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Sample records for diverse galaxy structures

  1. Diverse structural evolution at z > 1 in cosmologically simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory F.; Lotz, Jennifer; Moody, Christopher; Peth, Michael; Freeman, Peter; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel; Dekel, Avishai

    2015-08-01

    From mock Hubble Space Telescope images, we quantify non-parametric statistics of galaxy morphology, thereby predicting the emergence of relationships among stellar mass, star formation, and observed rest-frame optical structure at 1 < z < 3. We measure automated diagnostics of galaxy morphology in cosmological simulations of the formation of 22 central galaxies with 9.3 < log10M*/M⊙ < 10.7. These high-spatial-resolution zoom-in calculations enable accurate modelling of the rest-frame UV and optical morphology. Even with small numbers of galaxies, we find that structural evolution is neither universal nor monotonic: galaxy interactions can trigger either bulge or disc formation, and optically bulge-dominated galaxies at this mass may not remain so forever. Simulated galaxies with M* > 1010M⊙ contain relatively more disc-dominated light profiles than those with lower mass, reflecting significant disc brightening in some haloes at 1 < z < 2. By this epoch, simulated galaxies with specific star formation rates below 10- 9.7 yr- 1 are more likely than normal star-formers to have a broader mix of structural types, especially at M* > 1010 M⊙. We analyse a cosmological major merger at z ˜ 1.5 and find that the newly proposed Multimode-Intensity-Deviation (MID) morphology diagnostics trace later merger stages while Gini-M20 trace earlier ones. MID is sensitive also to clumpy star-forming discs. The observability time of typical MID-enhanced events in our simulation sample is <100 Myr. A larger sample of cosmological assembly histories may be required to calibrate such diagnostics in the face of their sensitivity to viewing angle, segmentation algorithm, and various phenomena such as clumpy star formation and minor mergers.

  2. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY (ZENS) OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. II. GALAXY STRUCTURAL MEASUREMENTS AND THE CONCENTRATION OF MORPHOLOGICALLY CLASSIFIED SATELLITES IN DIVERSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cibinel, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Miniati, F.; Cameron, E.; Peng, Y.; Pipino, A.; Rudick, C. S.; Silverman, J. D.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Finoguenov, A.; Norberg, P. E-mail: marcella@phys.ethz.ch

    2013-10-20

    We present structural measurements for the galaxies in the 0.05 < z < 0.0585 groups of the Zurich Environmental Study, aimed at establishing how galaxy properties depend on four environmental parameters: group halo mass (M{sub GROUP}), group-centric distance (R/R{sub 200}), ranking into central or satellite, and large-scale structure density (δ{sub LSS}). Global galaxy structure is quantified both parametrically and non-parametrically. We correct all these measurements for observational biases due to point-spread function blurring and surface brightness effects as a function of galaxy size, magnitude, steepness of light profile, and ellipticity. Structural parameters are derived also for bulges, disks, and bars. We use the galaxy bulge-to-total ratios (B/T) together with the calibrated non-parametric structural estimators to implement a quantitative morphological classification that maximizes purity in the resulting morphological samples. We investigate how the concentration C of satellite galaxies depends on galaxy mass for each Hubble type and on M{sub GROUP}, R/R{sub 200}, and δ{sub LSS}. At galaxy masses M ≥ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, the concentration of disk satellites increases with increasing stellar mass separately within each morphological bin of B/T. The known increase in concentration with stellar mass for disk satellites is thus due, at least in part, to an increase in galaxy central stellar density at constant B/T. The correlation between concentration and galaxy stellar mass becomes progressively steeper for later morphological types. The concentration of disk satellites shows a barely significant dependence on δ{sub LSS} or R/R{sub 200}. The strongest environmental effect is found with group mass for >10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} disk-dominated satellites, which are ∼10% more concentrated in high mass groups than in lower mass groups.

  3. Shaping galaxy evolution with galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond

    A fundamental pursuit of astronomy is to understand galaxy evolution. The enormous scales and complex physics involved in this endeavor guarantees a never-ending journey that has enamored both astronomers and laymen alike. But despite the difficulty of this task, astronomers have still attempted to further this goal. Among of these astronomers is Edwin Hubble. His work, which includes the famous Hubble sequence, has immeasurably influenced our understanding of galaxy evolution. In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5galaxies from quiescent galaxies. Our method indicates that the inner stellar mass is the most correlated parameter of quenching, implying that the process that quenches galaxies must also buildup their inner structure. Second, we explore the relationship between galactic bars and their host galaxies with Galaxy Zoo 2 at z˜0. The correlations of bar properties and galaxy properties are consistent with simulations of bar formation and evolution, indicating that bars affect their host galaxies. Finally, we investigate whether bars can drive supermassive black hole growth with data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble at 0.2galaxies to a matched sample of inactive, control galaxies shows that there is no statistically significant excess of bars in active hosts. Our result shows that bars are not the primary fueling mechanism of supermassive black hole

  4. Galaxy tools to study genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intra-species genetic variation can be used to investigate population structure, selection, and gene flow in non-model vertebrates; and due to the plummeting costs for genome sequencing, it is now possible for small labs to obtain full-genome variation data from their species of interest. However, those labs may not have easy access to, and familiarity with, computational tools to analyze those data. Results We have created a suite of tools for the Galaxy web server aimed at handling nucleotide and amino-acid polymorphisms discovered by full-genome sequencing of several individuals of the same species, or using a SNP genotyping microarray. In addition to providing user-friendly tools, a main goal is to make published analyses reproducible. While most of the examples discussed in this paper deal with nuclear-genome diversity in non-human vertebrates, we also illustrate the application of the tools to fungal genomes, human biomedical data, and mitochondrial sequences. Conclusions This project illustrates that a small group can design, implement, test, document, and distribute a Galaxy tool collection to meet the needs of a particular community of biologists. PMID:24377391

  5. Diverse Group of Galaxy Types, NGC 3190 Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet image of a diverse group of galaxy types. NGC 3190 is a dusty edge on spiral galaxy. NGC 3187 is highly distorted. The two are separated by only 35 kilo-parsecs (about half the diameter of our own Milky Way galaxy). A ring, elliptical, and other irregular galaxies are also present.

  6. THE SHAPE OF GALAXY STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Panko, Elena; Juszczyk, Teresa; Biernacka, Monika; Flin, Piotr E-mail: bmonika@ujk.kielce.pl

    2009-08-01

    An analysis is presented for a statistically complete sample of 547 galaxy structures with z {<=} 0.16, each containing at least 10 objects. The sample was divided according to structure richness, representing 10 richness classes, with the distribution of ellipticities differing among individual classes. Mean ellipticity varies from 0.34 to 0.18, less well populated structures being more elongated that richer ones. Statistics indicate that structures with at least 50 members originate from the same population. The mean redshift of a structure class is a function of richness, with less well populated classes exhibiting greater mean redshifts than richer galaxy clusters. Further analysis reveals a dependence of the ellipticity-redshift correlation on structure richness. Among rich galaxy clusters there is an anti-correlation between the parameters, the strongest correlation occurring for the most poorly populated galaxy classes.

  7. The Alignment of Galaxy Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernacka, M.; Panko, E.; Bajan, K.; Godłowski, W.; Flin, P.

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the orientation of the sample of ACO galaxy clusters. We examined the alignment in a subsample of 1056 galaxy structures taken from the Panko-Flin (2006) Catalog with known BM morphological types. We were looking for a correlation between the orientation of the cluster and the positions of neighboring clusters. The Binggeli effect (the excess of small values of the Δθ angles between the direction toward neighboring clusters and the cluster position angle) is observed, having a range up to about 45 h-1 Mpc. The strongest effect was found for elongated BM type I clusters. This is probably connected with the origins of the supergiant galaxy and with cluster formation along a long filament or plane in a supercluster.

  8. Observing the Origins of Galaxy Structure in the Illustris Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Greg

    2014-10-01

    Many processes affect the appearance of galaxies, and it has recently become possible to predict how these processes set internal galaxy structure in significant populations. Such calculations are poised to clarify the physics of star formation quenching, the cosmological formation of bulges and disks, and the observability of galaxy mergers. To advance these goals, we propose to build and analyze a very large set of mock HST images based on the Illustris Project. This accurate continuous-volume hydrodynamical simulation formed thousands of structurally diverse Milky Way-mass galaxies in {106.5 Mpc}^3 with detail comparable to the resolution of HST at many cosmic times. We will mock-observe 41,000 model galaxies at 0 < z < 5 in broadband filters used by ACS, WFC3, and JWST/NIRCAM, and measure automated morphology diagnostics from each image. This will constitute a timely and effective tool to advance two key goals of observational cosmology with HST: linking the building blocks of galaxies across cosmic time, and understanding the implications of galaxy morphology and structure. It will allow us to study the emergence of the Hubble Sequence, estimate merger rates and consequences, and interpret star formation patterns in distant galaxies. Therefore this model dataset is ideally suited to enhance results from HST Treasury and Archival Legacy surveys, the Ultra Deep Fields, and Frontier Fields. To increase the science return, we will publicly release our model images and morphology catalogs, providing a tool that can directly link physical mechanisms to high redshift galaxy data.

  9. Morphology and Structures of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Mira; Ann, H. B.

    2016-08-01

    We applied GALFIT and STARLIGHT to the r-band images and spectra, respectively, of ~1,100 dwarf galaxies to analyze the structural properties and stellar populations. In most cases, single component with n = 1 ~ 1.5 well describes the luminosity distribution of dwarf galaxies. However, a large fraction of dS0, dE bc , and dE blue galaxies show sub-structures such as spiral arms and rings. There is a bimodal distributions of stellar ages in dS0 galaxies. But other sub-types of dwarf galaxies show a single peak in the stellar distributions.

  10. Assessing and understanding diversity in galaxy star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Louis Evan

    Galaxy star formation histories (SFHs) form a central thread of the cosmological narrative. Assessing and understanding them is therefore a central mission of the study of galaxy evolution. Although an ever-better picture is emerging of the build-up of the stellar mass of the average galaxy over time, the relevance of this track to the growth of individual galaxies is unclear. Largely, this ambiguity is due to the availability of only loose, ensemble-level constraints at any redshift appreciably greater than zero. In this thesis, I outline how these constraints --- principally the cosmic star formation rate density, stellar mass function, and the star formation rate/stellar mass relation --- shape empirically based SFH models, especially in terms of the diversity of paths leading to a given end-state. Along the way, I show that three models propose very different answers to this question, corresponding (largely) to three different interpretations of the scatter in instantaneous galaxy growth rates at fixed stellar mass. I describe how these interpretations affect one's stance on the fundamental importance of so-called galaxy "bimodality" and quenching mechanisms, the influence of environment, and the role starbursts play in galaxy evolution. Ultimately, I conclude that there is insufficient evidence at present to select one interpretation over all others, but suggest that the situation might soon be resolved by upcoming observations that could clearly identify which model (or hybrid) is the most accurate description of galaxy growth.

  11. nIFTY galaxy cluster simulations - III. The similarity and diversity of galaxies and subhaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Knebe, Alexander; Pearce, Frazer R.; Power, Chris; Yepes, Gustavo; Cui, Weiguang; Cunnama, Daniel; Kay, Scott T.; Sembolini, Federico; Beck, Alexander M.; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Giuseppe; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Saro, Alexandro; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-05-01

    We examine subhaloes and galaxies residing in a simulated Λ cold dark matter galaxy cluster (M^crit_{200}=1.1× 10^{15} h^{-1} M_{⊙}) produced by hydrodynamical codes ranging from classic smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), newer SPH codes, adaptive and moving mesh codes. These codes use subgrid models to capture galaxy formation physics. We compare how well these codes reproduce the same subhaloes/galaxies in gravity-only, non-radiative hydrodynamics and full feedback physics runs by looking at the overall subhalo/galaxy distribution and on an individual object basis. We find that the subhalo population is reproduced to within ≲10 per cent for both dark matter only and non-radiative runs, with individual objects showing code-to-code scatter of ≲0.1 dex, although the gas in non-radiative simulations shows significant scatter. Including feedback physics significantly increases the diversity. Subhalo mass and Vmax distributions vary by ≈20 per cent. The galaxy populations also show striking code-to-code variations. Although the Tully-Fisher relation is similar in almost all codes, the number of galaxies with 109 h- 1 M⊙ ≲ M* ≲ 1012 h- 1 M⊙ can differ by a factor of 4. Individual galaxies show code-to-code scatter of ˜0.5 dex in stellar mass. Moreover, systematic differences exist, with some codes producing galaxies 70 per cent smaller than others. The diversity partially arises from the inclusion/absence of active galactic nucleus feedback. Our results combined with our companion papers demonstrate that subgrid physics is not just subject to fine-tuning, but the complexity of building galaxies in all environments remains a challenge. We argue that even basic galaxy properties, such as stellar mass to halo mass, should be treated with errors bars of ˜0.2-0.4 dex.

  12. The unexpected diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, Kyle A.; Navarro, Julio F.; Fattahi, Azadeh; Frenk, Carlos S.; Sawala, Till; White, Simon D. M.; Bower, Richard; Crain, Robert A.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2015-10-01

    We examine the circular velocity profiles of galaxies in Λ cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological hydrodynamical simulations from the EAGLE and LOCAL GROUPS projects and compare them with a compilation of observed rotation curves of galaxies spanning a wide range in mass. The shape of the circular velocity profiles of simulated galaxies varies systematically as a function of galaxy mass, but shows remarkably little variation at fixed maximum circular velocity. This is especially true for low-mass dark-matter-dominated systems, reflecting the expected similarity of the underlying CDM haloes. This is at odds with observed dwarf galaxies, which show a large diversity of rotation curve shapes, even at fixed maximum rotation speed. Some dwarfs have rotation curves that agree well with simulations, others do not. The latter are systems where the inferred mass enclosed in the inner regions is much lower than expected for CDM haloes and include many galaxies where previous work claims the presence of a constant density `core'. The `cusp versus core' issue is thus better characterized as an `inner mass deficit' problem than as a density slope mismatch. For several galaxies, the magnitude of this inner mass deficit is well in excess of that reported in recent simulations where cores result from baryon-induced fluctuations in the gravitational potential. We conclude that one or more of the following statements must be true: (i) the dark matter is more complex than envisaged by any current model; (ii) current simulations fail to reproduce the diversity in the effects of baryons on the inner regions of dwarf galaxies; and/or (iii) the mass profiles of `inner mass deficit' galaxies inferred from kinematic data are incorrect.

  13. The structure and evolution of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Paul

    I present a study of the structure and evolution of galaxies from their central, supermassive black holes to their global evolution over the lifetime of the universe. These observations, models, and theoretical predictions illustrate the current power and future potential of multiwavelength sky surveys for cosmological studies. The structure of our Galaxy provides one important constraint on any theory of galaxy formation. These theories must be able to reproduce our Galaxy's structure and stellar population. I have used a 6-filter, visible-wavelength imaging survey to analyze the structure, luminosity function, and mass function of the oldest stars in our Galactic disk. The vertical distribution of these stars is best fit by a thin + thick disk model. This result supports the current model for the gradual collapse of our Galaxy from a spherical, protogalactic cloud. The study also showed that the Salpeter mass function does not hold for stars less massive than 0.6 times our Sun and therefore low mass stars can not be the dominant mass constituent of the Galactic disk. I obtained additional near-infrared data to expand the existing visible-wavelength database and test current models of galaxy formation and evolution. The question of whether galaxies assembled relatively early and passively evolved as single units, or if galaxies hierarchically assembled through interactions over the lifetime of the universe, is a major area of current research. A vital component of studies such as this is accurate measurement of the total, integrated light of each galaxy. I compared several galaxy photometry techniques with simulations and determine that aperture photometry is the most reliable method for this study. I used the near-infrared sample to study the surface density of galaxies as a function of integrated brightness to test these galaxy formation models. The results favor simple passive galaxy evolution, although they are also consistent with some merging. These near

  14. THE STRUCTURE OF 2MASS GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Kochanek, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    We use a sample of galaxies from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog to refine a matched filter method of finding galaxy clusters that takes into account each galaxy's position, magnitude, and redshift if available. The matched filter postulates a radial density profile, luminosity function, and line-of-sight velocity distribution for cluster galaxies. We use this method to search for clusters in the galaxy catalog, which is complete to an extinction-corrected K-band magnitude of 13.25 and has spectroscopic redshifts for roughly 40% of the galaxies, including nearly all brighter than K = 11.25. We then use a stacking analysis to determine the average luminosity function, radial distribution, and velocity distribution of cluster galaxies in several richness classes, and use the results to update the parameters of the matched filter before repeating the cluster search. We also investigate the correlations between a cluster's richness and its velocity dispersion and core radius using these relations to refine priors that are applied during the cluster search process. After the second cluster search iteration, we repeat the stacking analysis. We find a cluster galaxy luminosity function that fits a Schechter form, with parameters M{sub K*} - 5log h = -23.64 {+-} 0.04 and {alpha} = -1.07 {+-} 0.03. We can achieve a slightly better fit to our luminosity function by adding a Gaussian component on the bright end to represent the brightest cluster galaxy population. The radial number density profile of galaxies closely matches a projected Navarro-Frenk-White profile at intermediate radii, with deviations at small radii due to well-known cluster centering issues and outside the virial radius due to correlated structure. The velocity distributions are Gaussian in shape, with velocity dispersions that correlate strongly with richness.

  15. Structural diversity of ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    ter Beek, Josy; Guskov, Albert

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters form a large superfamily of ATP-dependent protein complexes that mediate transport of a vast array of substrates across membranes. The 14 currently available structures of ABC transporters have greatly advanced insight into the transport mechanism and revealed a tremendous structural diversity. Whereas the domains that hydrolyze ATP are structurally related in all ABC transporters, the membrane-embedded domains, where the substrates are translocated, adopt four different unrelated folds. Here, we review the structural characteristics of ABC transporters and discuss the implications of this structural diversity for mechanistic diversity. PMID:24638992

  16. FIRST RESULTS FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY: THE STRIKING DIVERSITY OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z > 1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Nelson, Erica; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Bezanson, Rachel; Lundgren, Britt; Brammer, Gabriel; Fumagalli, Mattia; Franx, Marijn; Patel, Shannon; Labbe, Ivo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Kriek, Mariska; Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Erb, Dawn K.; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha; Illingworth, Garth D.; Magee, Dan; and others

    2011-12-10

    We present first results from the 3D-HST program, a near-IR spectroscopic survey performed with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the HST. We have used 3D-HST spectra to measure redshifts and H{alpha} equivalent widths (EW{sub H{alpha}}) for a complete, stellar mass-limited sample of 34 galaxies at 1 < z < 1.5 with M{sub star} > 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} in the COSMOS, GOODS, and AEGIS fields. We find that a substantial fraction of massive galaxies at this epoch are forming stars at a high rate: the fraction of galaxies with EW{sub H{alpha}} >10 A is 59%, compared to 10% among Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies of similar masses at z = 0.1. Galaxies with weak H{alpha} emission show absorption lines typical of 2-4 Gyr old stellar populations. The structural parameters of the galaxies, derived from the associated WFC3 F140W imaging data, correlate with the presence of H{alpha}; quiescent galaxies are compact with high Sersic index and high inferred velocity dispersion, whereas star-forming galaxies are typically large two-armed spiral galaxies, with low Sersic index. Some of these star-forming galaxies might be progenitors of the most massive S0 and Sa galaxies. Our results challenge the idea that galaxies at fixed mass form a homogeneous population with small scatter in their properties. Instead, we find that massive galaxies form a highly diverse population at z > 1, in marked contrast to the local universe.

  17. Information of Structures in Galaxy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fan

    2006-06-01

    We introduce an information-theoretic measure, the Rényi information, to describe the galaxy distribution in space. We discuss properties of the information measure and demonstrate its relationship with the probability distribution function and multifractal descriptions. Using the First Look Survey galaxy samples observed by the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we present measurements of the Rényi information, as well as the counts-in-cells distribution and multifractal properties of galaxies in mid-infrared wavelengths. Guided by a multiplicative cascade simulation based on a binomial model, we verify our measurements and discuss the spatial selection effects on measuring information of the spatial structures. We derive structure scan functions at scales where selection effects are small for the Spitzer samples. We discuss the results and the potential of applying the Rényi information to the measurement of other spatial structures.

  18. The Origin of the Diversity of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revaz, Yves; Jablonka, Pascale

    2010-06-01

    We present a large sample of 166 fully self-consistent hydrodynamical N-body/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies [1]. It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. Using the recent data of the ESO Large Programme DART, we have constrained the star formation history of four Milky Way dSphs, Sextans, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax. For the first time, [Mg/Fe] vs [Fe/H] diagrams derived from high-resolution spectroscopy of hundreds of individual stars are confronted with model predictions. Global relations of dSph are successfully reproduced. Our study shows that the total initial mass of these systems is the main driver of their evolution and explains the diversity in luminosity and metallicity observed in the Local Group dSphs.

  19. Structural decomposition of galaxies in the CALIFA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuutma, Teet; Tamm, Antti; Tempel, Elmo

    2016-10-01

    Several clues for understanding the nature and evolution of galaxies can be gained by studying galactic structures and their evolution with time and environment. However, even for nearby galaxies, detailed structural decomposition is not a straightforward task. Choosing the number of structural components and the limits placed on their parameters can have a large effect on the derived characteristics of galaxies. For distant galaxies, structural analysis is further hampered by the spatial resolution limits of the imaging. However, by using a relatively robust two-component bulge+disk modelling, galaxies in the nearby Universe can be compared to distant galaxies for tracing signs of evolution in the extracted structures. We start such a study by analysing first a well observed nearby sample of galaxies, using ~600 targets from the CALIFA survey. We show that even in this small sample of nearby galaxies, the effects of environmental density are already well apparent.

  20. AEGIS: The Diversity of Bright Near-IR Selected Distant RedGalaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Conselice, C.J.; Newman, J.A.; Georgakakis, A.; Almaini, O.; Coil, A.L.; Cooper, M.C.; Eisenhardt, P.; Foucaud, S.; Koekemoer, A.; Lotz, J.; Noeske, K.; Weiner, B.; Willmer, C.N.A

    2006-10-13

    We use deep and wide near infrared (NIR) imaging from the Palomar telescope combined with DEEP2 spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Chandra Space Telescope imaging to investigate the nature of galaxies that are red in NIR colors. We locate these 'distant red galaxies' (DRGs) through the color cut (J - K){sub vega} > 2.3 over 0.7 deg{sup 2}, where we find 1010 DRG candidates down to K{sub s} = 20.5. We combine 95 high quality spectroscopic redshifts with photometric redshifts from BRIJK photometry to determine the redshift and stellar mass distributions for these systems, and morphological/structural and X-ray properties for 107 DRGs in the Extended Groth Strip. We find that many bright (J - K){sub vega} > 2.3 galaxies with K{sub s} < 20.5 are at redshifts z < 2, with 64% between 1 < z < 2. The stellar mass distributions for these galaxies is broad, ranging from 10{sup 9} - 10{sup 12} M{sub {circle_dot}} , but with most z > 2 systems massive with M{sub *} > 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}}. HST imaging shows that the structural properties and morphologies of DRGs are also diverse, with the majority elliptical/compact (57%), and the remainder edge-on spirals (7%), and peculiar galaxies (29%). The DRGs at z < 1.4 with high quality spectroscopic redshifts are generally compact, with small half-light radii, and span a range in rest-frame optical properties. The spectral energy distributions for these objects differ from higher redshift DRGs: they are bluer by one magnitude in observed (I - J) color. A pure IR color selection of high redshift populations is not sufficient to identify unique populations, and other colors, or spectroscopic redshifts are needed to produce homogeneous samples.

