. While many processes may drive bulge formation, major and minor mergers are expected to play a crucial role. Stellar halos offer a novel and robust measurement of galactic merger history; cosmologically motivated models predict that mergers with larger satellites produce more massive, higher-metallicity stellar halos, reproducing the recently observed stellar halo metallicity–mass relation. We quantify the relationship between stellar halo mass and bulge or black hole prominence using a sample of 18 Milky Way-mass galaxies with newly available measurements of (or limits on) stellar halo properties. There is an order of magnitude range in bulge mass, and two orders of magnitude in black hole mass, at a given stellar halo mass (or, equivalently, merger history). Galaxies with low-mass bulges show a wide range of quiet merger histories, implying formation mechanisms that do not require intense merging activity. Galaxies with massive “classical” bulges and central black holes also show a wide range of merger histories. While three of these galaxies have massive stellar halos consistent with a merger origin, two do not—merging appears to have had little impact on making these two massive “classical” bulges. Such galaxies may be ideal laboratories to study massive bulge formation through pathways such as early gas-rich accretion, violent disk instabilities, or misaligned infall of gas throughout cosmic time.

  6. The Structure and Environment of H II Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, Eduardo

    1996-05-01

    H II galaxies are dwarf star forming galaxies found in objective prism surveys through their strong emission lines. They have been targets of extensive studies of their spectroscopic properties such as chemical abundances, physical conditions and kinematics. Little surface photometry work has been done on H II galaxies up to now. This thesis is primarily a CCD surface photometry study of the structural properties, optical colors and a statistical analysis of the environment of H II galaxies. In the chapter "The Morphology of H II Galaxies" I have used a sample of 39 H II galaxies with CCD images for a study of their overall morphology and luminosity profiles. The results show that H II galaxies can be classified in two main types: type I H II galaxies are luminous and have disturbed and irregular outer shapes while type II H II galaxies are less luminous and have regular shapes. The outer parts of profiles of all HIi galaxies are well represented by an exponential as in other types of known dwarf galaxies. In "The Dynamics of H II Galaxies" I have investigated the relation between the linear size of the starburst, luminosity and velocity dispersion. It is found that H II galaxies have similar relations as virialized systems which supports the gravitational origin of their overall kinematics. The possible bi-parametric behavior ("fundamental plane") of H II galaxies is also investigated. However, a conclusive answer to this question still requires more and better data. In "The Colors of H II Galaxies" I have presented a high spatial resolution CCD surface photometry study. The colors of the underlying stellar continuum within the starburst are obtained by removing the flux contribution of the emission lines in the broad band filters. Comparison with recent evolutionary population synthesis models show that the observational errors and the uncertainties in the models are still too large to put strict constraints on their past star formation history. However, the

  7. A FUNDAMENTAL PLANE OF SPIRAL STRUCTURE IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Shields, Douglas W.; Flatman, Russell; Hartley, Matthew T.; Berrier, Joel C.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2015-03-20

    Spiral structure is the most distinctive feature of disk galaxies and yet debate persists about which theory of spiral structure is correct. Many versions of the density wave theory demand that the pitch angle be uniquely determined by the distribution of mass in the bulge and disk of the galaxy. We present evidence that the tangent of the pitch angle of logarithmic spiral arms in disk galaxies correlates strongly with the density of neutral atomic hydrogen in the disk and with the central stellar bulge mass of the galaxy. These three quantities, when plotted against each other, form a planar relationship that we argue should be fundamental to our understanding of spiral structure in disk galaxies. We further argue that any successful theory of spiral structure must be able to explain this relationship.

  8. Structural diversity in social contagion.

    PubMed

    Ugander, Johan; Backstrom, Lars; Marlow, Cameron; Kleinberg, Jon

    2012-04-17

    The concept of contagion has steadily expanded from its original grounding in epidemic disease to describe a vast array of processes that spread across networks, notably social phenomena such as fads, political opinions, the adoption of new technologies, and financial decisions. Traditional models of social contagion have been based on physical analogies with biological contagion, in which the probability that an individual is affected by the contagion grows monotonically with the size of his or her "contact neighborhood"--the number of affected individuals with whom he or she is in contact. Whereas this contact neighborhood hypothesis has formed the underpinning of essentially all current models, it has been challenging to evaluate it due to the difficulty in obtaining detailed data on individual network neighborhoods during the course of a large-scale contagion process. Here we study this question by analyzing the growth of Facebook, a rare example of a social process with genuinely global adoption. We find that the probability of contagion is tightly controlled by the number of connected components in an individual's contact neighborhood, rather than by the actual size of the neighborhood. Surprisingly, once this "structural diversity" is controlled for, the size of the contact neighborhood is in fact generally a negative predictor of contagion. More broadly, our analysis shows how data at the size and resolution of the Facebook network make possible the identification of subtle structural signals that go undetected at smaller scales yet hold pivotal predictive roles for the outcomes of social processes.

  9. Shaping Galaxies:Internal Structure of the z˜2 Galaxy Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.-Y.; van der Wel, A.; Rix, H.-W.; Wuyts, S.; Zibetti, S.; Ramkumar, B.; Holden, B.

    2013-10-01

    We use high-resolution VLT/HAWK-I and HST/WFC3 imaging to study the structural evolution of early-type galaxies since z˜2. Mass-selected samples are drawn from pre-existing photometric redshift surveys, which are then separated into actively star-forming and passive galaxies. The (projected) axis-ratio distributions are compared with those of lower redshift samples, and we reconstruct intrinsic axis-ratio distributions by assuming that galaxies are simple, axi-symmetric systems. We find that at all redshifts z<˜2 more massive galaxies are rounder. That is, at all epochs stars are predominantly formed in disk-like systems, whereas early-type galaxies are more bulge dominated, especially at higher masses.

  10. The diverse evolutionary paths of simulated high-z massive, compact galaxies to z = 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellons, Sarah; Torrey, Paul; Ma, Chung-Pei; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Pillepich, Annalisa; Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Massive quiescent galaxies have much smaller physical sizes at high redshift than today. The strong evolution of galaxy size may be caused by progenitor bias, major and minor mergers, adiabatic expansion, and/or renewed star formation, but it is difficult to test these theories observationally. Herein, we select a sample of 35 massive, compact galaxies (M* = 1-3 × 1011 M⊙, M*/R1.5 > 1010.5 M⊙/kpc1.5) at z = 2 in the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Illustris and trace them forwards to z = 0 to uncover their evolution and identify their descendants. By z = 0, the original factor of 3 difference in stellar mass spreads to a factor of 20. The dark matter halo masses similarly spread from a factor of 5 to 40. The galaxies' evolutionary paths are diverse: about half acquire an ex situ envelope and are the core of a more massive descendant, a third survive undisturbed and gain very little mass, 15 per cent are consumed in a merger with a more massive galaxy, and a small remainder are thoroughly mixed by major mergers. The galaxies grow in size as well as mass, and only ˜10 per cent remain compact by z = 0. The majority of the size growth is driven by the acquisition of ex situ mass. The most massive galaxies at z = 0 are the most likely to have compact progenitors, but this trend possesses significant dispersion which precludes a direct linkage to compact galaxies at z = 2. The compact galaxies' merger rates are influenced by their z = 2 environments, so that isolated or satellite compact galaxies (which are protected from mergers) are the most likely to survive to the present day.

  11. The influence of halo evolution on galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Simon

    2015-03-01

    If Einstein-Newton gravity holds on galactic and larger scales, then current observations demonstrate that the stars and interstellar gas of a typical bright galaxy account for only a few percent of its total nonlinear mass. Dark matter makes up the rest and cannot be faint stars or any other baryonic form because it was already present and decoupled from the radiation plasma at z = 1000, long before any nonlinear object formed. The weak gravito-sonic waves so precisely measured by CMB observations are detected again at z = 4 as order unity fluctuations in intergalactic matter. These subsequently collapse to form today's galaxy/halo systems, whose mean mass profiles can be accurately determined through gravitational lensing. High-resolution simulations link the observed dark matter structures seen at all these epochs, demonstrating that they are consistent and providing detailed predictions for all aspects of halo structure and growth. Requiring consistency with the abundance and clustering of real galaxies strongly constrains the galaxy-halo relation, both today and at high redshift. This results in detailed predictions for galaxy assembly histories and for the gravitational arena in which galaxies live. Dark halos are not expected to be passive or symmetric but to have a rich and continually evolving structure which will drive evolution in the central galaxy over its full life, exciting warps, spiral patterns and tidal arms, thickening disks, producing rings, bars and bulges. Their growth is closely related to the provision of new gas for galaxy building.

  12. Extracting Structural information from Galaxy Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Wayne B.; Davis, D.

    2010-05-01

    The amount of data from sky images is large and growing. About 1 million galaxies can be discerned in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is being built and will scan the entire sky repeatedly, providing images of millions of galaxies and petabytes of data every night. The Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) is a proposed orbiting satellite that will repeatedly map the entire sky from orbit, providing images of perhaps billions of galaxies. Unfortunately, given an image of a spiral galaxy, there does not exist an automated vision algorithm that can even tell us which direction the spiral arms wind, much less count them or provide any other quantitative information about them. To wit, the largest galaxy classification project is the Galaxy Zoo, in which thousands of human volunteers classify images by eye over the web. Although valuable, such human classifications will provide only limited objective quantitative measurements, and will soon be overwhelmed with more data than humans can handle. However, such information would prove an invaluable source for astronomers and cosmologists to test current theories of galaxy formation and cosmic evolution (which can now be simulated with high accuracy on large computers, producing copious predictions that cannot be tested due to a lack of objective, quantitative observational data). In this talk, I will report on preliminary results from dynamical grammars and other machine learning and vision techniques to "parse" images of galaxies, starting us on the road towards producing quantitative data that will be useful for astronomers to test theories.

  13. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Structural Investigation of Galaxies via Model Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelvin, Lee S.; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Hill, David T.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bamford, Steven P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Graham, Alister W.; Häussler, Boris; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Norberg, Peder; Phillipps, Steven; Popescu, Cristina C.; Prescott, Matthew; Taylor, Edward N.; Tuffs, Richard J.

    2012-04-01

    We present single-Sérsic two-dimensional (2D) model fits to 167 600 galaxies modelled independently in the ugrizYJHK bandpasses using reprocessed Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven (SDSS DR7) and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey Large Area Survey imaging data available from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) data base. In order to facilitate this study we developed Structural Investigation of Galaxies via Model Analysis (SIGMA), an R wrapper around several contemporary astronomy software packages including SOURCE EXTRACTOR, PSF EXTRACTOR and GALFIT 3. SIGMA produces realistic 2D model fits to galaxies, employing automatic adaptive background subtraction and empirical point spread function measurements on the fly for each galaxy in GAMA. Using these results, we define a common coverage area across the three GAMA regions containing 138 269 galaxies. We provide Sérsic magnitudes truncated at 10re which show good agreement with SDSS Petrosian and GAMA photometry for low Sérsic index systems (n < 4), and much improved photometry for high Sérsic index systems (n > 4), recovering as much as Δm= 0.5 mag in the r band. We employ a K-band Sérsic index/u-r colour relation to delineate the massive (n > ˜2) early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the late-type galaxies (LTGs). The mean Sérsic index of these ETGs shows a smooth variation with wavelength, increasing by 30 per cent from g through K. LTGs exhibit a more extreme change in Sérsic index, increasing by 52 per cent across the same range. In addition, ETGs and LTGs exhibit a 38 and 25 per cent decrease, respectively, in half-light radius from g through K. These trends are shown to arise due to the effects of dust attenuation and stellar population/metallicity gradients within galaxy populations.

  14. On the characteristics of tidal structures of interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Y. H.; Reshetnikov, V. P.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.

    2011-10-01

    We present the results of our analysis of the geometrical tidal tail characteristics for nearby and distant interacting galaxies. The sample includes more than two hundred nearby galaxies and about seven hundred distant ones. The distant galaxies have been selected in several deep fields of the Hubble Space Telescope (HDF-N, HDF-S, HUDF, GOODS, GEMS) and they are at mean redshift < z> = 0.65. We analyze the distributions of lengths and thicknesses for the tidal structures and show that the tails in distant galaxies appear shorter than those in nearby ones. This effect can be partly attributed to observational selection, but, on the other hand, it may result from the general evolution of the sizes of spiral galaxies with z. The positions of interacting galaxies on the galaxy luminosity ( L)-tidal tail length ( l) plane are shown to be explained by a simple geometrical model, with the upper envelope of the observed distribution being l ∝ sqrt L. We have solved the problem on the relationship between the observed distribution of tail flatting and the tail length in angular measure by assuming the tidal tails to be arcs of circumferences visible at arbitrary angles to the line of sight. We conclude that the angular length of the tidal tails visually distinguished in nearby and distant galaxies, on average, exceeds 180°.

  15. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  16. Near-infrared Structure of Fast and Slow-rotating Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK s-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s-1 diversity of disk structure. Of the fast-rotating (V rot > 150 km s-1) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with hz <~ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ~5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ~25% of the total K s-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{K_s}/f60 μ m ≤ 0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J - K s) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  17. Probing Asymmetric Structures in the Outskirts of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhang Zheng; Zheng, Xian Zhong; An, Fang Xia

    2014-06-01

    Upcoming large imaging surveys will allow detailed studies of the structure and morphology of galaxies aimed at addressing how galaxies form and evolve. Computational approaches are needed to characterize their morphologies over large samples. We introduce an automatic method to quantify the outer structure of galaxies. The key to our approach is the division of a galaxy image into two sections delineated by the isophote, which encloses half the total brightness of the galaxy. We call the central section the inner half-flux region (IHR) and the outer section the outer half-flux region (OHR). From this division, we derive two parameters: A o, which measures the asymmetry of the OHR, and D o, which measures the deviation of the intensity weighted centroid of the OHR from that of the IHR relative to the effective radius. We derive the two parameters from HST/ACS z 850-band images for a sample of 764 galaxies with z 850 < 22 mag and 0.35 < z < 0.9 selected from the GEMS and GOODS-South surveys. We show that the sample galaxies having strong asymmetric structures, particularly tidal tails, are well-separated from those with regular morphologies in the A o-D o space. Meanwhile, the widely used CAS and Gini-M 20 methods turn out to be insensitive to such morphological features. We stress that the A o-D o method is an efficient way to select galaxies with significant asymmetric features like tidal tails and study galaxy mergers in the dynamical phase traced by these delicate features.

  18. Structural analysis of star-forming blue early-type galaxies. Merger-driven star formation in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Koshy

    2017-01-01

    Context. Star-forming blue early-type galaxies at low redshift can give insight to the stellar mass growth of L⋆ elliptical galaxies in the local Universe. Aims: We wish to understand the reason for star formation in these otherwise passively evolving red and dead stellar systems. The fuel for star formation can be acquired through recent accretion events such as mergers or flyby. The signatures of such events should be evident from a structural analysis of the galaxy image. Methods: We carried out structural analysis on SDSS r-band imaging data of 55 star-forming blue elliptical galaxies, derived the structural parameters, analysed the residuals from best-fit to surface brightness distribution, and constructed the galaxy scaling relations. Results: We found that star-forming blue early-type galaxies are bulge-dominated systems with axial ratio >0.5 and surface brightness profiles fitted by Sérsic profiles with index (n) mostly >2. Twenty-three galaxies are found to have n< 2; these could be hosting a disc component. The residual images of the 32 galaxy surface brightness profile fits show structural features indicative of recent interactions. The star-forming blue elliptical galaxies follow the Kormendy relation and show the characteristics of normal elliptical galaxies as far as structural analysis is concerned. There is a general trend for high-luminosity galaxies to display interaction signatures and high star formation rates. Conclusions: The star-forming population of blue early-type galaxies at low redshifts could be normal ellipticals that might have undergone a recent gas-rich minor merger event. The star formation in these galaxies will shut down once the recently acquired fuel is consumed, following which the galaxy will evolve to a normal early-type galaxy.

  19. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the wavelength dependence of galaxy structure versus redshift and luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Baldry, Ivan; Häußler, Boris; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Moffett, Amanda J.; Popescu, Cristina C.; Taylor, Edward N.; Tuffs, Richard J.; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2015-11-01

    We study how the sizes and radial profiles of galaxies vary with wavelength, by fitting Sérsic functions simultaneously to imaging in nine optical and near-infrared bands. To quantify the wavelength dependence of effective radius we use the ratio, R, of measurements in two rest-frame bands. The dependence of Sérsic index on wavelength, N, is computed correspondingly. Vulcani et al. have demonstrated that different galaxy populations present sharply contrasting behaviour in terms of R and N. Here we study the luminosity dependence of this result. We find that at higher luminosities, early-type galaxies display a more substantial decrease in effective radius with wavelength, whereas late types present a more pronounced increase in Sérsic index. The structural contrast between types thus increases with luminosity. By considering samples at different redshifts, we demonstrate that lower data quality reduces the apparent difference between the main galaxy populations. However, our conclusions remain robust to this effect. We show that accounting for different redshift and luminosity selections partly reconciles the size variation measured by Vulcani et al. with the weaker trends found by other recent studies. Dividing galaxies by visual morphology confirms the behaviour inferred using morphological proxies, although the sample size is greatly reduced. Finally, we demonstrate that varying dust opacity and disc inclination can account for features of the joint distribution of R and N for late-type galaxies. However, dust does not appear to explain the highest values of R and N. The bulge-disc nature of galaxies must also contribute to the wavelength dependence of their structure.

  20. The structure of reionization in hierarchical galaxy formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Seek; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.; Raskutti, Sudhir; Lacey, C. G.; Helly, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the epoch of reionization and the properties of the first galaxies represents an important goal for modern cosmology. The structure of reionization and hence the observed power spectrum of redshifted 21-cm fluctuations are known to be sensitive to the astrophysical properties of the galaxies that drove reionization. Thus, detailed measurements of the 21-cm power spectrum and its evolution could lead to measurements of the properties of early galaxies that are otherwise inaccessible. In this paper, we make predictions for the ionized structure during reionization and the 21-cm power spectrum based on detailed models of galaxy formation. We combine the semi-analytic galform model implemented within the Millennium-II dark matter simulation, with a semi-numerical scheme to describe the resulting ionization structure. Semi-analytic models based on the Millennium-II Simulation follow the properties of galaxies within haloes of mass greater than ˜1.4 × 108 M⊙ at z > 6, corresponding to the faint sources thought to dominate reionization. Using these models we show that the details of supernovae (SNe) and radiative feedback affect the structure and distribution of ionized regions, and hence the slope and amplitude of the 21-cm power spectrum. These results indicate that forthcoming measurements of the 21-cm power spectrum could be used to uncover details of early galaxy formation. We find that the strength of SN feedback is the dominant effect governing the evolution of structure during reionization. In particular, we show SN feedback to be more important than radiative feedback, the presence of which we find does not influence either the total stellar mass or overall ionizing photon budget. Thus, if SN feedback is effective at suppressing star formation in high-redshift galaxies, we find that photoionization feedback does not lead to self-regulation of the reionization process as has been thought.

  1. Inorganic pyrophosphatases: structural diversity serving the function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samygina, V. R.

    2016-05-01

    The review is devoted to ubiquitous enzymes, inorganic pyrophosphatases, which are essential in all living organisms. Despite the long history of investigations, these enzymes continue to attract interest. The review focuses on the three-dimensional structures of various representatives of this class of proteins. The structural diversity, the relationship between the structure and some properties of pyrophosphatases and various mechanisms of enzyme action related to the structural diversity of these enzymes are discussed. Interactions of pyrophosphatase with other proteins and possible practical applications are considered. The bibliography includes 56 references.

  2. A REVISED PARALLEL-SEQUENCE MORPHOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF GALAXIES: STRUCTURE AND FORMATION OF S0 AND SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf E-mail: bender@mpe.mpg.de

    2012-01-01

    We update van den Bergh's parallel-sequence galaxy classification in which S0 galaxies form a sequence S0a-S0b-S0c that parallels the sequence Sa-Sb-Sc of spiral galaxies. The ratio B/T of bulge-to-total light defines the position of a galaxy in this tuning-fork diagram. Our classification makes one major improvement. We extend the S0a-S0b-S0c sequence to spheroidal ('Sph') galaxies that are positioned in parallel to irregular galaxies in a similarly extended Sa-Sb-Sc-Im sequence. This provides a natural 'home' for spheroidals, which previously were omitted from galaxy classification schemes or inappropriately combined with ellipticals. To motivate our juxtaposition of Sph and Im galaxies, we present photometry and bulge-disk decompositions of four rare, late-type S0s that bridge the gap between the more common S0b and Sph galaxies. NGC 4762 is an edge-on SB0bc galaxy with a very small classical-bulge-to-total ratio of B/T = 0.13 {+-} 0.02. NGC 4452 is an edge-on SB0 galaxy with an even tinier pseudobulge-to-total ratio of PB/T = 0.017 {+-} 0.004. It is therefore an SB0c. VCC 2048, whose published classification is S0, contains an edge-on disk, but its 'bulge' plots in the structural parameter sequence of spheroidals. It is therefore a disky Sph. And NGC 4638 is similarly a 'missing link' between S0s and Sphs-it has a tiny bulge and an edge-on disk embedded in an Sph halo. In the Appendix, we present photometry and bulge-disk decompositions of all Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Virgo Cluster Survey S0s that do not have published decompositions. We use these data to update the structural parameter correlations of Sph, S+Im, and E galaxies. We show that Sph galaxies of increasing luminosity form a continuous sequence with the disks (but not bulges) of S0c-S0b-S0a galaxies. Remarkably, the Sph-S0-disk sequence is almost identical to that of Im galaxies and spiral galaxy disks. We review published observations for galaxy transformation processes

  3. A Revised Parallel-sequence Morphological Classification of Galaxies: Structure and Formation of S0 and Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    We update van den Bergh's parallel-sequence galaxy classification in which S0 galaxies form a sequence S0a-S0b-S0c that parallels the sequence Sa-Sb-Sc of spiral galaxies. The ratio B/T of bulge-to-total light defines the position of a galaxy in this tuning-fork diagram. Our classification makes one major improvement. We extend the S0a-S0b-S0c sequence to spheroidal ("Sph") galaxies that are positioned in parallel to irregular galaxies in a similarly extended Sa-Sb-Sc-Im sequence. This provides a natural "home" for spheroidals, which previously were omitted from galaxy classification schemes or inappropriately combined with ellipticals. To motivate our juxtaposition of Sph and Im galaxies, we present photometry and bulge-disk decompositions of four rare, late-type S0s that bridge the gap between the more common S0b and Sph galaxies. NGC 4762 is an edge-on SB0bc galaxy with a very small classical-bulge-to-total ratio of B/T = 0.13 ± 0.02. NGC 4452 is an edge-on SB0 galaxy with an even tinier pseudobulge-to-total ratio of PB/T = 0.017 ± 0.004. It is therefore an SB0c. VCC 2048, whose published classification is S0, contains an edge-on disk, but its "bulge" plots in the structural parameter sequence of spheroidals. It is therefore a disky Sph. And NGC 4638 is similarly a "missing link" between S0s and Sphs—it has a tiny bulge and an edge-on disk embedded in an Sph halo. In the Appendix, we present photometry and bulge-disk decompositions of all Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Virgo Cluster Survey S0s that do not have published decompositions. We use these data to update the structural parameter correlations of Sph, S+Im, and E galaxies. We show that Sph galaxies of increasing luminosity form a continuous sequence with the disks (but not bulges) of S0c-S0b-S0a galaxies. Remarkably, the Sph-S0-disk sequence is almost identical to that of Im galaxies and spiral galaxy disks. We review published observations for galaxy transformation processes

  4. Understanding the shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves in ΛCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Iorio, G.; Agertz, O.; Fraternali, F.

    2016-11-01

    The shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves is at apparent odds with dark matter halos in a Λ Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. We use mock data from isolated dwarf galaxy simulations to show that this owes to three main effects. Firstly, stellar feedback heats dark matter, leading to a `CORENFW' dark matter density profile with a slowly rising rotation curve. Secondly, if close to a recent starburst, large H I bubbles push the rotation curve out of equilibrium, deforming the rotation curve shape. Thirdly, when galaxies are viewed near face-on, their best fit inclination is biased high. This can lead to a very shallow rotation curve that falsely implies a large dark matter core. All three problems can be avoided, however, by a combination of improved mass models and a careful selection of target galaxies. Fitting our CORENFW model to mock rotation curve data, we show that we can recover the rotation curve shape, dark matter halo mass M200 and concentration parameter c within our quoted uncertainties. We fit our CORENFW model to real data for four isolated dwarf irregulars, chosen to span a wide range of rotation curve shapes. We obtain an excellent fit for NGC 6822 and WLM, with tight constraints on M200, and c consistent with ΛCDM. However, IC 1613 and DDO 101 give a poor fit. For IC 1613, we show that this owes to disequilibria and its uncertain inclination i; for DDO 101, it owes to its uncertain distance D. If we assume iIC1613 ˜ 15° and DDDO101 ˜ 12 Mpc, consistent with current uncertainties, we are able to fit both galaxies very well. We conclude that ΛCDM appears to give an excellent match to dwarf galaxy rotation curves.

  5. Gravitational Lenses and the Structure and Evolution of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochanek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The grant has supported the completion of 16 papers and 4 conference proceedings to date. During the first year of the project we completed five papers, each of which represents a new direction in the theory and interpretation of gravitational lenses. In the first paper, "The Importance of Einstein Rings", we developed the first theory for the formation and structure of the Einstein rings formed by lensing extended sources like the host galaxies of quasar and radio sources. We applied the theory to three lenses with lensed host galaxies. For the time delay lens PG 1115+080 we found that the structure of the Einstein ring ruled out models of the gravitational potential which permitted a large Hubble constant (70 km/s Mpc). In the second paper, :Cusped Mass Models Of Gravitational Lenses", we introduced a new class of lens models where the central density is characterized by a cusp ( rho proportional to tau(sup -gamma), 1 less than gamma less than 2) as in most modern models and theories of galaxies rather than a finite core radius. In the third paper, "Global Probes of the Impact of Baryons on Dark Matter Halos", we made the first globally consistent models for the separation distribution of gravitational lenses including both galaxy and cluster lenses. We show that the key physics for the origin of the sharp separation cutoff in the separation distribution near 3 arc sec is the effect of the cooling baryons in galaxies on the density structure of the system.

  6. Structural diversity of supercoiled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Irobalieva, Rossitza N.; Fogg, Jonathan M.; Catanese, Daniel J.; Sutthibutpong, Thana; Chen, Muyuan; Barker, Anna K.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Harris, Sarah A.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    By regulating access to the genetic code, DNA supercoiling strongly affects DNA metabolism. Despite its importance, however, much about supercoiled DNA (positively supercoiled DNA, in particular) remains unknown. Here we use electron cryo-tomography together with biochemical analyses to investigate structures of individual purified DNA minicircle topoisomers with defined degrees of supercoiling. Our results reveal that each topoisomer, negative or positive, adopts a unique and surprisingly wide distribution of three-dimensional conformations. Moreover, we uncover striking differences in how the topoisomers handle torsional stress. As negative supercoiling increases, bases are increasingly exposed. Beyond a sharp supercoiling threshold, we also detect exposed bases in positively supercoiled DNA. Molecular dynamics simulations independently confirm the conformational heterogeneity and provide atomistic insight into the flexibility of supercoiled DNA. Our integrated approach reveals the three-dimensional structures of DNA that are essential for its function. PMID:26455586

  7. Structures and Components in Galaxy Clusters: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Churazov, E. M.; Ferrari, C.; Forman, W. R.; Kaastra, J. S.; Klein, U.; Markevitch, M.; de Plaa, J.

    2015-05-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the largest gravitationally bounded structures in the Universe dominated by dark matter. We review the observational appearance and physical models of plasma structures in clusters of galaxies. Bubbles of relativistic plasma which are inflated by supermassive black holes of AGNs, cooling and heating of the gas, large scale plasma shocks, cold fronts, non-thermal halos and relics are observed in clusters. These constituents are reflecting both the formation history and the dynamical properties of clusters of galaxies. We discuss X-ray spectroscopy as a tool to study the metal enrichment in clusters and fine spectroscopy of Fe X-ray lines as a powerful diagnostics of both the turbulent plasma motions and the energetics of the non-thermal electron populations. The knowledge of the complex dynamical and feedback processes is necessary to understand the energy and matter balance as well as to constrain the role of the non-thermal components of clusters.

  8. Galaxy Structure: Core Radii, and Central Mass Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, A. W.; Trujillo, I.; Erwin, P.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the nuclear and global structure of elliptical galaxies, and the apparent disparity between the Nuker and Sérsic light-profile models. We show that the so-called ``power-law" galaxies in fact have Sérsic r1/n profiles over their entire observed radial range. Consequently, only three (Sérsic-profile) parameters are required to simultaneously describe both the inner (HST-resolved) and outer profiles of low-luminosity (M > -20.5 B-mag) elliptical galaxies. We also find that ``core galaxies" have Sérsic profiles with a (partially evacuated) single power-law core. We have developed a modified (5-parameter) Sérsic profile with a power-law core to model the complete radial extent of luminous galaxies with cores. In addition to quantifying the global stellar distribution in these systems, we have derived new estimates of their core radii and other central properties. Comparison of the central stellar deficits with the galaxies' black hole masses suggests that the number of (dissipationless) major mergers that have produced luminous elliptical galaxies is around 1-2, rather than 8-10, which agrees with theory and implies that the galactic merger history of the Universe is roughly an order of magnitude less violent than previous observational analyses had suggested. Support for proposal number HST-AR-09927.01-A was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  9. Understanding the Structure and Evolution of Nearby Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, we studied the stellar and gaseous components as well as the star formation rate in nearby disk galaxies. We used PS1 medium deep survey images to derive five-band (grizy) surface brightness profiles down to 30 ABmag/arcsec^2 for about 700 galaxies. From these stellar mass and mass-to-light ratio radial profiles are derived. The stellar mass radial profiles tend to bend-up at large radii, this often traces an extended old stellar population. The mass-to-light ratio profiles tend to rise outside the r25 radii. We also find a larger fraction of up-bending surface brightness profiles than Polen & Trujillo (2006). This may be because their sample is biased towards low surface brightness galaxies. We used HIPASS data as well as VLA HI 21cm data to study the gas component and dynamics of disk galaxies. We used the GALEX UV images to study the star formation of a HI-selected star-forming sample of about 400 galaxies, compiling a database of FUV and NUV radial profiles and related parameters. We used this to study the star forming efficiency (SFE, star formation rate per unit area divided by gas surface mass density) of the sample galaxies. We found that the UV based SFE has a tighter relationship with HI mass than an H_alpha based SFE as typically used in previous studies and the UV SFE is flat across wide range of stellar mass. We constructed a simple model to predict the distribution of interstellar medium and star formation rate in an equilibrium disk with constant two-fluid Toomre Q. This model can reproduces the SFE relations we derived.

  10. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-03

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts.

  11. Excitation and Evolution of Structure in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1996-01-01

    Even casual examination shows that most disk galaxies are not truly symmetric but exhibit a variety of morphological peculiarities of which spiral arms and bars are the most pronounced. After decades of effort, we now know that these features may be driven by environmental disturbance acting directly on the disk, in addition to self-excitation of a local disturbance (e.g. by swing amplification). However, all disks are embedded within halos and therefore are not dynamically independent. Are halos susceptible to such disturbances as well? If so, can the affect disks and on what time scales? y Until recently, conventional wisdom was that halos acted to stabilize disks but otherwise remained relatively inert. The argument behind this assumption is as follows. Halos, spheroids and bulges are supported against their own gravity by the random motion of their stars, a so-called "hot" distribution. On all but the largest scales, they look like a nearly homogeneous thermal bath of stars. Because all self-sustaining patterns or waves in a homogeneous universe of stars with a Maxwellian velocity distribution are predicted to damp quickly (e.g. Ikeuchi et al. 1974), one expects that any pattern will be strongly damped in halos and spheroids as well. However, recent work suggests that halos do respond to tidal encounters by companions or cluster members and are susceptible to induction of long-lived modes.

  12. Structural and mechanistic diversity of multidrug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Jarrod J; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-10-26

    Covering: 2009 to mid 2016Multidrug transporters are common and prevalent in all orders of life, having diverse functions from the removal of toxins, resistance to cytotoxins, and the transport of specific eluents. In addition, multidrug transporters pose a significant threat to modern medicine. Able to transport structurally diverse small molecule drugs, these transporters are implicated in antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, as well as chemotherapeutic-resistance cancer cells. Although important in such resistance, a relatively small number of multidrug transporters have been structurally characterized, primarily due to the difficulty in purifying and crystallizing active membrane proteins and protein complexes. This review will cover recent structural breakthroughs in the past six years that have led to increased knowledge of the mechanisms of multidrug transporter chemistry, and the role of these transporters in exporting secondary metabolites.

  13. Near-infrared structure of fast and slow-rotating disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK {sub s}-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s{sup –1} diversity of disk structure. Of the fast-rotating (V {sub rot} > 150 km s{sup –1}) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with h{sub z} ≲ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ∼5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ∼25% of the total K {sub s}-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{sub K{sub s}}/f{sub 60} {sub μm}≤0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J – K {sub s}) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  14. Chemical Diversity in the Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Tucana II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Alexander P.; Frebel, Anna; Ezzeddine, Rana; Casey, Andrew R.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first detailed chemical abundance study of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Tucana II, based on high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectra of four red giant stars. The metallicities of these stars range from [Fe/H] = -3.2 to -2.6, and all stars are low in neutron-capture abundances ([Sr/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] < -1). However, a number of anomalous chemical signatures are present. One star is relatively metal-rich ([Fe/H] = -2.6) and shows [Na, α, Sc/Fe] < 0, suggesting an extended star formation history with contributions from AGB stars and SNe Ia. Two stars with [Fe/H] < -3 are mildly carbon-enhanced ([C/Fe] ˜ 0.7) and may be consistent with enrichment by faint supernovae, if such supernovae can produce neutron-capture elements. A fourth star with [Fe/H] = -3 is carbon-normal, and exhibits distinct light element abundance ratios from the carbon-enhanced stars. This carbon-normal star implies that at least two distinct nucleosynthesis sources, both possibly associated with Population III stars, contributed to the early chemical enrichment of this galaxy. Despite its very low luminosity, Tucana II shows a diversity of chemical signatures that preclude it from being a simple “one-shot” first galaxy yet still provide a window into star and galaxy formation in the early universe. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  15. Multi-scale, Hierarchically Nested Young Stellar Structures in LEGUS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, David A.; LEGUS Team

    2017-01-01

    The study of star formation in galaxies has predominantly been limited to either young stellar clusters and HII regions, or much larger kpc-scale morphological features such as spiral arms. The HST Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) provides a rare opportunity to link these scales in a diverse sample of nearby galaxies and obtain a more comprehensive understanding of their co-evolution for comparison against model predictions. We have utilized LEGUS stellar photometry to identify young, resolved stellar populations belonging to several age bins and then defined nested hierarchical structures as traced by these subsamples of stars. Analagous hierarchical structures were also defined using LEGUS catalogs of unresolved young stellar clusters. We will present our emerging results concerning the physical properties (e.g. area, star counts, stellar mass, star formation rate, ISM characteristics), occupancy statistics (e.g. clusters per substructure versus age and scale, parent/child demographics) and relation to overall galaxy morphology/mass for these building blocks of hierarchical star-forming structure.

  16. Structural analysis of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present wide-field g- and i-band stellar photometry of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its surrounding area out to four times its half-light radius (rh = 695 pc), based on images obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO. We find clear evidence of stellar substructure associated with the galaxy, extending to a distance of 82 arcmin (2 kpc) from its centre. We perform a statistical analysis of the overdensities and find three distinct features, as well as an extended halo-like structure, to be significant at the 99.7 per cent confidence level or higher. Unlike the extremely elongated and extended substructures surrounding the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the overdensities seen around Sextans are distributed evenly about its centre, and do not appear to form noticeable tidal tails. Fitting a King model to the radial distribution of Sextans stars yields a tidal radius rt = 83.2 arcmin ± 7.1 arcmin (2.08 ± 0.18 kpc), which implies the majority of detected substructure is gravitationally bound to the galaxy. This finding suggests that Sextans is not undergoing significant tidal disruption from the Milky Way, supporting the scenario in which the orbit of Sextans has a low eccentricity.

  17. Line-of-sight structure toward strong lensing galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Johnson, Traci; Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael D.; Oguri, Masamune

    2014-03-01

    We present an analysis of the line-of-sight structure toward a sample of 10 strong lensing cluster cores. Structure is traced by groups that are identified spectroscopically in the redshift range, 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.9, and we measure the projected angular and comoving separations between each group and the primary strong lensing clusters in each corresponding line of sight. From these data we measure the distribution of projected angular separations between the primary strong lensing clusters and uncorrelated large-scale structure as traced by groups. We then compare the observed distribution of angular separations for our strong lensing selected lines of sight against the distribution of groups that is predicted for clusters lying along random lines of sight. There is clear evidence for an excess of structure along the line of sight at small angular separations (θ ≤ 6') along the strong lensing selected lines of sight, indicating that uncorrelated structure is a significant systematic that contributes to producing galaxy clusters with large cross sections for strong lensing. The prevalence of line-of-sight structure is one of several biases in strong lensing clusters that can potentially be folded into cosmological measurements using galaxy cluster samples. These results also have implications for current and future studies—such as the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields—that make use of massive galaxy cluster lenses as precision cosmological telescopes; it is essential that the contribution of line-of-sight structure be carefully accounted for in the strong lens modeling of the cluster lenses.

  18. Origin of structures in disc galaxies: internal or external processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    2015-03-01

    Disc galaxies have a number of structures, such as bars, spirals, rings, discy bulges, m = 1 asymmetries, thick discs, warps etc. I will summarise what is known about their origin and in particular whether it is due to an external or an internal process. The former include interactions, major or minor mergers etc, while the latter include instabilities, or driving by another component of the same galaxy, as e.g. the bar or the halo. In cases where more than one process is eligible, I will analyse whether it is possible to distinguish between different origins, and what it would take to do so. This discussion will show that, at least in some cases, it is difficult to distinguish between an internal and an external origin.

  19. The galaxy distribution and the large-scale structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, M. J.; Kurtz, M. J.; De Lapparent, V.

    1986-01-01

    Data related to the large-scale galaxy distribution are discussed. The galaxy counts of Shane-Wirtanen (1967) are analyzed; the effects of residual systematic errors on the galaxy distribution measurements are considered. The analysis reveals that the Shane-Wirtanen data are not applicable to the study of large-scale structure. A model which is capable of measuring galaxy correlation functions on scales greater than about 10 Mpc is evaluated.

  20. The Fraction of Stars Formed In A Diverse Sample of 8 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    We have estimated the fraction of stars born in compact star clusters, Gamma, in a diverse sample of 8 galaxies, including two irregulars, two dwarf starbursts, two spirals, and two mergers. We find an average value for our sample of Gamma ~30 +/- 12 %. We also calculate the fraction of stars found in clusters that have survived to older ages, and find values of 4.6 +/- 2.5% for 10-100 Myr clusters, and 2.4+/-1.1 % for 100-400 Myr clusters. Intriguingly, Gamma does not appear to vary with the star formation rate (SFR), the SFR density or the gas density in our sample. These new results are at odds with the well-established picture where a higher fraction of stars form in clusters when the star formation and gas densities are high. We explore reasons for the differences between our results and previous work, and describe how the LEGUS plus Halpha-LEGUS surveys will be used to help settle the issue of whether or not Gamma varies with galaxy property.

  1. Structural diversity of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Forsberg, Zarah; Loose, Jennifer Sm; Bissaro, Bastien; Eijsink, Vincent Gh

    2017-01-10

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) catalyze the oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds and represent a promising resource for development of industrial enzyme cocktails for biomass processing. LPMOs show high sequence and modular diversity and are known, so far, to cleave insoluble substrates such as cellulose, chitin and starch, as well as hemicelluloses such as beta-glucan, xyloglucan and xylan. All LPMOs share a catalytic histidine brace motif to bind copper, but differ strongly when it comes to the nature and arrangement of residues on the substrate-binding surface. In recent years, the number of available LPMO structures has increased rapidly, including the first structure of an enzyme-substrate complex. The insights gained from these structures is reviewed below.

  2. TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE AND MASS-TEMPERATURE SCATTER IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ventimiglia, David A.; Voit, G. Mark; Rasia, E. E-mail: voit@pa.msu.edu

    2012-03-10

    Precision cosmology studies based on wide-field surveys of galaxy clusters benefit from constraints on intrinsic scatter in mass-observable relationships. In principle, two-parameter models combining direct measurements of galaxy-cluster structural variation with mass proxies such as X-ray luminosity and temperature can be used to constrain scatter in the relationship between the mass proxy and the cluster's halo mass and to measure the redshift evolution of that scatter. One candidate for quantifying cluster substructure is the intracluster medium temperature inhomogeneity inferred from X-ray spectral properties, an example of which is T{sub HBR}, the ratio of hardband to broadband spectral-fit temperatures. In this paper we test the effectiveness of T{sub HBR} as an indicator of scatter in the mass-temperature relation using 118 galaxy clusters simulated with radiative cooling and feedback. We find that, while T{sub HBR} is correlated with clusters' departures {delta}ln T{sub X} from the mean M-T{sub X} relation, the effect is modest.

  3. Gravitational Lenses and the Structure and Evolution of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Kochanek, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    During the first year of the project we completed five papers, each of which represents a new direction in the theory and interpretation of gravitational lenses. In the first paper, The Importance of Einstein Rings, we developed the first theory for the formation and structure of the Einstein rings formed by lensing extended sources like the host galaxies of quasar and radio sources. In the second paper, Cusped Mass Models Of Gravitational Lenses, we introduced a new class of lens models. In the third paper, Global Probes of the Impact of Baryons on Dark Matter Halos, we made the first globally consistent models for the separation distribution of gravitational lenses including both galaxy and cluster lenses. The last two papers explore the properties of two lenses in detail. During the second year we have focused more closely on the relationship of baryons and dark matter. In the third year we have been further examining the relationship between baryons and dark matter. In the present year we extended our statistical analysis of lens mass distributions using a self-similar model for the halo mass distribution as compared to the luminous galaxy.

  4. Zooming on the internal structure of z≃6 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallottini, A.; Ferrara, A.; Gallerani, S.; Vallini, L.; Maiolino, R.; Salvadori, S.

    2017-03-01

    We present zoom-in, adaptive mesh refinement, high-resolution (≃30 pc) simulations of high-redshift (z ≃ 6) galaxies with the aim of characterizing their internal properties and interstellar medium. Among other features, we adopt a star formation model based on a physically sound molecular hydrogen prescription, and introduce a novel scheme for supernova feedback, stellar winds and dust-mediated radiation pressure. In the zoom-in simulation, the target halo hosts 'Dahlia', a galaxy with a stellar mass M⋆ = 1.6 × 1010 M⊙, representative of a typical z ∼ 6 Lyman-break galaxy. Dahlia has a total H2 mass of 108.5 M⊙ that is mainly concentrated in a disc-like structure of effective radius ≃0.6 kpc and scale height ≃200 pc. Frequent mergers drive fresh gas towards the centre of the disc, sustaining a star formation rate per unit area of ≃15 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. The disc is composed of dense (n ≳ 25 cm-3), metal-rich (Z ≃ 0.5 Z⊙) gas that is pressure supported by radiation. We compute the 158 μm [C II] emission arising from Dahlia, and find that ≃95 per cent of the total [C II] luminosity (L_{[C II]}˜eq 10^{7.5} L_{⊙}) arises from the H2 disc. Although 30 per cent of the C II mass is transported out of the disc by outflows, such gas negligibly contributes to [C II] emission, due to its low density (n ≲ 10 cm-3) and metallicity (Z ≲ 10-1 Z⊙). Dahlia is underluminous with respect to the local [C II]-SFR relation; however, its luminosity is consistent with upper limits derived for most z ∼ 6 galaxies.

  5. Gas and stellar spiral structures in tidally perturbed disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettitt, Alex R.; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James W.

    2016-06-01

    Tidal interactions between disc galaxies and low-mass companions are an established method for generating galactic spiral features. In this work, we present a study of the structure and dynamics of spiral arms driven in interactions between disc galaxies and perturbing companions in 3D N-body/smoothed hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Our specific aims are to characterize any differences between structures formed in the gas and stars from a purely hydrodynamical and gravitational perspective, and to find a limiting case for spiral structure generation. Through analysis of a number of different interacting cases, we find that there is very little difference between arm morphology, pitch angles and pattern speeds between the two media. The main differences are a minor offset between gas and stellar arms, clear spurring features in gaseous arms, and different radial migration of material in the stronger interacting cases. We investigate the minimum mass of a companion required to drive spiral structure in a galactic disc, finding the limiting spiral generation cases with companion masses of the order of 1 × 109 M⊙, equivalent to only 4 per cent of the stellar disc mass, or 0.5 per cent of the total galactic mass of a Milky Way analogue.

  6. Dark and luminous matter in galaxies and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guangfei

    of ≲ 0.035 on the average external shear. The total mass has an average ellipticity = 0.78 +/- 0.03 (rms of 0.12), which correlates extremely well with the stellar ellipticity, q*, resulting in = 0.99 +/- 0.03 (rms of 0.11) for sigma ≳ 225 kms-1. (iii) The average projected dark-matter mass fraction is inferred to be = 0.25 +/- 0.06 (rms of 0.22) inside , using the stellar mass-to-light ratios derived from the Fundamental Plane as priors. (iv) Combined with results from the Lenses Structure & Dynamics (LSD) Survey at z ≳ 0.3, we find no significant evolution of the total density slope inside one effective radius for galaxies with sigmaap ≥ 200 kms -1: a linear fit gives alphagamma' ≡ d/dz = 0.23 +/- 0.16 (1sigma) for the range z=0.08--1.01. We conclude that massive early-type galaxies at z=0.06--0.33 on average have an isothermal logarithmic density slope inside half an effective radius, with an intrinsic spread of at most 6% (1 sigma). Based on the galaxies hosted by halos more massive than 1013.5 M⊙ from the Millennium Run Simulation (MRS), the relations between the halo mass and cluster optical observables are investigated, at redshifts z = 0, z = 0.3, and z = 0.5 are investigated. Two simulated galaxy catalogs are used, with one from the Durham university group, and the other from Max Planck Institution for Astrophysics (MPA) group. The relations between halo mass and cluster luminosity, or halo mass and galaxy richness (galaxy number) can be well fit by power-law mean relations with lognormal scatter. The scatter is around 0.12 dex (Durham) and 0.15 dex (MPA) at cluster luminosity Ltot 101.4L*. The scatter in the Durham simulation decreases with increasing cluster luminosity, while no obvious trend appears in the MPA simulation. The central galaxy luminosity is also correlated with halo mass, but with larger scatter. At fixed halo mass, there is little or no correlation of average galaxy luminosity or

  7. DDE Transposases: Structural Similarity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nesmelova, Irina V.; Hackett, Perry B.

    2010-01-01

    DNA transposons are mobile DNA elements that can move from one DNA molecule to another and thereby deliver genetic information into human chromosomes in order to confer a new function or replace a defective gene. This process requires a transposase enzyme. During transposition DD[E/D]-transposases undergo a series of conformational changes. We summarize the structural features of DD[E/D]-transposases for which three-dimensional structures are available and that relate to transposases, which are being developed for use in mammalian cells. Similar to other members of the polynucleotidyl transferase family, the catalytic domains of DD[E/D]-transposases share a common feature: an RNase H-like fold that draws three catalytically active residues, the DDE motif, into close proximity. Beyond this fold, the structures of catalytic domains vary considerably, and the DD[E/D]-transposases display marked structural diversity within their DNA-binding domains. Yet despite such structural variability, essentially the same end result is achieved. PMID:20615441

  8. Structures in Galaxies: Nature versus Nurture. Input from Theory and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    2010-10-01

    Galaxies, in particular disc galaxies, contain a number of structures and substructures with well defined morphological, photometric and kinematic properties. Considerable theoretical effort has been put into explaining their formation and evolution, both analytically and with numerical simulations. In some theories, structures form during the natural evolution of the galaxy, i.e. they are a result of nature. For others, it is the interaction with other galaxies, or with the intergalactic medium—i.e. nurture—that accounts for a structure. Either way, the existence and properties of these structures reveal important information on the underlying potential of the galaxy, i.e. on the amount and distribution of matter—including the dark matter—in it, and on the evolutionary history of the galaxy. Here, I will briefly review the various formation scenarios and the respective role of nature and nurture in the formation, evolution and properties of the main structures and substructures.

  9. A CLASSICAL MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF GALAXIES IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, Ronald J.; Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Knapen, Johan H.; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Laine, Jarkko; Comerón, Sébastien; Elmegreen, Debra; Ho, Luis C.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L.; Courtois, Helene; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Paz, Armando Gil de; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; and others

    2015-04-15

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G) is the largest available database of deep, homogeneous middle-infrared (mid-IR) images of galaxies of all types. The survey, which includes 2352 nearby galaxies, reveals galaxy morphology only minimally affected by interstellar extinction. This paper presents an atlas and classifications of S{sup 4}G galaxies in the Comprehensive de Vaucouleurs revised Hubble-Sandage (CVRHS) system. The CVRHS system follows the precepts of classical de Vaucouleurs morphology, modified to include recognition of other features such as inner, outer, and nuclear lenses, nuclear rings, bars, and disks, spheroidal galaxies, X patterns and box/peanut structures, OLR subclass outer rings and pseudorings, bar ansae and barlenses, parallel sequence late-types, thick disks, and embedded disks in 3D early-type systems. We show that our CVRHS classifications are internally consistent, and that nearly half of the S{sup 4}G sample consists of extreme late-type systems (mostly bulgeless, pure disk galaxies) in the range Scd-Im. The most common family classification for mid-IR types S0/a to Sc is SA while that for types Scd to Sm is SB. The bars in these two type domains are very different in mid-IR structure and morphology. This paper examines the bar, ring, and type classification fractions in the sample, and also includes several montages of images highlighting the various kinds of “stellar structures” seen in mid-IR galaxy morphology.

  10. The Spatial Distribution of Star Formation in Galaxies: Observing the Emergence of Galactic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Erica June

    A high resolution measurement of the distribution of star formation within galaxies is key to understanding the emergence of galactic structure. The aim of this thesis is to understand how the structure of galaxies is built by developing a new method to spatially resolve their star formation. Using Ha maps for 2676 galaxies, this thesis shows where star formation is distributed in galaxies during the epoch 0.7 < z < 1.5 when a third of the total star formation in the history of the universe occurred. Across the star formation rate - stellar mass plane (the "main sequence"), star formation is `spatially coherent': in galaxies with higher than average star formation rates, Ha is enhanced throughout the disk; similarly, in galaxies with low star formation rates Ha is depressed throughout the disk. This places constraints both on the mechanisms for enhancing and quenching star formation as well as on how the structure of galaxies is built. The disk scale length of star formation in galaxies is larger than that of the stars, a direct demonstration that the disks of galaxies grow inside-out. While most star formation in most galaxies occurs in disks, not all of it does. With the first spatially resolved measurement of the Balmer decrement at z > 1, it can be seen that galaxies with M* > 1010M ⊙ have significant dust attenuation toward their centers. This means that we are witnessing the build-up of the dense stellar cores of massive galaxies through dust-obscured in-situ star formation. The most massive galaxies are thought to have formed their dense stellar cores at even earlier cosmic epochs. This thesis presents the first confirmed example of a massive galaxy core in the process of formation at z = 2.3. It has one of the highest velocity dispersions ever measured for a normal star forming galaxy and also appears to be building through very dense, dust-enshrouded star formation.

  11. Native dynamics from diversity in NMR structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Onuchic, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Protein function relies on the characteristic dynamics that arise in the protein's unique native structure, controlled by the smooth, funneled energy landscape evolved to enable fast and reliable folding. Structure-based models draw on energy landscape theory to build an ideally funneled energy landscape only from a protein's native structure. Simplified interactions of homogeneous strength are used to eliminate energetic frustration. The dynamics of the model are controlled by geometric constraints imposed by the native fold. The energy landscapes of many actual proteins are smooth enough to let such unfrustrated models describe their folding mechanisms. But conflicting functional demands upon the sequence may introduce sufficient frustration into the energetics to affect the dynamics. For such cases heterogeneous interactions can be optimized based on additional data. We use the diversity among the conformations deposited in a set of NMR structures to estimate the extent of fluctuations in the native state to build an improved model of protein S6. Qualitative modifications bring the observed mechanism into agreement with experiment, and matching of the entire fluctuation profile leads to similar contact maps as optimization based on either phi-values of sequence data.

  12. Analysis of the structure of disk galaxies in the NGC 2300 group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, M. A.; Sil'chenko, O. K.

    2016-10-01

    Data from the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory obtained using the SCORPIO instrument in imaging mode are used to study member galaxies of the NGC 2300 group. Surface photometry has been carried out for the five largest galaxies in the group, whose isophotal parameters and the parameters of their large-scale structural components (disks and bulges) have been determined. The morphological type of the central galaxy in the group has been refined, and shown to be elliptical. Studies of structural features in non-central disk galaxies have revealed an enhanced percent of bars: bars were found in all disk galaxies of this group, with all of these being compact structures. The similarity of the structural features of the disks of the group galaxies suggests that these disksmay be being restructured in the process of the current merger of the two X-ray subgroups comprising NGC 2300: the group NGC 2300 itself and the group NGC 2276.

  13. We Are Family: Using Diverse Family Structure Literature with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Deanna Peterschick; Bell, Kari

    2006-01-01

    The structure of the American family has changed over the years. Although the traditional father, mother, child structure still dominates, other family patterns are emerging. In this article the authors present: (1) current statistics relating to diverse family structures; (2) reasons for using diverse family structure literature with children;…

  14. Evolution of galaxy structure using visual morphologies in CANDELS and Hydro-ART simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozena, Mark W.

    2013-08-01

    The general properties, morphologies, and classes of galaxies in the local Universe are well studied. Most local galaxies are morphologically members of the Hubble sequence and can be crudely separated into elliptical red quiescent galaxies or disky blue star-forming galaxies. This Hubble sequence of relaxed structures has been shown to dominate galaxy populations out to a redshift of z~1. The description of galaxies at earlier times is not well known nor is it understood how and at what epoch the Hubble sequence formed. Of particular interest is the structure of galaxies at z~2. This epoch was an active time for galaxy growth and was the peak epoch for star formation rate, active galactic nuclei activity, and mergers between galaxies. With the installation of the near-infrared Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope in 2009, large area photometric surveys of galaxies were able to be performed for the first time at moderate redshifts (z~2) in wavebands that effectively trace the older stellar populations and stellar mass of the galaxies rather than the clumpy star-forming regions. Using WFC3 HST images, an in-depth morphology classification system was developed to probe the galaxy populations at higher redshifts (focusing on z~2). These visual classifications were used with other galaxy parameters (stellar mass, color, star formation rate, radius, Sersic profiles, etc) to identify and quantify the moderate redshift galaxy populations and study how these populations changed with time to form the relaxed Hubble sequence Universe we observe today. Additionally, these same tools that were used to probe galaxy populations at z~2 in the observed Universe were also used on simulated galaxy images produced from state-of-the-art cosmological simulations. These Hydro-ART simulations build artificial galaxies that are compared to observations so as to shed light on the relevant mechanisms in galaxy evolution. By classifying and comparing the populations

  15. Large-scale structure and the intrinsic alignment of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Seljak, Uroš; Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2016-10-01

    Coherent alignments of galaxy shapes, often called``intrinsic alignments'' (IA), are the most significant source of astrophysical uncertainty in weak lensing measurements. We develop the tidal alignment model of IA and demonstrate its success in describing observational data. We also describe a technique to separate IA from galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements. Applying this technique to luminous red galaxy lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we constrain potential IA contamination from associated sources to be below a few percent.

  16. Star formation along the Hubble sequence. Radial structure of the star formation of CALIFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Pérez, E.; García-Benito, R.; López Fernández, R.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Amorim, A. L.; Vale Asari, N.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, C. J.; Wisotzki, L.; Mast, D.; Alves, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The spatially resolved stellar population content of today's galaxies holds important information for understanding the different processes that contribute to the star formation and mass assembly histories of galaxies. The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by a uniquely rich and diverse data set drawn from the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses ranging from M⋆ ~ 109 to 7 × 1011 M⊙. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to the datacubes to derive 2D maps and radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past (ΣSFR), as well as related properties, such as the local specific star formation rate (sSFR), defined as the ratio between ΣSFR and the stellar mass surface density (μ⋆). To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF), we stack the individual radial profiles in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd), and several stellar masses. Our main results are: (a) the intensity of the star formation rate shows declining profiles that exhibit very small differences between spirals with values at R = 1 half light radius (HLR) within a factor two of ΣSFR ~ 20 M⊙Gyr-1pc-2. The dispersion in the ΣSFR(R) profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals (Sbc, Sc, Sd). This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant ΣSFR. (b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outward with a steeper slope in the inner 1 HLR. This behavior suggests that galaxies are quenched inside-out and that this process is faster in the central, bulge-dominated part than in the disks. (c) As a whole and at all radii, E and S0 are off the MSSF with SFR much smaller than spirals of the

  17. Structure of the Interacting Starburst Galaxy II Zw 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigan, P. J.; Gallagher, J. S.; Rudie, G.; Wehner, E. H.

    2005-09-01

    II Zw 23 (UGC 3179) is a luminous (MB -21) nearby compact narrow emission line starburst galaxy with blue optical colors and strong emission lines. We present a photometric and morphological study of II Zw 23 and its interacting companion, PC016099, using data obtained with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope in combination with a WFPC2 image from the HST archives. II Zw 23 has a highly disturbed outer structure with long trails of debris that may be feeding tidal dwarfs. Its central regions appear disk-like, a structure that is consistent with the overall rotation pattern observed in the Hα emission line velocity field measured from Densepak observations obtained with WIYN. We discuss these results in terms of the different evolutionary paths followed by stars and gas during strong interactions and the possibility of rapid secondary galactic disk formation in such events.

  18. Structural basis unifying diverse GTP hydrolysis mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Anand, Baskaran; Majumdar, Soneya; Prakash, Balaji

    2013-02-12

    Central to biological processes is the regulation rendered by GTPases. Until recently, the GTP hydrolysis mechanism, exemplified by Ras-family (and G-α) GTPases, was thought to be universal. This mechanism utilizes a conserved catalytic Gln supplied "in cis" from the GTPase and an arginine finger "in trans" from a GAP (GTPase activating protein) to stabilize the transition state. However, intriguingly different mechanisms are operative in structurally similar GTPases. MnmE and dynamin like cation-dependent GTPases lack the catalytic Gln and instead employ a Glu/Asp/Ser situated elsewhere and in place of the arginine finger use a K(+) or Na(+) ion. In contrast, Rab33 possesses the Gln but does not utilize it for catalysis; instead, the GAP supplies both a catalytic Gln and an arginine finger in trans. Deciphering the underlying principles that unify seemingly unrelated mechanisms is central to understanding how diverse mechanisms evolve. Here, we recognize that steric hindrance between active site residues is a criterion governing the mechanism employed by a given GTPase. The Arf-ArfGAP structure is testimony to this concept of spatial (in)compatibility of active site residues. This understanding allows us to predict an as yet unreported hydrolysis mechanism and clarifies unexplained observations about catalysis by Rab11 and the need for HAS-GTPases to employ a different mechanism. This understanding would be valuable for experiments in which abolishing GTP hydrolysis or generating constitutively active forms of a GTPase is important.

  19. Wavelet analysis of baryon acoustic structures in the galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, P.; Labatie, A.; Clerc, N.; Martínez, V. J.; Starck, J.-L.; Lachièze-Rey, M.; Saar, E.; Paredes, S.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) are imprinted in the density field by acoustic waves travelling in the plasma of the early universe. Their fixed scale can be used as a standard ruler to study the geometry of the universe. Aims: The BAO have been previously detected using correlation functions and power spectra of the galaxy distribution. We present a new method to detect the real-space structures associated with BAO. These baryon acoustic structures are spherical shells of relatively small density contrast, surrounding high density central regions. Methods: We design a specific wavelet adapted to search for shells, and exploit the physics of the process by making use of two different mass tracers, introducing a specific statistic to detect the BAO features. We show the effect of the BAO signal in this new statistic when applied to the Λ - cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model, using an analytical approximation to the transfer function. We confirm the reliability and stability of our method by using cosmological N-body simulations from the MareNostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE). Results: We apply our method to the detection of BAO in a galaxy sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use the "main" catalogue to trace the shells, and the luminous red galaxies (LRG) as tracers of the high density central regions. Using this new method, we detect, with a high significance, that the LRG in our sample are preferentially located close to the centres of shell-like structures in the density field, with characteristics similar to those expected from BAO. We show that stacking selected shells, we can find their characteristic density profile. Conclusions: We delineate a new feature of the cosmic web, the BAO shells. As these are real spatial structures, the BAO phenomenon can be studied in detail by examining those shells. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  20. Genetic diversity within a dominant plant outweighs plant species diversity in structuring an arthropod community.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Kerri M; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2013-05-01

    Plant biodiversity is being lost at a rapid rate. This has spurred much interest in elucidating the consequences of this loss for higher trophic levels. Experimental tests have shown that both plant species diversity and genetic diversity within a plant species can influence arthropod community structure. However, the majority of these studies have been conducted in separate systems, so their relative importance is currently unresolved. Furthermore, potential interactions between the two levels of diversity, which likely occur in natural systems, have not been investigated. To clarify these issues, we conducted three experiments in a freshwater sand dune ecosystem. We (1) independently manipulated plant species diversity, (2) independently manipulated genetic diversity within the dominant plant species, Ammophila breviligulata, and (3) jointly manipulated genetic diversity within the dominant plant and species diversity. We found that genetic diversity within the dominant plant species, Ammophila breviligulata, more strongly influenced arthropod communities than plant species diversity, but this effect was dependent on the presence of other species. In species mixtures, A. breviligulata genetic diversity altered overall arthropod community composition, and arthropod richness and abundance peaked at the highest level of genetic diversity. Positive nonadditive effects of diversity were detected, suggesting that arthropods respond to emergent properties of diverse plant communities. However, in the independent manipulations where A. breviligulata was alone, effects of genetic diversity were weaker, with only arthropod richness responding. In contrast, plant species diversity only influenced arthropods when A. breviligulata was absent, and then only influenced herbivore abundance. In addition to showing that genetic diversity within a dominant plant species can have large effects on arthropod community composition, these results suggest that understanding how species

  1. Detection of the Effect of Cosmological Large-Scale Structure on the Orientation of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Carretero, Conrado; Patiri, Santiago G.

    2006-04-01

    Galaxies are not distributed randomly throughout space but are instead arranged in an intricate ``cosmic web'' of filaments and walls surrounding bubble-like voids. There is still no compelling observational evidence of a link between the structure of the cosmic web and how galaxies form within it. However, such a connection is expected on the basis of our understanding of the origin of galaxy angular momentum: disk galaxies should be highly inclined relative to the plane defined by the large-scale structure surrounding them. Using the two largest galaxy redshift surveys currently in existence (2dFGRS and SDSS), we show at the 99.7% confidence level that these alignments do indeed exist: spiral galaxies located on the shells of the largest cosmic voids have rotation axes that lie preferentially on the void surface.