  1. STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF GALAXIES IN CANDELS

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Wel, A.; Chang, Yu-Yen; Rix, H.-W.; Bell, E. F.; Haeussler, B.; Hartley, W.; McGrath, E. J.; Cheung, E.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, D. D.; Mozena, M.; McIntosh, D. H.; Barden, M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Grogin, N. A.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Lotz, J.; Galametz, A.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; and others

    2012-12-15

    We present global structural parameter measurements of 109,533 unique, H{sub F160W}-selected objects from the CANDELS multi-cycle treasury program. Sersic model fits for these objects are produced with GALFIT in all available near-infrared filters (H{sub F160W}, J{sub F125W} and, for a subset, Y{sub F105W}). The parameters of the best-fitting Sersic models (total magnitude, half-light radius, Sersic index, axis ratio, and position angle) are made public, along with newly constructed point-spread functions for each field and filter. Random uncertainties in the measured parameters are estimated for each individual object based on a comparison between multiple, independent measurements of the same set of objects. To quantify systematic uncertainties, we create a mosaic with simulated galaxy images with a realistic distribution of input parameters and then process and analyze the mosaic in an identical manner as the real data. We find that accurate and precise measurements-to 10% or better-of all structural parameters can typically be obtained for galaxies with H{sub F160W} < 23, with comparable fidelity for basic size and shape measurements for galaxies to H{sub F160W} {approx} 24.5.

  2. Our Milky Way structure in the context of local galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Juntai

    2015-08-01

    The Milky Way is the closest galaxy to us, and has been studied extensively due to its proximity. Understanding its structure and dynamics will help us understand spiral galaxies in general. I will review the latest research progress in the structure, kinematics, and dynamics of the Milky Way in the context of local galaxies. I will cover most structural components (the bulge/bar, disk, and spiral structures) and discuss the implications of some new results on the formation history of our home galaxy.

  3. The Horizon-AGN simulation: morphological diversity of galaxies promoted by AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien; Pichon, Christophe; Devriendt, Julien; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Welker, Charlotte; Volonteri, Marta

    2016-09-01

    The interplay between cosmic gas accretion onto galaxies and galaxy mergers drives the observed morphological diversity of galaxies. By comparing the state-of-the-art hydrodynamical cosmological simulations Horizon-AGN and Horizon-noAGN, we unambiguously identify the critical role of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in setting up the correct galaxy morphology for the massive end of the population. With AGN feedback, typical kinematic and morpho-metric properties of galaxy populations as well as the galaxy-halo mass relation are in much better agreement with observations. Only AGN feedback allows massive galaxies at the center of groups and clusters to become ellipticals, while without AGN feedback those galaxies reform discs. It is the merger-enhanced AGN activity that is able to freeze the morphological type of the post-merger remnant by durably quenching its quiescent star formation. Hence morphology is shown not to be purely driven by mass but also by the nature of cosmic accretion: at constant galaxy mass, ellipticals are galaxies that are mainly assembled through mergers, while discs are preferentially built from the in situ star formation fed by smooth cosmic gas infall.

  4. The Horizon-AGN Simulation: Morphological Diversity of Galaxies ,Promoted by AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien; Pichon, Christophe; Devriendt, Julien; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Welker, Charlotte; Volonteri, Marta

    2016-09-01

    The interplay between cosmic gas accretion onto galaxies and galaxy mergers drives the observed morphological diversity of galaxies. By comparing the state-of-the-art hydrodynamical cosmological simulations HORIZON-AGN and HORIZON-NOAGN, we unambiguously identify the critical role of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in setting up the correct galaxy morphology for the massive end of the population. With AGN feedback, typical kinematic and morpho-metric properties of galaxy populations as well as the galaxy-halo mass relation are in much better agreement with observations. Only AGN feedback allows massive galaxies at the center of groups and clusters to become ellipticals, while without AGN feedback those galaxies reform discs. It is the merger-enhanced AGN activity that is able to freeze the morphological type of the post-merger remnant by durably quenching its quiescent star formation. Hence morphology is shown not to be purely driven by mass but also by the nature of cosmic accretion: at constant galaxy mass, ellipticals are galaxies that are mainly assembled through mergers, while discs are preferentially built from the in situ star formation fed by smooth cosmic gas infall.

  5. The Void Galaxy Survey: photometry, structure and identity of void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beygu, B.; Peletier, R. F.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kreckel, K.; van de Weygaert, R.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze photometry from deep B-band images of 59 void galaxies in the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), together with their near-infrared 3.6μm and 4.5μm Spitzer photometry. The VGS galaxies constitute a sample of void galaxies that were selected by a geometric-topological procedure from the SDSS DR7 data release, and which populate the deep interior of voids. Our void galaxies span a range of absolute B-magnitude from {M_B=-15.5} to {M_B=-20}, while at the 3.6μm band their magnitudes range from {M_{3.6}=-18} to {M_{3.6}=-24}. Their B-[3.6] colour and structural parameters indicate these are star forming galaxies. A good reflection of the old stellar population, the near-infrared band photometry also provide a robust estimate of the stellar mass, which for the VGS galaxies we confirm to be smaller than 3 × 1010 M⊙. In terms of the structural parameters and morphology, our findings align with other studies in that our VGS galaxy sample consists mostly of small late-type galaxies. Most of them are similar to Sd-Sm galaxies, although a few are irregularly shaped galaxies. The sample even includes two early-type galaxies, one of which is an AGN. Their Sérsic indices are nearly all smaller than n = 2 in both bands and they also have small half-light radii. In all, we conclude that the principal impact of the void environment on the galaxies populating them mostly concerns their low stellar mass and small size.

  6. The Galaxy in Context: Structural, Kinematic, and Integrated Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-09-01

    Our Galaxy, the Milky Way, is a benchmark for understanding disk galaxies. It is the only galaxy whose formation history can be studied using the full distribution of stars from faint dwarfs to supergiants. The oldest components provide us with unique insight into how galaxies form and evolve over billions of years. The Galaxy is a luminous (L⋆) barred spiral with a central box/peanut bulge, a dominant disk, and a diffuse stellar halo. Based on global properties, it falls in the sparsely populated “green valley” region of the galaxy color-magnitude diagram. Here we review the key integrated, structural and kinematic parameters of the Galaxy, and point to uncertainties as well as directions for future progress. Galactic studies will continue to play a fundamental role far into the future because there are measurements that can only be made in the near field and much of contemporary astrophysics depends on such observations.

  7. The GHOSTS survey - II. The diversity of halo colour and metallicity profiles of massive disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Radburn-Smith, David J.; Bailin, Jeremy; de Jong, Roelof S.; Holwerda, Benne; Streich, David; Silverstein, Grace

    2016-04-01

    We study the stellar halo colour properties of six nearby massive highly inclined disc galaxies using Hubble space telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 observations in both F606W and F814W filters from the GHOSTS (Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disks, and Star clusters) survey. The observed fields probe the stellar outskirts out to projected distances of ˜50-70 kpc from their galactic centre along the minor axis. The 50 per cent completeness levels of the colour-magnitude diagrams are typically at 2 mag below the tip of the red giant branch (RGB). We find that all galaxies have extended stellar haloes out to ˜50 kpc and two out to ˜70 kpc. We determined the halo colour distribution and colour profile for each galaxy using the median colours of stars in the RGB. Within each galaxy, we find variations in the median colours as a function of radius which likely indicates population variations, reflecting that their outskirts were built from several small accreted objects. We find that half of the galaxies (NGC 0891, NGC 4565, and NGC 7814) present a clear negative colour gradient in their haloes, reflecting a declining metallicity; the other have no significant colour or population gradient. In addition, notwithstanding the modest sample size of galaxies, there is no strong correlation between their halo colour/metallicity or gradient with galaxy's properties such as rotational velocity or stellar mass. The diversity in halo colour profiles observed in the GHOSTS galaxies qualitatively supports the predicted galaxy-to-galaxy scatter in halo stellar properties, a consequence of the stochasticity inherent in the assembling history of galaxies.

  8. Structural diversity in lithium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yangzheng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Cohen, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium-carbon binary system possesses a broad range of chemical compounds, which exhibit fascinating chemical bonding characteristics, which give rise to diverse and technologically important properties. While lithium carbides with various compositions have been studied or suggested previously, the crystal structures of these compounds are far from well understood. In this work, we present the first comprehensive survey of all ground state (GS) structures of lithium carbides over a broad range of thermodynamic conditions, using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) crystal structure searching methods. Thorough searches were performed for 29 stoichiometries ranging from Li12C to LiC12 at 0 and 40 GPa. Based on formation enthalpies from optimized van der Waals density functional calculations, three thermodynamically stable phases (Li4C3 , Li2C2 , and LiC12) were identified at 0 GPa, and seven thermodynamically stable phases (Li8C , Li6C , Li4C , Li8C3 , Li2C , Li3C4 , and Li2C3 ) were predicted at 40 GPa. A rich diversity of carbon bonding, including monomers, dimers, trimers, nanoribbons, sheets, and frameworks, was found within these structures, and the dimensionality of carbon connectivity existing within each phase increases with increasing carbon concentration. We find that the well-known composition LiC6 is actually a metastable one. We also find a unique coexistence of carbon monomers and dimers within the predicted thermodynamically stable phase Li8C3 , and different widths of carbon nanoribbons coexist in a metastable phase of Li2C2 (Imm2). Interesting mixed sp2-sp3 carbon frameworks are predicted in metastable phases with composition LiC6.

  9. Structure of magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotarba, Hanna; Lesch, H.; Dolag, K.; Naab, T.; Johansson, P. H.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2009-04-01

    We present a set of global, self-consistent N-body/SPH simulations of the dynamic evolution of galactic discs with gas and including magnetic fields. We have implemented a description to follow the ideal induction equation in the SPH part of the code Vine. Results from a direct implementation of the field equations are compared to a representation by Euler potentials, which pose a ∇ ċ B-free description, a constraint not fulfilled for the direct implementation. All simulations are compared to an implementation of magnetic fields in the code Gadget. Starting with a homogeneous field we find a tight connection of the magnetic field structure to the density pattern of the galaxy in our simulations, with the magnetic field lines being aligned with the developing spiral pattern of the gas. Our simulations clearly show the importance of non-axisymmetry of the dynamic pattern for the evolution of the magnetic field.

  10. A FUNDAMENTAL PLANE OF SPIRAL STRUCTURE IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Shields, Douglas W.; Flatman, Russell; Hartley, Matthew T.; Berrier, Joel C.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2015-03-20

    Spiral structure is the most distinctive feature of disk galaxies and yet debate persists about which theory of spiral structure is correct. Many versions of the density wave theory demand that the pitch angle be uniquely determined by the distribution of mass in the bulge and disk of the galaxy. We present evidence that the tangent of the pitch angle of logarithmic spiral arms in disk galaxies correlates strongly with the density of neutral atomic hydrogen in the disk and with the central stellar bulge mass of the galaxy. These three quantities, when plotted against each other, form a planar relationship that we argue should be fundamental to our understanding of spiral structure in disk galaxies. We further argue that any successful theory of spiral structure must be able to explain this relationship.

  11. INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF PROTOCLUSTER GALAXIES: ACCELERATED STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION IN OVERDENSE ENVIRONMENTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zirm, Andrew W.; Toft, Sune; Tanaka, Masayuki E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-01-10

    We present a high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS imaging survey in the field of a known protocluster surrounding the powerful radio galaxy MRC1138-262 at z = 2.16. Previously, we have shown that this field exhibits a substantial surface overdensity of red J-H galaxies. Here we focus on the stellar masses and galaxy effective radii in an effort to compare and contrast the properties of likely protocluster galaxies with their field counterparts and to look for correlations between galaxy structure and (projected) distance relative to the radio galaxy. We find a hint that quiescent, cluster galaxies are on average less dense than quiescent field galaxies of similar stellar mass and redshift. In fact, we find that only two (of eight) quiescent protocluster galaxies are of similar density to the majority of the massive, quiescent compact galaxies (Semi-Evolved Elephantine Dense galaxies; SEEDs) found in several field surveys. Furthermore, there is some indication that the structural Sersic n parameter is higher (n {approx} 3-4) on average for cluster galaxies compared to the field SEEDs (n {approx} 1-2). This result may imply that the accelerated galaxy evolution expected (and observed) in overdense regions also extends to structural evolution presuming that massive galaxies began as dense (low n) SEEDs and have already evolved to be more in line with local galaxies of the same stellar mass.

  12. STRUCTURES OF LOCAL GALAXIES COMPARED TO HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, Sara M.; De Mello, DuIlia F.; Gallagher, John S.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Matt Mountain, C.; Smith, Linda J.

    2009-08-15

    The rest-frame far-ultraviolet morphologies of eight nearby interacting and starburst galaxies (Arp 269, M 82, Mrk 8, NGC 520, NGC 1068, NGC 3079, NGC 3310, and NGC 7673) are compared with 54 galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 and 46 galaxies at z {approx} 4 observed in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The nearby sample is artificially redshifted to z {approx} 1.5 and 4 by applying luminosity and size scaling. We compare the simulated galaxy morphologies to real z {approx} 1.5 and 4 UV-bright galaxy morphologies. We calculate the Gini coefficient (G), the second-order moment of the brightest 20% of the galaxy's flux (M {sub 20}), and the Sersic index (n). We explore the use of nonparametric methods with two-dimensional profile fitting and find the combination of M {sub 20} with n an efficient method to classify galaxies as having merger, exponential disk, or bulge-like morphologies. When classified according to G and M {sub 20} 20/30% of real/simulated galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 and 37/12% at z {approx} 4 have bulge-like morphologies. The rest have merger-like or intermediate distributions. Alternatively, when classified according to the Sersic index, 70% of the z {approx} 1.5 and z {approx} 4 real galaxies are exponential disks or bulge-like with n>0.8, and {approx} 30% of the real galaxies are classified as mergers. The artificially redshifted galaxies have n values with {approx} 35% bulge or exponential at z {approx} 1.5 and 4. Therefore, {approx} 20%-30% of Lyman-break galaxies have structures similar to local starburst mergers, and may be driven by similar processes. We assume merger-like or clumpy star-forming galaxies in the GOODS field have morphological structure with values n < 0.8 and M {sub 20}> - 1.7. We conclude that Mrk 8, NGC 3079, and NGC 7673 have structures similar to those of merger-like and clumpy star-forming galaxies observed at z {approx} 1.5 and 4.

  13. Shaping Galaxies:Internal Structure of the z˜2 Galaxy Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.-Y.; van der Wel, A.; Rix, H.-W.; Wuyts, S.; Zibetti, S.; Ramkumar, B.; Holden, B.

    2013-10-01

    We use high-resolution VLT/HAWK-I and HST/WFC3 imaging to study the structural evolution of early-type galaxies since z˜2. Mass-selected samples are drawn from pre-existing photometric redshift surveys, which are then separated into actively star-forming and passive galaxies. The (projected) axis-ratio distributions are compared with those of lower redshift samples, and we reconstruct intrinsic axis-ratio distributions by assuming that galaxies are simple, axi-symmetric systems. We find that at all redshifts z<˜2 more massive galaxies are rounder. That is, at all epochs stars are predominantly formed in disk-like systems, whereas early-type galaxies are more bulge dominated, especially at higher masses.

  14. The 3-Dimensional Structure of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lindsay

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury Program CLASH (PI Postman) has provided the community with the most detailed views ever of the central regions of massive galaxy clusters. These galaxy clusters have also been observed with NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, with the ground-based Subaru telescope, and with other ground- and space-based facilities, resulting in unprecedented multi-wavelength data sets of the most massive bound structures in the universe. Fitting 3-Dimensional mass models is crucial to understanding how mass is distributed in individual clusters, investigating the properties of dark matter, and testing our cosmological model. With the exquisite data available, the time is now ideal to undertake this analysis. We propose to use algorithms that we have developed and obtain mass models for the clusters from the CLASH sample. The project would use archival gravitational lensing data, X-ray data of the cluster's hot gas and additional constraints from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) data. Specifically, we would model the 23 clusters for which both HST and Subaru data (or in one case WFI data) are publicly available, since the exquisite imaging of HST in the clusters' central regions is beautifully augmented by the wide field coverage of Subaru imaging. If the true 3-D shapes of clusters are not properly accounted for when analysing data, this can lead to inaccuracies in the mass density profiles of individual clusters - up to 50% bias in mass for the most highly triaxial systems. Our proposed project represents an independent analysis of the CLASH sample, complementary to that of the CLASH team, probing the triaxial shapes and orientations of the cluster dark matter halos and hot gas. Our findings will be relevant to the analysis of data from future missions such as JWST and Euclid, and also to ground-based surveys to be made with telescopes such as LSST.

  15. The influence of halo evolution on galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Simon

    2015-03-01

    If Einstein-Newton gravity holds on galactic and larger scales, then current observations demonstrate that the stars and interstellar gas of a typical bright galaxy account for only a few percent of its total nonlinear mass. Dark matter makes up the rest and cannot be faint stars or any other baryonic form because it was already present and decoupled from the radiation plasma at z = 1000, long before any nonlinear object formed. The weak gravito-sonic waves so precisely measured by CMB observations are detected again at z = 4 as order unity fluctuations in intergalactic matter. These subsequently collapse to form today's galaxy/halo systems, whose mean mass profiles can be accurately determined through gravitational lensing. High-resolution simulations link the observed dark matter structures seen at all these epochs, demonstrating that they are consistent and providing detailed predictions for all aspects of halo structure and growth. Requiring consistency with the abundance and clustering of real galaxies strongly constrains the galaxy-halo relation, both today and at high redshift. This results in detailed predictions for galaxy assembly histories and for the gravitational arena in which galaxies live. Dark halos are not expected to be passive or symmetric but to have a rich and continually evolving structure which will drive evolution in the central galaxy over its full life, exciting warps, spiral patterns and tidal arms, thickening disks, producing rings, bars and bulges. Their growth is closely related to the provision of new gas for galaxy building.

  16. The diverse evolutionary paths of simulated high-z massive, compact galaxies to z = 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellons, Sarah; Torrey, Paul; Ma, Chung-Pei; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Pillepich, Annalisa; Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Massive quiescent galaxies have much smaller physical sizes at high redshift than today. The strong evolution of galaxy size may be caused by progenitor bias, major and minor mergers, adiabatic expansion, and/or renewed star formation, but it is difficult to test these theories observationally. Herein, we select a sample of 35 massive, compact galaxies (M* = 1-3 × 1011 M⊙, M*/R1.5 > 1010.5 M⊙/kpc1.5) at z = 2 in the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Illustris and trace them forwards to z = 0 to uncover their evolution and identify their descendants. By z = 0, the original factor of 3 difference in stellar mass spreads to a factor of 20. The dark matter halo masses similarly spread from a factor of 5 to 40. The galaxies' evolutionary paths are diverse: about half acquire an ex situ envelope and are the core of a more massive descendant, a third survive undisturbed and gain very little mass, 15 per cent are consumed in a merger with a more massive galaxy, and a small remainder are thoroughly mixed by major mergers. The galaxies grow in size as well as mass, and only ˜10 per cent remain compact by z = 0. The majority of the size growth is driven by the acquisition of ex situ mass. The most massive galaxies at z = 0 are the most likely to have compact progenitors, but this trend possesses significant dispersion which precludes a direct linkage to compact galaxies at z = 2. The compact galaxies' merger rates are influenced by their z = 2 environments, so that isolated or satellite compact galaxies (which are protected from mergers) are the most likely to survive to the present day.

  17. Locally Biased Galaxy Formation and Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Vijay K.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Weinberg, David H.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the influence of the morphology-density relation and a wide range of simple models for biased galaxy formation on statistical measures of large-scale structure. We contrast the behavior of local biasing models, in which the efficiency of galaxy formation is determined by the density, geometry, or velocity dispersion of the local mass distribution, with that of nonlocal biasing models, in which galaxy formation is modulated coherently over scales larger than the galaxy correlation length. If morphological segregation of galaxies is governed by a local morphology-density relation, then the correlation function of E/S0 galaxies should be steeper and stronger than that of spiral galaxies on small scales, as observed, while on large scales the E/S0 and spiral galaxies should have correlation functions with the same shape but different amplitudes. Similarly, all of our local bias models produce scale-independent amplification of the correlation function and power spectrum in the linear and mildly nonlinear regimes; only a nonlocal biasing mechanism can alter the shape of the power spectrum on large scales. Moments of the biased galaxy distribution retain the hierarchical pattern of the mass moments, but biasing alters the values and scale dependence of the hierarchical amplitudes S3 and S4. Pair-weighted moments of the galaxy velocity distribution are sensitive to the details of the bias prescription even if galaxies have the same local velocity distribution as the underlying dark matter. The nonlinearity of the relation between galaxy density and mass density depends on the biasing prescription and the smoothing scale, and the scatter in this relation is a useful diagnostic of the physical parameters that determine the bias. While the assumption that galaxy formation is governed by local physics leads to some important simplifications on large scales, even local biasing is a multifaceted phenomenon whose impact cannot be described by a single parameter or

  18. Extracting Structural information from Galaxy Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Wayne B.; Davis, D.

    2010-05-01

    The amount of data from sky images is large and growing. About 1 million galaxies can be discerned in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is being built and will scan the entire sky repeatedly, providing images of millions of galaxies and petabytes of data every night. The Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) is a proposed orbiting satellite that will repeatedly map the entire sky from orbit, providing images of perhaps billions of galaxies. Unfortunately, given an image of a spiral galaxy, there does not exist an automated vision algorithm that can even tell us which direction the spiral arms wind, much less count them or provide any other quantitative information about them. To wit, the largest galaxy classification project is the Galaxy Zoo, in which thousands of human volunteers classify images by eye over the web. Although valuable, such human classifications will provide only limited objective quantitative measurements, and will soon be overwhelmed with more data than humans can handle. However, such information would prove an invaluable source for astronomers and cosmologists to test current theories of galaxy formation and cosmic evolution (which can now be simulated with high accuracy on large computers, producing copious predictions that cannot be tested due to a lack of objective, quantitative observational data). In this talk, I will report on preliminary results from dynamical grammars and other machine learning and vision techniques to "parse" images of galaxies, starting us on the road towards producing quantitative data that will be useful for astronomers to test theories.

  19. Star Formation Histories of Dwarf Galaxies: Keys to Galaxy Formation and Dark Matter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2014-10-01

    We propose to perform a suite of hydrodynamical simulations in order to understand the connection between dwarf galaxy star formation histories, stellar content, and central dark matter densities. This will leverage one of HST's unique and enduring scientific contributions, deep and uniform photometry of nearby dwarf galaxies that enables reconstructions of their ancient {z 6-10} star formation histories, to shed light on some of the main problems in galaxy formation and cosmology.Analysis of HST observations has definitively shown that dwarfs exhibit a surprising variety of star formation histories: some dwarfs host nearly purely ancient populations, while others have formed 90% of their stars after redshift 1. This diversity is unexpected in current theoretical models, which predict primarily old stellar populations in low-mass objects. The topic of star formation histories of dwarfs has also received significant attention recently in the context of possible small-scale problems of the LCDM model: if episodic bursts of star formation inject energy into dwarfs' dark matter halos, it may provide a natural explanation of the observed low densities of dwarf galaxies within LCDM.Our simulations will adopt physically-motivated, explicit feedback prescriptions that are fixed by our knowledge of stellar evolution. We will choose halos having diverse mass assembly histories within a narrow range of mass and compare their star formation histories to HST observations of nearby isolated dwarf galaxies, thereby testing fundamental aspects of galaxy formation modeling and dark matter astrophysics. Data from our simulations will be publicly released via a dedicated website.

  20. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  1. Early-type dwarf galaxies with multicomponent stellar structure: Are they remnants of disc galaxies strongly transformed by their environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The surface brightness distribution of ~30-40% of the early-type dwarf galaxies with - 18 ≤ MB ≤ -15 in the Virgo and the Coma clusters is fitted by models that include two structural components (Sérsic + exponential) as for bright disc galaxies. Aims: The goal of the present study is to determine whether early-type dwarf galaxies with a two-component stellar structure in the Virgo and the Coma clusters are low-luminosity copies of bright disc galaxies or are the remnants of bright galaxies strongly transformed by cluster environmental effects. Methods: I analysed the location of bright disc galaxies and early-type dwarfs in the rb,e/h- n plane. The location in this plane of the two-component dwarf galaxies was compared with the remnants of tidally disrupted disc galaxies reported by numerical simulations. Results: Bright unbarred disc galaxies show a strong correlation in the rb,e/h-n plane. Galaxies with larger Sérsic shape parameters show a higher rb,e/h ratio. In contrast, two-component early-type dwarf galaxies do not follow the same correlation. A fraction (~55%) of them are located outside the locus defined in this plane by having 95% of bright disc galaxies. This distribution indicates that they are not a low-mass replica of bright disc galaxies. The different location in the rb,e/h- n plane of two-component early-type dwarfs and bright galaxies can be qualitatively explain whether the former are remnants of disc galaxies strongly transformed by tidal processes. Conclusions: The progenitors of ~20-25% of early-type dwarf galaxies with - 18 ≤ MB ≤ -15 in the Virgo and Coma clusters could be bright disc galaxies transformed by effects of the environment. These tidally transformed galaxies can be selected according to their location in the rb,e/h-n plane.

  2. Assessment of structural diversity in combinatorial synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Suzanne; Bender, Andreas; Spring, David R

    2005-06-01

    This article covers the combinatorial synthesis of small molecules with maximal structural diversity to generate a collection of pure compounds that are attractive for lead generation in a phenotypic, high-throughput screening approach. Nature synthesises diverse small molecules, but there are disadvantages with using natural product sources. The efficient chemical synthesis of structural diversity (and complexity) is the aim of diversity-oriented synthesis, and recent progress is reviewed. Specific highlights include a discussion of strategies to obtain structural diversity and an analysis of molecular descriptors used to classify compounds. The assessment of how successful one synthesis is versus another is subjective, therefore we test-drive software to assess structural diversity in combinatorial synthesis, which is freely available via a web interface.

  3. Near-infrared Structure of Fast and Slow-rotating Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK s-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s-1 diversity of disk structure. Of the fast-rotating (V rot > 150 km s-1) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with hz <~ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ~5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ~25% of the total K s-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{K_s}/f60 μ m ≤ 0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J - K s) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  4. Probing asymmetric structures in the outskirts of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Zhang Zheng; Zheng, Xian Zhong; An, Fang Xia E-mail: xzzheng@pmo.ac.cn

    2014-06-01

    Upcoming large imaging surveys will allow detailed studies of the structure and morphology of galaxies aimed at addressing how galaxies form and evolve. Computational approaches are needed to characterize their morphologies over large samples. We introduce an automatic method to quantify the outer structure of galaxies. The key to our approach is the division of a galaxy image into two sections delineated by the isophote, which encloses half the total brightness of the galaxy. We call the central section the inner half-flux region (IHR) and the outer section the outer half-flux region (OHR). From this division, we derive two parameters: A {sub o}, which measures the asymmetry of the OHR, and D {sub o}, which measures the deviation of the intensity weighted centroid of the OHR from that of the IHR relative to the effective radius. We derive the two parameters from HST/ACS z {sub 850}-band images for a sample of 764 galaxies with z {sub 850} < 22 mag and 0.35 < z < 0.9 selected from the GEMS and GOODS-South surveys. We show that the sample galaxies having strong asymmetric structures, particularly tidal tails, are well-separated from those with regular morphologies in the A {sub o}-D {sub o} space. Meanwhile, the widely used CAS and Gini-M {sub 20} methods turn out to be insensitive to such morphological features. We stress that the A {sub o}-D {sub o} method is an efficient way to select galaxies with significant asymmetric features like tidal tails and study galaxy mergers in the dynamical phase traced by these delicate features.

  5. Transformations of galaxies - III. Encounter dynamics and tidal response as functions of galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Joshua E.

    2016-01-01

    Tidal interactions between disc galaxies depend on galaxy structure, but the details of this relationship are incompletely understood. I have constructed a three-parameter grid of bulge/disc/halo models broadly consistent with Λ cold dark matter, and simulated an extensive series of encounters using these models. Halo mass and extent strongly influence the dynamics of orbit evolution. In close encounters, the transfer of angular momentum mediated by the dynamical response of massive, extended haloes can reverse the direction of orbital motion of the central galaxies after their first passage. Tidal response is strongly correlated with the ratio ve/vc of escape to circular velocity within the participating discs. Moreover, the same ratio also correlates with the rate at which tidal tails are reaccreted by their galaxies of origin; consequently, merger remnants with `twin tails', such as NGC 7252, may prove hard to reproduce unless (ve/vc)2 ≲ 5.5. The tidal morphology of an interacting system can provide useful constraints on progenitor structure. In particular, encounters in which halo dynamics reverses orbital motion exhibit a distinctive morphology which may be recognized observationally. Detailed models attempting to reproduce observations of interacting galaxies should explore the likely range of progenitor structures along with other encounter parameters.

  6. The link between galaxy structure and star formation across cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jerome Joseph

    -wavelength datasets produced by the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). By finely dissecting our sample into narrow mass and redshift slices, we are able to uncover several striking trends, including evidence for mass-dependent evolution in terms of disk formation and the buildup of metals and dust, i.e., massive galaxies are more evolved at all epochs. However, at fixed mass, no correlation between structure and specific star-formation rate is seen for galaxies on the star-forming "main sequence." This behavior persists at all redshifts, despite the considerable diversity in size and shape among star-forming galaxies. This suggests that, on the main sequence, star formation is regulated primarily by external factors, e.g., halo accretion rate, rather than the internal structure of the galaxy.

  7. THE CARNEGIE-IRVINE GALAXY SURVEY. III. THE THREE-COMPONENT STRUCTURE OF NEARBY ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Song; Ho, Luis C.; Peng, Chien Y.; Li, Zhao-Yu; Barth, Aaron J.

    2013-03-20

    Motivated by recent developments in our understanding of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies, we explore the detailed photometric structure of a representative sample of 94 bright, nearby elliptical galaxies, using high-quality optical images from the Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey. The sample spans a range of environments and stellar masses, from M{sub *} = 10{sup 10.2} to 10{sup 12.0} M{sub Sun }. We exploit the unique capabilities of two-dimensional image decomposition to explore the possibility that local elliptical galaxies may contain photometrically distinct substructure that can shed light on their evolutionary history. Compared with the traditional one-dimensional approach, these two-dimensional models are capable of consistently recovering the surface brightness distribution and the systematic radial variation of geometric information at the same time. Contrary to conventional perception, we find that the global light distribution of the majority ({approx}>75%) of elliptical galaxies is not well described by a single Sersic function. Instead, we propose that local elliptical galaxies generically contain three subcomponents: a compact (R{sub e} {approx}< 1 kpc) inner component with luminosity fraction f Almost-Equal-To 0.1-0.15; an intermediate-scale (R{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 2.5 kpc) middle component with f Almost-Equal-To 0.2-0.25; and a dominant (f = 0.6), extended (R{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 10 kpc) outer envelope. All subcomponents have average Sersic indices n Almost-Equal-To 1-2, significantly lower than the values typically obtained from single-component fits. The individual subcomponents follow well-defined photometric scaling relations and the stellar mass-size relation. We discuss the physical nature of the substructures and their implications for the formation of massive elliptical galaxies.

  8. A Revised Parallel-sequence Morphological Classification of Galaxies: Structure and Formation of S0 and Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    We update van den Bergh's parallel-sequence galaxy classification in which S0 galaxies form a sequence S0a-S0b-S0c that parallels the sequence Sa-Sb-Sc of spiral galaxies. The ratio B/T of bulge-to-total light defines the position of a galaxy in this tuning-fork diagram. Our classification makes one major improvement. We extend the S0a-S0b-S0c sequence to spheroidal ("Sph") galaxies that are positioned in parallel to irregular galaxies in a similarly extended Sa-Sb-Sc-Im sequence. This provides a natural "home" for spheroidals, which previously were omitted from galaxy classification schemes or inappropriately combined with ellipticals. To motivate our juxtaposition of Sph and Im galaxies, we present photometry and bulge-disk decompositions of four rare, late-type S0s that bridge the gap between the more common S0b and Sph galaxies. NGC 4762 is an edge-on SB0bc galaxy with a very small classical-bulge-to-total ratio of B/T = 0.13 ± 0.02. NGC 4452 is an edge-on SB0 galaxy with an even tinier pseudobulge-to-total ratio of PB/T = 0.017 ± 0.004. It is therefore an SB0c. VCC 2048, whose published classification is S0, contains an edge-on disk, but its "bulge" plots in the structural parameter sequence of spheroidals. It is therefore a disky Sph. And NGC 4638 is similarly a "missing link" between S0s and Sphs—it has a tiny bulge and an edge-on disk embedded in an Sph halo. In the Appendix, we present photometry and bulge-disk decompositions of all Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Virgo Cluster Survey S0s that do not have published decompositions. We use these data to update the structural parameter correlations of Sph, S+Im, and E galaxies. We show that Sph galaxies of increasing luminosity form a continuous sequence with the disks (but not bulges) of S0c-S0b-S0a galaxies. Remarkably, the Sph-S0-disk sequence is almost identical to that of Im galaxies and spiral galaxy disks. We review published observations for galaxy transformation processes

  9. A REVISED PARALLEL-SEQUENCE MORPHOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF GALAXIES: STRUCTURE AND FORMATION OF S0 AND SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf E-mail: bender@mpe.mpg.de

    2012-01-01

    We update van den Bergh's parallel-sequence galaxy classification in which S0 galaxies form a sequence S0a-S0b-S0c that parallels the sequence Sa-Sb-Sc of spiral galaxies. The ratio B/T of bulge-to-total light defines the position of a galaxy in this tuning-fork diagram. Our classification makes one major improvement. We extend the S0a-S0b-S0c sequence to spheroidal ('Sph') galaxies that are positioned in parallel to irregular galaxies in a similarly extended Sa-Sb-Sc-Im sequence. This provides a natural 'home' for spheroidals, which previously were omitted from galaxy classification schemes or inappropriately combined with ellipticals. To motivate our juxtaposition of Sph and Im galaxies, we present photometry and bulge-disk decompositions of four rare, late-type S0s that bridge the gap between the more common S0b and Sph galaxies. NGC 4762 is an edge-on SB0bc galaxy with a very small classical-bulge-to-total ratio of B/T = 0.13 {+-} 0.02. NGC 4452 is an edge-on SB0 galaxy with an even tinier pseudobulge-to-total ratio of PB/T = 0.017 {+-} 0.004. It is therefore an SB0c. VCC 2048, whose published classification is S0, contains an edge-on disk, but its 'bulge' plots in the structural parameter sequence of spheroidals. It is therefore a disky Sph. And NGC 4638 is similarly a 'missing link' between S0s and Sphs-it has a tiny bulge and an edge-on disk embedded in an Sph halo. In the Appendix, we present photometry and bulge-disk decompositions of all Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Virgo Cluster Survey S0s that do not have published decompositions. We use these data to update the structural parameter correlations of Sph, S+Im, and E galaxies. We show that Sph galaxies of increasing luminosity form a continuous sequence with the disks (but not bulges) of S0c-S0b-S0a galaxies. Remarkably, the Sph-S0-disk sequence is almost identical to that of Im galaxies and spiral galaxy disks. We review published observations for galaxy transformation processes

  10. Inorganic pyrophosphatases: structural diversity serving the function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samygina, V. R.

    2016-05-01

    The review is devoted to ubiquitous enzymes, inorganic pyrophosphatases, which are essential in all living organisms. Despite the long history of investigations, these enzymes continue to attract interest. The review focuses on the three-dimensional structures of various representatives of this class of proteins. The structural diversity, the relationship between the structure and some properties of pyrophosphatases and various mechanisms of enzyme action related to the structural diversity of these enzymes are discussed. Interactions of pyrophosphatase with other proteins and possible practical applications are considered. The bibliography includes 56 references.

  11. Gravitational lenses, cosmology, and galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, J.

    2002-05-01

    Gravitational lenses can be used to study dark matter in galaxies and to measure the Hubble constant. The statistics of lensing can be used to measure the cosmological constant. I have been conducting a survey of the southern sky for new lenses at radio wavelengths, which has resulted in 4 confirmed lenses and 3 strong candidates that require further follow-up. I will describe the survey and the scientific results that have been obtained from the new lenses. I will also describe my other life as a science journalist.

  12. Structures and Components in Galaxy Clusters: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Churazov, E. M.; Ferrari, C.; Forman, W. R.; Kaastra, J. S.; Klein, U.; Markevitch, M.; de Plaa, J.

    2015-05-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the largest gravitationally bounded structures in the Universe dominated by dark matter. We review the observational appearance and physical models of plasma structures in clusters of galaxies. Bubbles of relativistic plasma which are inflated by supermassive black holes of AGNs, cooling and heating of the gas, large scale plasma shocks, cold fronts, non-thermal halos and relics are observed in clusters. These constituents are reflecting both the formation history and the dynamical properties of clusters of galaxies. We discuss X-ray spectroscopy as a tool to study the metal enrichment in clusters and fine spectroscopy of Fe X-ray lines as a powerful diagnostics of both the turbulent plasma motions and the energetics of the non-thermal electron populations. The knowledge of the complex dynamical and feedback processes is necessary to understand the energy and matter balance as well as to constrain the role of the non-thermal components of clusters.

  13. Understanding the shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves in ΛCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Iorio, G.; Agertz, O.; Fraternali, F.

    2016-11-01

    The shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves is at apparent odds with dark matter halos in a Λ Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. We use mock data from isolated dwarf galaxy simulations to show that this owes to three main effects. Firstly, stellar feedback heats dark matter, leading to a `CORENFW' dark matter density profile with a slowly rising rotation curve. Secondly, if close to a recent starburst, large H I bubbles push the rotation curve out of equilibrium, deforming the rotation curve shape. Thirdly, when galaxies are viewed near face-on, their best fit inclination is biased high. This can lead to a very shallow rotation curve that falsely implies a large dark matter core. All three problems can be avoided, however, by a combination of improved mass models and a careful selection of target galaxies. Fitting our CORENFW model to mock rotation curve data, we show that we can recover the rotation curve shape, dark matter halo mass M200 and concentration parameter c within our quoted uncertainties. We fit our CORENFW model to real data for four isolated dwarf irregulars, chosen to span a wide range of rotation curve shapes. We obtain an excellent fit for NGC 6822 and WLM, with tight constraints on M200, and c consistent with ΛCDM. However, IC 1613 and DDO 101 give a poor fit. For IC 1613, we show that this owes to disequilibria and its uncertain inclination i; for DDO 101, it owes to its uncertain distance D. If we assume iIC1613 ˜ 15° and DDDO101 ˜ 12 Mpc, consistent with current uncertainties, we are able to fit both galaxies very well. We conclude that ΛCDM appears to give an excellent match to dwarf galaxy rotation curves.

  14. S Galaxies: Their Gas Content, Structure and Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, Jo Ann

    1990-09-01

    The nature of SO galaxies was studied by comparing the neutral hydrogen content and structural parameters of early type disk galaxies in three density regimes: low, intermediate and high densities as represented by the Karachentseva isolated sample, the Hydra cluster, and the Coma cluster. Two observing projects were undertaken: the first, a sensitive 21 cm. survey of massive early type disk galaxies done with the 300 m. Arecibo radio telescope; and the second, a CCD photometric study of B and R images of galaxies from the H I survey and from the three density regimes. The resulting surface brightness profiles were deconvolved into bulge and disk components where possible. The parameters derived from these projects were analyzed in the context of the parallel sequence system which classifies disk galaxies according to their bulge-to-total light ratio (B/T) (horizontally) and their disk structure (vertically). Although the Arecibo H I survey detected 48% of the SO's, 73% of the SOa's and 96% of the Sa's, few, if any, gas-rich galaxies would have gone undetected due to the inability of a 10 MHz bandwidth to detect a wide velocity spectral profile. A comparison of a hybrid, distance-independent H I surface density (M_{rm HI }/D_{rm opt} ^2) showed that the values for SO galaxies ranged continuously from amounts equivalent to those found in Sa's and Sb's, (10^9-10 10 solar masses) to low upper limits (<10^7 solar masses). The vertical axis of the classification system can thus be identified with a gradation in the neutral gas content, as well as with decreasing evidence of star formation activity. The variation of gas and structural properties along this axis is consistent with the evolution of Sa galaxies into SO's due only to astration. Although we find no strong evidence to support an environmental enhancement of this evolution, the distributions of B/T, total colors, disk colors, and (bulge-disk) colors are not inconsistent with a picture in which star formation in

  15. The diversity of growth histories of Milky Way-mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrazas, Bryan A.; Bell, Eric F.; Henriques, Bruno M. B.; White, Simon D. M.

    2016-06-01

    We use the semi-analytic model developed by Henriques et al. to explore the origin of star formation history diversity for galaxies that lie at the centre of their dark matter haloes and have present-day stellar masses in the range 5-8 × 1010 M⊙, similar to that of the Milky Way. In this model, quenching is the dominant physical mechanism for introducing scatter in the growth histories of these galaxies. We find that present-day quiescent galaxies have a larger variety of growth histories than star-formers since they underwent `staggered quenching' - a term describing the correlation between the time of quenching and present-day halo mass. While halo mass correlates broadly with quiescence, we find that quiescence is primarily a function of black hole mass, where galaxies quench when heating from their active galactic nuclei becomes sufficient to offset the redshift-dependent cooling rate. In this model, the emergence of a prominent quiescent population is the main process that flattens the stellar mass-halo mass relation at mass scales at or above that of the Milky Way.

  16. Galaxy Structure: Core Radii, and Central Mass Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, A. W.; Trujillo, I.; Erwin, P.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the nuclear and global structure of elliptical galaxies, and the apparent disparity between the Nuker and Sérsic light-profile models. We show that the so-called ``power-law" galaxies in fact have Sérsic r1/n profiles over their entire observed radial range. Consequently, only three (Sérsic-profile) parameters are required to simultaneously describe both the inner (HST-resolved) and outer profiles of low-luminosity (M > -20.5 B-mag) elliptical galaxies. We also find that ``core galaxies" have Sérsic profiles with a (partially evacuated) single power-law core. We have developed a modified (5-parameter) Sérsic profile with a power-law core to model the complete radial extent of luminous galaxies with cores. In addition to quantifying the global stellar distribution in these systems, we have derived new estimates of their core radii and other central properties. Comparison of the central stellar deficits with the galaxies' black hole masses suggests that the number of (dissipationless) major mergers that have produced luminous elliptical galaxies is around 1-2, rather than 8-10, which agrees with theory and implies that the galactic merger history of the Universe is roughly an order of magnitude less violent than previous observational analyses had suggested. Support for proposal number HST-AR-09927.01-A was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  17. Understanding the Structure and Evolution of Nearby Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, we studied the stellar and gaseous components as well as the star formation rate in nearby disk galaxies. We used PS1 medium deep survey images to derive five-band (grizy) surface brightness profiles down to 30 ABmag/arcsec^2 for about 700 galaxies. From these stellar mass and mass-to-light ratio radial profiles are derived. The stellar mass radial profiles tend to bend-up at large radii, this often traces an extended old stellar population. The mass-to-light ratio profiles tend to rise outside the r25 radii. We also find a larger fraction of up-bending surface brightness profiles than Polen & Trujillo (2006). This may be because their sample is biased towards low surface brightness galaxies. We used HIPASS data as well as VLA HI 21cm data to study the gas component and dynamics of disk galaxies. We used the GALEX UV images to study the star formation of a HI-selected star-forming sample of about 400 galaxies, compiling a database of FUV and NUV radial profiles and related parameters. We used this to study the star forming efficiency (SFE, star formation rate per unit area divided by gas surface mass density) of the sample galaxies. We found that the UV based SFE has a tighter relationship with HI mass than an H_alpha based SFE as typically used in previous studies and the UV SFE is flat across wide range of stellar mass. We constructed a simple model to predict the distribution of interstellar medium and star formation rate in an equilibrium disk with constant two-fluid Toomre Q. This model can reproduces the SFE relations we derived.

  18. Structural diversity of supercoiled DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irobalieva, Rossitza N.; Fogg, Jonathan M.; Catanese, Daniel J.; Sutthibutpong, Thana; Chen, Muyuan; Barker, Anna K.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Harris, Sarah A.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2015-10-01

    By regulating access to the genetic code, DNA supercoiling strongly affects DNA metabolism. Despite its importance, however, much about supercoiled DNA (positively supercoiled DNA, in particular) remains unknown. Here we use electron cryo-tomography together with biochemical analyses to investigate structures of individual purified DNA minicircle topoisomers with defined degrees of supercoiling. Our results reveal that each topoisomer, negative or positive, adopts a unique and surprisingly wide distribution of three-dimensional conformations. Moreover, we uncover striking differences in how the topoisomers handle torsional stress. As negative supercoiling increases, bases are increasingly exposed. Beyond a sharp supercoiling threshold, we also detect exposed bases in positively supercoiled DNA. Molecular dynamics simulations independently confirm the conformational heterogeneity and provide atomistic insight into the flexibility of supercoiled DNA. Our integrated approach reveals the three-dimensional structures of DNA that are essential for its function.