  2. Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Franx, Marijn; Bezanson, Rachel; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Kriek, Mariska T.; Labbé, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J.; Rigby, Jane R.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-09-01

    It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass ({M}\\star ), the “star formation sequence,” and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. Here, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sérsic indices, n, of galaxies across the SFR-{M}\\star plane. We use a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5 selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs. Galaxy light profiles parameterized by n are based on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey near-infrared imaging. We use a single SFR indicator empirically calibrated from stacks of Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm imaging, adding the unobscured and obscured star formation. We find that the scatter of the star formation sequence is related in part to galaxy structure; the scatter due to variations in n at fixed mass for star-forming galaxies ranges from 0.14 ± 0.02 dex at z ˜ 2 to 0.30 ± 0.04 dex at z < 1. While the slope of the {log} {SFR}-{log} {M}\\star relation is of order unity for disk-like galaxies, galaxies with n > 2 (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower {SFR}/{M}\\star than the main ridgeline of the star formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive z ˜ 2 galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At z < 1, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global {SFR}/{M}\\star , decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the scatter of the star formation sequence.

  3. Spatial structure leads to ecological breakdown and loss of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Saxer, Gerda; Doebeli, Michael; Travisano, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Spatial structure has been identified as a major contributor to the maintenance of diversity. Here, we show that the impact of spatial structure on diversity is strongly affected by the ecological mechanisms maintaining diversity. In well-mixed, unstructured environments, microbial populations can diversify by production of metabolites during growth, providing additional resources for novel specialists. By contrast, spatially structured environments potentially limit such facilitation due to reduced metabolite diffusion. Using replicate microcosms containing the bacterium Escherichia coli, we predicted the loss of diversity during an environmental shift from a spatially unstructured environment to spatially structured conditions. Although spatial structure is frequently observed to be a major promoter of diversity, our results indicate that it can also have negative impacts on diversity. PMID:19324788

  4. 3D structure of nearby groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, L.; Makarov, D.; Klypin, A.; Gottlöber, S.

    2016-10-01

    Using high accuracy distance estimates, we study the three-dimensional distribution of galaxies in five galaxy groups at a distance less than 5 Mpc from the Milky Way. Due to proximity of these groups our sample of galaxies is nearly complete down to extremely small dwarf galaxies with absolute magnitudes M B = -12. We find that the average number-density profile of the groups shows a steep power-law decline dn/dV ˜ R-3 at distances R=(100-500) kpc consistent with predictions of the standard cosmological model. We also find that there is no indication of a truncation or a cutoff in the density at the expected virial radius: the density profile extends at least to 1.5 Mpc. Vast majority of galaxies within 1.5 Mpc radius around group centres are gas-rich star-forming galaxies. Early-type galaxies are found only in the central ˜ 300 kpc region. Lack of dwarf spheroidal and dwarf elliptical galaxies in the field and in the outskirts of large groups is a clear indication that these galaxies experienced morphological transformation when they came close to the central region of forming galaxy group.

  5. Mapping the gas kinematics and ionization structure of four ultraluminous IRAS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilman, R. J.; Crawford, C. S.; Abraham, R. G.

    1999-10-01

    We present a study of the morphology, kinematics and ionization structure of the extended emission-line regions in four intermediate-redshift (0.118galaxies, derived from ARGUS two-dimensional fibre spectroscopy. The gas kinematics in the hyperluminous system IRAS F20460+1925 lack coherent structure, with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) >1000kms-1 within 1arcsec of the nucleus, suggesting that any merger is well-advanced. Emission-line intensity ratios point to active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization for the excitation of this gas at the systemic velocity. An isolated blob ~8kpc from the nucleus with a much smaller velocity dispersion may lie in a structure similar to the photoionization cones seen in lower-luminosity objects. A second, spatially unresolved, narrow-line component is also present on nucleus, blueshifted by ~=990kms-1 from the systemic and plausibly powered by photoionizing shocks. IRAS F23060+0505 has more ordered kinematics, with a region of increased FWHM coincident with the blue half of a dipolar velocity field. The systemic velocity rotation curve is asymmetric in appearance, as a result either of the on-going merger or of nuclear dust obscuration. From a higher-resolution ISIS spectrum, we attribute the blue asymmetry in the narrow-line profiles to a spatially resolved nuclear outflow. Emission-line intensity ratios suggest shock+precursor ionization for the systemic component, consistent with the X-ray view of a heavily obscured AGN. The lower-luminosity objects IRAS F01217+0122 and F01003-2238 complete the sample. The former has a featureless velocity field with a high FWHM, a high-ionization AGN spectrum and a ~1Gyr old starburst continuum. IRAS F01003-2238 has a dipolar velocity field and an Hii region emission-line spectrum with a strong blue continuum. After correction for intrinsic extinction, the latter can be reproduced with ~107 O5 stars, sufficient to power the bolometric luminosity of the

  6. The Luminosity Profile and Structural Parameters of the Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courteau, Stéphane; Widrow, Lawrence M.; McDonald, Michael; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Zhu, Yucong; Beaton, Rachael Lynn; Majewski, Steven R.

    2011-09-01

    We have constructed an extended composite luminosity profile for the Andromeda galaxy, M31, and have decomposed it into three basic luminous structural components: a bulge, a disk, and a halo. The dust-free Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) imaging and extended spatial coverage of ground-based optical imaging and deep star counts allow us to map M31's structure from its center to 22 kpc along the major axis. We apply, and address the limitations of, different decomposition methods for the one-dimensional luminosity profiles and two-dimensional images. These methods include nonlinear least-squares and Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov chain analyses. The basic photometric model for M31 has a Sérsic bulge with shape index n ~= 2.2 ± .3 and effective radius Re = 1.0 ± 0.2 kpc, and a dust-free exponential disk of scale length Rd = 5.3 ± .5 kpc the parameter errors reflect the range between different decomposition methods. Despite model covariances, the convergence of solutions based on different methods and current data suggests a stable set of structural parameters. The ellipticities (epsilon = 1 - b/a) of the bulge and the disk from the IRAC image are 0.37 ± 0.03 and 0.73 ± 0.03, respectively. The bulge parameter n is rather insensitive to bandpass effects and its value (2.2) suggests a first rapid formation via mergers followed by secular growth from the disk. The M31 halo has a two-dimensional power-law index ~= - 2.5 ± 0.2 (or -3.5 in three-dimensional), comparable to that of the Milky Way. We find that the M31 bulge light is mostly dominant over the range R min <~ 1.2 kpc. The disk takes over in the range 1.2 kpc <~ R min <~ 9 kpc, whereas the halo dominates at R min >~ 9 kpc. The stellar nucleus, bulge, disk, and halo components each contribute roughly 0.05%, 23%, 73%, and 4% of the total light of M31 out to 200 kpc along the minor axis. Nominal errors for the structural parameters of the M31 bulge, disk, and halo amount to 20%. If M31 and the Milky Way are

  7. The Connection between Galaxies and Dark Matter Structures in the Local Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Behroozi, Peter S.

    2012-07-11

    We provide new constraints on the connection between galaxies in the local Universe, identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and dark matter halos and their constituent substructures in the {Lambda}CDM model using WMAP7 cosmological parameters. Predictions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos, and the relationship between dark matter hosts and substructures, are based on a high-resolution cosmological simulation, the Bolshoi simulation. We associate galaxies with dark matter halos and subhalos using subhalo abundance matching, and perform a comprehensive analysis which investigates the underlying assumptions of this technique including (a) which halo property is most closely associated with galaxy stellar masses and luminosities, (b) how much scatter is in this relationship, and (c) how much subhalos can be stripped before their galaxies are destroyed. The models are jointly constrained by new measurements of the projected two-point galaxy clustering and the observed conditional stellar mass function of galaxies in groups. We find that an abundance matching model that associates galaxies with the peak circular velocity of their halos is in good agreement with the data, when scatter of 0.20 {+-} 0.03 dex in stellar mass at a given peak velocity is included. This confirms the theoretical expectation that the stellar mass of galaxies is tightly correlated with the potential wells of their dark matter halos before they are impacted by larger structures. The data put tight constraints on the satellite fraction of galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass and on the scatter between halo and galaxy properties, and rule out several alternative abundance matching models that have been considered. This will yield important constraints for galaxy formation models, and also provides encouraging indications that the galaxy - halo connection can be modeled with sufficient fidelity for future precision studies of the dark Universe.

  8. Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; 3D-HST Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (M*), the "star formation sequence," and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. In this talk, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sérsic indices, n, of galaxies across the SFR-M* plane. Using a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5 selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs, we find that the scatter of the star formation sequence is related in part to galaxy structure; the scatter due to variations in n at fixed mass for star-forming galaxies ranges from 0.14 ± 0.02 dex at z ˜ 2 to 0.30 ± 0.04 dex at z < 1. While the slope of the log(SFR)-log(M*) relation is of order unity for disk-like galaxies, galaxies with n > 2 (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower SFR/M* than the main ridgeline of the star formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive z ˜ 2 galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At z < 1, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global SFR/M*, decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the scatter of the star formation sequence.

  9. Automated Quantification of Arbitrary Arm-Segment Structure in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Darren Robert

    This thesis describes a system that, given approximately-centered images of spiral galaxies, produces quantitative descriptions of spiral galaxy structure without the need for per-image human input. This structure information consists of a list of spiral arm segments, each associated with a fitted logarithmic spiral arc and a pixel region. This list-of-arcs representation allows description of arbitrary spiral galaxy structure: the arms do not need to be symmetric, may have forks or bends, and, more generally, may be arranged in any manner with a consistent spiral-pattern center (non-merging galaxies have a sufficiently well-defined center). Such flexibility is important in order to accommodate the myriad structure variations observed in spiral galaxies. From the arcs produced from our method it is possible to calculate measures of spiral galaxy structure such as winding direction, winding tightness, arm counts, asymmetry, or other values of interest (including user-defined measures). In addition to providing information about the spiral arm "skeleton" of each galaxy, our method can enable analyses of brightness within individual spiral arms, since we provide the pixel regions associated with each spiral arm segment. For winding direction, arm tightness, and arm count, comparable information is available (to various extents) from previous efforts; to the extent that such information is available, we find strong correspondence with our output. We also characterize the changes to (and invariances in) our output as a function of modifications to important algorithm parameters. By enabling generation of extensive data about spiral galaxy structure from large-scale sky surveys, our method will enable new discoveries and tests regarding the nature of galaxies and the universe, and will facilitate subsequent work to automatically fit detailed brightness models of spiral galaxies.

  10. Dynamics of galaxy structures in the Local Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.

    2016-10-01

    I consider a sample of `Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog' that contains eight hundred objects within 11 Mpc. Environment of each galaxy is characterized by a tidal index Θ1 depending on separation and mass of the galaxy Main Disturber (=MD). The UNGC galaxies with a common MD are ascribed to its `suite' and ranked according to their Θ1. Fifteen the most populated suites contain more than half of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at M_B = -18 mag. The observational properties of galaxies accumulated in UNGC are used to derive orbital masses of giant galaxies via motions of their satellites. The average orbital-to-stellar mass ratio for them is M orb M* ~= 30, corresponding to the mean local density of matter Ωm ~= 0.09, i.e 1/3 of the global cosmic one. The dark-to-stellar mass ratio for the Milky Way and M31 is typical for other neighboring giant galaxies.

  11. Structure of the Canes Venatici I cloud of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Dmitry I.; Makarova, Lidia N.; Uklein, Roman I.

    2016-10-01

    We study the spatial distribution of the sparse cloud of galaxies in the Canes Venatici constellation. We determined distances of 30 galaxies using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method. This homogeneous sample allows us to distinguish the zone of chaotic motions around the center of the system. A group of galaxies around M94 is characterized by the mass-luminosity ratio of M/L B=159 (M/L)⊙. It is significantly higher than the typical ratio M/L B=159 (M/L)⊙ for the nearby groups of galaxies. The CVn I cloud of galaxies contains 4-5 times less luminous matter compared with the well-known nearby groups, such as the Local Group, M 81 and Centaurus A. The central galaxy M 94 is at least 1 mag fainter than any other central galaxy of these groups. However, the concentration of galaxies in the Canes Venatici may have a comparable total mass.

  12. Unveiling the structure of the farthest galaxy protocluster: WFC3 imaging of a z~8 galaxy overdensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenti, Michele

    2012-10-01

    Our pure-parallel WFC3/BoRG survey identified the highest redshift {z 8} protocluster candidate, presenting the unique opportunity for follow-up observations that will unveil the nature and properties of star formation at the earliest stages of galaxy cluster assembly. We found a rare overdensity of 5 Y-dropout galaxies, with m_AB=26-27, all brighter than m_*{z=8} and strongly clustered in a region of about 1 arcmin diameter { 2 Mpc/h comoving}. The existing data establish at 99.9% confidence that the overdensity is physical and not a line-of-sight effect, but only show a glimpse of the protocluster structure and properties. Not only is the protocluster center near the edge of the imaged field but theoretical modeling predicts the presence of dozens of fainter galaxies. We propose follow-up multi-band WFC3 observations centered on the protocluster and reaching m_AB=27.5 to image the only known galaxy overdensity at z>7, missing in legacy surveys such as CANDELS because of cosmic variance. From the new dataset we will detect 5-10 new protocluster members, tighten redshift uncertainty to +/-0.1, and double the S/N of current detections to characterize their stellar population properties. The new data, combined with, and compared to detailed numerical and theoretical modeling will characterize the earliest stages of galaxy and cluster formation, shedding light on the processes that drove cosmic reionization in overdense environments. Because of a one order of magnitude boost in the number density of galaxies with m_AB

  13. Giant radio galaxies as effective probes of X-ray gas in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Malarecki, Jurek; Jones, Heath; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2015-08-01

    Giant radio galaxies are AGNs with relativistic jets that dynamically evolve into Mpc scale synchrotron lobes around the host elliptical. The thermal gas environment influences the jet advance and lobe formation. Since the host ellipticals are in filamentary low-density galaxy environments, the ambient gas for the Mpc-scale radio structures is likely the warm-hot X-ray gas inhabiting the intergalactic medium. We have, therefore, used large radio galaxies as probes of the distribution of hot and tenuous gas on mega-parsec scales in these relatively low density large-scale structures.For a sample of 19 giant radio galaxies we obtained radio continuum images of the synchrotron structures, and redshifts of a total of nearly 9000 galaxies in their vicinity. The 2-degree field redshift data traces the large-scale galaxy structure around the radio sources. The radio-optical data allows an estimation of the pressure, temperature and distribution of hot thermal gas associated with the large-scale structure in the vicinity of the radio AGN (Malarecki, Staveley-Smith, Saripalli, Subrahmanyan, Jones, Duffy, Rioja 2013, MNRAS 432, 200).Strong correspondence between radio galaxy lobes and galaxy distribution is observed. The data suggests that galaxies trace gas, and that radio jets and lobes of giant radio galaxies are sensitive tracers of gas on mega-parsec scales and may be used as effective probes of the difficult-to-detect IGM (Malarecki, Jones, Saripalli, Stavele-Smith, Subrahmanyan, 2015, MNRAS in press; arXiv150203954).

  14. The diversity of evolutionary pathways of compact elliptical galaxies in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellons, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Observations of the high-redshift universe have revealed a population of galaxies which are already very massive (~1e11 solar masses at z=2) and have typical sizes of < 2 kpc, much smaller than their counterparts in the local universe. How such dense, massive galaxies form, and why they appear to be less common at low redshift, have been questions of interest for both theorists and observers. I will discuss these questions in the context of the Illustris simulation, a hydrodynamical cosmological simulation in which tens of thousands of galaxies form, evolve, and interact with each other, situated within a cosmological context. I select a group of massive compact galaxies at z=2 in the simulation and trace them back and forth in time to discover both how they formed at high redshift, and what they evolve into at the present day. I find a variety of both progenitors (compact galaxies form in the simulation either via central starbursts generally brought on by mergers, or by racing out to the tip of the SF main sequence and forming very early) and descendants (many formerly-compact galaxies lurk at the core of a more massive galaxy today, others were consumed in mergers, and some evolve passively and undisturbed). I will also discuss the implications of these results for observational methods of connecting galaxy populations across redshifts - in particular, the assumption of a constant cumulative comoving number density - and suggest an improvement to this method which takes the complexity and variety of galaxies' evolutionary paths into account.

  15. The Diversity of Diffuse Lyα Nebulae around Star-forming Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Rui; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Dey, Arjun; Reddy, Naveen; Hong, Sungryong; Prescott, Moire K. M.; Inami, Hanae; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.

    2017-03-01

    We report the detection of diffuse Lyα emission, or Lyα halos (LAHs), around star-forming galaxies at z ≈ 3.78 and 2.66 in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Boötes field. Our samples consist of a total of ∼1400 galaxies, within two separate regions containing spectroscopically confirmed galaxy overdensities. They provide a unique opportunity to investigate how the LAH characteristics vary with host galaxy large-scale environment and physical properties. We stack Lyα images of different samples defined by these properties and measure their median LAH sizes by decomposing the stacked Lyα radial profile into a compact galaxy-like and an extended halo-like component. We find that the exponential scale-length of LAHs depends on UV continuum and Lyα luminosities, but not on Lyα equivalent widths or galaxy overdensity parameters. The full samples, which are dominated by low UV-continuum luminosity Lyα emitters (M UV ≳ ‑21), exhibit LAH sizes of 5–6 kpc. However, the most UV- or Lyα-luminous galaxies have more extended halos with scale-lengths of 7–9 kpc. The stacked Lyα radial profiles decline more steeply than recent theoretical predictions that include the contributions from gravitational cooling of infalling gas and from low-level star formation in satellites. However, the LAH extent matches what one would expect for photons produced in the galaxy and then resonantly scattered by gas in an outflowing envelope. The observed trends of LAH sizes with host galaxy properties suggest that the physical conditions of the circumgalactic medium (covering fraction, H i column density, and outflow velocity) change with halo mass and/or star formation rates.

  16. Group-galaxy correlations in redshift space as a probe of the growth of structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, F. G.; de la Torre, S.; Bianchi, D.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the use of the cross-correlation between galaxies and galaxy groups to measure redshift-space distortions (RSD) and thus probe the growth rate of cosmological structure. This is compared to the classical approach based on using galaxy auto-correlation. We make use of realistic simulated galaxy catalogues that have been constructed by populating simulated dark matter haloes with galaxies through halo occupation prescriptions. We adapt the classical RSD dispersion model to the case of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function and estimate the RSD parameter β by fitting both the full anisotropic correlation function ξs(rp, π) and its multipole moments. In addition, we define a modified version of the latter statistics by truncating the multipole moments to exclude strongly non-linear distortions at small transverse scales. We fit these three observable quantities in our set of simulated galaxy catalogues and estimate statistical and systematic errors on β for the case of galaxy-galaxy, group-group, and group-galaxy correlation functions. When ignoring off-diagonal elements of the covariance matrix in the fitting, the truncated multipole moments of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function provide the most accurate estimate, with systematic errors below 3 per cent when fitting transverse scales larger than 10 h-1 Mpc. Including the full data covariance enlarges statistical errors but keep unchanged the level of systematic error. Although statistical errors are generally larger for groups, the use of group-galaxy cross-correlation can potentially allow the reduction of systematics while using simple linear or dispersion models.

  17. The Structure of Galaxies. III. Two Structural Families of Ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schombert, James M.

    2015-11-01

    Using isophotal radius correlations for a sample of Two Micron All Sky Survey ellipticals, we have constructed a series of template surface brightness profiles to describe the profile shapes of ellipticals as a function of luminosity. The templates are a smooth function of luminosity, yet are not adequately matched to any fitting function supporting the view that ellipticals are weakly nonhomologous with respect to structure. Through comparison to the templates, it is discovered that ellipticals are divided into two families: those well matched to the templates, and a second class of ellipticals with distinctly shallower profile slopes. We refer to this second type of ellipticals as D class, an old morphological designation acknowledging diffuse appearance on photographic material. D ellipticals cover the same range of luminosity, size, and kinematics as normal ellipticals, but maintain a signature of recent equal-mass dry mergers. We propose that normal ellipticals grow after an initial dissipation formation era by accretion of low-mass companions as outlined in hierarchical formation scenarios, while D ellipticals are the result of later equal-mass mergers producing shallow luminosity profiles.

  18. The red extended structure of IC 10, the nearest blue compact galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbrandt, Stephanie A. N.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Mike

    2015-11-01

    The Local Group starburst galaxy IC 10 is the closest example of a blue compact galaxy. Here, we use optical gi imaging from Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam and near infrared JHK imaging from United Kingdom Infrared Telescope/Wide Field Camera to conduct a comprehensive survey of the structure of IC 10. We examine the spatial distribution of its resolved young, intermediate and old stellar populations to large radius and low effective surface brightness levels. Akin to other dwarfs with multiple populations of different ages, stellar populations of decreasing average age are increasingly concentrated in this galaxy. We find that the young, starbursting population and the asymptotic giant branch population are both offset from the geometric centre of the older red giant branch (RGB) population by a few hundred parsecs, implying that the younger star formation occurred significantly away from the centre of the galaxy. The RGB population traces an extended structure that is typical of blue compact galaxies, with an effective radius of ˜5.75 arcmin (˜1.25 kpc). These measurements show that IC 10 is much more extended than has previously been realized, and this blue compact galaxy is one of the most extended dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. The outermost isophotes of this galaxy are very regular in shape and essentially circular in morphology. Based on this analysis, we do not find any evidence to suggest that IC 10 has undergone a recent, significant, interaction with an unknown companion.

  19. Radio galaxy jets as probes of galactic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Saslaw, W.C.; Whittle, M.

    1988-02-01

    It has been noted that the central source of an asymmetric nuclear galactic radio jet may experience considerable net thrust and consequently behave like a massive rocket. In this paper, simple models for the motion of a rocket through a galaxy are examined. It is found that the density distribution of the galaxy is important, and determines whether a given source can escape. Thus, observations of the location and velocity of a source relative to its galactic center may provide new constraints on models of the density distribution in galaxies. 35 references.

  20. Far infrared structure of spiral galaxies from the IRAS CPC images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainscoat, Richard J.; Chokshi, Arati; Doyle, Laurance R.

    1989-01-01

    Significant extended far infrared (50 micron and 100 micron) structure was found for five face-on spiral galaxies (NGC2403, M51, M83, NGC6946, and IC342) from fourteen galaxies searched in the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) chopped photometric channel (CPC) catalogue. Images were initially processed to remove instrumental and background artifacts, the isophotal centroids of each image determined, and multiple images of each galaxy (for each wavelength) superimposed and averaged to improve signal-to-noise. Calibration of these images was performed using IRAS survey array data. Infrared isophotes were then superimposed on optical (blue) images so that direct structural comparisons could be made.

  1. Narrow-line Seyfert Galaxies. Connection between abundance and the large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermash, A. A.; Komberg, B. V.

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing methods, developed by the author the correlations between spatial concentrations of active nuclei (NLS and BLS) and concentration of galaxies of full uniform sample were obtained. Galaxies of this uniform sample trace the large-scale structure. We used SDSS DR 7 data. The correlations obtained are linear and the NLS/BLS ratio is constant. That leads to conclusion that amounts NLS and BLS are some fixed portion of all galaxies independent on the density of large-scale environment. In order to check validity of our results we also confirmed the well known result that fraction of red galaxies increases with density of environment. Also it was confirmed that this trend is more prominent for less massive galaxies.

  2. Structural Analysis of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Vanessa D.; Kang, Young-Shin; Thompson, George F.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the five-factor structure of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity (RACD) instrument, which assesses resident assistant (RA) confidence in addressing issues of cultural diversity in college and university residence halls. The instrument has five components that explore RA confidence: (1) belief in the need for cultural…

  3. Nonlinear density wave theory for the spiral structure of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, S; Teramoto, R; Yoshida, Z

    2000-05-01

    The theory of nonlinear waves for plasmas has been applied to the analysis of the density wave theory of galaxies which are many-body systems of gravity. A nonlinear Schrödinger equation has been derived by applying the reductive perturbation method on the fluid equations that describe the behavior of infinitesimally thin disk galaxies. Their spiral arms are characterized by a soliton and explained as a pattern of a propagating nonlinear density wave.

  4. Globular Clusters as Tracers of Fine Structure in the Dramatic Shell Galaxy NGC 474

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sungsoon; Peng, Eric W.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Fensch, Jérémy; Durrell, Patrick R.; Harris, William E.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Gwyn, Stephen; Lançon, Ariane; Sánchez-Janssen, Rúben

    2017-02-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are some of the most visible tracers of the merging and accretion histories of galaxy halos. Metal-poor GCs, in particular, are thought to arrive in massive galaxies largely through dry, minor merging events, but it is rare to see a direct connection between GCs and visible stellar streams. NGC 474 is a post-merger early-type galaxy with dramatic fine structures made of concentric shells and radial streams that have been more clearly revealed by deep imaging. We present a study of GCs in NGC 474 to better establish the relationship between merger-induced fine structure and the GC system. We find that many GCs are superimposed on visible streams and shells, and about 35% of GCs outside 3{R}{{e},{galaxy}} are located in regions of fine structure. The spatial correlation between GCs and fine structure is significant at the 99.9% level, which shows that this correlation is not coincidental. The colors of GCs on fine structures are mostly blue, and we also find an intermediate-color population that is dominant in the central region and that will likely passively evolve to have colors consistent with a traditional metal-rich GC population. The association of the blue GCs with fine structures is direct confirmation that many metal-poor GCs are accreted onto massive galaxy halos through merging events and that the progenitors of these mergers are sub-{L}\\star galaxies.

  5. Multiple Tracers of Structure, Substructure, and Dynamics of Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron

    2015-08-01

    I will present a suite of results on the fundamental properties of galaxy halos, using a variety of observational tracers for a range of galaxy types, from giant ellipticals to spirals to dwarfs, along with comparisons to numerical simulations. The tracers include diffuse stellar light spectroscopy up to ~4 Re, resolved stellar photometry and spectroscopy, metal-poor and metal-rich globular cluster subpopulations, and planetary nebulae. The results include extended rotation and metallicity profiles, scaling relations for total angular momentum, shape inferences for the halos, orbital anisotropy estimates, kinematically "decoupled" halos, surprisingly homogeneous total mass profiles, and both detection and chemodynamical mapping of streams, shells, and other substructures. Connections are made to simulations of idealized galaxy mergers and of full cosmological formation histories, using the observed properties to make inferences about the assembly mechanisms of individual galaxies and of different galaxy types. Detailed models of stellar streams are used to infer their progenitor properties and to probe the gravitational potentials of the host galaxies. Novel observations are presented of compact stellar systems (globular clusters, ultra-compact dwarfs, compact ellipticals, and transition objects), with implications for the merger histories of their host halos.

  6. Structure and Kinematics of Early-Type Galaxies from Integral Field Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Observations of galaxy isophotes, long-slit kinematics, and high-resolution photometry suggested a possible dichotomy between two distinct classes of elliptical galaxies. But these methods are expensive for large galaxy samples. Instead, integral field spectroscopy can efficiently recognize the shape, dynamics, and stellar population of complete samples of early-type galaxies (ETGs). These studies showed that the two main classes, the fast and slow rotators, can be separated using stellar kinematics. I show that there is a dichotomy in the dynamics of the two classes. The slow rotators are weakly triaxial and dominate above [Formula: see text]. Below Mcrit, the structure of fast rotators parallels that of spiral galaxies. There is a smooth sequence along which the age, the metal content, the enhancement in α-elements, and the weight of the stellar initial mass function all increase with the central mass density slope, or bulge mass fraction, while the molecular gas fraction correspondingly decreases. The properties of ETGs on galaxy scaling relations, in particular the [Formula: see text] diagram, and their dependence on environment, indicate two main independent channels for galaxy evolution. Fast-rotator ETGs start as star-forming disks and evolve through a channel dominated by gas accretion, bulge growth, and quenching, whereas slow rotators assemble near the centers of massive halos via intense star formation at high redshift and remain as such for the rest of their evolution via a channel dominated by gas poor mergers. This is consistent with independent studies of the galaxies redshift evolution.

  7. Characterizing Clumpy Structure of z 2 Galaxies in HST Observations from CANDELS and Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozena, Mark; Faber, S. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dekel, A.; Ceverino, D.; Koo, D. C.; Fumagalli, M.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D. J.; Lai, K.; Kocevski, D. D.; McGrath, E. J.; Trump, J. R.; CANDELS

    2011-01-01

    The first data from the HST Multi-Cycle Treasury CANDELS (Cosmic Assembly Near Infra-red Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey - candels.ucolick.org) are producing images of thousands of z 2 galaxies in observed optical (ACS) and NIR (WFC3) bands. We have developed a new visual classification scheme for z 2 galaxies which is motivated by the significant population of galaxies that are dominated by giant clumps in the HST images, and by the theoretical predictions for clumpy galaxies based on analytic studies and zoom-in hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. This classification method was developed using about a thousand z 2 galaxies in the GOODS-S Early Release Survey (ERS) region imaged with ACS and WFC3. The ERS data have been observed in a way similar to the CANDELS observations. I will also discuss the latest cosmologically motivated ART hydrodynamical simulations by Ceverino, Dekel, and Primack. We render these simulated z 2 galaxies to mimic our HST ACS and WFC3 images and visually classify their stellar structure to compare them with the galaxies observed in ERS. We have compared the effects of dust extinction due to the complex clumpy distribution of gas within these simulations. Comparing the visual classification of the HST observations with the simulations provides new clues to galaxy assembly.

  8. Design and fabrication of diverse metamaterial structures by holographic lithography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Qiuze; Wang, Guo Ping

    2008-07-21

    We demonstrate a holographic lithography for the fabrication of diverse metamaterial structures by using an optical prism. Cylindrical nanoshells, U-shaped resonator arrays, and double-split ring arrays are obtained experimentally by real time modulating the phase relation of the interference beams. This easy-to-use method may provide a roadway for the design and fabrication of future metamaterials requiring diverse structures for effectively manipulating electromagnetic properties at optical frequencies.

  9. Structural Properties and Visual Morphologies of 2 Galaxies in the CANDELS Fields and Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozena, Mark; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Primack, J. R.; Dekel, A.; Moody, C. E.; Ceverino, D.; CANDELS

    2013-01-01

    The 2 universe is an active epoch of increased star formation and AGN activity. Through major mergers, minor mergers, and cold flow gas accretion, galaxies are quickly increasing their masses and changing their global structural properties and morphologies. Using the deepest optical (ACS) and near infra-red (WFC3) observations from the HST Multi-Cycle Treasury CANDELS (Cosmic Assembly Near Infra-Red Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey), we compare the structural properties of 2 galaxies in the rest-frame near-UV and optical to those predicted by the latest cosmologically motivated hydrodynamical simulations (Hydro-ART by Ceverino, Dekel and Primack and ERIS by Guedes and Madau). We render these simulated galaxy images to mimic the observed ACS and WFC3 images in CANDELS, and include the effects of dust obscuration. We explore how the sizes, masses, and morphologies of 2 galaxies observed in the hydrodynamical models compare with the global properties of galaxies observed in the CANDELS fields. Comparing the observations of 2 CANDELS galaxies with those from the latest hydrodynamical models provides new and important insights into the nature of galaxy formation and assembly in the exciting 2 universe.

  10. STRUCTURE AND FORMATION OF ELLIPTICAL AND SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kormendy, John; Fisher, David B.; Cornell, Mark E.; Bender, Ralf E-mail: dbfisher@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: bender@usm.uni-muenchen.de

    2009-05-15

    New surface photometry of all known elliptical galaxies in the Virgo cluster is combined with published data to derive composite profiles of brightness, ellipticity, position angle, isophote shape, and color over large radius ranges. These provide enough leverage to show that Sersic log I {proportional_to} r {sup 1/n} functions fit the brightness profiles I(r) of nearly all ellipticals remarkably well over large dynamic ranges. Therefore, we can confidently identify departures from these profiles that are diagnostic of galaxy formation. Two kinds of departures are seen at small radii. All 10 of our ellipticals with total absolute magnitudes M{sub VT} {<=} -21.66 have cuspy cores-'missing light'-at small radii. Cores are well known and naturally scoured by binary black holes (BHs) formed in dissipationless ('dry') mergers. All 17 ellipticals with -21.54 {<=} M{sub VT} {<=} -15.53 do not have cores. We find a new distinct component in these galaxies: all coreless ellipticals in our sample have extra light at the center above the inward extrapolation of the outer Sersic profile. In large ellipticals, the excess light is spatially resolved and resembles the central components predicted in numerical simulations of mergers of galaxies that contain gas. In the simulations, the gas dissipates, falls toward the center, undergoes a starburst, and builds a compact stellar component that, as in our observations, is distinct from the Sersic-function main body of the elliptical. But ellipticals with extra light also contain supermassive BHs. We suggest that the starburst has swamped core scouring by binary BHs. That is, we interpret extra light components as a signature of formation in dissipative ('wet') mergers. Besides extra light, we find three new aspects to the ('E-E') dichotomy into two types of elliptical galaxies. Core galaxies are known to be slowly rotating, to have relatively anisotropic velocity distributions, and to have boxy isophotes. We show that they have

  11. Fine structure of the nucleus of the galaxy NGC 1275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveyenko, L. I.; Seleznev, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The fine structure of the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275 was investigated in 2005-2010 at a wavelength of 2 cm with a resolution as high as 50 μas. The structure consists of two parallel identical systems, eastern and western, spaced 0.5 pc apart in the plane of the sky. Each of them contains an ejector and a bipolar outflow. There are extended regions, lobes, at the extension of the bipolar outflows in the -10° and 170° directions at distances of 5 pc northward and 6.5 pc southward of the active zone. The observed difference between the jet and counterjet sizes by a factor of ~3 and between the distances to the lobes by a factor of 0.8 is determined by the difference between their velocities and by the change of sign of the outflow acceleration in the period of silence. The high-velocity bipolar outflows are surrounded by three pairs of low-velocity components. The diameters of the low-velocity coaxial outflows and the third component are Ø1 ≈ 0.3 pc, Ø2 ≈ 0.8 pc, and Ø3 ≈ 1.4 pc at the detection limit. The outer low-velocity components of the outflows encompass both high-velocity outflows. The velocities of the outflows and their brightness temperatures increase exponentially as the center of the high-velocity outflows is approached. The brightness temperatures of the high-velocity outflows at the ejector exit are T b > 1012 K. The spectral line velocities in the nuclear region differ by ~600 km s-1 due to the velocity difference between the two systems. In the case of Keplerian motion, the revolution period is ~5 × 103 yr, and the mass of the central massive bodies, black holes, is M ≈ 107M⊙. The fine structure suggests a vortical nature of the formation. In the case under consideration, two parallel vortices spaced ~0.5 pc apart and shifted by ~0.5 pc relative to each other were formed. The surrounding material inflows onto the disk of each system, is transferred in a spiral to the center, and is ejected in the -10° and 170

  12. A New Dataset of Automatically Extracted Structure of Arms and Bars in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Wayne B.; Davis, D.

    2012-05-01

    We present an algorithm capable of automatically extracting quantitative structure (bars and arms) from images of spiral galaxies. We have run the algorithm on 30,000 galaxies and compared the results to human classifications generously provided pre-publication by the Galaxy Zoo 2 team. In all available measures, our algorithm agrees with the humans about as well as they agree with each other. In addition we provide objective, quantitative measures not available in human classifications. We provide a preliminary analysis of this dataset to see how the properties of arms and bars vary as a function of basic variables such as environment, redshift, absolute magnitude, and color. We also show how structure can vary across wavebands as well as along and across individual arms and bars. Finally, we present preliminary results of a measurement of the total angular momentum present in our observed set of galaxies with an eye towards determining if there is a preferred "handedness" in the universe.

  13. Inner and Outer Photometric Structure of Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Alister W.; Erwin, P.; Trujillo, I.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    The Nuker model, when applied to the inner regions of ``core'' galaxies, is shown to produce systematic biases in the determination of the core ``break-radii''. These radii can easily be (and often have been, see Trujillo et al. 2003) over-estimated by more than 100%. Moreover, due to curvature in the outer profiles of early-type galaxies (i.e., beyond the break-radius), none of the Nuker model parameters are found to be robust quantities. A new empirical model that simultaneously describes both the inner and outer light-profiles of elliptical galaxies (and bulges in general) is presented. It consists of a Sérsic function with an inner power-law and a variable transition region.

  14. Herschel-ATLAS: the surprising diversity of dust-selected galaxies in the local submillimetre Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, C. J. R.; Dunne, L.; Gomez, H. L.; Maddox, S.; De Vis, P.; Smith, M. W. L.; Eales, S. A.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Grootes, M. W.; Ivison, R. J.; Schofield, S. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Rowlands, K.; Valiante, E.; Vlahakis, C.; van der Werf, P.; Wright, A. H.; de Zotti, G.

    2015-09-01

    We present the properties of the first 250 μm blind sample of nearby galaxies (15 < D < 46 Mpc) containing 42 objects from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Herschel's sensitivity probes the faint end of the dust luminosity function for the first time, spanning a range of stellar mass (7.4 < M⋆ < 11.3 log10 M⊙), star formation activity (-11.8 < SSFR < -8.9 log10 yr-1), gas fraction (3-96 per cent), and colour (0.6 < FUV-KS < 7.0 mag). The median cold dust temperature is 14.6 K, colder than in the Herschel Reference Survey (18.5 K) and Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (17.7 K). The mean dust-to-stellar mass ratio in our sample is higher than these surveys by factors of 3.7 and 1.8, with a dust mass volume density of (3.7 ± 0.7) × 105 M⊙ Mpc-3. Counter-intuitively, we find that the more dust rich a galaxy, the lower its UV attenuation. Over half of our dust-selected sample are very blue in FUV-KS colour, with irregular and/or highly flocculent morphology; these galaxies account for only 6 per cent of the sample's stellar mass but contain over 35 per cent of the dust mass. They are the most actively star-forming galaxies in the sample, with the highest gas fractions and lowest UV attenuation. They also appear to be in an early stage of converting their gas into stars, providing valuable insights into the chemical evolution of young galaxies.

  15. The compact radio structure of radio-loud NLS1 galaxies and the relationship to CSS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, M.; Chen, Y.; Komossa, S.; Yuan, W.; Shen, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are thought to be young AGNs with relatively small black hole masses and high accretion rates. Radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (RLNLS1s) are very special, because some of them show blazar-like characteristics, while others resemble compact steep-spectrum sources. Relativistic jets were shown to exist in a few RLNLS1s based on VLBI observations and confirmed by the gamma-ray flaring of some of them. These properties may possibly be contrary to typical radio-loud AGNs, in light of the low black-hole masses, and high accretion rates. We present the compact radio structure of fourteen RLNLS1 galaxies from Very Long Baseline Array observations at 5 GHz in 2013. Although all these sources are very radio-loud with {R > 100}, their jet properties are diverse, in terms of their milli-arcsecond (mas) scale (pc scale) morphology and their overall radio spectral shape. The core brightness temperatures of our sources are significantly lower than those of blazars, therefore, the beaming effect is generally not significant in our sources, compared to blazars. This implies that the bulk jet speed may likely be low in our sources. The relationship between RLNLS1s and compact steep-spectrum sources, and the implications on jet formation are discussed based on the pc-scale jet properties.

  16. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A.; Dunn, Matthew R.; Chaput, John C.; Van Horn, Wade D.; Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson–Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space. PMID:26673703

  17. Arm structure in normal spiral galaxies, 1: Multivariate data for 492 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magri, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    Multivariate data have been collected as part of an effort to develop a new classification system for spiral galaxies, one which is not necessarily based on subjective morphological properties. A sample of 492 moderately bright northern Sa and Sc spirals was chosen for future statistical analysis. New observations were made at 20 and 21 cm; the latter data are described in detail here. Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) fluxes were obtained from archival data. Finally, new estimates of arm pattern radomness and of local environmental harshness were compiled for most sample objects.

  18. The structural origin of metabolic quantitative diversity

    PubMed Central

    Koshiba, Seizo; Motoike, Ikuko; Kojima, Kaname; Hasegawa, Takanori; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Saito, Tomo; Saigusa, Daisuke; Danjoh, Inaho; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Ogishima, Soichi; Kawai, Yosuke; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Sakurai, Miyuki; Hirano, Sachiko; Nakata, Junichi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Hozawa, Atsushi; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Minegishi, Naoko; Nagasaki, Masao; Takai-Igarashi, Takako; Fuse, Nobuo; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Sugawara, Junichi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Kure, Shigeo; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Tanabe, Osamu; Kinoshita, Kengo; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Relationship between structural variants of enzymes and metabolic phenotypes in human population was investigated based on the association study of metabolite quantitative traits with whole genome sequence data for 512 individuals from a population cohort. We identified five significant associations between metabolites and non-synonymous variants. Four of these non-synonymous variants are located in enzymes involved in metabolic disorders, and structural analyses of these moderate non-synonymous variants demonstrate that they are located in peripheral regions of the catalytic sites or related regulatory domains. In contrast, two individuals with larger changes of metabolite levels were also identified, and these individuals retained rare variants, which caused non-synonymous variants located near the catalytic site. These results are the first demonstrations that variant frequency, structural location, and effect for phenotype correlate with each other in human population, and imply that metabolic individuality and susceptibility for diseases may be elicited from the moderate variants and much more deleterious but rare variants. PMID:27528366

  19. 9. DETAIL OF DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF DERBY LAKE (SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF DERBY LAKE (SECTION 2) SHOWING DIVERSION GATE TO LAKE LADORA. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  20. Stand structural diversity rather than species diversity enhances aboveground carbon storage in secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Arshad; Yan, En-Rong; Chen, Han Y. H.; Chang, Scott X.; Zhao, Yan-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Ming-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Stand structural diversity, typically characterized by variances in tree diameter at breast height (DBH) and total height, plays a critical role in influencing aboveground carbon (C) storage. However, few studies have considered the multivariate relationships of aboveground C storage with stand age, stand structural diversity, and species diversity in natural forests. In this study, aboveground C storage, stand age, tree species, DBH and height diversity indices, were determined across 80 subtropical forest plots in Eastern China. We employed structural equation modelling (SEM) to test for the direct and indirect effects of stand structural diversity, species diversity, and stand age on aboveground C storage. The three final SEMs with different directions for the path between species diversity and stand structural diversity had a similar goodness of fit to the data. They accounted for 82 % of the variation in aboveground C storage, 55-59 % of the variation in stand structural diversity, and 0.1 to 9 % of the variation in species diversity. Stand age demonstrated strong positive total effects, including a positive direct effect (β = 0.41), and a positive indirect effect via stand structural diversity (β = 0.41) on aboveground C storage. Stand structural diversity had a positive direct effect on aboveground C storage (β = 0.56), whereas there was little total effect of species diversity as it had a negative direct association with, but had a positive indirect effect, via stand structural diversity, on aboveground C storage. The negligible total effect of species diversity on aboveground C storage in the forests under study may have been attributable to competitive exclusion with high aboveground biomass, or a historical logging preference for productive species. Our analyses suggested that stand structural diversity was a major determinant for variations in aboveground C storage in the secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China. Hence, maintaining tree DBH and

  1. Structure, diversity and evolution of myriapod hemocyanins.

    PubMed

    Pick, Christian; Scherbaum, Samantha; Hegedüs, Elöd; Meyer, Andreas; Saur, Michael; Neumann, Ruben; Markl, Jürgen; Burmester, Thorsten

    2014-04-01

    Oxygen transport in the hemolymph of many arthropods is mediated by hemocyanins, large copper-containing proteins that are well-studied in Chelicerata and Crustacea, but had long been considered unnecessary in the subphylum of Myriapoda. Only recently has it become evident that hemocyanins are present in Scutigeromorpha (Chilopoda) and Spirostreptida (Diplopoda). Here we present evidence for a more widespread occurrence of hemocyanin in the myriapods. By means of RT-PCR, western blotting and database searches, hemocyanins were identified in the symphylans Hanseniella audax and Symphylella vulgaris, the chilopod Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani and the diplopod Polydesmus angustus. No hemocyanins were found in the diplopods Polyxenus lagurus, Cylindroiulus punctatus, Glomeris marginata, Glomeris pustulata and Arthrosphaera brandtii, or the chilopods Lithobius forficatus, Geophilus flavus and Strigamia maritima. This suggests multiple independent losses in myriapod taxa. Two independent hemocyanin subunits were found that were already present in the myriapod stem line. We specifically investigated the structure of the hemocyanin of P. angustus, which consists of three distinct subunits that occur in an approximately equimolar ratio. As deduced by 3D electron microscopy, the quaternary structure is a 3 × 6-mer that resembles the half structure of the 6 × 6-mer hemocyanin from Scutigera coleoptrata. It was analyzed more closely by homology modeling of 1 × 6-mers and their rigid-body fitting to the electron density map of the 3 × 6-mer. In addition, we obtained the cDNA sequence of a putative myriapod phenoloxidase. Phenoloxidases are related to the arthropod hemocyanins, but diverged before radiation of the arthropod subphyla.

  2. Structural and functional diversity of desmosomes.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Robert M; Green, Kathleen J

    2013-12-01

    Desmosomes anchor intermediate filaments at sites of cell contact established by the interaction of cadherins extending from opposing cells. The incorporation of cadherins, catenin adaptors, and cytoskeletal elements resembles the closely related adherens junction. However, the recruitment of intermediate filaments distinguishes desmosomes and imparts a unique function. By linking the load-bearing intermediate filaments of neighboring cells, desmosomes create mechanically contiguous cell sheets and, in so doing, confer structural integrity to the tissues they populate. This trait and a well-established role in human disease have long captured the attention of cell biologists, as evidenced by a publication record dating back to the mid-1860s. Likewise, emerging data implicating the desmosome in signaling events pertinent to organismal development, carcinogenesis, and genetic disorders will secure a prominent role for desmosomes in future biological and biomedical investigations.

  3. Modeling Forest Structure and Vascular Plant Diversity in Piedmont Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkenberg, C.

    2014-12-01

    When the interacting stressors of climate change and land cover/land use change (LCLUC) overwhelm ecosystem resilience to environmental and climatic variability, forest ecosystems are at increased risk of regime shifts and hyperdynamism in process rates. To meet the growing range of novel biotic and environmental stressors on human-impacted ecosystems, the maintenance of taxonomic diversity and functional redundancy in metacommunities has been proposed as a risk spreading measure ensuring that species critical to landscape ecosystem functioning are available for recruitment as local systems respond to novel conditions. This research is the first in a multi-part study to establish a dynamic, predictive model of the spatio-temporal dynamics of vascular plant diversity in North Carolina Piedmont mixed forests using remotely sensed data inputs. While remote sensing technologies are optimally suited to monitor LCLUC over large areas, direct approaches to the remote measurement of plant diversity remain a challenge. This study tests the efficacy of predicting indices of vascular plant diversity using remotely derived measures of forest structural heterogeneity from aerial LiDAR and high spatial resolution broadband optical imagery in addition to derived topo-environmental variables. Diversity distribution modelling of this sort is predicated upon the idea that environmental filtering of dispersing species help define fine-scale (permeable) environmental envelopes within which biotic structural and compositional factors drive competitive interactions that, in addition to background stochasticity, determine fine-scale alpha diversity. Results reveal that over a range of Piedmont forest communities, increasing structural complexity is positively correlated with measures of plant diversity, though the nature of this relationship varies by environmental conditions and community type. The diversity distribution model is parameterized and cross-validated using three high

  4. The catalog of edge-on disk galaxies from SDSS. I. The catalog and the structural parameters of stellar disks

    SciTech Connect

    Bizyaev, D. V.; Kautsch, S. J.; Mosenkov, A. V.; Reshetnikov, V. P.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Yablokova, N. V.; Hillyer, R. W.

    2014-05-20

    We present a catalog of true edge-on disk galaxies automatically selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A visual inspection of the g, r, and i images of about 15,000 galaxies allowed us to split the initial sample of edge-on galaxy candidates into 4768 (31.8% of the initial sample) genuine edge-on galaxies, 8350 (55.7%) non-edge-on galaxies, and 1865 (12.5%) edge-on galaxies not suitable for simple automatic analysis because these objects either show signs of interaction and warps, or nearby bright stars project on it. We added more candidate galaxies from RFGC, EFIGI, RC3, and Galaxy Zoo catalogs found in the SDSS footprints. Our final sample consists of 5747 genuine edge-on galaxies. We estimate the structural parameters of the stellar disks (the stellar disk thickness, radial scale length, and central surface brightness) in the galaxies by analyzing photometric profiles in each of the g, r, and i images. We also perform simplified three-dimensional modeling of the light distribution in the stellar disks of edge-on galaxies from our sample. Our large sample is intended to be used for studying scaling relations in the stellar disks and bulges and for estimating parameters of the thick disks in different types of galaxies via the image stacking. In this paper, we present the sample selection procedure and general description of the sample.

  5. Opposing Responses of Bird Functional Diversity to Vegetation Structural Diversity in Wet and Dry Forest.

    PubMed

    Sitters, Holly; York, Alan; Swan, Matthew; Christie, Fiona; Di Stefano, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance regimes are changing worldwide, and the consequences for ecosystem function and resilience are largely unknown. Functional diversity (FD) provides a surrogate measure of ecosystem function by capturing the range, abundance and distribution of trait values in a community. Enhanced understanding of the responses of FD to measures of vegetation structure at landscape scales is needed to guide conservation management. To address this knowledge gap, we used a whole-of-landscape sampling approach to examine relationships between bird FD, vegetation diversity and time since fire. We surveyed birds and measured vegetation at 36 landscape sampling units in dry and wet forest in southeast Australia during 2010 and 2011. Four uncorrelated indices of bird FD (richness, evenness, divergence and dispersion) were derived from six bird traits, and we investigated responses of these indices and species richness to both vertical and horizontal vegetation diversity using linear mixed models. We also considered the extent to which the mean and diversity of time since fire were related to vegetation diversity. Results showed opposing responses of FD to vegetation diversity in dry and wet forest. In dry forest, where fire is frequent, species richness and two FD indices (richness and dispersion) were positively related to vertical vegetation diversity, consistent with theory relating to environmental variation and coexistence. However, in wet forest subject to infrequent fire, the same three response variables were negatively associated with vertical diversity. We suggest that competitive dominance by species results in lower FD as vegetation diversity increases in wet forest. The responses of functional evenness were opposite to those of species richness, functional richness and dispersion in both forest types, highlighting the value of examining multiple FD metrics at management-relevant scales. The mean and diversity of time since fire were uncorrelated with vegetation

  6. Opposing Responses of Bird Functional Diversity to Vegetation Structural Diversity in Wet and Dry Forest

    PubMed Central

    York, Alan; Swan, Matthew; Christie, Fiona; Di Stefano, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance regimes are changing worldwide, and the consequences for ecosystem function and resilience are largely unknown. Functional diversity (FD) provides a surrogate measure of ecosystem function by capturing the range, abundance and distribution of trait values in a community. Enhanced understanding of the responses of FD to measures of vegetation structure at landscape scales is needed to guide conservation management. To address this knowledge gap, we used a whole-of-landscape sampling approach to examine relationships between bird FD, vegetation diversity and time since fire. We surveyed birds and measured vegetation at 36 landscape sampling units in dry and wet forest in southeast Australia during 2010 and 2011. Four uncorrelated indices of bird FD (richness, evenness, divergence and dispersion) were derived from six bird traits, and we investigated responses of these indices and species richness to both vertical and horizontal vegetation diversity using linear mixed models. We also considered the extent to which the mean and diversity of time since fire were related to vegetation diversity. Results showed opposing responses of FD to vegetation diversity in dry and wet forest. In dry forest, where fire is frequent, species richness and two FD indices (richness and dispersion) were positively related to vertical vegetation diversity, consistent with theory relating to environmental variation and coexistence. However, in wet forest subject to infrequent fire, the same three response variables were negatively associated with vertical diversity. We suggest that competitive dominance by species results in lower FD as vegetation diversity increases in wet forest. The responses of functional evenness were opposite to those of species richness, functional richness and dispersion in both forest types, highlighting the value of examining multiple FD metrics at management-relevant scales. The mean and diversity of time since fire were uncorrelated with vegetation

  7. The structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays. A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Symposium entitled 'The Structure and Content of the Galaxy and Galactic Gamma Rays', held at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in June, 1976, is briefly reviewed. Highlights from presentations on galactic structure, discrete sources, and low energy gamma rays are described. New data and their interpretations are also summarized.

  8. On the filamentary structures in the Lick galaxy catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycki, Adam

    1989-01-01

    The positions of the filaments observed by Moody et al. (1983) are discussed with respect to the arrangement of the plates in the Lick galaxy survey. An apparent difficiency of filaments near the plate centers is noted. Although the most prominent filaments appear to pass through the areas in the sky where the Lick survey plates overlap, on the whole there is no statistical tendency for the filaments to lie only on the overlapping areas.

  9. 28. CONCRETE DIVERSION STRUCTURE ON THE WEST SIDE OF D ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. CONCRETE DIVERSION STRUCTURE ON THE WEST SIDE OF D STREET ABOUT ONE-QUARTER MILE SOUTH OF 9TH AVNEUE (SECTION 26); THE LATERAL CONTINUES NORTHEAST WHILE A SIDE DITCH PROCEEDS NORTHWARD. THE DIVERSION STRUCTURE SHOWN IN CO-43-A-27 IS VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  10. Structural diversity in lithium aryloxides, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    BOYLE,TIMOTHY J.; PEDROTTY,DAWN M.; ALAM,TODD M.; VICK,SARA C.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.

    2000-06-06

    A series of arylalcohols [H-OAr where OAr = OC{sub 6}H{sub 5} (OPh), OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(2-Me) (oMP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(2,6-Me){sub 2} (DMP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(2-Pr{prime}) (oPP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(2,6-Pr{prime}){sub 2} (DIP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(2-Bu{prime}) (oBP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(2,6-Bu{prime}){sub 2} (DBP) where Me = CH{sub 3}, Pr{prime} = CHMe{sub 2}, and Bu{prime} = CMe{sub 3}] were reacted with LiN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2} in pyridine (py) to generate the appropriate ``Li(OAr)(py){sub x}'' complex. The resultant products were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction as: [Li(OPh)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (1), [Li(oMP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (2), [Li(DMP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (3), [Li(oPP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (4), [Li(DIP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (5), [Li(oBP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (6), and [Li(DBP)(py)]{sub 2} (7). Compounds 1--6 adopt a dinuclear, edge-shared tetrahedral complex. For 7, due to the steric crowding of the DBP ligand, only one py is coordinated yielding a dinuclear fused trigonal planar arrangement. Two additional structure types were also characterized for the DIP ligand as [Li(DIP)(H-DIP)(py)]{sub 2} (5b) and [Li{sub 2}(DIP){sub 2}(py){sub 3}] (5c). {sup 6,7}Li and {sup 13}C NMR solid state MAS spectroscopy indicated that the bulk powder was consistent with the crystalline material. Solution state NMR spectroscopy revealed a symmetric molecule existed in solution for 1--7.

  11. Large and small-scale structures and the dust energy balance problem in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saftly, W.; Baes, M.; De Geyter, G.; Camps, P.; Renaud, F.; Guedes, J.; De Looze, I.

    2015-04-01

    The interstellar dust content in galaxies can be traced in extinction at optical wavelengths, or in emission in the far-infrared. Several studies have found that radiative transfer models that successfully explain the optical extinction in edge-on spiral galaxies generally underestimate the observed FIR/submm fluxes by a factor of about three. In order to investigate this so-called dust energy balance problem, we use two Milky Way-like galaxies produced by high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. We create mock optical edge-on views of these simulated galaxies (using the radiative transfer code SKIRT), and we then fit the parameters of a basic spiral galaxy model to these images (using the fitting code FitSKIRT). The basic model includes smooth axisymmetric distributions along a Sérsic bulge and exponential disc for the stars, and a second exponential disc for the dust. We find that the dust mass recovered by the fitted models is about three times smaller than the known dust mass of the hydrodynamical input models. This factor is in agreement with previous energy balance studies of real edge-on spiral galaxies. On the other hand, fitting the same basic model to less complex input models (e.g. a smooth exponential disc with a spiral perturbation or with random clumps), does recover the dust mass of the input model almost perfectly. Thus it seems that the complex asymmetries and the inhomogeneous structure of real and hydrodynamically simulated galaxies are a lot more efficient at hiding dust than the rather contrived geometries in typical quasi-analytical models. This effect may help explain the discrepancy between the dust emission predicted by radiative transfer models and the observed emission in energy balance studies for edge-on spiral galaxies.

  12. LUMINOUS RED GALAXY HALO DENSITY FIELD RECONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATION TO LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth A.; Spergel, David N.; Bode, Paul E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-09-01

    The nontrivial relationship between observations of galaxy positions in redshift space and the underlying matter field complicates our ability to determine the linear theory power spectrum and extract cosmological information from galaxy surveys. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalog has the potential to place powerful constraints on cosmological parameters. LRGs are bright, highly biased tracers of large-scale structure. However, because they are highly biased, the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies to the galaxy power spectrum is large and fingers-of-God (FOGs) are significant. The combination of these effects leads to a {approx}10% correction in the underlying power spectrum at k = 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {approx}40% correction at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} in the LRG P(k) analysis of Tegmark et al., thereby compromising the cosmological constraints when this potentially large correction is left as a free parameter. We propose an alternative approach to recovering the matter field from galaxy observations. Our approach is to use halos rather than galaxies to trace the underlying mass distribution. We identify FOGs and replace each FOG with a single halo object. This removes the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies, the one-halo term. We test our method on a large set of high-fidelity mock SDSS LRG catalogs and find that the power spectrum of the reconstructed halo density field deviates from the underlying matter power spectrum at the {<=}1% level for k {<=} 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {<=}4% at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}. The reconstructed halo density field also removes the bias in the measurement of the redshift space distortion parameter {beta} induced by the FOG smearing of the linear redshift space distortions.

  13. Panchromatic modeling of structure and stellar population of early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhengyi; Chen, Zhendong

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a new approach to model the structure and stellar population of early type galaxies (ETGs). In this method, the mass distribution of stellar components in the galaxy is assumed directly, instead of that used in previous studies, which is the surface brightness profile of a specific wave band. Thus, multiple wavebands photometric data, from optical to NIR, can be used simultaneously to determine model parameters, such as the Sersic index and the size of galaxy structure, age, metallicity and their radial gradients of stellar population. The PSF effects of different wavebands are also considered in the model prediction, with which compare the observational photometric profiles. Also, information from fiber spectrum of the central part of a galaxy is very easy to be taken into account during the fitting process. Moreover, the Bayesian evidence (BE) is involved in the method to assess different empirical models, and help us to decide, for individual ETGs, if an extra outer disk structure is necessary to be added. Primary results show that, for most of ETGs from SDSS, they have negative color gradients, which means their stellar population in central part are older or metal richer than that in outer part, and this gradient is significantly correlated to the total stellar mass of the galaxy, more massive ETGs have shallower gradients. Additionally, the scaling relation of ETGs, such as their fundamental plane, is well constrained by their stellar mass distributions rather than by surface brightness profiles.

  14. Early Type Galaxies and Structural Parameters from ESO Public Survey KiDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, N.; Napolitano, N. R.; La Barbera, F.; Tortora, C.; Getman, F.; Radovich, M.; Capaccioli, M.

    The Kilo Degree survey (KiDS) is a large-scale optical imaging survey carried out with the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), which is the ideal tool for galaxy evolution studies. We expect to observe millions of galaxies for which we extract the structural parameters in four wavebands (u, g, r and i). This sample will represent the largest dataset with measured structural parameters up to a redshift z = 0. 5. In this paper we will introduce the sample, and describe the 2D fitting procedure using the 2DPHOT environment and the validation of the parameters with an external catalog.

  15. Structural Diversity and Close Interracial Relationships in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent legal and political actions have challenged the use of race-conscious college admissions policies. Earlier research offers mixed evidence about the link between an institution's racial/ethnic composition (i.e., structural diversity) and the formation of close interracial relationships, so the present study examines this topic directly for…

  16. 52. Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing original masonry structure at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing original masonry structure at right and concrete weir at left added later. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. Probing the 2-D Kinematic Structure of Early-Type Galaxies Out to 3 Effective Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Robert N.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Spolaor, Max; Trevor Mendel, J.; Spitler, Lee

    2010-06-01

    We detail an innovative new technique for measuring the 2-D velocity moments (rotation velocity, velocity dispersion and Gauss-Hermite coefficients h3 and h4) using spectra from Keck DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopic observations. The data are used to reconstruct 2-D rotation velocity maps. Here we present data for one of five early-type galaxies whose kinematics we have measured out to ~3 effective radii (see [1]). From these data 2D kinematic maps are constructed. We show such analyses can provide significant insights into the global kinematic structure of galaxies, and, in some cases, challenge the accepted morphological classification. Our results are of particular importance to studies which attempt to classify galaxies by their kinematic structure within one effective radius, such as the recent definition of fast- and slow- rotator classes by the SAURON project.

  18. Interactive diversity promotes the evolution of cooperation in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Long

    2016-10-01

    Evolutionary games on networks traditionally assume that each individual adopts an identical strategy to interact with all its neighbors in each generation. Considering the prevalent diversity of individual interactions in the real society, here we propose the concept of interactive diversity, which allows individuals to adopt different strategies against different neighbors in each generation. We investigate the evolution of cooperation based on the edge dynamics rather than the traditional nodal dynamics in networked systems. The results show that, without invoking any other mechanisms, interactive diversity drives the frequency of cooperation to a high level for a wide range of parameters in both well-mixed and structured populations. Even in highly connected populations, cooperation still thrives. When interactive diversity and large topological heterogeneity are combined together, however, in the relaxed social dilemma, cooperation level is lower than that with just one of them, implying that the combination of many promotive factors may make a worse outcome. By an analytical approximation, we get the condition under which interactive diversity provides more advantages for cooperation than traditional evolutionary dynamics does. Numerical simulations validating the approximation are also presented. Our work provides a new line to explore the latent relation between the ubiquitous cooperation and individuals’ distinct responses in different interactions. The presented results suggest that interactive diversity should receive more attention in pursuing mechanisms fostering cooperation.

  19. ON THE EXTENDED STRUCTURE OF THE PHOENIX DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Aparicio, Antonio; MartInez-Delgado, David; Gallart, Carme E-mail: antapaj@iac.e E-mail: carme@iac.e

    2009-11-01

    We present the star formation history (SFH) and its variations with galactocentric distance for the Local Group dwarf galaxy of Phoenix. They have been derived from a (F555W, F814W) color-magnitude diagram obtained from WFPC2-HST data, which reaches the oldest main-sequence turnoffs. The IAC-star and IAC-pop codes and the MinnIAC suite have been used to obtain the star formation rate as a function of time and metallicity, psi(t, z). We find that Phoenix has had ongoing but gradually decreasing star formation over nearly a Hubble time. The highest level of star formation occurred from the formation of the galaxy till 10.5 Gyr ago, when 50% of the total star formation had already taken place. From that moment, star formation continues at a significant level until 6 Gyr ago (an additional 35% of the stars are formed in this time interval), and at a very low level till the present time. The chemical enrichment law shows a trend of slowly increasing metallicity as a function of time until 6-8 Gyr ago, when metallicity starts to increase steeply to the current value. We have paid particular attention to the study of the variations of the SFH as a function of radius. Young stars are found in the inner region of the galaxy only, but intermediate-age and old stars can be found at all galactocentric distances. The distribution of mass density in alive stars and its evolution with time has been studied. This study shows that star formation started at all galactocentric distances in Phoenix at an early epoch. If stars form in situ in Phoenix, the star formation onset took place all over the galaxy (up to a distance of about 400 pc from the center), but preferentially out of center regions. After that, our results are compatible with a scenario in which the star formation region envelope slowly shrinks as time goes on, possibly as a natural result of pressure support reduction as gas supply diminishes. As a consequence, the star formation stopped first (about 7-8 Gyr ago) in

  20. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  1. Environment and Structure of Massive Central Galaxies through the Eye of Hyper Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Song; HSC Survey Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Although the environmental dependence of structures for massive central galaxies is predicted by the promising hierarchical assembly model, observations at low redshift seem to find no convincing evidence of that. With the help of deep i-band images of a large sample of massive central galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.5 from the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey, we map their stellar mass distributions out to radius larger than 100 kpc, and discover subtle, but systematic and robust structural differences that depend on halo mass. At fixed stellar mass within 100 kpc, the massive central galaxies in more massive (M_{200,c} > 1.6x10^14 M_sun$) halos have a slightly flattened inner profile within ~15-20 kpc, and a more prominent outer envelope compared to ones in less massive (M_{200,c} < 8.7\\x10^13 M_sun) halos. For centrals with M_* > 10^11.5 M_sun, the ones in more massive halos show very significant excess of mass in the outskirt when the two samples are matched using proxies of mass assembled at z > 1. Such differences are broadly consistent with richer recent merging history for more massive halos. We suggest that the relation between total stellar mass and mass within inner 5 or 10 kpc is potentially interesting for diagnosing the role played by host halo in shaping the structures of massive central galaxies. These results also highlight the importance of deep photometry and the usage of detailed structural information in the study of the assembly history of galaxies. We also show that the radial profiles of ellipticity and optical color, along with the preliminary weak lensing signals will enable us gain more insights about the evolution of massive galaxies.