  19. Structural diversity of supercoiled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Irobalieva, Rossitza N.; Fogg, Jonathan M.; Catanese, Daniel J.; Sutthibutpong, Thana; Chen, Muyuan; Barker, Anna K.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Harris, Sarah A.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    By regulating access to the genetic code, DNA supercoiling strongly affects DNA metabolism. Despite its importance, however, much about supercoiled DNA (positively supercoiled DNA, in particular) remains unknown. Here we use electron cryo-tomography together with biochemical analyses to investigate structures of individual purified DNA minicircle topoisomers with defined degrees of supercoiling. Our results reveal that each topoisomer, negative or positive, adopts a unique and surprisingly wide distribution of three-dimensional conformations. Moreover, we uncover striking differences in how the topoisomers handle torsional stress. As negative supercoiling increases, bases are increasingly exposed. Beyond a sharp supercoiling threshold, we also detect exposed bases in positively supercoiled DNA. Molecular dynamics simulations independently confirm the conformational heterogeneity and provide atomistic insight into the flexibility of supercoiled DNA. Our integrated approach reveals the three-dimensional structures of DNA that are essential for its function. PMID:26455586

  20. Disentangling Structures in the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 133

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamical analysis of the structure of the cluster of galaxies Abell 133 will be presented using multi-wavelength data combined from multiple space and earth based observations. New and familiar statistical clustering techniques are used in combination in an attempt to gain a fully consistent picture of this interesting nearby cluster of galaxies. The type of analysis presented should be typical of cluster studies in the future, especially those to come from the surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2DF.

  1. Integrating diverse databases into an unified analysis framework: a Galaxy approach.

    PubMed

    Blankenberg, Daniel; Coraor, Nathan; Von Kuster, Gregory; Taylor, James; Nekrutenko, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Recent technological advances have lead to the ability to generate large amounts of data for model and non-model organisms. Whereas, in the past, there have been a relatively small number of central repositories that serve genomic data, an increasing number of distinct specialized data repositories and resources have been established. Here, we describe a generic approach that provides for the integration of a diverse spectrum of data resources into a unified analysis framework, Galaxy (http://usegalaxy.org). This approach allows the simplified coupling of external data resources with the data analysis tools available to Galaxy users, while leveraging the native data mining facilities of the external data resources. DATABASE URL: http://usegalaxy.org.

  2. Structural diversity in social contagion

    PubMed Central

    Ugander, Johan; Backstrom, Lars; Marlow, Cameron; Kleinberg, Jon

    2012-01-01

    The concept of contagion has steadily expanded from its original grounding in epidemic disease to describe a vast array of processes that spread across networks, notably social phenomena such as fads, political opinions, the adoption of new technologies, and financial decisions. Traditional models of social contagion have been based on physical analogies with biological contagion, in which the probability that an individual is affected by the contagion grows monotonically with the size of his or her “contact neighborhood”—the number of affected individuals with whom he or she is in contact. Whereas this contact neighborhood hypothesis has formed the underpinning of essentially all current models, it has been challenging to evaluate it due to the difficulty in obtaining detailed data on individual network neighborhoods during the course of a large-scale contagion process. Here we study this question by analyzing the growth of Facebook, a rare example of a social process with genuinely global adoption. We find that the probability of contagion is tightly controlled by the number of connected components in an individual's contact neighborhood, rather than by the actual size of the neighborhood. Surprisingly, once this “structural diversity” is controlled for, the size of the contact neighborhood is in fact generally a negative predictor of contagion. More broadly, our analysis shows how data at the size and resolution of the Facebook network make possible the identification of subtle structural signals that go undetected at smaller scales yet hold pivotal predictive roles for the outcomes of social processes. PMID:22474360

  3. Computer experiments on the structure and dynamics of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.

    1972-01-01

    The evolution of an initially balanced rotating disk of stars with an initial velocity dispersion given by Toomre's local criterion was investigated by means of a computer model for isolated disks of stars. It was found that the disk is unstable against very large scale modes. A stable axisymmetric disk with a velocity dispersion much larger than that given by Toomre's criterion was generated. The final mass distribution for the disk gives a high density central core and a disk population of stars that is closely approximated by an exponential variation. Various methods and rates of cooling the hot axisymmetric disks were investigated. It was found that the cooling resulted in the development of two-arm spiral structures which persisted as long as cooling continued. An experiment was performed to induce spiral structure in a galaxy by means of the close passage of a companion galaxy. Parameters similar to those expected for M51 and its companion were used. It was found that because of the high velocity dispersion of the disturbed disk galaxy, only a weak two-arm spiral structure appeared. The evolution of a uniformly rotating disk galaxy which is a stationary solution of the collisionless Boltzmann equation was investigated for various values of the initial rms velocity dispersion. It was found that the disk becomes stable at a value of the velocity dispersion predicted by theory.

  4. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts.

  5. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts. PMID:17082451

  6. Excitation and Evolution of Structure in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1996-01-01

    Even casual examination shows that most disk galaxies are not truly symmetric but exhibit a variety of morphological peculiarities of which spiral arms and bars are the most pronounced. After decades of effort, we now know that these features may be driven by environmental disturbance acting directly on the disk, in addition to self-excitation of a local disturbance (e.g. by swing amplification). However, all disks are embedded within halos and therefore are not dynamically independent. Are halos susceptible to such disturbances as well? If so, can the affect disks and on what time scales? y Until recently, conventional wisdom was that halos acted to stabilize disks but otherwise remained relatively inert. The argument behind this assumption is as follows. Halos, spheroids and bulges are supported against their own gravity by the random motion of their stars, a so-called "hot" distribution. On all but the largest scales, they look like a nearly homogeneous thermal bath of stars. Because all self-sustaining patterns or waves in a homogeneous universe of stars with a Maxwellian velocity distribution are predicted to damp quickly (e.g. Ikeuchi et al. 1974), one expects that any pattern will be strongly damped in halos and spheroids as well. However, recent work suggests that halos do respond to tidal encounters by companions or cluster members and are susceptible to induction of long-lived modes.

  7. THE EVOLUTION OF LOW-REDSHIFT GALAXY STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Biernacka, Monika; Flin, Piotr; Panko, Elena E-mail: sfflin@cyf-kr.edu.pl

    2009-05-10

    Ellipticities for 6188 low-redshift (z < 0.18) poor and rich galaxy structures have been examined along with their evolution using an optical observational base that is statistically complete. The shape of each structure projected on the celestial sphere was determined using the covariance ellipse method. Analysis of the data indicates that structure ellipticity changes with redshift, being smaller for nearby objects and greater for those located further away. Such a change is also described better by quadratic or exponential relations than by a simple linear scheme. It is concluded that between redshifts of z = 0.18 and z = 0 we observe the dynamical evolution of galaxy clusters. Such a change in ellipticity with redshift is expected in {lambda}CDM models.

  8. Near-infrared structure of fast and slow-rotating disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK {sub s}-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s{sup –1} diversity of disk structure. Of the fast-rotating (V {sub rot} > 150 km s{sup –1}) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with h{sub z} ≲ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ∼5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ∼25% of the total K {sub s}-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{sub K{sub s}}/f{sub 60} {sub μm}≤0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J – K {sub s}) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  9. Structural analysis of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present wide-field g- and i-band stellar photometry of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its surrounding area out to four times its half-light radius (rh = 695 pc), based on images obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO. We find clear evidence of stellar substructure associated with the galaxy, extending to a distance of 82 arcmin (2 kpc) from its centre. We perform a statistical analysis of the overdensities and find three distinct features, as well as an extended halo-like structure, to be significant at the 99.7 per cent confidence level or higher. Unlike the extremely elongated and extended substructures surrounding the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the overdensities seen around Sextans are distributed evenly about its centre, and do not appear to form noticeable tidal tails. Fitting a King model to the radial distribution of Sextans stars yields a tidal radius rt = 83.2 arcmin ± 7.1 arcmin (2.08 ± 0.18 kpc), which implies the majority of detected substructure is gravitationally bound to the galaxy. This finding suggests that Sextans is not undergoing significant tidal disruption from the Milky Way, supporting the scenario in which the orbit of Sextans has a low eccentricity.

  10. Line-of-sight structure toward strong lensing galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Johnson, Traci; Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael D.; Oguri, Masamune

    2014-03-01

    We present an analysis of the line-of-sight structure toward a sample of 10 strong lensing cluster cores. Structure is traced by groups that are identified spectroscopically in the redshift range, 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.9, and we measure the projected angular and comoving separations between each group and the primary strong lensing clusters in each corresponding line of sight. From these data we measure the distribution of projected angular separations between the primary strong lensing clusters and uncorrelated large-scale structure as traced by groups. We then compare the observed distribution of angular separations for our strong lensing selected lines of sight against the distribution of groups that is predicted for clusters lying along random lines of sight. There is clear evidence for an excess of structure along the line of sight at small angular separations (θ ≤ 6') along the strong lensing selected lines of sight, indicating that uncorrelated structure is a significant systematic that contributes to producing galaxy clusters with large cross sections for strong lensing. The prevalence of line-of-sight structure is one of several biases in strong lensing clusters that can potentially be folded into cosmological measurements using galaxy cluster samples. These results also have implications for current and future studies—such as the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields—that make use of massive galaxy cluster lenses as precision cosmological telescopes; it is essential that the contribution of line-of-sight structure be carefully accounted for in the strong lens modeling of the cluster lenses.

  11. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): understanding the wavelength dependence of galaxy structure with bulge-disc decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Baldry, Ivan; Bremer, Malcolm; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Driver, Simon; Duncan, Kenneth; Graham, Alister W.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Phillipps, Steven; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-08-01

    With a large sample of bright, low-redshift galaxies with optical-near-IR imaging from the GAMA survey we use bulge-disc decompositions to understand the wavelength-dependent behaviour of single-Sérsic structural measurements. We denote the variation in single-Sérsic index with wavelength as {N}, likewise for effective radius we use {R}. We find that most galaxies with a substantial disc, even those with no discernable bulge, display a high value of {N}. The increase in Sérsic index to longer wavelengths is therefore intrinsic to discs, apparently resulting from radial variations in stellar population and/or dust reddening. Similarly, low values of {R} (< 1) are found to be ubiquitous, implying an element of universality in galaxy colour gradients. We also study how bulge and disc colour distributions vary with galaxy type. We find that, rather than all bulges being red and all discs being blue in absolute terms, both components become redder for galaxies with redder total colours. We even observe that bulges in bluer galaxies are typically bluer than discs in red galaxies, and that bulges and discs are closer in colour for fainter galaxies. Trends in total colour are therefore not solely due to the colour or flux dominance of the bulge or disc.

  12. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Galaxy colour gradients versus colour, structure, and luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Brough, Sarah; Holwerda, Benne; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-09-01

    Using single-component fits to SDSS/UKIDSS images of galaxies in the G09 region of the GAMA survey we study radial colour gradients across the galaxy population. We use the multi-wavelength information provided by MegaMorph analysis of galaxy light profiles to calculate intrinsic colour gradients, and divide into six subsamples split by overall Sérsic index (n) and galaxy colour. We find a bimodality in the colour gradients of high- and low-n galaxies in all wavebands which varies with overall galaxy luminosity. Global trends in colour gradients therefore result from combining the contrasting behaviour of a number of different galaxy populations. The ubiquity of strong negative colour gradients supports the picture of inside-out growth through gas accretion for blue, low-n galaxies, and through dry minor mergers for red, high-n galaxies. An exception is the blue high-n population which has properties indicative of dissipative major mergers.

  13. Galaxy Transformation Under Extreme Conditions: The Evolution of Galaxies in the Largest Structures in the High Redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaux, Brian Clark

    a process in the early universe known as reionization, which is the subject of much debate amongst astronomers. The second and third of these studies are investigations using near-infrared spectroscopy of X-ray bright and red galaxies that exhibit optical spectra with prominent emission features. These studies are the first systematic investigations of both galaxy populations in the middle-aged universe using near-infrared spectroscopy. In both studies I conclude the dominant mechanism giving rise to optical emission line features are processes associated with the presence of an Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) rather than normal star formation. This result has important consequences for galaxy evolutionary scenarios, as the two processes are typically difficult to separate observationally and are thought to be related. The final study in this presentation is a full investigation of the processes driving galaxy evolution in one of the ORELSE fields, the Cl1604 supercluster. In this study I present the wealth of astronomical observations available to the ORELSE survey on the member galaxies of this supercluster. Several transitional populations of galaxies are detected in the supercluster environment, and their properties are analyzed in the context of galaxy evolution. Processing of the galaxy population is found to be significant in both the densest environments in the supercluster and the lower-density regions. One of the major conclusions of this work relates to the efficiency of these transformative processes and the global environment in which a galaxy resides. I present evidence for a process termed "dynamical downsizing", in which efficient transforming of galaxies occurs earliest in structures of galaxies that are observed to be relaxed (i.e., virialized) in their dynamics.

  14. ATLASGAL: A Galaxy-wide sample of dense filamentary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Urquhart, James S.; Leurini, Silvia; Csengeri, Timea; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Menten, Karl M.; Schuller, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    Context. Filamentary structures are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium. Investigating their connection to the large-scale structure of the Galaxy and their role in star formation is leading to a paradigm shift in our understanding of star formation. Aims: We study the properties of filamentary structures from the ATLASGAL survey, which is the largest and most sensitive systematic ground-based survey of the inner Galactic plane at submillimeter wavelengths. Methods: We use the DisPerSE algorithm to identify spatially coherent structures located across the inner-Galaxy (300° < ℓ < 60° and |b| < 1.5). As a result we produce a catalogue of ~1800 structures; these were then independently classified by the five lead authors into one of the following types: marginally resolved, elongated structures, filaments, network of filaments and complexes. This resulted in the identification of 517 filamentary structures. We determine their physical properties and investigate their overall Galactic distribution. Results: We find that almost 70% of the total 870 μm flux associated with these structures resides in filaments and networks of filaments and we estimate that they are likely to be associated with a similar fraction of the mass. Correlating these structures with tracers of massive star formation we also find that a similar fraction of the massive star forming clumps are associated with filaments and networks of filaments, which highlights the importance of these types of structures to star formation in the Galaxy. We have determined distances, masses and physical sizes for 241 of the filamentary structures. We find a median distance of 3.8 kpc, a mean mass of a few 103 M⊙, a mean length of ~6 pc and a mass-to-length ratio of (M/L) ~200-2000 M⊙ pc-1. We also find that these filamentary structures are tightly correlated with the spiral arms in longitude and velocity, and that their semi-major axis is preferentially aligned parallel to the Galactic mid-plane and

  15. The extended structure of the dwarf irregular galaxy Sagittarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccari, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Fraternali, F.; Battaglia, G.; Perina, S.; Sollima, A.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Testa, V.; Galleti, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present a detailed study of the stellar and H i structure of the dwarf irregular galaxy Sagittarius. We use new deep and wide field photometry to trace the surface brightness profile of the galaxy out to ≃5.0' (corresponding to ≃1600 pc) and down to μV ≃ 30.0 mag/arcsec2, thus showing that the stellar body of the galaxy is much more extended than previously believed, and it is similarly (or more) extended than the overall H i distribution. The whole major-axis profile is consistent with a pure exponential, with a scale radius of ≃340 pc. The surface density maps reveal that the distribution of old and intermediate-age stars is smooth and remarkably flattened out to its edges, while the associated H i has a much rounder shape, is off-centred and presents multiple density maxima and a significant hole. No clear sign of systemic rotation is detectable in the complex H i velocity field. No metallicity gradient is detected in the old and intermediate age population of the galaxy, and we confirm that this population has a much more extended distribution than young stars (age ≲ 1 Gyr). Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under the Program 089.D-0052(A).Table of stellar photometry (IN6) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/570/A78

  16. Gas and stellar spiral structures in tidally perturbed disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettitt, Alex R.; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James W.

    2016-06-01

    Tidal interactions between disc galaxies and low-mass companions are an established method for generating galactic spiral features. In this work, we present a study of the structure and dynamics of spiral arms driven in interactions between disc galaxies and perturbing companions in 3D N-body/smoothed hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Our specific aims are to characterize any differences between structures formed in the gas and stars from a purely hydrodynamical and gravitational perspective, and to find a limiting case for spiral structure generation. Through analysis of a number of different interacting cases, we find that there is very little difference between arm morphology, pitch angles and pattern speeds between the two media. The main differences are a minor offset between gas and stellar arms, clear spurring features in gaseous arms, and different radial migration of material in the stronger interacting cases. We investigate the minimum mass of a companion required to drive spiral structure in a galactic disc, finding the limiting spiral generation cases with companion masses of the order of 1 × 109 M⊙, equivalent to only 4 per cent of the stellar disc mass, or 0.5 per cent of the total galactic mass of a Milky Way analogue.

  17. ON THE SHAPES AND STRUCTURES OF HIGH-REDSHIFT COMPACT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chevance, Melanie; Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Simard, Luc; Van den Bergh, Sidney; Caris, Evelyn; Glazebrook, Karl

    2012-08-01

    Recent deep Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 imaging suggests that a majority of compact quiescent massive galaxies at z {approx} 2 may contain disks. To investigate this claim, we have compared the ellipticity distribution of 31 carefully selected high-redshift massive quiescent compact galaxies to a set of mass-selected ellipticity and Sersic index distributions obtained from two-dimensional structural fits to {approx}40, 000 nearby galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the distribution of ellipticities for the high-redshift galaxies is consistent with the ellipticity distribution of a similarly chosen sample of massive early-type galaxies. However, the distribution of Sersic indices for the high-redshift sample is inconsistent with that of local early-type galaxies, and instead resembles that of local disk-dominated populations. The mismatch between the properties of high-redshift compact galaxies and those of both local early-type and disk-dominated systems leads us to conclude that the basic structures of high-redshift compact galaxies probably do not closely resemble those of any single local galaxy population. Any galaxy population analog to the high-redshift compact galaxies that exists at the current epoch is either a mix of different types of galaxies, or possibly a unique class of objects on their own.

  18. Structures in Galaxies: Nature versus Nurture. Input from Theory and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    2010-10-01

    Galaxies, in particular disc galaxies, contain a number of structures and substructures with well defined morphological, photometric and kinematic properties. Considerable theoretical effort has been put into explaining their formation and evolution, both analytically and with numerical simulations. In some theories, structures form during the natural evolution of the galaxy, i.e. they are a result of nature. For others, it is the interaction with other galaxies, or with the intergalactic medium—i.e. nurture—that accounts for a structure. Either way, the existence and properties of these structures reveal important information on the underlying potential of the galaxy, i.e. on the amount and distribution of matter—including the dark matter—in it, and on the evolutionary history of the galaxy. Here, I will briefly review the various formation scenarios and the respective role of nature and nurture in the formation, evolution and properties of the main structures and substructures.

  19. A CLASSICAL MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF GALAXIES IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, Ronald J.; Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Knapen, Johan H.; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Laine, Jarkko; Comerón, Sébastien; Elmegreen, Debra; Ho, Luis C.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L.; Courtois, Helene; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Paz, Armando Gil de; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; and others

    2015-04-15

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G) is the largest available database of deep, homogeneous middle-infrared (mid-IR) images of galaxies of all types. The survey, which includes 2352 nearby galaxies, reveals galaxy morphology only minimally affected by interstellar extinction. This paper presents an atlas and classifications of S{sup 4}G galaxies in the Comprehensive de Vaucouleurs revised Hubble-Sandage (CVRHS) system. The CVRHS system follows the precepts of classical de Vaucouleurs morphology, modified to include recognition of other features such as inner, outer, and nuclear lenses, nuclear rings, bars, and disks, spheroidal galaxies, X patterns and box/peanut structures, OLR subclass outer rings and pseudorings, bar ansae and barlenses, parallel sequence late-types, thick disks, and embedded disks in 3D early-type systems. We show that our CVRHS classifications are internally consistent, and that nearly half of the S{sup 4}G sample consists of extreme late-type systems (mostly bulgeless, pure disk galaxies) in the range Scd-Im. The most common family classification for mid-IR types S0/a to Sc is SA while that for types Scd to Sm is SB. The bars in these two type domains are very different in mid-IR structure and morphology. This paper examines the bar, ring, and type classification fractions in the sample, and also includes several montages of images highlighting the various kinds of “stellar structures” seen in mid-IR galaxy morphology.

  20. Presumed fair: ironic effects of organizational diversity structures.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Cheryl R; Major, Brenda; Jurcevic, Ines; Dover, Tessa L; Brady, Laura M; Shapiro, Jenessa R

    2013-03-01

    This research tests the hypothesis that the presence (vs. absence) of organizational diversity structures causes high-status group members (Whites, men) to perceive organizations with diversity structures as procedurally fairer environments for underrepresented groups (racial minorities, women), even when it is clear that underrepresented groups have been unfairly disadvantaged within these organizations. Furthermore, this illusory sense of fairness derived from the mere presence of diversity structures causes high-status group members to legitimize the status quo by becoming less sensitive to discrimination targeted at underrepresented groups and reacting more harshly toward underrepresented group members who claim discrimination. Six experiments support these hypotheses in designs using 4 types of diversity structures (diversity policies, diversity training, diversity awards, idiosyncratically generated diversity structures from participants' own organizations) among 2 high-status groups in tests involving several types of discrimination (discriminatory promotion practices, adverse impact in hiring, wage discrimination). Implications of these experiments for organizational diversity and employment discrimination law are discussed.

  1. Analysis of the structure of disk galaxies in the NGC 2300 group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, M. A.; Sil'chenko, O. K.

    2016-10-01

    Data from the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory obtained using the SCORPIO instrument in imaging mode are used to study member galaxies of the NGC 2300 group. Surface photometry has been carried out for the five largest galaxies in the group, whose isophotal parameters and the parameters of their large-scale structural components (disks and bulges) have been determined. The morphological type of the central galaxy in the group has been refined, and shown to be elliptical. Studies of structural features in non-central disk galaxies have revealed an enhanced percent of bars: bars were found in all disk galaxies of this group, with all of these being compact structures. The similarity of the structural features of the disks of the group galaxies suggests that these disksmay be being restructured in the process of the current merger of the two X-ray subgroups comprising NGC 2300: the group NGC 2300 itself and the group NGC 2276.

  2. Structural diversity of the epigenetics pocketome.

    PubMed

    Cabaye, Alexandre; Nguyen, Kong T; Liu, Lihua; Pande, Vineet; Schapira, Matthieu

    2015-07-01

    Protein families involved in chromatin-templated events are emerging as novel target classes in oncology and other disease areas. The ability to discover selective inhibitors against chromatin factors depends on the presence of structural features that are unique to the targeted sites. To evaluate challenges and opportunities toward the development of selective inhibitors, we calculated all pair wise structural distances between 575 structures from the protein databank representing 163 unique binding pockets found in protein domains that write, read or erase post-translational modifications on histones, DNA, and RNA. We find that the structural similarity of binding sites does not always follow the sequence similarity of protein domains. Our analysis reveals increased risks of activity across target-class for compounds competing with the cofactor of protein arginine methyltransferases, lysine acetyltransferases, and sirtuins, while exploiting the conformational plasticity of a protein target is a path toward selective inhibition. The structural diversity landscape of the epigenetics pocketome can be explored via an open-access graphic user interface at thesgc.org/epigenetics_pocketome. PMID:25974248

  3. Large-scale structure and the intrinsic alignment of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Seljak, Uroš; Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2016-10-01

    Coherent alignments of galaxy shapes, often called``intrinsic alignments'' (IA), are the most significant source of astrophysical uncertainty in weak lensing measurements. We develop the tidal alignment model of IA and demonstrate its success in describing observational data. We also describe a technique to separate IA from galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements. Applying this technique to luminous red galaxy lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we constrain potential IA contamination from associated sources to be below a few percent.

  4. Evolution of galaxy structure using visual morphologies in CANDELS and Hydro-ART simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozena, Mark W.

    2013-08-01

    The general properties, morphologies, and classes of galaxies in the local Universe are well studied. Most local galaxies are morphologically members of the Hubble sequence and can be crudely separated into elliptical red quiescent galaxies or disky blue star-forming galaxies. This Hubble sequence of relaxed structures has been shown to dominate galaxy populations out to a redshift of z~1. The description of galaxies at earlier times is not well known nor is it understood how and at what epoch the Hubble sequence formed. Of particular interest is the structure of galaxies at z~2. This epoch was an active time for galaxy growth and was the peak epoch for star formation rate, active galactic nuclei activity, and mergers between galaxies. With the installation of the near-infrared Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope in 2009, large area photometric surveys of galaxies were able to be performed for the first time at moderate redshifts (z~2) in wavebands that effectively trace the older stellar populations and stellar mass of the galaxies rather than the clumpy star-forming regions. Using WFC3 HST images, an in-depth morphology classification system was developed to probe the galaxy populations at higher redshifts (focusing on z~2). These visual classifications were used with other galaxy parameters (stellar mass, color, star formation rate, radius, Sersic profiles, etc) to identify and quantify the moderate redshift galaxy populations and study how these populations changed with time to form the relaxed Hubble sequence Universe we observe today. Additionally, these same tools that were used to probe galaxy populations at z~2 in the observed Universe were also used on simulated galaxy images produced from state-of-the-art cosmological simulations. These Hydro-ART simulations build artificial galaxies that are compared to observations so as to shed light on the relevant mechanisms in galaxy evolution. By classifying and comparing the populations

  5. Structural diversity of bacterial flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songye; Beeby, Morgan; Murphy, Gavin E; Leadbetter, Jared R; Hendrixson, David R; Briegel, Ariane; Li, Zhuo; Shi, Jian; Tocheva, Elitza I; Müller, Axel; Dobro, Megan J; Jensen, Grant J

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is one of nature's most amazing and well-studied nanomachines. Its cell-wall-anchored motor uses chemical energy to rotate a microns-long filament and propel the bacterium towards nutrients and away from toxins. While much is known about flagellar motors from certain model organisms, their diversity across the bacterial kingdom is less well characterized, allowing the occasional misrepresentation of the motor as an invariant, ideal machine. Here, we present an electron cryotomographical survey of flagellar motor architectures throughout the Bacteria. While a conserved structural core was observed in all 11 bacteria imaged, surprisingly novel and divergent structures as well as different symmetries were observed surrounding the core. Correlating the motor structures with the presence and absence of particular motor genes in each organism suggested the locations of five proteins involved in the export apparatus including FliI, whose position below the C-ring was confirmed by imaging a deletion strain. The combination of conserved and specially-adapted structures seen here sheds light on how this complex protein nanomachine has evolved to meet the needs of different species. PMID:21673657

  6. Star formation along the Hubble sequence. Radial structure of the star formation of CALIFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Pérez, E.; García-Benito, R.; López Fernández, R.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Amorim, A. L.; Vale Asari, N.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, C. J.; Wisotzki, L.; Mast, D.; Alves, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The spatially resolved stellar population content of today's galaxies holds important information for understanding the different processes that contribute to the star formation and mass assembly histories of galaxies. The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by a uniquely rich and diverse data set drawn from the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses ranging from M⋆ ~ 109 to 7 × 1011 M⊙. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to the datacubes to derive 2D maps and radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past (ΣSFR), as well as related properties, such as the local specific star formation rate (sSFR), defined as the ratio between ΣSFR and the stellar mass surface density (μ⋆). To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF), we stack the individual radial profiles in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd), and several stellar masses. Our main results are: (a) the intensity of the star formation rate shows declining profiles that exhibit very small differences between spirals with values at R = 1 half light radius (HLR) within a factor two of ΣSFR ~ 20 M⊙Gyr-1pc-2. The dispersion in the ΣSFR(R) profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals (Sbc, Sc, Sd). This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant ΣSFR. (b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outward with a steeper slope in the inner 1 HLR. This behavior suggests that galaxies are quenched inside-out and that this process is faster in the central, bulge-dominated part than in the disks. (c) As a whole and at all radii, E and S0 are off the MSSF with SFR much smaller than spirals of the

  7. Wavelet analysis of baryon acoustic structures in the galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, P.; Labatie, A.; Clerc, N.; Martínez, V. J.; Starck, J.-L.; Lachièze-Rey, M.; Saar, E.; Paredes, S.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) are imprinted in the density field by acoustic waves travelling in the plasma of the early universe. Their fixed scale can be used as a standard ruler to study the geometry of the universe. Aims: The BAO have been previously detected using correlation functions and power spectra of the galaxy distribution. We present a new method to detect the real-space structures associated with BAO. These baryon acoustic structures are spherical shells of relatively small density contrast, surrounding high density central regions. Methods: We design a specific wavelet adapted to search for shells, and exploit the physics of the process by making use of two different mass tracers, introducing a specific statistic to detect the BAO features. We show the effect of the BAO signal in this new statistic when applied to the Λ - cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model, using an analytical approximation to the transfer function. We confirm the reliability and stability of our method by using cosmological N-body simulations from the MareNostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE). Results: We apply our method to the detection of BAO in a galaxy sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use the "main" catalogue to trace the shells, and the luminous red galaxies (LRG) as tracers of the high density central regions. Using this new method, we detect, with a high significance, that the LRG in our sample are preferentially located close to the centres of shell-like structures in the density field, with characteristics similar to those expected from BAO. We show that stacking selected shells, we can find their characteristic density profile. Conclusions: We delineate a new feature of the cosmic web, the BAO shells. As these are real spatial structures, the BAO phenomenon can be studied in detail by examining those shells. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  8. Kinematics and Structure of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 7673

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeier, N. L.; Gallagher, J. S.

    1999-09-01

    The morphology and kinematics of the luminous blue starburst galaxy NGC 7673 are explored using the WIYN (Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO) 3.5 m telescope. Signs of a past kinematic disturbance are detected in the outer galaxy; the most notable feature is a luminous ripple located 1.55 arcmin from the center of NGC 7673. Subarcsecond imaging in B and R filters also reveals red dust lanes and blue star clusters that delineate spiral arms in the bright inner disk, and narrowband Hα imaging shows that the luminous star clusters are associated with giant H II regions. The Hα kinematics measured with echelle imaging spectroscopy using the WIYN DensePak fiber array imply that these H II regions are confined to a smoothly rotating disk. The velocity dispersion in ionized gas in the disk is σ~24 km s-1, which sets an upper boundary on the dispersion of young stellar populations. Broad emission components with σ~63 km s-1 found in some regions are likely produced by mechanical power supplied by massive, young stars; a violent starburst is occurring in a kinematically calm disk. Although the asymmetric outer features point to a merger or interaction as the starburst trigger, the inner disk structure constrains the strength of the event to the scale of a minor merger or weak interaction that occurred at least an outer disk dynamical timescale in the past.

  9. We Are Family: Using Diverse Family Structure Literature with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Deanna Peterschick; Bell, Kari

    2006-01-01

    The structure of the American family has changed over the years. Although the traditional father, mother, child structure still dominates, other family patterns are emerging. In this article the authors present: (1) current statistics relating to diverse family structures; (2) reasons for using diverse family structure literature with children;…

  10. Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Franx, Marijn; Bezanson, Rachel; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Kriek, Mariska T.; Labbé, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J.; Rigby, Jane R.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-09-01

    It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass ({M}\\star ), the “star formation sequence,” and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. Here, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sérsic indices, n, of galaxies across the SFR-{M}\\star plane. We use a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5 selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs. Galaxy light profiles parameterized by n are based on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey near-infrared imaging. We use a single SFR indicator empirically calibrated from stacks of Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm imaging, adding the unobscured and obscured star formation. We find that the scatter of the star formation sequence is related in part to galaxy structure; the scatter due to variations in n at fixed mass for star-forming galaxies ranges from 0.14 ± 0.02 dex at z ˜ 2 to 0.30 ± 0.04 dex at z < 1. While the slope of the {log} {SFR}-{log} {M}\\star relation is of order unity for disk-like galaxies, galaxies with n > 2 (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower {SFR}/{M}\\star than the main ridgeline of the star formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive z ˜ 2 galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At z < 1, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global {SFR}/{M}\\star , decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the scatter of the star formation sequence.

  11. Ten Billion Years of Growth: Massive Galaxy Evolution from Structures and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezanson, Rachel

    Once thought to be relies of a much earlier epoch, the most massive local galaxies are red and dead ellipticals, with little ongoing star formation or organized rotation. In the last decade, observations of their assumed progenitors have demonstrated that billions of years ago, massive galaxies were more compact and morphologically different, possibly with more disklike structures. The details of this observed evolution can place constraints on the physical processes that have driven massive galaxy evolution through cosmic time. The work presented in this thesis provides observational constraints on the dynamical and structural evolution of massive galaxies since z ~ 1.5 - 2 using a variety of photometric and spectroscopic surveys, including OBEY, SDSS, NMBS, and UDS. First, we find that although overall densities of these galaxies have decreased with time, the central densities of massive galaxies at high and low redshifts, are quite similar. This suggests that massive galaxies grow "inside-out": compact cores form early and then gradually build a more diffuse envelope of stars in their outskirts. Balancing the need for efficient size growth and consistent number densities of progenitor and descendent galaxies, we conclude that minor-merging is the best physical explanation for the observed size evolution. The remainder of this dissertation focuses on the inferred and measured dynamical evolution of massive galaxies since z ~ 2. Using velocity dispersions inferred by galaxy stellar masses and morphologies, we find that the number density of galaxies at a given velocity dispersion, or velocity dispersion function , is quite stable with redshift since z ~ 1.5, with a weak evolution at the low dispersion end due to a growing population of quenched galaxies. The constancy provides evidence in favor of inside-out growth of galaxies and is consistent with theoretical predictions that the central potentials of massive galaxies are set early. We suggest a toy model that

  12. 3D structure of nearby groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, L.; Makarov, D.; Klypin, A.; Gottlöber, S.

    2016-10-01

    Using high accuracy distance estimates, we study the three-dimensional distribution of galaxies in five galaxy groups at a distance less than 5 Mpc from the Milky Way. Due to proximity of these groups our sample of galaxies is nearly complete down to extremely small dwarf galaxies with absolute magnitudes M B = -12. We find that the average number-density profile of the groups shows a steep power-law decline dn/dV ˜ R-3 at distances R=(100-500) kpc consistent with predictions of the standard cosmological model. We also find that there is no indication of a truncation or a cutoff in the density at the expected virial radius: the density profile extends at least to 1.5 Mpc. Vast majority of galaxies within 1.5 Mpc radius around group centres are gas-rich star-forming galaxies. Early-type galaxies are found only in the central ˜ 300 kpc region. Lack of dwarf spheroidal and dwarf elliptical galaxies in the field and in the outskirts of large groups is a clear indication that these galaxies experienced morphological transformation when they came close to the central region of forming galaxy group.

  13. Genetic diversity within a dominant plant outweighs plant species diversity in structuring an arthropod community.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Kerri M; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2013-05-01

    Plant biodiversity is being lost at a rapid rate. This has spurred much interest in elucidating the consequences of this loss for higher trophic levels. Experimental tests have shown that both plant species diversity and genetic diversity within a plant species can influence arthropod community structure. However, the majority of these studies have been conducted in separate systems, so their relative importance is currently unresolved. Furthermore, potential interactions between the two levels of diversity, which likely occur in natural systems, have not been investigated. To clarify these issues, we conducted three experiments in a freshwater sand dune ecosystem. We (1) independently manipulated plant species diversity, (2) independently manipulated genetic diversity within the dominant plant species, Ammophila breviligulata, and (3) jointly manipulated genetic diversity within the dominant plant and species diversity. We found that genetic diversity within the dominant plant species, Ammophila breviligulata, more strongly influenced arthropod communities than plant species diversity, but this effect was dependent on the presence of other species. In species mixtures, A. breviligulata genetic diversity altered overall arthropod community composition, and arthropod richness and abundance peaked at the highest level of genetic diversity. Positive nonadditive effects of diversity were detected, suggesting that arthropods respond to emergent properties of diverse plant communities. However, in the independent manipulations where A. breviligulata was alone, effects of genetic diversity were weaker, with only arthropod richness responding. In contrast, plant species diversity only influenced arthropods when A. breviligulata was absent, and then only influenced herbivore abundance. In addition to showing that genetic diversity within a dominant plant species can have large effects on arthropod community composition, these results suggest that understanding how species

  14. Galaxy Zoo: evidence for diverse star formation histories through the green valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethurst, R. J.; Lintott, C. J.; Simmons, B. D.; Schawinski, K.; Marshall, P. J.; Bamford, S.; Fortson, L.; Kaviraj, S.; Masters, K. L.; Melvin, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

    2015-06-01

    Does galaxy evolution proceed through the green valley via multiple pathways or as a single population? Motivated by recent results highlighting radically different evolutionary pathways between early- and late-type galaxies, we present results from a simple Bayesian approach to this problem wherein we model the star formation history (SFH) of a galaxy with two parameters, [t, τ] and compare the predicted and observed optical and near-ultraviolet colours. We use a novel method to investigate the morphological differences between the most probable SFHs for both disc-like and smooth-like populations of galaxies, by using a sample of 126 316 galaxies (0.01 < z < 0.25) with probabilistic estimates of morphology from Galaxy Zoo. We find a clear difference between the quenching time-scales preferred by smooth- and disc-like galaxies, with three possible routes through the green valley dominated by smooth- (rapid time-scales, attributed to major mergers), intermediate- (intermediate time-scales, attributed to minor mergers and galaxy interactions) and disc-like (slow time-scales, attributed to secular evolution) galaxies. We hypothesize that morphological changes occur in systems which have undergone quenching with an exponential time-scale τ < 1.5 Gyr, in order for the evolution of galaxies in the green valley to match the ratio of smooth to disc galaxies observed in the red sequence. These rapid time-scales are instrumental in the formation of the red sequence at earlier times; however, we find that galaxies currently passing through the green valley typically do so at intermediate time-scales.†

  15. How Supernova Feedback Affects Observed Galaxy Sizes and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, M. K. Ryan; Cen, R.; Bryan, G. L.

    2009-01-01

    Feedback from massive stars is perhaps the least understood aspect of galaxy formation. Based on adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations and stellar population synthesis models, we compute half-light radii of high redshift galaxies and use them to compare simulated and observed size-mass and size-luminosity relations in the rest-frame UV/optical. The sizes of the simulated galaxies depend on the assumed strength of supernova feedback; we investigate the origin of this relation. We discuss minimum requirements for correct numerical modeling of supernova feedback in starburst galaxies.

  16. The Connection between Galaxies and Dark Matter Structures in the Local Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Behroozi, Peter S.

    2012-07-11

    We provide new constraints on the connection between galaxies in the local Universe, identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and dark matter halos and their constituent substructures in the {Lambda}CDM model using WMAP7 cosmological parameters. Predictions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos, and the relationship between dark matter hosts and substructures, are based on a high-resolution cosmological simulation, the Bolshoi simulation. We associate galaxies with dark matter halos and subhalos using subhalo abundance matching, and perform a comprehensive analysis which investigates the underlying assumptions of this technique including (a) which halo property is most closely associated with galaxy stellar masses and luminosities, (b) how much scatter is in this relationship, and (c) how much subhalos can be stripped before their galaxies are destroyed. The models are jointly constrained by new measurements of the projected two-point galaxy clustering and the observed conditional stellar mass function of galaxies in groups. We find that an abundance matching model that associates galaxies with the peak circular velocity of their halos is in good agreement with the data, when scatter of 0.20 {+-} 0.03 dex in stellar mass at a given peak velocity is included. This confirms the theoretical expectation that the stellar mass of galaxies is tightly correlated with the potential wells of their dark matter halos before they are impacted by larger structures. The data put tight constraints on the satellite fraction of galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass and on the scatter between halo and galaxy properties, and rule out several alternative abundance matching models that have been considered. This will yield important constraints for galaxy formation models, and also provides encouraging indications that the galaxy - halo connection can be modeled with sufficient fidelity for future precision studies of the dark Universe.

  17. Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; 3D-HST Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (M*), the "star formation sequence," and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. In this talk, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sérsic indices, n, of galaxies across the SFR-M* plane. Using a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5 selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs, we find that the scatter of the star formation sequence is related in part to galaxy structure; the scatter due to variations in n at fixed mass for star-forming galaxies ranges from 0.14 ± 0.02 dex at z ˜ 2 to 0.30 ± 0.04 dex at z < 1. While the slope of the log(SFR)-log(M*) relation is of order unity for disk-like galaxies, galaxies with n > 2 (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower SFR/M* than the main ridgeline of the star formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive z ˜ 2 galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At z < 1, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global SFR/M*, decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the scatter of the star formation sequence.

  18. Unveiling the Structure of Barred Galaxies at 3.6 μm with the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). I. Disk Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehyun; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Sheth, Kartik; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Madore, Barry F.; Elmegreen, Bruce; Knapen, Johan H.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Ho, Luis C.; Comerón, Sébastien; Holwerda, Benne; Hinz, Joannah L.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Cisternas, Mauricio; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Buta, Ron; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Laine, Jarkko; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Regan, Michael W.; de Swardt, Bonita; Gil de Paz, Armando; Seibert, Mark; Mizusawa, Trisha

    2014-02-01

    We have performed two-dimensional multicomponent decomposition of 144 local barred spiral galaxies using 3.6 μm images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Our model fit includes up to four components (bulge, disk, bar, and a point source) and, most importantly, takes into account disk breaks. We find that ignoring the disk break and using a single disk scale length in the model fit for Type II (down-bending) disk galaxies can lead to differences of 40% in the disk scale length, 10% in bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T), and 25% in bar-to-total luminosity ratios. We find that for galaxies with B/T >= 0.1, the break radius to bar radius, r br/R bar, varies between 1 and 3, but as a function of B/T the ratio remains roughly constant. This suggests that in bulge-dominated galaxies the disk break is likely related to the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar and thus moves outward as the bar grows. For galaxies with small bulges, B/T < 0.1, r br/R bar spans a wide range from 1 to 6. This suggests that the mechanism that produces the break in these galaxies may be different from that in galaxies with more massive bulges. Consistent with previous studies, we conclude that disk breaks in galaxies with small bulges may originate from bar resonances that may be also coupled with the spiral arms, or be related to star formation thresholds.

  19. Dynamics of galaxy structures in the Local Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.

    2016-10-01

    I consider a sample of `Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog' that contains eight hundred objects within 11 Mpc. Environment of each galaxy is characterized by a tidal index Θ1 depending on separation and mass of the galaxy Main Disturber (=MD). The UNGC galaxies with a common MD are ascribed to its `suite' and ranked according to their Θ1. Fifteen the most populated suites contain more than half of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at M_B = -18 mag. The observational properties of galaxies accumulated in UNGC are used to derive orbital masses of giant galaxies via motions of their satellites. The average orbital-to-stellar mass ratio for them is M orb M* ~= 30, corresponding to the mean local density of matter Ωm ~= 0.09, i.e 1/3 of the global cosmic one. The dark-to-stellar mass ratio for the Milky Way and M31 is typical for other neighboring giant galaxies.

  20. Structure of the Canes Venatici I cloud of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Dmitry I.; Makarova, Lidia N.; Uklein, Roman I.

    2016-10-01

    We study the spatial distribution of the sparse cloud of galaxies in the Canes Venatici constellation. We determined distances of 30 galaxies using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method. This homogeneous sample allows us to distinguish the zone of chaotic motions around the center of the system. A group of galaxies around M94 is characterized by the mass-luminosity ratio of M/L B=159 (M/L)⊙. It is significantly higher than the typical ratio M/L B=159 (M/L)⊙ for the nearby groups of galaxies. The CVn I cloud of galaxies contains 4-5 times less luminous matter compared with the well-known nearby groups, such as the Local Group, M 81 and Centaurus A. The central galaxy M 94 is at least 1 mag fainter than any other central galaxy of these groups. However, the concentration of galaxies in the Canes Venatici may have a comparable total mass.

  1. THE SLACS SURVEY. VIII. THE RELATION BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Treu, Tommaso; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gorecki, Alexia; Marshall, Philip J.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Bolton, Adam S.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Burles, Scott E-mail: pjm@physics.ucsb.edu E-mail: koopmans@astro.rug.nl E-mail: leonidas@jpl.nasa.gov

    2009-01-01

    We study the relation between the internal structure of early-type galaxies and their environment using 70 strong gravitational lenses from the SLACS Survey. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database is used to determine two measures of overdensity of galaxies around each lens-the projected number density of galaxies inside the tenth nearest neighbor ({sigma}{sub 10}) and within a cone of radius one h{sup -1} Mpc (D {sub 1}). Our main results are as follows. (1) The average overdensity is somewhat larger than unity, consistent with lenses preferring overdense environments as expected for massive early-type galaxies (12/70 lenses are in known groups/clusters). (2) The distribution of overdensities is indistinguishable from that of 'twin' nonlens galaxies selected from SDSS to have the same redshift and stellar velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub *}. Thus, within our errors, lens galaxies are an unbiased population, and the SLACS results can be generalized to the overall population of early-type galaxies. (3) Typical contributions from external mass distribution are no more than a few percent in local mass density, reaching 10-20% ({approx}0.05-0.10 external convergence) only in the most extreme overdensities. (4) No significant correlation between overdensity and slope of the mass-density profile of the lens galaxies is found. (5) Satellite galaxies (those with a more luminous companion) have marginally steeper mass-density profiles (as quantified by f {sub SIE} = {sigma}{sub *}/{sigma}{sub SIE} = 1.12 {+-} 0.05 versus 1.01 {+-} 0.01) and smaller dynamically normalized mass enclosed within the Einstein radius ({delta}log M {sub Ein}/M {sub dim} differs by -0.09 {+-} 0.03 dex) than central galaxies (those without). This result suggests that tidal stripping may affect the mass structure of early-type galaxies down to kpc scales probed by strong lensing, when they fall into larger structures.

  2. Galaxy clusters, type Ia supernovae and the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Busti, V. C.; Colaço, L. R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Landau, S. J.

    2016-08-01

    As is well known, measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect can be combined with observations of the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters to estimate the angular diameter distance to these structures. In this paper, we show that this technique depends on the fine structure constant, α. Therefore, if α is a time-dependent quantity, e.g., α = α0phi(z), where phi is a function of redshift, we argue that current data do not provide the real angular diameter distance, DA(z), to the cluster, but instead DAdata(z) = phi(z)2 DA(z). We use this result to derive constraints on a possible variation of α for a class of dilaton runaway models considering a sample of 25 measurements of DAdata(z) in redshift range 0.023 < z < 0.784 and estimates of DA(z) from current type Ia supernovae observations. We find no significant indication of variation of α with the present data.