  2. Addressing the Role of Conformational Diversity in Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tertiary structures has become of standard use to study proteins that lack experimental characterization. Unfortunately, 3D structure prediction methods and model quality assessment programs often overlook that an ensemble of conformers in equilibrium populates the native state of proteins. In this work we collected sets of publicly available protein models and the corresponding target structures experimentally solved and studied how they describe the conformational diversity of the protein. For each protein, we assessed the quality of the models against known conformers by several standard measures and identified those models ranked best. We found that model rankings are defined by both the selected target conformer and the similarity measure used. 70% of the proteins in our datasets show that different models are structurally closest to different conformers of the same protein target. We observed that model building protocols such as template-based or ab initio approaches describe in similar ways the conformational diversity of the protein, although for template-based methods this description may depend on the sequence similarity between target and template sequences. Taken together, our results support the idea that protein structure modeling could help to identify members of the native ensemble, highlight the importance of considering conformational diversity in protein 3D quality evaluations and endorse the study of the variability of the native structure for a meaningful biological analysis. PMID:27159429

  3. Biological Diversity Comprising Microbial Structures of Antarctic Ice Covered Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matys, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of microbial membrane lipids is a rapid and non-selective method for evaluating the composition of microbial communities. To fully realise the diagnostic potential of these lipids, we must first understand their structural diversity, biological sources, physiological functions, and pathways of preservation. Particular environmental conditions likely prompt the production of different membrane lipid structures. Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys host numerous ice-covered lakes with sharp chemical gradients that vary in illumination, geochemical structure, and benthic mat morphologies that are structured by nutrient availability and water chemistry. The lipid contents of these benthic mats have not received extensive study nor have the communities yet been thoroughly characterized. Accordingly, a combination of lipid biomarker and nucleic acid sequence data provides the means of assessing species diversity and environmental controls on the composition and diversity of membrane lipid assemblages. We investigated the richness and diversity of benthic microbial communities and accumulated organic matter in Lake Vanda of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. We have identified diverse glycolipids, aminolipids, and phospholipids in addition to many unknown compounds that may be specific to these particular environments. Light levels fluctuate seasonally, favoring low-light-tolerant cyanobacteria and specific lipid assemblages. Adaptations to nutrient limitations are reflected in contrasting intact polar lipid assemblages. For example, under P-limiting conditions, phospholipids are subsidiary to membrane-forming lipids that do not contain P (i.e. ornithine, betaine, and sulfolipids). The bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) composition is dominated by bacteriohopanetetrol (BHT), a ubiquitous BHP, and 2-methylhopanoids. The relative abundance of 2-methylhopanoids is unprecedented and may reflect the unusual seasonal light regime of this polar environment. By establishing correlations

  4. The Study of Clusters of Galaxies and Large Scale Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Many research projects have been initiated and completed under support of this program. The results are summarized below. The work on the ROSAT Deep Survey has been successfully completed. A number of interesting results have been established within this joint MPE, Cal Tech, JHU, ST ScI, ESO collaboration. First, a very large fraction, 70-80 percent, of the X-ray background has been directly resolved into point sources. We have derived a new log N-log S for X-ray sources and have measured a source density of 970 sources per square degree at a limiting flux level. Care was taken in these studies to accurately model and measure the effects of sources confusion. This was possible because of our observing strategy which included both deep PSPC and HRI observations. No evidence of a population of narrow emission line galaxies has been established but some evidence for the evolution of low luminosity AGN (Seyfert galaxies) has been reported. The work on the ROSAT All Sky Survey Northern Cluster Survey has been substantially concluded but the publication of the list has been held up by the need to analyze newly re-calibrated data. This should result in publication over the next year. During the past year we have submitted a paper to the Astrophysical Journal which utilized a sample of clusters originally selected from the ROSAT All-sky survey at redshifts greater than 0.3. This sample was studied with ASCA to determine temperature and luminosity.

  5. PDR modeling of the LWS fine-structure lines in ultraluminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhman, M. L.; Satyapal, S.; Fischer, J.; Wolfire, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    The observations performed onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) long wavelength spectrometer (LWS) on the fine structure lines in ultraluminous galaxies are reported on. The C II 158 micrometer, the O I 63 and 146 micrometer fine structure lines were detected. These lines were compared to the results of the revised theoretical models of extragalactic photodissociation regions (PDRs). The PDR origin of the fine structure lines and the physical properties of the PDR component are discussed.

  6. The structural and size evolution of star-forming galaxies over the last 11 Gyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino-Afonso, Ana; Sobral, David; Buitrago, Fernando; Afonso, José

    2017-03-01

    We present new results on the evolution of rest-frame blue/UV sizes and Sérsic indices of Hα-selected star-forming galaxies over the last 11 Gyr. We investigate how the perceived evolution can be affected by a range of biases and systematics such as cosmological dimming and resolution effects. We use GALFIT and an artificial redshifting technique, which includes the luminosity evolution of Hα-selected galaxies, to quantify the change on the measured structural parameters with redshift. We find typical sizes of 2-3 kpc and Sérsic indices of n ∼ 1.2, close to pure exponential discs all the way from z = 2.23 to z = 0.4. At z = 0, we find typical sizes of 4-5 kpc. Our results show that, when using GALFIT, cosmological dimming has a negligible impact on the derived effective radius for galaxies with <10 kpc, but we find an ∼20 per cent bias on the estimate of the median Sérsic indices, rendering galaxies more disc-like. Star-forming galaxies have grown on average by a factor of 2-3 in the last 11 Gyr with re ∝ (1 + z)-0.75. By exploring the evolution of the stellar mass-size relation, we find evidence for a stronger size evolution of the most massive star-forming galaxies since z ∼ 2, as they grow faster towards z ∼ 0 when compared to the lower stellar mass counterparts. As we are tracing the rest-frame blue/UV, we are likely witnessing the growth of discs where star formation is ongoing in galaxies while their profiles remain close to exponential discs, n ≲ 1.5, across the same period.

  7. Beyond Ellipse(s): Accurately Modelling the Isophotal Structure of Galaxies with ISOFIT and CMODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  8. BEYOND ELLIPSE(S): ACCURATELY MODELING THE ISOPHOTAL STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES WITH ISOFIT AND CMODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-10

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  9. Structural diversity promotes productivity of mixed, uneven-aged forests in southwestern Germany.

    PubMed

    Dănescu, Adrian; Albrecht, Axel T; Bauhus, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    Forest diversity-productivity relationships have been intensively investigated in recent decades. However, few studies have considered the interplay between species and structural diversity in driving productivity. We analyzed these factors using data from 52 permanent plots in southwestern Germany with more than 53,000 repeated tree measurements. We used basal area increment as a proxy for productivity and hypothesized that: (1) structural diversity would increase tree and stand productivity, (2) diversity-productivity relationships would be weaker for species diversity than for structural diversity, and (3) species diversity would also indirectly impact stand productivity via changes in size structure. We measured diversity using distance-independent indices. We fitted separate linear mixed-effects models for fir, spruce and beech at the tree level, whereas at the stand level we pooled all available data. We tested our third hypothesis using structural equation modeling. Structural and species diversity acted as direct and independent drivers of stand productivity, with structural diversity being a slightly better predictor. Structural diversity, but not species diversity, had a significant, albeit asymmetric, effect on tree productivity. The functioning of structurally diverse, mixed forests is influenced by both structural and species diversity. These sources of trait diversity contribute to increased vertical stratification and crown plasticity, which in turn diminish competitive interferences and lead to more densely packed canopies per unit area. Our research highlights the positive effects of species diversity and structural diversity on forest productivity and ecosystem dynamics.

  10. Photoionization modeling of the LWS fine-structure lines in IR bright galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyapal, S.; Luhman, M. L.; Fischer, J.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Wolfire, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    The long wavelength spectrometer (LWS) fine structure line spectra from infrared luminous galaxies were modeled using stellar evolutionary synthesis models combined with photoionization and photodissociation region models. The calculations were carried out by using the computational code CLOUDY. Starburst and active galactic nuclei models are presented. The effects of dust in the ionized region are examined.

  11. Plant species loss decreases arthropod diversity and shifts trophic structure.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nick M; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Gross, Kevin; Haarstad, John; Knops, Johannes M H; Tilman, David

    2009-10-01

    Plant diversity is predicted to be positively linked to the diversity of herbivores and predators in a foodweb. Yet, the relationship between plant and animal diversity is explained by a variety of competing hypotheses, with mixed empirical results for each hypothesis. We sampled arthropods for over a decade in an experiment that manipulated the number of grassland plant species. We found that herbivore and predator species richness were strongly, positively related to plant species richness, and that these relationships were caused by different mechanisms at herbivore and predator trophic levels. Even more dramatic was the threefold increase, from low- to high-plant species richness, in abundances of predatory and parasitoid arthropods relative to their herbivorous prey. Our results demonstrate that, over the long term, the loss of plant species propagates through food webs, greatly decreasing arthropod species richness, shifting a predator-dominated trophic structure to being herbivore dominated, and likely impacting ecosystem functioning and services.

  12. An Open-Source Galaxy Redshift Survey Simulator for next-generation Large Scale Structure Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijak, Uros

    Galaxy redshift surveys produce three-dimensional maps of the galaxy distribution. On large scales these maps trace the underlying matter fluctuations in a relatively simple manner, so that the properties of the primordial fluctuations along with the overall expansion history and growth of perturbations can be extracted. The BAO standard ruler method to measure the expansion history of the universe using galaxy redshift surveys is thought to be robust to observational artifacts and understood theoretically with high precision. These same surveys can offer a host of additional information, including a measurement of the growth rate of large scale structure through redshift space distortions, the possibility of measuring the sum of neutrino masses, tighter constraints on the expansion history through the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and constraints on the scale-dependence and non-Gaussianity of the primordial fluctuations. Extracting this broadband clustering information hinges on both our ability to minimize and subtract observational systematics to the observed galaxy power spectrum, and our ability to model the broadband behavior of the observed galaxy power spectrum with exquisite precision. Rapid development on both fronts is required to capitalize on WFIRST's data set. We propose to develop an open-source computational toolbox that will propel development in both areas by connecting large scale structure modeling and instrument and survey modeling with the statistical inference process. We will use the proposed simulator to both tailor perturbation theory and fully non-linear models of the broadband clustering of WFIRST galaxies and discover novel observables in the non-linear regime that are robust to observational systematics and able to distinguish between a wide range of spatial and dynamic biasing models for the WFIRST galaxy redshift survey sources. We have demonstrated the utility of this approach in a pilot study of the SDSS-III BOSS galaxies, in which we

  13. GASEOUS STRUCTURES IN BARRED GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF THE BAR STRENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Yonghwi

    2012-10-10

    Using hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the physical properties of gaseous substructures in barred galaxies and their relationships with the bar strength. The gaseous medium is assumed to be isothermal and unmagnetized. The bar potential is modeled as a Ferrers prolate with index n. To explore situations with differing bar strength, we vary the bar mass f{sub bar} relative to the spheroidal component as well as its aspect ratio R. We derive expressions as functions of f{sub bar} and R for the bar strength Q{sub b} and the radius r(Q{sub b} ) where the maximum bar torque occurs. When applied to observations, these expressions suggest that bars in real galaxies are most likely to have f{sub bar} {approx} 0.25-0.50 and n {approx}< 1. Dust lanes approximately follow one of the x{sub 1}-orbits and tend to be straighter under a stronger and more elongated bar, but are insensitive to the presence of self-gravity. A nuclear ring of a conventional x{sub 2} type forms only when the bar is not so massive or elongated. The radius of an x{sub 2}-type ring is generally smaller than the inner Lindblad resonance, decreases systematically with increasing Q{sub b} , and is slightly larger when self-gravity is included. This is evidence that the ring position is not determined by the resonance, but instead by the amount of angular momentum loss at dust-lane shocks. Nuclear spirals exist only when the ring is of the x{sub 2} type and is sufficiently large in size. Unlike the other features, nuclear spirals are transient in that they start out being tightly wound and weak, and then, due to the nonlinear effect, unwind and become stronger until they turn into shocks, with an unwinding rate that is higher for larger Q{sub b} . The mass inflow rate to the galaxy center is found to be less than 0.01 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for models with Q{sub b} {approx}< 0.2, while becoming larger than 0.1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} when Q{sub b} {approx}> 0.2 and self-gravity is included.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of a diverse set of rice germplasm for association mapping.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Peng; Sun, Mei; Corke, Harold; Bao, Jinsong

    2010-08-01

    Germplasm diversity is the mainstay for crop improvement and genetic dissection of complex traits. Understanding genetic diversity, population structure, and the level and distribution of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in target populations is of great importance and a prerequisite for association mapping. In this study, 100 genome-wide simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to assess genetic diversity, population structure, and LD of 416 rice accessions including landraces, cultivars and breeding lines collected mostly in China. A model-based population structure analysis divided the rice materials into seven subpopulations. 63% of the SSR pairs in these accessions were in LD, which was mostly due to an overall population structure, since the number of locus pairs in LD was reduced sharply within each subpopulation, with the SSR pairs in LD ranging from 5.9 to 22.9%. Among those SSR pairs showing significant LD, the intrachromosomal LD had an average of 25-50 cM in different subpopulations. Analysis of the phenotypic diversity of 25 traits showed that the population structure accounted for an average of 22.4% of phenotypic variation. An example association mapping for starch quality traits using both the candidate gene mapping and genome-wide mapping strategies based on the estimated population structure was conducted. Candidate gene mapping confirmed that the Wx and starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) genes could be identified as strongly associated with apparent amylose content (AAC) and pasting temperature (PT), respectively. More importantly, we revealed that the Wx gene was also strongly associated with PT. In addition to the major genes, we found five and seven SSRs were associated with AAC and PT, respectively, some of which have not been detected in previous linkage mapping studies. The results suggested that the population may be useful for the genome-wide marker-trait association mapping. This new association population has the potential to identify

  15. The meaning of alignment: lessons from structural diversity

    PubMed Central

    Pirovano, Walter; Feenstra, K Anton; Heringa, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein structural alignment provides a fundamental basis for deriving principles of functional and evolutionary relationships. It is routinely used for structural classification and functional characterization of proteins and for the construction of sequence alignment benchmarks. However, the available techniques do not fully consider the implications of protein structural diversity and typically generate a single alignment between sequences. Results We have taken alternative protein crystal structures and generated simulation snapshots to explicitly investigate the impact of structural changes on the alignments. We show that structural diversity has a significant effect on structural alignment. Moreover, we observe alignment inconsistencies even for modest spatial divergence, implying that the biological interpretation of alignments is less straightforward than commonly assumed. A salient example is the GroES 'mobile loop' where sub-Ångstrom variations give rise to contradictory sequence alignments. Conclusion A comprehensive treatment of ambiguous alignment regions is crucial for further development of structural alignment applications and for the representation of alignments in general. For this purpose we have developed an on-line database containing our data and new ways of visualizing alignment inconsistencies, which can be found at . PMID:19105835

  16. The structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Stecker, F. W.

    1976-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with galactic structure drawing on all branches of galactic astronomy with emphasis on the implications of the new gamma ray observations. Topics discussed include: (1) results from the COS-B gamma ray satellite; (2) results from SAS-2 on gamma ray pulsar, Cygnus X-3, and maps of the galactic diffuse flux; (3) recent data from CO surveys of the galaxy; (4) high resolution radio surveys of external galaxies; (5) results on the galactic distribution of pulsars; and (6) theoretical work on galactic gamma ray emission.

  17. The structure of cross-cultural musical diversity.

    PubMed

    Rzeszutek, Tom; Savage, Patrick E; Brown, Steven

    2012-04-22

    Human cultural traits, such as languages, musics, rituals and material objects, vary widely across cultures. However, the majority of comparative analyses of human cultural diversity focus on between-culture variation without consideration for within-culture variation. In contrast, biological approaches to genetic diversity, such as the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) framework, partition genetic diversity into both within- and between-population components. We attempt here for the first time to quantify both components of cultural diversity by applying the AMOVA model to music. By employing this approach with 421 traditional songs from 16 Austronesian-speaking populations, we show that the vast majority of musical variability is due to differences within populations rather than differences between. This demonstrates a striking parallel to the structure of genetic diversity in humans. A neighbour-net analysis of pairwise population musical divergence shows a large amount of reticulation, indicating the pervasive occurrence of borrowing and/or convergent evolution of musical features across populations.

  18. Study of the structure and kinematics of the NGC 7465/64/63 triplet galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, O. A.; Karataeva, G. M.; Yakovleva, V. A.; Burenkov, A. N.

    2012-05-01

    We analyze new observational data obtained at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences with the multimode SCORPIO instrument and the Multi-Pupil Fiber Spectrograph for the group of galaxies NGC 7465/64/63. For one of the group members (NGC 7465), the presence of a polar ring has been suspected. We have constructed the large-scale brightness distributions, the ionized-gas velocity and velocity dispersion fields for all three galaxies as well as the line-of-sight velocity curves based on emission and absorption lines and the stellar velocity field in the central region for NGC 7465. As a result of our analysis of the data obtained, we have discovered an inner stellar disk ( r ≈ 0.5 kpc) and a warped gaseous disk in NGC 7465, in addition to the main stellar disk. Based on a joint study of our photometric and spectroscopic data, we have established that NGC 7464 is an irregular IrrI-type galaxy whose structural and kinematic peculiarities most likely resulted from its gravitational interaction with NGC 7465. The velocity field of the ionized gas in NGC 7463 turns out to be typical of barred spiral galaxies, and the warp of the outer parts of its disk could arise from a close encounter with one of the galaxies of the environment.

  19. Measuring Large-Scale Structure at z ~ 1 with the VIPERS galaxy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) is the largest redshift survey ever conducted with the ESO telescopes. It has used the Very Large Telescope to collect nearly 100,000 redshifts from the general galaxy population at 0.5 < z < 1.2. With a combination of volume and high sampling density that is unique for these redshifts, it allows statistical measurements of galaxy clustering and related cosmological quantities to be obtained on an equal footing with classic results from local redshift surveys. At the same time, the simple magnitude-limited selection and the wealth of ancillary photometric data provide a general view of the galaxy population, its physical properties and the relation of the latter to large-scale structure. This paper presents an overview of the galaxy clustering results obtained so far, together with their cosmological implications. Most of these are based on the ~ 55,000 galaxies forming the first public data release (PDR-1). As of January 2015, observations and data reduction are complete and the final data set of more than 90,000 redshifts is being validated and made ready for the final investigations.

  20. Building disc structure and galaxy properties through angular momentum: the DARK SAGE semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam R. H.; Croton, Darren J.; Mutch, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    We present the new semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution, DARK SAGE, a heavily modified version of the publicly available SAGE code. The model is designed for detailed evolution of galactic discs. We evolve discs in a series of annuli with fixed specific angular momentum, which allows us to make predictions for the radial and angular-momentum structure of galaxies. Most physical processes, including all channels of star formation and associated feedback, are performed in these annuli. We present the surface density profiles of our model spiral galaxies, both as a function of radius and specific angular momentum, and find that the discs naturally build a pseudo-bulge-like component. Our main results are focused on predictions relating to the integrated mass-specific angular momentum relation of stellar discs. The model produces a distinct sequence between these properties in remarkable agreement with recent observational literature. We investigate the impact Toomre disc instabilities have on shaping this sequence and find they are crucial for regulating both the mass and spin of discs. Without instabilities, high-mass discs would be systematically deficient in specific angular momentum by a factor of ˜2.5, with increased scatter. Instabilities also appear to drive the direction in which the mass-spin sequence of spiral galaxy discs evolves. With them, we find galaxies of fixed mass have higher specific angular momentum at later epochs.

  1. Galaxy evolution. Quasar quartet embedded in giant nebula reveals rare massive structure in distant universe.

    PubMed

    Hennawi, Joseph F; Prochaska, J Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio

    2015-05-15

    All galaxies once passed through a hyperluminous quasar phase powered by accretion onto a supermassive black hole. But because these episodes are brief, quasars are rare objects typically separated by cosmological distances. In a survey for Lyman-α emission at redshift z ≈ 2, we discovered a physical association of four quasars embedded in a giant nebula. Located within a substantial overdensity of galaxies, this system is probably the progenitor of a massive galaxy cluster. The chance probability of finding a quadruple quasar is estimated to be ∼10(-7), implying a physical connection between Lyman-α nebulae and the locations of rare protoclusters. Our findings imply that the most massive structures in the distant universe have a tremendous supply (≃10(11) solar masses) of cool dense (volume density ≃ 1 cm(-3)) gas, which is in conflict with current cosmological simulations.

  2. Observational Studies of the Angular Structure of the Radio Galaxy 3C 234 at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megn, A. V.; Braude, S. Ya.; Rashkovskiy, S. L.; Sharykin, N. K.; Shepelev, V. A.; Inyutin, G. A.; Vashchishin, R. V.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Bulatsen, V. G.

    2003-12-01

    An analysis of the angular structure of the radio galaxy 3C 234 at decameter wavelengths based on data obtained on the URAN-1 and URAN-2 interferometers is presented. Four of the five model components that describe the radio-brightness distribution at centimeter wavelengths are observed at decameter wavelengths: two compact components and two neighboring extended components. The fifth, undetected, component is the most extended, and encompasses the central region of the radio source, including the nucleus of the galaxy. Self-absorption is detected in the compact components, whose angular sizes are determined to be 0.27±0.03″ (northeast component) and 0.55±0.05″ (southwest component), in agreement with direct measurements at centimeter wavelengths. Most of the decameter emission of the radio galaxy is associated with its extended components.

  3. The structure of the nearby universe traced by theIRAS galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahil, Amos

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important discoveries of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) has been the detection of about 20,000 galaxies with 60 microns fluxes above 0.5 Jy. From the observational point of view, the IRAS galaxies are ideal tracers of density, since they are homogeneously detected over most of the sky, and their fluxes are unaffected by galactic extinction. The nearby universe was mapped by the IRAS galaxies to a distance of approximately 200 h(exp -1) Mpc for the absolute value of b less than 5 deg. The ability to map down to such low galactic latitudes has proven to be particularly imporant, since some of the most important nearby large-scale structures, such as the Great Attractor, the Perseus-Pisces region, and the Shapley concentration, all lie there. Two major results of the U.S. IRAS redshift survey are discussed.

  4. The vertical disk structure of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 3079

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan; Cecil, G.; Tully, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    NGC 3079 is an edge-on SB(s)c galaxy at a redshift of 1225 km/s relative to the Local Group. Earlier researchers found a spectacular 'figure-eight' radio structure aligned along the minor axis of the galaxy, centered on the nucleus, and extending 3 kpc above and below the plane. The geometry of this structure and the evidence of unusually high nuclear gas velocities suggest that a wind-type outflow from the nucleus is taking place. The disk of NGC 3079 is also remarkable: it is extremely rich in H 2 regions and is the only unambiguous example of a galaxy outside M31 and our own Galaxy to exhibit 'Heiles-like' shells. Other researchers have also identified a nebulosity with a ragged X-shaped morphology formed by a system of lumpy filaments with individual lengths of 3 - 5 kpc. They suggest that this material is ambient halo gas entrained into the boundary layers of the nuclear outflow. The complex structure of the line emission in NGC 3079 makes this object an ideal target for an imaging spectroscopic study. The present paper reports the preliminary results of such a study.

  5. Revealing the structural and functional diversity of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Knox, J Paul

    2008-06-01

    The extensive knowledge of the chemistry of isolated cell wall polymers, and that relating to the identification and partial annotation of gene families involved in their synthesis and modification, is not yet matched by a sophisticated understanding of the occurrence of the polymers within cell walls of the diverse cell types within a growing organ. Currently, the main sets of tools that are used to determine cell-type-specific configurations of cell wall polymers and aspects of cell wall microstructures are antibodies, carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and microspectroscopies. As these tools are applied we see that cell wall polymers are extensively developmentally regulated and that there is a range of structurally distinct primary and secondary cell walls within organs and across species. The challenge now is to document cell wall structures in relation to diverse cell biological events and to integrate this knowledge with the emerging understanding of polymer functions.

  6. Structural basis of diverse membrane target recognitions by ankyrins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Keyu; Ye, Fei; Yu, Cong; Bennett, Vann; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-11-10

    Ankyrin adaptors together with their spectrin partners coordinate diverse ion channels and cell adhesion molecules within plasma membrane domains and thereby promote physiological activities including fast signaling in the heart and nervous system. Ankyrins specifically bind to numerous membrane targets through their 24 ankyrin repeats (ANK repeats), although the mechanism for the facile and independent evolution of these interactions has not been resolved. Here we report the structures of ANK repeats in complex with an inhibitory segment from the C-terminal regulatory domain and with a sodium channel Nav1.2 peptide, respectively, showing that the extended, extremely conserved inner groove spanning the entire ANK repeat solenoid contains multiple target binding sites capable of accommodating target proteins with very diverse sequences via combinatorial usage of these sites. These structures establish a framework for understanding the evolution of ankyrins' membrane targets, with implications for other proteins containing extended ANK repeat domains.

  7. 8. GENERAL VIEW OF LARGE DIVERSION STRUCTURE ON LATERAL WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL VIEW OF LARGE DIVERSION STRUCTURE ON LATERAL WEST OF LOWER DERBY LAKE (SECTION 2). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  8. 25. DIVERSION STRUCTURE EAST OF FORMER BASIN F IN SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DIVERSION STRUCTURE EAST OF FORMER BASIN F IN SECTION 26. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  9. 26. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH FORMER BASIN F IN DISTANCE (SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH FORMER BASIN F IN DISTANCE (SECTION 26). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Qi, Jianjian; Shi, Qiuxiang; Shen, Di; Zhang, Shengping; Shao, Guangjin; Li, Hang; Sun, Zhanyong; Weng, Yiqun; Shang, Yi; Gu, Xingfang; Li, Xixiang; Zhu, Xiaoguo; Zhang, Jinzhe; van Treuren, Robbert; van Dooijeweert, Willem; Zhang, Zhonghua; Huang, Sanwen

    2012-01-01

    Knowing the extent and structure of genetic variation in germplasm collections is essential for the conservation and utilization of biodiversity in cultivated plants. Cucumber is the fourth most important vegetable crop worldwide and is a model system for other Cucurbitaceae, a family that also includes melon, watermelon, pumpkin and squash. Previous isozyme studies revealed a low genetic diversity in cucumber, but detailed insights into the crop's genetic structure and diversity are largely missing. We have fingerprinted 3,342 accessions from the Chinese, Dutch and U.S. cucumber collections with 23 highly polymorphic Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers evenly distributed in the genome. The data reveal three distinct populations, largely corresponding to three geographic regions. Population 1 corresponds to germplasm from China, except for the unique semi-wild landraces found in Xishuangbanna in Southwest China and East Asia; population 2 to Europe, America, and Central and West Asia; and population 3 to India and Xishuangbanna. Admixtures were also detected, reflecting hybridization and migration events between the populations. The genetic background of the Indian germplasm is heterogeneous, indicating that the Indian cucumbers maintain a large proportion of the genetic diversity and that only a small fraction was introduced to other parts of the world. Subsequently, we defined a core collection consisting of 115 accessions and capturing over 77% of the SSR alleles. Insight into the genetic structure of cucumber will help developing appropriate conservation strategies and provides a basis for population-level genome sequencing in cucumber.

  11. Origin, genetic diversity, and population structure of Chinese domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Yuan; Duan, Zi-Yuan; Sha, Tao; Xiangyu, Jinggong; Wu, Shi-Fang; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2006-07-19

    To characterize the origin, genetic diversity, and phylogeographic structure of Chinese domestic sheep, we here analyzed a 531-bp fragment of mtDNA control region of 449 Chinese autochthonous sheep from 19 breeds/populations from 13 geographic regions, together with previously reported 44 sequences from Chinese indigenous sheep. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all three previously defined lineages A, B, and C were found in all sampled Chinese sheep populations, except for the absence of lineage C in four populations. Network profiles revealed that the lineages B and C displayed a star-like phylogeny with the founder haplotype in the centre, and that two star-like subclades with two founder haplotypes were identified in lineage A. The pattern of genetic variation in lineage A, together with the divergence time between the two central founder haplotypes suggested that two independent domestication events have occurred in sheep lineage A. Considerable mitochondrial diversity was observed in Chinese sheep. Weak structuring was observed either among Chinese indigenous sheep populations or between Asian and European sheep and this can be attributable to long-term strong gene flow induced by historical human movements. The high levels of intra-population diversity in Chinese sheep and the weak phylogeographic structuring indicated three geographically independent domestication events have occurred and the domestication place was not only confined to the Near East, but also occurred in other regions.

  12. A novel complexity-to-diversity strategy for the diversity-oriented synthesis of structurally diverse and complex macrocycles from quinine.

    PubMed

    Ciardiello, J J; Stewart, H L; Sore, H F; Galloway, W R J D; Spring, D R

    2017-02-28

    Recent years have witnessed a global decline in the productivity and advancement of the pharmaceutical industry. A major contributing factor to this is the downturn in drug discovery successes. This can be attributed to the lack of structural (particularly scaffold) diversity and structural complexity exhibited by current small molecule screening collections. Macrocycles have been shown to exhibit a diverse range of biological properties, with over 100 natural product-derived examples currently marketed as FDA-approved drugs. Despite this, synthetic macrocycles are widely considered to be a poorly explored structural class within drug discovery, which can be attributed to their synthetic intractability. Herein we describe a novel complexity-to-diversity strategy for the diversity-oriented synthesis of novel, structurally complex and diverse macrocyclic scaffolds from natural product starting materials. This approach exploits the inherent structural (including functional) and stereochemical complexity of natural products in order to rapidly generate diversity and complexity. Readily-accessible natural product-derived intermediates serve as structural templates which can be divergently functionalized with different building blocks to generate a diverse range of acyclic precursors. Subsequent macrocyclisation then furnishes compounds that are each based around a distinct molecular scaffold. Thus, high levels of library scaffold diversity can be rapidly achieved. In this proof-of-concept study, the natural product quinine was used as the foundation for library synthesis, and six novel structurally diverse, highly complex and functionalized macrocycles were generated.

  13. Structural diversity in a human antibody germline library

    PubMed Central

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Obmolova, Galina; Malia, Thomas J.; Luo, Jinquan; Muzammil, Salman; Sweet, Raymond; Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To support antibody therapeutic development, the crystal structures of a set of 16 germline variants composed of 4 different kappa light chains paired with 4 different heavy chains have been determined. All four heavy chains of the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) have the same complementarity-determining region (CDR) H3 that was reported in an earlier Fab structure. The structure analyses include comparisons of the overall structures, canonical structures of the CDRs and the VH:VL packing interactions. The CDR conformations for the most part are tightly clustered, especially for the ones with shorter lengths. The longer CDRs with tandem glycines or serines have more conformational diversity than the others. CDR H3, despite having the same amino acid sequence, exhibits the largest conformational diversity. About half of the structures have CDR H3 conformations similar to that of the parent; the others diverge significantly. One conclusion is that the CDR H3 conformations are influenced by both their amino acid sequence and their structural environment determined by the heavy and light chain pairing. The stem regions of 14 of the variant pairs are in the ‘kinked’ conformation, and only 2 are in the extended conformation. The packing of the VH and VL domains is consistent with our knowledge of antibody structure, and the tilt angles between these domains cover a range of 11 degrees. Two of 16 structures showed particularly large variations in the tilt angles when compared with the other pairings. The structures and their analyses provide a rich foundation for future antibody modeling and engineering efforts. PMID:27210805

  14. Sufficient observables for large-scale structure in galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carron, J.; Szapudi, I.

    2014-03-01

    Beyond the linear regime, the power spectrum and higher order moments of the matter field no longer capture all cosmological information encoded in density fluctuations. While non-linear transforms have been proposed to extract this information lost to traditional methods, up to now, the way to generalize these techniques to discrete processes was unclear; ad hoc extensions had some success. We pointed out in Carron and Szapudi's paper that the logarithmic transform approximates extremely well the optimal `sufficient statistics', observables that extract all information from the (continuous) matter field. Building on these results, we generalize optimal transforms to discrete galaxy fields. We focus our calculations on the Poisson sampling of an underlying lognormal density field. We solve and test the one-point case in detail, and sketch out the sufficient observables for the multipoint case. Moreover, we present an accurate approximation to the sufficient observables in terms of the mean and spectrum of a non-linearly transformed field. We find that the corresponding optimal non-linear transformation is directly related to the maximum a posteriori Bayesian reconstruction of the underlying continuous field with a lognormal prior as put forward in the paper of Kitaura et al.. Thus, simple recipes for realizing the sufficient observables can be built on previously proposed algorithms that have been successfully implemented and tested in simulations.

  15. Characterizing the Small Scale Structure in Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, William R.

    2001-01-01

    We studied galaxy clusters Abell 119, Abell 754, and Abell 1750, using data from the ASCA and ROSAT satellites. In addition, we completed the paper "Merging Binary Clusters". In this paper we study three prominent bi-modal X-ray clusters: A3528, A1750 and A3395. Since the sub-clusters in these systems have projected separations of 0.93, 1.00 and 0.67 Mpc respectively, we examine their X-ray and optical observations to investigate the dynamics and possible merging of these sub-clusters. Using data taken with ROSAT and ASCA, we analyze the temperature and surface brightness distributions. We also analyze the velocity distributions of the three clusters using new measurements supplemented with previously published data. We examined both the overall cluster properties as well as the two sub-cluster elements in each. These results were then applied to the determination of the overall cluster masses, that demonstrate excellent consistency between the various methods used. While the characteristic parameters of the sub-clusters are typical of isolated objects, our temperature results for the regions between the two sub-clusters clearly confirm the presence of merger activity that is suggested by the surface brightness distributions. These three clusters represent a progression of equal-sized sub-cluster mergers, starting from initial contact to immediately before first core passage.

  16. Using asteroseismology to probe the structure and evolution of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stello, Dennis

    2015-08-01

    Recent space missions have transformed our ability to use asteroseismology on vast numbers of stars. This advance has opened up for exploration of the structure and evolution of the Galaxy using oscillating red giant stars as distant tracers of stellar populations including the halo, the bulge and the thin and thick disks. Asteroseismology provides a powerful way to obtain precise estimates of stellar bulk properties such as radius, mass, and age. The radius, and hence distance, places a star accurately in the Galaxy, the mass reveals the mass function and, in combination with composition, provide ages for red giants. Initial results from the CoRoT and Kepler missions have demonstrated the enormous potential there is in the marriage between asteroseismology and contemporary Galactic Archaeology based on single-epoch spectroscopy, photometry, and parallax measurements. The scope for this research received a significant boost last year on several fronts. The re-purposed Kepler telescope, K2, started observing tens of thousands of red giants along the ecliptic covering all main constituents of the Galaxy, and in a few years time NASA's TESS mission will stars observing up to 1 mio red giants full sky. Finally, ESA's decision to fund PLATO guaranties that high quality seismic measurements will continue to flow beyond the nextdecade. In this talk I will give an overview of how seismology can aid the study of the structure and evolution of the Galaxy. I will include the most recent results that we have obtained with our K2 Galactic Archaeology Program.

  17. MAJOR STRUCTURES OF THE INNER GALAXY DELINEATED BY 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. A.; Caswell, J. L.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Breen, S. L.; Voronkov, M. A.; Avison, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Gray, M. D.; Burton, M. G.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Pestalozzi, M.

    2011-05-20

    We explore the longitude-velocity distribution of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in the context of the inner structure of our Galaxy. We analyze the correlation in velocities within this distribution and identify density enhancements indicating large-scale regions of enhanced star formation. These are interpreted as the starting points of the spiral arms and the interaction of the Galactic bar with the 3 kpc arms. The methanol masers support the presence of a long thin bar with a 45{sup 0} orientation. Signatures of the full 3 kpc arm structure are seen, including a prominent tangent at approximately -22{sup 0} Galactic longitude. We compare this distribution with existing models of the gas dynamics of our Galaxy. The 3 kpc arm structure appears likely to correspond to the radius of corotation resonance of the bar, with the bar on its inner surface and the starting points of the spiral arms on its outer surface.

  18. Lanthanide coordination polymers: Synthesis, diverse structure and luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xue-Qin Lei, Yao-Kun; Wang, Xiao-Run; Zhao, Meng-Meng; Peng, Yun-Qiao; Cheng, Guo-Quan

    2014-10-15

    The new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand incorporating furfurysalicylamide terminal groups, namely, 1,4-bis([(2′-furfurylaminoformyl)phenoxyl]methyl)-2,5-bismethylbenzene (L) was synthesized and used as building blocks for constructing lanthanide coordination polymers with luminescent properties. The series of lanthanide nitrate complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The semirigid ligand L, as a bridging ligand, reacts with lanthanide nitrates forming three distinct structure types: chiral noninterpenetrated two-dimensional (2D) honeycomblike (6,3) (hcb, Schläfli symbol 6{sup 3}, vertex symbol 6 6 6) topological network as type I, 1D zigzag chain as type II and 1D trapezoid ladder-like chain as type III. The structural diversities indicate that lanthanide contraction effect played significant roles in the structural self-assembled process. The luminescent properties of Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail. Due to the good match between the lowest triplet state of the ligand and the resonant energy level of the lanthanide ion, the lanthanide ions in Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes can be efficiently sensitized by the ligand. - Graphical abstract: We present herein six lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand which not only display diverse structures but also possess strong luminescence properties. - Highlights: • We present lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand. • The lanthanide coordination polymers exhibit diverse structures. • The luminescent properties of Tb{sup III}, Eu{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail.

  19. UBVRI Photometry of Stellar Structures throughout the Disk of the Barred Galaxy NGC 3367

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Barreto, J. Antonio; Hernández-Toledo, Héctor; Moreno-Díaz, Edmundo; Bernal-Marín, Tula; Villarreal-Castillo, A. Lucía

    2007-07-01

    We report new detailed surface U, B, V, R, and I photometry of 81 stellar structures in the disk of the barred galaxy NGC 3367. The images show many different structures, indicating that star formation is going on in most parts of the disk. NGC 3367 is known to have a very high concentration of molecular gas distribution in the central regions of the galaxy and bipolar synchrotron emission from the nucleus, with two lobes (at 6 kpc) forming a triple structure similar to a radio galaxy. We have determined the U, B, V, R, and I magnitudes and U-B, B-V, U-V, and V-I colors for the central region (nucleus), a region which includes supernova 2003 AA, and 79 star associations throughout NGC 3367. The estimation of ages of star associations is very difficult due to several factors, among them the filling factor, metallicity, spatial distribution of each structure, and the fact that we estimated the magnitudes with a circular aperture of 16 pixels in diameter, equivalent to 6.8''~1.4 kpc. However, even though the colors derived for NGC 3367 were similar to the colors expected of star clusters with theoretical evolutionary star tracks developed for the LMC and had a similar metallicity, NGC 3367 shows 56% of the observed structures with age type SWB I (a few tens of megayears), with seven sources outside the high surface brightness visible disk.

  20. Structural diversity of the ordinary and specialized lateral line organs.

    PubMed

    Cernuda-Cernuda, R; García-Fernández, J M

    1996-07-01

    Lateral line organ, a superficial sensory system in amphibia and fish which provides the animal with information about its surrounding environment, is divided classically into two main different types, ordinary and specialized, whose functions are mechanoreceptive and electroreceptive, respectively. Although it has great diversity, the basic sensory unit, which is usually called "neuromast," is composed of sensory cells embedded in accessory cells. The functions of the latter are to support the sensory cells and to secrete the material that covers the organs, forming a cupular structure or filling a canal which enables the organ to communicate with the exterior. Sensory cells of mechanoreceptive neuromasts have a tuft of processes included in the cupular material; these are a kinocilium and a group of stereocilia with a typical staircase arrangement. The displacement of the stereocilia towards or away from the kinocilium produces different stimuli. The electroreceptive organs are more diverse. They include ampullary and tuberous organs. The latter can be subdivided into different types: knollenorgans, mormyromasts, gymnarchomasts, etc. All of these present a great diversity among species, but their morphology is less reported than that of the mechanoreceptive organs. This paper summarizes the structural features of the main different types of lateral line organs, as well as their taxonomic distribution and different patterns of distribution along the surface of the animal.

  1. The nearby Galaxy structure toward the Vela Gum nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, E. E.; Solivella, G. R.; Perren, G. I.; Vázquez, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    We report on UBVI photometry and spectroscopy for MK classification purposes carried out in the fields of five open clusters projected against the Vela Gum in the Third Galactic Quadrant of the Galaxy. They are Ruprecht 20, Ruprecht 47, Ruprecht 60, NGC 2660 and NGC 2910. We could improve/confirm the parameters of these objects derived before. Ruprecht 20 is not a real physical entity, in agreement with earlier suggestions. Ruprecht 47, a young cluster in the Galactic plane, at 4.4 kpc from the Sun is quite farther than in previous distance estimations and becomes, therefore, a member of the Puppis OB2 association. For the first time Ruprecht 60 was surveyed in UBVI photometry. We found it to be placed at 4.2 kpc from the Sun of about and 1 Gyr old. NGC 2660 is another old object in our survey for which distance and age are coincident with previous findings. NGC 2910 turns out to be a young cluster of Vela OB1 association at a distance of 1.4 kpc approximately and 60 Myr old. The spectroscopic parallax method has been applied to several stars located in the fields of four out of the five clusters to get their distances and reddenings. With this method we found two blue stars in the field of NGC 2910 at distances that make them likely members of Vela OB1 too. Also, projected against the fields of Ruprecht 20 and Ruprecht 47 we have detected other young stars favoring not only the existence of Puppis OB1 and OB2 but conforming a young stellar group at ∼ 1 kpc from the Sun and extending for more than 6 kpc outward the Galaxy. If this is the case, there is a thickening of the thin Galactic disk of more than 300 pc at just 2-3 kpc from the Sun. Ruprecht 60 and NGC 2660 are too old objects that have no physical relation with the associations under discussion. An astonishing result has been the detection in the background of Ruprecht 47 of a young star at the impressive distance of 9.5 kpc from the Sun that could be a member of the innermost part of the Outer Arm

  2. Morphological parameters of a Spitzer survey of stellar structure in galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Holwerda, B. W.; Muñoz-Mateos, J.-C.; Sheth, K.; Kim, T.; Meidt, S.; Mizusawa, T.; Hinz, J. L.; Zaritsky, D.; Regan, M. W.; Gil de Paz, A.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Seibert, M.; Ho, L. C.; Gadotti, D. A.; Erroz-Ferrer, S. E-mail: benne.holwerda@gmail.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s and others

    2014-01-20

    The morphology of galaxies can be quantified to some degree using a set of scale-invariant parameters. Concentration (C), asymmetry (A), smoothness (S), the Gini index (G), the relative contribution of the brightest pixels to the second-order moment of the flux (M {sub 20}), ellipticity (E), and the Gini index of the second-order moment (G{sub M} ) have all been applied to morphologically classify galaxies at various wavelengths. Here, we present a catalog of these parameters for the Spitzer Survey of stellar structure in Galaxies, a volume-limited, near-infrared (NIR) imaging survey of nearby galaxies using the 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels of the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our goal is to provide a reference catalog of NIR quantified morphology for high-redshift studies and galaxy evolution models with enough detail to resolve stellar mass morphology. We explore where normal, non-interacting galaxies—those typically found on the Hubble tuning fork—lie in this parameter space and show that there is a tight relation between concentration (C {sub 82}) and M {sub 20} for normal galaxies. M {sub 20} can be used to classify galaxies into earlier and later types (i.e., to separate spirals from irregulars). Several criteria using these parameters exist to select systems with a disturbed morphology, i.e., those that appear to be undergoing a tidal interaction. We examine the applicability of these criteria to Spitzer NIR imaging. We find that four relations, based on the parameters A and S, G and M {sub 20}, G{sub M} , C, and M {sub 20}, respectively, select outliers in morphological parameter space, but each selects different subsets of galaxies. Two criteria (G{sub M} > 0.6, G > –0.115 × M {sub 20} + 0.384) seem most appropriate to identify possible mergers and the merger fraction in NIR surveys. We find no strong relation between lopsidedness and most of these morphological parameters, except for a weak dependence of lopsidedness on

  3. Diversity, structure and convergent evolution of the global sponge microbiome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Torsten; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Lurgi, Miguel; Björk, Johannes R; Easson, Cole; Astudillo-García, Carmen; Olson, Julie B; Erwin, Patrick M; López-Legentil, Susanna; Luter, Heidi; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Costa, Rodrigo; Schupp, Peter J; Steindler, Laura; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Gilbert, Jack; Knight, Rob; Ackermann, Gail; Victor Lopez, Jose; Taylor, Michael W; Thacker, Robert W; Montoya, Jose M; Hentschel, Ute; Webster, Nicole S

    2016-06-16

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are early-diverging metazoa renowned for establishing complex microbial symbioses. Here we present a global Porifera microbiome survey, set out to establish the ecological and evolutionary drivers of these host-microbe interactions. We show that sponges are a reservoir of exceptional microbial diversity and major contributors to the total microbial diversity of the world's oceans. Little commonality in species composition or structure is evident across the phylum, although symbiont communities are characterized by specialists and generalists rather than opportunists. Core sponge microbiomes are stable and characterized by generalist symbionts exhibiting amensal and/or commensal interactions. Symbionts that are phylogenetically unique to sponges do not disproportionally contribute to the core microbiome, and host phylogeny impacts complexity rather than composition of the symbiont community. Our findings support a model of independent assembly and evolution in symbiont communities across the entire host phylum, with convergent forces resulting in analogous community organization and interactions.

  4. Diversity, structure and convergent evolution of the global sponge microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Torsten; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Lurgi, Miguel; Björk, Johannes R.; Easson, Cole; Astudillo-García, Carmen; Olson, Julie B.; Erwin, Patrick M.; López-Legentil, Susanna; Luter, Heidi; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Costa, Rodrigo; Schupp, Peter J.; Steindler, Laura; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Gilbert, Jack; Knight, Rob; Ackermann, Gail; Victor Lopez, Jose; Taylor, Michael W.; Thacker, Robert W.; Montoya, Jose M.; Hentschel, Ute; Webster, Nicole S.

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are early-diverging metazoa renowned for establishing complex microbial symbioses. Here we present a global Porifera microbiome survey, set out to establish the ecological and evolutionary drivers of these host–microbe interactions. We show that sponges are a reservoir of exceptional microbial diversity and major contributors to the total microbial diversity of the world's oceans. Little commonality in species composition or structure is evident across the phylum, although symbiont communities are characterized by specialists and generalists rather than opportunists. Core sponge microbiomes are stable and characterized by generalist symbionts exhibiting amensal and/or commensal interactions. Symbionts that are phylogenetically unique to sponges do not disproportionally contribute to the core microbiome, and host phylogeny impacts complexity rather than composition of the symbiont community. Our findings support a model of independent assembly and evolution in symbiont communities across the entire host phylum, with convergent forces resulting in analogous community organization and interactions. PMID:27306690

  5. Structural and Functional Diversity of Nairovirus-Encoded Nucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenming; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Xu; Dong, Hui; Ma, Chao; Wang, Jingmin; Liu, Baocheng; Mao, Yonghong; Wang, Ying; Li, Ting

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nairoviruses include assorted tick-borne bunyaviruses that are emerging as causative agents of infectious diseases among humans and animals. As negative-sense single-stranded RNA (−ssRNA) viruses, nairoviruses encode nucleoprotein (NP) that encapsidates the genomic RNA and further forms ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). We previously revealed that the monomeric NP encoded by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) presents a racket-shaped structure and shows unusual DNA-specific endonuclease activity. To examine the structural and biological variation of nairovirus-encoded NPs, here, we systematically solved the crystal structures of NPs encoded by various nairoviruses, including Hazara virus (HAZV), Kupe virus (KUPV), and Erve virus (ERVEV). Combined with biochemical analysis, our results generate a clearer picture to aid in the understanding of the functional diversity of nairovirus-encoded NPs and the formation of nairovirus RNPs. IMPORTANCE Nairoviruses comprise several tick-borne bunyaviruses that are emerging as causative agents of infectious diseases among humans and animals; however, little is known of the nairovirus genome assembly and transcription mechanisms. Based on the previous study of CCHFV NP reported by different research groups, we systematically investigate here the structural and functional diversity among three different nairoviruses. This work provides important information on nairovirus nucleoprotein function and the formation of RNPs. PMID:26246561

  6. The evolution of galaxies at constant number density: a less biased view of star formation, quenching, and structural formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ownsworth, Jamie R.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Mundy, Carl J.; Mortlock, Alice; Hartley, William G.; Duncan, Kenneth; Almaini, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Due to significant galaxy contamination and impurity in stellar mass selected samples (up to 95 per cent from z = 0-3), we examine the star formation history, quenching time-scales, and structural evolution of galaxies using a constant number density selection with data from the United Kingdom Infra-Red Deep Sky Survey Ultra-Deep Survey field. Using this methodology, we investigate the evolution of galaxies at a variety of number densities from z = 0-3. We find that samples chosen at number densities ranging from 3 × 10-4 to 10-5 galaxies Mpc-3 (corresponding to z ˜ 0.5 stellar masses of M* = 1010.95-11.6 M0) have a star-forming blue fraction of ˜50 per cent at z ˜ 2.5, which evolves to a nearly 100 per cent quenched red and dead population by z ˜ 1. We also see evidence for number density downsizing, such that the galaxies selected at the lowest densities (highest masses) become a homogeneous red population before those at higher number densities. Examining the evolution of the colours for these systems furthermore shows that the formation redshift of galaxies selected at these number densities is zform > 3. The structural evolution through size and Sérsic index fits reveal that while there remains evolution in terms of galaxies becoming larger and more concentrated in stellar mass at lower redshifts, the magnitude of the change is significantly smaller than for a mass-selected sample. We also find that changes in size and structure continues at z < 1, and is coupled strongly to passivity evolution. We conclude that galaxy structure is driving the quenching of galaxies, such that galaxies become concentrated before they become passive.

  7. Plasmodium vivax Diversity and Population Structure across Four Continents

    PubMed Central

    Koepfli, Cristian; Rodrigues, Priscila T.; Antao, Tiago; Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Van den Eede, Peter; Gamboa, Dionicia; van Hong, Nguyen; Bendezu, Jorge; Erhart, Annette; Barnadas, Céline; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Menard, Didier; Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela; Nour, Bakri Y. M.; Karunaweera, Nadira; Mueller, Ivo; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the geographically most widespread human malaria parasite. To analyze patterns of microsatellite diversity and population structure across countries of different transmission intensity, genotyping data from 11 microsatellite markers was either generated or compiled from 841 isolates from four continents collected in 1999–2008. Diversity was highest in South-East Asia (mean allelic richness 10.0–12.8), intermediate in the South Pacific (8.1–9.9) Madagascar and Sudan (7.9–8.4), and lowest in South America and Central Asia (5.5–7.2). A reduced panel of only 3 markers was sufficient to identify approx. 90% of all haplotypes in South Pacific, African and SE-Asian populations, but only 60–80% in Latin American populations, suggesting that typing of 2–6 markers, depending on the level of endemicity, is sufficient for epidemiological studies. Clustering analysis showed distinct clusters in Peru and Brazil, but little sub-structuring was observed within Africa, SE-Asia or the South Pacific. Isolates from Uzbekistan were exceptional, as a near-clonal parasite population was observed that was clearly separated from all other populations (FST>0.2). Outside Central Asia FST values were highest (0.11–0.16) between South American and all other populations, and lowest (0.04–0.07) between populations from South-East Asia and the South Pacific. These comparisons between P. vivax populations from four continents indicated that not only transmission intensity, but also geographical isolation affect diversity and population structure. However, the high effective population size results in slow changes of these parameters. This persistency must be taken into account when assessing the impact of control programs on the genetic structure of parasite populations. PMID:26125189

  8. A near-infrared census of the multicomponent stellar structure of early-type dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Lisker, T.; Hansson, K. S. A.; Meyer, H. T.; Paudel, S.; Peletier, R. F.; Den Brok, M.; Niemi, S.-M.; Toloba, E.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A.

    2014-05-10

    The fraction of star-forming to quiescent dwarf galaxies varies from almost infinity in the field to zero in the centers of rich galaxy clusters. What is causing this pronounced morphology-density relation? What do quiescent dwarf galaxies look like when studied in detail, and what conclusions can be drawn about their formation mechanism? Here we study a nearly magnitude-complete sample (–19 < M{sub r} < –16 mag) of 121 Virgo cluster early types with deep near-infrared images from the SMAKCED project. We fit two-dimensional models with optional inner and outer components, as well as bar and lens components (in ∼15% of the galaxies), to the galaxy images. While a single Sérsic function may approximate the overall galaxy structure, it does not entirely capture the light distribution of two-thirds of our galaxies, for which multicomponent models provide a better fit. This fraction of complex galaxies shows a strong dependence on luminosity, being larger for brighter objects. We analyze the global and component-specific photometric scaling relations of early-type dwarf galaxies and discuss similarities with bright early and late types. The dwarfs' global galaxy parameters show scaling relations that are similar to those of bright disk galaxies. The inner components are mostly fitted with Sérsic n values close to 1. At a given magnitude, they are systematically larger than the bulges of spirals, suggesting that they are not ordinary bulges. We argue that the multicomponent structures in early-type dwarfs are mostly a phenomenon inherent to the disks and may indeed stem from environmental processing.

  9. Complex central structures suggest complex evolutionary paths for barred S0 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Martínez-Lombilla, Cristina; Knapen, Johan H.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate three barred lenticular galaxies (NGC 2681, NGC 3945 and NGC 4371), which were previously reported to have complex central structures but without a detailed structural analysis of these galaxies' high-resolution data. We have therefore performed four- to six-component (pseudo-)bulge/disc/bar/ring/point source) decompositions of the composite (Hubble Space Telescope plus ground-based) surface brightness profiles. We find that NGC 2681 hosts three bars, while NGC 3945 and NGC 4371 are double- and single-barred galaxies, respectively, in agreement with past isophotal analysis. We find that the bulges in these galaxies are compact, and have Sérsic indices of n ˜ 2.2-3.6 and stellar masses of M* ˜ 0.28 × 1010-1.1 × 1010 M⊙. NGC 3945 and NGC 4371 have intermediate-scale `pseudo-bulges' that are well described by a Sérsic model with low n ≲ 0.5 instead of an exponential (n = 1) profile as done in the past. We measure emission line fluxes enclosed within nine different elliptical apertures, finding that NGC 2681 has a low-ionization nuclear emission region (LINER)-type emission inside R ˜ 3 arcsec, but the emission line due to star formation is significant when aperture size is increased. In contrast, NGC 3945 and NGC 4371 have composite (active galactic nucleus plus star-forming)- and LINER-type emissions inside and outside R ˜ 2 arcsec, respectively. Our findings suggest that the three galaxies have experienced a complex evolutionary path. The bulges appear to be consequences of an earlier violent merging event while subsequent disc formation via gas accretion and bar-driven perturbations may account for the build-up of pseudo-bulges, bars, rings and point sources.

  10. Determining the Nature of the Extended H I Structure around LITTLE THINGS Dwarf Galaxy NGC 1569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Megan

    2013-06-01

    This work presents an extended, neutral hydrogen emission map around Magellanic-type dwarf irregular galaxy (dIm) NGC 1569. In the spring of 2010, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope was used to map a 9° × 2° region in H I line emission that includes NGC 1569 and IC 342 as well as two other dwarf galaxies. The primary objective for these observations was to search for structures potentially connecting NGC 1569 with IC 342 group members in order to trace previous interactions and thus, provide an explanation for the starburst and peculiar kinematics prevalent in NGC 1569. A large, half-degree diameter H I cloud was detected that shares the same position and velocity as NGC 1569. Also, two long structures were discovered that are reminiscent of intergalactic filaments extending out in a V-shaped manner from NGC 1569 toward UGCA 92, a nearby dwarf galaxy. These filamentary structures extend for about 1.°5, which is 77 kpc at NGC 1569. There is a continuous velocity succession with the 0.°5 H I cloud, filaments, and main body of the galaxy. The 0.°5 H I cloud and filamentary structures may be foreground Milky Way, but are suggestive as possible remnants of an interaction between NGC 1569 and UGCA 92. The data also show two tidal tails extending from UGCA 86 and IC 342, respectively. These structures may be part of a continuous H I bridge but more data are needed to determine if this is the case.

  11. DETERMINING THE NATURE OF THE EXTENDED H I STRUCTURE AROUND LITTLE THINGS DWARF GALAXY NGC 1569

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Megan

    2013-06-15

    This work presents an extended, neutral hydrogen emission map around Magellanic-type dwarf irregular galaxy (dIm) NGC 1569. In the spring of 2010, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope was used to map a 9 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 2 Degree-Sign region in H I line emission that includes NGC 1569 and IC 342 as well as two other dwarf galaxies. The primary objective for these observations was to search for structures potentially connecting NGC 1569 with IC 342 group members in order to trace previous interactions and thus, provide an explanation for the starburst and peculiar kinematics prevalent in NGC 1569. A large, half-degree diameter H I cloud was detected that shares the same position and velocity as NGC 1569. Also, two long structures were discovered that are reminiscent of intergalactic filaments extending out in a V-shaped manner from NGC 1569 toward UGCA 92, a nearby dwarf galaxy. These filamentary structures extend for about 1. Degree-Sign 5, which is 77 kpc at NGC 1569. There is a continuous velocity succession with the 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud, filaments, and main body of the galaxy. The 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud and filamentary structures may be foreground Milky Way, but are suggestive as possible remnants of an interaction between NGC 1569 and UGCA 92. The data also show two tidal tails extending from UGCA 86 and IC 342, respectively. These structures may be part of a continuous H I bridge but more data are needed to determine if this is the case.

  12. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Prediction and discovery of new structures in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Aleksei M.

    2007-02-01

    A review is given of the last 20 years of published research into the nature, origin mechanisms, and observed features of spiral-vortex structures found in galaxies. The so-called rotating shallow water experiments are briefly discussed, carried out with a facility designed by the present author and built at the Russian Scientific Center 'Kurchatov Institute' to model the origin of galactic spiral structures. The discovery of new vortex-anticyclone structures in these experiments stimulated searching for them astronomically using the RAS Special Astrophysical Observatory's 6-meter BTA optical telescope, formerly the world's and now Europe's largest. Seven years after the pioneering experiments, Afanasyev and the present author discovered the predicted giant anticyclones in the galaxy Mrk 1040 by using BTA. Somewhat later, the theoretical prediction of giant cyclones in spiral galaxies was made, also to be verified by BTA afterwards. To use the observed line-of-sight velocity field for reconstructing the 3D velocity vector distribution in a galactic disk, a method for solving a problem from the class of ill-posed astrophysical problems was developed by the present author and colleagues. In addition to the vortex structure, other new features were discovered — in particular, slow bars (another theoretical prediction), for whose discovery an observational test capable of distinguishing them from their earlier-studied normal (fast) counterparts was designed.

  13. Large scale structure and galaxy disks as Lyman-alpha clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salpeter, Edwin E.

    1993-10-01

    Large-scale structure in the universe is enriched by two morphological categories, expanding 'clouds' of bound 'local groups' of galaxies and superclusters. Part of the complexity is due to a 'category overlap' in length scales, e.g., some galaxy pairs have a larger separation than the size of some rich compact groups. This essay includes conjectures on (presently unseen) galaxies, located in the Voids between superclusters, with highly extended gas disks (out to about 250 kpc) providing most of the Ly-alpha 'forest' absorption systems. The main postulate is a small central peak value N(max) of the mass surface density for the protodisks of these galaxies, which delays not only the recombination of hydrogen but also the phase transition from warm to cold neutral hydrogen. On this model, star formation starts only when the cold phase is reached, but then results in a violent starburst. If conditions are favorable, this burst results in a mild galactic wind (or a galactic fountain) which removes much of the inner gas disk, but leaves most of the outer disk intact; the ratio of the number of 'damped wing' to the number of forest lines is predicted to be much smaller at low redshifts than for z above 2.

  14. The structure and dynamics of the AC114 galaxy cluster revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, Dominique; Yegorova, Irina; Saviane, Ivo; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Bresolin, Fabio; Salzer, John J.; Capelato, Hugo V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the galaxy cluster AC114 based on a catalogue of 524 velocities. Of these, 169 (32 per cent) are newly obtained at European Southern Observatory (Chile) with the Very Large Telescope and the VIsible MultiObject spectrograph. Data on individual galaxies are presented and the accuracy of the measured velocities is discussed. Dynamical properties of the cluster are derived. We obtain an improved mean redshift value z = 0.31665 ± 0.0008 and velocity dispersion σ = 1893^{+73}_{-82} km s^{-1}. A large velocity dispersion within the core radius and the shape of the infall pattern suggests that this part of the cluster is in a radial phase of relaxation with a very elongated radial filament spanning 12 000 km s-1. A radial foreground structure is detected within the central 0.5 h-1 Mpc radius, recognizable as a redshift group at the same central redshift value. We analyse the colour distribution for this archetype Butcher-Oemler galaxy cluster and identify the separate red and blue galaxy sequences. The latter subset contains 44 per cent of confirmed members of the cluster, reaching magnitudes as faint as Rf= 21.1 (1.0 mag fainter than previous studies). We derive a mass M200 = (4.3 ± 0.7) × 1015 M⊙ h-1. In a subsequent paper, we will utilize the spectral data presented here to explore the mass-metallicity relation for this intermediate redshift cluster.

  15. THICK DISKS OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES SEEN THROUGH THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): LAIR OF MISSING BARYONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Comeron, Sebastien; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Knapen, Johan H.; Salo, Heikki; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Hinz, Joannah L.; De Paz, Armando Gil; Menendez-Delmestre, KarIn; Seibert, Mark; Ho, Luis C.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.

    2011-11-01

    Most, if not all, disk galaxies have a thin (classical) disk and a thick disk. In most models thick disks are thought to be a necessary consequence of the disk formation and/or evolution of the galaxy. We present the results of a study of the thick disk properties in a sample of carefully selected edge-on galaxies with types ranging from T = 3 to T = 8. We fitted one-dimensional luminosity profiles with physically motivated functions-the solutions of two stellar and one gaseous isothermal coupled disks in equilibrium-which are likely to yield more accurate results than other functions used in previous studies. The images used for the fits come from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G). We found that thick disks are on average more massive than previously reported, mostly due to the selected fitting function. Typically, the thin and thick disks have similar masses. We also found that thick disks do not flare significantly within the observed range in galactocentric radii and that the ratio of thick-to-thin disk scale heights is higher for galaxies of earlier types. Our results tend to favor an in situ origin for most of the stars in the thick disk. In addition, the thick disk may contain a significant amount of stars coming from satellites accreted after the initial buildup of the galaxy and an extra fraction of stars coming from the secular heating of the thin disk by its own overdensities. Assigning thick disk light to the thin disk component may lead to an underestimate of the overall stellar mass in galaxies because of different mass-to-light ratios in the two disk components. On the basis of our new results, we estimate that disk stellar masses are between 10% and 50% higher than previously thought and we suggest that thick disks are a reservoir of 'local missing baryons'.

  16. BREAKS IN THIN AND THICK DISKS OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES IMAGED IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Comeron, Sebastien; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Laine, Jarkko; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Knapen, Johan H.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Sheth, Kartik; Munoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Hinz, Joannah L.; Regan, Michael W.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Seibert, Mark; Ho, Luis C.; Mizusawa, Trisha; Holwerda, Benne

    2012-11-10

    Breaks in the radial luminosity profiles of galaxies have until now been mostly studied averaged over disks. Here, we study separately breaks in thin and thick disks in 70 edge-on galaxies using imaging from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We built luminosity profiles of the thin and thick disks parallel to midplanes and we found that thin disks often truncate (77%). Thick disks truncate less often (31%), but when they do, their break radius is comparable with that in the thin disk. This suggests either two different truncation mechanisms-one of dynamical origin affecting both disks simultaneously and another one only affecting the thin disk-or a single mechanism that creates a truncation in one disk or in both depending on some galaxy property. Thin disks apparently antitruncate in around 40% of galaxies. However, in many cases, these antitruncations are an artifact caused by the superposition of a thin disk and a thick disk, with the latter having a longer scale length. We estimate the real thin disk antitruncation fraction to be less than 15%. We found that the ratio of the thick and thin stellar disk mass is roughly constant (0.2 < M{sub T} /M{sub t} < 0.7) for circular velocities v{sub c} > 120 km s{sup -1}, but becomes much larger at smaller velocities. We hypothesize that this is due to a combination of a high efficiency of supernova feedback and a slower dynamical evolution in lower-mass galaxies causing stellar thin disks to be younger and less massive than in higher-mass galaxies.

  17. The Structure of the Radio Galaxy 3C388 at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megn, A. V.; Braude, S. Ya.; Rashkovskii, S. L.; Sharykin, N. K.; Shepelev, V. A.; Inyutin, G. A.; Vashchishin, R. V.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Bulatsen, V. G.

    2001-02-01

    Observations of the structure of the radio galaxy 3C338 at decameter wavelengths obtained using the URAN-1 and URAN-2 radio interferometers are presented. The structure of this object at these wavelengths differs appreciably from images obtained at higher frequencies. The most probable simple models for the radio brightness distributions at 25 and 20 MHz are determined: two extended components with sizes from 40″ to 50″ whose centers are separated by 90″ 100″ in position angle about 100°, and a single compact component 9″×4″ in size, whose flux density does not exceed 10% of the total flux density of the radio galaxy.

  18. High-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas in galaxy halos and large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Limin

    This dissertation presents spectroscopic studies of gas in galaxy halos and large-scale structures through high-resolution quasar absorption lines. The broad goal of this effort is to learn how galaxies acquire their gas and how they return it to the intergalactic medium, or more generally, how galaxies interact with their environment. The study of the absorption lines due to the extraplanar 21cm "Outer Arm" (OA) of the Milky Way toward two quasars, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907, provides valuable insight into the gas accretion processes. It yields the following results. (1) The OA is a multiphase cloud and high ions show small but significant offsets in velocity and are unlikely to be cospatial with the low ions. (2) The overall metallicity of the OA is Z=0.3-0.5 Z⊙, but nitrogen is underabundant. (3) The abundance of N, O, and S derived are roughly consistent with outer-galaxy emission-line abundances and the metallicity gradient derived from H II regions. The similarity of the OA kinematics to several nearby high velocity clouds (HVCs, e.g. Complexes C, G, and H) suggests that these clouds could be detritus from a merging satellite galaxy. To test this hypothesis, we build up a simple model including tidal tripping, ram-pressure stripping, and dynamical friction to consider whether the OA could be debris affiliated with the Monoceros Ring. Our model can roughly reproduce the spatial and velocity characteristics of the OA. Moreover, the metallicity of the OA is similar to the higher metallicities measured in the younger stellar components of the Monoceros Ring and the progenitor candidate, the CMa overdensity. However, both our model and the Galactic warp scenario can not explain other HVCs that are likely to be related to the OA. Instead of acquiring gas, some galaxies have their gas removed through various physical processes. Ram-pressure stripping and tidal interaction are important mechanisms for galaxies to loose their gas. The high-resolution spectrum of Mrk

  19. Structural and Functional Diversity of the Microbial Kinome

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Natarajan; Taylor, Susan S; Zhai, Yufeng; Venter, J. Craig; Manning, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) domain mediates the majority of signaling and coordination of complex events in eukaryotes. By contrast, most bacterial signaling is thought to occur through structurally unrelated histidine kinases, though some ePK-like kinases (ELKs) and small molecule kinases are known in bacteria. Our analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) dataset reveals that ELKs are as prevalent as histidine kinases and may play an equally important role in prokaryotic behavior. By combining GOS and public databases, we show that the ePK is just one subset of a diverse superfamily of enzymes built on a common protein kinase–like (PKL) fold. We explored this huge phylogenetic and functional space to cast light on the ancient evolution of this superfamily, its mechanistic core, and the structural basis for its observed diversity. We cataloged 27,677 ePKs and 18,699 ELKs, and classified them into 20 highly distinct families whose known members suggest regulatory functions. GOS data more than tripled the count of ELK sequences and enabled the discovery of novel families and classification and analysis of all ELKs. Comparison between and within families revealed ten key residues that are highly conserved across families. However, all but one of the ten residues has been eliminated in one family or another, indicating great functional plasticity. We show that loss of a catalytic lysine in two families is compensated by distinct mechanisms both involving other key motifs. This diverse superfamily serves as a model for further structural and functional analysis of enzyme evolution. PMID:17355172

  20. Structural and functional diversity of the microbial kinome.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Natarajan; Taylor, Susan S; Zhai, Yufeng; Venter, J Craig; Manning, Gerard

    2007-03-01

    The eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) domain mediates the majority of signaling and coordination of complex events in eukaryotes. By contrast, most bacterial signaling is thought to occur through structurally unrelated histidine kinases, though some ePK-like kinases (ELKs) and small molecule kinases are known in bacteria. Our analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) dataset reveals that ELKs are as prevalent as histidine kinases and may play an equally important role in prokaryotic behavior. By combining GOS and public databases, we show that the ePK is just one subset of a diverse superfamily of enzymes built on a common protein kinase-like (PKL) fold. We explored this huge phylogenetic and functional space to cast light on the ancient evolution of this superfamily, its mechanistic core, and the structural basis for its observed diversity. We cataloged 27,677 ePKs and 18,699 ELKs, and classified them into 20 highly distinct families whose known members suggest regulatory functions. GOS data more than tripled the count of ELK sequences and enabled the discovery of novel families and classification and analysis of all ELKs. Comparison between and within families revealed ten key residues that are highly conserved across families. However, all but one of the ten residues has been eliminated in one family or another, indicating great functional plasticity. We show that loss of a catalytic lysine in two families is compensated by distinct mechanisms both involving other key motifs. This diverse superfamily serves as a model for further structural and functional analysis of enzyme evolution.

  1. Genetic diversity and population structure of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae).

    PubMed

    Massey, L; Hamrick, J

    1998-03-01

    Using 19 allozyme loci we studied genetic diversity in 18 populations of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae) from the southeastern United States. Of the 19 loci surveyed, 17 (89.5%) were polymorphic in at least one of the populations sampled. There was considerable variation among populations in the percentage of polymorphic loci (range = 31.6-84.2%, mean = 67.6%). Similar heterogeneity among populations was observed for mean number of alleles per polymorphic locus (range = 2.0-3.0; mean = 2.48) and mean expected heterozygosity (range = 0.113-0.288; mean = 0.213). On average, 83% of the total genetic diversity was found within populations. Duplications of three allozyme loci were detected in several populations. The life-history characteristics of Y. filamentosa (a long-lived, semiwoody, predominantly outcrossing monocot with a large geographical range) may contribute to the maintenance of such high levels of genetic diversity. These results contradict expectations of the genetic structure of Y. filamentosa based on observations of the dispersal and pollination behavior of its sole pollinator, Tegeticula yuccasella, the yucca moth.

  2. Structural Diversity of Self-Assembled Iridescent Arthropod Biophotonic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranathan, Vinod Kumar; Prum, Richard O.

    2015-03-01

    Many organisms, especially arthropods, produce vivid interference colors using diverse mesoscopic (100-350 nm) integumentary biophotonic nanostructures that are increasingly being investigated for technological applications. Despite a century of interest, we lack precise structural knowledge of many biophotonic nanostructures and mechanisms controlling their development, when such knowledge can open novel biomimetic routes to facilely self-assemble tunable, multi-functional materials. Here, we use synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy to characterize the photonic nanostructure of 140 iridescent integumentary scales and setae from 127 species of terrestrial arthropods in 85 genera from 5 orders. We report a rich nanostructural diversity, including triply-periodic bicontinuous networks, close-packed spheres, inverse columnar, perforated lamellar, and disordered sponge-like morphologies, commonly observed as stable phases of amphiphilic surfactants, block copolymer, and lyotropic lipid-water systems. Diverse arthropod lineages appear to have independently evolved to utilize the self-assembly of infolding bilayer membranes to develop biophotonic nanostructures that span the phase-space of amphiphilic morphologies, but at optical length scales.

  3. 27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, A SHORT DISTANCE WEST OF D STREET ABOUT ONE-QUARTER MILE SOUTH OF 9TH AVENUE (SECTION 26). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  4. 11. CONTINUATION OF LATERAL LEAVING THE DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. CONTINUATION OF LATERAL LEAVING THE DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF LOWER DERBY LAKE (SECTION 2), SHOWING MEASURING GAUGE. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  5. The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G): Stellar Masses, Sizes, and Radial Profiles for 2352 Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Sheth, Kartik; Regan, Michael; Kim, Taehyun; Laine, Jarkko; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Gil de Paz, Armando; Comeron, Sebastien; Hinz, Joannah; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Bouquin, Alexandre Y. K.; Schinnerer, Eva; Ho, Luis; Zaritsky, Dennis; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Madore, Barry; Holwerda, Benne; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Knapen, Johan H.; Meidt, Sharon; Querejeta, Miguel; Mizusawa, Trisha; Seibert, Mark; Laine, Seppo; Courtois, Helene

    2015-07-01

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies is a volume, magnitude, and size-limited survey of 2352 nearby galaxies with deep imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. In this paper, we describe our surface photometry pipeline and showcase the associated data products that we have released to the community. We also identify the physical mechanisms leading to different levels of central stellar mass concentration for galaxies with the same total stellar mass. Finally, we derive the local stellar mass-size relation at 3.6 μm for galaxies of different morphologies. Our radial profiles reach stellar mass surface densities below ˜ 1 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-2. Given the negligible impact of dust and the almost constant mass-to-light ratio at these wavelengths, these profiles constitute an accurate inventory of the radial distribution of stellar mass in nearby galaxies. From these profiles we have also derived global properties such as asymptotic magnitudes (and the corresponding stellar masses), isophotal sizes and shapes, and concentration indices. These and other data products from our various pipelines (science-ready mosaics, object masks, 2D image decompositions, and stellar mass maps) can be publicly accessed at IRSA (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/data/SPITZER/S4G/).

  6. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS GENERAL CATALOG: STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS FOR APPROXIMATELY HALF A MILLION GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Roger L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cooper, Michael C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Stern, Daniel; Comerford, Julia M.; Davis, Marc; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Barden, Marco; Conselice, Christopher J.; Capak, Peter L.; Scoville, Nick; Sheth, Kartik; Shopbell, Patrick; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; and others

    2012-05-01

    We present the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog (ACS-GC), a photometric and morphological database using publicly available data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. The goal of the ACS-GC database is to provide a large statistical sample of galaxies with reliable structural and distance measurements to probe the evolution of galaxies over a wide range of look-back times. The ACS-GC includes approximately 470,000 astronomical sources (stars + galaxies) derived from the AEGIS, COSMOS, GEMS, and GOODS surveys. GALAPAGOS was used to construct photometric (SEXTRACTOR) and morphological (GALFIT) catalogs. The analysis assumes a single Sersic model for each object to derive quantitative structural parameters. We include publicly available redshifts from the DEEP2, COMBO-17, TKRS, PEARS, ACES, CFHTLS, and zCOSMOS surveys to supply redshifts (spectroscopic and photometric) for a considerable fraction ({approx}74%) of the imaging sample. The ACS-GC includes color postage stamps, GALFIT residual images, and photometry, structural parameters, and redshifts combined into a single catalog.

  7. The Circumgalactic Medium surrounding =2.3 Star-Forming Galaxies in the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudie, Gwen C.

    2013-01-01

    The gaseous environments of galaxies are a crucial but poorly-constrained component of galaxy formation and evolution and contain vital information about the movement of baryons into and out of galaxies. I will present results from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS), a unique spectroscopic survey designed to explore the connection between galaxies and intergalactic baryons during the cosmic peak of star formation ( 2-3). The KBSS combines Keck/HIRES spectra of 15 hyperluminous QSOs with densely-sampled galaxy redshift surveys surrounding each QSO sightline. Through Voigt profile decomposition of ~6000 HI absorbers within the Lya forest in the QSO spectra, my thesis provides the first measurements of the physical properties of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of high-redshift galaxies characterizing the distribution, HI column densities (NHI), kinematics, and line widths of the gas within 50 kpc to 3 Mpc of 886 foreground galaxies. We find that the strongest absorbers within 100 kpc of galaxies have 1000 times higher NHI than typical IGM values and that the strongest absorption is found within 300 kpc and 300 km/s of galaxies. The spatial covering fraction, multiplicity, and characteristic NHI remain elevated to transverse distances of 2 Mpc while redshift anisotropies on these scales indicate coherent infall. The Doppler widths of CGM absorbers are ~50% larger than average, suggesting higher temperatures and/or increased turbulence likely caused by accretion shocks and/or galactic winds. Comparison with recent theoretical predictions reveals significant discrepancies suggesting that the current understanding of gas flows remains incomplete. Ongoing analysis of metallic CGM absorption features will provide unique insight into the metallicity and physical state of the CGM. Collectively, these measurements yield the first constraints of the co-evolution of galaxies and the IGM, the nature of baryonic flows, and the effect of star formation on both the IGM and on

  8. Cosmological N-body Simulation of Galaxy and Large-Scale Structure Formation: The Gravity Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly

    2015-04-01

    One of the first N-body simulations done almost 50 years ago had only 200 self-gravitating particles. Even this first baby step made substantial impact on understanding how astronomical objects should form. Now powerful supercomputers and new algorithms allow astronomers produce N-body simulations that employ up to a trillion dark matter particles and produce vital theoretical predictions regarding formation, evolution, structure and statistics of objects ranging from dwarf galaxies to clusters and superclusters of galaxies. With only gravity involved in these theoretical models, one would naively expect that by now we should know everything we need about N-body dynamics of cosmological fluctuations. Not the case. It appears that the Universe was not cooperative and gave us divergencies in the initial conditions generated during the Inflation epoch and subsequent expansion of the Universe - the infinite phase-space density and divergent density fluctuations. Ever increasing observational demands on statistics and accuracy of theoretical predictions is another driving force for more realistic and larger N-body simulations. Large current and new planned observational projects such as BOSS, eBOSS, Euclid, LSST will bring information on spatial distribution, motion, and properties of millions of galaxies at different redshifts. Direct simulations of evolution of gas and formation of stars for millions of forming galaxies will not be available for years leaving astronomers with the only option - to develop methods to combine large N-body simulations with models of galaxy formation to produce accurate theoretical predictions. I will discuss the current status of the field and directions of its development.

  9. Population structure and genetic diversity of moose in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer I; Hundertmark, Kris J; Bowyer, R Terry; McCracken, Kevin G

    2009-01-01

    Moose (Alces alces) are highly mobile mammals that occur across arboreal regions of North America, Europe, and Asia. Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) range across much of Alaska and are primary herbivore consumers, exerting a prominent influence on ecosystem structure and functioning. Increased knowledge gained from population genetics provides insights into their population dynamics, history, and dispersal of these unique large herbivores and can aid in conservation efforts. We examined the genetic diversity and population structure of moose (n = 141) with 8 polymorphic microsatellites from 6 regions spanning much of Alaska. Expected heterozygosity was moderate (H(E) = 0.483-0.612), and private alleles ranged from 0 to 6. Both F(ST) and R(ST) indicated significant population structure (P < 0.001) with F(ST) < 0.109 and R(ST) < 0.125. Results of analyses from STRUCTURE indicated 2 prominent population groups, a mix of moose from the Yakutat and Tetlin regions versus all other moose, with slight substructure observed among the second population. Estimates of dispersal differed between analytical approaches, indicating a high level of historical or current gene flow. Mantel tests indicated that isolation-by-distance partially explained observed structure among moose populations (R(2) = 0.45, P < 0.01). Finally, there was no evidence of bottlenecks either at the population level or overall. We conclude that weak population structure occurs among moose in Alaska with population expansion from interior Alaska westward toward the coast.

  10. Structural Diversity in the AdoMet Radical Enzyme Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Daniel P.; Vey, Jessica L.; Croft, Anna K.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2012-01-01

    AdoMet radical enzymes are involved in processes such as cofactor biosynthesis, anaerobic metabolism, and natural product biosynthesis. These enzymes utilize the reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to afford L-methionine and a transient 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical, which subsequently generates a substrate radical species. By harnessing radical reactivity, the AdoMet radical enzyme superfamily is responsible for an incredible diversity of chemical transformations. Structural analysis reveals that family members adopt a full or partial Triose-phosphate Isomerase Mutase (TIM) barrel protein fold, containing core motifs responsible for binding a catalytic [4Fe-4S] cluster and AdoMet. Here we evaluate over twenty structures of AdoMet radical enzymes and classify them into two categories: traditional and ThiC-like (named for the structure of 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate synthase (ThiC)). In light of new structural data, we reexamine the traditional structural motifs responsible for binding the [4Fe-4S] cluster and AdoMet, and compare and contrast these motifs with the ThiC case. We also review how structural data combine with biochemical, spectroscopic, and computational data to help us understand key features of this enzyme superfamily, such as the energetics, the triggering, and the molecular mechanisms of AdoMet reductive cleavage. PMID:22579873

  11. Finding faint H I structure in and around galaxies: Scraping the barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzo, D.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Roerdink, J. B. T. M.

    2016-10-01

    Soon to be operational H I survey instruments such as APERTIF and ASKAP will produce large datasets. These surveys will provide information about the H I in and around hundreds of galaxies with a typical signal-to-noise ratio of ∼10 in the inner regions and ∼1 in the outer regions. In addition, such surveys will make it possible to probe faint H I structures, typically located in the vicinity of galaxies, such as extra-planar-gas, tails and filaments. These structures are crucial for understanding galaxy evolution, particularly when they are studied in relation to the local environment. Our aim is to find optimized kernels for the discovery of faint and morphologically complex H I structures. Therefore, using H I data from a variety of galaxies, we explore state-of-the-art filtering algorithms. We show that the intensity-driven gradient filter, due to its adaptive characteristics, is the optimal choice. In fact, this filter requires only minimal tuning of the input parameters to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of faint components. In addition, it does not degrade the resolution of the high signal-to-noise component of a source. The filtering process must be fast and be embedded in an interactive visualization tool in order to support fast inspection of a large number of sources. To achieve such interactive exploration, we implemented a multi-core CPU (OpenMP) and a GPU (OpenGL) version of this filter in a 3D visualization environment (SlicerAstro).

  12. Structural basis of diverse membrane target recognitions by ankyrins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Keyu; Ye, Fei; Yu, Cong; Bennett, Vann; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-01-01

    Ankyrin adaptors together with their spectrin partners coordinate diverse ion channels and cell adhesion molecules within plasma membrane domains and thereby promote physiological activities including fast signaling in the heart and nervous system. Ankyrins specifically bind to numerous membrane targets through their 24 ankyrin repeats (ANK repeats), although the mechanism for the facile and independent evolution of these interactions has not been resolved. Here we report the structures of ANK repeats in complex with an inhibitory segment from the C-terminal regulatory domain and with a sodium channel Nav1.2 peptide, respectively, showing that the extended, extremely conserved inner groove spanning the entire ANK repeat solenoid contains multiple target binding sites capable of accommodating target proteins with very diverse sequences via combinatorial usage of these sites. These structures establish a framework for understanding the evolution of ankyrins' membrane targets, with implications for other proteins containing extended ANK repeat domains. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04353.001 PMID:25383926

  13. Structuring of Bacterioplankton Diversity in a Large Tropical Bay

    PubMed Central

    Gregoracci, Gustavo B.; Nascimento, Juliana R.; Cabral, Anderson S.; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Valentin, Jean L.; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2012-01-01

    Structuring of bacterioplanktonic populations and factors that determine the structuring of specific niche partitions have been demonstrated only for a limited number of colder water environments. In order to better understand the physical chemical and biological parameters that may influence bacterioplankton diversity and abundance, we examined their productivity, abundance and diversity in the second largest Brazilian tropical bay (Guanabara Bay, GB), as well as seawater physical chemical and biological parameters of GB. The inner bay location with higher nutrient input favored higher microbial (including vibrio) growth. Metagenomic analysis revealed a predominance of Gammaproteobacteria in this location, while GB locations with lower nutrient concentration favored Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. According to the subsystems (SEED) functional analysis, GB has a distinctive metabolic signature, comprising a higher number of sequences in the metabolism of phosphorus and aromatic compounds and a lower number of sequences in the photosynthesis subsystem. The apparent phosphorus limitation appears to influence the GB metagenomic signature of the three locations. Phosphorus is also one of the main factors determining changes in the abundance of planktonic vibrios, suggesting that nutrient limitation can be observed at community (metagenomic) and population levels (total prokaryote and vibrio counts). PMID:22363639

  14. Structural adaptations to diverse fighting styles in sexually selected weapons

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Erin L.; Tobalske, Bret W.; Emlen, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The shapes of sexually selected weapons differ widely among species, but the drivers of this diversity remain poorly understood. Existing explanations suggest weapon shapes reflect structural adaptations to different fighting styles, yet explicit tests of this hypothesis are lacking. We constructed finite element models of the horns of different rhinoceros beetle species to test whether functional specializations for increased performance under species-specific fighting styles could have contributed to the diversification of weapon form. We find that horns are both stronger and stiffer in response to species-typical fighting loads and that they perform more poorly under atypical fighting loads, which suggests weapons are structurally adapted to meet the functional demands of fighting. Our research establishes a critical link between weapon form and function, revealing one way male–male competition can drive the diversification of animal weapons. PMID:25201949

  15. A Low Cost Structurally Optimized Design for Diverse Filter Types

    PubMed Central

    Kazmi, Majida; Aziz, Arshad; Akhtar, Pervez; Ikram, Nassar

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of image processing applications deploys two dimensional (2D)-filters for performing diversified tasks such as image enhancement, edge detection, noise suppression, multi scale decomposition and compression etc. All of these tasks require multiple type of 2D-filters simultaneously to acquire the desired results. The resource hungry conventional approach is not a viable option for implementing these computationally intensive 2D-filters especially in a resource constraint environment. Thus it calls for optimized solutions. Mostly the optimization of these filters are based on exploiting structural properties. A common shortcoming of all previously reported optimized approaches is their restricted applicability only for a specific filter type. These narrow scoped solutions completely disregard the versatility attribute of advanced image processing applications and in turn offset their effectiveness while implementing a complete application. This paper presents an efficient framework which exploits the structural properties of 2D-filters for effectually reducing its computational cost along with an added advantage of versatility for supporting diverse filter types. A composite symmetric filter structure is introduced which exploits the identities of quadrant and circular T-symmetries in two distinct filter regions simultaneously. These T-symmetries effectually reduce the number of filter coefficients and consequently its multipliers count. The proposed framework at the same time empowers this composite filter structure with additional capabilities of realizing all of its Ψ-symmetry based subtypes and also its special asymmetric filters case. The two-fold optimized framework thus reduces filter computational cost up to 75% as compared to the conventional approach as well as its versatility attribute not only supports diverse filter types but also offers further cost reduction via resource sharing for sequential implementation of diversified image

  16. Superlarge-scale structure in the Durham/UKST Galaxy Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, Andrei G.; Fong, Richard; McCracken, Henry J.; Ratcliffe, Andrew; Shanks, Tom; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    2000-07-01

    Several `great walls' are clearly visible in the Durham/UKST Galaxy Redshift Survey (DURS). We make a statistical study of this superlarge-scale structure (SLSS) by applying our core sampling, cluster, inertia tensor and minimal-spanning-tree analyses to the DURS. The results in the main support similar results from the complementary Las Campañas Redshift Survey (LCRS); the DURS is a fully three-dimensional, though shallower, survey, whilst the LCRS was carried out in six thin wedges of space. Because of the one-in-three sparse sampling used for DURS, the galaxy filaments of large-scale structure (LSS) are less clear here; the mean separation of ~25h-1Mpc for the richer filaments is consistent with the LCRS result, but the poorer filaments are not seen in the DURS. In contrast, the analysis clearly picks out SLSS and we find, as with the LCRS, that ~50 per cent of the galaxies lie within the SLSS in regions with overdensities of 5-10 times the mean galaxy density. It quantitatively demonstrates that SLSS is a major component of large-scale structure in the Universe. The SLSS is also confirmed as having statistical parameters similar to those for a sheet-like object, albeit a very irregular one with a highly inhomogeneous inner structure. The `mean-free path', or average separation between SLSS structures, is found to be Ds~50h-1Mpc. The inertia tensor analysis gives mean lengths, widths and thicknesses of ~20-40, 10 and 5h-1Mpc, respectively, for the clusters of SLSS. In particular, the largest great wall in the DURS is found to have a length of ~75h-1Mpc. Unlike the LCRS, the cluster mass function for the three-dimensional DURS has a high mass `tail' such a `tail' would constitute a quantitative signature for the presence of great walls. Finally, theoretical considerations would suggest that the results support arguments for the large-scale biasing of galaxies with respect to dark matter.

  17. Structure and kinematics of polar ring galaxies: new observations and estimation of the dark halo shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A.; Khoperskov, S.; Khoperskov, A.; Smirnova, K.; Smirnova, A.; Saburova, A.; Reshetnikov, V.

    The polar ring galaxies (PRGs) represent an interesting type of peculiar systems in which the outer matter is rotating in the plane which is roughly perpendicular to the disk of the main galaxy. Despite the long-lasting study of the PRGs, the amount of observational data detailed enough is insufficient; there still remain many open questions. Among the most interesting issues, there are: estimating the flattening of dark matter halos in these systems and verifying the assumption that the most massive polar structures were formed by accretion of the matter from intergalactic filaments. The new catalog recently compiled by our team using SDSS images increased, by several times, the number of known PRGs. The current paper gives an overview of our latest results on the study of morphological and photometric structure of the PRGs. Using the stellar and ionized gas kinematics data based on spectroscopic observations with the Russian 6-m telescope, we estimate the shape of dark matter halo in individual galaxies.

  18. The structure of the interstellar medium of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2012-04-01

    We develop and implement numerical methods for including stellar feedback in galaxy-scale numerical simulations. Our models include simplified treatments of heating by Type I and Type II supernovae, gas recycling from young stars and asymptotic giant branch winds, heating from the shocked stellar winds, H II photoionization heating and radiation pressure from stellar photons. The energetics and time dependence associated with the feedback are taken directly from stellar evolution models. We implement these stellar feedback models in smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with pc-scale resolution, modelling galaxies from Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) like dwarfs and Milky Way (MW) analogues to massive z˜ 2 star-forming discs. In the absence of stellar feedback, gas cools rapidly and collapses without limit into dense sub-units, inconsistent with observations. By contrast, in all cases with feedback, the interstellar medium (ISM) quickly approaches a statistical steady state in which giant molecular clouds (GMCs) continuously form, disperse and re-form, leading to a multiphase ISM. In this paper, we quantify the properties of the ISM and GMCs in this self-regulated state. In a companion paper we study the galactic winds driven by stellar feedback. Our primary results on the structure of the ISM in star-forming galaxies include the following. 1. Star-forming galaxies generically self-regulate so that the cool, dense gas maintains Toomre's Q˜ 1. Most of the volume is occupied by relatively diffuse hot gas, while most of the mass is in dense GMC complexes created by self-gravity. The phase structure of the gas and the gas mass fraction at high densities are much more sensitive probes of the physics of stellar feedback than integrated quantities such as the Toomre Q or gas velocity dispersion. 2. Different stellar feedback mechanisms act on different spatial (and density) scales. Radiation pressure and H II gas pressure are critical for preventing runaway collapse

  19. Structures and chaos in galaxies. An interview with A. M. Fridman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhin, R. R.

    A. M. Fridman is one of the distinguished astrophysicists of the modern times. He with his colleagues has brought a fundamental contribution to the explanation of the observed structure and stability of the planetary rings. Basing on the laboratory modeling of the vortex motion Fridman with his colleagues has developed the appropriate technique and predicted giant vortexes in galaxies which were revealed in observations. These researches produce the remarkable examples of the nonlinear phenomena in astronomy: on the one hand - self-organization, on the other hand - chaotic behavior. The Lyapunov characteristics numbers are used for description of the chaotic dynamics phenomena, its positive value for a family of nearby trajectories implies that they follow an exponential divergence, testify to a local instability and chaotic behavior. Phenomena having regular and chaotic nature were discovered in a gaseous disk of the spiral galaxy NGC 3631.

  20. Linear structures in the core of the Coma cluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, J S; Fabian, A C; Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A A; Simionescu, A; Walker, S A; Werner, N

    2013-09-20

    The hot x-ray-emitting plasma in galaxy clusters is predicted to have turbulent motion, which can contribute around 10% of the cluster's central energy density. We report deep Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the Coma cluster core, showing the presence of quasi-linear high-density arms spanning 150 kiloparsecs, consisting of low-entropy material that was probably stripped from merging subclusters. Two appear to be connected with a subgroup of galaxies at a 650-kiloparsec radius that is merging into the cluster, implying coherence over several hundred million years. Such a long lifetime implies that strong isotropic turbulence and conduction are suppressed in the core, despite the unrelaxed state of the cluster. Magnetic fields are presumably responsible. The structures seen in Coma present insight into the past billion years of subcluster merger activity.

  1. The structure of the radio galaxy 3C 111 at decameter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megn, A. V.; Braude, S. Ya.; Rashkovskii, S. L.; Sharykin, N. K.; Shepelev, V. A.; Inyutin, G. A.

    1999-07-01

    Results of the first radio interferometric observations of the radio galaxy 3C 111 at decameter wavelengths are presented. The observations were obtained using the URAN-1 interferometer. A simple model for the radio-brightness distribution of this source at 25 and 20 MHz has been determined. The general properties of the best-fit three-component model at these wavelengths are similar to those observed at centimeter wavelengths; the overall maximum sizes and position angles of the structures are virtually identical. However, there are appreciable differences; in particular, the decameter angular sizes of the outer components are considerably larger, and the relative contribution of the central component (which coincides with the optical galaxy) is much less.

  2. TIGHT CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MASSIVE GALAXY STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES AND DYNAMICS: THE MASS FUNDAMENTAL PLANE WAS IN PLACE BY z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska

    2013-12-20

    The fundamental plane (FP) is an empirical relation between the size, surface brightness, and velocity dispersion of early-type galaxies. This relation has been studied extensively for early-type galaxies in the local universe to constrain galaxy formation mechanisms. The evolution of the zero point of this plane has been extended to high redshifts to study the luminosity evolution of massive galaxies, under the assumption of structural homology. In this work, we assess this assumption by replacing surface brightness with stellar mass density and present the evolution of the ''mass FP'' for massive, quiescent galaxies since z ∼ 2. By accounting for stellar populations, we thereby isolate and trace structural and dynamical evolution. Despite the observed dramatic evolution in the sizes and morphologies of massive galaxies since z ∼ 3, we find that quiescent galaxies lie on the mass FP out to z ∼ 2. In contrast with ∼1.4 dex evolution in the luminosity FP, average residuals from the z ∼ 0 mass FP are less than ∼0.15 dex since z ∼ 2. Assuming the Hyde and Bernardi mass FP slope, we find that this minimal offset scales as (1 + z){sup –0.095} {sup ±} {sup 0.043}. This result lends credence to previous studies that derived luminosity evolution from the FP. Therefore, despite their compact sizes and suggestions that massive galaxies are more disk-like at z ∼ 2, the relationship between their dynamics and structural properties are consistent with local early-type galaxies. Finally, we find no strong evidence for a tilt of the mass FP relative to the virial plane, but emphasize the need for full models including selection biases to fully investigate this issue.

  3. CONNECTING STAR FORMATION QUENCHING WITH GALAXY STRUCTURE AND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL HEATING OF COOLING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai

    2014-12-20

    Recent observations suggested that star formation quenching in galaxies is related to galaxy structure. Here we propose a new mechanism to explain the physical origin of this correlation. We assume that while quenching is maintained in quiescent galaxies by a feedback mechanism, cooling flows in the hot halo gas can still develop intermittently. We study cooling flows in a large suite of around 90 hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated galaxy group, and find that the flow development depends significantly on the gravitational potential well in the central galaxy. If the galaxy's gravity is not strong enough, cooling flows result in a central cooling catastrophe, supplying cold gas and feeding star formation to galactic bulges. When the bulge grows prominent enough, compressional heating starts to offset radiative cooling and maintains cooling flows in a long-term hot mode without producing a cooling catastrophe. Our model thus describes a self-limited growth channel for galaxy bulges and naturally explains the connection between quenching and bulge prominence. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate that M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5} is a good structural predictor of quenching. We further find that the gravity from the central supermassive black hole also affects the bimodal fate of cooling flows, and we predict a more general quenching predictor to be M{sub bh}{sup 1.6}M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5}, which may be tested in future observational studies.

  4. Strong lensing signatures of luminous structure and substructure in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Daniel; Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso; Keeton, Charles R.; Nierenberg, Anna M.

    2017-01-01

    The arrival times, positions, and fluxes of multiple images in strong lens systems can be used to infer the presence of dark subhalos in the deflector, and thus test predictions of cold dark matter models. However, gravitational lensing does not distinguish between perturbations to a smooth gravitational potential arising from baryonic and non-baryonic mass. In this work, we quantify the extent to which the stellar mass distribution of a deflector can reproduce flux ratio and astrometric anomalies typically associated with the presence of a dark matter subhalo. Using Hubble Space Telescope images of nearby galaxies, we simulate strong lens systems with real distributions of stellar mass as they would be observed at redshift zd = 0.5. We add a dark matter halo and external shear to account for the smooth dark matter field, omitting dark substructure, and use a Monte Carlo procedure to characterize the distributions of image positions, time delays, and flux ratios for a compact background source of diameter 5 pc. By convolving high-resolution images of real galaxies with a Gaussian PSF, we simulate the most detailed smooth potential one could construct given high quality data, and find scatter in flux ratios of ≈10%, which we interpret as a typical deviation from a smooth potential caused by large and small scale structure in the lensing galaxy. We demonstrate that the flux ratio anomalies arising from galaxy-scale baryonic structure can be minimized by selecting the most massive and round deflectors, and by simultaneously modeling flux ratio and astrometric data.

  5. The morphologies and magnetic field structures of six 3CR double radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L.

    1985-08-01

    Observations of the regions of low surface brightness in six 3CR double radio galaxies (3C 98, 184.1, 192, 223, 332 and 430) have been made with the Cambridge 5-km telescope. Maps of total and polarized intensity are presented, and the projected magnetic field structures have been deduced. High fractional polarization is seen in these sources, indicating that the magnetic fields are well-ordered. A qualitative model for the formation of the magnetic field structures is presented, in which pressure gradients in the extended lobes cause bulk flow of plasma and consequent large-scale shearing of the magnetic fields.

  6. STREGA@VST: Structure and Evolution of the Galaxy .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Ripepi, V.; De Martino, D.; Silvotti, R.; Capaccioli, M.; Cappellaro, E.; Cignoni, M.; Dall'Ora, M.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Iodice, E.; Ruoppo, A.; Bono, G.; Brocato, E.; Caputo, F.; Carollo, D.; Castellani, M.; Castellani, V.; Cioni, M. R.; Degli Innocenti, S.; Momany, Y.; Monelli, M.; Piotto, G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Raimondo, G.

    In this article we present the survey STREGA, that has been proposed as part of the VST GTO (VLT Survey Telescope Guarantee Time of Observation) that will be given to the INAF-OAC in exchange for the construction of the telescope (see Alcalàet al., this volume). This survey will cover an area of about 150 sq. deg., searching for the southern portion of the Fornax stream, also allowing to study the properties of Disk and Halo White Dwarfs and interacting binaries in different fields at increasing galactic latitudes and to provide an ideal database for star counts and for the comparison with Galactic model predictions. The final aim is to constrain the structure and the evolutionary properties of the Milky Way. For the Fornax Stream this proposal is coordinated with a LBT Science Verification Pilot Project (P.I.: G. Bono).

  7. Pneumococcal prophages are diverse, but not without structure or history

    PubMed Central

    Brueggemann, Angela B.; Harrold, Caroline L.; Rezaei Javan, Reza; van Tonder, Andries J.; McDonnell, Angus J.; Edwards, Ben A.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) infect many bacterial species, but little is known about the diversity of phages among the pneumococcus, a leading global pathogen. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, diversity and molecular epidemiology of prophages (phage DNA integrated within the bacterial genome) among pneumococci isolated over the past 90 years. Nearly 500 pneumococcal genomes were investigated and RNA sequencing was used to explore prophage gene expression. We revealed that every pneumococcal genome contained prophage DNA. 286 full-length/putatively full-length pneumococcal prophages were identified, of which 163 have not previously been reported. Full-length prophages clustered into four major groups and every group dated from the 1930–40 s onward. There was limited evidence for genes shared between prophage clusters. Prophages typically integrated in one of five different sites within the pneumococcal genome. 72% of prophages possessed the virulence genes pblA and/or pblB. Individual prophages and the host pneumococcal genetic lineage were strongly associated and some prophages persisted for many decades. RNA sequencing provided clear evidence of prophage gene expression. Overall, pneumococcal prophages were highly prevalent, demonstrated a structured population, possessed genes associated with virulence, and were expressed under experimental conditions. Pneumococcal prophages are likely to play a more important role in pneumococcal biology and evolution than previously recognised. PMID:28218261

  8. Landscape genetics, adaptive diversity and population structure in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Monica; Rau, Domenico; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Biagetti, Eleonora; Carboni, Andrea; Gepts, Paul; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto; Attene, Giovanna

    2016-03-01

    Here we studied the organization of genetic variation of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in its centres of domestication. We used 131 single nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate 417 wild common bean accessions and a representative sample of 160 domesticated genotypes, including Mesoamerican and Andean genotypes, for a total of 577 accessions. By analysing the genetic spatial patterns of the wild common bean, we documented the existence of several genetic groups and the occurrence of variable degrees of diversity in Mesoamerica and the Andes. Moreover, using a landscape genetics approach, we demonstrated that both demographic processes and selection for adaptation were responsible for the observed genetic structure. We showed that the study of correlations between markers and ecological variables at a continental scale can help in identifying local adaptation genes. We also located putative areas of common bean domestication in Mesoamerica, in the Oaxaca Valley, and the Andes, in southern Bolivia-northern Argentina. These observations are of paramount importance for the conservation and exploitation of the genetic diversity preserved within this species and other plant genetic resources.

  9. Pneumococcal prophages are diverse, but not without structure or history.

    PubMed

    Brueggemann, Angela B; Harrold, Caroline L; Rezaei Javan, Reza; van Tonder, Andries J; McDonnell, Angus J; Edwards, Ben A

    2017-02-20

    Bacteriophages (phages) infect many bacterial species, but little is known about the diversity of phages among the pneumococcus, a leading global pathogen. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, diversity and molecular epidemiology of prophages (phage DNA integrated within the bacterial genome) among pneumococci isolated over the past 90 years. Nearly 500 pneumococcal genomes were investigated and RNA sequencing was used to explore prophage gene expression. We revealed that every pneumococcal genome contained prophage DNA. 286 full-length/putatively full-length pneumococcal prophages were identified, of which 163 have not previously been reported. Full-length prophages clustered into four major groups and every group dated from the 1930-40 s onward. There was limited evidence for genes shared between prophage clusters. Prophages typically integrated in one of five different sites within the pneumococcal genome. 72% of prophages possessed the virulence genes pblA and/or pblB. Individual prophages and the host pneumococcal genetic lineage were strongly associated and some prophages persisted for many decades. RNA sequencing provided clear evidence of prophage gene expression. Overall, pneumococcal prophages were highly prevalent, demonstrated a structured population, possessed genes associated with virulence, and were expressed under experimental conditions. Pneumococcal prophages are likely to play a more important role in pneumococcal biology and evolution than previously recognised.

  10. Effect of structurally diverse peroxisome proliferators on rat hepatic sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    Witzmann, F; Coughtrie, M; Fultz, C; Lipscomb, J

    1996-01-05

    Exposure to perfluorocarboxylic acids, pthalate esters, and some hypolipidemic agents results in the proliferation of peroxisomes in the rodent liver. The structural diversity of these compounds suggests mechanistic diversity in their toxicity as well. To establish reliable biomarkers of peroxisome proliferation (PP) in compounds with distinct chemical toxicities, this study investigated the effect of in vivo exposure to perfluoro-n-octanoic acid, perfluoro-n-decanoic acid, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and clofibrate on two-dimensional electrophoretic protein patterns of rat hepatic sulfotransferases, ST1A1, ST1C1 and ST2A1. After exposure to peroxisome proliferative doses, both ST1A1 and ST1C1 abundance in whole liver homogenates was significantly reduced, but only as a result of perfluorocarboxylic and exposure. The well-established PPs, DEHP and clofibrate had no effect on sulfotransferase expression whatsoever. The observed down-regulation of these STs is significant with respect to their normal detoxication activities and its potential correlation to carcinogenesis warrants further study. The present investigation supports previous studies that demonstrate the unique features of perfluorocarboxylic acid toxicity, relative to classic peroxisome proliferators and endorses the continued use of 2D protein-mapping of Sts and other proteins as biomarkers of chemical toxicity.

  11. STRUCTURE IN THE 3D GALAXY DISTRIBUTION. II. VOIDS AND WATERSHEDS OF LOCAL MAXIMA AND MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D. E-mail: PGazis@sbcglobal.net

    2015-01-20

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  12. Bacterial membrane lipids: diversity in structures and pathways.

    PubMed

    Sohlenkamp, Christian; Geiger, Otto

    2016-01-01

    For many decades, Escherichia coli was the main model organism for the study of bacterial membrane lipids. The results obtained served as a blueprint for membrane lipid biochemistry, but it is clear now that there is no such thing as a typical bacterial membrane lipid composition. Different bacterial species display different membrane compositions and even the membrane composition of cells belonging to a single species is not constant, but depends on the environmental conditions to which the cells are exposed. Bacterial membranes present a large diversity of amphiphilic lipids, including the common phospholipids phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin, the less frequent phospholipids phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylinositol and a variety of other membrane lipids, such as for example ornithine lipids, glycolipids, sphingolipids or hopanoids among others. In this review, we give an overview about the membrane lipid structures known in bacteria, the different metabolic pathways involved in their formation, and the distribution of membrane lipids and metabolic pathways across taxonomical groups.

  13. Sponge derived bromotyrosines: structural diversity through natural combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Hendrik; Marmann, Andreas; Lin, Wenhan; Proksch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Sponge derived bromotyrosines are a multifaceted class of marine bioactive compounds that are important for the chemical defense of sponges but also for drug discovery programs as well as for technical applications in the field of antifouling constituents. These compounds, which are mainly accumulated by Verongid sponges, exhibit a diverse range of bioactivities including antibiotic, cytotoxic and antifouling effects. In spite of the simple biogenetic building blocks, which consist only of brominated tyrosine and tyramine units, an impressive diversity of different compounds is obtained through different linkages between these precursors and through structural modifications of the side chains and/or aromatic rings resembling strategies that are known from combinatorial chemistry. As examples for bioactive, structurally divergent bromotyrosines psammaplin A, Aplysina alkaloids featuring aerothionin, aeroplysinin-1 and the dienone, and the bastadins, including the synthetically derived hemibastadin congeners, have been selected for this review. Whereas all of these natural products are believed to be involved in the chemical defense of sponges, some of them may also be of particular relevance to drug discovery due to their interaction with specific molecular targets in eukaryotic cells. These targets involve important enzymes and receptors, such as histone deacetylases (HDAC) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), which are inhibited by psammaplin A, as well as ryanodine receptors that are targeted by bastadine type compounds. The hemibastadins such as the synthetically derived dibromohemibastadin are of particular interest due to their antifouling activity. For the latter, a phenoloxidase which catalyzes the bioglue formation needed for firm attachment of fouling organisms to a given substrate was identified as a molecular target. The Aplysina alkaloids finally provide a vivid example for dynamic wound induced bioconversions of natural products that generate highly

  14. Community structure and elevational diversity patterns of soil Acidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuguang; Cong, Jing; Lu, Hui; Li, Guangliang; Qu, Yuanyuan; Su, Xiujiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang

    2014-08-01

    Acidobacteria is one of the most dominant and abundant phyla in soil, and was believed to have a wide range of metabolic and genetic functions. Relatively little is known about its community structure and elevational diversity patterns. We selected four elevation gradients from 1000 to 2800 m with typical vegetation types of the northern slope of Shennongjia Mountain in central China. The vegetation types were evergreen broadleaved forest, deciduous broadleaved forest, coniferous forest and sub-alpine shrubs. We analyzed the soil acidobacterial community composition, elevational patterns and the relationship between Acidobacteria subdivisions and soil enzyme activities by using the 16S rRNA meta-sequencing technique and multivariate statistical analysis. The result found that 19 known subdivisions as well as an unclassified phylotype were presented in these forest sites, and Subdivision 6 has the highest number of detectable operational taxonomic units (OTUs). A significant single peak distribution pattern (P<0.05) between the OTU number and the elevation was observed. The Jaccard and Bray-Curtis index analysis showed that the soil Acidobacteria compositional similarity significantly decreased (P<0.01) with the increase in elevation distance. Mantel test analysis showed the most of the soil Acidobacteria subdivisions had the significant relationship (P<0.01) with different soil enzymes. Therefore, soil Acidobacteria may be involved in different ecosystem functions in global elemental cycles. Partial Mantel tests and CCA analysis showed that soil pH, soil temperature and plant diversity may be the key factors in shaping the soil Acidobacterial community structure.

  15. The dynamics and structure of the S0 galaxy NGC 7332

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David; Illingworth, Garth; Franx, Marijn

    1994-01-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric observations of the edge-on S0 galaxy NGC 7332 are presented. The spectra show the galaxy to possess a rapidly counter-rotating extended gas disk as detected from both (O III) 5007 A and H alpha emission. Multiple slit orientations at a variety of position angles clearly show the decoupling of the angular momenta between the stellar and gaseous components. The gas is distributed asymmetrically and displays noncircular motions indicating that it has not reached equilibrium. These observations are strong evidence in support of an accretion process having occurred in NGC 7332. Broad R and B band CCD images show the boxy isophotes that NGC 7332 has long been known to possess while offset spectra taken parallel to the major and minor axes display the cylindrical rotation common to galaxies with box-shaped bulges. The bulge of NGC 7332 is well described by an r(exp 1/4)-law on both the major and minor axes while the outer disk is exponential. The B-R color of the disk is uniform; the only indication of a trend to blue colors is a Delta(B-R(sub c))/Delta log r= -0.04 +/- 0.01 gradient seen perpendicular to the bulge and disk. There exists a 10 sec long region of nearly constant surface brightness along the major axis between the bulge and disk components. Not likely due to absorbing material, the relation of this feature to the already complicated structure of the galaxy is considered.

  16. MAPPING THE CLUMPY STRUCTURES WITHIN SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES USING LASER-GUIDE STAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Goncalves, Thiago S.; Blain, Andrew W.; Swinbank, Mark; Smail, Ian; Ivison, Rob J.; Chapman, Scott C.

    2013-04-20

    We present the first integral-field spectroscopic observations of high-redshift submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) using Laser-Guide Star Adaptive Optics. We target H{alpha} emission of three SMGs at redshifts z {approx} 1.4-2.4 with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph on Keck. The spatially resolved spectroscopy of these galaxies reveals unresolved broad-H{alpha} line regions (FWHM >1000 km s{sup -1}) likely associated with an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and regions of diffuse star formation traced by narrow-line H{alpha} emission (FWHM {approx}< 500 km s{sup -1}) dominated by multiple H{alpha}-bright stellar clumps, each contributing 1%-30% of the total clump-integrated H{alpha} emission. We find that these SMGs host high star formation rate surface densities, similar to local extreme sources, such as circumnuclear starbursts and luminous infrared galaxies. However, in contrast to these local environments, SMGs appear to be undergoing such intense activity on significantly larger spatial scales as revealed by extended H{alpha} emission over 4-16 kpc. H{alpha} kinematics show no evidence of ordered global motion as would be found in a disk, but rather large velocity offsets ({approx}few Multiplication-Sign 100 km s{sup -1}) between the distinct stellar clumps. Together with the asymmetric distribution of the stellar clumps around the AGN in these objects, it is unlikely that we are unveiling a clumpy disk structure as has been suggested in other high-redshift populations of star-forming galaxies. The SMG clumps in this sample may correspond to remnants of originally independent gas-rich systems that are in the process of merging, hence triggering the ultraluminous SMG phase.

  17. Structure and diversity in mammalian accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Meisami, E; Bhatnagar, K P

    1998-12-15

    The accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) is the first neural integrative center for the olfactory-like vomeronasal sensory system. In this article, we first briefly present an overview of vomeronasal system organization and review the history of the discovery of mammalian AOB. Next, we briefly review the evolution of the vomeronasal system in vertebrates, in particular the reptiles. Following these introductory aspects, the structure of the rodent AOB, as typical of the well-developed mammalian AOB, is presented, detailing laminar organization and cell types as well as aspects of the homology with the main olfactory bulb. Then, the evolutionary origin and diversity of the AOB in mammalian orders and species is discussed, describing structural, phylogenetic, and species-specific variation in the AOB location, shape, and size and morphologic differentiation and development. The AOB is believed to be absent in fishes but present in terrestrial tetrapods including amphibians; among the reptiles AOB is absent in crocodiles, present in turtles, snakes, and some lizards where it may be as large or larger than the main bulb. The AOB is absent in bird and in the aquatic mammals (whales, porpoises, manatees). Among other mammals, AOB is present in the monotremes and marsupials, edentates, and in the majority of the placental mammals like carnivores, herbivores, as well as rodents and lagomorphs. Most bat species do not have an AOB and among those where one is found, it shows marked variation in size and morphologic development. Among insectivores and primates, AOB shows marked variation in occurrence, size, and morphologic development. It is small in shrews and moles, large in hedgehogs and prosimians; AOB continues to persist in New World monkeys but is not found in the adults of the higher primates such as the Old World monkeys, apes, and humans. In many species where AOB is absent in the adult, it often develops in the embryo and fetus but regresses in later stages of

  18. GalaxyHomomer: a web server for protein homo-oligomer structure prediction from a monomer sequence or structure.

    PubMed

    Baek, Minkyung; Park, Taeyong; Heo, Lim; Park, Chiwook; Seok, Chaok

    2017-04-06

    Homo-oligomerization of proteins is abundant in nature, and is often intimately related with the physiological functions of proteins, such as in metabolism, signal transduction or immunity. Information on the homo-oligomer structure is therefore important to obtain a molecular-level understanding of protein functions and their regulation. Currently available web servers predict protein homo-oligomer structures either by template-based modeling using homo-oligomer templates selected from the protein structure database or by ab initio docking of monomer structures resolved by experiment or predicted by computation. The GalaxyHomomer server, freely accessible at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/homomer, carries out template-based modeling, ab initio docking or both depending on the availability of proper oligomer templates. It also incorporates recently developed model refinement methods that can consistently improve model quality. Moreover, the server provides additional options that can be chosen by the user depending on the availability of information on the monomer structure, oligomeric state and locations of unreliable/flexible loops or termini. The performance of the server was better than or comparable to that of other available methods when tested on benchmark sets and in a recent CASP performed in a blind fashion.

  19. The diversity pyramid: an organizational model to structure diversity recruitment and retention in nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Lisa; O'Rourke, Marilyn E

    2011-10-01

    The literature on increasing the diversity of individuals who enter and practice the nursing profession comes with sound argument, yet we have seen only modest gains in diversification over the past 10 years. This article addresses how to develop a sustainable program to increase the recruitment and retention of underrepresented students. The diversity pyramid is suggested as a conceptual planning model for increasing diversity that is matched to an institution and its resources. The foundation of the pyramid is an organizational commitment to attracting and retaining diverse students. The middle level addresses financial support for underrepresented students. From the top of the pyramid, one chooses appropriate media and relational tactics necessary to attract the underrepresented students a program seeks. All three elements of the pyramid-organizational commitment to diversity, significant financial support, and a targeted use of resources-play important and sequential roles in building a sustainable diversity initiative.

  20. Galaxy Assembly and the Evolution of Structure over the First Third of Cosmic Time - I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey {CANDELS}is designed to document the |*|rst third of galactic evolution from z =8 to 1.5 via deep imaging of more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IRand ACS. It will also find the first Type Ia SNe beyond z > 1.5 andestablish their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Fivepremier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected from the SpitzerExtragalactic Deep Survey {SEDS} to provide complementary IRAC imagingdata down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource for stellar masses at allredshifts. The use of |*|ve widely separated |*|elds mitigates cosmicvariance and yields statistically robust and complete samples ofgalaxies down to 10^9 solar masses out to z 8.The program merges two originally separate MCT proposals. The Faberprogram incorporates a |*|Wide|*| imaging survey in three separate fieldsto 2 orbit depth over 0.2 sq. degrees, plus a |*|Deep|*| imaging surveyto 12 orbit depth in the two GOODS regions over 0.04 sq. degrees.In combination with ultra-deep imaging from the Hubble Ultradeep Fieldprogram {GO 11563}, the result is a three-tiered strategy that ef|*|cientlysamples both bright/rare and faint/common extragalactic objects. TheFerguson program adds an extensive high-redshift Type Ia SNe search,plus ultraviolet "daytime" UVIS exposures in GOODS-N to exploit theCVZ opportunity in that field.This program, GO 12064, is part of the Wide mosaic survey, which has thefollowing field centers and sizes: Field ID RA{2000} Dec{2000} WFC3 Dim. PA on sky UDS 02 17 38 -05 12 02 4x11 270 COSMOS 10 00 31 +02 24 00 4x11 180 EGS 14 19 31 +52 54 10 3x15 41 Science highlights from the Wide program: * Underlying structural properties of galaxies as revealed by WFC3-IR images sensitive to older stars {beyond the 4000-A break} and less affected by dust than ACS. A key redshift is z 2, where star-formation peaks, QSOs are most abundant, and where restframe B-band is still accessible to WFC3. Sample questions include

  1. Cosmic Structure and Galaxy Evolution through Intensity Mapping of Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Keating, Garrett K.; Marrone, Daniel P.; YT Lee Array Team, SZA Team

    2016-01-01

    The origin and evolution of structure in the Universe is one of the major challenges of observational astronomy. How does baryonic structure trace the underlying dark matter? How have galaxies evolved to produce the present day Universe? A multi-wavelength, multi-tool approach is necessary to provide the complete story of the evolution of structure in the Universe. Intensity mapping, which relies on the ability to detect many objects at once through their integrated emission rather than direct detection of individual objects, is a critical part of this mosaic. In particular, our understanding of the molecular gas component of massive galaxies is being revolutionized by ALMA and EVLA but the population of smaller, star-forming galaxies, which provide the bulk of star formation cannot be individually probed by these instruments.In this talk, I will summarize two intensity mapping experiments to detect molecular gas through the carbon monoxide (CO) rotational transition. We have completed sensitive observations with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovic Array (SZA) telescope at a wavelength of 1 cm that are sensitive to emission at redshifts 2.3 to 3.3. The SZA experiments sets strong limits on models for the CO emission and demonstrates the ability to reject foregrounds and telescope systematics in very deep integrations. I also describe the development of an intensity mapping capability for the Y.T. Lee Array, a 13-element interferometer located on Mauna Loa. In its first phase, this project focuses on detection of CO at redshifts 2.4 - 3.0 with detection via power spectrum and cross-correlation with other surveys. The project includes a major technical upgrade, a new digital correlator and IF electronics component to be deployed in 2015/2016. The Y.T. Lee Array observations will be more sensitive and extend to larger angular scales than the SZA observations.

  2. STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF NON-SPHERICAL DARK HALOS IN MILKY WAY AND ANDROMEDA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kohei; Chiba, Masashi E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the non-spherical density structure of dark halos of the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies in the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies based on revised axisymmetric mass models from our previous work. The models we adopt here fully take into account velocity anisotropy of tracer stars confined within a flattened dark halo. Applying our models to the available kinematic data of the 12 bright dSphs, we find that these galaxies associate with, in general, elongated dark halos, even considering the effect of this velocity anisotropy of stars. We also find that the best-fit parameters, especially for the shapes of dark halos and velocity anisotropy, are susceptible to both the availability of velocity data in the outer regions and the effect of the lack of sample stars in each spatial bin. Thus, to obtain more realistic limits on dark halo structures, we require photometric and kinematic data over much larger areas in the dSphs than previously explored. The results obtained from the currently available data suggest that the shapes of dark halos in the dSphs are more elongated than those of ΛCDM subhalos. This mismatch needs to be solved by theory including baryon components and the associated feedback to dark halos as well as by further observational limits in larger areas of dSphs. It is also found that more diffuse dark halos may have undergone consecutive star formation history, thereby implying that dark-halo structure plays an important role in star formation activity.

  3. Genetic diversity of coastal bottlenose dolphins revealed by structurally and functionally diverse hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Remington, Nicole; Stevens, Robert D; Wells, Randall S; Holn, Aleta; Dhungana, Suraj; Taboy, Celine H; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Henkens, Robert; Bonaventura, Celia

    2007-08-15

    Studies of structure-function relationships in the respiratory proteins of marine mammals revealed unexpected variations in the number and types of hemoglobins (Hbs) present in coastal bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus. We obtained blood samples from free-ranging coastal bottlenose dolphins as a component of capture-release studies. We found that the oxygen-binding functions of bottlenose dolphin blood are poised between effector-saturated and unsaturated levels, enabling exercise-dependent shifts in oxygen transfer functions. Isolated bottlenose dolphin Hbs showed elevated pH sensitivities (Bohr effects) and appreciably lower oxygen affinities than adult human Hb in the absence of allosteric effectors. These properties may be an adaptive modification that enhances oxygen delivery during diving episodes when oxygen tensions and effector levels are low. The Hbs of individual dolphins showed similar oxygen affinities, responses to effectors, and expression of heme-heme interaction in oxygen binding, but differed in their redox potentials and rates of autoxidation. The heterogeneity suggested by these functional variations in Hbs of individual dolphins was born out by variations in the molecular weights and numbers of their alpha and beta globin chains. Although coastal bottlenose dolphins were expected to have a single type of Hb, the mass differences observed revealed considerable genetic diversity. There were multiple Hb forms in some individuals and differences in Hb patterns among individuals within the same community.

  4. Metabolic Effects of Berries with Structurally Diverse Anthocyanins

    PubMed Central

    Overall, John; Bonney, Sierra A.; Wilson, Mickey; Beermann, Arnold; Grace, Mary H.; Esposito, Debora; Lila, Mary Ann; Komarnytsky, Slavko

    2017-01-01

    Overconsumption of energy dense foods and sedentary lifestyle are considered as major causes of obesity-associated insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. Results from both cohort studies and randomized trials suggested that anthocyanins from berries may lower metabolic risks, however these reports are equivocal. The present study was designed to examine effects of six berries with structurally diverse anthocyanin profiles (normalized to 400 µg/g total anthocyanin content) on development of metabolic risk factors in the C57BL/6 mouse model of polygenic obesity. Diets supplemented with blackberry (mono-glycosylated cyanidins), black raspberry (acylated mono-glycosylated cyanidins), blackcurrant (mono- and di-glycosylated cyanidins and delphinidins), maqui berry (di-glycosylated delphinidins), Concord grape (acylated mono-glycosylated delphinidins and petunidins), and blueberry (mono-glycosylated delphinidins, malvidins, and petunidins) showed a prominent discrepancy between biological activities of delphinidin/malvidin-versus cyanidin-type anthocyanins that could be explained by differences in their structure and metabolism in the gut. Consumption of berries also resulted in a strong shift in the gastrointestinal bacterial communities towards obligate anaerobes that correlated with decrease in the gastrointestinal luminal oxygen and oxidative stress. Further work is needed to understand mechanisms that lead to nearly anoxic conditions in the gut lumens, including the relative contributions of host, diet and/or microbial oxidative activity, and their implication to human health. PMID:28212306

  5. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Ofelia Andrea; Sánchez-Sánchez, Odilón; Pérez-Vázquez, Arturo; Caplan, Joshua S.; Danjon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots). The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14 ± 5% (mean ± standard deviation). Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil. PMID:23844412

  6. Structurally diverse dehydroshikimate dehydratase variants participate in microbial quinate catabolism.

    PubMed

    Peek, James; Roman, Joseph; Moran, Graham R; Christendat, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Quinate and shikimate can be degraded by a number of microbes. Dehydroshikimate dehydratases (DSDs) play a central role in this process, catalyzing the conversion of 3-dehydroshikimate to protocatechuate, a common intermediate of aromatic degradation pathways. DSDs have applications in metabolic engineering for the production of valuable protocatechuate-derived molecules. Although a number of Gram-negative bacteria are known to catabolize quinate and shikimate, only limited information exists on the quinate/shikimate catabolic enzymes found in these organisms. Here, we have functionally and structurally characterized a putative DSD designated QuiC1, which is present in some pseudomonads. The QuiC1 protein is not related by sequence with previously identified DSDs from the Gram-negative genus, Acinetobacter, but instead shows limited sequence identity in its N-terminal half with fungal DSDs. Analysis of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa quiC1 gene knock-out demonstrates that it is important for growth on either quinate or shikimate. The structure of a QuiC1 enzyme from P. putida reveals that the protein is a fusion of two distinct modules: an N-terminal sugar phosphate isomerase-like domain associated with DSD activity and a novel C-terminal hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase-like domain. The results of this study highlight the considerable diversity of enzymes that participate in quinate/shikimate catabolism in different microbes.

  7. A long-term space astrophysics research program: An x-ray perspective of the components and structure of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray studies of galaxies by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and MIT are described. Activities at SAO include ROSAT PSPC x-ray data reduction and analysis pipeline; x-ray sources in nearby Sc galaxies; optical, x-ray, and radio study of ongoing galactic merger; a radio, far infrared, optical, and x-ray study of the Sc galaxy NGC247; and a multiparametric analysis of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies. Activities at MIT included continued analysis of observations with ROSAT and ASCA, and continued development of new approaches to spectral analysis with ASCA and AXAF. Also, a new method for characterizing structure in galactic clusters was developed and applied to ROSAT images of a large sample of clusters. An appendix contains preprints generated by the research.