  3. Group-galaxy correlations in redshift space as a probe of the growth of structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, F. G.; de la Torre, S.; Bianchi, D.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the use of the cross-correlation between galaxies and galaxy groups to measure redshift-space distortions (RSD) and thus probe the growth rate of cosmological structure. This is compared to the classical approach based on using galaxy auto-correlation. We make use of realistic simulated galaxy catalogues that have been constructed by populating simulated dark matter haloes with galaxies through halo occupation prescriptions. We adapt the classical RSD dispersion model to the case of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function and estimate the RSD parameter β by fitting both the full anisotropic correlation function ξs(rp, π) and its multipole moments. In addition, we define a modified version of the latter statistics by truncating the multipole moments to exclude strongly non-linear distortions at small transverse scales. We fit these three observable quantities in our set of simulated galaxy catalogues and estimate statistical and systematic errors on β for the case of galaxy-galaxy, group-group, and group-galaxy correlation functions. When ignoring off-diagonal elements of the covariance matrix in the fitting, the truncated multipole moments of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function provide the most accurate estimate, with systematic errors below 3 per cent when fitting transverse scales larger than 10 h-1 Mpc. Including the full data covariance enlarges statistical errors but keep unchanged the level of systematic error. Although statistical errors are generally larger for groups, the use of group-galaxy cross-correlation can potentially allow the reduction of systematics while using simple linear or dispersion models.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Genomic Structure and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Klockgether, Jens; Cramer, Nina; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Davenport, Colin F.; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome (G + C content 65–67%, size 5.5–7 Mbp) is made up of a single circular chromosome and a variable number of plasmids. Sequencing of complete genomes or blocks of the accessory genome has revealed that the genome encodes a large repertoire of transporters, transcriptional regulators, and two-component regulatory systems which reflects its metabolic diversity to utilize a broad range of nutrients. The conserved core component of the genome is largely collinear among P. aeruginosa strains and exhibits an interclonal sequence diversity of 0.5–0.7%. Only a few loci of the core genome are subject to diversifying selection. Genome diversity is mainly caused by accessory DNA elements located in 79 regions of genome plasticity that are scattered around the genome and show an anomalous usage of mono- to tetradecanucleotides. Genomic islands of the pKLC102/PAGI-2 family that integrate into tRNALys or tRNAGly genes represent hotspots of inter- and intraclonal genomic diversity. The individual islands differ in their repertoire of metabolic genes that make a large contribution to the pangenome. In order to unravel intraclonal diversity of P. aeruginosa, the genomes of two members of the PA14 clonal complex from diverse habitats and geographic origin were compared. The genome sequences differed by less than 0.01% from each other. One hundred ninety-eight of the 231 single nucleotide substitutions (SNPs) were non-randomly distributed in the genome. Non-synonymous SNPs were mainly found in an integrated Pf1-like phage and in genes involved in transcriptional regulation, membrane and extracellular constituents, transport, and secretion. In summary, P. aeruginosa is endowed with a highly conserved core genome of low sequence diversity and a highly variable accessory genome that communicates with other pseudomonads and genera via horizontal gene transfer. PMID:21808635

  5. Far infrared structure of spiral galaxies from the IRAS CPC images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainscoat, Richard J.; Chokshi, Arati; Doyle, Laurance R.

    1989-01-01

    Significant extended far infrared (50 micron and 100 micron) structure was found for five face-on spiral galaxies (NGC2403, M51, M83, NGC6946, and IC342) from fourteen galaxies searched in the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) chopped photometric channel (CPC) catalogue. Images were initially processed to remove instrumental and background artifacts, the isophotal centroids of each image determined, and multiple images of each galaxy (for each wavelength) superimposed and averaged to improve signal-to-noise. Calibration of these images was performed using IRAS survey array data. Infrared isophotes were then superimposed on optical (blue) images so that direct structural comparisons could be made.

  6. THE LUMINOSITY PROFILE AND STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, Stephane; Widrow, Lawrence M.; McDonald, Michael; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhu Yucong

    2011-09-20

    We have constructed an extended composite luminosity profile for the Andromeda galaxy, M31, and have decomposed it into three basic luminous structural components: a bulge, a disk, and a halo. The dust-free Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) imaging and extended spatial coverage of ground-based optical imaging and deep star counts allow us to map M31's structure from its center to 22 kpc along the major axis. We apply, and address the limitations of, different decomposition methods for the one-dimensional luminosity profiles and two-dimensional images. These methods include nonlinear least-squares and Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov chain analyses. The basic photometric model for M31 has a Sersic bulge with shape index n {approx_equal} 2.2 {+-} .3 and effective radius R{sub e} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2 kpc, and a dust-free exponential disk of scale length R{sub d} = 5.3 {+-} .5 kpc; the parameter errors reflect the range between different decomposition methods. Despite model covariances, the convergence of solutions based on different methods and current data suggests a stable set of structural parameters. The ellipticities ({epsilon} = 1 - b/a) of the bulge and the disk from the IRAC image are 0.37 {+-} 0.03 and 0.73 {+-} 0.03, respectively. The bulge parameter n is rather insensitive to bandpass effects and its value (2.2) suggests a first rapid formation via mergers followed by secular growth from the disk. The M31 halo has a two-dimensional power-law index {approx_equal} - 2.5 {+-} 0.2 (or -3.5 in three-dimensional), comparable to that of the Milky Way. We find that the M31 bulge light is mostly dominant over the range R{sub min} {approx}< 1.2 kpc. The disk takes over in the range 1.2 kpc {approx}< R{sub min} {approx}< 9 kpc, whereas the halo dominates at R{sub min} {approx}> 9 kpc. The stellar nucleus, bulge, disk, and halo components each contribute roughly 0.05%, 23%, 73%, and 4% of the total light of M31 out to 200 kpc along the minor axis. Nominal errors for the

  7. The unique structural parameters of the underlying host galaxies in blue compact dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Janowiecki, Steven; Salzer, John J. E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu

    2014-10-01

    The nature of possible evolutionary pathways between various types of dwarf galaxies is still not fully understood. Blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) provide a unique window into dwarf galaxy formation and evolution and are often thought of as an evolutionary stage between different classes of dwarf galaxies. In this study we use deep optical and near-infrared observations of the underlying hosts of BCDs in order to study the structural differences between different types of dwarf galaxies. When compared with dwarf irregular galaxies of similar luminosities, we find that the underlying hosts of BCDs have significantly more concentrated light distributions, with smaller scale lengths and brighter central surface brightnesses. We demonstrate here that the underlying hosts of BCDs are distinct from the broad continuum of typical dwarf irregular galaxies, and that it is unlikely that most dwarf irregular galaxies can transform into a BCD or vice versa. Furthermore, we find that the starburst in a BCD only brightens it on average by ∼0.8 mag (factor of two), in agreement with other studies. It appears that a BCD is a long-lived and distinct type of dwarf galaxy that exhibits an exceptionally concentrated matter distribution. We suggest that it is this compact mass distribution that enables the strong star formation events that characterize this class of dwarf galaxy, that the compactness of the underlying host can be used as a distinguishing parameter between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies, and that it can also be used to identify BCDs which are not currently experiencing an intense starburst event.

  8. Galaxy7TM: flexible GPCR-ligand docking by structure refinement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu Rie; Seok, Chaok

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important physiological roles related to signal transduction and form a major group of drug targets. Prediction of GPCR-ligand complex structures has therefore important implications to drug discovery. With previously available servers, it was only possible to first predict GPCR structures by homology modeling and then perform ligand docking on the model structures. However, model structures generated without explicit consideration of specific ligands of interest can be inaccurate because GPCR structures can be affected by ligand binding. The Galaxy7TM server, freely accessible at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/7TM, improves an input GPCR structure by simultaneous ligand docking and flexible structure refinement using GALAXY methods. The server shows better performance in both ligand docking and GPCR structure refinement than commonly used programs AutoDock Vina and Rosetta MPrelax, respectively. PMID:27131365

  9. Galaxy7TM: flexible GPCR–ligand docking by structure refinement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyu Rie; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important physiological roles related to signal transduction and form a major group of drug targets. Prediction of GPCR–ligand complex structures has therefore important implications to drug discovery. With previously available servers, it was only possible to first predict GPCR structures by homology modeling and then perform ligand docking on the model structures. However, model structures generated without explicit consideration of specific ligands of interest can be inaccurate because GPCR structures can be affected by ligand binding. The Galaxy7TM server, freely accessible at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/7TM, improves an input GPCR structure by simultaneous ligand docking and flexible structure refinement using GALAXY methods. The server shows better performance in both ligand docking and GPCR structure refinement than commonly used programs AutoDock Vina and Rosetta MPrelax, respectively. PMID:27131365

  10. Structure and Kinematics of Early-Type Galaxies from Integral Field Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Observations of galaxy isophotes, long-slit kinematics, and high-resolution photometry suggested a possible dichotomy between two distinct classes of elliptical galaxies. But these methods are expensive for large galaxy samples. Instead, integral field spectroscopy can efficiently recognize the shape, dynamics, and stellar population of complete samples of early-type galaxies (ETGs). These studies showed that the two main classes, the fast and slow rotators, can be separated using stellar kinematics. I show that there is a dichotomy in the dynamics of the two classes. The slow rotators are weakly triaxial and dominate above [Formula: see text]. Below Mcrit, the structure of fast rotators parallels that of spiral galaxies. There is a smooth sequence along which the age, the metal content, the enhancement in α-elements, and the weight of the stellar initial mass function all increase with the central mass density slope, or bulge mass fraction, while the molecular gas fraction correspondingly decreases. The properties of ETGs on galaxy scaling relations, in particular the [Formula: see text] diagram, and their dependence on environment, indicate two main independent channels for galaxy evolution. Fast-rotator ETGs start as star-forming disks and evolve through a channel dominated by gas accretion, bulge growth, and quenching, whereas slow rotators assemble near the centers of massive halos via intense star formation at high redshift and remain as such for the rest of their evolution via a channel dominated by gas poor mergers. This is consistent with independent studies of the galaxies redshift evolution.

  11. Structure and Dynamics of Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Joseph Benoi T.

    1997-06-01

    We present several data-based studies of the dynamics and morphology of early-type galaxies, with an emphasis on the distribution of dark matter. In the first study (Chapter 2), we attempt to map the distribution of dark matter around the giant elliptical galaxy M87 using the velocities of 43 globular clusters reported by Mould et al. (AJ, 99, 1823 (1990)). Assuming spherical symmetry in configuration and velocity space, we find a most likely, power-law dependence of dark matter density on radius of p(r) ∝ r-1.8, where the exponent lies between 0.2 and 3.0 with 99% confidence. We estimate that a sample of roughly 200 velocities would be required to determine the mass-density exponent to a precision of ±0.5. In the second part of the thesis (Chapters 3 and 4), we present the results of a study of the galaxy pair NGC 3384 (SB0)/NGC 3379 (E1) in the Leo I group using the Rutgers Fabry-Perot interferometer. We measured the velocities of 148 planetary nebulae around the two galaxies from the Doppler-shifted (OIII) emission line. The planetary nebula system in NGC 3384 exhibits an orderly rotation field aligned with the photometric axes of the galaxy. The mass of NGC 3384 is infered to be 1.6 x 1011 M⊙ within our last data point at 13 kpc. In the case of NGC 3379, no significant rotation of the planetary nebula system was detected. The mass of NGC 3379 is estimated to be 3 x 1011 M⊙ within 9 kpc, assuming a spherical, isotropic distribution of nebulae. The third part of the thesis (Chapters 5 and 6) consists of a fully nonparametric study of the distribution of elliptical galaxy intrinsic shapes. If elliptical galaxies of all intrinsic luminosities are considered as a single group, the frequency function of intrinsic shapes is found to be inconsistent with the axisymmetric hypothesis at the 99% level. However, many triaxial shape distributions can be found that reproduce the data. If elliptical galaxies are segregated according to intrinsic luminosity, we find a

  12. STRUCTURE AND FORMATION OF ELLIPTICAL AND SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kormendy, John; Fisher, David B.; Cornell, Mark E.; Bender, Ralf E-mail: dbfisher@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: bender@usm.uni-muenchen.de

    2009-05-15

    New surface photometry of all known elliptical galaxies in the Virgo cluster is combined with published data to derive composite profiles of brightness, ellipticity, position angle, isophote shape, and color over large radius ranges. These provide enough leverage to show that Sersic log I {proportional_to} r {sup 1/n} functions fit the brightness profiles I(r) of nearly all ellipticals remarkably well over large dynamic ranges. Therefore, we can confidently identify departures from these profiles that are diagnostic of galaxy formation. Two kinds of departures are seen at small radii. All 10 of our ellipticals with total absolute magnitudes M{sub VT} {<=} -21.66 have cuspy cores-'missing light'-at small radii. Cores are well known and naturally scoured by binary black holes (BHs) formed in dissipationless ('dry') mergers. All 17 ellipticals with -21.54 {<=} M{sub VT} {<=} -15.53 do not have cores. We find a new distinct component in these galaxies: all coreless ellipticals in our sample have extra light at the center above the inward extrapolation of the outer Sersic profile. In large ellipticals, the excess light is spatially resolved and resembles the central components predicted in numerical simulations of mergers of galaxies that contain gas. In the simulations, the gas dissipates, falls toward the center, undergoes a starburst, and builds a compact stellar component that, as in our observations, is distinct from the Sersic-function main body of the elliptical. But ellipticals with extra light also contain supermassive BHs. We suggest that the starburst has swamped core scouring by binary BHs. That is, we interpret extra light components as a signature of formation in dissipative ('wet') mergers. Besides extra light, we find three new aspects to the ('E-E') dichotomy into two types of elliptical galaxies. Core galaxies are known to be slowly rotating, to have relatively anisotropic velocity distributions, and to have boxy isophotes. We show that they have

  13. Structural Analysis of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Vanessa D.; Kang, Young-Shin; Thompson, George F.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the five-factor structure of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity (RACD) instrument, which assesses resident assistant (RA) confidence in addressing issues of cultural diversity in college and university residence halls. The instrument has five components that explore RA confidence: (1) belief in the need for cultural…

  14. The co-evolution of spiral structure and mass distribution in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigar, Marc

    2005-07-01

    We propose to use a new diagnostic tool to study the mass buildup in disk galaxies as a function of look-back time out to z 1. The tight correlation between spiral arm pitch angle and rotation curve shear rate {Seigar et al. 2005} demonstrates that the tightness of spiral structure in disk galaxies depends on the central mass concentration {including dark matter}, as this determines the shear rate. Galaxies with high central mass concentration have a higher shear rate and more tightly wound spiral structure than those with low mass concentration. As a result, the evolution of spiral structure over time can be used to search for evolution in the mass distribution in spiral galaxies. The main goal of this project is to determine evolution in the mass distribution of disk galaxies, using spiral arm pitch angles as a quanitative indicator. In order to do this we will use nearly face-on disk galaxies with measurable spiral structure, observed in the GOODS fields.

  15. The structure and evolution of interacting binary galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, K. D.

    1983-08-01

    A numerical code was constructed for the study of the evolution of interacting binary galaxies. This "multiple three-body" algorithm (MTBA) essentially involves N concurrent three-body integrations. MTBA incorporates a violent relaxation phase that allows the particles to redistribute themselves in the gravitational field of the perturber prior to the full binary orbital evolution calculation. This redistribution is important for systems with an initially strong tidal potential; their predicted merger times are 50-100% larger than previously estimated. Merger times are tabulated both for circular and for elliptical orbits. Typical close binary galaxies will merge in about twice their initial binary oribtal periods. A specific interacting binary simulation is described in detail in the first paper. Many of the results reported here are consistent with those obtained from the larger, more expensive N-body simulations. MTBA is altered so that each "galaxy" is represented by a configuration of test particles.

  16. Basis for Structural Diversity in Homologous RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, Andrey S.; Xiao, Yinghua; Pan, Tao; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-03-08

    Large RNA molecules, such as ribozymes, fold with well-defined tertiary structures that are important for their activity. There are many instances of ribozymes with identical function but differences in their secondary structures, suggesting alternative tertiary folds. Here, we report a crystal structure of the 161-nucleotide specificity domain of an A-type ribonuclease P that differs in secondary and tertiary structure from the specificity domain of a B-type molecule. Despite the differences, the cores of the domains have similar three-dimensional structure. Remarkably, the similar geometry of the cores is stabilized by a different set of interactions involving distinct auxiliary elements.

  17. Design and fabrication of diverse metamaterial structures by holographic lithography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Qiuze; Wang, Guo Ping

    2008-07-21

    We demonstrate a holographic lithography for the fabrication of diverse metamaterial structures by using an optical prism. Cylindrical nanoshells, U-shaped resonator arrays, and double-split ring arrays are obtained experimentally by real time modulating the phase relation of the interference beams. This easy-to-use method may provide a roadway for the design and fabrication of future metamaterials requiring diverse structures for effectively manipulating electromagnetic properties at optical frequencies. PMID:18648445

  18. The compact radio structure of radio-loud NLS1 galaxies and the relationship to CSS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, M.; Chen, Y.; Komossa, S.; Yuan, W.; Shen, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are thought to be young AGNs with relatively small black hole masses and high accretion rates. Radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (RLNLS1s) are very special, because some of them show blazar-like characteristics, while others resemble compact steep-spectrum sources. Relativistic jets were shown to exist in a few RLNLS1s based on VLBI observations and confirmed by the gamma-ray flaring of some of them. These properties may possibly be contrary to typical radio-loud AGNs, in light of the low black-hole masses, and high accretion rates. We present the compact radio structure of fourteen RLNLS1 galaxies from Very Long Baseline Array observations at 5 GHz in 2013. Although all these sources are very radio-loud with {R > 100}, their jet properties are diverse, in terms of their milli-arcsecond (mas) scale (pc scale) morphology and their overall radio spectral shape. The core brightness temperatures of our sources are significantly lower than those of blazars, therefore, the beaming effect is generally not significant in our sources, compared to blazars. This implies that the bulk jet speed may likely be low in our sources. The relationship between RLNLS1s and compact steep-spectrum sources, and the implications on jet formation are discussed based on the pc-scale jet properties.

  19. Studying the Structure and Dynamics of the Subcomponents of the Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jimmy; Mukherjee, Arin; Wang, Margaret; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Fardal, Mark A.; Sohn, S. Tony; Cunningham, Emily; Deason, Alis J.; Toloba, Elisa; Keoliya, Shruti; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.; Rockosi, Constance M.; HSTPROMO, HALO7D, SPLASH

    2016-01-01

    The Andromeda (M31) galaxy is the only large galaxy besides the Milky Way (MW) that is nearby enough to be dissected star by star, making it an excellent candidate for studying galaxy formation and evolution. A galaxy's evolutionary path is determined by factors such as its dark matter distribution, gas content, energy injection by supernovae and active nucleus, merger history, etc.. To constrain these physical processes, we studied the structure and dynamics M31 using very accurate proper motion (PM) measurements and exquisite photometry from three Hubble Space Telescope fields in the direction of the M31 galaxy. In order to exclude the MW contaminants from our data set, we used PM and photometric data to cuts define our M31 sample. We used this sample to analyze the motion of the subcomponents of M31 in the context of the state-of-the-art M31 model presented in van der Marel et al. 2012. We observed the relative PMs of three M31 subcomponents to gain unprecedented insight into the internal kinematics of M31. The PM differences we found were compared to a M31 model and provide input for refining the model. Our results serve as constraints for any dynamical formation model of the subcomponents of M31 and for any other large galaxy, allowing for better study and understanding of the dark matter contents and formation of the M31 galaxy.

  20. Kinematics, structure and environment of three dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharina, M. E.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the environmental status of three low surface brightnessdwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) KKH65, KK180 and KK227 using the results of our long slitspectroscopic observations at the 6m telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences and surfacephotometry on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images.The objects were selected by Karachentseva in 2010 as presumably isolated galaxies.The obtained surface brightness profiles demonstrate that our sample dSphs are lesscentrally concentrated than the objects of the same morphological type in the Virgo cluster (VC).Using the derived kinematic data we searched for possible neighbours of the dSphs withinthe projected distances from them Rproj > 500 kpc and with the differences in radial velocities |Δ V| > 500 kms-1. We applied the group finding algorithm byMakarov and Karachentsev to the selected sample.Our analysis shows that the dwarf galaxies of our study are not isolated.KKH65 and KK227 belong to the groups NGC3414and NGC5371, respectively. KK180 is in the VC infall region. We conclude thatit is not possible at the moment to justify the existence of isolated dSphs outsidethe Local Volume. The searches are complicated due to the lack of the accuratedistances to the galaxies farther than 10 Mpc.

  1. Orbital structure and mass distribution in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronawitter, Andi; Saglia, R. P.; Gerhard, Ortwin; Bender, Ralf

    2000-05-01

    We report on a homogeneous dynamical analysis of a sample of 21 round (17 E0/E1, 4 E2) elliptical galaxies. We present new kinematic data for eight of these galaxies and new photometry for one object. The remaining kinematic and photometric data and the required distance information are taken from the literature. The analysis uses non-parametric spherical models and takes into account line profile information as well as velocity dispersions. We present model fits to the kinematic data and the derived radial profiles of orbital anisotropy and B-band mass-to-light ratio, including confidence intervals. The circular velocity curves resulting from our model fits are all consistent with being flat outside R~ 0.3 R_e. Generally, the M/L ratio profiles show an outward increase, although models based on luminous matter are ruled out at 95% confidence only for three galaxies (NGC 2434, NGC 7507, NGC 7626). For NGC 1399, NGC 4472, NGC 4486, and NGC 4636, where X-ray observations are available, the mass profiles of the best fit models match the ones derived from the X-ray analysis. The best models for most galaxies are isotropic to slightly radially anisotropic, with typical beta <~0.3, in a few cases beta <~0 .5 at R_e/2. We discuss the generally small effects of flattening along the line-of-sight (the expected = 0.79 for this sample of luminous ellipticals) and of small embedded disks. Our results suggest that elliptical galaxies have surprisingly uniform dynamical properties.

  2. Forest structure drives global diversity of primates.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Sidney F; Villalobos, Fabricio; Dobrovolski, Ricardo; Beltrão-Mendes, Raone; Ferrari, Stephen F

    2014-11-01

    Geographic gradients in the species richness of non-human primates have traditionally been attributed to the variation in forest productivity (related to precipitation levels), although an all-inclusive, global-scale analysis has never been conducted. We perform a more comprehensive test on the role of precipitation and biomass production and propose an alternative hypothesis - the variation in vertical structure of forest habitats as measured by forest canopy height - in determining primate species richness on a global scale. Considering the potential causal relationships among precipitation, productivity and forest structure, we arranged these variables within a path framework to assess their direct and indirect associations with the pattern of primate species richness using structural equation modelling. The analysis also accounted for the influence of spatial autocorrelation in the relationships and assessed possible historical differences among biogeographical regions. The path coefficients indicate that forest canopy height (used as a proxy for vertical forest structure) is a better predictor of primate species richness than either precipitation or productivity on both global and continental scales. The only exception was Asia, where precipitation prevailed, albeit independently from productivity or forest structure. The influence of spatially structured processes varied markedly among biogeographical regions. Our results challenge the traditional rainfall-based viewpoint in favour of forest distribution and structure as primary drivers of primate species richness, which aggregate potential effects from both climatic factors and habitat complexity. These findings may support predictions of the impact of forest removal on primate species richness.

  3. Herschel-ATLAS: the surprising diversity of dust-selected galaxies in the local submillimetre Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, C. J. R.; Dunne, L.; Gomez, H. L.; Maddox, S.; De Vis, P.; Smith, M. W. L.; Eales, S. A.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Grootes, M. W.; Ivison, R. J.; Schofield, S. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Rowlands, K.; Valiante, E.; Vlahakis, C.; van der Werf, P.; Wright, A. H.; de Zotti, G.

    2015-09-01

    We present the properties of the first 250 μm blind sample of nearby galaxies (15 < D < 46 Mpc) containing 42 objects from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Herschel's sensitivity probes the faint end of the dust luminosity function for the first time, spanning a range of stellar mass (7.4 < M⋆ < 11.3 log10 M⊙), star formation activity (-11.8 < SSFR < -8.9 log10 yr-1), gas fraction (3-96 per cent), and colour (0.6 < FUV-KS < 7.0 mag). The median cold dust temperature is 14.6 K, colder than in the Herschel Reference Survey (18.5 K) and Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (17.7 K). The mean dust-to-stellar mass ratio in our sample is higher than these surveys by factors of 3.7 and 1.8, with a dust mass volume density of (3.7 ± 0.7) × 105 M⊙ Mpc-3. Counter-intuitively, we find that the more dust rich a galaxy, the lower its UV attenuation. Over half of our dust-selected sample are very blue in FUV-KS colour, with irregular and/or highly flocculent morphology; these galaxies account for only 6 per cent of the sample's stellar mass but contain over 35 per cent of the dust mass. They are the most actively star-forming galaxies in the sample, with the highest gas fractions and lowest UV attenuation. They also appear to be in an early stage of converting their gas into stars, providing valuable insights into the chemical evolution of young galaxies.

  4. SPIN ALIGNMENTS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES WITHIN THE LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE FROM SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu; Luo, Wentao; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Lei; Mo, H. J.; Van den Bosch, Frank C. E-mail: xyang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of spiral galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and Galaxy Zoo 2, we investigate the alignment of spin axes of spiral galaxies with their surrounding large-scale structure, which is characterized by the large-scale tidal field reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the spin axes only have weak tendencies to be aligned with (or perpendicular to) the intermediate (or minor) axis of the local tidal tensor. The signal is the strongest in a cluster environment where all three eigenvalues of the local tidal tensor are positive. Compared to the alignments between halo spins and the local tidal field obtained in N-body simulations, the above observational results are in best agreement with those for the spins of inner regions of halos, suggesting that the disk material traces the angular momentum of dark matter halos in the inner regions.

  5. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A; Dunn, Matthew R; Chaput, John C; Van Horn, Wade D; Egli, Martin

    2016-02-18

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson-Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space. PMID:26673703

  6. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A.; Dunn, Matthew R.; Chaput, John C.; Van Horn, Wade D.; Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson–Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space. PMID:26673703

  7. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A; Dunn, Matthew R; Chaput, John C; Van Horn, Wade D; Egli, Martin

    2016-02-18

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson-Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space.

  8. The catalog of edge-on disk galaxies from SDSS. I. The catalog and the structural parameters of stellar disks

    SciTech Connect

    Bizyaev, D. V.; Kautsch, S. J.; Mosenkov, A. V.; Reshetnikov, V. P.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Yablokova, N. V.; Hillyer, R. W.

    2014-05-20

    We present a catalog of true edge-on disk galaxies automatically selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A visual inspection of the g, r, and i images of about 15,000 galaxies allowed us to split the initial sample of edge-on galaxy candidates into 4768 (31.8% of the initial sample) genuine edge-on galaxies, 8350 (55.7%) non-edge-on galaxies, and 1865 (12.5%) edge-on galaxies not suitable for simple automatic analysis because these objects either show signs of interaction and warps, or nearby bright stars project on it. We added more candidate galaxies from RFGC, EFIGI, RC3, and Galaxy Zoo catalogs found in the SDSS footprints. Our final sample consists of 5747 genuine edge-on galaxies. We estimate the structural parameters of the stellar disks (the stellar disk thickness, radial scale length, and central surface brightness) in the galaxies by analyzing photometric profiles in each of the g, r, and i images. We also perform simplified three-dimensional modeling of the light distribution in the stellar disks of edge-on galaxies from our sample. Our large sample is intended to be used for studying scaling relations in the stellar disks and bulges and for estimating parameters of the thick disks in different types of galaxies via the image stacking. In this paper, we present the sample selection procedure and general description of the sample.

  9. Structural Properties of Spherical Galaxies: a Semi-Analytical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonneau, E.; Prada, F.

    2004-04-01

    Since the distribution of light measured along any galactocentric radius of an elliptical galaxy has the same functional form exp[-R1/n] (Sérsic profile) for almost all galaxies, and since this profile is the Abel integral of the luminous density, it looks worth-while to seek the way to derive the latter from the former. We propose in this paper a ''discrete ordinate'' method, which yields, for any value of n > 1, an explicit expression for the luminous density, ρL(r), that can be evaluated numerically to any required degree of precision. Once we have obtained such an expresion for the spatial density, ρL(r), we can compute straightforwardly the mass distribution, M(r), the potential, φ(r), and the velocity dispersions, σs2 (r), in space and on the observational plane, σp2(R).

  10. The Structure of Dark Matter Halos in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.

    1995-07-01

    Recent observations indicate that dark matter halos have flat central density profiles. Cosmological simulations with nonbaryonic dark matter, however, predict self-similar halos with central density cusps. This contradiction has lead to the conclusion that dark matter must be baryonic. Here it is shown that the dark matter halos of dwarf spiral galaxies represent a one-parameter family with self-similar density profiles. The observed global halo parameters are coupled with each other through simple scaling relations which can be explained by the standard cold dark matter model if one assumes that all the halos formed from density fluctuations with the same primordial amplitude. We find that the finite central halo densities correlate with the other global parameters. This result rules out scenarios where the flat halo cores formed subsequently through violent dynamical processes in the baryonic component. These cores instead provide important information on the origin and nature of dark matter in dwarf galaxies.

  11. The structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays. A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Symposium entitled 'The Structure and Content of the Galaxy and Galactic Gamma Rays', held at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in June, 1976, is briefly reviewed. Highlights from presentations on galactic structure, discrete sources, and low energy gamma rays are described. New data and their interpretations are also summarized.

  12. Understanding the structural scaling relations of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, L. A.; Somerville, R. S.; Primack, J. R.; Johansson, P. H.

    2014-10-01

    We use a large suite of hydrodynamical simulations of binary galaxy mergers to construct and calibrate a physical prescription for computing the effective radii and velocity dispersions of spheroids. We implement this prescription within a semi-analytic model embedded in merger trees extracted from the Bolshoi Λ cold dark matter N-body simulation, accounting for spheroid growth via major and minor mergers and disc instabilities. We find that without disc instabilities, our model does not predict sufficient numbers of intermediate-mass early-type galaxies in the local Universe. Spheroids also form earlier in models with spheroid growth via disc instabilities. Our model correctly predicts the normalization, slope, and scatter of the low-redshift size-mass and Fundamental Plane relations for early-type galaxies. It predicts a degree of curvature in the Faber-Jackson relation that is not seen in local observations, but this could be alleviated if higher mass spheroids have more bottom-heavy initial mass functions. The model also correctly predicts the observed strong evolution of the size-mass relation for spheroids out to higher redshifts, as well as the slower evolution in the normalization of the Faber-Jackson relation. We emphasize that these are genuine predictions of the model since it was tuned to match hydrodynamical simulations and not these observations.

  13. The structural origin of metabolic quantitative diversity.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Seizo; Motoike, Ikuko; Kojima, Kaname; Hasegawa, Takanori; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Saito, Tomo; Saigusa, Daisuke; Danjoh, Inaho; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Ogishima, Soichi; Kawai, Yosuke; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Sakurai, Miyuki; Hirano, Sachiko; Nakata, Junichi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Hozawa, Atsushi; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Minegishi, Naoko; Nagasaki, Masao; Takai-Igarashi, Takako; Fuse, Nobuo; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Sugawara, Junichi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Kure, Shigeo; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Tanabe, Osamu; Kinoshita, Kengo; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Relationship between structural variants of enzymes and metabolic phenotypes in human population was investigated based on the association study of metabolite quantitative traits with whole genome sequence data for 512 individuals from a population cohort. We identified five significant associations between metabolites and non-synonymous variants. Four of these non-synonymous variants are located in enzymes involved in metabolic disorders, and structural analyses of these moderate non-synonymous variants demonstrate that they are located in peripheral regions of the catalytic sites or related regulatory domains. In contrast, two individuals with larger changes of metabolite levels were also identified, and these individuals retained rare variants, which caused non-synonymous variants located near the catalytic site. These results are the first demonstrations that variant frequency, structural location, and effect for phenotype correlate with each other in human population, and imply that metabolic individuality and susceptibility for diseases may be elicited from the moderate variants and much more deleterious but rare variants. PMID:27528366

  14. The structural origin of metabolic quantitative diversity

    PubMed Central

    Koshiba, Seizo; Motoike, Ikuko; Kojima, Kaname; Hasegawa, Takanori; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Saito, Tomo; Saigusa, Daisuke; Danjoh, Inaho; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Ogishima, Soichi; Kawai, Yosuke; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Sakurai, Miyuki; Hirano, Sachiko; Nakata, Junichi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Hozawa, Atsushi; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Minegishi, Naoko; Nagasaki, Masao; Takai-Igarashi, Takako; Fuse, Nobuo; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Sugawara, Junichi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Kure, Shigeo; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Tanabe, Osamu; Kinoshita, Kengo; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Relationship between structural variants of enzymes and metabolic phenotypes in human population was investigated based on the association study of metabolite quantitative traits with whole genome sequence data for 512 individuals from a population cohort. We identified five significant associations between metabolites and non-synonymous variants. Four of these non-synonymous variants are located in enzymes involved in metabolic disorders, and structural analyses of these moderate non-synonymous variants demonstrate that they are located in peripheral regions of the catalytic sites or related regulatory domains. In contrast, two individuals with larger changes of metabolite levels were also identified, and these individuals retained rare variants, which caused non-synonymous variants located near the catalytic site. These results are the first demonstrations that variant frequency, structural location, and effect for phenotype correlate with each other in human population, and imply that metabolic individuality and susceptibility for diseases may be elicited from the moderate variants and much more deleterious but rare variants. PMID:27528366

  15. 9. DETAIL OF DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF DERBY LAKE (SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF DERBY LAKE (SECTION 2) SHOWING DIVERSION GATE TO LAKE LADORA. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  16. THE DIVERSE HOT GAS CONTENT AND DYNAMICS OF OPTICALLY SIMILAR LOW-MASS ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan, Akos; David, Laurence P.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.

    2012-10-10

    The presence of hot X-ray-emitting gas is ubiquitous in massive early-type galaxies. However, much less is known about the content and physical status of the hot X-ray gas in low-mass ellipticals. In the present paper, we study the X-ray gas content of four low-mass elliptical galaxies using archival Chandra X-ray observations. The sample galaxies, NGC 821, NGC 3379, NGC 4278, and NGC 4697, have approximately identical K-band luminosities, and hence stellar masses, yet their X-ray appearance is strikingly different. We conclude that the unresolved emission in NGC 821 and NGC 3379 is built up from a multitude of faint compact objects, such as coronally active binaries and cataclysmic variables. Despite the non-detection of X-ray gas, these galaxies may host low density, and hence low luminosity, X-ray gas components, which undergo an outflow driven by a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). We detect hot X-ray gas with a temperature of kT {approx} 0.35 keV in NGC 4278, the component of which has a steeper surface brightness distribution than the stellar light. Within the central 50'' ({approx}3.9 kpc), the estimated gas mass is {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, implying a gas mass fraction of {approx}0.06%. We demonstrate that the X-ray gas exhibits a bipolar morphology in the northeast-southwest direction, indicating that it may be outflowing from the galaxy. The mass and energy budget of the outflow can be maintained by evolved stars and SNe Ia, respectively. The X-ray gas in NGC 4697 has an average temperature of kT {approx} 0.3 keV and a significantly broader distribution than the stellar light. The total gas mass within 90'' ({approx}5.1 kpc) is {approx}2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, hence the gas mass fraction is {approx}0.4%. Based on the distribution and physical parameters of the X-ray gas, we conclude that it is most likely in hydrostatic equilibrium, although a subsonic outflow may be present.

  17. Bar properties as seen in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik

    2015-03-01

    Bars serve a crucial signpost in galaxy evolution because they form quickly once a disk is sufficiently massive and dynamically cold. Although the bar fraction in the local Universe is well-established since the mid-60s, a variety of studies have concluded varying bar fractions due to different definitions of bars, use of low quality data or different sample selection. The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) offers us the ideal data set for resolving this outstanding issue once and for all. S4G consists of over 2000 nearby galaxies chosen based on optical brightness, distance, galactic latitude and size in a 40 Mpc volume. With a 4 minute integration time per pixel over >1.5 × D25 diameter for each galaxy, the data provide the deepest, homogenous, mid-infrared (3.6 and 4.5 microns) data on the nearby Universe. The data are so deep that we are tracing stellar surface densities << 1 solar mass per square parsec. With these data we can confidently constrain the bar fraction and thus shed important light on the evolutionary state of galaxies as a function of mass, environment and other galaxy host properties.

  18. Large and small-scale structures and the dust energy balance problem in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saftly, W.; Baes, M.; De Geyter, G.; Camps, P.; Renaud, F.; Guedes, J.; De Looze, I.

    2015-04-01

    The interstellar dust content in galaxies can be traced in extinction at optical wavelengths, or in emission in the far-infrared. Several studies have found that radiative transfer models that successfully explain the optical extinction in edge-on spiral galaxies generally underestimate the observed FIR/submm fluxes by a factor of about three. In order to investigate this so-called dust energy balance problem, we use two Milky Way-like galaxies produced by high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. We create mock optical edge-on views of these simulated galaxies (using the radiative transfer code SKIRT), and we then fit the parameters of a basic spiral galaxy model to these images (using the fitting code FitSKIRT). The basic model includes smooth axisymmetric distributions along a Sérsic bulge and exponential disc for the stars, and a second exponential disc for the dust. We find that the dust mass recovered by the fitted models is about three times smaller than the known dust mass of the hydrodynamical input models. This factor is in agreement with previous energy balance studies of real edge-on spiral galaxies. On the other hand, fitting the same basic model to less complex input models (e.g. a smooth exponential disc with a spiral perturbation or with random clumps), does recover the dust mass of the input model almost perfectly. Thus it seems that the complex asymmetries and the inhomogeneous structure of real and hydrodynamically simulated galaxies are a lot more efficient at hiding dust than the rather contrived geometries in typical quasi-analytical models. This effect may help explain the discrepancy between the dust emission predicted by radiative transfer models and the observed emission in energy balance studies for edge-on spiral galaxies.

  19. LUMINOUS RED GALAXY HALO DENSITY FIELD RECONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATION TO LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth A.; Spergel, David N.; Bode, Paul E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-09-01

    The nontrivial relationship between observations of galaxy positions in redshift space and the underlying matter field complicates our ability to determine the linear theory power spectrum and extract cosmological information from galaxy surveys. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalog has the potential to place powerful constraints on cosmological parameters. LRGs are bright, highly biased tracers of large-scale structure. However, because they are highly biased, the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies to the galaxy power spectrum is large and fingers-of-God (FOGs) are significant. The combination of these effects leads to a {approx}10% correction in the underlying power spectrum at k = 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {approx}40% correction at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} in the LRG P(k) analysis of Tegmark et al., thereby compromising the cosmological constraints when this potentially large correction is left as a free parameter. We propose an alternative approach to recovering the matter field from galaxy observations. Our approach is to use halos rather than galaxies to trace the underlying mass distribution. We identify FOGs and replace each FOG with a single halo object. This removes the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies, the one-halo term. We test our method on a large set of high-fidelity mock SDSS LRG catalogs and find that the power spectrum of the reconstructed halo density field deviates from the underlying matter power spectrum at the {<=}1% level for k {<=} 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {<=}4% at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}. The reconstructed halo density field also removes the bias in the measurement of the redshift space distortion parameter {beta} induced by the FOG smearing of the linear redshift space distortions.

  20. Stand structural diversity rather than species diversity enhances aboveground carbon storage in secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Arshad; Yan, En-Rong; Chen, Han Y. H.; Chang, Scott X.; Zhao, Yan-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Ming-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Stand structural diversity, typically characterized by variances in tree diameter at breast height (DBH) and total height, plays a critical role in influencing aboveground carbon (C) storage. However, few studies have considered the multivariate relationships of aboveground C storage with stand age, stand structural diversity, and species diversity in natural forests. In this study, aboveground C storage, stand age, tree species, DBH and height diversity indices, were determined across 80 subtropical forest plots in Eastern China. We employed structural equation modelling (SEM) to test for the direct and indirect effects of stand structural diversity, species diversity, and stand age on aboveground C storage. The three final SEMs with different directions for the path between species diversity and stand structural diversity had a similar goodness of fit to the data. They accounted for 82 % of the variation in aboveground C storage, 55-59 % of the variation in stand structural diversity, and 0.1 to 9 % of the variation in species diversity. Stand age demonstrated strong positive total effects, including a positive direct effect (β = 0.41), and a positive indirect effect via stand structural diversity (β = 0.41) on aboveground C storage. Stand structural diversity had a positive direct effect on aboveground C storage (β = 0.56), whereas there was little total effect of species diversity as it had a negative direct association with, but had a positive indirect effect, via stand structural diversity, on aboveground C storage. The negligible total effect of species diversity on aboveground C storage in the forests under study may have been attributable to competitive exclusion with high aboveground biomass, or a historical logging preference for productive species. Our analyses suggested that stand structural diversity was a major determinant for variations in aboveground C storage in the secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China. Hence, maintaining tree DBH and

  1. Early Type Galaxies and Structural Parameters from ESO Public Survey KiDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, N.; Napolitano, N. R.; La Barbera, F.; Tortora, C.; Getman, F.; Radovich, M.; Capaccioli, M.

    The Kilo Degree survey (KiDS) is a large-scale optical imaging survey carried out with the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), which is the ideal tool for galaxy evolution studies. We expect to observe millions of galaxies for which we extract the structural parameters in four wavebands (u, g, r and i). This sample will represent the largest dataset with measured structural parameters up to a redshift z = 0. 5. In this paper we will introduce the sample, and describe the 2D fitting procedure using the 2DPHOT environment and the validation of the parameters with an external catalog.

  2. Structural and functional diversity of desmosomes.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Robert M; Green, Kathleen J

    2013-12-01

    Desmosomes anchor intermediate filaments at sites of cell contact established by the interaction of cadherins extending from opposing cells. The incorporation of cadherins, catenin adaptors, and cytoskeletal elements resembles the closely related adherens junction. However, the recruitment of intermediate filaments distinguishes desmosomes and imparts a unique function. By linking the load-bearing intermediate filaments of neighboring cells, desmosomes create mechanically contiguous cell sheets and, in so doing, confer structural integrity to the tissues they populate. This trait and a well-established role in human disease have long captured the attention of cell biologists, as evidenced by a publication record dating back to the mid-1860s. Likewise, emerging data implicating the desmosome in signaling events pertinent to organismal development, carcinogenesis, and genetic disorders will secure a prominent role for desmosomes in future biological and biomedical investigations.

  3. Tracing galaxy evolution by their present-day luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, Elmo

    2011-04-01

    Galaxies, which are complex objects containing up to several tens of billions stars, as well as gas and dust, are remarkable objects. The Universe contains a very diverse "zoo" of galaxies: there are galaxies with a discy shape and spiral structure, elliptical galaxies, and even galaxies, which show no sign of structure. This variety of galaxies leads to the basic question: how the galaxies form and evolve and which processes shape the structure of galaxies? Due to the complexity of galaxy formation and evolution, this question is still an unresolved puzzle and it is one of the biggest challenges in modern cosmology. The present thesis is based on large galaxy surveys and concentrates on the large-scale structure: how galaxy evolution is related to the surrounding large-scale environment of superclusters and voids. To study the evolution of galaxies, we use the luminosity function, which is in this respect one of the most fundamental of all cosmological observables. One of the principal results of the present study was the conclusion that the evolution of spiral galaxies is almost independent of the global environment, especially for blue and red spirals separately, showing that the formation of spiral galaxies has to be similar in all environments. Meanwhile, the luminosity function of elliptical galaxies depends strongly on the environment. This shows that the global environmental density is an important factor (via merging history) in the formation of elliptical galaxies. The results of the present study show clearly, that besides the local/group environment, the global (supercluster-void) environment plays also an important role in the formation and evolution of galaxies. Accounting for the role of global environment can help to solve several problems in the present picture of galaxy formation and evolution.

  4. Modeling Forest Structure and Vascular Plant Diversity in Piedmont Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkenberg, C.

    2014-12-01

    When the interacting stressors of climate change and land cover/land use change (LCLUC) overwhelm ecosystem resilience to environmental and climatic variability, forest ecosystems are at increased risk of regime shifts and hyperdynamism in process rates. To meet the growing range of novel biotic and environmental stressors on human-impacted ecosystems, the maintenance of taxonomic diversity and functional redundancy in metacommunities has been proposed as a risk spreading measure ensuring that species critical to landscape ecosystem functioning are available for recruitment as local systems respond to novel conditions. This research is the first in a multi-part study to establish a dynamic, predictive model of the spatio-temporal dynamics of vascular plant diversity in North Carolina Piedmont mixed forests using remotely sensed data inputs. While remote sensing technologies are optimally suited to monitor LCLUC over large areas, direct approaches to the remote measurement of plant diversity remain a challenge. This study tests the efficacy of predicting indices of vascular plant diversity using remotely derived measures of forest structural heterogeneity from aerial LiDAR and high spatial resolution broadband optical imagery in addition to derived topo-environmental variables. Diversity distribution modelling of this sort is predicated upon the idea that environmental filtering of dispersing species help define fine-scale (permeable) environmental envelopes within which biotic structural and compositional factors drive competitive interactions that, in addition to background stochasticity, determine fine-scale alpha diversity. Results reveal that over a range of Piedmont forest communities, increasing structural complexity is positively correlated with measures of plant diversity, though the nature of this relationship varies by environmental conditions and community type. The diversity distribution model is parameterized and cross-validated using three high

  5. Structure and dynamics of star-forming galaxies across the history of the Universe using GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thöne, Christina; Fynbo, Johan; de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are exploding massive stars and some of the most luminous explosions in the Universe. They can serve as powerful light houses that probe the structure and abundances of the dense ISM in their hosts at almost any redshift and not accessible by other types of observations, e.g. using quasars. Since 2009 our collaboration has collected UV to nIR medium-resolution spectra of over 70 GRB afterglows using the ESO/VLT X-shooter spectrograph. Our sample covers a redshift range from 0.06 to 6.3 allowing us to study the dynamics of the ISM in star-forming galaxies from the nearby Universe out to the epoch of reionization and for the first time in a statistically sound way. Absorption lines usually show a rich structure of different components due to galaxy dynamics, turbulences or in-/outflows and different ionization levels seem to arise from different regions in the host. Fine-structure lines some of which are uniquely observed in GRB hosts are excited in the dense regions close to the GRB site itself. For some host with z < 3 we can also simultaenously observe emission lines from the hot ISM, comparing the origin of hot and cold gas within the same galaxy. The large wavelength coverage of the sample gives us the unique opportunity to study the evolution of gas dynamics across most of the time galaxies have existed, how the gas structure changed over time and what is the importance and consistency of in- and ouflows. Here we will present the X-shooter GRB afterglow sample, our results on the study of absorption and emission line features and compare the observed structures with theoretical models of galaxies to get a unique insight on the distrubution and dynamics of the ISM in starforming galaxies at any redshift.