  8. Dark energy and the structure of the Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Byrd, G. G.; Merafina, M.

    2013-05-01

    Context. We consider the Coma cluster of galaxies as a gravitationally bound physical system embedded in the perfectly uniform static dark energy background as implied by ΛCDM cosmology. Aims: We ask if the density of dark energy is high enough to affect the structure of a large and rich cluster of galaxies. Methods: We base our work on recent observational data on the Coma cluster, and apply our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy, including the zero-gravity radius RZG of the local force field as the key parameter. Results: 1) Three masses are defined that characterize the structure of a regular cluster: the matter mass MM, the dark-energy effective mass MDE (<0), and the gravitating mass MG (=MM + MDE). 2) A new matter-density profile is suggested that reproduces the observational data well for the Coma cluster in the radius range from 1.4 Mpc to 14 Mpc and takes the dark energy background into account. 3) Using this profile, we calculate upper limits for the total size of the Coma cluster, R ≤ RZG ≈ 20 Mpc, and its total matter mass, MM ≲ MM(RZG) = 6.2 × 1015 M⊙. Conclusions: The dark energy antigravity affects the structure of the Coma cluster strongly at large radii R ≳ 14 Mpc and should be considered when its total mass is derived.

  9. Beyond spheroids and discs: classifications of CANDELS galaxy structure at 1.4 < z < 2 via principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peth, Michael A.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Freeman, Peter E.; McPartland, Conor; Mortazavi, S. Alireza; Snyder, Gregory F.; Barro, Guillermo; Grogin, Norman A.; Guo, Yicheng; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Papovich, Casey; Primack, Joel R.; Simons, Raymond C.

    2016-05-01

    Important but rare and subtle processes driving galaxy morphology and star formation may be missed by traditional spiral, elliptical, irregular or Sérsic bulge/disc classifications. To overcome this limitation, we use a principal component analysis (PCA) of non-parametric morphological indicators (concentration, asymmetry, Gini coefficient, M20, multimode, intensity and deviation) measured at rest-frame B band (corresponding to HST/WFC3 F125W at 1.4 1010 M⊙) galaxy morphologies. PCA quantifies the correlations between these morphological indicators and determines the relative importance of each. The first three principal components (PCs) capture ˜75 per cent of the variance inherent to our sample. We interpret the first PC as bulge strength, the second PC as dominated by concentration and the third PC as dominated by asymmetry. Both PC1 and PC2 correlate with the visual appearance of a central bulge and predict galaxy quiescence. PC1 is a better predictor of quenching than stellar mass, as good as other structural indicators (Sérsic-n or compactness). We divide the PCA results into groups using an agglomerative hierarchical clustering method. Unlike Sérsic, this classification scheme separates compact galaxies from larger, smooth protoelliptical systems, and star-forming disc-dominated clumpy galaxies from star-forming bulge-dominated asymmetric galaxies. Distinguishing between these galaxy structural types in a quantitative manner is an important step towards understanding the connections between morphology, galaxy assembly and star formation.

  10. Isotopic diversity indices: how sensitive to food web structure?

    PubMed

    Brind'Amour, Anik; Dubois, Stanislas F

    2013-01-01

    Recently revisited, the concept of niche ecology has lead to the formalisation of functional and trophic niches using stable isotope ratios. Isotopic diversity indices (IDI) derived from a set of measures assessing the dispersion/distribution of points in the δ-space were recently suggested and increasingly used in the literature. However, three main critics emerge from the use of these IDI: 1) they fail to account for the isotopic sources overlap, 2) some indices are highly sensitive to the number of species and/or the presence of rare species, and 3) the lack of standardization prevents any spatial and temporal comparisons. Using simulations we investigated the ability of six commonly used IDI to discriminate among different trophic food web structures, with a focus on the first two critics. We tested the sensitivity of the IDI to five food web structures along a gradient of sources overlap, varying from two distinct food chains with differentiated sources to two superimposed food chains sharing two sources. For each of the food web structure we varied the number of species (from 10 to 100 species) and the type of species feeding behaviour (i.e. random or selective feeding). Values of IDI were generally larger in food webs with distinct basal sources and tended to decrease as the superimposition of the food chains increased. This was more pronounced when species displayed food preferences in comparison to food webs where species fed randomly on any prey. The number of species composing the food web also had strong effects on the metrics, including those that were supposedly less sensitive to small sample size. In all cases, computing IDI on food webs with low numbers of species always increases the uncertainty of the metrics. A threshold of ~20 species was detected above which several metrics can be safely used.

  11. THE IMPACT OF BARYON PHYSICS ON THE STRUCTURE OF HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zemp, Marcel; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2012-03-20

    We study the detailed structure of galaxies at redshifts z {>=} 2 using cosmological simulations with improved modeling of the interstellar medium and star formation. The simulations follow the formation and dissociation of molecular hydrogen and include star formation only in cold molecular gas. The molecular gas is more concentrated toward the center of galaxies than the atomic gas, and as a consequence, the resulting stellar distribution is very compact. For halos with total mass above 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, the median half-mass radius of the stellar disks is 0.8 kpc at z Almost-Equal-To 3. The vertical structure of the molecular disk is much thinner than that of the atomic neutral gas. Relative to the non-radiative run, the inner regions of the dark matter halo change shape from prolate to mildly oblate and align with the stellar disk. However, we do not find evidence for a significant fast-rotating 'dark disk' of dark matter around the stellar disk. The outer halo regions retain the orientation acquired during accretion and mergers and are significantly misaligned with the inner regions. The radial profile of the dark matter halo contracts in response to baryon dissipation, establishing an approximately isothermal profile throughout most of the halo. This effect can be accurately described by a modified model of halo contraction. The angular momentum of a fixed amount of inner dark matter is approximately conserved over time, while in the dissipationless case most of it is transferred outward during mergers. The conservation of the dark matter angular momentum provides supporting evidence for the validity of the halo contraction model in a hierarchical galaxy formation process.

  12. The Imprint of Radial Migration on the Vertical Structure of Galaxy Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera-Ciro, Carlos; D'Onghia, Elena; Navarro, Julio F.

    2016-12-01

    We use numerical simulations to examine the effects of radial migration on the vertical structure of galaxy disks. The simulations follow three exponential disks of different mass but similar circular velocity, radial scalelength, and (constant) scale height. The disks develop different non-axisymmetric patterns, ranging from feeble, long-lived multiple arms to strong, rapidly evolving few-armed spirals. These fluctuations induce radial migration through secular changes in the angular momentum of disk particles, mixing the disk radially and blurring pre-existing gradients. Migration primarily affects stars with small vertical excursions, regardless of spiral pattern. This “provenance bias” largely determines the vertical structure of migrating stars: inward migrators thin down as they move in, whereas outward migrators do not thicken up but rather preserve the disk scale height at their destination. Migrators of equal birth radius thus develop a strong scale-height gradient, not by flaring out as commonly assumed, but by thinning down as they spread inward. Similar gradients have been observed for low-[α/Fe] mono-abundance populations (MAPs) in the Galaxy, but our results argue against interpreting them as a consequence of radial migration. This is because outward migration does not lead to thickening, implying that the maximum scale height of any population should reflect its value at birth. In contrast, Galactic MAPs have scale heights that increase monotonically outward, reaching values that greatly exceed those at their presumed birth radii. Given the strong vertical bias affecting migration, a proper assessment of the importance of radial migration in the Galaxy should take carefully into account the strong radial dependence of the scale heights of the various stellar populations.

  13. An assessment of the impact of water impoundment and diversion structures on vegetation in Southern Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conn, J. S.; Mouat, D. A.; Clark, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    High-altitude color infrared photography was used to survey existing conditions, both upstream and downstream, from nineteen diversion structures in Southern Arizona to determine their effect upon vegetation health, vigor, and cover. A diversion structure is defined as a man/made feature constructed to control storm runoff. The results are used to determine the policy for future structure design.

  14. Probing small-scale structure in galaxies with strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congdon, Arthur Benjamin

    We use gravitational lensing to study the small-scale distribution of matter in galaxies. First, we examine galaxies and their dark matter halos. Roughly half of all observed four-image quasar lenses have image flux ratios that differ from the values predicted by simple lens potentials. We show that smooth departures from elliptical symmetry fail to explain anomalous radio fluxes, strengthening the case for dark matter substructure. Our results have important implications for the "missing satellites'' problem. We then consider how time delays between lensed images can be used to identify lens galaxies containing small-scale structure. We derive an analytic relation for the time delay between the close pair of images in a "fold'' lens, and perform Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the utility of time delays for probing small- scale structure in realistic lens populations. We compare our numerical predictions with systems that have measured time delays and discover two anomalous lenses. Next, we consider microlensing, where stars in the lens galaxy perturb image magnifications. This is relevant at optical wavelengths, where the size of the lensed source is comparable to the Einstein radius of a typical star. Our simulations of negative-parity images show that raising the fraction of dark matter relative to stars increases image flux variability for small sources, and decreases it for large sources. This suggests that quasar accretion disks and broad-emission-line regions may respond differently to microlensing. We also consider extended sources with a range of ellipticities, which has relevance to a population of inclined accretion disks. Depending on their orientation, more elongated sources lead to more rapid variability, which may complicate the interpretation of microlensing light curves. Finally, we consider prospects for observing strong lensing by the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, Sgr A*. Assuming a black hole on the million

  15. The Structure & Stellar Populations of Nuclear Star Clusters in Late-Type Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Daniel James

    Luminous, compact stellar systems known as nuclear clusters (NCs) are commonly found in the centers of galaxies across the entire Hubble sequence. I present an analysis of the structure and stellar populations of a sample of ten of the nearest and brightest NCs residing in late-type spiral galaxies, using images from Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 in seven bands that span the near-ultraviolet to the near-infrared in wavelength. The intrinsic shapes and sizes of the NCs, disentangled from the effects of point spread function (PSF) blurring, were measured using GALFIT. We find evidence for radial color gradients within the NCs, as well as young disk structures aligned with the host galaxy disk. In color-color diagrams spanning the near-UV through the near-IR, NCs tend to lie far from single-burst evolutionary tracks, indicating the presence of multi-age populations. I developed a Monte Carlo code to fit linear combinations of simple stellar population models to the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) of each NC and assess the uncertainties in the fit parameters. Tests on a catalog of mock SEDs demonstrate that our method gives unbiased mass age, and reddening estimates for populations with U - V colors redder than ˜ -2 mag. Stellar masses computed via SED fitting are in good agreement with previous dynamical studies. The NCs are generally dominated by an old (> 1 Gyr) population component, but are best described by temporally extended star formation histories. On average, populations with ages < 100 Myr contribute 1.8% of the total stellar mass and 10.4% of the total B-band luminosity. From spatially resolved stellar population modeling, we compute maps of stellar density and age, which reveal radial age gradients. Multi-Gaussian Expansion models of NC stellar surface density, which will be used in future dynamical studies, are presented. We report an effective surface density of 6.7 x 105 solar masses per square parsec in IC 342, the densest

  16. Detected Galaxies and Large Scale Structure in the Arecibo L-band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance Survey (ALFAZOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Patricia A.; Sanchez-Barrantes, Monica; McIntyre, Travis; Minchin, Robert F.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Butcher, Zhon; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Schneider, Stephen E.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; van Driel, Wim; Ramatsoku, Mpati; Koribalski, Baerbel; Spears, Brady

    2017-01-01

    While large, systematic redshift surveys of galaxies have been conducted for decades, lack of information behind the Milky Way (the Zone of Avoidance) contributes uncertainty to our picture of dynamics in the local universe. Controversy persists for the dipole calculated from galaxy and redshift surveys compared to the CMB. Depth in redshift space is an issue, as is incomplete sky mapping, even of supposed all sky redshifts surveys. For instance, the wide-angle 2MASS Redshift Survey retains a gap of 5-8 deg around the Galactic plane. Fortunately, there is no ZOA at 21cm, except for velocities occupied by the Galaxy. This long-wavelength spectral line passes unimpeded through dust, and is unaffected by stellar confusion. With immediate redshift determination, a 21-cm survey produces a 3-dimensional map of the distribution of obscured galaxies which contain HI. It traces large-scale structure right across the Galactic Plane, and identifies obscured mass overdensities relevant to flow-field studies.ALFAZOA is a blind HI survey for galaxies behind the Milky Way covering more than 1000 square degrees of the Arecibo sky. It proceeds in two phases: shallow (completed) and deep (ongoing). The shallow survey (rms ~5-7 mJy) mapped the region within Galactic longitude l = 30 - 75 deg, and latitude b = -10 to +10 deg, detecting several hundred galaxies to about 12,000 km/s, tracing large-scale structure across the plane. The deep survey (rms ~1 mJy), in both the inner (Galactic longitude 30 - 75 deg and latitude plus/minus 2 deg) and outer (longitude 175 - 207 deg and latitude = +1 to -2 deg) Galaxy is ongoing, with detections reaching to 18,000 km/s. Analysis of detections to date, and large-scale structure mapped, will be presented.

  17. Antimicrobial plant metabolites: structural diversity and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Radulović, N S; Blagojević, P D; Stojanović-Radić, Z Z; Stojanović, N M

    2013-01-01

    Microbial infectious diseases continue to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. It has been estimated that microbial species comprise about 60% of the Earth's biomass. This, together with the fact that their genetic, metabolic and physiological diversity is extraordinary, makes them a major threat to the health and development of populations across the world. Widespread antibiotic resistance, the emergence of new pathogens in addition to the resurgence of old ones, and the lack of effective new therapeutics exacerbate the problems. Thus, the need to discover and develop new antimicrobial agents is critical to improve mankind's future health. Plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) offer particular promise in this sense. Plant Kingdom could be considered a rich source of the most diverse structures (e.g. there are more than 12,000 known alkaloids, more than 8,000 phenolic compounds and over 25,000 different terpenoids), many of which were proven to possess strong antimicrobial properties (e.g. thymol, eurabienol, etc.). In many instances, PSMs can be easily isolated from the plant matrix, either in pure state or in the form of mixtures of chemically related compounds. What is also important is that the development of bacterial resistance toward natural plant products (that are generally regarded as eco-friendly) has been thus far documented in a very limited number of cases (e.g. for reserpine). Having all of the mentioned advantages of PSMs as potential antimicrobials in mind, a major question arises: why is it that there are still no commercially available or commonly used antibiotics of plant origin? This review tries to give a critical answer to this question by considering potential mechanisms of antimicrobial action of PSMs (inhibition of cell wall or protein synthesis, inducing leakage from the cells by tampering with the function of the membranes, interfering with intermediary metabolisms or DNA/RNA synthesis/function), as well as their

  18. Horizon Run 4 Simulation: Coupled Evolution of Galaxies and Large-Scale Structures of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhan; Park, Changbom; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Hong, Sungwook E.

    2015-08-01

    The Horizon Run 4 is a cosmological N-body simulation designed for the study of coupled evolution between galaxies and large-scale structures of the Universe, and for the test of galaxy formation models. Using 6300^3 gravitating particles in a cubic box of L_{box} = 3150 h^{-1} Mpc, we build a dense forest of halo merger trees to trace the halo merger history with a halo mass resolution scale down to M_s = 2.7 × 10^{11} h^{-1} M_⊙. We build a set of particle and halo data, which can serve as testbeds for comparison of cosmological models and gravitational theories with observations. We find that the FoF halo mass function shows a substantial deviation from the universal form with tangible redshift evolution of amplitude and shape. At higher redshifts, the amplitude of the mass function is lower, and the functional form is shifted toward larger values of ln (1/σ). We also find that the baryonic acoustic oscillation feature in the two-point correlation funct-ion of mock galaxies becomes broader with a peak position moving to smaller scales and the peak amplitude decreasing for increasing directional cosine mu compared to the linear predictions. From the halo merger trees built from halo data at 75 redshifts, we measure the half-mass epoch of halos and find that less massive halos tend to reach half of their current mass at higher redshifts. Simulation outputs including snapshot data, past lightcone space data, and halo merger data are available at http://sdss.kias.re.kr/astro/Horizon-Run4

  19. Catalogue of the morphological features in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Endoqui, M.; Díaz-García, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.

    2015-10-01

    Context. A catalogue of the features for the complete Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G), including 2352 nearby galaxies, is presented. The measurements are made using 3.6 μm images, largely tracing the old stellar population; at this wavelength the effects of dust are also minimal. The measured features are the sizes, ellipticities, and orientations of bars, rings, ringlenses, and lenses. Measured in a similar manner are also barlenses (lens-like structures embedded in the bars), which are not lenses in the usual sense, being rather the more face-on counterparts of the boxy/peanut structures in the edge-on view. In addition, pitch angles of spiral arm segments are measured for those galaxies where they can be reliably traced. More than one pitch angle may appear for a single galaxy. All measurements are made in a human-supervised manner so that attention is paid to each galaxy. Aims: We create a catalogue of morphological features in the complete S4G. Methods: We used isophotal analysis, unsharp masking, and fitting ellipses to measured structures. Results: We find that the sizes of the inner rings and lenses normalized to barlength correlate with the galaxy mass: the normalized sizes increase toward the less massive galaxies; it has been suggested that this is related to the larger dark matter content in the bar region in these systems. Bars in the low mass galaxies are also less concentrated, likely to be connected to the mass cut-off in the appearance of the nuclear rings and lenses. We also show observational evidence that barlenses indeed form part of the bar, and that a large fraction of the inner lenses in the non-barred galaxies could be former barlenses in which the thin outer bar component has dissolved. Full Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A86

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy structural parameters from 3.6um images (Kim+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Gadotti, D. A.; Sheth, K.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Lee, M. G.; Madore, B. F.; Elmegreen, B.; Knapen, J. H.; Zaritsky, D.; Ho, L. C.; Comeron, S.; Holwerda, B.; Hinz, J. L.; Munoz-Mateos, J.-C.; Cisternas, M.; Erroz-Ferrer, S.; Buta, R.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Laine, J.; Menendez-Delmestre, K.; Regan, M. W.; de Swardt, B.; Gil de Paz, A.; Seibert, M.; Mizusawa, T.

    2016-03-01

    We select our samples from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G; Sheth et al. 2010, cat. J/PASP/122/1397). We chose galaxies that had already been processed by the first three S4G pipelines (Pipelines 1, 2, and 3; Sheth et al. 2010, cat. J/PASP/122/1397) at the moment of this study (2011 November). In brief, Pipeline processes images and provides science-ready images. Pipeline 2 prepares mask images (to exclude foreground and background objects) for further analysis, and Pipeline 3 derives surface brightness profiles and total magnitudes using IRAF ellipse fits. We excluded highly inclined (b/a<0.5), significantly disturbed, very faint, or irregular galaxies. Galaxies were also discarded if their images are unsuitable for decomposition due to contamination such as a bright foreground star or significant stray light from stars in the IRAC scattering zones. Then we chose barred galaxies from all Hubble types from S0 to Sdm using the numerical Hubble types from Hyperleda (Paturel et al. 2003, cat. VII/237, VII/238). The assessment of the presence of a bar was done visually by K. Sheth, T. Kim, and B. de Swardt. Later, we also confirmed the presence of a bar by checking the mid-infrared classification (Buta et al. 2010, cat. J/ApJS/190/147; Buta et al. 2015, cat. J/ApJS/217/32). A total of 144 barred galaxies were selected that satisfy our criteria, and we list our sample in Table1 with basic information. Table2 presents the measures of structural parameters for all galaxies in the sample obtained from the 2D model fit with BUDDA (BUlge/disk Decomposition Analysis, de Souza et al., 2004ApJS..153..411D; Gadotti, 2008MNRAS.384..420G) code. (2 data files).

  1. Heterometallic europium disiloxanediolates: synthesis, structural diversity, and photoluminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Janek; Lorenz, Volker; Hrib, Cristian G; Frettlöh, Vanessa; Adlung, Matthias; Wickleder, Claudia; Hilfert, Liane; Jones, Peter G; Edelmann, Frank T

    2014-11-03

    This contribution presents a full account of a structurally diverse class of heterometallic europium disiloxanediolates. The synthetic protocol involves in situ metalation of (HO)SiPh2OSiPh2(OH) (1) with either (n)BuLi or KN(SiMe3)2 followed by treatment with EuCl3 in suitable solvents such as 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) or tetrahydrofuran (THF). Reaction of EuCl3 with 2 equiv of (LiO)SiPh2OSiPh2(OLi) in DME afforded the Eu(III) bis(disiloxanediolate) "ate" complex [{(Ph2SiO)2O}2{Li(DME)}3]EuCl2 (2), which upon attempted reduction with Zn gave the tris(disiloxanediolate) [{(Ph2SiO)2O}3{Li(DME)}3]Eu (3). Treatment of EuCl3 with (LiO)SiPh2OSiPh2(OLi) in a molar ratio of 1:2 yielded both the ate complex [{(Ph2SiO)2O}3Li{Li(THF)2}{Li(THF)}]EuCl·Li(THF)3 (4) and the LiCl-free europium(III) complex [{(Ph2SiO)2O}2{Li(THF)2}2]EuCl (5). Compound 5 was found to exhibit a brilliant red triboluminescence. When (KO)SiPh2OSiPh2(OK) was used as starting material in a 3:1 reaction with EuCl3, the Eu(III) tris(disiloxanediolate) [{(Ph2SiO)2O}3{K(DME)}3]Eu (6) was isolated. Attempted ligand transfer between 5 and (DAD(Dipp))2Ba(DME) (DAD(Dipp) = N,N'-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-1,4-diaza-1,3-butadiene) afforded the unique mixed-valent Eu(III)/Eu(II) disiloxanediolate cluster [(Ph2SiO)2O]6Eu(II)4Eu(III)2Li4O2Cl2 (7). All new complexes were structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. Photoluminescence studies were carried out for complex 5 showing an excellent color quality, due to the strong (5)D0→(7)F2 transition, but a weak antenna effect.

  2. Clonal structure and genetic diversity of three desert phreatophytes.

    PubMed

    Vonlanthen, Beatrix; Zhang, Ximing; Bruelheide, Helge

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper was to assess clone sizes of three perennial desert plant species with AFLP markers and to relate them to clonal and genetic diversity and to hydroecology. The study was carried out at the southern rim of the Taklamakan Desert, where sexual regeneration is only possible shortly after rare flooding events, resulting in rarely established cohorts with subsequent extensive vertical growth and horizontal clonal spread. In this environment, repeated seedling establishment is excluded. We expected decreasing clonal and genetic diversity with increasing clone size and increasing distance to the groundwater table and a common response pattern among all study species. Maximum sizes of Populus euphratica and Alhagi sparsifolia clones were 121 ha and 6.1 ha, respectively, while Tamarix ramosissima clones reached a maximum size of only 38 m(2). In P. euphratica and A. sparsifolia, clonal diversity declined with increasing clone size and increasing distance to the groundwater table, while genetic diversity remained unaffected. Tamarix ramosissima differed from the other species because of a much smaller clonality. Clone size and clonal diversity were found to be good proxy variables for clone age. Despite the considerable age of the clones, genetic diversity is maintained in the populations.

  3. New insights into galaxy structure from GALPHAT- I. Motivation, methodology and benchmarks for Sérsic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ilsang; Weinberg, Martin D.; Katz, Neal

    2011-06-01

    We introduce a new galaxy image decomposition tool, GALPHAT (GALaxy PHotometric ATtributes), which is a front-end application of the Bayesian Inference Engine (BIE), a parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo package, to provide full posterior probability distributions and reliable confidence intervals for all model parameters. The BIE relies on GALPHAT to compute the likelihood function. GALPHAT generates scale-free cumulative image tables for the desired model family with precise error control. Interpolation of this table yields accurate pixellated images with any centre, scale and inclination angle. GALPHAT then rotates the image by position angle using a Fourier shift theorem, yielding high-speed, accurate likelihood computation. We benchmark this approach using an ensemble of simulated Sérsic model galaxies over a wide range of observational conditions: the signal-to-noise ratio S/N, the ratio of galaxy size to the point spread function (PSF) and the image size, and errors in the assumed PSF; and a range of structural parameters: the half-light radius re and the Sérsic index n. We characterize the strength of parameter covariance in the Sérsic model, which increases with S/N and n, and the results strongly motivate the need for the full posterior probability distribution in galaxy morphology analyses and later inferences. The test results for simulated galaxies successfully demonstrate that, with a careful choice of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms and fast model image generation, GALPHAT is a powerful analysis tool for reliably inferring morphological parameters from a large ensemble of galaxies over a wide range of different observational conditions.

  4. Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchtmeier, W. K.; Richter, O. G.; Materne, J.

    1981-09-01

    The large-scale structure of the universe is dominated by clustering. Most galaxies seem to be members of pairs, groups, clusters, and superclusters. To that degree we are able to recognize a hierarchical structure of the universe. Our local group of galaxies (LG) is centred on two large spiral galaxies: the Andromeda nebula and our own galaxy. Three sr:naller galaxies - like M 33 - and at least 23 dwarf galaxies (KraanKorteweg and Tammann, 1979, Astronomische Nachrichten, 300, 181) can be found in the evironment of these two large galaxies. Neighbouring groups have comparable sizes (about 1 Mpc in extent) and comparable numbers of bright members. Small dwarf galaxies cannot at present be observed at great distances.

  5. Optical and Near Infrared studies of the photometric structure and starburst activity of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noeske, K. G.

    2003-03-01

    This thesis describes three studies of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs), focussed on the structure of the stellar components, the star-forming activity, and the environment of such galaxies, as well as the physical background of their morphological variety. The analysis of deep Near Infrared (NIR) image data of a significant sample of BCDs allows to study the evolved stellar low surface brightness (LSB) components of BCDs more precisely than previous studies at visible wavelengths. Azimuthally averaged radial surface brightness profiles (SBPs) show an exponential intensity distribution of the stellar LSB components at large galactocentric radii. This result, along with the derived exponential scale lengths which are systematically smaller than those of dwarf Irregular and dwarf Elliptical galaxies, agrees with previous optical studies. Towards smaller radii, however, the NIR data reveal an inwards-flattening of the SBPs of the stellar LSB components with respect to their outer exponential slopes in more than half of the BCDs under study. Such inwards-flattening exponential SBPs are frequent in dwarf Irregulars and dwarf Ellipticals, but were hitherto largely undiscovered in the stellar hosts of BCDs. The physical origin of such SBPs in dwarf galaxies is to date not understood. Empirical approaches to their systematization and quantitative investigation are discussed, along with the various implications of the discovery of such SBPs in many BCDs for the understanding of such galaxies. Based on the derived structural information on the stellar LSB components and the starburst components, the hypothesis is raised that below a certain threshold density of the stellar LSB component, of the order of 0.4 solar masses per cubic parsec, burst-like star formation does not occur in gas-rich dwarf galaxies. On this hypothesis, the observed relations between the structure of the stellar LSB components of BCDs and their luminosity can be reproduced, as well as the systematic

  6. The structure of the barred galaxy NGC253: target of the VISTA and VST Science Verification extragalactic mini-survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iodice, E.; VISTA Team; VST SV Team; Pompei, E.; Mieske, S.; Szeifert, T.; Ivanov, V.; Arnaboldi M.; Battaglia, G.; Bilbao, L.; Freudling, W.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hilker, M.; Hummel, W.; Melnick, J.; Misgeld, I.; Moller, P.; Neeser, M.; Nadine, N.; Nilsson, K.; Rejkuba, M.; Retzlaff, J.; Romaniello, M.; Slijkhuis, R.; Venemans, B.; Ziegler, B.; Harald, K.; Iodice E.; Greggio L.; Emerson, J.; Sutherland, W.; Irwin, M.; J., Lewis; Hodgkin, S.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Capaccioli, M.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.

    The Sculptor Galaxy NGC253 is a nearby barred Sc galaxy seen nearly edge-on and it has been the target of the Science Verification (SV) for the new ESO survey telescopes VST and VISTA: SV have been defined by teams of astronomers from ESO and the community, including the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics. On the behalf of the VISTA and VST SV Team, I will present in this paper the first results on the NGC253 structure by the new NIR VISTA and optical VST images. These data have emphasized the huge potentiality of the VISTA and VST telescopes to study the structure of galaxies with a detail and accuracy comparable to higher class telescopes, i.e. VLT and HST, with the advantage of the large Field of View (FoV): i) the high angular resolution let to detect and study the sub-structures towards the nuclear regions; ii) the large FoV let to ''correlate'' the inner features to the structure of the outer galaxy disk and to map the surface brightness and colors out to the very faint outskirts.

  7. The structure of the broad-line region in the Seyfert galaxy Markarian 590

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Bradley M.; Ali, Babar; Horne, Keith; Bertram, Ray; Lame, Nancy J.; Pogge, Richard W.; Wagner, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    We have undertaken a nine-month study of continuum and emission-line variability in the Seyfert galaxy Mrk 590 in order to determine the structure of the broad-line region. The H-beta variations are found to lag behind those of the optical continuum by about 19 days. We apply a maximum entropy method to solve for the transfer function which relates the line and continuum variability. This analysis suggests that there is a deficit of emission-line response due to gas along the line of sight to the continuum source, as in the case of NGC 5548, although these data do not allow us to reject with confidence models with significant line-of-sight response. We also show that the H-beta line variability is apparently confined to the core of the emission line, as suggested previously by Ferland, Korista, and Peterson (1990).

  8. Genetic diversity and structure in two protected Posidonia oceanica meadows.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Carla; D'Esposito, Daniela; Belmonte, Alessandro; Peirano, Andrea; Valiante, Luigi Maria; Procaccini, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Posidonia oceanica meadows growing along the west Mediterranean coastline are under continuous anthropogenic pressure. The way meadow health correlates with genetic and genotypic diversity in P. oceanica, is still under debate. Here we report a microsatellite analysis of two P. oceanica meadows living in protected areas of the Ligurian (Monterosso al Mare, MPA of "Cinque Terre") and central Tyrrhenian Sea (Santa Marinella, regional Site of Community Importance). Both meadows were recently classified as "disturbed", according to shoot density and other phenological parameters. Between the two meadows, Santa Marinella showed higher genetic diversity, while clear genetic substructure was present in both sites, reflecting high spatial heterogeneity. The present study suggests that genetic diversity does not match unequivocally with shoot density and leaf morphology and that small scale intra-meadow heterogeneity is an important factor to consider for establishing the relation between genetic/genotypic variability and health of natural seagrass meadows.

  9. Global-, local-, and intermediate-scale structures in prototype spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between galactic spiral structure and the matter in the underlying disk constitutes one of the central problems in galactic dynamics. In Bertin et al. (1989), disk matter characterized by a low-dispersive speed is shown to be capable of playing a key role in the generation of large-scale spiral structure. In Roberts et al. (1992), this self-gravitating, low-dispersion disk matter is shown to be capable of playing an essential role in the formation of structure on local and intermediate scales. Both in computed cases where large-scale spiral structure is present and in those where it is not, the same dominant physical processes and fundamental dynamical mechanisms are active on local scales. The new perception, in which large-scale and small-scale phenomena operate somewhat independently as evidenced in the computational studies, permits a range of flocculent, multiarmed, and grand design spiral types to be simulated. In particular, grand design galaxies with ragged appearances exhibiting spurs, arm branchings, and interarm bridges in addition to the major spiral arms, similar to those often observed, can be generated.

  10. THE COMPACT RADIO STRUCTURE OF RADIO-LOUD NARROW LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Minfeng; Chen Yongjun

    2010-06-15

    We present the compact radio structure of three radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies from the Very Long Baseline Array archive data at 2.3, 5, and 8.4 GHz. In RXS J16290+4007, the radio structure is mostly unresolved. The combination of compact radio structure, high brightness temperature, and inverted spectrum between simultaneous 2.3 and 8.4 GHz strongly favors jet relativistic beaming. Combined with the very long baseline interferometry data at 1.6 and 8.4 GHz from the literature, we argue that RXS J16333+4718 also may harbor a relativistic jet, with resolved core-jet structure in 5 GHz. B3 1702+457 is clearly resolved with a well-defined jet component. The overall radio steep spectrum indicates that B3 1702+457 is likely a source optically defined as NLS1 with radio definition of compact steep spectrum sources. From these three sources, we found that radio loud NLS1s can be either intrinsically radio loud (e.g., B3 1702+457) or apparently radio loud due to jet beaming effects (e.g., RXS J16290+4007 and RXS J16333+4718).

  11. The Mass, Color, and Structural Evolution of Today’s Massive Galaxies Since z ∼ 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Allison R.; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Clauwens, Bart; Schreiber, Corentin; Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Labbe, Ivo; Brammer, Gabriel; Caputi, Karina; Fynbo, Johan; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Skelton, Rosalind E.; van Dokkum, Pieter; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we use stacking analysis to trace the mass growth, color evolution, and structural evolution of present-day massive galaxies ({log}({M}* /{M}ȯ )=11.5) out to z = 5. We utilize the exceptional depth and area of the latest UltraVISTA data release, combined with the depth and unparalleled seeing of CANDELS to gather a large, mass-selected sample of galaxies in the NIR (rest-frame optical to UV). Progenitors of present-day massive galaxies are identified via an evolving cumulative number density selection, which accounts for the effects of merging to correct for the systematic biases introduced using a fixed cumulative number density selection, and find progenitors grow in stellar mass by ≈ 1.5 {dex} since z = 5. Using stacking, we analyze the structural parameters of the progenitors and find that most of the stellar mass content in the central regions was in place by z∼ 2, and while galaxies continue to assemble mass at all radii, the outskirts experience the largest fractional increase in stellar mass. However, we find evidence of significant stellar mass build-up at r< 3 {kpc} beyond z> 4 probing an era of significant mass assembly in the interiors of present-day massive galaxies. We also compare mass assembly from progenitors in this study to the EAGLE simulation and find qualitatively similar assembly with z at r< 3 {kpc}. We identify z∼ 1.5 as a distinct epoch in the evolution of massive galaxies where progenitors transitioned from growing in mass and size primarily through in situ star formation in disks to a period of efficient growth in r e consistent with the minor merger scenario.

  12. The relationship between star formation activity and galaxy structural properties in CANDELS and a semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Ryan; Pandya, Viraj; Somerville, Rachel S.; Barro, Guillermo; Bluck, Asa F. L.; Taylor, Edward N.; Wuyts, Stijn; Bell, Eric F.; Dekel, Avishai; Faber, Sandra; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Kurczynski, Peter; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Primack, Joel

    2017-02-01

    We study the correlation of galaxy structural properties with their location relative to the SFR-M* correlation, also known as the star formation `star-forming main sequence' (SFMS), in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey and Galaxy and Mass Assembly Survey and in a semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation. We first study the distribution of median Sérsic index, effective radius, star formation rate (SFR) density and stellar mass density in the SFR-M* plane. We then define a redshift-dependent main sequence and examine the medians of these quantities as a function of distance from this main sequence, both above (higher SFRs) and below (lower SFRs). Finally, we examine the distributions of distance from the main sequence in bins of these quantities. We find strong correlations between all of these galaxy structural properties and the distance from the SFMS, such that as we move from galaxies above the SFMS to those below it, we see a nearly monotonic trend towards higher median Sérsic index, smaller radius, lower SFR density, and higher stellar density. In the SAM, bulge growth is driven by mergers and disc instabilities, and is accompanied by the growth of a supermassive black hole which can regulate or quench star formation via active galactic nucleus feedback. We find that our model qualitatively reproduces the trends described above, supporting a picture in which black holes and bulges co-evolve, and active galactic nucleus feedback plays a critical role in moving galaxies off of the SFMS.

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of begomoviruses infecting sweet potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Begomoviruses infecting sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) exhibit high genetic diversity, and approximately eight species including Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) have been described from different regions around the world. In this study, the complete genomic sequences of 17 geographically dist...

  14. DISSECTING EARLY-TYPE DWARF GALAXIES INTO THEIR MULTIPLE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Lisker, T.; Peletier, R. F.; Den Brok, M.; Niemi, S.-M.; Toloba, E.; Hensler, G.

    2012-02-15

    Early-type dwarf galaxies, once believed to be simple systems, have recently been shown to exhibit an intriguing diversity in structure and stellar content. To analyze this further, we started the SMAKCED project (Stellar content, MAss and Kinematics of Cluster Early-type Dwarfs, http://www.smakced.net) and obtained deep H-band images for 101 early-type dwarf galaxies in the Virgo Cluster in a brightness range of -19 mag {<=} M{sub r} {<=} -16 mag, typically reaching a signal-to-noise ratio of 1 per pixel of {approx}0.''25 at surface brightnesses {approx}22.5 mag arcsec{sup -2} in the H band. Here we present the first results of decomposing their two-dimensional light distributions. This is the first study dedicated to early-type dwarf galaxies using the two-dimensional multi-component decomposition approach, which has been proven to be important for giant galaxies. Armed with this new technique, we find more structural components than previous studies: only a quarter of the galaxies fall into the simplest group, namely, those represented by a single Sersic function, optionally with a nucleus. Furthermore, we find a bar fraction of 18%. We also detect a similar fraction of lenses which appear as shallow structures with sharp outer edges. Galaxies with bars and lenses are found to be more concentrated toward the Virgo galaxy center than the other sample galaxies.

  15. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. III. GALAXY PHOTOMETRIC MEASUREMENTS AND THE SPATIALLY RESOLVED COLOR PROPERTIES OF EARLY- AND LATE-TYPE SATELLITES IN DIVERSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cibinel, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Miniati, F.; Pipino, A.; Cameron, E.; Peng, Y.; Rudick, C. S.; Bonoli, S.; Silverman, J. D.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Finoguenov, A.; Norberg, P. E-mail: marcella@phys.ethz.ch

    2013-11-10

    We present photometric measurements for the galaxies—and when possible their bulges and disks—in the 0.05 < z < 0.0585 groups of the Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS); these measurements include (B – I) colors, color gradients and maps, color dispersions, as well as stellar masses and star formation rates. The ZENS galaxies are classified into quenched, moderately star-forming, and strongly star-forming using a combination of spectral features and far-UV-to-optical colors; this approach optimally distinguishes quenched systems from dust-reddened star-forming galaxies. The latter contribute up to 50% to the (B – I) 'red sequence' at ∼10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}. At fixed morphological or spectral type, we find that galaxy stellar masses are largely independent of environment, and especially of halo mass. As a first utilization of our photometric database, we study, at fixed stellar mass and Hubble type, how (B – I) colors, color gradients, and color dispersion of disk satellites depend on group mass M{sub GROUP}, group-centric distance R/R{sub 200}, and large-scale structure overdensity δ{sub LSS}. The strongest environmental trend is found for disk-dominated satellites with M{sub GROUP} and R/R{sub 200}. At M ∼< 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, disk-dominated satellites are redder in the inner regions of the groups than in the outer parts. At M ∼> 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, these satellites have shallower color gradients in higher mass groups and in the cores of groups compared with lower mass groups and the outskirts of groups. Stellar population analyses and semi-analytic models suggest that disk-dominated satellites undergo quenching of star formation in their outer disks, on timescales τ{sub quench} ∼ 2 Gyr, as they progressively move inside the group potential.

  16. Structural parameters and blue stragglers in Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Jílková, Lucie; Carraro, Giovanni; Catelan, Márcio; Amigo, Pía.

    2012-04-01

    We present BV photometry of four Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy globular clusters: Arp 2, NGC 5634, Palomar 12 and Terzan 8, obtained with the Danish Telescope at ESO La Silla. We measure the structural parameters of the clusters using a King profile fitting, obtaining the first reliable measurements of the tidal radius of Arp 2 and Terzan 8. These two clusters are remarkably extended and with low concentrations; with a concentration of only c= 0.41 ± 0.02, Terzan 8 is less concentrated than any cluster in our Galaxy. Blue stragglers are identified in the four clusters, and their spatial distribution is compared to those of horizontal branch and red giant branch stars. The blue straggler properties do not provide evidence of mass segregation in Terzan 8, while Arp 2 probably shares the same status, although with less confidence. In the case of NGC 5634 and Palomar 12, blue stragglers are significantly less populous, and their analysis suggests that the two clusters have probably undergone mass segregation. References: (1) Peterson (1976); (2) Kron, Hewitt & Wasserman (1984); (3) Chernoff & Djorgovski (1989); (4) Trager, Djorgovski & King (1993); (5) Trager et al. (1995); (6) Rosenberg et al. (1998); (7) Mackey & Gilmore (2003b); (8) McLaughlin & van der Marel (2005) and (9) Carballo-Bello et al. (2012).

  17. EVIDENCE OF QUASI-LINEAR SUPER-STRUCTURES IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND AND GALAXY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kaiki Taro; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Kenji

    2010-11-20

    Recent measurements of hot and cold spots on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky suggest the presence of super-structures on (>100 h {sup -1} Mpc) scales. We develop a new formalism to estimate the expected amplitude of temperature fluctuations due to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect from prominent quasi-linear structures. Applying the developed tools to the observed ISW signals from voids and clusters in catalogs of galaxies at redshifts z < 1, we find that they indeed imply a presence of quasi-linear super-structures with a comoving radius of 100 {approx} 300 h {sup -1} Mpc and a density contrast |{delta}| {approx} O(0.1). We also find that the observed ISW signals are at odds with the concordant {Lambda} cold dark matter model that predicts Gaussian primordial perturbations at {approx}>3{sigma} level. We confirm that the mean temperature around the CMB cold spot in the southern Galactic hemisphere filtered by a compensating top-hat filter deviates from the mean value at {approx}3{sigma} level, implying that a quasi-linear supervoid or an underdensity region surrounded by a massive wall may reside at low redshifts z < 0.3 and the actual angular size (16{sup 0}-17{sup 0}) may be larger than the apparent size (4{sup 0}-10{sup 0}) discussed in literature. Possible solutions are briefly discussed.

  18. STRUCTURE IN THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL GALAXY DISTRIBUTION. I. METHODS AND EXAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D. E-mail: PGazis@sbcglobal.net

    2011-01-20

    Three methods for detecting and characterizing structure in point data, such as that generated by redshift surveys, are described: classification using self-organizing maps, segmentation using Bayesian blocks, and density estimation using adaptive kernels. The first two methods are new, and allow detection and characterization of structures of arbitrary shape and at a wide range of spatial scales. These methods should elucidate not only clusters, but also the more distributed, wide-ranging filaments and sheets, and further allow the possibility of detecting and characterizing an even broader class of shapes. The methods are demonstrated and compared in application to three data sets: a carefully selected volume-limited sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey redshift data, a similarly selected sample from the Millennium Simulation, and a set of points independently drawn from a uniform probability distribution-a so-called Poisson distribution. We demonstrate a few of the many ways in which these methods elucidate large-scale structure in the distribution of galaxies in the nearby universe.

  19. Formation of S0 galaxies through mergers. Bulge-disc structural coupling resulting from major mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querejeta, M.; Eliche-Moral, M. C.; Tapia, T.; Borlaff, A.; Rodríguez-Pérez, C.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observations reveal a strong structural coupling between bulge and disc in S0 galaxies, which seems difficult to explain if they have formed from supposedly catastrophic events such as major mergers. Aims: We face this question by quantifying the bulge-disc coupling in dissipative simulations of major and minor mergers that result in realistic S0s. Methods: We have studied the dissipative N-body binary merger simulations from the GalMer database that give rise to realistic, relaxed E/S0 and S0 remnants (67 major and 29 minor mergers). We simulate surface brightness profiles of these S0-like remnants in the K band, mimicking typical observational conditions, to perform bulge-disc decompositions analogous to those carried out in real S0s. Additional components have been included when needed. The global bulge-disc structure of these remnants has been compared with real data. Results: The S0-like remnants distribute in the B/T - re - hd parameter space consistently with real bright S0s, where B/T is the bulge-to-total luminosity ratio, re is the bulge effective radius, and hd is the disc scalelength. Major mergers can rebuild a bulge-disc coupling in the remnants after having destroyed the structures of the progenitors, whereas minor mergers directly preserve them. Remnants exhibit B/T and re/hd spanning a wide range of values, and their distribution is consistent with observations. Many remnants have bulge Sérsic indices ranging 1 structures in less than ~3 Gyr. The bulge-disc coupling and the presence of pseudobulges in real S0s cannot be used as an argument against the possible major-merger origin of these galaxies. Table 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. THE RELATION BETWEEN GALAXY STRUCTURE AND SPECTRAL TYPE: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE BUILDUP OF THE QUIESCENT GALAXY POPULATION AT 0.5 < z < 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Michael; Kriek, Mariska; Wel, Arjen van der; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2016-02-01

    We present the relation between galaxy structure and spectral type, using a K-selected galaxy sample at 0.5 < z < 2.0. Based on similarities between the UV-to-NIR spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we classify galaxies into 32 spectral types. The different types span a wide range in evolutionary phases, and thus—in combination with available CANDELS/F160W imaging—are ideal to study the structural evolution of galaxies. Effective radii (R{sub e}) and Sérsic parameters (n) have been measured for 572 individual galaxies, and for each type, we determine R{sub e} at fixed stellar mass by correcting for the mass-size relation. We use the rest-frame U − V versus V − J diagram to investigate evolutionary trends. When moving into the direction perpendicular to the star-forming sequence, in which we see the Hα equivalent width and the specific star formation rate (sSFR) decrease, we find a decrease in R{sub e} and an increase in n. On the quiescent sequence we find an opposite trend, with older redder galaxies being larger. When splitting the sample into redshift bins, we find that young post-starburst galaxies are most prevalent at z > 1.5 and significantly smaller than all other galaxy types at the same redshift. This result suggests that the suppression of star formation may be associated with significant structural evolution at z > 1.5. At z < 1, galaxy types with intermediate sSFRs (10{sup −11.5}–10{sup −10.5} yr{sup −1}) do not have post-starburst SED shapes. These galaxies have similar sizes as older quiescent galaxies, implying that they can passively evolve onto the quiescent sequence, without increasing the average size of the quiescent galaxy population.

  1. Galaxy morphologies in the era of big-data surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas-Company, M.

    Galaxy morphology is a first-order descriptor of a galaxy and a useful proxy to identify physical processes. The 100 years old Hubble fork describes the structural diversity of galaxies in the local universe. Unveiling the origins of this galaxy zoology is a key challenge in galaxy evolution. In this review talk, I first summarized some key advances in our understanding of the morphological evolution of galaxies from z ~ 0 to z ~ 3, thank you in particular to the SDSS and HST legacies. In the second part, I focused on the classification techniques. With the emergence in the last years of large surveys the samples of study have increased by several orders of magnitude going from a few tens to several millions of objects. This trend will clearly continue in the next decade with coming surveys/missions such as EUCLID and WFIRST. While galaxy classification is still a required step in any survey, visual inspection of galaxies is becoming prohibitively time-consuming. Under these circumstances, the techniques used to estimate galaxy morphologies need to be updated.

  2. The Structure and Dynamics of Massive Early-Type Galaxies: On Homology, Isothermality, and Isotropy Inside One Effective Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, L. V. E.; Bolton, A.; Treu, T.; Czoske, O.; Auger, M. W.; Barnabè, M.; Vegetti, S.; Gavazzi, R.; Moustakas, L. A.; Burles, S.

    2009-09-01

    Based on 58 SLACS strong-lens early-type galaxies (ETGs) with direct total-mass and stellar-velocity dispersion measurements, we find that inside one effective radius massive elliptical galaxies with M eff gsim 3 × 1010 M sun are well approximated by a power-law ellipsoid, with an average logarithmic density slope of langγ'LDrang ≡ -dlog(ρtot)/dlog(r) = 2.085+0.025 -0.018 (random error on mean) for isotropic orbits with β r = 0, ±0.1 (syst.) and σ_{γ'} ≲ 0.20^{+0.04}_{-0.02} intrinsic scatter (all errors indicate the 68% CL). We find no correlation of γ'LD with galaxy mass (M eff), rescaled radius (i.e., R einst/R eff) or redshift, despite intrinsic differences in density-slope between galaxies. Based on scaling relations, the average logarithmic density slope can be derived in an alternative manner, fully independent from dynamics, yielding langγ'SRrang = 1.959 ± 0.077. Agreement between the two values is reached for langβ r rang = 0.45 ± 0.25, consistent with mild radial anisotropy. This agreement supports the robustness of our results, despite the increase in mass-to-light ratio with total galaxy mass: M eff vprop L 1.363±0.056 V,eff. We conclude that massive ETGs are structurally close to homologous with close to isothermal total density profiles (lsim10% intrinsic scatter) and have at most some mild radial anisotropy. Our results provide new observational limits on galaxy formation and evolution scenarios, covering 4 Gyr look-back time.

  3. Structural and Photometric Properties of the Andromeda Satellite Dwarf Galaxy Lacerta I from Deep Imaging with WIYN PODI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Crnojević, Denija; Sand, David J.; Janowiecki, Steven; Young, Michael D.; Spekkens, Kristine

    2017-02-01

    We present results from WIYN pODI imaging of Lacerta I (And XXXI), a satellite dwarf galaxy discovered in the outskirts of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) in Pan-STARRS1 survey data. Our deep, wide-field g,i photometry reaches ∼3 mag fainter than the photometry in the Pan-STARRS1 discovery paper and allows us to trace the stellar population of Lac I beyond two half-light radii from the galaxy center. We measure a Tip of the Red Giant Branch distance for Lac I of {(m-M)}0=24.44+/- 0.11 mag (773 ± 40 kpc, or 264 ± 6 kpc from M31), which is consistent with the Pan-STARRS1 distance. We use a maximum-likelihood technique to derive structural properties for the galaxy, and find a half-light radius (r h ) of 3.24 ± 0.21 arcmin (728 ± 47 pc), ellipticity (ε ) of 0.44 ± 0.03, total magnitude M V = ‑11.4 ± 0.3, and central surface brightness {μ }V,0=24.8+/- 0.3 mag arcsec‑2. We find no H i emission in archival data and set a limit on Lac I’s neutral gas mass-to-light ratio of {M}{{H}{{I}}}/{L}V < 0.06 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ , confirming Lac I as a gas-poor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Photometric metallicities derived from Red Giant Branch stars within 2 r h yield a median [Fe/H] of ‑1.68 ± 0.03, which is more metal-rich than the spectroscopically derived value from Martin et al. Combining our measured magnitude with this higher metallicity estimate places Lac I closer to its expected position on the luminosity–metallicity relation for dwarf galaxies.

  4. "No. 182. Grand Valley Diversion Dam. June, 1917. R.B.D." Structures ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "No. 182. Grand Valley Diversion Dam. June, 1917. R.B.D." Structures on the west side of the river below the dam are three bunkhouses, a mess hall, hospital, doctor's residence, engineer's residence, and outbuildings." - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  5. Genetic diversity and population structure of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic diversity of cowpea was analyzed and the population structure was estimated in a diverse set of 768 cultivated cowpea genotypes from USDA GRIN cowpea collection, originally collected from 56 countries worldwide. Genotyping by sequencing was used to discover single nucleotide polymorphism...

  6. Origins of structural diversity within sequentially identical hexapeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, B. I.; Presnell, S. R.; Cohen, F. E.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts to predict protein secondary structure have been hampered by the apparent structural plasticity of local amino acid sequences. Kabsch and Sander (1984, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 1075-1078) articulated this problem by demonstrating that identical pentapeptide sequences can adopt distinct structures in different proteins. With the increased size of the protein structure database and the availability of new methods to characterize structural environments, we revisit this observation of structural plasticity. Within a set of proteins with less than 50% sequence identity, 59 pairs of identical hexapeptide sequences were identified. These local structures were compared and their surrounding structural environments examined. Within a protein structural class (alpha/alpha, beta/beta, alpha/beta, alpha + beta), the structural similarity of sequentially identical hexapeptides usually is preserved. This study finds eight pairs of identical hexapeptide sequences that adopt beta-strand structure in one protein and alpha-helical structure in the other. In none of the eight cases do the members of these sequences pairs come from proteins within the same folding class. These results have implications for class dependent secondary structure prediction algorithms. PMID:8298461

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of cottons (Gossypium spp.) of the New World assessed by SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A global analysis of cotton (Gossypium spp.) genetic diversity is the first step to understand its geographical distribution, dissemination, genetic relatedness, and population structure. To assess the genetic diversity and population structure in Gossypium species, 111 cotton accessions representin...

  8. The structure of early-type galaxies from the ACS Virgo and Fornax cluster surveys: cores, nuclei and supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    The core structure of early-type galaxies is revisited in light of recent results from the ACS Virgo and Fornax Cluster Surveys. These surveys are comprised of HST/ACS g, z band images for a representative sample of 143 early-type galaxies, spanning a factor 720 in B-band luminosity. The data indicates a clear transition in the core structure going from the brightest to the faintest galaxies. In contrast to previous claims, however, this transition is found to be a continuous function of galaxy magnitude. We characterize the core structure in terms of deviations of the observed surface brightness profile measured within ~ 2% of the galaxy effective radius relative to the inner extrapolation of the Sérsic law that best fits the profiles on larger scales. Virtually all galaxies fainter than MB ~ -20 mag contain distinct stellar nuclei, and are described by surface brightness profiles that lie above the Sérsic extrapolation, while the reverse is true for brighter galaxies. The latter are also known to host supermassive black holes. A relation between SBHs and stellar nuclei is suggested by the fact that both types of “central massive objects” contain the same fraction, 0.2% of the total mass of the host galaxy.

  9. Surveying Galaxy Proto-clusters in Emission: A Large-scale Structure at z = 2.44 and the Outlook for HETDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Overzier, Roderik A.; Gebhardt, Karl; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Chiang, Chi-Ting; Hill, Gary J.; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Drory, Niv; Chonis, Taylor S.; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Hagen, Alex; Schneider, Donald P.; Jogee, Shardha; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl

    2015-07-01

    Galaxy proto-clusters at z≳ 2 provide a direct probe of the rapid mass assembly and galaxy growth of present-day massive clusters. Because of the need for precise galaxy redshifts for density mapping and the prevalence of star formation before quenching, nearly all the proto-clusters known to date were confirmed by spectroscopy of galaxies with strong emission lines. Therefore, large emission-line galaxy surveys provide an efficient way to identify proto-clusters directly. Here we report the discovery of a large-scale structure at z = 2.44 in the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) Pilot Survey. On a scale of a few tens of Mpc comoving, this structure shows a complex overdensity of Lyα emitters (LAE), which coincides with broadband selected galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA photometric and zCOSMOS spectroscopic catalogs, as well as overdensities of intergalactic gas revealed in the Lyα absorption maps of Lee et al. We construct mock LAE catalogs to predict the cosmic evolution of this structure. We find that such an overdensity should have already broken away from the Hubble flow, and part of the structure will collapse to form a galaxy cluster with {10}14.5+/- 0.4 {M}⊙ by z = 0. The structure contains a higher median stellar mass of broadband selected galaxies, a boost of extended Lyα nebulae, and a marginal excess of active galactic nuclei relative to the field, supporting a scenario of accelerated galaxy evolution in cluster progenitors. Based on the correlation between galaxy overdensity and the z = 0 descendant halo mass calibrated in the simulation, we predict that several hundred 1.9\\lt z\\lt 3.5 proto-clusters with z = 0 mass of \\gt {10}14.5 {M}⊙ will be discovered in the 8.5 Gpc3 of space surveyed by the HETDEX.

  10. WAXS studies of the structural diversity of hemoglobin in solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, L.; Bardhan, J.; Gore, D.; Lal, J.; Mandava, S.; Park, S.; Rodi, D. J.; Ho, N. T.; Ho, C.; Fischetti, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    Specific ligation states of hemoglobin are, when crystallized, capable of taking on multiple quaternary structures. The relationship between these structures, captured in crystal lattices, and hemoglobin structure in solution remains uncertain. Wide-angle X-ray solution scattering (WAXS) is a sensitive probe of protein structure in solution that can distinguish among similar structures and has the potential to contribute to these issues. We used WAXS to assess the relationships among the structures of human and bovine hemoglobins in different liganded forms in solution. WAXS data readily distinguished among the various forms of hemoglobins. WAXS patterns confirm some of the relationships among hemoglobin structures that have been defined through crystallography and NMR and extend others. For instance, methemoglobin A in solution is, as expected, nearly indistinguishable from HbCO A. Interestingly, for bovine hemoglobin, the differences between deoxy-Hb, methemoglobin and HbCO are smaller than the corresponding differences in human hemoglobin. WAXS data were also used to assess the spatial extent of structural fluctuations of various hemoglobins in solution. Dynamics has been implicated in allosteric control of hemoglobin, and increased dynamics has been associated with lowered oxygen affinity. Consistent with that notion, WAXS patterns indicate that deoxy-Hb A exhibits substantially larger structural fluctuations than HbCO A. Comparisons between the observed WAXS patterns and those predicted on the basis of atomic coordinate sets suggest that the structures of Hb in different liganded forms exhibit clear differences from known crystal structure.

  11. Star Formation Quenching in High-redshift Large-scale Structure: Post-starburst Galaxies in the Cl 1604 Supercluster at z ~ 0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Gal, Roy R.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lubin, Lori M.; Rumbaugh, Nicholas; Squires, Gordon K.

    2014-09-01

    The Cl 1604 supercluster at z ~ 0.9 is one of the most extensively studied high-redshift large-scale structures, with more than 500 spectroscopically confirmed members. It consists of eight clusters and groups, with members numbering from a dozen to nearly a hundred, providing a broad range of environments for investigating the large-scale environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Here we examine the properties of 48 post-starburst galaxies in Cl 1604, comparing them to other galaxy populations in the same supercluster. Incorporating photometry from ground-based optical and near-infrared imaging, along with Spitzer mid-infrared observations, we derive stellar masses for all Cl 1604 members. The colors and stellar masses of the K+A galaxies support the idea that they are progenitors of red sequence galaxies. Their morphologies, residual star formation rates, and spatial distributions suggest that galaxy mergers may be the principal mechanism producing post-starburst galaxies. Interaction between galaxies and the dense intracluster medium (ICM) is also effective, but only in the cores of dynamically evolved clusters. The prevalence of post-starburst galaxies in clusters correlates with the dynamical state of the host cluster, as both galaxy mergers and the dense ICM produce post-starburst galaxies. We also investigate the incompleteness and contamination of K+A samples selected by means of Hδ and [O II] equivalent widths. K+A samples may be up to ~50% incomplete due to the presence of LINERs/Seyferts, and up to ~30% of K+A galaxies could have substantial star formation activity.

  12. Star formation quenching in high-redshift large-scale structure: post-starburst galaxies in the Cl 1604 supercluster at z ∼ 0.9

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Po-Feng; Gal, Roy R.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lubin, Lori M.; Rumbaugh, Nicholas; Squires, Gordon K.

    2014-09-01

    The Cl 1604 supercluster at z ∼ 0.9 is one of the most extensively studied high-redshift large-scale structures, with more than 500 spectroscopically confirmed members. It consists of eight clusters and groups, with members numbering from a dozen to nearly a hundred, providing a broad range of environments for investigating the large-scale environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Here we examine the properties of 48 post-starburst galaxies in Cl 1604, comparing them to other galaxy populations in the same supercluster. Incorporating photometry from ground-based optical and near-infrared imaging, along with Spitzer mid-infrared observations, we derive stellar masses for all Cl 1604 members. The colors and stellar masses of the K+A galaxies support the idea that they are progenitors of red sequence galaxies. Their morphologies, residual star formation rates, and spatial distributions suggest that galaxy mergers may be the principal mechanism producing post-starburst galaxies. Interaction between galaxies and the dense intracluster medium (ICM) is also effective, but only in the cores of dynamically evolved clusters. The prevalence of post-starburst galaxies in clusters correlates with the dynamical state of the host cluster, as both galaxy mergers and the dense ICM produce post-starburst galaxies. We also investigate the incompleteness and contamination of K+A samples selected by means of Hδ and [O II] equivalent widths. K+A samples may be up to ∼50% incomplete due to the presence of LINERs/Seyferts, and up to ∼30% of K+A galaxies could have substantial star formation activity.

  13. Structure Analysis Uncovers a Highly Diverse but Structurally Conserved Effector Family in Phytopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Jérome; Fournier, Elisabeth; Kroj, Thomas; Padilla, André

    2015-01-01

    Phytopathogenic ascomycete fungi possess huge effector repertoires that are dominated by hundreds of sequence-unrelated small secreted proteins. The molecular function of these effectors and the evolutionary mechanisms that generate this tremendous number of singleton genes are largely unknown. To get a deeper understanding of fungal effectors, we determined by NMR spectroscopy the 3-dimensional structures of the Magnaporthe oryzae effectors AVR1-CO39 and AVR-Pia. Despite a lack of sequence similarity, both proteins have very similar 6 β-sandwich structures that are stabilized in both cases by a disulfide bridge between 2 conserved cysteins located in similar positions of the proteins. Structural similarity searches revealed that AvrPiz-t, another effector from M. oryzae, and ToxB, an effector of the wheat tan spot pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis have the same structures suggesting the existence of a family of sequence-unrelated but structurally conserved fungal effectors that we named MAX-effectors (Magnaporthe Avrs and ToxB like). Structure-informed pattern searches strengthened this hypothesis by identifying MAX-effector candidates in a broad range of ascomycete phytopathogens. Strong expansion of the MAX-effector family was detected in M. oryzae and M. grisea where they seem to be particularly important since they account for 5–10% of the effector repertoire and 50% of the cloned avirulence effectors. Expression analysis indicated that the majority of M. oryzae MAX-effectors are expressed specifically during early infection suggesting important functions during biotrophic host colonization. We hypothesize that the scenario observed for MAX-effectors can serve as a paradigm for ascomycete effector diversity and that the enormous number of sequence-unrelated ascomycete effectors may in fact belong to a restricted set of structurally conserved effector families. PMID:26506000

  14. Microsatellite diversity and genetic structure among common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces in Brazil, a secondary center of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Burle, Marília Lobo; Fonseca, Jaime Roberto; Kami, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Brazil is the largest producer and consumer of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), which is the most important source of human dietary protein in that country. This study assessed the genetic diversity and the structure of a sample of 279 geo-referenced common bean landraces from Brazil, using molecular markers. Sixty-seven microsatellite markers spread over the 11 linkage groups of the common bean genome, as well as Phaseolin, PvTFL1y, APA and four SCAR markers were used. As expected, the sample showed lower genetic diversity compared to the diversity in the primary center of diversification. Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools were both present but the latter gene pool was four times more frequent than the former. The two gene pools could be clearly distinguished; limited admixture was observed between these groups. The Mesoamerican group consisted of two sub-populations, with a high level of admixture between them leading to a large proportion of stabilized hybrids not observed in the centers of domestication. Thus, Brazil can be considered a secondary center of diversification of common bean. A high degree of genome-wide multilocus associations even among unlinked loci was observed, confirming the high level of structure in the sample and suggesting that association mapping should be conducted in separate Andean and Mesoamerican Brazilian samples. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1350-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20502861

  15. Relationships between adaptive and neutral genetic diversity and ecological structure and functioning: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of intraspecific genetic diversity on the structure and functioning of ecological communities is a fundamentally important part of evolutionary ecology and may also have conservation relevance in identifying the situations in which genetic diversity coincides with species-level diversity.Early studies within this field documented positive relationships between genetic diversity and ecological structure, but recent studies have challenged these findings. Conceptual synthesis has been hampered because studies have used different measures of intraspecific variation (phenotypically adaptive vs. neutral) and have considered different measures of ecological structure in different ecological and spatial contexts. The aim of this study is to strengthen conceptual understanding by providing an empirical synthesis quantifying the relationship between genetic diversity and ecological structure.Here, I present a meta-analysis of the relationship between genetic diversity within plant populations and the structure and functioning of associated ecological communities (including 423 effect sizes from 70 studies). I used Bayesian meta-analyses to examine (i) the strength and direction of this relationship, (ii) the extent to which phenotypically adaptive and neutral (molecular) measures of diversity differ in their association with ecological structure and (iii) variation in outcomes among different measures of ecological structure and in different ecological contexts.Effect sizes measuring the relationship between adaptive diversity (genotypic richness) and both community- and ecosystem-level ecological responses were small, but significantly positive. These associations were supported by genetic effects on species richness and productivity, respectively.There was no overall association between neutral genetic diversity and measures of ecological structure, but a positive correlation was observed under a limited set of demographic conditions. These

  16. Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in hierarchically structured populations.

    PubMed

    Song, Seongho; Dey, Dipak K; Holsinger, Kent E

    2011-08-01

    Microsatellite loci are widely used for investigating patterns of genetic variation within and among populations. Those patterns are in turn determined by population sizes, migration rates, and mutation rates. We provide exact expressions for the first two moments of the allele frequency distribution in a stochastic model appropriate for studying microsatellite evolution with migration, mutation, and drift under the assumption that the range of allele sizes is bounded. Using these results, we study the behavior of several measures related to Wright's F(ST), including Slatkin's R(ST). Our analytical approximations for F(ST) and R(ST) show that familiar relationships between N(e)m and F(ST) or R(ST) hold when the migration and mutation rates are small. Using the exact expressions for F(ST) and R(ST), our numerical results show that, when the migration and mutation rates are large, these relationships no longer hold. Our numerical results also show that the diversity measures most closely related to F(ST) depend on mutation rates, mutational models (stepwise versus two-phase), migration rates, and population sizes. Surprisingly, R(ST) is relatively insensitive to the mutation rates and mutational models. The differing behaviors of R(ST) and F(ST) suggest that properties of the among-population distribution of allele frequencies may allow the roles of mutation and migration in producing patterns of diversity to be distinguished, a topic of continuing investigation.

  17. Quantifying the (X/peanut)-shaped structure in edge-on disc galaxies: length, strength, and nested peanuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambur, Bogdan C.; Graham, Alister W.

    2016-06-01

    X-shaped or peanut-shaped (X/P) bulges are observed in more than 40 per cent of (nearly) edge-on disc galaxies, though to date a robust method to quantify them is lacking. Using Fourier harmonics to describe the deviation of galaxy isophotes from ellipses, we demonstrate with a sample of 11 such galaxies (including NGC 128) that the sixth Fourier component (B6) carries physical meaning by tracing this X/P structure. We introduce five quantitative diagnostics based on the radial B6 profile, namely: its `peak' amplitude (Πmax); the (projected major-axis) `length' where this peak occurs (RΠ, max); its vertical `height' above the disc plane (zΠ, max); a measure of the B6 profile's integrated `strength' (SΠ); and the B6 peak `width' (WΠ). We also introduce different `classes' of B6 profile shape. Furthermore, we convincingly detect and measure the properties of multiple (nested) X/P structures in individual galaxies which additionally display the signatures of multiple bars in their surface brightness profiles, thus consolidating further the scenario in which peanuts are associated with bars. We reveal that the peanut parameter space (`length', `strength' and `height') for real galaxies is not randomly populated, but the three metrics are inter-correlated (both in kpc and disc scalelength h). Additionally, the X/P `length' and `strength' appear to correlate with (vrot/σ⋆), lending further support to the notion that peanuts `know' about the galactic disc in which they reside. Such constraints are important for numerical simulations, as they provide a direct link between peanuts and their host disc. Our diagnostics reveal a spectrum of X/P properties and could provide a means of distinguishing between different peanut formation scenarios discussed in the literature. Moreover, nested peanuts, as remnants of bar buckling events, can provide insights into the disc and bar instability history.

  18. LYα FOREST TOMOGRAPHY FROM BACKGROUND GALAXIES: THE FIRST MEGAPARSEC-RESOLUTION LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MAP AT z > 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Eilers, Anna-Christina; Stark, Casey; White, Martin; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Schlegel, David J.; Arinyo-i-Prats, Andreu; Suzuki, Nao; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Caputi, Karina I.; Cassata, Paolo; Ilbert, Olivier; Le Brun, Vincent; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Garilli, Bianca; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Maccagni, Dario; Nugent, Peter; and others

    2014-11-01

    We present the first observations of foreground Lyα forest absorption from high-redshift galaxies, targeting 24 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with z ∼ 2.3-2.8 within a 5' × 14' region of the COSMOS field. The transverse sightline separation is ∼2 h {sup –1} Mpc comoving, allowing us to create a tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) Lyα forest absorption field over the redshift range 2.20 ≤ z ≤ 2.45. The resulting map covers 6 h {sup –1} Mpc × 14 h {sup –1} Mpc in the transverse plane and 230 h {sup –1} Mpc along the line of sight with a spatial resolution of ≈3.5 h {sup –1} Mpc, and is the first high-fidelity map of a large-scale structure on ∼Mpc scales at z > 2. Our map reveals significant structures with ≳ 10 h {sup –1} Mpc extent, including several spanning the entire transverse breadth, providing qualitative evidence for the filamentary structures predicted to exist in the high-redshift cosmic web. Simulated reconstructions with the same sightline sampling, spectral resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio recover the salient structures present in the underlying 3D absorption fields. Using data from other surveys, we identified 18 galaxies with known redshifts coeval with our map volume, enabling a direct comparison with our tomographic map. This shows that galaxies preferentially occupy high-density regions, in qualitative agreement with the same comparison applied to simulations. Our results establish the feasibility of the CLAMATO survey, which aims to obtain Lyα forest spectra for ∼1000 SFGs over ∼1 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, in order to map out the intergalactic medium large-scale structure at (z) ∼ 2.3 over a large volume (100 h {sup –1} Mpc){sup 3}.

  19. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco -Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastian E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.

  20. The VVDS: Early Results on the Large Scale Structure Distribution of Galaxies out to z ˜ 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Vettolani, G.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bondi, M.; Bottini, D.; Busarello, G.; Cappi, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Charlot, S.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Mellier, Y.; Meneux, B.; Merluzzi, P.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Rizzo, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Zamorani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) is an on-going program to map the evolution of galaxies, large scale structures and AGNs from the redshift measurement of more than 100000 objects down to a magnitude IAB=24, in combination with a multi-wavelength dataset from radio to X-rays. We present here the first results obtained from more than 20000 spectra. Dedicated effort has been invested to successfully enter the "redshift desert" 1.5galaxy templates in the rest wavelength domain probed by VIMOS. We have produced the luminosity function (LF) of galaxies for the first time out to IAB=24, and the evolution of the LF for each morphological type is clearly established, indicating that most of the LF evolution is concentrated in the later types. We present for the first time the 3D spatial distribution of a well controlled sample of faint galaxies, and show that significant clustering is detected out to z~1.5.

  1. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    DOE PAGES

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; ...

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets formore » which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.« less

  2. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  3. IR Fine-Structure Line Signatures of Central Dust-Bounded Nebulae in Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, J.; Allen, R.; Dudley, C. C.; Satyapal, S.; Luhman, M.; Wolfire, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2004-01-01

    To date, the only far-infrared spectroscopic observations of ultraluminous infrared galaxies have been obtained with the European Space Agency s Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer. The spectra of these galaxies are characterized by molecular absorption lines and weak emission lines from photodissociation regions (PDRs), but no far-infrared (greater than 40 microns) lines from ionized regions have been detected. ESA s Herschel Space Observatory, slated for launch in 2007, will likely be able to detect these lines in samples of local and moderate redshift ultra luminous galaxies and to enable measurement of the ionization parameters, the slope of the ionizing continuum, and densities present in the ionized regions of these galaxies. The higher spatial resolution of proposed observatories discussed in this workshop will enable isolation of the central regions of local galaxies and detection of these lines in high-redshift galaxies for study of the evolution of galaxies. Here we discuss evidence for the e.ects of absorption by dust within ionized regions and present the spectroscopic signatures predicted by photoionization modeling of dust-bounded regions.

  4. Stability of soil microbial structure and activity depends on microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Vincent; Mathieu, Olivier; Lévêque, Jean; Terrat, Sébastien; Chabbi, Abad; Lemanceau, Philippe; Ranjard, Lionel; Maron, Pierre-Alain

    2014-04-01

    Despite the central role of microbes in soil processes, empirical evidence concerning the effect of their diversity on soil stability remains controversial. Here, we addressed the ecological insurance hypothesis by examining the stability of microbial communities along a gradient of soil microbial diversity in response to mercury pollution and heat stress. Diversity was manipulated by dilution extinction approach. Structural and functional stabilities of microbial communities were assessed from patterns of genetic structure and soil respiration after the stress. Dilution led to the establishment of a consistent diversity gradient, as revealed by 454 sequencing of ribosomal genes. Diversity stability was enhanced in species-rich communities whatever the stress whereas functional stability was improved with increasing diversity after heat stress, but not after mercury pollution. This discrepancy implies that the relevance of ecological insurance for soil microbial communities might depend on the type of stress. Our results also suggest that the significance of microbial diversity for soil functional stability might increase with available soil resources. This could have strong repercussions in the current 'global changes' context because it suggests that the combined increased frequencies of extreme climatic events, nutrient loading and biotic exploitation may amplify the functional consequences of diversity decrease.

  5. STREGA: STRucture and Evolution of the GAlaxy - I. Survey overview and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Cignoni, M.; Dall'Ora, M.; Bono, G.; Ripepi, V.; Brocato, E.; Raimondo, G.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Coppola, G.; Moretti, M. I.; Stetson, P. B.; Calamida, A.; Cantiello, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Cappellaro, E.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; De Martino, D.; Di Cecco, A.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Silvotti, R.; Buonanno, R.; Getman, F.; Napolitano, N. R.; Pulone, L.; Schipani, P.

    2014-11-01

    STREGA (STRucture and Evolution of the GAlaxy) is a guaranteed time survey being performed at the VST (the ESO Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope) to map about 150 square degrees in the Galactic halo, in order to constrain the mechanisms of galactic formation and evolution. The survey is built as a 5 yr project, organized in two parts: a core programme to explore the surrounding regions of selected stellar systems and a second complementary part to map the southern portion of the Fornax orbit and extend the observations of the core programme. The adopted stellar tracers are mainly variable stars (RR Lyraes and long-period variables) and main-sequence turn-off stars for which observations in the g, r, i bands are obtained. We present an overview of the survey and some preliminary results for three observing runs that have been completed. For the region centred on ω Cen (37 deg2), covering about three tidal radii, we also discuss the detected stellar density radial profile and angular distribution, leading to the identification of extratidal cluster stars. We also conclude that the cluster tidal radius is about 1.2 deg, in agreement with values in the literature based on the Wilson model.

  6. International Conference: Milky Way Surveys: The Structure and Evolution of Our Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, Dan

    2004-01-01

    We were granted NASA support for partial sponsorship of an international conference on Galactic science, held June 15-17, 2003 and hosted by the Institute for Astrophysical Research at Boston University. This conference, entitled 'Milky Way Surveys: The Structure and Evolution of Our Galaxy' drew some 125 scientific experts, researchers, and graduate students to Boston to: (1) Present large area survey plans and findings; (2) Discuss important remaining questions and puzzles in Galactic science; and (3) To inform and excite students and researchers about the potential for using large area survey databases to address key Galactic science questions. An international Scientific Organizing Committee for this conference crafted a tightly packed two-day conference designed to highlight many recent and upcoming large area surveys (including 2MASS, SDSS, MSX, VLA-HI, GRS, and SIRTF/GLIMPSE) and current theoretical understandings and questions. By bringing together experts in the conduct of Galactic surveys and leading theorists, new ways of attacking long-standing scientific questions were encouraged. The titles of most of the talks and posters presented are attached to the end of this report.

  7. The radio core structure of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 4418. A young clustered starburst revealed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varenius, E.; Conway, J. E.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Aalto, S.; Beswick, R.; Costagliola, F.; Klöckner, H.-R.

    2014-06-01

    Context. The galaxy NGC 4418 contains one of the most compact obscured nuclei within a luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) in the nearby Universe. This nucleus contains a rich molecular gas environment and an unusually high ratio of infrared-to-radio luminosity (q-factor). The compact nucleus is powered by either a compact starburst or an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Aims: The aim of this study is to constrain the nature of the nuclear region (starburst or AGN) within NGC 4418 via very-high-resolution radio imaging. Methods: Archival data from radio observations using the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (EVN) and Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) interferometers are imaged. Sizes and flux densities are obtained by fitting Gaussian intensity distributions to the image. The average spectral index of the compact radio emission is estimated from measurements at 1.4 GHz and 5.0 GHz. Results: The nuclear structure of NGC 4418 visible with EVN and MERLIN consists of eight compact (<49 mas i.e. <8 pc) features spread within a region of 250 mas, i.e. 41 pc. We derive an inverted spectral index α ≥ 0.7 (Sν ∝ να) for the compact radio emission. Conclusions: Brightness temperatures >104.8 K indicate that these compact features cannot be HII-regions. The complex morphology and inverted spectrum of the eight detected compact features is evidence against the hypothesis that an AGN alone is powering the nucleus of NGC 4418. The compact features could be super star clusters with intense star formation, and their associated free-free absorption could then naturally explain both their inverted radio spectrum and the low radio-to-IR ratio of the nucleus. The required star formation area density is extreme, however, and close to the limit of what can be observed in a well-mixed thermal/non-thermal plasma produced by star formation, and is also close to the limit of what can be physically sustained.

  8. The structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E. (Editor); Stecker, F. W. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Gamma radiation investigations by COS-B and SAS-2 satellite are reported. Data from CO surveys of the galaxy and the galactic distribution of pulsars are analyzed. Theories of galactic gamma ray emission are explored.

  9. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    of galaxy clusters will be at locations of the peaks in the true underlying (mostly) dark matter density field. Kaiser (1984) [19] called this the high-peak model, which we demonstrate in Figure 16.1. We show a two-dimensional representation of a density field created by summing plane-waves with a predetermined power and with random wave-vector directions. In the left panel, we plot only the largest modes, where we see the density peaks (black) and valleys (white) in the combined field. In the right panel, we allow for smaller modes. You can see that the highest density peaks in the left panel contain smaller-scale, but still high-density peaks. These are the locations of future galaxy clusters. The bottom panel shows just these cluster-scale peaks. As you can see, the peaks themselves are clustered, and instead of just one large high-density peak in the original density field (see the left panel), the smaller modes show that six peaks are "born" within the broader, underlying large-scale density modes. This exemplifies the "bias" or amplified structure that is traced by galaxy clusters [19]. Clusters are rare, easy to find, and their member galaxies provide good distance estimates. In combination with their amplified clustering signal described above, galaxy clusters are considered an efficient and precise tracer of the large-scale matter density field in the Universe. Galaxy clusters can also be used to measure the baryon content of the Universe [43]. They can be used to identify gravitational lenses [38] and map the distribution of matter in clusters. The number and spatial distribution of galaxy clusters can be used to constrain cosmological parameters, like the fraction of the energy density in the Universe due to matter (Omega_matter) or the variation in the density field on fixed physical scales (sigma_8) [26,33]. The individual clusters act as “Island Universes” and as such are laboratories here we can study the evolution of the properties of the cluster

  10. Structure of Abell 1995 from optical and X-ray data: a galaxy cluster with an elongated radio halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschin, W.; Girardi, M.; Barrena, R.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Abell 1995 is a puzzling galaxy cluster hosting a powerful radio halo, but it has not yet been recognized as a obvious cluster merger, as usually expected for clusters with diffuse radio emission. Aims: We aim at an exhaustive analysis of the internal structure of Abell 1995 to verify that this cluster is really dynamically relaxed, as reported in previous studies. Methods: We base our analysis on new and archival spectroscopic and photometric data for 126 galaxies in the field of Abell 1995. The study of the hot intracluster medium was performed on X-ray archival data. Results: Based on 87 fiducial cluster members, we have computed the average cluster redshift ⟨z⟩ = 0.322 and the global radial velocity dispersion σV ~ 1300 km s-1. We detect two main optical subclusters separated by 1.5'that cause the known NE-SW elongation of the galaxy distribution and a significant velocity gradient in the same direction. As for the X-ray analysis, we confirm that the intracluster medium is mildly elongated, but we also detect three X-ray peaks. Two X-ray peaks are offset with respect to the two galaxy peaks and lie between them, thus suggesting a bimodal merger caught in a phase of post core-core passage. The third X-ray peak lies between the NE galaxy peak and a third, minor galaxy peak suggesting a more complex merger. The difficulty of separating the two main systems leads to a large uncertainty on the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity separation and the system mass: ΔVrf,LOS = 600-2000 km s-1and Msys = 2-5×1015 h70-1 M⊙, respectively. Simple analytical arguments suggest a merging scenario for Abell 1995, where two main subsystems are seen just after the collision with an intermediate projection angle. Conclusions: The high mass of Abell 1995 and the evidence of merging suggest it is not atypical among clusters with known radio halos. Interestingly, our findings reinforce the previous evidence for the peculiar dichotomy between the dark matter and galaxy

  11. Bayesian Inference of Galaxy Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ilsang; Weinberg, M.; Katz, N.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable inference on galaxy morphology from quantitative analysis of ensemble galaxy images is challenging but essential ingredient in studying galaxy formation and evolution, utilizing current and forthcoming large scale surveys. To put galaxy image decomposition problem in broader context of statistical inference problem and derive a rigorous statistical confidence levels of the inference, I developed a novel galaxy image decomposition tool, GALPHAT (GALaxy PHotometric ATtributes) that exploits recent developments in Bayesian computation to provide full posterior probability distributions and reliable confidence intervals for all parameters. I will highlight the significant improvements in galaxy image decomposition using GALPHAT, over the conventional model fitting algorithms and introduce the GALPHAT potential to infer the statistical distribution of galaxy morphological structures, using ensemble posteriors of galaxy morphological parameters from the entire galaxy population that one studies.

  12. Structural Differences Explain Diverse Functions of Plasmodium Actins

    PubMed Central

    Vahokoski, Juha; Martinez, Silvia Muñico; Ignatev, Alexander; Lepper, Simone; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Sidén-Kiamos, Inga; Sachse, Carsten; Kursula, Inari

    2014-01-01

    Actins are highly conserved proteins and key players in central processes in all eukaryotic cells. The two actins of the malaria parasite are among the most divergent eukaryotic actins and also differ from each other more than isoforms in any other species. Microfilaments have not been directly observed in Plasmodium and are presumed to be short and highly dynamic. We show that actin I cannot complement actin II in male gametogenesis, suggesting critical structural differences. Cryo-EM reveals that Plasmodium actin I has a unique filament structure, whereas actin II filaments resemble canonical F-actin. Both Plasmodium actins hydrolyze ATP more efficiently than α-actin, and unlike any other actin, both parasite actins rapidly form short oligomers induced by ADP. Crystal structures of both isoforms pinpoint several structural changes in the monomers causing the unique polymerization properties. Inserting the canonical D-loop to Plasmodium actin I leads to the formation of long filaments in vitro. In vivo, this chimera restores gametogenesis in parasites lacking actin II, suggesting that stable filaments are required for exflagellation. Together, these data underline the divergence of eukaryotic actins and demonstrate how structural differences in the monomers translate into filaments with different properties, implying that even eukaryotic actins have faced different evolutionary pressures and followed different paths for developing their polymerization properties. PMID:24743229

  13. γ-Protocadherin structural diversity and functional implications

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Kerry Marie; Rubinstein, Rotem; Thu, Chan Aye; Mannepalli, Seetha; Bahna, Fabiana; Ahlsén, Göran; Rittenhouse, Chelsea; Maniatis, Tom; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-10-26

    Stochastic cell-surface expression of α-, β-, and γ-clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs) provides vertebrate neurons with single-cell identities that underlie neuronal self-recognition. Here we report crystal structures of ectodomain fragments comprising cell-cell recognition regions of mouse γ-Pcdhs γA1, γA8, γB2, and γB7 revealingtrans-homodimers, and of C-terminal ectodomain fragments from γ-Pcdhs γA4 and γB2, which depictcis-interacting regions in monomeric form. Together these structures span the entire γ-Pcdh ectodomain. Thetrans-dimer structures reveal determinants of γ-Pcdh isoform-specific homophilic recognition. We identified and structurally mappedcis-dimerization mutations to the C-terminal ectodomain structures. Biophysical studies showed that Pcdh ectodomains from γB-subfamily isoforms formedcisdimers, whereas γA isoforms did not, but both γA and γB isoforms could interact inciswith α-Pcdhs. Together, these data show how interaction specificity is distributed over all domains of the γ-Pcdhtransinterface, and suggest that subfamily- or isoform-specificcis-interactions may play a role in the Pcdh-mediated neuronal self-recognition code.

  14. γ-Protocadherin structural diversity and functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kerry Marie; Rubinstein, Rotem; Thu, Chan Aye; Mannepalli, Seetha; Bahna, Fabiana; Ahlsén, Göran; Rittenhouse, Chelsea; Maniatis, Tom; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic cell-surface expression of α-, β-, and γ-clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs) provides vertebrate neurons with single-cell identities that underlie neuronal self-recognition. Here we report crystal structures of ectodomain fragments comprising cell-cell recognition regions of mouse γ-Pcdhs γA1, γA8, γB2, and γB7 revealing trans-homodimers, and of C-terminal ectodomain fragments from γ-Pcdhs γA4 and γB2, which depict cis-interacting regions in monomeric form. Together these structures span the entire γ-Pcdh ectodomain. The trans-dimer structures reveal determinants of γ-Pcdh isoform-specific homophilic recognition. We identified and structurally mapped cis-dimerization mutations to the C-terminal ectodomain structures. Biophysical studies showed that Pcdh ectodomains from γB-subfamily isoforms formed cis dimers, whereas γA isoforms did not, but both γA and γB isoforms could interact in cis with α-Pcdhs. Together, these data show how interaction specificity is distributed over all domains of the γ-Pcdh trans interface, and suggest that subfamily- or isoform-specific cis-interactions may play a role in the Pcdh-mediated neuronal self-recognition code. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20930.001 PMID:27782885

  15. THE STRUCTURE OF MASSIVE QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT Z {approx} 3 IN THE CANDELS-COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Lulu; Chen Yang; Pan Zhizheng; Lv Xuanyi; Li Jinrong; Lin Lin; Kong Xu; Fang Guanwen

    2013-07-10

    In this Letter, we use a two-color (J - L) versus (V - J) selection criterion to search massive quiescent galaxy (QG) candidates at 2.5 {<=} z {<=} 4.0 in the CANDELS-COSMOS field. We construct an H{sub F160W}-selected catalog and complement it with public auxiliary data. We finally obtain 19 passive VJL-selected (hereafter pVJL) galaxies as the possible massive QG candidates at z {approx} 3 by several constrains. We find the sizes of our pVJL galaxies are on average three to four times smaller than those of local early-type galaxies (ETGs) with analogous stellar mass. The compact size of these z {approx} 3 galaxies can be modeled by assuming their formation at z{sub form} {approx} 4-6 according to the dissipative collapse of baryons. Up to z < 4, the mass-normalized size evolution can be described by r{sub e} {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -1.0}. Low Sersic index and axis ratio, with median values n {approx}1.5 and b/a {approx} 0.65, respectively, indicate that most of the pVJL galaxies are disk-dominated. Despite large uncertainty, the inner region of the median mass profile of our pVJL galaxies is similar to those of QGs at 0.5 < z < 2.5 and local ETGs. It indicates that local massive ETGs have been formed according to an inside-out scenario: the compact galaxies at high redshift make up the cores of local massive ETGs and then build up the outskirts according to dissipationless minor mergers.

  16. Faint extended structures near galaxies: preliminary results from the Wise Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosch, Noah; Mosenkov, Aleksandr; Rich, R. Michael

    2017-03-01

    We present the first results from a survey of deep imaging of edge-on galaxies, with the goal of testing the growth-by-accretion of galaxies proposed by ΛCDM. The data were obtained with a new telescope at the Wise Observatory. Our images show previously unreported extensions of the disk, tidal distortions, and streams at the level of 27-28 mag arcsec-2.

  17. Combining Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Youngsoo; Krause, Elisabeth; Dodelson, Scott; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Amara, Adam; Becker, Matt; Bridle, Sarah; Clampitt, Joseph; Crocce, Martin; Honscheid, Klaus; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Sanchez, Carles; Wechsler, Risa

    2015-01-01

    Combining galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth rate of large scale structure, a quantity that will shed light on the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a prime candidate for such an analysis, with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies on the sky and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. By constructing an end-to-end analysis that combines large-scale galaxy clustering and small-scale galaxy-galaxy lensing, we also forecast the potential of a combined probes analysis on DES datasets. In particular, we develop a practical approach to a DES combined probes analysis by jointly modeling the assumptions and systematics affecting the different components of the data vector, employing a shared halo model, HOD parametrization, photometric redshift errors, and shear measurement errors. Furthermore, we study the effect of external priors on different subsets of these parameters. We conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/ optimistically constraining the growth function to 8%/4.9% with its first-year data covering 1000 square degrees, and to 4%/2.3% with its full five-year data covering 5000 square degrees.

  18. Two spectroscopically confirmed galaxy structures at z = 0.61 and 0.74 in the CFHTLS Deep 3 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Cypriano, E. S.; Durret, F.; Le Brun, V.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Martinet, N.; Perez, F.; Rouze, B.; Sodré, L.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Galaxy evolution is known to depend on environment since it differs in clusters and in the field, but studies are sometimes limited to the relatively nearby Universe (z < 0.5). It is still necessary to increase our knowledge of cluster galaxy properties above z = 0.5. Aims: In a previous paper we have detected several cluster candidates at z> 0.5 as part of a systematic search for clusters in the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey by applying the Adami & MAzure Cluster FInder (AMACFI), based on photometric redshifts. We focus here on two of them, located in the Deep 3 (hereafter D3) field: D3-6 and D3-43. Methods: We have obtained spectroscopy with Gemini/GMOS instrument and measured redshifts for 23 and 14 galaxies in the two structures. These redshifts were combined with those available in the literature. A dynamical and a weak lensing analysis were also performed, together with the study of X-ray Chandra archive data. Results: Cluster D3-6 is found to be a single structure of eight spectroscopically confirmed members at an average redshift z = 0.607, with a velocity dispersion of 423 km s-1. It appears to be a relatively low-mass cluster. D3-43-S3 has 46 spectroscopically confirmed members at an average redshift z = 0.739. The cluster can be decomposed into two main substructures, having a velocity dispersion of about 600 and 350 km s-1. An explanation of the fact that D3-43-S3 is detected through weak lensing (only marginally, at the ~3σ level) but not in X-rays could be that the two substructures are just beginning to merge more or less along the line of sight. We also show that D3-6 and D3-43-S3 have similar global galaxy luminosity functions, stellar mass functions, and star formation rate (SFR) distributions. The only differences are that D3-6 exhibits a lack of faint early-type galaxies, a deficit of extremely high stellar mass galaxies compared to D3-43-S3, and an excess of very high SFR galaxies. Conclusions: This study shows the

  19. THE RESOLVED STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF AN ISOLATED DWARF GALAXY: A VLT AND KECK SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF WLM

    SciTech Connect

    Leaman, Ryan; Venn, Kim A.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Brooks, Alyson M.; Cole, Andrew A.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Irwin, Mike J.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tolstoy, Eline

    2012-05-01

    We present spectroscopic data for 180 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the isolated dwarf irregular galaxy Wolf-Lundmark-Mellote (WLM). Observations of the calcium II triplet lines in spectra of RGB stars covering the entire galaxy were obtained with FORS2 at the Very Large Telescope and DEIMOS on Keck II, allowing us to derive velocities, metallicities, and ages for the stars. With accompanying photometric and radio data we have measured the structural parameters of the stellar and gaseous populations over the full galaxy. The stellar populations show an intrinsically thick configuration with 0.39 {<=} q{sub 0} {<=} 0.57. The stellar rotation in WLM is measured to be 17 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1}; however, the ratio of rotation to pressure support for the stars is V/{sigma} {approx} 1, in contrast to the gas, whose ratio is seven times larger. This, along with the structural data and alignment of the kinematic and photometric axes, suggests we are viewing WLM as a highly inclined oblate spheroid. Stellar rotation curves, corrected for asymmetric drift, are used to compute a dynamical mass of (4.3 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} at the half-light radius (r{sub h} = 1656 {+-} 49 pc). The stellar velocity dispersion increases with stellar age in a manner consistent with giant molecular cloud and substructure interactions producing the heating in WLM. Coupled with WLM's isolation, this suggests that the extended vertical structure of its stellar and gaseous components and increase in stellar velocity dispersion with age are due to internal feedback, rather than tidally driven evolution. These represent some of the first observational results from an isolated Local Group dwarf galaxy that can offer important constraints on how strongly internal feedback and secular processes modulate star formation and dynamical evolution in low-mass isolated objects.

  20. THE GEMINI/HST CLUSTER PROJECT: STRUCTURAL AND PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF GALAXIES IN THREE z = 0.28-0.89 CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Joergensen, Inger; Barr, Jordi; Collobert, Maela; Davies, Roger; Flint, Kathleen E-mail: ijorgensen@gemini.edu E-mail: maela.collobert@gmail.com E-mail: kflint@nationalpostdoc.org

    2009-10-01

    We present the data processing and analysis techniques we are using to determine the structural and photometric properties of galaxies in our Gemini/HST Galaxy Cluster Project sample. The goal of this study is to understand cluster galaxy evolution in terms of scaling relations and structural properties of cluster galaxies at redshifts 0.15 < z < 1.0. To derive parameters such as total magnitude, half-light radius, effective surface brightness, and Sersic n, we fit r {sup 1/4} law and Sersic function two-dimensional surface brightness profiles to each of the galaxies in our sample. Using simulated galaxies, we test how the assumed profile affects the derived parameters and how the uncertainties affect our Fundamental Plane results. We find that while fitting galaxies that have Sersic index n < 4 with r {sup 1/4} law profiles systematically overestimates the galaxy radius and flux, the combination of profile parameters that enter the Fundamental Plane has uncertainties that are small. Average systematic offsets and associated random uncertainties in magnitude and log r{sub e} for n>2 galaxies fitted with r {sup 1/4} law profiles are -0.1 {+-} 0.3 and 0.1 {+-} 0.2, respectively. The combination of effective radius and surface brightness, log r{sub e} - {beta}log (I) {sub e}, that enters the Fundamental Plane produces offsets smaller than -0.02 {+-} 0.10. This systematic error is insignificant and independent of galaxy magnitude or size. A catalog of photometry and surface brightness profile parameters is presented for three of the clusters in our sample, RX J0142.0+2131, RX J0152.7-1357, and RX J1226.9+3332 at redshifts 0.28, 0.83, and 0.89, respectively.

  1. Multiple Shock Structures in a Radio-selected Cluster of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S.; Duesterhoeft, J.; Rudnick, L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new radio-selected cluster of galaxies, 0217+70, using observations from the Very Large Array and archival optical and X-ray data. The new cluster is one of only seven known that has candidate double peripheral radio relics, and the second of those with a giant radio halo (GRH), as well. It also contains unusual diffuse radio filaments interior to the peripheral relics and a clumpy, elongated X-ray structure. All of these indicate a very actively evolving system, with ongoing accretion and merger activity, illuminating a network of shocks, such as those first seen in numerical simulations. The peripheral relics are most easily understood as outgoing spherical merger shocks with large variations in brightness along them, likely reflecting the inhomogeneities in the shocks' magnetic fields. The interior filaments could be projections of substructures from the sheet-like peripheral shocks or they might be separate structures due to multiple accretion events. ROSAT images show large-scale diffuse X-ray emission coincident with the GRH and additional patchy diffuse emission that suggests a recent merger event. This uniquely rich set of radio shocks and halo offer the possibility, with deeper X-ray and optical data and higher resolution radio observations, of testing the models of how shocks and turbulence couple to the relativistic plasma. The cluster 0217+70 is also overluminous in the radio compared with the empirical radio-X-ray correlation for clusters—the third example of such a system. This new population of diffuse radio emission opens up the possibility of probing low-mass cluster mergers with upcoming deep radio continuum surveys.

  2. Convergent structural responses of tropical forests to diverse disturbance regimes.

    PubMed

    Kellner, James R; Asner, Gregory P

    2009-09-01

    Size frequency distributions of canopy gaps are a hallmark of forest dynamics. But it remains unknown whether legacies of forest disturbance are influencing vertical size structure of landscapes, or space-filling in the canopy volume. We used data from LiDAR remote sensing to quantify distributions of canopy height and sizes of 434,501 canopy gaps in five tropical rain forest landscapes in Costa Rica and Hawaii. The sites represented a wide range of variation in structure and natural disturbance history, from canopy gap dynamics in lowland Costa Rica and Hawaii, to stages and types of stand-level dieback on upland Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes. Large differences in vertical canopy structure characterized these five tropical rain forest landscapes, some of which were related to known disturbance events. Although there were quantitative differences in the values of scaling exponents within and among sites, size frequency distributions of canopy gaps followed power laws at all sites and in all canopy height classes. Scaling relationships in gap size at different heights in the canopy were qualitatively similar at all sites, revealing a remarkable similarity despite clearly defined differences in species composition and modes of prevailing disturbance. These findings indicate that power-law gap-size frequency distributions are ubiquitous features of these five tropical rain forest landscapes, and suggest that mechanisms of forest disturbance may be secondary to other processes in determining vertical and horizontal size structure in canopies.

  3. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP MODELS FOR PREDICTION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING AFFINITY OF STRUCTURALLY DIVERSE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The demonstrated ability of a variety of structurally diverse chemicals to bind to the estrogen receptor has raised the concern that chemicals in the environment may be causing adverse effects through interference with nuclear receptor pathways. Many structure-activity relationsh...

  4. "Presumed fair: Ironic effects of organizational diversity structures": Correction to Kaiser et al. (2013).

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Reports an error in "Presumed fair: Ironic effects of organizational diversity structures" by Cheryl R. Kaiser, Brenda Major, Ines Jurcevic, Tessa L. Dover, Laura M. Brady and Jenessa R. Shapiro (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2013[Mar], Vol 104[3], 504-519). In the article, a raw data merging error in one racial discrimination claim condition from Experiment 6 inadvertently resulted in data analyses on an inaccurate data set. When the error was discovered by the authors and corrected, all analyses reported in Experiment 6 for claim validity, seriousness of the claim, and support for the claimant were inaccurate and none were statistically significant. The conclusions should be altered to indicate that participants with management experience who reflected on their own workplace diversity policies did not show the predicted effects. The literature review, remaining five studies, and remaining conclusions in the article are unaffected by this error. Experiment 6 should also report that 26.4% (not 26.4.7%) of participants had a graduate degree and eight participants (not 8%) did not provide educational data. Experiment 5 should have referred to the claim validity measure as a six-item measure ( .92) rather than a five-item measure; analyses on claim validity are accurate in text. Table 2's note should have said standard errors, not standard deviations. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2012-31077-001.) This research tests the hypothesis that the presence (vs. absence) of organizational diversity structures causes high-status group members (Whites, men) to perceive organizations with diversity structures as procedurally fairer environments for underrepresented groups (racial minorities, women), even when it is clear that underrepresented groups have been unfairly disadvantaged within these organizations. Furthermore, this illusory sense of fairness derived from the mere presence of diversity structures causes high

  5. Sclerotic Rings in Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae): Structures and Taxonomic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Momo; Konishi, Takuya; Sato, Tamaki

    2015-01-01

    Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae) were a highly diverse, globally distributed group of aquatic lizards in the Late Cretaceous (98–66 million years ago) that exhibited a high degree of adaptation to life in water. To date, despite their rich fossil record, the anatomy of complete mosasaur sclerotic rings, embedded in the sclera of the eyeball, has not been thoroughly investigated. We here describe and compare sclerotic rings of four mosasaur genera, Tylosaurus, Platecarpus, Clidastes, and Mosasaurus, for the first time. Two specimens of Tylosaurus and Platecarpus share an exact scleral ossicle arrangement, excepting the missing portion in the specimen of Platecarpus. Furthermore, the exact arrangement and the total count of 14 ossicles per ring are shared between Tylosaurus and numerous living terrestrial lizard taxa, pertaining to both Iguania and Scleroglossa. In contrast, two species of Mosasaurus share the identical count of 12 ossicles and the arrangement with each other, while no living lizard taxa share exactly the same arrangement. Such a mosaic distribution of these traits both among squamates globally and among obligatorily aquatic mosasaurs specifically suggests that neither the ossicle count nor their arrangement played major roles in the aquatic adaptation in mosasaur eyes. All the mosasaur sclerotic rings examined consistently exhibit aperture eccentricity and the scleral ossicles with gently convex outer side. Hitherto unknown to any squamate taxa, one specimen of Platecarpus unexpectedly shows a raised, concentric band of roughened surface on the inner surface of the sclerotic ring. It is possible that one or both of these latter features may have related to adaptation towards aquatic vision in mosasaurs, but further quantitative study of extant reptilian clades containing both terrestrial and aquatic taxa is critical and necessary in order to understand possible adaptive significances of such osteological features. PMID:25692667

  6. Rhamnolipids: diversity of structures, microbial origins and roles

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Mawgoud, Ahmad Mohammad; Lépine, François

    2010-01-01

    Rhamnolipids are glycolipidic biosurfactants produced by various bacterial species. They were initially found as exoproducts of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and described as a mixture of four congeners: α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-β-hydroxydecanoyl-β-hydroxydecanoate (Rha-Rha-C10-C10), α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-β-hydroxydecanoate (Rha-Rha-C10), as well as their mono-rhamnolipid congeners Rha-C10-C10 and Rha-C10. The development of more sensitive analytical techniques has lead to the further discovery of a wide diversity of rhamnolipid congeners and homologues (about 60) that are produced at different concentrations by various Pseudomonas species and by bacteria belonging to other families, classes, or even phyla. For example, various Burkholderia species have been shown to produce rhamnolipids that have longer alkyl chains than those produced by P. aeruginosa. In P. aeruginosa, three genes, carried on two distinct operons, code for the enzymes responsible for the final steps of rhamnolipid synthesis: one operon carries the rhlAB genes and the other rhlC. Genes highly similar to rhlA, rhlB, and rhlC have also been found in various Burkholderia species but grouped within one putative operon, and they have been shown to be required for rhamnolipid production as well. The exact physiological function of these secondary metabolites is still unclear. Most identified activities are derived from the surface activity, wetting ability, detergency, and other amphipathic-related properties of these molecules. Indeed, rhamnolipids promote the uptake and biodegradation of poorly soluble substrates, act as immune modulators and virulence factors, have antimicrobial activities, and are involved in surface motility and in bacterial biofilm development. PMID:20336292

  7. Structural diversity in echinocandin biosynthesis: the impact of oxidation steps and approaches toward an evolutionary explanation.

    PubMed

    Hüttel, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Echinocandins are an important group of cyclic non-ribosomal peptides with strong antifungal activity produced by filamentous fungi from Aspergillaceae and Leotiomycetes. Their structure is characterized by numerous hydroxylated non-proteinogenic amino acids. Biosynthetic clusters discovered in the last years contain up to six oxygenases, all of which are involved in amino acid modifications. Especially, variations in the oxidation pattern induced by these enzymes account for a remarkable structural diversity among the echinocandins. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of echinocandin biosynthesis with a special focus on diversity-inducing oxidation steps. The emergence of metabolic diversity is further discussed on the basis of a comprehensive overview of the structurally characterized echinocandins, their producer strains and biosynthetic clusters. For the pneumocandins, echinocandins produced by Glarea lozoyensis, the formation of metabolic diversity in a single organism is analyzed. It is compared to two common models for the evolution of secondary metabolism: the 'target-based' approach and the 'diversity-based' model. Whereas the early phase of pneumocandin biosynthesis supports the target-based model, the diversity-inducing late steps and most oxidation reactions best fit the diversity-based approach. Moreover, two types of diversity-inducing steps can be distinguished. Although incomplete hydroxylation is a common phenomenon in echinocandin production and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in general, the incorporation of diverse hydroxyprolines at position 6 is apparently a unique feature of pneumocandin biosynthesis, which stands in stark contrast to the strict selectivity found in echinocandin biosynthesis by Aspergillaceae. The example of echinocandin biosynthesis shows that the existing models for the evolution of secondary metabolism can be well applied to parts of the pathway; however, thus far, there is no comprehensive theory

  8. Structural diversity and biological importance of ABO, H, Lewis and secretor histo-blood group carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    ABO, H, secretor and Lewis histo-blood system genes control the expression of part of the carbohydrate repertoire present in areas of the body occupied by microorganisms. These carbohydrates, besides having great structural diversity, act as potential receptors for pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms influencing susceptibility and resistance to infection and illness. Despite the knowledge of some structural variability of these carbohydrate antigens and their polymorphic levels of expression in tissue and exocrine secretions, little is known about their biological importance and potential applications in medicine. This review highlights the structural diversity, the biological importance and potential applications of ABO, H, Lewis and secretor histo-blood carbohydrates.

  9. Galactic Winds and Structure of z ~ 2 Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Sarah F.

    Galactic-scale outflows are a key driver of galaxy evolution through their feedback effect on star-formation and their ejection of metals and energy into the inter-galactic medium (IGM). While it is known that outflows likely play an important role in the quenching of star-formation - transforming actively star-forming, blue galaxies into their 'red and dead' counterparts - this role is currently not well understood. In particular, at z ˜ 2, during the most active epoch of star-formation, the mass and energy in these outflows is poorly constrained, as is the mechanism for launching them. Furthermore, active-galactic nuclei (AGN) in the centers of massive star-forming galaxies (SFGs) likely play an important role in star-formation quenching, but we do not have a clear understanding of how this AGN feedback compares with that of star-formation driven feedback, and it is not known how many of these massive SFGs at z ˜ 2 even have AGN. This issue is complicated by the fact that many high-z AGN are likely highly obscured, and have strong nebular emission line contributions from both star-formation and the AGN. In this dissertation, I explore these issues using high-spatial and spectral resolution integral field unit spectroscopic data of z ˜ 2 SFGs. The observations are obtained with the instrument SINFONI on the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Cerro Paranal. These high-quality data allow spatially-resolved studies of the gas-phase kinematics of these galaxies, as well dynamical information on their outflows. In this work, I explore outflow properties in one galaxy with exceptionally deep data, allowing detailed examination of the outflow energetics, spatial extent and underlying ISM properties, as well those from a larger sample of galaxies. I also probe the fraction of SFGs in our sample which contain (possibly obscured) AGN, and study how this affects our determination of galaxy properties, such as gas-phase metallicity. Finally

  10. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey - III. Structural parameters of galaxies using single Sérsic fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Guzmán, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Graham, Alister W.; Hammer, Derek; Karick, Arna M.; Lucey, John R.; Matković, Ana; Merritt, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Valentijn, Edwin

    2011-03-01

    We present a catalogue of structural parameters for 8814 galaxies in the 25 fields of the Hubble Space Telescope/ACS Coma Treasury Survey. Parameters from Sérsic fits to the two-dimensional surface brightness distributions are given for all galaxies from our published Coma photometric catalogue with mean effective surface brightness brighter than 26.0 mag arcsec-2 and brighter than 24.5 mag (equivalent to absolute magnitude -10.5), as given by the fits, all in F814W(AB). The sample comprises a mixture of Coma members and background objects; 424 galaxies have redshifts and of these 163 are confirmed members. The fits were carried out using both the GIM2D and GALFIT codes. We provide the following parameters: galaxy ID, RA, Dec., the total corrected automatic magnitude from the photometric catalogue, the total magnitude of the model (F814WAB), the geometric mean effective radius Re, the mean surface brightness within the effective radius <μ>e, the Sérsic index n, the ellipticity and the source position angle. The selection limits of the catalogue and the errors listed for the Sérsic parameters come from extensive simulations of the fitting process using synthetic galaxy models. The agreement between GIM2D and GALFIT parameters is sensitive to details of the fitting procedure; for the settings employed here the agreement is excellent over the range of parameters covered in the catalogue. We define and present two goodness-of-fit indices which quantify the degree to which the image can be approximated by a Sérsic model with concentric, coaxial elliptical isophotes; such indices may be used to objectively select galaxies with more complex structures such as bulge-disc, bars or nuclear components. We make the catalogue available in electronic format at ASTRO-WISE and MAST. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in

  11. Genetic diversity, structure and differentiation in cultivated walnut (juglans regia l.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An analysis of genetic structure and differentiation in cultivated walnut (Juglans regia) using 15 microsatellite loci revealed a considerable amount of genetic variation with a mild genetic structure indicating five genetic groups corresponding to the centers of diversity within the home range of w...

  12. Linking structural dynamics and functional diversity in asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Akihiro; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2009-03-18

    Proteins, the functional molecules in biological systems, are sophisticated chemical devices that have evolved over billions of years. Their function is intimately related to their three-dimensional structure and elegantly regulated by conformational changes through allosteric regulators and a number of reversible or unidirectional post-translational modifications. This functional diversification in response to external stimuli allows for an orderly and timely progression of intra- and extracellular events. In contrast, enantioselective catalysts generally exhibit limited conformational flexibility and thereby exert a single specific function. Exploiting the features of conformationally flexible asymmetric ligands and the variable coordination patterns of rare earth metals, we demonstrate dynamic structural and functional changes of a catalyst in asymmetric catalysis, leading to two distinct reaction outcomes in a single flask.

  13. Structural diversity of alkaline-earth 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balendra; Ramanan, Arunachalam

    2017-03-01

    Exploration of the structural landscape of the system containing divalent alkaline-earth metal ion (Mg, Ca and Sr) with the rigid 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid (TDC) under varying solvothermal condition (DMF, DMA and DEF) yielded five new crystals: [Mg(TDC) (DEF)2(H2O)1/2] (1), [Ca(TDC) (DMA)] (2), [Ca(TDC) (DMA) (H2O)] (3), [Sr(TDC) (DMA)] (4) and [Sr(TDC) (DMA) (H2O)] (5) and two known solids. Single crystal structures of all the solids are characteristic of extended coordination interaction between metal and carboxylate ions. While the smaller magnesium ion crystallized into a 2D coordination polymer, the larger calcium and strontium compounds resulted into the growth of 3D metal organic frameworks. All the solids show blue emission arising from intra ligand charge transfer.

  14. Dispersal network structure and infection mechanism shape diversity in a coevolutionary bacteria-phage system.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Michael; Robb, Matthew; Forde, Samantha E; Gudelj, Ivana

    2014-03-01

    Resource availability, dispersal and infection genetics all have the potential to fundamentally alter the coevolutionary dynamics of bacteria-bacteriophage interactions. However, it remains unclear how these factors synergise to shape diversity within bacterial populations. We used a combination of laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling to test how the structure of a dispersal network affects host phenotypic diversity in a coevolving bacteria-phage system in communities of differential resource input. Unidirectional dispersal of bacteria and phage from high to low resources consistently increased host diversity compared with a no dispersal regime. Bidirectional dispersal, on the other hand, led to a marked decrease in host diversity. Our mathematical model predicted these opposing outcomes when we incorporated modified gene-for-gene infection genetics. To further test how host diversity depended on the genetic underpinnings of the bacteria-phage interaction, we expanded our mathematical model to include different infection mechanisms. We found that the direction of dispersal had very little impact on bacterial diversity when the bacteria-phage interaction was mediated by matching alleles, gene-for-gene or related infection mechanisms. Our experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that the effects of dispersal on diversity in coevolving host-parasite systems depend on an intricate interplay of the structure of the underlying dispersal network and the specifics of the host-parasite interaction.

  15. Diverse mechanisms of somatic structural variations in human cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lixing; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Xi, Ruibin; Haseley, Psalm S.; Hsieh, Chih-Heng; Zhang, Chengsheng; Ren, Xiaojia; Protopopov, Alexei; Chin, Lynda; Kucherlapati, Raju; Lee, Charles; Park, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Identification of somatic rearrangements in cancer genomes has accelerated through analysis of high-throughput sequencing data. However, characterization of complex structural alterations and their underlying mechanisms remains inadequate. Here, applying an algorithm to predict structural variations from short reads, we report a comprehensive catalog of somatic structural variations and the mechanisms generating them, using high-coverage whole-genome sequencing data from 140 patients across ten tumor types. We characterize the relative contributions of different types of rearrangements and their mutational mechanisms, find that ~20% of the somatic deletions are complex deletions formed by replication errors, and describe the differences between the mutational mechanisms in somatic and germline alterations. Importantly, we provide detailed reconstructions of the events responsible for loss of CDKN2A/B and gain of EGFR in glioblastoma, revealing that these alterations can result from multiple mechanisms even in a single genome and that both DNA double-strand breaks and replication errors drive somatic rearrangements. PMID:23663786

  16. STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES TO z = 2.5 IN CANDELS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Yen; Van der Wel, Arjen; Rix, Hans-Walter; Holden, Bradford; Faber, S. M.; Mozena, Mark; Guo Yicheng; Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Wuyts, Stijn; Haeussler, Boris; Barden, Marco; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Galametz, Audrey; Dekel, Avishai; Hathi, Nimish P.; and others

    2013-08-20

    Projected axis ratio measurements of 880 early-type galaxies at redshifts 1 < z < 2.5 selected from CANDELS are used to reconstruct and model their intrinsic shapes. The sample is selected on the basis of multiple rest-frame colors to reflect low star-formation activity. We demonstrate that these galaxies as an ensemble are dust-poor and transparent and therefore likely have smooth light profiles, similar to visually classified early-type galaxies. Similar to their present-day counterparts, the z > 1 early-type galaxies show a variety of intrinsic shapes; even at a fixed mass, the projected axis ratio distributions cannot be explained by the random projection of a set of galaxies with very similar intrinsic shapes. However, a two-population model for the intrinsic shapes, consisting of a triaxial, fairly round population, combined with a flat (c/a {approx} 0.3) oblate population, adequately describes the projected axis ratio distributions of both present-day and z > 1 early-type galaxies. We find that the proportion of oblate versus triaxial galaxies depends both on the galaxies' stellar mass, and-at a given mass-on redshift. For present-day and z < 1 early-type galaxies the oblate fraction strongly depends on galaxy mass. At z > 1, this trend is much weaker over the mass range explored here (10{sup 10} < M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 10{sup 11}), because the oblate fraction among massive (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) was much higher in the past: 0.59 {+-} 0.10 at z > 1, compared to 0.20 {+-} 0.02 at z {approx} 0.1. When combined with previous findings that the number density and sizes of early-type galaxies substantially increase over the same redshift range, this can be explained by the gradual emergence of merger-produced elliptical galaxies, at the expense of the destruction of pre-existing disks that were common among their high-redshift progenitors. In contrast, the oblate fraction among low-mass early-type galaxies (log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 10

  17. The structure of NGC at 100, 160, and 200 microns - Continuum dust emission in a quiescent Sb galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engargiola, G.; Harper, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of NGC 4565 at 100, 160, and 200 microns with the University of Chicago Far-Infrared Camera and the NASA-Kuiper Airborne Observatory are reported. In order to examine the dependence of FIR emission on spiral structure and star formation activity, these observations of NGC 4565, a quiescent Sb galaxy, are compared with observations of NGC 6946, an active Sc galaxy, made by Engargiola (1991) using the same instruments. Warm dust (30 K) in a bisymmetric spiral pattern superposed on an exponential disk of cool dust (20 K) can account for the FIR morphology of NGC 4565. Optical and IR data suggest that there are more embedded sources heating dust locally in the southeast arm region and more UV radiation from unobscured young stellar associations heating the cool, neutral medium in the northeast arm region.

  18. Structure and Formation of Massive Galaxies with Old Stellar Populations at z=1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Stockton, A.

    2006-12-01

    Observational evidence has been mounting over the past decade that at least some luminous ( 2 L*) galaxies at high redshift have formed nearly all of their stars within the first billion years after the big bang. These are examples of the first major episodes of star formation in the universe and provide insights into the formation of the earliest massive galaxies. We have examined in detail the morphologies and stellar populations of seven z=1.5 passively evolving galaxies using high resolution HST NICMOS and ACS imaging data as well as medium resolution Keck spectroscopy. Almost all of these galaxies appear to be relaxed systems, with smooth morphologies at both rest-frame UV and visible wavelengths. Furthermore, spectral synthesis modeling favors a single burst of star formation more than 2 Gyr before the observed epoch. We note, however, that the prevalence of old stellar populations does not necessarily correlate with early-type morphologies, as the light profiles for several of these galaxies appear to be dominated by massive exponential disks. This evidence for massive old disks, along with the uniformity of stellar age across the disk, suggests formation by a mechanism better described as a form of monolithic collapse than as a hierarchical merger. There is at least one case, however, that appears to be undergoing a "dry merger", which may be an example of the process that converts these unusual galaxies into the familiar spheroids that dominate galaxies comprising old stellar populations at the present epoch. We acknowledge our collaborators in the HST observations, Gabriela Canalizo, Masanori Iye, and Toshinori Maihara. This research was supported by NSF grant AST03-07335 and HST grant GO-10418.01-A.

  19. Parsec-scale H I absorption structure in a low-redshift galaxy seen against a compact symmetric object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, A. D.; Zwaan, M. A.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Péroux, C.; Liske, J.

    2016-11-01

    We present global VLBI observations of the 21-cm transition of atomic hydrogen seen in absorption against the radio source J0855+5751. The foreground absorber (SDSS J085519.05+575140.7) is a dwarf galaxy at z = 0.026. As the background source is heavily resolved by VLBI, the data allow us to map the properties of the foreground H I gas with a spatial resolution of 2 pc. The absorbing gas corresponds to a single coherent structure with an extent >35 pc, but we also detect significant and coherent variations, including a change in the H I optical depth by a factor of 5 across a distance of ≲ 6 pc. The large size of the structure provides support for the Heiles & Troland model of the interstellar medium, as well as its applicability to external galaxies. The large variations in H I optical depth also suggest that caution should be applied when interpreting TS measurements from radio-detected DLAs. In addition, the distorted appearance of the background radio source is indicative of a strong jet-cloud interaction in its host galaxy. We have measured its redshift (z = 0.541 86) using optical spectroscopy on the William Herschel Telescope and this confirms that J0855+5751 is an FR II radio source with a physical extent of <1 kpc and supports the previous identification of this source as a compact symmetric object. These sources often show absorption associated with the host galaxy and we suggest that both H I and OH should be searched for in J0855+5751.

  20. EVOLUTION OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS IN THE LAST {approx}6 Gyr: FEEDBACK PROCESSES VERSUS MERGER EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ascaso, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Moles, M.

    2011-01-10

    We present results on the evolution of the structural parameters of two samples of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the last 6 Gyr. The nearby sample of BCGs consists of 69 galaxies from the WINGS survey spanning a redshift range of 0.04 < z < 0.07. The intermediate-redshift (0.3 < z < 0.6) sample is formed by 20 BCGs extracted from the Hubble Space Telescope archive. Both samples have similar spatial resolution and their host clusters have similar X-ray luminosities. We report an increase in the size of the BCGs from intermediate to local redshift. However, we do not detect any variation in the Sersic shape parameter in both samples. These results prove to be robust since the observed tendencies are model independent. We also obtain significant correlations between some of the BCG parameters and the main properties of the host clusters. More luminous, larger, and centrally located BCGs are located in more massive and dominant galaxy clusters. These facts indicate that the host galaxy cluster has played an important role in the formation of their BCGs. We discuss the possible mechanisms that can explain the observed evolution of the structural parameters of the BCGs. We conclude that the main mechanisms that can explain the increase in size and the non-evolution in the Sersic shape parameter of the BCGs in the last 6 Gyr are feedback processes. This result disagrees with semi-analytical simulation results supporting the idea that merging processes are the main mechanism responsible for the evolution of the BCGs up until the present epoch.

  1. Measuring the Fraction of Bars and Offset Bars Using the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Using the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies at 3.6 and 4.5μm, I have measured a preliminary bar fraction and offset bar fraction in the local universe by visually identifying bar structure within a sample of 2,140 local galaxies. A sample this large has not been used since 1963, when Gerard de Vaucouleurs found the bar fraction to be roughly fbar ˜ 0.6 in the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies. Since then, there has been much debate over the true value of the bar fraction. The purpose of finding a bar fraction using S4G is to provide a final say in this debate. I have found that the bar fraction in the local universe is fbar = 0.69 when including both definite bars (SB) and candidate bars (SAB). I have also measured a preliminary value for the fraction of offset bars using the same sample. Offset bars are a very rare phenomenon. Of the sample used, 91 galaxies are found to be definite offset bars while an additional 39 are found to be candidate offset bars. When including both definite offset bars and candidate offset bars, the offset bar fraction in the local universe becomes fob = 0.12. I also measure the fraction of offset bars as a function of Hubble type and stellar mass. We find that 54% of offset bars are found in disks having a stellar mass of M ≤ 108 M⊙. Late-type disks possess significantly more offset bars than early-type with 60% of offset bars being found in disks having a Hubble type t ≥ 6.

  2. Corynebacterium diphtheriae: genome diversity, population structure and genotyping perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mokrousov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic re-emergence of diphtheria in Russia and the Newly Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet Union in the 1990s demonstrated the continued threat of this thought to be rare disease. The bacteriophage encoded toxin is a main virulence factor of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, however, an analysis of the first complete genome sequence of C. diphtheriae revealed a recent acquisition of other pathogenicity factors including iron-uptake systems, adhesins and fimbrial proteins as indeed this extracellular pathogen has more possibilities for lateral gene transfer than, e.g., its close relative, mainly intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis. C. diphtheriae appears to have a phylogeographical structure mainly represented by area-specific variants whose circulation is under strong influence of human host factors, including health control measures, first of all, vaccination, and social economic conditions. This framework core population structure may be challenged by importation of the endemic and eventually toxigenic strains from new areas thus leading to localized or large epidemics caused directly by imported strains or by bacteriophage-lysogenized indigenous strains converted into toxin production. A feature of C. diphtheriae co-existence with humans is its periodicity: following large epidemic in the 1990s, the present period is marked by increasing heterogeneity of the circulating populations whereas re-emergence of new toxigenic variants along with persistent circulation of invasive non-toxigenic strains appear alarming. To identify and rapidly monitor subtle changes in the genome structure at an infraclonal level during and between epidemics, portable and discriminatory typing methods of C. diphtheriae are still needed. In this view, CRISPRs and minisatellites are promising genomic markers for development of high-resolution typing schemes and databasing of C. diphtheriae.

  3. Structural diversity in the self-assembly of pseudopeptidic macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Ignacio; Bru, Miriam; Burguete, M Isabel; García-Verdugo, Eduardo; Luis, Santiago V

    2010-01-25

    The self-assembling abilities of several pseudopeptidic macrocycles have been thoroughly studied both in the solid (SEM, TEM, FTIR) and in solution (NMR, UV, CD, FTIR) states. Detailed microscopy revealed large differences in the morphology of the self-assembling micro/nanostructures depending on the macrocyclic chemical structures. Self-assembly was triggered by the presence of additional methylene groups or by changing from para to meta geometry of the aromatic phenylene backbone moiety. More interestingly, the nature of the side chain also plays a fundamental role in some of the obtained nanostructures, thus producing structures from long fibers to hollow spheres. These nanostructures were obtained in different solvents and on different surfaces, thus implying that the chemical information for the self-assembly is contained in the molecular structure. Dilution NMR studies (chemical shift and self-diffusion rates) suggest the formation of incipient aggregates in solution by a combination of hydrogen-bonding and pi-pi interactions, thus implicating amide and aryl groups, respectively. Electronic spectroscopy further supports the pi-pi interactions because the compounds that lead to fibers show large hypochromic shifts in the UV spectra. Moreover, the fiber-forming macrocycles also showed a more intense CD signature. The hydrogen-bonding interactions within the nanostructures were also characterized by attenuated total-reflectance FTIR spectroscopy, which allowed us to monitor the complete transition from the solution to the dried nanostructure. Overall, we concluded that the self-assembly of this family of pseudopeptidic macrocycles is dictated by a synergic action of hydrogen-bonding and pi-pi interactions. The feasibility and geometrical disposition of these interactions finally render a hierarchical organization, which has been rationalized with a proposal of a model. The understanding of the process at the molecular level has allowed us to prepare hybrid soft

  4. Diversity and spatial distribution of surname structure in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Okyu; Son, Woo-Sik

    2015-11-01

    We studied the population structure of South Korea by using the distributions of surnames for all 246 administrative regions. Every 4,177 surnames are distinguished by their bon-gwan which indicates the place of their family clans. Using Fisher's Alpha, we found that the level of inbreeding increases as the distance from the capital Seoul increases. We introduced the Shannon index to measure the level of spatial diffusion for each surname population, and the geographical clusters based on similarities of the surname compositions among the regions show almost exact agreement with those at the administrative districts.

  5. Determination of the Structural Basis of Antibody Diversity Using NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-14

    22. Perkins, S.J. and Dwek, R.A. (1980). Comparison of Ring-Current Shifts Calculated from the Crystal Structure of Egg White Lysozyme 27 of Hen with...the first and second kind with modulus k = 2 J (4) + p) 2 + z 2 Values for the parameters a and i are giver, in Table I. The separation of the current...the sp 2 plane of the two doublely bonded nuclei. The current loops were separated from this plane by 0.638 A. Each ring was given one electron. The

  6. Bulges and discs in the local Universe. Linking the galaxy structure to star formation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morselli, L.; Popesso, P.; Erfanianfar, G.; Concas, A.

    2017-01-01

    We use a sample built on the SDSS DR7 catalogue and the bulge-disc decomposition of Simard et al. (2011, ApJS, 196, 11) to study how the bulge and disc components contribute to the parent galaxy's star formation activity, by determining its position in the star formation rate (SFR) - stellar mass (M⋆) plane at 0.02 < z < 0.1 and around the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies. For this purpose, we use the bulge and disc colours as proxy for their SFRs, while the total galaxy SFR comes from Hα or D4000. We study the mean galaxy bulge-total mass ratio (B/T) as a function of the residual from the MS (ΔMS) and find that the B/T-ΔMS relation exhibits a parabola-like shape with the peak of the MS corresponding to the lowest B/Ts at any stellar mass. The lower and upper envelope of the MS are populated by galaxies with similar B/T, velocity dispersion and concentration (R90/R50) values. The mean values of such distributions indicate that the majority of the galaxies are characterised by classical bulges and not pseudo-bulges. Bulges above the MS are characterised by blue colours or, when red, by a high level of dust obscuration, thus indicating that in both cases they are actively star forming. When on the MS or below it, bulges are mostly red and dead. At stellar masses above 1010.5M⊙, bulges on the MS or in the green valley tend to be significantly redder than their counterparts in the quiescence region, despite similar levels of dust obscuration. This could be explained with different age or metallicity content, suggesting different evolutionary paths for bulges on the MS and green valley with respect to those in the quiescence region. The disc g-r colour anti-correlates at any mass with the distance from the MS, getting redder when approaching the MS lower envelope and the quiescence region. The anti-correlation flattens as a function of the stellar mass, likely due to a higher level of dust obscuration in massive SF galaxies. We conclude that the

  7. Functional diversity and structural disorder in the human ubiquitination pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Pallab; Pancsa, Rita; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a central role in cellular regulation and protein quality control (PQC). The system is built as a pyramid of increasing complexity, with two E1 (ubiquitin activating), few dozen E2 (ubiquitin conjugating) and several hundred E3 (ubiquitin ligase) enzymes. By collecting and analyzing E3 sequences from the KEGG BRITE database and literature, we assembled a coherent dataset of 563 human E3s and analyzed their various physical features. We found an increase in structural disorder of the system with multiple disorder predictors (IUPred - E1: 5.97%, E2: 17.74%, E3: 20.03%). E3s that can bind E2 and substrate simultaneously (single subunit E3, ssE3) have significantly higher disorder (22.98%) than E3s in which E2 binding (multi RING-finger, mRF, 0.62%), scaffolding (6.01%) and substrate binding (adaptor/substrate recognition subunits, 17.33%) functions are separated. In ssE3s, the disorder was localized in the substrate/adaptor binding domains, whereas the E2-binding RING/HECT-domains were structured. To demonstrate the involvement of disorder in E3 function, we applied normal modes and molecular dynamics analyses to show how a disordered and highly flexible linker in human CBL (an E3 that acts as a regulator of several tyrosine kinase-mediated signalling pathways) facilitates long-range conformational changes bringing substrate and E2-binding domains towards each other and thus assisting in ubiquitin transfer. E3s with multiple interaction partners (as evidenced by data in STRING) also possess elevated levels of disorder (hubs, 22.90% vs. non-hubs, 18.36%). Furthermore, a search in PDB uncovered 21 distinct human E3 interactions, in 7 of which the disordered region of E3s undergoes induced folding (or mutual induced folding) in the presence of the partner. In conclusion, our data highlights the primary role of structural disorder in the functions of E3 ligases that manifests itself in the substrate/adaptor binding functions as well

  8. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters – V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    DOE PAGES

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-07-15

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. In addition, we present constraints on the concentration–mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = –0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions.more » For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = –0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ~50 kpc–1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to –1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.« less

  9. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters – V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-07-15

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. We present constraints on the concentration–mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = -0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions. For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = -0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ~50 kpc–1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to -1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.

  10. The impact of baryons on massive galaxy clusters: halo structure and cluster mass estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, Monique A.; Barnes, David J.; Kay, Scott T.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Schaye, Joop

    2017-03-01

    We use the BAHAMAS (BAryons and HAloes of MAssive Systems) and MACSIS (MAssive ClusterS and Intercluster Structures) hydrodynamic simulations to quantify the impact of baryons on the mass distribution and dynamics of massive galaxy clusters, as well as the bias in X-ray and weak lensing mass estimates. These simulations use the subgrid physics models calibrated in the BAHAMAS project, which include feedback from both supernovae and active galactic nuclei. They form a cluster population covering almost two orders of magnitude in mass, with more than 3500 clusters with masses greater than 1014 M⊙ at z = 0. We start by characterizing the clusters in terms of their spin, shape and density profile, before considering the bias in both weak lensing and hydrostatic mass estimates. Whilst including baryonic effects leads to more spherical, centrally concentrated clusters, the median weak lensing mass bias is unaffected by the presence of baryons. In both the dark matter only and hydrodynamic simulations, the weak lensing measurements underestimate cluster masses by ≈10 per cent for clusters with M200 ≤ 1015 M⊙ and this bias tends to zero at higher masses. We also consider the hydrostatic bias when using both the true density and temperature profiles, and those derived from X-ray spectroscopy. When using spectroscopic temperatures and densities, the hydrostatic bias decreases as a function of mass, leading to a bias of ≈40 per cent for clusters with M500 ≥ 1015 M⊙. This is due to the presence of cooler gas in the cluster outskirts. Using mass weighted temperatures and the true density profile reduces this bias to 5-15 per cent.

  11. W.W. Morgan and the Discovery of the Spiral Arm Structure of our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, William

    2008-03-01

    William Wilson Morgan was one of the great astronomers of the twentieth century. He considered himself a morphologist, and was preoccupied throughout his career with matters of classification. Though, his early life was difficult, and his pursuit of astronomy as a career was opposed by his father, he took a position at Yerkes Observatory in 1926 and remained there for the rest of his working life. Thematically, his work was also a unified whole. Beginning with spectroscopic studies under Otto Struve at Yerkes Observatory, by the late 1930s he concentrated particularly on the young O and B stars. His work an stellar classification led to the Morgan-Keenan-Kellman [MKK] system of classification of stars, and later - as he grappled with the question of the intrinsic color and brightness of stars at great distances - to the Johnson-Morgan UBV system for measuring stellar colors. Eventually these concerns with classification and method led to his greatest single achievement - the recognition of the nearby spiral arms of our Galaxy by tracing the OB associations and HII regions that outline them. After years of intensive work on the problem of galactic structure, the discovery came in a blinding flash of Archimedean insight as he walked under the night sky between his office and his house in the autumn of 1951. His optical discovery of the spiral arms preceded the radio-mapping of the spiral arms by more than a year. Morgan suffered a nervous breakdown soon after he announced his discovery, however, and so was prevented from publishing a complete account of his work. As a result of that, and the announcement soon afterward of the first radio maps of the spiral arms, the uniqueness of his achievement was not fully appreciated at the time.

  12. Structural Diversity and Function of Xyloglucan Sidechain Substituents

    PubMed Central

    Schultink, Alex; Liu, Lifeng; Zhu, Lei; Pauly, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Xyloglucan (XyG) is a hemicellulose found in the cell walls of all land plants including early-divergent groups such as liverworts, hornworts and mosses. The basic structure of XyG, a xylosylated glucan, is similar in all of these plants but additional substituents can vary depending on plant family, tissue, and developmental stage. A comprehensive list of known XyG sidechain substituents is assembled including their occurrence within plant families, thereby providing insight into the evolutionary origin of the various sidechains. Recent advances in DNA sequencing have enabled comparative genomics approaches for the identification of XyG biosynthetic enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana as well as in non-model plant species. Characterization of these biosynthetic genes not only allows the determination of their substrate specificity but also provides insights into the function of the various substituents in plant growth and development. PMID:27135518

  13. Construction of a library of structurally diverse ribonucleopeptides with catalytic groups.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomoki; Nakano, Shun; Nakata, Eiji; Morii, Takashi

    2017-03-15

    Functional screening of structurally diverse libraries consisting of proteins or nucleic acids is an effective method to obtain receptors or aptamers with unique molecular recognition characteristics. However, further modification of these selected receptors to exert a newly desired function is still a challenging task. We have constructed a library of structurally diverse ribonucleopeptides (RNPs) that are modified with a catalytic group, in which the catalytic group aligns with various orientations against the ATP binding pocket of RNA subunit. As a proof-of-principle, the screening of the constructed RNP library for the catalytic reaction of ester hydrolysis was successfully carried out. The size of both the substrate-binding RNA library and the catalytic group modified peptide library are independently expandable, and thus, the size of RNPs library could be enlarged by a combination of these two subunits. We anticipate that the library of functionalized and structurally diverse RNPs would be expanded for various other catalytic reactions.

  14. The Gaseous Environment of High-z Galaxies: Precision Measurements of Neutral Hydrogen in the Circumgalactic Medium of z ~ 2-3 Galaxies in the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudie, Gwen C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Trainor, Ryan F.; Rakic, Olivera; Bogosavljević, Milan; Pettini, Max; Reddy, Naveen; Shapley, Alice E.; Erb, Dawn K.; Law, David R.

    2012-05-01

    We present results from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS), a unique spectroscopic survey of the distant universe designed to explore the details of the connection between galaxies and intergalactic baryons within the same survey volumes, focusing particularly on scales from ~50 kpc to a few Mpc. The KBSS is optimized for the redshift range z ~ 2-3, combining S/N ~100 Keck/HIRES spectra of 15 of the brightest QSOs in the sky at z ~= 2.5-2.9 with very densely sampled galaxy redshift surveys within a few arcmin of each QSO sightline. In this paper, we present quantitative results on the distribution, column density, kinematics, and absorber line widths of neutral hydrogen (H I) surrounding a subset of 886 KBSS star-forming galaxies with 2.0 <~ z <~ 2.8 and with projected distances <=3 physical Mpc from a QSO sightline. Using Voigt profile decompositions of the full Lyα forest region of all 15 QSO spectra, we compiled a catalog of ~6000 individual absorbers in the redshift range of interest, with 12 <= log (N H I ) <=21. These are used to measure H I absorption statistics near the redshifts of foreground galaxies as a function of projected galactocentric distance from the QSO sightline and for randomly chosen locations in the intergalactic medium (IGM) within the survey volume. We find that N H I and the multiplicity of velocity-associated H I components increase rapidly with decreasing galactocentric impact parameter and as the systemic redshift of the galaxy is approached. The strongest H I absorbers within ~= 100 physical kpc of galaxies have N H I ~3 orders of magnitude higher than those near random locations in the IGM. The circumgalactic zone of most significantly enhanced H I absorption is found within transverse distances of <~ 300 kpc and within ±300 km s-1 of galaxy systemic redshifts. Taking this region as the defining bounds of the circumgalactic medium (CGM), nearly half of absorbers with log(N H I ) > 15.5 are found within the CGM of galaxies

  15. Dynamical evolution of topology of large-scale structure. [in distribution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear effects of statistical biasing and gravitational evolution on the genus are studied. The biased galaxy subset is picked for the first time by actually identifying galaxy-sized peaks above a fixed threshold in the initial conditions, and their subsequent evolution is followed. It is found that in the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model the statistical biasing in the locations of galaxies produces asymmetry in the genus curve and coupling with gravitational evolution gives rise to a shift in the genus curve to the left in moderately nonlinear regimes. Gravitational evolution alone reduces the amplitude of the genus curve due to strong phase correlations in the density field and also produces asymmetry in the curve. Results on the genus of the mass density field for both CDM and hot dark matter models are consistent with previous work by Melott, Weinberg, and Gott (1987).

  16. Radical aryl migration enables diversity-oriented synthesis of structurally diverse medium/macro- or bridged-rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Zhong-Liang; Wang, Fu-Li; Guo, Zhen; Cheng, Yong-Feng; Wang, Na; Dong, Xiao-Wu; Fang, Chao; Liu, Jingjiang; Hou, Chunhui; Tan, Bin; Liu, Xin-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Medium-sized and medium-bridged rings are attractive structural motifs in natural products and therapeutic agents. Due to the unfavourable entropic and/or enthalpic factors with these ring systems, their efficient construction remains a formidable challenge. To address this problem, we herein disclose a radical-based approach for diversity-oriented synthesis of various benzannulated carbon- and heteroatom-containing 8-11(14)-membered ketone libraries. This strategy involves 1,4- or 1,5-aryl migration triggered by radical azidation, trifluoromethylation, phosphonylation, sulfonylation, or perfluoroalkylation of unactivated alkenes followed by intramolecular ring expansion. Demonstration of this method as a highly flexible tool for the construction of 37 synthetically challenging medium-sized and macrocyclic ring scaffolds including bridged rings with diverse functionalities and skeletons is highlighted. Some of these products showed potent inhibitory activity against the cancer cell or derivative of human embryonic kidney line in preliminary biological studies. The mechanism of this novel strategy is investigated by control experiments and DFT calculations.

  17. Radical aryl migration enables diversity-oriented synthesis of structurally diverse medium/macro- or bridged-rings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Li, Zhong-Liang; Wang, Fu-Li; Guo, Zhen; Cheng, Yong-Feng; Wang, Na; Dong, Xiao-Wu; Fang, Chao; Liu, Jingjiang; Hou, Chunhui; Tan, Bin; Liu, Xin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Medium-sized and medium-bridged rings are attractive structural motifs in natural products and therapeutic agents. Due to the unfavourable entropic and/or enthalpic factors with these ring systems, their efficient construction remains a formidable challenge. To address this problem, we herein disclose a radical-based approach for diversity-oriented synthesis of various benzannulated carbon- and heteroatom-containing 8–11(14)-membered ketone libraries. This strategy involves 1,4- or 1,5-aryl migration triggered by radical azidation, trifluoromethylation, phosphonylation, sulfonylation, or perfluoroalkylation of unactivated alkenes followed by intramolecular ring expansion. Demonstration of this method as a highly flexible tool for the construction of 37 synthetically challenging medium-sized and macrocyclic ring scaffolds including bridged rings with diverse functionalities and skeletons is highlighted. Some of these products showed potent inhibitory activity against the cancer cell or derivative of human embryonic kidney line in preliminary biological studies. The mechanism of this novel strategy is investigated by control experiments and DFT calculations. PMID:28004746

  18. THE STELLAR MASS STRUCTURE OF MASSIVE GALAXIES FROM z = 0 TO z = 2.5: SURFACE DENSITY PROFILES AND HALF-MASS RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Szomoru, Daniel; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Trenti, Michele; Illingworth, Garth D.; Oesch, Pascal

    2013-02-15

    We present stellar mass surface density profiles of a mass-selected sample of 177 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5, obtained using very deep Hubble Space Telescope optical and near-infrared data over the GOODS-South field, including recent CANDELS data. Accurate stellar mass surface density profiles have been measured for the first time for a complete sample of high-redshift galaxies more massive than 10{sup 10.7} M {sub Sun }. The key advantage of this study compared to previous work is that the surface brightness profiles are deconvolved for point-spread function smoothing, allowing accurate measurements of the structure of the galaxies. The surface brightness profiles account for contributions from complex galaxy structures such as rings and faint outer disks. Mass profiles are derived using radial rest-frame ug color profiles and a well-established empirical relation between these colors and the stellar mass-to-light ratio. We derive stellar half-mass radii from the mass profiles, and find that these are on average {approx}25% smaller than rest-frame g-band half-light radii. This average size difference of 25% is the same at all redshifts, and does not correlate with stellar mass, specific star formation rate, effective surface density, Sersic index, or galaxy size. Although on average the difference between half-mass size and half-light size is modest, for approximately 10% of massive galaxies this difference is more than a factor of two. These extreme galaxies are mostly extended, disk-like systems with large central bulges. These results are robust, but could be impacted if the central dust extinction becomes high. ALMA observations can be used to explore this possibility. These results provide added support for galaxy growth scenarios wherein massive galaxies at these epochs grow by accretion onto their outer regions.

  19. Chemical and structural diversity of siRNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Barbara; Sipa, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are 21-23 nt long double-stranded oligoribonucleotides which in mammalian cells exhibit a potency for sequence-specific gene silencing via an RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. It has been already proven that exogenous, chemically synthesized siRNA molecules are effective inhibitors of gene expression and are widely applied for analysis of protein function and proteomics-based target identification. Moreover, since their discovery siRNA molecules have been implemented as potential candidates for therapeutic applications. Variously modified siRNA molecules containing sugar modifications (2'-OMe, -F, -O-allyl, -amino, orthoesters and LNA analogues), internucleotide phospodiester bond modifications (phosphorothioates, boranophosphates), base modifications (s(2)U) as well as 3'-terminal cholesterol-conjugated constructs were investigated as potential candidates for effective inhibition of gene expression. This chapter reviews an impact of chemical and structural modifications of siRNA molecules on their serum and thermal stability, cellular and in vivo activity, cellular uptake, biodistribution and cytotoxicity. Functional analysis of chemically modified siRNA molecules allows for better understanding of the mechanism of the RNA interference process as well as demonstrates immense efforts in optimizing in vivo potency of siRNA molecules for RNAi-based drug design.

  20. Mammalian proteasome subtypes: Their diversity in structure and function.

    PubMed

    Dahlmann, Burkhardt

    2016-02-01

    The 20S proteasome is a multicatalytic proteinase catalysing the degradation of the majority of intracellular proteins. Thereby it is involved in almost all basic cellular processes, which is facilitated by its association with various regulator complexes so that it appears in different disguises like 26S proteasome, hybrid-proteasome and others. The 20S proteasome has a cylindrical structure built up by four stacked rings composed of α- and β-subunits. Since the three active site-containing β-subunits can all or in part be replaced by immuno-subunits, three main subpopulations exist, namely standard-, immuno- and intermediate-proteasomes. Due to posttranslational modifications or/and genetic variations all α- and β-subunits occur in multiple iso- or proteoforms. This leads to the fact that each of the three subpopulations is composed of a variety of 20S proteasome subtypes. This review summarizes the knowledge of proteasome subtypes in mammalian cells and tissues and their possible biological and medical relevancy.

  1. Experimental warming effects on the bacterial community structure and diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Han, S.; Adams, J.; Son, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the responses of soil bacterial community to future temperature increase by conducting open-field warming experiment. We conducted an open-field experimental warming system using infra-red heater in 2011 and regulated the temperature of warmed plots by 3oC higher than that of control plots constantly. The seeds of Pinus densiflora, Abies holophylla, Abies koreana, Betula costata, Quercus variabilis, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, and Zelkova serrata were planted in each 1 m × 1 m plot (n=3) in April, 2012. We collected soil samples from the rhizosphere of 7 tree species. DNA was extracted and PCR-amplified for the bacterial 16S gene targeting V1-V3 region. The paired-end sequencing was performed at Beijing Genome Institute (BGI, Hong Kong, China) using 2× 100 bp Hiseq2000 (Illumina). This study aimed to answer the following prediction/hypothesis: 1) Experimental warming will change the structure of soil bacterial community, 2) There will be distinct 'indicator group' which response to warming treatment relatively more sensitive than other groups. 3) Warming treatment will enhance the microbial activity in terms of soil respiration. 4) The rhizoplane bacterial communities for each of 7 tree species will show different response pattern to warming treatment. Since the sequence data does not arrive before the submission deadline, therefore, we would like to present the results and discussions on December 2014, AGU Fall Meeting.

  2. Modeling and Analysis of Modular Structure in Diverse Biological Networks.

    PubMed

    Bader, Al-Anzi; Sherif, Gerges; Noah, Olsman; Christopher, Ormerod; Georgios, Piliouras; John, Ormerod; Kai, Zinn

    2017-04-07

    Biological networks, like most engineered networks, are not the product of a singular design but rather are the result of a long process of refinement and optimization. Many large real-world networks are comprised of well-defined and meaningful smaller modules. While engineered networks are designed and refined by humans with particular goals in mind, biological networks are created by the selective pressures of evolution. In this paper, we seek to define aspects of network architecture that are shared among different types of evolved biological networks. First, we developed a new mathematical model, the Stochastic Block Model with Path Selection (SBM-PS) that simulates biological network formation based on the selection of edges that increase clustering. SBM-PS can produce modular networks whose properties resemble those of real networks. Second, we analyzed three real networks of very different types, and showed that all three can be fit well by the SBM-PS model. Third, we showed that modular elements within the three networks correspond to meaningful biological structures. The networks chosen for analysis were a proteomic network composed of all proteins required for mitochondrial function in budding yeast, a mesoscale anatomical network composed of axonal connections among regions of the mouse brain, and the connectome of individual neurons in the nematode C. elegans. We find that the three networks have common architectural features, and each can be divided into subnetworks with characteristic topologies that control specific phenotypic outputs.

  3. Structurally Diverse Alkaloids from the Seeds of Peganum harmala.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Bo; Li, Da-Hong; Bao, Yu; Cao, Fei; Wang, Wen-Jing; Lin, Clement; Bin, Wen; Bai, Jiao; Pei, Yue-Hu; Jing, Yong-Kui; Yang, Danzhou; Li, Zhan-Lin; Hua, Hui-Ming

    2017-02-24

    Investigation of the alkaloids from Peganum harmala seeds yielded two pairs of unique racemic pyrroloindole alkaloids, (±)-peganines A-B (1-2); two rare thiazole derivatives, peganumals A-B (3-4); six new β-carboline alkaloids, pegaharmines F-K (5-10); and 12 known analogues. Their structures, including stereochemistry, were elucidated through spectroscopic analyses, quantum chemistry calculations, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Notably, the incorporation of pyrrole and indole moieties in peganines A-B, thiazole fragments in peganumals A-B, and a C-1 α,β-unsaturated ester motif in pegaharmine F (5) are all rare, and their presence in the genus Peganum were demonstrated for the first time. All isolates were tested for antiproliferative activities against the HL-60, PC-3, and SGC-7901 cancer cell lines, and compounds 9, 11, 12, and 13 exhibited moderate cytotoxicity against HL-60 cancer cell lines with IC50 values in the range of 4.36-9.25 μM.

  4. Analysis of population structure and genetic diversity of Egyptian and exotic rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Salem, Khaled F M; Sallam, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the population structure and genetic diversity is a very important goal to improve the economic value of crops. In rice, a loss of genetic diversity in the last few centuries is observed. To address this challenge, a set of 22 lines from three different regions - India (two), and Philippines (six), and Egypt (14) - were used to assess the genetic diversity and the features of population structure. These genotypes were analyzed using 106 SSR alleles that showed a clear polymorphism among the lines. Genetic diversity was estimated based on the number of different alleles, polymorphism information content (PIC), and gene diversity. A total of 106 SSR alleles was identified from the 23 SSR loci and used to study the population structure and carry out a cluster analysis. All SSR loci showed a wide range of the number of different alleles extended from two (one loci) to seven alleles (three loci). Five and eight loci showed high PIC and gene diversity (≥0.70), respectively. The results of population structure are in agreement with cluster analysis results. Both analyses revealed two different subpopulations (G1 and G2) with different genetic properties in number of private alleles, number of different alleles (Na), number of effective alleles (Ne), expected heterozygosity (He), and Shannon's Information Index (SII). Our findings indicate that five SSR loci (RM 111, RM 307, RM 22, RM 19, and RM 271) could be used in breeding programs to enhance the marker-assisted selection through QTL mapping and association studies. A high genetic diversity found between genotypes which can be exploited to improve and produce rice cultivars for important traits (e.g. high agronomic features and tolerance to biotic or/and abiotic stresses).

  5. Scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities using functional diversity and community deconstruction approaches.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro Giovâni da; Hernández, Malva Isabel Medina

    2015-01-01

    Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass) for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae) community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in the distribution

  6. Scale-Dependence of Processes Structuring Dung Beetle Metacommunities Using Functional Diversity and Community Deconstruction Approaches

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Pedro Giovâni; Hernández, Malva Isabel Medina

    2015-01-01

    Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass) for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae) community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in the distribution

  7. A computer-generated galaxy model with long-lived two-armed spiral structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomasson, Magnus; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Donner, Karl Johan; Sundelius, Bjorn

    1990-06-01

    A long-lived two-armed spiral has been generated in an N-body computer simulation of a galaxy with a static bulge and halo and an active disk composed of 60,000 particles. The spiral lasts for about three pattern revolutions without severe distortion and persists for at least two more revolutions with distortions and bifurcations resulting from an increasingly clumpy ISM. This suggests that two-armed grand design spirals in nonbarred noninteracting galaxies can be long-lived if star formation and other heat sources not present in the simulation maintain a steady interstellar medium.

  8. Nematode community structure and diversity pattern in sandy beaches of Qingdao, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Er; Mu, Fanghong; Zhang, Zhinan; Yang, Shichao; Zhang, Ting; Li, Jia

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the diversity and structure of free-living marine nematode communities at three sandy beaches representing typical intertidal environments of a temperate zone in Qingdao, Shandong Province, China. Average nematode abundance ranged from 1006 to 2170 ind. 10 cm-2, and a total of 34 nematode genera were recorded, of which only 8 were common in all the studied beaches. Pielou's evenness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index were the lowest at the second beach where nematode abundance was the highest. The highest species diversity index coincided with the lowest nematode abundance at Shilaoren beach. Sediment median grain size, sorting coefficient, and chlorophyll-a content were essential for differentiation in nematode abundance and species diversity, whereas taxonomic diversity of nematode was homogeneous across the three beaches. In 0-20 cm sediment profile, nematode abundance declined abruptly with depth, whereas nematode diversity changed gently with obvious difference in 16-20 cm layer. Sediment granulometry and chlorophyll- a content were the two foremost factors which influenced the vertical distribution pattern of nematode generic diversity. Non-selective deposit feeders constituted the most dominant trophic group, followed by epistratum feeders. Bathylaimus (family: Tripyloididae) dominated at the second and Yangkou beach, while Theristus (family: Xyalidae) prevailed at Shilaoren beach. Omnivores and predators became important at Shilaoren beach because of the high proportion of Enoplolaimus. Even though, nematode community of the studied beaches did not differ significantly from each other.

  9. Characterizing Croatian Wheat Germplasm Diversity and Structure in a European Context by DArT Markers.

    PubMed

    Novoselović, Dario; Bentley, Alison R; Šimek, Ruđer; Dvojković, Krešimir; Sorrells, Mark E; Gosman, Nicolas; Horsnell, Richard; Drezner, Georg; Šatović, Zlatko

    2016-01-01

    Narrowing the genetic base available for future genetic progress is a major concern to plant breeders. In order to avoid this, strategies to characterize and protect genetic diversity in regional breeding pools are required. In this study, 89 winter wheat cultivars released in Croatia between 1936 and 2006 were genotyped using 1,229 DArT (diversity array technology) markers to assess the diversity and population structure. In order to place Croatian breeding pool (CBP) in a European context, Croatian wheat cultivars were compared to 523 European cultivars from seven countries using a total of 166 common DArT markers. The results show higher genetic diversity in the wheat breeding pool from Central Europe (CE) as compared to that from Northern and Western European (NWE) countries. The most of the genetic diversity was attributable to the differences among cultivars within countries. When the geographical criterion (CE vs. NWE) was applied, highly significant difference between regions was obtained that accounted for 16.19% of the total variance, revealing that the CBP represents genetic variation not currently captured in elite European wheat. The current study emphasizes the important contribution made by plant breeders to maintaining wheat genetic diversity and suggests that regional breeding is essential to the maintenance of this diversity. The usefulness of open-access wheat datasets is also highlighted.

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria malaccensis revealed potential for future conservation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pradeep; Nag, Akshay; Parmar, Rajni; Ghosh, Sneha; Bhau, Brijmohan Singh; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis,is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A. malaccensis accessions from 10 home gardens of three states of northeast India were assessed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Of the 1153 fragments amplified with four AFLP primer combinations, 916 (79.4%) were found to be polymorphic. Polymorphic information content (PIC) and marker index (MI) of each primer combination correlate significantly with the number of genotypes resolved. Overall, a high genetic diversity (avg. 71.85%) was recorded. Further, high gene flow (Nm: 3.37), low genetic differentiation (FST: 0.069) and high within population genetic variation (93%) suggests that most of the genetic diversity is restricted within population. Neighbour joining (NJ), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and Bayesian-based STRUCTURE grouped all the accessions in two clusters with significant intermixing between populations, therefore, revealed that two genetically distinct gene pools are operating in the A. malaccensis populations cultivated in home gardens. Based on the various diversity inferences, five diverse populations (JOH, FN, HLF, DHM and ITN) were identified, which can be potentially exploited to develop conservation strategies for A. malaccensis.

  11. Achievement of Diverse Domain Structures in Soft Magnetic Thin Film through Adjusting Intrinsic Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Juanying; Wang, Tao; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Li, Fashen

    2017-01-01

    Oriented soft magnetic hcp-Co1 - x Ir x films with a fixed thickness of 120 nm were fabricated. All prepared films exhibit soft magnetic properties but various magnetocrystalline anisotropies with the variation of Ir content. The measured data shows that diverse domain structures including the Néel wall, Bloch wall, and stripe domains present in a fixed film thickness. It is singular for the single-layer soft magnetic film to possess diverse domains in a fixed thickness. This phenomenon was explained by introducing intrinsic magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy into soft magnetic films rather than the structural parameters of the film, inner stress, and microstructure effect.

  12. Achievement of Diverse Domain Structures in Soft Magnetic Thin Film through Adjusting Intrinsic Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Juanying; Wang, Tao; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Li, Fashen

    2017-12-01

    Oriented soft magnetic hcp-Co1 - x Ir x films with a fixed thickness of 120 nm were fabricated. All prepared films exhibit soft magnetic properties but various magnetocrystalline anisotropies with the variation of Ir content. The measured data shows that diverse domain structures including the Néel wall, Bloch wall, and stripe domains present in a fixed film thickness. It is singular for the single-layer soft magnetic film to possess diverse domains in a fixed thickness. This phenomenon was explained by introducing intrinsic magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy into soft magnetic films rather than the structural parameters of the film, inner stress, and microstructure effect.

  13. The morphology of faint galaxies in Medium Deep Survey images using WFPC2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Casertano, S.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G. F.; Glazebrook, K.; Santiago, B.; Huchra, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    First results from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey images taken with Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) demonstrate that galaxy classifications can be reliably performed to magnitudes I814 approximately less than 22.0 in the F815W band. Published spectroscopic surveys to this depth indicate a mean redshift of bar-z approximately 0.5. We have classified over 200 galaxies in nine WFPC2 fields according to a basic morphological scheme. The majority of these faint galaxies appear to be similar to regular Hubble-sequence examples observed at low redshift. To the precision of our classification scheme, the relative proportion of spheroidal and disk systems of normal appearance is as expected from nearby samples, indicating that the bulk of the local galaxy population was in place at half the Hubble time. However, the most intriguing result is the relatively high proportion (approximately 40%) of objects which are in some way anomalous, and which may be of relevance in understanding the origin of the familiar excess population of faint galaxies established by others. These diverse objects include apparently interacting pairs whose multiple structure is only revealed with HST's angular resolution, galaxies with superluminous star-forming regions, diffuse low surface brightness galaxies of various forms, and compact galaxies. These anomalous galaxies contribute a substantial fraction of the excess counts at our limiting magnitude, and may provide insights into the 'faint blue galaxy' problem.

  14. Scaling relations of cluster elliptical galaxies at z~ 1.3. Distinguishing luminosity and structural evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, P.; Casati, A.; Gargiulo, A.; Longhetti, M.; Lonoce, I.; Tamburri, S.; Bettoni, D.; D'Onofrio D'Onofrio, M.; Fasano, G.; Poggianti, B. M.; Boutsia, K.; Fumana, M.; Sani, E.

    2014-07-01

    Context. We studied the size-surface brightness and the size-mass relations of a sample of 16 cluster elliptical galaxies in the mass range ~ 1010-2 × 1011 M⊙, which were morphologically selected in the cluster RDCS J0848+4453 at z = 1.27. Aims: Our aim is to assess whether they have completed their mass growth at their redshift or significant mass, and/or size growth can or must still take place until z = 0. This will enable us to know whether the elliptical galaxies of clusters follow or not the observed size evolution of passive galaxies. Methods: To compare our data with the local universe we considered the Kormendy relation derived from the early-type galaxies of a local Coma Cluster reference sample and the WINGS survey sample. The comparison with the local Kormendy relation shows that the luminosity evolution due to the aging of the stellar content already assembled at z = 1.27 brings them on the local relation. Moreover, this stellar content places them on the size-mass relation of the local cluster ellipticals. These results imply that for a given mass, the stellar mass at z ~ 1.3 is distributed within these ellipticals according to the same stellar mass profile of local ellipticals. We find that a pure size evolution, even mild, is ruled out for our galaxies since it would lead them away from both the Kormendy and the size-mass relation. If an evolution of the effective radius takes place, this must be compensated by an increase in the luminosity, hence of the stellar mass of the galaxies, to keep them on the local relations. We show that to follow the Kormendy relation, the stellar mass must increase as the effective radius. However, this mass growth is not sufficient to keep the galaxies on the size-mass relation for the same variation in effective radius. Thus, if we want to preserve the Kormendy relation, we fail to satisfy the size-mass relation and vice versa. Results: The combined analysis of the size-surface brightness relation with the size

  15. The relative importance of host-plant genetic diversity in structuring the associated herbivore community.

    PubMed

    Tack, Ayco J M; Roslin, Tomas

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that intraspecific genetic diversity in one species may leave a substantial imprint on the surrounding community and ecosystem. Here, we test the hypothesis that genetic diversity within host-plant patches translates into consistent and ecologically important changes in the associated herbivore community. More specifically, we use potted, grafted oak saplings to construct 41 patches of four saplings each, with one, two, or four tree genotypes represented among the host plants. These patches were divided among two common gardens. Focusing first at the level of individual trees, we assess how tree-specific genotypic identity, patch-level genetic diversity, garden-level environmental variation, and their interactions affect the structure of the herbivore community. At the level of host-plant patches, we analyze whether the joint responses of herbivore species to environmental variation and genetic diversity result in differences in species diversity among tree quartets. Strikingly, both species-specific abundances and species diversity varied substantially among host-tree genotypes, among common gardens, and among specific locations within individual gardens. In contrast, the genetic diversity of the patch left a detectable imprint on local abundances of only two herbivore taxa. In both cases, the effect of genetic diversity was inconsistent among gardens and among host-plant genotypes. While the insect community differed significantly among individual host-plant genotypes, there were no interactive effects of the number of different genotypes within the patch. Overall, additive effects of intraspecific genetic diversity of the host plant explained a similar or lower proportion (7-10%) of variation in herbivore species diversity than did variation among common gardens. Combined with the few previous studies published to date, our study suggests that the impact of host-plant genetic diversity on the herbivore community can range from none to

  16. Temporal stability in patterns of genetic diversity and structure of a marine foundation species (Zostera marina).

    PubMed

    Reynolds, L K; Stachowicz, J J; Hughes, A R; Kamel, S J; Ort, B S; Grosberg, R K

    2017-04-01

    Genetic diversity and population structure reflect complex interactions among a diverse set of processes that may vary temporally, limiting their potential to predict ecological and evolutionary outcomes. Yet, the stability of these patterns is rarely tested. We resampled eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows from published studies to determine variability in genetic diversity and structure within and between meadows over 5-12 years. The meadows sampled (San Francisco, Tomales and Bodega Bays in California and the Virginia coastal bays) represent a range of life histories (annual vs perennial), age (well-established vs restored) and environments (rural vs urbanized). In all of these systems, neither diversity nor differentiation (FST) changed over time. Differences among tidal heights within Bodega Bay were also remarkably consistent, with the high intertidal being more diverse than the subtidal, and tidal height differentiation being modest but significant at both time points. Historical studies used only a few microsatellite loci; therefore, our temporal comparisons were based on 4-5 loci. However, analysis of the current data using a set of 12 loci show that 4-5 loci are sufficient to describe diversity and differentiation patterns in this system. This temporal consistency was not because of the resampling of large clones, underscoring the feasibility and relevance of understanding drivers of the differences. Because seagrasses are declining at rapid rates, restoration and conservation are increasingly a coastal management priority. Our results argue that surveys of eelgrass genetic structure and diversity at decadal scales can provide accurate depictions of populations, increasing the utility of published genetic data for restoration and designing networks of reserves.

  17. Superluminous Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Patrick M.; Lanz, Lauranne; Nader, Cyril; Helou, George

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of spiral galaxies that are as optically luminous as elliptical brightest cluster galaxies, with r-band monochromatic luminosity Lr = 8-14L* (4.3-7.5 × 1044 erg s-1). These super spiral galaxies are also giant and massive, with diameter D = 57-134 kpc and stellar mass Mstars = 0.3-3.4 × 1011M⊙. We find 53 super spirals out of a complete sample of 1616 SDSS galaxies with redshift z < 0.3 and Lr > 8L*. The closest example is found at z = 0.089. We use existing photometry to estimate their stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs). The SDSS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer colors are consistent with normal star-forming spirals on the blue sequence. However, the extreme masses and rapid SFRs of 5-65 M⊙ yr-1 place super spirals in a sparsely populated region of parameter space, above the star-forming main sequence of disk galaxies. Super spirals occupy a diverse range of environments, from isolation to cluster centers. We find four super spiral galaxy systems that are late-stage major mergers—a possible clue to their formation. We suggest that super spirals are a remnant population of unquenched, massive disk galaxies. They may eventually become massive lenticular galaxies after they are cut off from their gas supply and their disks fade.

  18. BaLROG: The Influence of Bars on the Dynamical Structure in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, M. K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Díaz-García, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Knapen, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    Using the BaLROG (Bars in Low Redshift Optical Galaxies) sample of 16 morphologically distinct barred spirals, we constrain the influence of bars on nearby galaxies observationally. Our sample appears small compared to ongoing IFU surveys, but offers a tenfold sharper spatial resolution (˜100 pc) as each galaxy is a mosaic of several pointings observed with the IFU spectrograph SAURON. We demonstrate a correlation between the bar strength Qb determined from classical torque analysis using 3.6 μm Spitzer (S4G) images, with Qkin, a kinematic torque, calculated via our new method based solely on the kinematics. Using a large number of N-body simulations, we verify this correlation and the measurement of Qb. We also determine bar strengths from ionized gas kinematics and find that they are ˜2.5 larger than those measured from stellar kinematics. Further, inner kinematic features related to bars as predicted by simulations seem to be stronger for stronger bars. We find a stellar angular momentum dip at 0.2±0.1 bar lengths. In these central regions, about half of our sample also exhibits an anti-correlation of h3 - stellar velocity (v/σ). An increased flattening of the stellar σ gradient with increasing bar strength supports the notion of bar-induced orbit mixing. Our results constrain the spatial scales and magnitude of a kinematic influence of bar-driven secular evolution in present day galaxies.

  19. Structure and substructure analysis of DAFT/FADA galaxy clusters in the [0.4-0.9] redshift range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guennou, L.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Ulmer, M. P.; Clowe, D.; LeBrun, V.; Martinet, N.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Basa, S.; Benoist, C.; Biviano, A.; Cappi, A.; Cypriano, E. S.; Gavazzi, R.; Halliday, C.; Ilbert, O.; Jullo, E.; Just, D.; Limousin, M.; Márquez, I.; Mazure, A.; Murphy, K. J.; Plana, H.; Rostagni, F.; Russeil, D.; Schirmer, M.; Slezak, E.; Tucker, D.; Zaritsky, D.; Ziegler, B.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The DAFT/FADA survey is based on the study of ~90 rich (masses found in the literature >2 × 1014 M⊙) and moderately distant clusters (redshifts 0.4 < z < 0.9), all with HST imaging data available. This survey has two main objectives: to constrain dark energy (DE) using weak lensing tomography on galaxy clusters and to build a database (deep multi-band imaging allowing photometric redshift estimates, spectroscopic data, X-ray data) of rich distant clusters to study their properties. Aims: We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range are available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. Methods: In X-rays, we analysed the XMM-Newton data available, fit a β-model, and subtracted it to identify residuals. We used Chandra data, when available, to identify point sources. In the optical, we applied a Serna & Gerbal (SG) analysis to clusters with at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts available in the cluster range. We discuss the substructure detection efficiencies of both methods. Results: XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a β-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. The choice of a minimum number of 15 redshifts implies that only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first

  20. Studying the large scale structure and interstellar medium of galaxies during the epochs of peak cosmic star formation and Reionization with infrared fine structure lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzgil, Bade D.

    Infrared (IR) fine-structure (FS) lines from trace metals in the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies are valuable diagnostics of the physical conditions in a broad range of astrophysical environments, such gas irradiated by stellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons or X-rays from accreting supermassive black holes, called active galactic nuclei (AGN). The transparency of these lines to dust and their high escape fractions into the intergalactic medium (IGM) render them as useful probes to study the epochs of peak cosmic star formation (SF) and Reionization. Chapter 1 of this thesis is a study of the ISM of the Cloverleaf quasar. Observations of IR FS lines from singly ionized carbon and neutral oxygen have allowed us to assess the physical conditions---parametrized by their gas density and the impingent FUV flux---prevalent in atomic gas heated by stellar FUV photons. We find that UV heating from local SF is not sufficient to explain the measured FS and molecular luminosities, and suggest that X-ray heating from the AGN is required to simultaneously explain both sets of data. The general picture of the Cloverleaf ISM that emerges from our composite model is one where the [CII] and [OI]63 line emission is produced primarily within PDRs and HII regions of a 1.3-kpc wide starburst, which is embedded in a denser XDR component that is the dominant source of heating for the CO gas. The fact that the star-forming PDR and HII region gas is co-spatial with the XDR---and within ˜ 650 pc of the accreting black hole---provides strong evidence that SF is ongoing while immersed in a strong X-ray radiation field provided by the nearby AGN. This finding has implications for the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. The work in this chapter will be submitted for first-author publication imminently. In Chapter 2, we explore the possibility of studying the redshifted far-IR fine-structure line emission using the three-dimensional (3-D) power spectra

  1. Structural Transition in the NGC 6251 Jet: an Interplay with the Supermassive Black Hole and Its Host Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chih-Yin; Asada, Keiichi; Nakamura, Masanori; Pu, Hung-Yi; Algaba, Juan-Carlos; Lo, Wen-Ping

    2016-12-01

    The structure of the NGC 6251 jet on the milliarcsecond scale is investigated using images taken with the European VLBI Network and the Very Long Baseline Array. We detect a structural transition of the jet from a parabolic to a conical shape at a distance of (1-2) × 105 times the Schwarzschild radius from the central engine, which is close to the sphere of gravitational influence of the supermassive black hole (SMBH). We also examine the jet pressure profiles with the synchrotron minimum energy assumption to discuss the physical origin of the structural transition. The NGC 6251 jet, together with the M87 jet, suggests a fundamental process of structural transition in the jets of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Collimated AGN jets are characterized by their external galactic medium, showing that AGN jets interplay with the SMBH and its host galaxy.

  2. Plausible Boosting of Millimeter-Galaxies in the COSMOS Field by Intervening Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretxaga, I.; Wilson, G. W.; Aguilar, E.; Alberts, S.; Scott, K. S.; Scoville, N.; Yun, M. S.; Austermann, J.; Downes, T. D.; Ezawa, H.; Hatsukade, B.; Hughes, D. H.; Kawabe, R.; Kohno, K.; Oshima, T.; Perera, T. A.; Tamura, Y.; Zeballos, M.

    2011-10-01

    The 0.72 sq. deg. contiguous 1.1mm survey in the central area of the COSMOS field, carried out to a 1σ≍1.26 mJy beam-1 depth with the AzTEC camera mounted on the 10m Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE), shows number counts with a significant excess of sources when compared to the number counts derived from the ˜0.5 sq. deg. area sampled at similar depths in the Scuba HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES, Austermann et al. 2010). They are, however, consistent with those derived from fields that were considered too small to characterize the overall blank-field population. We identify differences to be more significant in the S1.1mm ˜> 5 mJy regime, and demonstrate that these excesses in number counts are related to the areas where galaxies at redshifts ˜< 1.1 are more densely clustered. The positions of optical-IR galaxies in the redshift interval 0.6 ˜< z ˜< 0.75 are the ones that show the strongest correlation with the positions of the 1.1mm bright population (S1.mm ˜>5 mJy), a result which does not depend exclusively on the presence of rich clusters within the survey sampled area. The most likely explanation for the observed excess in number counts at 1.1mm is galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-group lensing at moderate amplification levels, that increases in amplitude as one samples larger and larger flux densities.

  3. Considering Future Potential Regarding Structural Diversity in Selection of Forest Reserves.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    A rich structural diversity in forests promotes biodiversity. Forests are dynamic and therefore it is crucial to consider future structural potential when selecting reserves, to make robust conservation decisions. We analyzed forests in boreal Sweden based on 17,599 National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots with the main aim to understand how effectiveness of reserves depends on the time dimension in the selection process, specifically by considering future structural diversity. In the study both the economic value and future values of 15 structural variables were simulated during a 100 year period. To get a net present structural value (NPSV), a single value covering both current and future values, we used four discounting alternatives: (1) only considering present values, (2) giving equal importance to values in each of the 100 years within the planning horizon, (3) applying an annual discount rate considering the risk that values could be lost, and (4) only considering the values in year 100. The four alternatives were evaluated in a reserve selection model under budget-constrained and area-constrained selections. When selecting young forests higher structural richness could be reached at a quarter of the cost over almost twice the area in a budget-constrained selection compared to an area-constrained selection. Our results point to the importance of considering future structural diversity in the selection of forest reserves and not as is done currently to base the selection on existing values. Targeting future values increases structural diversity and implies a relatively lower cost. Further, our results show that a re-orientation from old to young forests would imply savings while offering a more extensive reserve network with high structural qualities in the future. However, caution must be raised against a drastic reorientation of the current old-forest strategy since remnants of ancient forests will need to be prioritized due to their role for disturbance

  4. Considering Future Potential Regarding Structural Diversity in Selection of Forest Reserves

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    A rich structural diversity in forests promotes biodiversity. Forests are dynamic and therefore it is crucial to consider future structural potential when selecting reserves, to make robust conservation decisions. We analyzed forests in boreal Sweden based on 17,599 National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots with the main aim to understand how effectiveness of reserves depends on the time dimension in the selection process, specifically by considering future structural diversity. In the study both the economic value and future values of 15 structural variables were simulated during a 100 year period. To get a net present structural value (NPSV), a single value covering both current and future values, we used four discounting alternatives: (1) only considering present values, (2) giving equal importance to values in each of the 100 years within the planning horizon, (3) applying an annual discount rate considering the risk that values could be lost, and (4) only considering the values in year 100. The four alternatives were evaluated in a reserve selection model under budget-constrained and area-constrained selections. When selecting young forests higher structural richness could be reached at a quarter of the cost over almost twice the area in a budget-constrained selection compared to an area-constrained selection. Our results point to the importance of considering future structural diversity in the selection of forest reserves and not as is done currently to base the selection on existing values. Targeting future values increases structural diversity and implies a relatively lower cost. Further, our results show that a re-orientation from old to young forests would imply savings while offering a more extensive reserve network with high structural qualities in the future. However, caution must be raised against a drastic reorientation of the current old-forest strategy since remnants of ancient forests will need to be prioritized due to their role for disturbance

  5. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68), which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G”ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively) and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands. PMID:26079603

  6. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68), which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G"ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively) and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands.

  7. VIPERS: Unveiling the Combined Evolution of Galaxies and Large Scale Structure at 0.5≤z ≤1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovino, A.; Vipers Team

    2016-10-01

    The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) is the largest redshift survey ever conducted with the ESO telescopes. It has used the Very Large Telescope to collect nearly 100,000 redshifts from the general galaxy population at 0.5≤ z ≤1.2. With a combination of volume and sampling density that is unique for these redshifts, VIPERS allows statistical measurements of galaxy clustering and related cosmological quantities to be obtained on an equal footing with classic results from local redshift surveys. At the same time, the broad selection function and ancillary photometric data provide detailed information on the physical properties of the galaxy population and their relation to large-scale structure. This talk presents an overview of the results obtained so far, mostly based on the ˜ 55,000 galaxies forming the first public data release (PDR-1).

  8. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters – V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-07-15

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. In addition, we present constraints on the concentration–mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = –0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions. For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = –0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ~50 kpc–1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to –1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.

  9. Interracial Friendship and Structural Diversity: Trends for Greek, Religious, and Ethnic Student Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Julie J.; Kim, Young K.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how peer interactions in college organizations (Greek, ethnic, and religious) affect interracial friendships, including whether peer interaction in student organizations mediates the relationship between structural diversity and interracial friendship. Involvement in ethnic student organizations was non-significant;…

  10. Diverse Narrative Structures in Contemporary Picturebooks: Opportunities for Children's Meaning-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleo, Sylvia; Sipe, Lawrence R.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors situate their discussion of diverse narrative structures in the context of oral storytelling practices and postmodern picturebooks. They focus on three contemporary picturebooks: "Don't Read This Book!" (Lewis, 2009), "Abe Lincoln Crosses a Creek: A Tall Thin Tale" (Hopkins, 2008), and "The Stinky Cheese Man and Other…

  11. Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Resistance to Phytophthora capsici of a Worldwide Collection of Eggplant Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Naegele, Rachel P.; Boyle, Samantha; Quesada-Ocampo, Lina M.; Hausbeck, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is an important solanaceous crop with high phenotypic diversity and moderate genotypic diversity. Ninety-nine genotypes of eggplant germplasm (species (S. melongena, S. incanum, S. linnaeanum and S. gilo), landraces and heirloom cultivars) from 32 countries and five continents were evaluated for genetic diversity, population structure, fruit shape, and disease resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot. Fruits from each line were measured for fruit shape and evaluated for resistance to two Phytophthora capsici isolates seven days post inoculation. Only one accession (PI 413784) was completely resistant to both isolates evaluated. Partial resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot was found in accessions from all four eggplant species evaluated in this study. Genetic diversity and population structure were assessed using 22 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The polymorphism information content (PIC) for the population was moderate (0.49) in the population. Genetic analyses using the program STRUCTURE indicated the existence of four genetic clusters within the eggplant collection. Population structure was detected when eggplant lines were grouped by species, continent of origin, country of origin, fruit shape and disease resistance. PMID:24819601

  12. Application of resistance gene analog markers to analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juansheng; Yu, Yuchao; Gao, Fangyuan; Zeng, Lihua; Lu, Xianjun; Wu, Xianting; Yan, Wengui; Ren, Guangjun

    2013-07-01

    Plant disease resistance gene analog (RGA) markers were designed according to the conserved sequence of known RGAs and used to map resistance genes. We used genome-wide RGA markers for genetic analyses of structure and diversity in a global rice germplasm collection. Of the 472 RGA markers, 138 were polymorphic and these were applied to 178 entries selected from the USDA rice core collection. Results from the RGA markers were similar between two methods, UPGMA and STRUCTURE. Additionally, the results from RGA markers in our study were agreeable with those previously reported from SSR markers, including cluster of ancestral classification, genetic diversity estimates, genetic relatedness, and cluster of geographic origins. These results suggest that RGA markers are applicable for analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice. However, unlike SSR markers, the RGA markers failed to differentiate temperate japonica, tropical japonica, and aromatic subgroups. The restricted way for developing RGA markers from the cDNA sequence might limit the polymorphism of RGA markers in the genome, thus limiting the discriminatory power in comparison with SSR markers. Genetic differentiation obtained using RGA markers may be useful for defining genetic diversity of a suite of random R genes in plants, as many studies show a differentiation of resistance to a wide array of pathogens. They could also help to characterize the genetic structure and geographic distribution in crops, including rice, wheat, barley, and banana.

  13. Microbial community structure and diversity as indicators for evaluating soil quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review addresses two critical questions regarding soil quality: (1) which soil microbial properties, in particular diversity and community structure, most effectively characterize soil quality and should be used as indicators, and (2) how can soil quality assessed by such indicators be improved...

  14. Structure of Vocational Interests for Diverse Groups on the 2005 Strong Interest Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantamneni, Neeta; Fouad, Nadya

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the structure of vocational interests in a diverse sample of individuals who completed the 2005 revision of the Strong Interest Inventory. We examined the fit of three racial/ethnic groups (African American, Caucasian, and Latino/a), both genders, and three levels of professional status (GRS participant, student,…

  15. Genetic diversity, population structure, and formulation of a core collection of 1,197 Citrullus accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been continuing interests in breeding of watermelon for economic benefits, but information on the scope and utilization of genetic variations in this genus (Citrullus) is still limited. We evaluated the genetic diversity and population structure of 1,197 watermelon collections, which belon...

  16. The Diverse Social and Economic Structure of Nonmetropolitan America. Rural Development Research Report No. 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Lloyd D.; And Others

    Effective rural development planning depends on facts and analysis based, not on rural averages, but on the diverse social and economic structure of rural America. Programs tailored to particular types of rural economies may be more effective than generalized programs. Because of their unique characteristics, government policies and economic…

  17. Population structure and genetic diversity of Fusicladium effusum in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scab (Fusicladium effusum) is the most destructive disease of pecan in the Southeast US. Infection is thought to occur solely through asexually produced conidia. To explore the population structure and genetic diversity of F. effusum, populations were hierarchically sampled from 11 orchards in Alaba...

  18. Understanding the genetic diversity and population structure of yam (Dioscorea alata L.) using microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Arnau, Gemma; MN, Sheela; Chair, Hana; Lebot, Vincent; K, Abraham; Perrier, Xavier; Petro, Dalila; Penet, Laurent; Pavis, Claudie

    2017-01-01

    Yams (Dioscorea sp.) are staple food crops for millions of people in tropical and subtropical regions. Dioscorea alata, also known as greater yam, is one of the major cultivated species and most widely distributed throughout the tropics. Despite its economic and cultural importance, very little is known about its origin, diversity and genetics. As a consequence, breeding efforts for resistance to its main disease, anthracnose, have been fairly limited. The objective of this study was to contribute to the understanding of D. alata genetic diversity by genotyping 384 accessions from different geographical regions (South Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Caribbean), using 24 microsatellite markers. Diversity structuration was assessed via Principal Coordinate Analysis, UPGMA analysis and the Bayesian approach implemented in STRUCTURE. Our results revealed the existence of a wide genetic diversity and a significant structuring associated with geographic origin, ploidy levels and morpho-agronomic characteristics. Seventeen major groups of genetically close cultivars have been identified, including eleven groups of diploid cultivars, four groups of triploids and two groups of tetraploids. STRUCTURE revealed the existence of six populations in the diploid genetic pool and a few admixed cultivars. These results will be very useful for rationalizing D. alata genetic resources in breeding programs across different regions and for improving germplasm conservation methods. PMID:28355293

  19. Population structure and genetic diversity of Sclerotinia minor from peanut research plots in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia minor is the causal agent of Sclerotinia blight, a disease that significantly reduces peanut (Arachis hypogea) productivity. This study analyzed the diversity and population structure of 164 S. minor isolates from Oklahoma. Isolates were obtained from infected stems of peanut plants fr...

  20. [Age structure and genetic diversity of Homatula pycnolepis in the Nujiang River basin].

    PubMed

    Yue, Xing-Jian; Liu, Shao-Ping; Liu, Ming-Dian; Duan, Xin-Bin; Wang, Deng-Qiang; Chen, Da-Qing

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the age structure of the Loach, Homatula pycnolepis through the otolith growth rings in 204 individual specimens collected from the Xiaomengtong River of the Nujiang River (Salween River) basin in April, 2008. There were only two different age classes, 1 and 2 years of age-no 3 year olds were detected. The age structure of H. pycnolepis was simple. The complete mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene sequences (1140) of 80 individuals from 4 populations collected in the Nujiang River drainage were sequenced and a total of 44 variable sites were found among 4 different haplotypes. The global haplotype diversity (Hd) and nucleotide diversity (Pi) were calculated at 0.7595, 0.0151 respectively, and 0, 0 in each population, indicating a consistent lack of genetic diversity in each small population. There was obvious geographic structure in both the Nujiang River basin (NJB) group, and the Nanding River (NDR) group. The genetic distance between NJB and NDR was calculated at 0.0356, suggesting that genetic divergence resulted from long-term isolation of individual population. Such a simple age structure and a lack of genetic diversity in H. pycnolepis may potentially be due to small populations and locale fishing pressures. Accordingly, the results of this study prompt us to recommend that the NJB, NDR and Lancang River populations should be protected as three different evolutionary significant units or separated management units.

  1. [60]Fullerene-peptides: bio-nano conjugates with structural and chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Barron, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    [60]Fullerene-peptides represent a simple yet chemically diverse example of a bio-nano conjugate. The C60 moiety provides the following attributes to the conjugate: (a) precise three-dimensional architecture, (b) a large hydrophobic mass and (c) unique electronic properties. Conversely, the peptide component provides: (a) structural diversity depending on the overall length and amino acids composition, (b) charge flexibility and (c) secondary structure and recognition. Recent advances in the synthetic strategy for [60]fullerene-peptide synthesis from both pre-formed peptides and using solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) are described. The effects of the hydrophobic C60 on the secondary structure of the peptide depend on the sequence of the latter, but in general the relative stability of particular structures is greatly enhanced. The ability of the [60]fullerene substituent to dramatically modify both cellular uptake and transdermal transport is discussed as is the effects on cell viability and antimicrobial activity.

  2. Allozyme diversity and genetic structure of the leafy cactus (Pereskia guamacho [Cactaceae]).

    PubMed

    Nassar, J M; Hamrick, J L; Fleming, T H

    2002-01-01

    We examined levels of genetic variation and genetic structure in the leafy cactus (Pereskia guamacho) in arid and semiarid zones in Venezuela. We surveyed genetic diversity within 17 populations using 19 allozyme loci. Genetic diversity was relatively high at both the species (P(s) = 89%, A(s) = 3.26, AP(s) = 3.53, H(es) = 0.24) and population (P(p) = 63%, A(p) = 1.90, AP(p) = 2.42, H(ep) = 0.20) levels. A significant deficit of heterozygote individuals was detected within populations in the Paraguana Peninsula region (F(IS) = 0.301). Relatively low levels of population differentiation were detected at macrogeographic (G(ST) = 0.112) and regional levels (G(ST) = 0.044 for peninsula region and G(ST) = 0.074 for mainland region), suggesting substantial genetic exchange among populations; however, gene flow in this species seems to be regulated by the distance among populations. Overall, estimates of genetic diversity found in P. guamacho are concordant with the pattern observed for other cacti surveyed, namely high levels of polymorphism and genetic diversity with one common allele and several rare alleles per locus. Differences in gene dispersal systems between this species and other cacti studied were not reflected in the patterns of genetic diversity observed. The concentration of the highest estimates of genetic variation in northwestern Venezuela suggests a potential reservoir of plant genetic diversity within xerophilous ecosystems in northern South America.

  3. Genomic diversity, population structure, and migration following rapid range expansion in the Balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stephen R; Olson, Matthew S; Silim, Salim; Schroeder, William; Tiffin, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Rapid range expansions can cause pervasive changes in the genetic diversity and structure of populations. The postglacial history of the Balsam Poplar, Populus balsamifera, involved the colonization of most of northern North America, an area largely covered by continental ice sheets during the last glacial maximum. To characterize how this expansion shaped genomic diversity within and among populations, we developed 412 SNP markers that we assayed for a range-wide sample of 474 individuals sampled from 34 populations. We complemented the SNP data set with DNA sequence data from 11 nuclear loci from 94 individuals, and used coalescent analyses to estimate historical population size, demographic growth, and patterns of migration. Bayesian clustering identified three geographically separated demes found in the Northern, Central, and Eastern portions of the species' range. These demes varied significantly in nucleotide diversity, the abundance of private polymorphisms, and population substructure. Most measures supported the Central deme as descended from the primary refuge of diversity. Both SNPs and sequence data suggested recent population growth, and coalescent analyses of historical migration suggested a massive expansion from the Centre to the North and East. Collectively, these data demonstrate the strong influence that range expansions exert on genomic diversity, both within local populations and across the range. Our results suggest that an in-depth knowledge of nucleotide diversity following expansion requires sampling within multiple populations, and highlight the utility of combining insights from different data types in population genomic studies.

  4. STAR FORMATION AND UV COLORS OF THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE REPRESENTATIVE XMM-NEWTON CLUSTER STRUCTURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Megan; Bruch, Seth; Wang, Emily; Voit, G. Mark; Hicks, Amalia K.; Haarsma, Deborah B.; Croston, Judith H.; Pratt, Gabriel W.; O'Connell, Robert W.

    2010-06-01

    We present UV broadband photometry and optical emission-line measurements for a sample of 32 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in clusters of the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) with z = 0.06-0.18. The REXCESS clusters, chosen to study scaling relations in clusters of galaxies, have X-ray measurements of high quality. The trends of star formation and BCG colors with BCG and host properties can be investigated with this sample. The UV photometry comes from the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor, supplemented by existing archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer photometry. We detected H{alpha} and forbidden line emission in seven (22%) of these BCGs, in optical spectra obtained using the Southern Astrophysical Research Goodman spectrograph. All of these emission-line BCGs occupy clusters classified as cool cores (CCs) based on the central cooling time in the cluster core, for an emission-line incidence rate of 70% for BCGs in REXCESS CC clusters. Significant correlations between the H{alpha} equivalent widths, excess UV production in the BCG, and the presence of dense, X-ray bright intracluster gas with a short cooling time are seen, including the fact that all of the H{alpha} emitters inhabit systems with short central cooling times and high central intracluster medium densities. Estimates of the star formation rates based on H{alpha} and UV excesses are consistent with each other in these seven systems, ranging from 0.1to8 solar masses per year. The incidence of emission-line BCGs in the REXCESS sample is intermediate, somewhat lower than in other X-ray-selected samples ({approx}35%), and somewhat higher than but statistically consistent with optically selected, slightly lower redshift BCG samples ({approx}10%-15%). The UV-optical colors (UVW1 - R {approx}4.7 {+-} 0.3) of REXCESS BCGs without strong optical emission lines are consistent with those predicted from templates and observations of ellipticals dominated by old stellar populations. We see no

  5. Zika virus NS1 structure reveals diversity of electrostatic surfaces among flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Haywood, Joel; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-05-01

    The association of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections with microcephaly has resulted in an ongoing public-health emergency. Here we report the crystal structure of a C-terminal fragment of ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), a major host-interaction molecule that functions in flaviviral replication, pathogenesis and immune evasion. Comparison with West Nile and dengue virus NS1 structures reveals conserved features but diverse electrostatic characteristics at host-interaction interfaces, thus possibly implying different modes of flavivirus pathogenesis.

  6. Genetic Structure and Potential Environmental Determinants of Local Genetic Diversity in Japanese Honeybees (Apis cerana japonica)

    PubMed Central

    Nagamitsu, Teruyoshi; Yasuda, Mika; Saito-Morooka, Fuki; Inoue, Maki N.; Nishiyama, Mio; Goka, Koichi; Sugiura, Shinji; Maeto, Kaoru; Okabe, Kimiko; Taki, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    Declines in honeybee populations have been a recent concern. Although causes of the declines remain unclear, environmental factors may be responsible. We focused on the potential environmental determinants of local populations of wild honeybees, Apis cerana japonica, in Japan. This subspecies has little genetic variation in terms of its mitochondrial DNA sequences, and genetic variations at nuclear loci are as yet unknown. We estimated the genetic structure and environmental determinants of local genetic diversity in nuclear microsatellite genotypes of fathers and mothers, inferred from workers collected at 139 sites. The genotypes of fathers and mothers showed weak isolation by distance and negligible genetic structure. The local genetic diversity was high in central Japan, decreasing toward the peripheries, and depended on the climate and land use characteristics of the sites. The local genetic diversity decreased as the annual precipitation increased, and increased as the proportion of urban and paddy field areas increased. Positive effects of natural forest area, which have also been observed in terms of forager abundance in farms, were not detected with respect to the local genetic diversity. The findings suggest that A. cerana japonica forms a single population connected by gene flow in its main distributional range, and that climate and landscape properties potentially affect its local genetic diversity. PMID:27898704

  7. Genetic structure and diversity among maize inbred lines as inferred from DNA microsatellites.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kejun; Goodman, Major; Muse, Spencer; Smith, J Stephen; Buckler, Ed; Doebley, John

    2003-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty maize inbred lines, representative of the genetic diversity among essentially all public lines of importance to temperate breeding and many important tropical and subtropical lines, were assayed for polymorphism at 94 microsatellite loci. The 2039 alleles identified served as raw data for estimating genetic structure and diversity. A model-based clustering analysis placed the inbred lines in five clusters that correspond to major breeding groups plus a set of lines showing evidence of mixed origins. A "phylogenetic" tree was constructed to further assess the genetic structure of maize inbreds, showing good agreement with the pedigree information and the cluster analysis. Tropical and subtropical inbreds possess a greater number of alleles and greater gene diversity than their temperate counterparts. The temperate Stiff Stalk lines are on average the most divergent from all other inbred groups. Comparison of diversity in equivalent samples of inbreds and open-pollinated landraces revealed that maize inbreds capture <80% of the alleles in the landraces, suggesting that landraces can provide additional genetic diversity for maize breeding. The contributions of four different segments of the landrace gene pool to each inbred group's gene pool were estimated using a novel likelihood-based model. The estimates are largely consistent with known histories of the inbreds and indicate that tropical highland germplasm is poorly represented in maize inbreds. Core sets of inbreds that capture maximal allelic richness were defined. These or similar core sets can be used for a variety of genetic applications in maize. PMID:14704191

  8. Genetic diversity and structure of the threatened species Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) Ying.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Wang, J; Yin, D X; Yang, M; Wang, P; Han, Q S; Ma, Q Q; Liu, J J; Wang, J X

    2016-06-10

    Sinopodophyllum hexandrum is an important medicinal plant that has been listed as an endangered species, making the conservation of its genetic diversity a priority. Therefore, the genetic diversity and population structure of S. hexandrum was investigated through inter-simple sequence repeat analysis of eight natural populations. Eleven selected primers generated 141 discernible fragments. The percentage of polymorphic bands was 37.59% at the species level, and 7.66-24.32% at the population level. Genetic diversity of S. hexandrum was low within populations (average HE = 0.0366), but higher at the species level (HE = 0.0963). Clear structure and high genetic differentiation were detected between populations using unweighted pair groups mean arithmetic and principle coordinate analysis. Clustering approaches clustered the eight sampled populations into three major groups, and AMOVA confirmed there to be significant variation between populations (63.27%). Genetic differentiation may have arisen through limited gene flow (Nm = 0.3317) in this species. Isolation by distance among populations was determined by comparing genetic distance versus geographical distance using the Mantel test. The results revealed no correlation between spatial pattern and geographic location. Given the low within-population genetic diversity, high differentiation among populations, and the increasing anthropogenic pressure on this species, in situ conservation measures, in addition to sampling and ex situ preservation, are recommended to preserve S. hexandrum populations and to retain their genetic diversity.

  9. A Reassessment of the Impact of European Contact on the Structure of Native American Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hunley, Keith; Gwin, Kiela; Liberman, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Our current understanding of pre-Columbian history in the Americas rests in part on several trends identified in recent genetic studies. The goal of this study is to reexamine these trends in light of the impact of post-Columbian admixture and the methods used to study admixture. The previously-published data consist of 645 autosomal microsatellite genotypes from 1046 individuals in 63 populations. We used STRUCTURE to estimate ancestry proportions and tested the sensitivity of these estimates to the choice of the number of clusters, K. We used partial correlation analyses to examine the relationship between gene diversity and geographic distance from Beringia, controlling for non-Native American ancestry (from Africa, Europe and East Asia), and taking into account alternative paths of migration. Principal component analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to investigate the relationships between Andean and non-Andean populations and to explore gene-language correspondence. We found that 1) European and East Asian ancestry estimates decline as K increases, especially in Native Canadian populations, 2) a north-south decline in gene diversity is driven by low diversity in Amazonian and Paraguayan populations, not serial founder effects from Beringia, 3) controlling for non-Native American ancestry, populations in the Andes and Mesoamerica have higher gene diversity than populations in other regions, and 4) patterns of genetic and linguistic diversity are poorly correlated. We conclude that patterns of diversity previously attributed to pre-Columbian processes may in part reflect post-Columbian admixture and the choice of K in STRUCTURE analyses. Accounting for admixture, the pattern of diversity is inconsistent with a north-south founder effect process, though the genetic similarities between Mesoamerican and Andean populations are consistent with rapid dispersal along the western coast of the Americas. Further, even setting aside the disruptive effects of

  10. MERGERS OF UNEQUAL-MASS GALAXIES: SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARY EVOLUTION AND STRUCTURE OF MERGER REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Fazeel Mahmood; Preto, Miguel; Berentzen, Ingo; Just, Andreas; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer

    2012-04-20

    Galaxy centers are residing places for supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Galaxy mergers bring SMBHs close together to form gravitationally bound binary systems, which, if able to coalesce in less than a Hubble time, would be one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs) for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. In spherical galaxy models, SMBH binaries stall at a separation of approximately 1 pc, leading to the 'final parsec problem' (FPP). On the other hand, it has been shown that merger-induced triaxiality of the remnant in equal-mass mergers is capable of supporting a constant supply of stars on the so-called centrophilic orbits that interact with the binary and thus avoid the FPP. In this paper, using a set of direct N-body simulations of mergers of initially spherically symmetric galaxies with different mass ratios, we show that the merger-induced triaxiality is also able to drive unequal-mass SMBH binaries to coalescence. The binary hardening rates are high and depend only weakly on the mass ratios of SMBHs for a wide range of mass ratios q. There is, however, an abrupt transition in the hardening rates for mergers with mass ratios somewhere between q {approx} 0.05 and 0.1, resulting from the monotonic decrease of merger-induced triaxiality with mass ratio q, as the secondary galaxy becomes too small and light to significantly perturb the primary, i.e., the more massive one. The hardening rates are significantly higher for galaxies having steep cusps in comparison with those having shallow cups at centers. The evolution of the binary SMBH leads to relatively shallower inner slopes at the centers of the merger remnants. The stellar mass displaced by the SMBH binary on its way to coalescence is {approx}1-5 times the combined mass of binary SMBHs. The coalescence timescales for SMBH binary with mass {approx}10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} are less than 1 Gyr and for those at the upper end of SMBH masses 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} are 1-2 Gyr for less eccentric

  11. Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in the Forest State of Artikutza (Navarra: Spain): Diversity and Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Jesica; Oltra-Moscardó, Teresa; Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier; Jiménez-Peydró, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Microgastrinae is one of the largest subfamilies of the Braconidae with about 2,000 described species worldwide. These wasps are of enormous ecological interest due to their role in controlling the caterpillar populations. This study analyses diversity and community structure within the Microgastrinae in the Artikutza Forest, located in the Peñas de Aia Natural Park, western Pyrenees, Spain. The specimens were collected in two different habitats: mixed forest and beech forest. A total of 524 specimens, belonging to nine separate genera and 27 species were captured. Alpha, beta and gamma diversity were analyzed. Additionally, the relationship between Microgastrinae phenology and climatic conditions were studied. PMID:26462432

  12. Morphological diversity and evolution of egg and clutch structure in amphibians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Altig, Ronald; McDiarmid, Roy W.

    2007-01-01

    The first part of this synthesis summarizes the morphology of the jelly layers surrounding an amphibian ovum. We propose a standard terminology and discuss the evolution of jelly layers. The second part reviews the morphological diversity and arrangement of deposited eggs?the ovipositional mode; we recognize 5 morphological classes including 14 modes. We discuss some of the oviductal, ovipositional, and postovipositional events that contribute to these morphologies. We have incorporated data from taxa from throughout the world but recognize that other types will be discovered that may modify understanding of these modes. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary context of the diversity of clutch structure and present a first estimate of its evolution.

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Sudan, Madagascar, French Guiana and Armenia.

    PubMed

    Menegon, Michela; Durand, Patrick; Menard, Didier; Legrand, Eric; Picot, Stéphane; Nour, Bakri; Davidyants, Vladimir; Santi, Flavia; Severini, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Polymorphic genetic markers and especially microsatellite analysis can be used to investigate multiple aspects of the biology of Plasmodium species. In the current study, we characterized 7 polymorphic microsatellites in a total of 281 Plasmodium vivax isolates to determine the genetic diversity and population structure of P. vivax populations from Sudan, Madagascar, French Guiana, and Armenia. All four parasite populations were highly polymorphic with 3-32 alleles per locus. Mean genetic diversity values was 0.83, 0.79, 0.78 and 0.67 for Madagascar, French Guiana, Sudan, and Armenia, respectively. Significant genetic differentiation between all four populations was observed.

  14. Structure and Formation of cD Galaxies: NGC 6166 in ABELL 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Ralf; Kormendy, John; Cornell, Mark E.; Fisher, David B.

    2015-07-01

     Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy is used to measure the velocity dispersion profile of the nearest prototypical cD galaxy, NGC 6166 in the cluster Abell 2199. We also present composite surface photometry from many telescopes. We confirm the defining feature of a cD galaxy; i.e., (we suggest), a halo of stars that fills the cluster center and that is controlled dynamically by cluster gravity, not by the central galaxy. Our HET spectroscopy shows that the velocity dispersion of NGC 6166 rises from σ ≃ 300 km s-1 in the inner r˜ 10\\prime\\prime to σ =865+/- 58 km s-1 at r ˜ 100″ in the cD halo. This extends published observations of an outward σ increase and shows for the first time that σ rises all the way to the cluster velocity dispersion of 819 ± 32 km s-1. We also observe that the main body of NGC 6166 moves at +206 ± 39 km s-1 with respect to the cluster mean velocity, but the velocity of the inner cD halo is ˜70 km s-1 closer to the cluster velocity. These results support our picture that cD halos consist of stars that were stripped from individual cluster galaxies by fast tidal encounters.  However, our photometry does not confirm the widespread view that cD halos are identifiable as an extra, low-surface-brightness component that is photometrically distinct from the inner, steep-Sérsic-function main body of an otherwise-normal giant elliptical galaxy. Instead, all of the brightness profile of NGC 6166 outside its core is described to ±0.037 V mag arcsec-2 by a single Sérsic function with index n≃ 8.3. The cD halo is not recognizable from photometry alone. This blurs the distinction between cluster-dominated cD halos and the similarly-large-Sérsic-index halos of giant, core-boxy-nonrotating ellipticals. These halos are believed to be accreted onto compact, high-redshift progenitors (“red nuggets”) by large numbers of minor mergers. They belong dynamically to their central galaxies. Still, cDs and core-boxy-nonrotating Es

  15. Synthetic HI observations of spiral structure in the outer disk in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoperskov, Sergey A.; Bertin, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    > By means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, in a separate paper we have discussed the properties of non-axisymmetric density wave trains in the outermost regions of galaxy disks, based on the picture that self-excited global spiral modes in the bright optical stellar disk are accompanied by low-amplitude short trailing wave signals outside corotation; in the gas, such wave trains can penetrate through the outer Lindblad resonance and propagate outwards, forming prominent spiral patterns. In this paper we present the synthetic 21 cm velocity maps expected from simulated models of the outer gaseous disk, focusing on the case when the disk is dominated by a two-armed spiral pattern, but considering also other more complex situations. We discuss some aspects of the spiral pattern in the gaseous periphery of galaxy disks noted in our simulations that might be interesting to compare with specific observed cases.

  16. A Portrait of Cold Gas in Galaxies at 60 pc Resolution and a Simple Method to Test Hypotheses That Link Small-scale ISM Structure to Galaxy-scale Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Hughes, Annie; Schruba, Andreas; Rosolowsky, Erik; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Colombo, Dario; Escala, Andres; Kramer, Carsten; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Meidt, Sharon; Pety, Jerome; Querejeta, Miguel; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Sliwa, Kazimierz; Usero, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The cloud-scale density, velocity dispersion, and gravitational boundedness of the interstellar medium (ISM) vary within and among galaxies. In turbulent models, these properties play key roles in the ability of gas to form stars. New high-fidelity, high-resolution surveys offer the prospect to measure these quantities across galaxies. We present a simple approach to make such measurements and to test hypotheses that link small-scale gas structure to star formation and galactic environment. Our calculations capture the key physics of the Larson scaling relations, and we show good correspondence between our approach and a traditional “cloud properties” treatment. However, we argue that our method is preferable in many cases because of its simple, reproducible characterization of all emission. Using, low-J 12CO data from recent surveys, we characterize the molecular ISM at 60 pc resolution in the Antennae, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), M31, M33, M51, and M74. We report the distributions of surface density, velocity dispersion, and gravitational boundedness at 60 pc scales and show galaxy-to-galaxy and intragalaxy variations in each. The distribution of flux as a function of surface density appears roughly lognormal with a 1σ width of ∼0.3 dex, though the center of this distribution varies from galaxy to galaxy. The 60 pc resolution line width and molecular gas surface density correlate well, which is a fundamental behavior expected for virialized or free-falling gas. Varying the measurement scale for the LMC and M31, we show that the molecular ISM has higher surface densities, lower line widths, and more self-gravity at smaller scales.

  17. SSR-based genetic diversity and structure of garlic accessions from Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Camila Pinto; Resende, Francisco Vilela; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Pinheiro, José Baldin

    2014-10-01

    Garlic is a spice and a medicinal plant; hence, there is an increasing interest in 'developing' new varieties with different culinary properties or with high content of nutraceutical compounds. Phenotypic traits and dominant molecular markers are predominantly used to evaluate the genetic diversity of garlic clones. However, 24 SSR markers (codominant) specific for garlic are available in the literature, fostering germplasm researches. In this study, we genotyped 130 garlic accessions from Brazil and abroad using 17 polymorphic SSR markers to assess the genetic diversity and structure. This is the first attempt to evaluate a large set of accessions maintained by Brazilian institutions. A high level of redundancy was detected in the collection (50 % of the accessions represented eight haplotypes). However, non-redundant accessions presented high genetic diversity. We detected on average five alleles per locus, Shannon index of 1.2, HO of 0.5, and HE of 0.6. A core collection was set with 17 accessions, covering 100 % of the alleles with minimum redundancy. Overall FST and D values indicate a strong genetic structure within accessions. Two major groups identified by both model-based (Bayesian approach) and hierarchical clustering (UPGMA dendrogram) techniques were coherent with the classification of accessions according to maturity time (growth cycle): early-late and midseason accessions. Assessing genetic diversity and structure of garlic collections is the first step towards an efficient management and conservation of accessions in genebanks, as well as to advance future genetic studies and improvement of garlic worldwide.

  18. Effects of grazer presence on genetic structure of a phenotypically diverse diatom population.

    PubMed

    Sjöqvist, C; Kremp, A; Lindehoff, E; Båmstedt, U; Egardt, J; Gross, S; Jönsson, M; Larsson, H; Pohnert, G; Richter, H; Selander, E; Godhe, A

    2014-01-01

    Studies of predator-prey systems in both aquatic and terrestrial environments have shown that grazers structure the intraspecific diversity of prey species, given that the prey populations are phenotypically variable. Populations of phytoplankton have traditionally considered comprising only low intraspecific variation, hence selective grazing as a potentially structuring factor of both genetic and phenotypic diversity has not been comprehensively studied. In this study, we compared strain specific growth rates, production of polyunsaturated aldehydes, and chain length of the marine diatom Skeletonema marinoi in both grazer and non-grazer conditions by conducting monoclonal experiments. Additionally, a mesocosm experiment was performed with multiclonal experimental S. marinoi populations exposed to grazers at different levels of copepod concentration to test effects of grazer presence on diatom diversity in close to natural conditions. Our results show that distinct genotypes of a geographically restricted population exhibit variable phenotypic traits relevant to grazing interactions such as chain length and growth rates. Grazer presence affected clonal richness and evenness of multiclonal Skeletonema populations in the mesocosms, likely in conjunction with intrinsic interactions among the diatom strains. Only the production of polyunsaturated aldehydes was not affected by grazer presence. Our findings suggest that grazing can be an important factor structuring diatom population diversity in the sea and emphasize the importance of considering clonal differences when characterizing species and their role in nature.

  19. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  20. Microbiological functioning, diversity, and structure of bacterial communities in ultramafic soils from a tropical savanna.

    PubMed

    Pessoa-Filho, Marco; Barreto, Cristine Chaves; dos Reis Junior, Fábio Bueno; Fragoso, Rodrigo Rocha; Costa, Flávio Silva; de Carvalho Mendes, Ieda; de Andrade, Leide Rovênia Miranda

    2015-04-01

    Ultramafic soils are characterized by high levels of metals, and have been studied because of their geochemistry and its relation to their biological component. This study evaluated soil microbiological functioning (SMF), richness, diversity, and structure of bacterial communities from two ultramafic soils and from a non-ultramafic soil in the Brazilian Cerrado, a tropical savanna. SMF was represented according to simultaneous analysis of microbial biomass C (MBC) and activities of the enzymes β-glucosidase, acid phosphomonoesterase and arylsulfatase, linked to the C, P and S cycles. Bacterial community diversity and structure were studied by sequencing of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. MBC and enzyme activities were not affected by high Ni contents. Changes in SMF were more related to the organic matter content of soils (SOM) than to their available Ni. Phylogeny-based methods detected qualitative and quantitative differences in pairwise comparisons of bacterial community structures of the three sites. However, no correlations between community structure differences and SOM or SMF were detected. We believe this work presents benchmark information on SMF, diversity, and structure of bacterial communities for a unique type of environment within the Cerrado biome.

  1. Overstory structure and soil nutrients effect on plant diversity in unmanaged moist tropical forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Mukesh Kumar; Manhas, Rajesh Kumar; Tripathi, Ashutosh Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Forests with intensive management past are kept unmanaged to restore diversity and ecosystem functioning. Before perpetuating abandonment after protracted restitution, understanding its effect on forest vegetation is desirable. We studied plant diversity and its relation with environmental variables and stand structure in northern Indian unmanaged tropical moist deciduous forest. We hypothesized that post-abandonment species richness would have increased, and the structure of contemporary forest would be heterogeneous. Vegetation structure, composition, and diversity were recorded, in forty 0.1 ha plots selected randomly in four forest ranges. Three soil samples per 0.1 ha were assessed for physicochemistry, fine sand, and clay mineralogy. Contemporary forest had less species richness than pre-abandonment reference period. Fourteen species were recorded as either seedling or sapling, suggesting reappearance or immigration. For most species, regeneration was either absent or impaired. Ordination and multiple regression results showed that exchangeable base cations and phosphorous affected maximum tree diversity and structure variables. Significant correlations between soil moisture and temperature, and shrub layer was observed, besides tree layer correspondence with shrub richness, suggesting that dense overstory resulting from abandonment through its effect on soil conditions, is responsible for dense shrub layer. Herb layer diversity was negatively associated with tree layer and shrub overgrowth (i.e. Mallotus spp.). Protracted abandonment may not reinforce species richness and heterogeneity; perhaps result in high tree and shrub density in moist deciduous forests, which can impede immigrating or reappearing plant species establishment. This can be overcome by density/basal area reduction strategies, albeit for both tree and shrub layer.

  2. Population structure and genetic diversity of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) in a highly fragmented watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, S.M.; Wilson, C.C.; Mandrak, N.E.; Carl, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dams have the potential to affect population size and connectivity, reduce genetic diversity, and increase genetic differences among isolated riverine fish populations. Previous research has reported adverse effects on the distribution and demographics of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), a threatened fish species in Canada. However, effects on genetic diversity and population structure are unknown. We used microsatellite DNA markers to assess the number of genetic populations in the Grand River (Ontario) and to test whether dams have resulted in a loss of genetic diversity and increased genetic differentiation among populations. Three hundred and seventy-seven individuals from eight Grand River sites were genotyped at eight microsatellite loci. Measures of genetic diversity were moderately high and not significantly different among populations; strong evidence of recent population bottlenecks was not detected. Pairwise FST and exact tests identified weak (global FST = 0.011) but statistically significant population structure, although little population structuring was detected using either genetic distances or an individual-based clustering method. Neither geographic distance nor the number of intervening dams were correlated with pairwise differences among populations. Tests for regional equilibrium indicate that Grand River populations were either in equilibrium between gene flow and genetic drift or that gene flow is more influential than drift. While studies on other species have identified strong dam-related effects on genetic diversity and population structure, this study suggests that barrier permeability, river fragment length and the ecological characteristics of affected species can counterbalance dam-related effects. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  3. K-shuff: A Novel Algorithm for Characterizing Structural and Compositional Diversity in Gene Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Jangid, Kamlesh; Kao, Ming-Hung; Lahamge, Aishwarya; Williams, Mark A.; Rathbun, Stephen L.; Whitman, William B.

    2016-01-01

    K-shuff is a new algorithm for comparing the similarity of gene sequence libraries, providing measures of the structural and compositional diversity as well as the significance of the differences between these measures. Inspired by Ripley’s K-function for spatial point pattern analysis, the Intra K-function or IKF measures the structural diversity, including both the richness and overall similarity of the sequences, within a library. The Cross K-function or CKF measures the compositional diversity between gene libraries, reflecting both the number of OTUs shared as well as the overall similarity in OTUs. A Monte Carlo testing procedure then enables statistical evaluation of both the structural and compositional diversity between gene libraries. For 16S rRNA gene libraries from complex bacterial communities such as those found in seawater, salt marsh sediments, and soils, K-shuff yields reproducible estimates of structural and compositional diversity with libraries greater than 50 sequences. Similarly, for pyrosequencing libraries generated from a glacial retreat chronosequence and Illumina® libraries generated from US homes, K-shuff required >300 and 100 sequences per sample, respectively. Power analyses demonstrated that K-shuff is sensitive to small differences in Sanger or Illumina® libraries. This extra sensitivity of K-shuff enabled examination of compositional differences at much deeper taxonomic levels, such as within abundant OTUs. This is especially useful when comparing communities that are compositionally very similar but functionally different. K-shuff will therefore prove beneficial for conventional microbiome analysis as well as specific hypothesis testing. PMID:27911946

  4. K-shuff: A Novel Algorithm for Characterizing Structural and Compositional Diversity in Gene Libraries.

    PubMed

    Jangid, Kamlesh; Kao, Ming-Hung; Lahamge, Aishwarya; Williams, Mark A; Rathbun, Stephen L; Whitman, William B

    2016-01-01

    K-shuff is a new algorithm for comparing the similarity of gene sequence libraries, providing measures of the structural and compositional diversity as well as the significance of the differences between these measures. Inspired by Ripley's K-function for spatial point pattern analysis, the Intra K-function or IKF measures the structural diversity, including both the richness and overall similarity of the sequences, within a library. The Cross K-function or CKF measures the compositional diversity between gene libraries, reflecting both the number of OTUs shared as well as the overall similarity in OTUs. A Monte Carlo testing procedure then enables statistical evaluation of both the structural and compositional diversity between gene libraries. For 16S rRNA gene libraries from complex bacterial communities such as those found in seawater, salt marsh sediments, and soils, K-shuff yields reproducible estimates of structural and compositional diversity with libraries greater than 50 sequences. Similarly, for pyrosequencing libraries generated from a glacial retreat chronosequence and Illumina® libraries generated from US homes, K-shuff required >300 and 100 sequences per sample, respectively. Power analyses demonstrated that K-shuff is sensitive to small differences in Sanger or Illumina® libraries. This extra sensitivity of K-shuff enabled examination of compositional differences at much deeper taxonomic levels, such as within abundant OTUs. This is especially useful when comparing communities that are compositionally very similar but functionally different. K-shuff will therefore prove beneficial for conventional microbiome analysis as well as specific hypothesis testing.

  5. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II - The IRAS faint source survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.; Conrow, T. P.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1990-07-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling.

  6. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II. The IRAS faint source survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Hacking, P.B.; Conrow, T.P.; Rowan-Robinson, M. Queen Mary College, London )

    1990-07-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling. 105 refs.

  7. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II - The IRAS faint source survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.; Conrow, T. P.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1990-01-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling.

  8. Massive Neutrino Decay Driven Radiative Instabilities, Sub-Structure Survival in Galaxy Clusters and a Nested - Particle-Mesh Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splinter, Randall John

    1995-01-01

    I have performed a series of studies concerning the clustering of mass on large scales in the universe, with the goal being an increased understanding of the role of various processes in the formation of structure in the universe. One of the first dark matter candidates was the massive neutrino. In this section I investigate the role of a radiative decay mode for a massive neutrino species, and its impact on structure formation. By reviving a concept known as "mock gravity" I attempt to provide seed masses for eventual galaxy formation in a Hot Dark Matter universe. I show that mock gravity is ineffective at generating seed masses for galaxy formation; the ionization rate is too large and the universe becomes fully ionized well before the radiation pressure can have any effect on the clumping of matter. The final section of this thesis presents a series of N-body experiments which are aimed at understanding the theoretical sources of substructure in galaxy clusters. I perform a series of simulations using a variety of power law initial conditions to generate our cluster data sets. From there I use the statistical methods developed by Bird to analyze the subsequent survival of the sub-structures. I find that for a high omega universe that a significant number of clusters should exhibit sub-structure for very long periods of time after their formation. To test whether the sub-structure results are dependent upon the resolution of the N-body code I develop a nested-grid code for use in performing high resolution studies of gravitational instability. In the next section I present an N-body code which features a nested-grid technology. This nested-grid method allows me to extend both the force and mass resolution of a traditional particle-mesh type code. This code will prove extremely useful for studying problems in large-scale structure formation where one is focusing on highly non -linear objects, and hence force and mass resolution are at a premium. In this chapter I

  9. Forest structure in low-diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests.

    PubMed

    Ostertag, Rebecca; Inman-Narahari, Faith; Cordell, Susan; Giardina, Christian P; Sack, Lawren

    2014-01-01

    The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai'i Island. We compared the species diversity, tree density, basal area, biomass, and size class distributions between the two forest types. We then examined these variables across tropical forests within the CTFS network. Consistent with other island forests, the Hawai'i forests were characterized by low species richness and very high relative dominance. The two Hawai'i forests were floristically distinct, yet similar in species richness (15 vs. 21 species) and stem density (3078 vs. 3486/ha). While these forests were selected for their low invasive species cover relative to surrounding forests, both forests averaged 5->50% invasive species cover; ongoing removal will be necessary to reduce or prevent competitive impacts, especially from woody species. The montane wet forest had much larger trees, resulting in eightfold higher basal area and above-ground biomass. Across the CTFS network, the Hawaiian montane wet forest was similar to other tropical forests with respect to diameter distributions, density, and aboveground biomass, while the Hawai'i lowland dry forest was similar in density to tropical forests with much higher diversity. These findings suggest that forest structural variables can be similar across tropical forests independently of species richness. The inclusion of low-diversity Pacific Island forests in the CTFS network provides an ∼80-fold range in species richness (15-1182 species), six-fold variation in mean annual rainfall (835-5272 mm yr(-1)) and 1.8-fold variation in mean annual temperature (16.0-28.4°C). Thus, the Hawaiian forest plots expand the global forest plot network to enable testing of ecological theory for

  10. Home Life: Factors Structuring the Bacterial Diversity Found within and between Homes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Most of our time is spent indoors where we are exposed to a wide array of different microorganisms living on surfaces and in the air of our homes. Despite their ubiquity and abundance, we have a limited understanding of the microbial diversity found within homes and how the composition and diversity of microbial communities change across different locations within the home. Here we examined the diversity of bacterial communities found in nine distinct locations within each of forty homes in the Raleigh-Durham area of North Carolina, USA, using high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We found that each of the sampled locations harbored bacterial communities that were distinct from one another with surfaces that are regularly cleaned typically harboring lower levels of diversity than surfaces that are cleaned infrequently. These location-specific differences in bacterial communities could be directly related to usage patterns and differences in the likely sources of bacteria dispersed onto these locations. Finally, we examined whether the variability across homes in bacterial diversity could be attributed to outdoor environmental factors, indoor habitat structure, or the occupants of the home. We found that the presence of dogs had a significant effect on bacterial community composition in multiple locations within homes as the homes occupied by dogs harbored more diverse communities and higher relative abundances of dog-associated bacterial taxa. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the types of bacteria deposited on surfaces outside the home and those found inside the home, highlighting that microbes from outside the home can have a direct effect on the microbial communities living on surfaces within our homes. Together this work provides the first comprehensive analysis of the microbial communities found in the home and the factors that shape the structure of these communities both within and between homes. PMID:23717552

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure of leafy kale and Brassica rupestris Raf. in south Italy.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, Lorenzo; von Bothmer, Roland; Poulsen, Gert; Branca, Ferdinando; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    2014-12-01

    Local varieties of leafy kales (Brassica oleracea L.) are grown in home gardens in Calabria and Sicily for self-consumption, in the same area where the wild relative Brassica rupestris Raf. also grows. With the use of AFLP markers, comparisons were made of the genetic diversity and population structure of ten wild and 22 cultivated populations, as well as of a hybrid population and of four commercial cultivars of different B. oleracea crops. The level of genetic diversity was higher in leafy kales than in wild populations and this diversity was mainly distributed within populations. Wild populations remained distinct from cultivated material. Additionally, most wild populations were distinctively isolated from each other. On the other hand, it was not possible to molecularly distinguish even geographically distant leafy kale populations from each other or from different B. oleracea crops. It was possible to detect inter-crossing between leafy kales and B. rupestris. Findings from this study illustrate the existing level of genetic diversity in the B. oleracea gene pool. Individual populations (either wild or leafy kales) with higher levels of genetic diversity have been identified and suggestions are given for an informed conservation strategy. Domestication hypotheses are also discussed.

  12. Architectural design influences the diversity and structure of the built environment microbiome.

    PubMed

    Kembel, Steven W; Jones, Evan; Kline, Jeff; Northcutt, Dale; Stenson, Jason; Womack, Ann M; Bohannan, Brendan Jm; Brown, G Z; Green, Jessica L

    2012-08-01

    Buildings are complex ecosystems that house trillions of microorganisms interacting with each other, with humans and with their environment. Understanding the ecological and evolutionary processes that determine the diversity and composition of the built environment microbiome--the community of microorganisms that live indoors--is important for understanding the relationship between building design, biodiversity and human health. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to quantify relationships between building attributes and airborne bacterial communities at a health-care facility. We quantified airborne bacterial community structure and environmental conditions in patient rooms exposed to mechanical or window ventilation and in outdoor air. The phylogenetic diversity of airborne bacterial communities was lower indoors than outdoors, and mechanically ventilated rooms contained less diverse microbial communities than did window-ventilated rooms. Bacterial communities in indoor environments contained many taxa that are absent or rare outdoors, including taxa closely related to potential human pathogens. Building attributes, specifically the source of ventilation air, airflow rates, relative humidity and temperature, were correlated with the diversity and composition of indoor bacterial communities. The relative abundance of bacteria closely related to human pathogens was higher indoors than outdoors, and higher in rooms with lower airflow rates and lower relative humidity. The observed relationship between building design and airborne bacterial diversity suggests that we can manage indoor environments, altering through building design and operation the community of microbial species that potentially colonize the human microbiome during our time indoors.

  13. Community structure and diversity of tropical forest mammals: data from a global camera trap network

    PubMed Central

    Ahumada, Jorge A.; Silva, Carlos E. F.; Gajapersad, Krisna; Hallam, Chris; Hurtado, Johanna; Martin, Emanuel; McWilliam, Alex; Mugerwa, Badru; O'Brien, Tim; Rovero, Francesco; Sheil, Douglas; Spironello, Wilson R.; Winarni, Nurul; Andelman, Sandy J.

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial mammals are a key component of tropical forest communities as indicators of ecosystem health and providers of important ecosystem services. However, there is little quantitative information about how they change with local, regional and global threats. In this paper, the first standardized pantropical forest terrestrial mammal community study, we examine several aspects of terrestrial mammal species and community diversity (species richness, species diversity, evenness, dominance, functional diversity and community structure) at seven sites around the globe using a single standardized camera trapping methodology approach. The sites—located in Uganda, Tanzania, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Suriname, Brazil and Costa Rica—are surrounded by different landscape configurations, from continuous forests to highly fragmented forests. We obtained more than 51 000 images and detected 105 species of mammals with a total sampling effort of 12 687 camera trap days. We find that mammal communities from highly fragmented sites have lower species richness, species diversity, functional diversity and higher dominance when compared with sites in partially fragmented and continuous forest. We emphasize the importance of standardized camera trapping approaches for obtaining baselines for monitoring forest mammal communities so as to adequately understand the effect of global, regional and local threats and appropriately inform conservation actions. PMID:21844049

  14. New approaches indicate constant viral diversity despite shifts in assemblage structure in an Australian hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Joanne B; Thomas, Brian C; Andrade, Karen; Heidelberg, Karla B; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-11-01

    It is widely stated that viruses represent the most significant source of biodiversity on Earth, yet characterizing the diversity of viral assemblages in natural systems remains difficult. Viral diversity studies are challenging because viruses lack universally present, phylogenetically informative genes. Here, we developed an approach to estimate viral diversity using a series of functional and novel conserved genes. This approach provides direct estimates of viral assemblage diversity while retaining resolution at the level of individual viral populations in a natural system. We characterized viral assemblages in eight samples from hypersaline Lake Tyrrell (LT), Victoria, Australia, using 39,636 viral contigs. We defined viral operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in two ways. First, we used genes with three different functional predictions that were abundantly represented in the data set. Second, we clustered proteins of unknown function based on sequence similarity, and we chose genes represented by three clusters with numerous members to define OTUs. In combination, diversity metrics indicated between 412 and 735 sampled populations, and the number of populations remained relatively constant across samples. We determined the relative representation of each viral OTU in each sample and found that viral assemblage structures correlate with salinity and solution chemistry. LT viral assemblages were near-replicates from the same site sampled a few days apart but differed significantly on other spatial and temporal scales. The OTU definition approach proposed here paves the way for metagenomics-based analyses of viral assemblages using ecological models previously applied to bacteria and archaea.

  15. Community structure and diversity of tropical forest mammals: data from a global camera trap network.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, Jorge A; Silva, Carlos E F; Gajapersad, Krisna; Hallam, Chris; Hurtado, Johanna; Martin, Emanuel; McWilliam, Alex; Mugerwa, Badru; O'Brien, Tim; Rovero, Francesco; Sheil, Douglas; Spironello, Wilson R; Winarni, Nurul; Andelman, Sandy J

    2011-09-27

    Terrestrial mammals are a key component of tropical forest communities as indicators of ecosystem health and providers of important ecosystem services. However, there is little quantitative information about how they change with local, regional and global threats. In this paper, the first standardized pantropical forest terrestrial mammal community study, we examine several aspects of terrestrial mammal species and community diversity (species richness, species diversity, evenness, dominance, functional diversity and community structure) at seven sites around the globe using a single standardized camera trapping methodology approach. The sites-located in Uganda, Tanzania, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Suriname, Brazil and Costa Rica-are surrounded by different landscape configurations, from continuous forests to highly fragmented forests. We obtained more than 51 000 images and detected 105 species of mammals with a total sampling effort of 12 687 camera trap days. We find that mammal communities from highly fragmented sites have lower species richness, species diversity, functional diversity and higher dominance when compared with sites in partially fragmented and continuous forest. We emphasize the importance of standardized camera trapping approaches for obtaining baselines for monitoring forest mammal communities so as to adequately understand the effect of global, regional and local threats and appropriately inform conservation actions.

  16. New Approaches Indicate Constant Viral Diversity despite Shifts in Assemblage Structure in an Australian Hypersaline Lake

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Brian C.; Andrade, Karen; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely stated that viruses represent the most significant source of biodiversity on Earth, yet characterizing the diversity of viral assemblages in natural systems remains difficult. Viral diversity studies are challenging because viruses lack universally present, phylogenetically informative genes. Here, we developed an approach to estimate viral diversity using a series of functional and novel conserved genes. This approach provides direct estimates of viral assemblage diversity while retaining resolution at the level of individual viral populations in a natural system. We characterized viral assemblages in eight samples from hypersaline Lake Tyrrell (LT), Victoria, Australia, using 39,636 viral contigs. We defined viral operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in two ways. First, we used genes with three different functional predictions that were abundantly represented in the data set. Second, we clustered proteins of unknown function based on sequence similarity, and we chose genes represented by three clusters with numerous members to define OTUs. In combination, diversity metrics indicated between 412 and 735 sampled populations, and the number of populations remained relatively constant across samples. We determined the relative representation of each viral OTU in each sample and found that viral assemblage structures correlate with salinity and solution chemistry. LT viral assemblages were near-replicates from the same site sampled a few days apart but differed significantly on other spatial and temporal scales. The OTU definition approach proposed here paves the way for metagenomics-based analyses of viral assemblages using ecological models previously applied to bacteria and archaea. PMID:23995931

  17. Using Galaxy Winds to Constrain Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Klypin, A.; Ceverino, D.; Kacprzak, G.; Klimek, E.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of mock quasar spectra of metal absorption lines in the proximity of formed galaxies in cosmological simulation is a highly promising for understanding the role of galaxies in IGM physics, or IGM physics in the role of galaxy formation in context of the cosmic web. Such analysis using neutral hydrogen in the cosmic web has literally revolutionized our understanding of the Lyman alpha forest. We are undertaking a wholesale approach to use powerful Lambda-CDM simulations to interpret absorption line data from redshift 1-3 starbursting galaxies e.g. Lyman break galaxies, etc) The data with which direct quantitative comparison is made are from the DEEP survey (Weiner et al.) and the collective work of Steidel et al. and collaborators. The simulations are performed using the Eulerian Gasdynamics plus N-body Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code, which has gas cell resolutions of 20-50 pc. Physical processes implemented in the code include realistic radiative cooling, star formation, metal enrichment and thermal feedback due to type II and type Ia supernovae. We quantitatively compare the spatial and kinematic distribution of HI, MgII, CIV, and OVI of absorption lines over a range of impact parameters for various simulated galaxies as a function of redshift, and discuss key insights for interpreting the underlying temperature, density, and ionization structure of the halo/cosmic-web interface, and the influence of galaxies on its chemical enrichment.

  18. MOSFIRE Spectroscopy of Quiescent Galaxies at 1.5 < z < 2.5. I. Evolution of Structural and Dynamical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, Sirio; Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    We present deep near-infrared spectra for a sample of 24 quiescent galaxies in the redshift range 1.5< z< 2.5 obtained with the MOSFIRE spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. In conjunction with a similar data set we obtained in the range 1< z< 1.5 with the LRIS spectrograph, we analyze the kinematic and structural properties for 80 quiescent galaxies, the largest homogeneously selected sample to date spanning 3 Gyr of early cosmic history. Analysis of our Keck spectra together with measurements derived from associated Hubble Space Telescope images reveals increasingly larger stellar velocity dispersions and smaller sizes to redshifts beyond z∼ 2. By classifying our sample according to Sérsic indices, we find that among disk-like systems the flatter ones show a higher dynamical to stellar mass ratio compared to their rounder counterparts, which we interpret as evidence for a significant contribution of rotational motion. For this subset of disk-like systems, we estimate that V/σ , the ratio of the circular velocity to the intrinsic velocity dispersion, is a factor of two larger than for present-day disky quiescent galaxies. We use the velocity dispersion measurements also to explore the redshift evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio, and to measure for the first time the physical size growth rate of individual systems over two distinct redshift ranges, finding a faster evolution at earlier times. We discuss the physical origin of this time-dependent growth in size in the context of the associated reduction of the systematic rotation.

  19. Mineralogy influences structure and diversity of bacterial communities associated with geological substrata in a pristine aquifer.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Cummings, David E; Geesey, Gill G

    2007-07-01

    Our understanding of mineralogical influences on subsurface microbial community structure and diversity has been difficult to assess due to difficulties in isolating this variable from others in the subsurface environment. In this study, biofilm coupons were used to isolate specific geological substrata from the surrounding geological matrix during colonization by microorganisms suspended in the surrounding groundwater for an 8-week period. Upon retrieval, the structure and diversity of the microbial community associated with each type of substratum was evaluated using 16S rDNA-based terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Phylogenetic affiliations of the populations associated with each type of substratum were established based on sequence analysis of near full-length 16S rDNA obtained through construction of a clone library. Hematite, quartz, and saprolite each harbored a community dominated by members of the division Proteobacteria (>67% of community). However, the different substrata selected for different subdivisions of bacteria within the Proteobacteria. After accounting for the influence exerted by substratum type on recovery of DNA from the attached populations, both phylogenetic data and Jaccard and Bray-Curtis similarity indices derived from terminal-restriction fragment (T-RF) profiles suggested a strong mineralogical influence on the structure and composition of the solid phase-associated community. The results suggest that mineralogical heterogeneity influences microbial community structure and diversity in pristine aquifers.

  20. Spatiotemporal diversity, structure and trophic guilds of insect assemblages in a semi-arid Sabkha ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Menasria, Taha; Neffar, Souad; Chafaa, Smail; Bradai, Lyès; Chaibi, Rachid; Mekahlia, Mohamed Nacer; Bendjoudi, Djamel; Si Bachir, Abdelkrim

    2015-01-01

    The current study highlights some knowledge on the diversity and structure of insect communities and trophic groups living in Sabkha Djendli (semi-arid area of Northeastern Algeria). The entomofauna was monthly sampled from March to November 2006 using pitfall traps at eight sites located at the vicinity of the Sabkha. Structural and diversity parameters (species richness, Shannon index, evenness) were measured for both insect orders and trophic guilds. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was applied to determine how vegetation parameters (species richness and cover) influence spatial and seasonal fluctuations of insect assemblages. The catches totalled 434 insect individuals classified into 75 species, 62 genera, 31 families and 7 orders, of which Coleoptera and Hymenoptera were the most abundant and constant over seasons and study stations. Spring and autumn presented the highest values of diversity parameters. Individual-based Chao-1 species richness estimator indicated 126 species for the total individuals captured in the Sabkha. Based on catch abundances, the structure of functional trophic groups was predators (37.3%), saprophages (26.7%), phytophages (20.5%), polyphages (10.8%), coprophages (4.6%); whereas in terms of numbers of species, they can be classified as phytophages (40%), predators (25.3%), polyphages (13.3%), saprophages (12%), coprophages (9.3%). The CCA demonstrated that phytophages and saprophages as well as Coleoptera and Orthoptera were positively correlated with the two parameters of vegetation, especially in spring and summer. While the abundance of coprophages was positively correlated with species richness of plants, polyphage density was positively associated with vegetation cover. The insect community showed high taxonomic and functional diversity that is closely related to diversity and vegetation cover in different stations of the wetland and seasons. PMID:25825682

  1. Population structure and genetic diversity of the perennial medicinal shrub Plumbago

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Sayantan; Naik, Dhiraj; Kamble, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the natural genetic variation and structure in a species is important for developing appropriate conservation strategies. As genetic diversity analysis among and within populations of Plumbago zeylanica remains unknown, we aimed (i) to examine the patterns and levels of morphological and genetic variability within/among populations and ascertain whether these variations are dependent on geographical conditions; and (ii) to evaluate genetic differentiation and population structure within the species. A total of 130 individuals from 13 populations of P. zeylanica were collected, covering the entire distribution area of species across India. The genetic structure and variation within and among populations were evaluated using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and randomly amplified DNA polymorphism (RAPD) markers. High levels of genetic diversity and significantly high genetic differentiation were revealed by both the markers among all studied populations. High values of among-population genetic diversity were found, which accounted for 60 % of the total genetic variance. The estimators of genetic diversity were higher in northern and eastern populations than in southern and western populations indicating the possible loss of genetic diversity during the spread of this species to Southern India. Bayesian analysis, unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average cluster analysis and principal coordinates analysis all showed similar results. A significant isolation-by-distance pattern was revealed in P. zeylanica by ISSR (r = 0.413, P = 0.05) and RAPD (r = 0.279, P = 0.05) analysis. The results obtained suggest an urgent need for conservation of existing natural populations along with extensive domestication of this species for commercial purpose. PMID:25957315

  2. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Polygonum cespitosum: Insights to an Ongoing Plant Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Matesanz, Silvia; Theiss, Kathryn E.; Holsinger, Kent E.; Sultan, Sonia E.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular markers can help elucidate how neutral evolutionary forces and introduction history contribute to genetic variation in invaders. We examined genetic diversity, population structure and colonization patterns in the invasive Polygonum cespitosum, a highly selfing, tetraploid Asian annual introduced to North America. We used nine diploidized polymorphic microsatellite markers to study 16 populations in the introduced range (northeastern North America), via the analyses of 516 individuals, and asked the following questions: 1) Do populations have differing levels of within-population genetic diversity? 2) Do populations form distinct genetic clusters? 3) Does population structure reflect either geographic distances or habitat similarities? We found low heterozygosity in all populations, consistent with the selfing mating system of P. cespitosum. Despite the high selfing levels, we found substantial genetic variation within and among P. cespitosum populations, based on the percentage of polymorphic loci, allelic richness, and expected heterozygosity. Inferences from individual assignment tests (Bayesian clustering) and pairwise FST values indicated high among-population differentiation, which indicates that the effects of gene flow are limited relative to those of genetic drift, probably due to the high selfing rates and the limited seed dispersal ability of P. cespitosum. Population structure did not reflect a pattern of isolation by distance nor was it related to habitat similarities. Rather, population structure appears to be the result of the random movement of propagules across the introduced range, possibly associated with human dispersal. Furthermore, the high population differentiation, genetic diversity, and fine-scale genetic structure (populations founded by individuals from different genetic sources) in the introduced range suggest that multiple introductions to this region may have occurred. High genetic diversity may further contribute to the

  3. Influence of biotic variables on invertebrate size structure and diversity in coastal wetlands of Southeastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón-Pardo, María; Armengol, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Biomass and size-based estimations provide relevant information regarding ecosystem functioning and biotic interactions. Our aims were to study the effect of fish and macrophytes on the size structure of invertebrate assemblages (from rotifers to insects) in a set of coastal water bodies, estimating the biomass (total and main invertebrate groups), the biomass-size spectra (model of Pareto) and size diversity. In fishless ponds, cladoceran and ostracod biomass were higher, and they presented greater size diversity. In fish ponds, rotifer biomass presented greater proportion; while in fishless ponds, cladocerans were usually the most abundant taxa and the largest organisms. The biomass size spectra showed more irregularities in fishless ponds, due to the low densities of small taxa (rotifers and copepod juveniles) and big taxa (malacostraceans or insects). Differences is size structure and diversity were also observed between spring and summer, suggesting a higher recruitment of juveniles in spring, and thus, a higher predation pressure upon zooplankton at that moment. Macrophyte cover did not apparently influence those parameters, except for the biomass of ostracods, copepods, and insects. Therefore, predation by fish strongly affected invertebrate biomass, reflecting their selective feeding, and allowing high densities of small taxa. Predation pressure decreased size diversity, by limiting the abundance of vulnerable taxa of specific size. Seasonal changes were likely related to the spring recruitment of fish juveniles. The presence of small fish and invertebrate predator taxa among the macrophytes, restrict their role as refuges for prey invertebrates.

  4. [Community structure and diversity of soil arthropods in naturally restored sandy grasslands after grazing].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren-tao; Zhao, Ha-lin; Zhao, Xue-yong

    2010-11-01

    Taking the Naiman Desertification Research Station under Chinese Academy of Sciences as a base, an investigation was conducted on the community structure of soil arthropods in the naturally restored sandy grasslands after different intensity grazing disturbance, with the effects of vegetation and soil on this community structure approached. In the non-grazing grassland, soil arthropods were rich in species and more in individuals, and had the highest diversity. In the restored grassland after light grazing, soil arthropods had the lowest evenness and diversity. In the restored grassland after moderate grazing, the individuals of soil arthropods were lesser but the major groups were more, and the evenness and diversity were higher. In the restored grassland after heavy grazing, the individuals of soil arthropods were more but the major groups were lesser, and the diversity was higher. Plant individuals' number, vegetation height and coverage, and soil alkalinity were the main factors affecting the soil arthropod community in naturally restored grasslands after different intensity grazing disturbance. It was implied that after 12-year exclosure of grassland, soil arthropod community could be recovered to some degree, while grazing disturbance had long-term negative effects on the arthropod community.

  5. Exposure of soil microbial communities to chromium and arsenic alters their diversity and structure.

    PubMed

    Sheik, Cody S; Mitchell, Tyler W; Rizvi, Fariha Z; Rehman, Yasir; Faisal, Muhammad; Hasnain, Shahida; McInerney, Michael J; Krumholz, Lee R

    2012-01-01

    Extensive use of chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) based preservatives from the leather tanning industry in Pakistan has had a deleterious effect on the soils surrounding production facilities. Bacteria have been shown to be an active component in the geochemical cycling of both Cr and As, but it is unknown how these compounds affect microbial community composition or the prevalence and form of metal resistance. Therefore, we sought to understand the effects that long-term exposure to As and Cr had on the diversity and structure of soil microbial communities. Soils from three spatially isolated tanning facilities in the Punjab province of Pakistan were analyzed. The structure, diversity and abundance of microbial 16S rRNA genes were highly influenced by the concentration and presence of hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) and arsenic. When compared to control soils, contaminated soils were dominated by Proteobacteria while Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria (which are generally abundant in pristine soils) were minor components of the bacterial community. Shifts in community composition were significant and revealed that Cr (VI)-containing soils were more similar to each other than to As contaminated soils lacking Cr (VI). Diversity of the arsenic resistance genes, arsB and ACR3 were also determined. Results showed that ACR3 becomes less diverse as arsenic concentrations increase with a single OTU dominating at the highest concentration. Chronic exposure to either Cr or As not only alters the composition of the soil bacterial community in general, but affects the arsenic resistant individuals in different ways.

  6. ON THE ORIGIN OF LOPSIDEDNESS IN GALAXIES AS DETERMINED FROM THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L.; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Comeron, Sebastien; Laine, Jarkko; Elmegreen, Debra; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Elmegreen, Bruce; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Kim, Taehyun; De Paz, Armando Gil; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Laine, Seppo; Meidt, Sharon; and others

    2013-08-01

    We study the m = 1 distortions (lopsidedness) in the stellar components of 167 nearby galaxies that span a wide range of morphologies and luminosities. We confirm the previous findings of (1) a high incidence of lopsidedness in the stellar distributions, (2) increasing lopsidedness as a function of radius out to at least 3.5 exponential scale lengths, and (3) greater lopsidedness, over these radii, for galaxies of later type and lower surface brightness. Additionally, the magnitude of the lopsidedness (1) correlates with the character of the spiral arms (stronger arm patterns occur in galaxies with less lopsidedness), (2) is not correlated with the presence or absence of a bar, or the strength of the bar when one is present, (3) is inversely correlated to the stellar mass fraction, f{sub *}, within one radial scale length, and (4) correlates directly with f{sub *} measured within the radial range over which we measure lopsidedness. We interpret these findings to mean that lopsidedness is a generic feature of galaxies and does not, generally, depend on a rare event, such as a direct accretion of a satellite galaxy onto the disk of the parent galaxy. While lopsidedness may be caused by several phenomena, moderate lopsidedness ((A{sub 1}){sub i} + (A{sub 1}){sub o})/2 < 0.3) is likely to reflect halo asymmetries to which the disk responds or a gravitationally self-generated mode. We hypothesize that the magnitude of the stellar response depends both on how centrally concentrated the stars are with respect to the dark matter and whether there are enough stars in the region of the lopsidedness that self-gravity is dynamically important.

  7. Topology of Large-Scale Structures of Galaxies in two Dimensions—Systematic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Stephen; Park, Changbom; Hong, Sungwook E.; Kim, Juhan

    2017-02-01

    We study the two-dimensional topology of galactic distribution when projected onto two-dimensional spherical shells. Using the latest Horizon Run 4 simulation data, we construct the genus of the two-dimensional field and consider how this statistic is affected by late-time nonlinear effects—principally gravitational collapse and redshift space distortion (RSD). We also consider systematic and numerical artifacts, such as shot noise, galaxy bias, and finite pixel effects. We model the systematics using a Hermite polynomial expansion and perform a comprehensive analysis of known effects on the two-dimensional genus, with a view toward using the statistic for cosmological parameter estimation. We find that the finite pixel effect is dominated by an amplitude drop and can be made less than 1% by adopting pixels smaller than 1/3 of the angular smoothing length. Nonlinear gravitational evolution introduces time-dependent coefficients of the zeroth, first, and second Hermite polynomials, but the genus amplitude changes by less than 1% between z = 1 and z = 0 for smoothing scales {R}{{G}}> 9 {Mpc}/{{h}}. Non-zero terms are measured up to third order in the Hermite polynomial expansion when studying RSD. Differences in the shapes of the genus curves in real and redshift space are small when we adopt thick redshift shells, but the amplitude change remains a significant ∼ { O }(10 % ) effect. The combined effects of galaxy biasing and shot noise produce systematic effects up to the second Hermite polynomial. It is shown that, when sampling, the use of galaxy mass cuts significantly reduces the effect of shot noise relative to random sampling.

  8. The Structure of the Circumgalactic Medium of Galaxies: Cool Accretion Inflow Around NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, David V.; Chelouche, Doron; Jenkins, Edward B.; Tripp, Todd M.; Pettini, Max; York, Donald G.; Frye, Brenda L.

    2016-07-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope far-UV spectra of four QSOs whose sightlines pass through the halo of NGC 1097 at impact parameters of ρ = 48-165 kpc. NGC 1097 is a nearby spiral galaxy that has undergone at least two minor merger events, but no apparent major mergers, and is relatively isolated with respect to other nearby bright galaxies. This makes NGC 1097 a good case study for exploring baryons in a paradigmatic bright-galaxy halo. Lyα absorption is detected along all sightlines and Si iii λ1206 is found along the three sightlines with the smallest ρ metal lines of C ii, Si ii, and Si iv are only found with certainty toward the innermost sightline. The kinematics of the absorption lines are best replicated by a model with a disk-like distribution of gas approximately planar to the observed 21 cm H i disk, which is rotating more slowly than the inner disk, and into which gas is infalling from the intergalactic medium. Some part of the absorption toward the innermost sightline may arise either from a small-scale outflow or from tidal debris associated with the minor merger that gives rise to the well known “dog-leg” stellar stream that projects from NGC 1097. When compared to other studies, NGC 1097 appears to be a “typical” absorber, although the large dispersion in absorption line column density and equivalent width in a single halo goes perhaps some way toward explaining the wide range of these values seen in higher-z studies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  9. Disclosing the distinct interfacial behaviors of structurally and configurationally diverse triazologlycolipids.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Peng; Xu, Xiaolian; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Chen, Guo-Rong; Xu, Shouhong; Liu, Honglai

    2011-08-16

    1- or 6-Triazologluco- and galactolipid derivatives bearing a lipid chain length of 16 carbons were efficiently constructed via click chemistry. The differentiation in their surface pressure-molecular area (π-A) isotherms first implies that these structurally and configurationally diverse amphiphiles adopt different distribution manner at air-water interfaces. The Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of the synthesized glycoconjugates on mica surface were subsequently prepared and visualized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), which exhibited diverse topographies and possess different contact angles with water. These data further suggest that the structural variation as well as epimeric identity of triazologlycolipids may result in their distinct interfacial behaviors at the air-solid interface. Furthermore, the addition of increasing amounts of 1-triazologalactolipid 2 to poly-diacetylene (PDA) was determined to impact the π-A isotherm of the latter, prompting us to further fabricate new colorimetrically detectable mixed-type vesicles containing triazologlycolipids for biochemical studies.

  10. A ring-distortion strategy to construct stereochemically complex and structurally diverse compounds from natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huigens, Robert W., III; Morrison, Karen C.; Hicklin, Robert W.; Flood, Timothy A., Jr.; Richter, Michelle F.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2013-03-01

    High-throughput screening is the dominant method used to identify lead compounds in drug discovery. As such, the makeup of screening libraries largely dictates the biological targets that can be modulated and the therapeutics that can be developed. Unfortunately, most compound-screening collections consist principally of planar molecules with little structural or stereochemical complexity, compounds that do not offer the arrangement of chemical functionality necessary for the modulation of many drug targets. Here we describe a novel, general and facile strategy for the creation of diverse compounds with high structural and stereochemical complexity using readily available natural products as synthetic starting points. We show through the evaluation of chemical properties (which include fraction of sp3 carbons, ClogP and the number of stereogenic centres) that these compounds are significantly more complex and diverse than those in standard screening collections, and we give guidelines for the application of this strategy to any suitable natural product.

  11. Community diversity, structure and carbon footprint of nematode food web following reforestation on degraded Karst soil

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ning; Li, Hui; Tang, Zheng; Li, Zhongfang; Tian, Jing; Lou, Yilai; Li, Jianwei; Li, Guichun; Hu, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    We examined community diversity, structure and carbon footprint of nematode food web along a chronosequence of T. Sinensis reforestation on degraded Karst. In general, after the reforestation: a serious of diversity parameters and community indices (Shannon-Weinier index (H′), structure index (SI), etc.) were elevated; biomass ratio of fungivores to bacterivores (FFC/BFC), and fungi to bacteria (F/B) were increased, and nematode channel ratio (NCR) were decreased; carbon footprints of all nematode trophic groups, and biomass of bacteria and fungi were increased. Our results indicate that the Karst aboveground vegetation restoration was accompanied with belowground nematode food web development: increasing community complexity, function and fungal dominance in decomposition pathway, and the driving forces included the bottom-up effect (resource control), connectedness of functional groups, as well as soil environments. PMID:27311984

  12. Spontaneous formation of structurally diverse membrane channel architectures from a single antimicrobial peptide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yukun; Chen, Charles H.; Hu, Dan; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.

    2016-01-01

    Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) selectively target and form pores in microbial membranes. However, the mechanisms of membrane targeting, pore formation and function remain elusive. Here we report an experimentally guided unbiased simulation methodology that yields the mechanism of spontaneous pore assembly for the AMP maculatin at atomic resolution. Rather than a single pore, maculatin forms an ensemble of structurally diverse temporarily functional low-oligomeric pores, which mimic integral membrane protein channels in structure. These pores continuously form and dissociate in the membrane. Membrane permeabilization is dominated by hexa-, hepta- and octamers, which conduct water, ions and small dyes. Pores form by consecutive addition of individual helices to a transmembrane helix or helix bundle, in contrast to current poration models. The diversity of the pore architectures—formed by a single sequence—may be a key feature in preventing bacterial resistance and could explain why sequence–function relationships in AMPs remain elusive. PMID:27874004

  13. Community diversity, structure and carbon footprint of nematode food web following reforestation on degraded Karst soil.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ning; Li, Hui; Tang, Zheng; Li, Zhongfang; Tian, Jing; Lou, Yilai; Li, Jianwei; Li, Guichun; Hu, Xiaomin

    2016-06-17

    We examined community diversity, structure and carbon footprint of nematode food web along a chronosequence of T. Sinensis reforestation on degraded Karst. In general, after the reforestation: a serious of diversity parameters and community indices (Shannon-Weinier index (H'), structure index (SI), etc.) were elevated; biomass ratio of fungivores to bacterivores (FFC/BFC), and fungi to bacteria (F/B) were increased, and nematode channel ratio (NCR) were decreased; carbon footprints of all nematode trophic groups, and biomass of bacteria and fungi were increased. Our results indicate that the Karst aboveground vegetation restoration was accompanied with belowground nematode food web development: increasing community complexity, function and fungal dominance in decomposition pathway, and the driving forces included the bottom-up effect (resource control), connectedness of functional groups, as well as soil environments.

  14. Community diversity, structure and carbon footprint of nematode food web following reforestation on degraded Karst soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ning; Li, Hui; Tang, Zheng; Li, Zhongfang; Tian, Jing; Lou, Yilai; Li, Jianwei; Li, Guichun; Hu, Xiaomin

    2016-06-01

    We examined community diversity, structure and carbon footprint of nematode food web along a chronosequence of T. Sinensis reforestation on degraded Karst. In general, after the reforestation: a serious of diversity parameters and community indices (Shannon-Weinier index (H‧), structure index (SI), etc.) were elevated; biomass ratio of fungivores to bacterivores (FFC/BFC), and fungi to bacteria (F/B) were increased, and nematode channel ratio (NCR) were decreased; carbon footprints of all nematode trophic groups, and biomass of bacteria and fungi were increased. Our results indicate that the Karst aboveground vegetation restoration was accompanied with belowground nematode food web development: increasing community complexity, function and fungal dominance in decomposition pathway, and the driving forces included the bottom-up effect (resource control), connectedness of functional groups, as well as soil environments.

  15. Spontaneous formation of structurally diverse membrane channel architectures from a single antimicrobial peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yukun; Chen, Charles H.; Hu, Dan; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.

    2016-11-01

    Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) selectively target and form pores in microbial membranes. However, the mechanisms of membrane targeting, pore formation and function remain elusive. Here we report an experimentally guided unbiased simulation methodology that yields the mechanism of spontaneous pore assembly for the AMP maculatin at atomic resolution. Rather than a single pore, maculatin forms an ensemble of structurally diverse temporarily functional low-oligomeric pores, which mimic integral membrane protein channels in structure. These pores continuously form and dissociate in the membrane. Membrane permeabilization is dominated by hexa-, hepta- and octamers, which conduct water, ions and small dyes. Pores form by consecutive addition of individual helices to a transmembrane helix or helix bundle, in contrast to current poration models. The diversity of the pore architectures--formed by a single sequence--may be a key feature in preventing bacterial resistance and could explain why sequence-function relationships in AMPs remain elusive.

  16. Microbial community structure and occurrence of diverse autotrophic ammonium oxidizing microorganisms in the anammox process.

    PubMed

    Bae, H; Chung, Y-C; Jung, J-Y

    2010-01-01

    The enrichment of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria using an upflow anaerobic sludge bioreactor was successfully conducted for 400 days of continuous operation. The bacterial community structure of anammox bioreactor included Proteobacteria (42%), Chloroflexi (22%), Planctomycetes (20%), Chlorobi (7%), Bacteroidetes (5%), Acidobacteria (2%), and Actinobacteria (2%). All clones of Planctomycetes were affiliated with the anammox bacteria, Planctomycete KSU-1 (AB057453). The presence and diversity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) were identified by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) based on the amoA gene sequences. The AOB in anammox bioreactor were affiliated with the Nitrosomonas europaea cluster. The T-RFLP result of AOA showed the diverse microbial community structure of AOA with three terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs).

  17. The stellar structure of early-type galaxies: a wide-field Mitchell Spectrograph view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, N. F.; Weijmans, A.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; Zhu, L.; Yildirim, A.; van de Ven, G.; Cappellari, M.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, E.; Krajnović, D.; Naab, T.

    2017-03-01

    Much progress has been made in recent years towards understanding how early-type galaxies (ETGs) form and evolve. SAURON (Bacon et al. 2001) integral-field spectroscopy from the ATLAS3D survey (Cappellari et al. 2011) has suggested that less massive ETGs are linked directly to spirals, whereas the most massive objects appear to form from a series of merging and accretion events (Cappellari et al. 2013). However, the ATLAS3D data typically only extends to about one half-light radius (or effective radius, Re ), making it unclear if this picture is truly complete.

  18. Fingerprints of the hierarchical building-up of the structure on the gas kinematics of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rossi, M. E.; Tissera, P. B.; Pedrosa, S. E.

    2012-10-01

    Context. Recent observational and theoretical works have suggested that the Tully-Fisher relation might be generalised to include dispersion-dominated systems by combining the rotation and dispersion velocity in the definition of the kinematical indicator. Mergers and interactions have been pointed out as responsible of driving turbulent and disordered gas kinematics, which could generate Tully-Fisher relation outliers. Aims: We investigated the gas kinematics of galaxies by using a simulated sample that includes gas-disc-dominated as well as spheroid-dominated systems. We paid particular attention to the scatter evolution of the Tully-Fisher relation. We also determined the gas-phase velocity indicator, which traces the potential well of the galaxy better. Methods: Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that include a multiphase model and physically motivated supernova feedback were performed to follow the evolution of galaxies as they are assembled. We analysed the gas kinematics of the surviving gas discs to estimate all velocity indicators. Results: Both the baryonic and stellar Tully-Fisher relations for gas-disc-dominated systems are tight while, as more dispersion-dominated systems are included, the scatter increases. We found a clear correlation between σ/Vrot and morphology, with dispersion-dominated systems exhibiting higher values (>0.7). Mergers and interactions can affect the rotation curves directly or indirectly, inducing a scatter in the Tully-Fisher relation larger than the simulated evolution since z ~ 3. Kinematical indicators, which combine rotation velocity and dispersion velocity, can reduce the scatter in the baryonic and the stellar mass-velocity relations. In particular, s1.0 = (Vrot2 + σ2)0.5 seems to be the best tracer of the circular velocity at larger radii. Our findings also show that the lowest scatter in both relations is obtained if the velocity indicators are measured at the maximum of the rotation curve. Conclusions: In

  19. X-ray clusters of galaxies as tracers of structure in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Borgani, S; Guzzo, L

    2001-01-04

    Clusters of galaxies are visible tracers of the network of matter in the Universe, marking the high-density regions where filaments of dark matter join together. When observed at X-ray wavelengths these clusters shine like cosmic lighthouses, as a consequence of the hot gas trapped within their gravitational potential wells. The X-ray emission is linked directly to the total mass of a cluster, and so can be used to investigate the mass distribution for a sizeable fraction of the Universe. The picture that has emerged from recent studies is remarkably consistent with the predictions for a low-density Universe dominated by cold dark matter.

  20. Synergy of VSWIR and LiDAR for Ecosystem Structure, Biomass, and Canopy Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Bruce D.;