  6. Error, population structure and the origin of diverse sign systems.

    PubMed

    Grassly, N C; Von Haeseler, A; Krakauer, D C

    2000-10-01

    Evolutionary models of communication are used to shed some light on the selective pressures involved in the evolution of simple referential signals, and the constraints hindering the emergence of signs. Error-prone communication results from errors in transmission (in which individuals learn the wrong associations) and communication (in which signs are mistaken for one another). We demonstrate how both classes of errors are required to generate diversity and subsequently impose limits on the sign repertoire within a population. We then explore the influence of geographic structuring of a population on the evolution of a shared sign system and the importance of such structure for the maintenance of sign diversity. Deceit tends to erode conventional signs systems thereby reducing signal diversity, we demonstrate that population structure can act as a hedge against deceit, thereby ensuring the persistence of sign systems. PMID:10988022

  7. ON THE EXTENDED STRUCTURE OF THE PHOENIX DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Aparicio, Antonio; MartInez-Delgado, David; Gallart, Carme E-mail: antapaj@iac.e E-mail: carme@iac.e

    2009-11-01

    We present the star formation history (SFH) and its variations with galactocentric distance for the Local Group dwarf galaxy of Phoenix. They have been derived from a (F555W, F814W) color-magnitude diagram obtained from WFPC2-HST data, which reaches the oldest main-sequence turnoffs. The IAC-star and IAC-pop codes and the MinnIAC suite have been used to obtain the star formation rate as a function of time and metallicity, psi(t, z). We find that Phoenix has had ongoing but gradually decreasing star formation over nearly a Hubble time. The highest level of star formation occurred from the formation of the galaxy till 10.5 Gyr ago, when 50% of the total star formation had already taken place. From that moment, star formation continues at a significant level until 6 Gyr ago (an additional 35% of the stars are formed in this time interval), and at a very low level till the present time. The chemical enrichment law shows a trend of slowly increasing metallicity as a function of time until 6-8 Gyr ago, when metallicity starts to increase steeply to the current value. We have paid particular attention to the study of the variations of the SFH as a function of radius. Young stars are found in the inner region of the galaxy only, but intermediate-age and old stars can be found at all galactocentric distances. The distribution of mass density in alive stars and its evolution with time has been studied. This study shows that star formation started at all galactocentric distances in Phoenix at an early epoch. If stars form in situ in Phoenix, the star formation onset took place all over the galaxy (up to a distance of about 400 pc from the center), but preferentially out of center regions. After that, our results are compatible with a scenario in which the star formation region envelope slowly shrinks as time goes on, possibly as a natural result of pressure support reduction as gas supply diminishes. As a consequence, the star formation stopped first (about 7-8 Gyr ago) in

  8. Opposing Responses of Bird Functional Diversity to Vegetation Structural Diversity in Wet and Dry Forest

    PubMed Central

    York, Alan; Swan, Matthew; Christie, Fiona; Di Stefano, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance regimes are changing worldwide, and the consequences for ecosystem function and resilience are largely unknown. Functional diversity (FD) provides a surrogate measure of ecosystem function by capturing the range, abundance and distribution of trait values in a community. Enhanced understanding of the responses of FD to measures of vegetation structure at landscape scales is needed to guide conservation management. To address this knowledge gap, we used a whole-of-landscape sampling approach to examine relationships between bird FD, vegetation diversity and time since fire. We surveyed birds and measured vegetation at 36 landscape sampling units in dry and wet forest in southeast Australia during 2010 and 2011. Four uncorrelated indices of bird FD (richness, evenness, divergence and dispersion) were derived from six bird traits, and we investigated responses of these indices and species richness to both vertical and horizontal vegetation diversity using linear mixed models. We also considered the extent to which the mean and diversity of time since fire were related to vegetation diversity. Results showed opposing responses of FD to vegetation diversity in dry and wet forest. In dry forest, where fire is frequent, species richness and two FD indices (richness and dispersion) were positively related to vertical vegetation diversity, consistent with theory relating to environmental variation and coexistence. However, in wet forest subject to infrequent fire, the same three response variables were negatively associated with vertical diversity. We suggest that competitive dominance by species results in lower FD as vegetation diversity increases in wet forest. The responses of functional evenness were opposite to those of species richness, functional richness and dispersion in both forest types, highlighting the value of examining multiple FD metrics at management-relevant scales. The mean and diversity of time since fire were uncorrelated with vegetation

  9. 28. CONCRETE DIVERSION STRUCTURE ON THE WEST SIDE OF D ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. CONCRETE DIVERSION STRUCTURE ON THE WEST SIDE OF D STREET ABOUT ONE-QUARTER MILE SOUTH OF 9TH AVNEUE (SECTION 26); THE LATERAL CONTINUES NORTHEAST WHILE A SIDE DITCH PROCEEDS NORTHWARD. THE DIVERSION STRUCTURE SHOWN IN CO-43-A-27 IS VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  10. Structural diversity in lithium aryloxides, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    BOYLE,TIMOTHY J.; PEDROTTY,DAWN M.; ALAM,TODD M.; VICK,SARA C.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.

    2000-06-06

    A series of arylalcohols [H-OAr where OAr = OC{sub 6}H{sub 5} (OPh), OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(2-Me) (oMP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(2,6-Me){sub 2} (DMP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(2-Pr{prime}) (oPP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(2,6-Pr{prime}){sub 2} (DIP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(2-Bu{prime}) (oBP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(2,6-Bu{prime}){sub 2} (DBP) where Me = CH{sub 3}, Pr{prime} = CHMe{sub 2}, and Bu{prime} = CMe{sub 3}] were reacted with LiN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2} in pyridine (py) to generate the appropriate ``Li(OAr)(py){sub x}'' complex. The resultant products were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction as: [Li(OPh)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (1), [Li(oMP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (2), [Li(DMP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (3), [Li(oPP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (4), [Li(DIP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (5), [Li(oBP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (6), and [Li(DBP)(py)]{sub 2} (7). Compounds 1--6 adopt a dinuclear, edge-shared tetrahedral complex. For 7, due to the steric crowding of the DBP ligand, only one py is coordinated yielding a dinuclear fused trigonal planar arrangement. Two additional structure types were also characterized for the DIP ligand as [Li(DIP)(H-DIP)(py)]{sub 2} (5b) and [Li{sub 2}(DIP){sub 2}(py){sub 3}] (5c). {sup 6,7}Li and {sup 13}C NMR solid state MAS spectroscopy indicated that the bulk powder was consistent with the crystalline material. Solution state NMR spectroscopy revealed a symmetric molecule existed in solution for 1--7.

  11. The Study of Clusters of Galaxies and Large Scale Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Many research projects have been initiated and completed under support of this program. The results are summarized below. The work on the ROSAT Deep Survey has been successfully completed. A number of interesting results have been established within this joint MPE, Cal Tech, JHU, ST ScI, ESO collaboration. First, a very large fraction, 70-80 percent, of the X-ray background has been directly resolved into point sources. We have derived a new log N-log S for X-ray sources and have measured a source density of 970 sources per square degree at a limiting flux level. Care was taken in these studies to accurately model and measure the effects of sources confusion. This was possible because of our observing strategy which included both deep PSPC and HRI observations. No evidence of a population of narrow emission line galaxies has been established but some evidence for the evolution of low luminosity AGN (Seyfert galaxies) has been reported. The work on the ROSAT All Sky Survey Northern Cluster Survey has been substantially concluded but the publication of the list has been held up by the need to analyze newly re-calibrated data. This should result in publication over the next year. During the past year we have submitted a paper to the Astrophysical Journal which utilized a sample of clusters originally selected from the ROSAT All-sky survey at redshifts greater than 0.3. This sample was studied with ASCA to determine temperature and luminosity.

  12. Network analyses structure genetic diversity in independent genetic worlds.

    PubMed

    Halary, Sébastien; Leigh, Jessica W; Cheaib, Bachar; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2010-01-01

    DNA flows between chromosomes and mobile elements, following rules that are poorly understood. This limited knowledge is partly explained by the limits of current approaches to study the structure and evolution of genetic diversity. Network analyses of 119,381 homologous DNA families, sampled from 111 cellular genomes and from 165,529 phage, plasmid, and environmental virome sequences, offer challenging insights. Our results support a disconnected yet highly structured network of genetic diversity, revealing the existence of multiple "genetic worlds." These divides define multiple isolated groups of DNA vehicles drawing on distinct gene pools. Mathematical studies of the centralities of these worlds' subnetworks demonstrate that plasmids, not viruses, were key vectors of genetic exchange between bacterial chromosomes, both recently and in the past. Furthermore, network methodology introduces new ways of quantifying current sampling of genetic diversity.

  13. Differences in the Structural Properties and Star-formation Rates of Field and Cluster Galaxies at z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Rebecca J.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Glazebrook, Karl; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Spitler, Lee R.; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Cowley, Michael; Nanayakkara, Themiya

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the dependence of galaxy sizes and star formation rates (SFRs) on their environment using a mass-limited sample of quiescent and star-forming galaxies with log(M */{M}ȯ ) ≥ 9.5 at \\bar{z}=0.92 selected from the NEWFIRM medium-band Survey (NMBS). Using the Galaxy Environment Evolution Collaboration 2 spectroscopic cluster catalog and the accurate photometric redshifts from the NMBS, we select quiescent and star-forming cluster (\\bar{σ }=490 km s‑1) galaxies within two virial radius, R vir, intervals of 2 > R vir > 0.5 and R vir < 0.5. Galaxies residing outside of the 2 R vir of both the cluster centers and the additional candidate over-densities are defined as our field sample. Galaxy structural parameters are measured from the COSMOS legacy Hubble Space Telescope/ACS F814W image. The sizes and Sérsic indices of quiescent field and cluster galaxies have the same distribution regardless of R vir. However, cluster star-forming galaxies within 0.5 R vir have lower mass-normalized average sizes by 16+/- 7 % , and a higher fraction of Sérsic indices with n\\gt 1, than field star-forming galaxies. The average SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies show a trend of decreasing SFR with clustocentric radius. The mass-normalized average SFR of cluster star-forming galaxies is a factor of 2{--}2.5 (7{--}9σ ) lower than that of star-forming galaxies in the field. While we find no significant dependence on environment for quiescent galaxies, the properties of star-forming galaxies are affected, which could be the result of environment acting on their gas content.

  14. Differences in the Structural Properties and Star-formation Rates of Field and Cluster Galaxies at z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Rebecca J.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Glazebrook, Karl; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Spitler, Lee R.; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Cowley, Michael; Nanayakkara, Themiya

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the dependence of galaxy sizes and star formation rates (SFRs) on their environment using a mass-limited sample of quiescent and star-forming galaxies with log(M */{M}⊙ ) ≥ 9.5 at \\bar{z}=0.92 selected from the NEWFIRM medium-band Survey (NMBS). Using the Galaxy Environment Evolution Collaboration 2 spectroscopic cluster catalog and the accurate photometric redshifts from the NMBS, we select quiescent and star-forming cluster (\\bar{σ }=490 km s-1) galaxies within two virial radius, R vir, intervals of 2 > R vir > 0.5 and R vir < 0.5. Galaxies residing outside of the 2 R vir of both the cluster centers and the additional candidate over-densities are defined as our field sample. Galaxy structural parameters are measured from the COSMOS legacy Hubble Space Telescope/ACS F814W image. The sizes and Sérsic indices of quiescent field and cluster galaxies have the same distribution regardless of R vir. However, cluster star-forming galaxies within 0.5 R vir have lower mass-normalized average sizes by 16+/- 7 % , and a higher fraction of Sérsic indices with n\\gt 1, than field star-forming galaxies. The average SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies show a trend of decreasing SFR with clustocentric radius. The mass-normalized average SFR of cluster star-forming galaxies is a factor of 2{--}2.5 (7{--}9σ ) lower than that of star-forming galaxies in the field. While we find no significant dependence on environment for quiescent galaxies, the properties of star-forming galaxies are affected, which could be the result of environment acting on their gas content.

  15. Beyond Ellipse(s): Accurately Modelling the Isophotal Structure of Galaxies with ISOFIT and CMODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  16. Studying structure formation and evolution with strong-lensing galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foëx, Gaël; Motta, Veronica; Limousin, Marceau; Verdugo, Tomas; Gastaldello, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    We present the analysis of a sample of strong-lensing galaxy group candidates. Our main findings are: confirmation of group-scale systems, complex light distributions, presence of large-scale structures in their surroundings, and evidence of a strong-lensing bias in the mass-concentration relation. We also report the detection of the first 'Bullet group'.

  17. An Open-Source Galaxy Redshift Survey Simulator for next-generation Large Scale Structure Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijak, Uros

    Galaxy redshift surveys produce three-dimensional maps of the galaxy distribution. On large scales these maps trace the underlying matter fluctuations in a relatively simple manner, so that the properties of the primordial fluctuations along with the overall expansion history and growth of perturbations can be extracted. The BAO standard ruler method to measure the expansion history of the universe using galaxy redshift surveys is thought to be robust to observational artifacts and understood theoretically with high precision. These same surveys can offer a host of additional information, including a measurement of the growth rate of large scale structure through redshift space distortions, the possibility of measuring the sum of neutrino masses, tighter constraints on the expansion history through the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and constraints on the scale-dependence and non-Gaussianity of the primordial fluctuations. Extracting this broadband clustering information hinges on both our ability to minimize and subtract observational systematics to the observed galaxy power spectrum, and our ability to model the broadband behavior of the observed galaxy power spectrum with exquisite precision. Rapid development on both fronts is required to capitalize on WFIRST's data set. We propose to develop an open-source computational toolbox that will propel development in both areas by connecting large scale structure modeling and instrument and survey modeling with the statistical inference process. We will use the proposed simulator to both tailor perturbation theory and fully non-linear models of the broadband clustering of WFIRST galaxies and discover novel observables in the non-linear regime that are robust to observational systematics and able to distinguish between a wide range of spatial and dynamic biasing models for the WFIRST galaxy redshift survey sources. We have demonstrated the utility of this approach in a pilot study of the SDSS-III BOSS galaxies, in which we

  18. Structural Diversity and Close Interracial Relationships in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent legal and political actions have challenged the use of race-conscious college admissions policies. Earlier research offers mixed evidence about the link between an institution's racial/ethnic composition (i.e., structural diversity) and the formation of close interracial relationships, so the present study examines this topic directly for…

  19. 52. Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing original masonry structure at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing original masonry structure at right and concrete weir at left added later. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. The structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Stecker, F. W.

    1976-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with galactic structure drawing on all branches of galactic astronomy with emphasis on the implications of the new gamma ray observations. Topics discussed include: (1) results from the COS-B gamma ray satellite; (2) results from SAS-2 on gamma ray pulsar, Cygnus X-3, and maps of the galactic diffuse flux; (3) recent data from CO surveys of the galaxy; (4) high resolution radio surveys of external galaxies; (5) results on the galactic distribution of pulsars; and (6) theoretical work on galactic gamma ray emission.

  1. Interactive diversity promotes the evolution of cooperation in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Long

    2016-10-01

    Evolutionary games on networks traditionally assume that each individual adopts an identical strategy to interact with all its neighbors in each generation. Considering the prevalent diversity of individual interactions in the real society, here we propose the concept of interactive diversity, which allows individuals to adopt different strategies against different neighbors in each generation. We investigate the evolution of cooperation based on the edge dynamics rather than the traditional nodal dynamics in networked systems. The results show that, without invoking any other mechanisms, interactive diversity drives the frequency of cooperation to a high level for a wide range of parameters in both well-mixed and structured populations. Even in highly connected populations, cooperation still thrives. When interactive diversity and large topological heterogeneity are combined together, however, in the relaxed social dilemma, cooperation level is lower than that with just one of them, implying that the combination of many promotive factors may make a worse outcome. By an analytical approximation, we get the condition under which interactive diversity provides more advantages for cooperation than traditional evolutionary dynamics does. Numerical simulations validating the approximation are also presented. Our work provides a new line to explore the latent relation between the ubiquitous cooperation and individuals’ distinct responses in different interactions. The presented results suggest that interactive diversity should receive more attention in pursuing mechanisms fostering cooperation.

  2. Structural and functional diversity of cadherin at the adherens junction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Adhesion between cells is essential to the evolution of multicellularity. Indeed, morphogenesis in animals requires firm but flexible intercellular adhesions that are mediated by subcellular structures like the adherens junction (AJ). A key component of AJs is classical cadherins, a group of transmembrane proteins that maintain dynamic cell–cell associations in many animal species. An evolutionary reconstruction of cadherin structure and function provides a comprehensive framework with which to appreciate the diversity of morphogenetic mechanisms in animals. PMID:21708975

  3. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  4. RED NUGGETS AT HIGH REDSHIFT: STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES OVER 10 Gyr OF COSMIC HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Mentuch, Erin; Glazebrook, Karl; Caris, Evelyn; Green, Andrew W.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Crampton, David; Murowinski, Richard; Joergensen, Inger; Roth, Kathy; Juneau, Stephanie; Marzke, Ronald O.; Savaglio, Sandra; Yan Haojing

    2011-10-01

    We present an analysis of the size growth seen in early-type galaxies over 10 Gyr of cosmic time. Our analysis is based on a homogeneous synthesis of published data from 16 spectroscopic surveys observed at similar spatial resolution, augmented by new measurements for galaxies in the Gemini Deep Deep Survey. In total, our sample contains structural data for 465 galaxies (mainly early-type) in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 2.7. The size evolution of passively evolving galaxies over this redshift range is gradual and continuous, with no evidence for an end or change to the process around z {approx} 1, as has been hinted at by some surveys which analyze subsets of the data in isolation. The size growth appears to be independent of stellar mass, with the mass-normalized half-light radius scaling with redshift as R{sub e} {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -1.62{+-}0.34}. Surprisingly, this power law seems to be in good agreement with the recently reported continuous size evolution of UV-bright galaxies in the redshift range z {approx} 0.5-3.5. It is also in accordance with the predictions from recent theoretical models.

  5. Building disc structure and galaxy properties through angular momentum: the DARK SAGE semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam R. H.; Croton, Darren J.; Mutch, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    We present the new semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution, DARK SAGE, a heavily modified version of the publicly available SAGE code. The model is designed for detailed evolution of galactic discs. We evolve discs in a series of annuli with fixed specific angular momentum, which allows us to make predictions for the radial and angular-momentum structure of galaxies. Most physical processes, including all channels of star formation and associated feedback, are performed in these annuli. We present the surface density profiles of our model spiral galaxies, both as a function of radius and specific angular momentum, and find that the discs naturally build a pseudo-bulge-like component. Our main results are focused on predictions relating to the integrated mass-specific angular momentum relation of stellar discs. The model produces a distinct sequence between these properties in remarkable agreement with recent observational literature. We investigate the impact Toomre disc instabilities have on shaping this sequence and find they are crucial for regulating both the mass and spin of discs. Without instabilities, high-mass discs would be systematically deficient in specific angular momentum by a factor of ˜2.5, with increased scatter. Instabilities also appear to drive the direction in which the mass-spin sequence of spiral galaxy discs evolves. With them, we find galaxies of fixed mass have higher specific angular momentum at later epochs.

  6. Measuring Large-Scale Structure at z ~ 1 with the VIPERS galaxy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) is the largest redshift survey ever conducted with the ESO telescopes. It has used the Very Large Telescope to collect nearly 100,000 redshifts from the general galaxy population at 0.5 < z < 1.2. With a combination of volume and high sampling density that is unique for these redshifts, it allows statistical measurements of galaxy clustering and related cosmological quantities to be obtained on an equal footing with classic results from local redshift surveys. At the same time, the simple magnitude-limited selection and the wealth of ancillary photometric data provide a general view of the galaxy population, its physical properties and the relation of the latter to large-scale structure. This paper presents an overview of the galaxy clustering results obtained so far, together with their cosmological implications. Most of these are based on the ~ 55,000 galaxies forming the first public data release (PDR-1). As of January 2015, observations and data reduction are complete and the final data set of more than 90,000 redshifts is being validated and made ready for the final investigations.

  7. Galaxy evolution. Quasar quartet embedded in giant nebula reveals rare massive structure in distant universe.

    PubMed

    Hennawi, Joseph F; Prochaska, J Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio

    2015-05-15

    All galaxies once passed through a hyperluminous quasar phase powered by accretion onto a supermassive black hole. But because these episodes are brief, quasars are rare objects typically separated by cosmological distances. In a survey for Lyman-α emission at redshift z ≈ 2, we discovered a physical association of four quasars embedded in a giant nebula. Located within a substantial overdensity of galaxies, this system is probably the progenitor of a massive galaxy cluster. The chance probability of finding a quadruple quasar is estimated to be ∼10(-7), implying a physical connection between Lyman-α nebulae and the locations of rare protoclusters. Our findings imply that the most massive structures in the distant universe have a tremendous supply (≃10(11) solar masses) of cool dense (volume density ≃ 1 cm(-3)) gas, which is in conflict with current cosmological simulations. PMID:25977547

  8. Galaxy evolution. Quasar quartet embedded in giant nebula reveals rare massive structure in distant universe.

    PubMed

    Hennawi, Joseph F; Prochaska, J Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio

    2015-05-15

    All galaxies once passed through a hyperluminous quasar phase powered by accretion onto a supermassive black hole. But because these episodes are brief, quasars are rare objects typically separated by cosmological distances. In a survey for Lyman-α emission at redshift z ≈ 2, we discovered a physical association of four quasars embedded in a giant nebula. Located within a substantial overdensity of galaxies, this system is probably the progenitor of a massive galaxy cluster. The chance probability of finding a quadruple quasar is estimated to be ∼10(-7), implying a physical connection between Lyman-α nebulae and the locations of rare protoclusters. Our findings imply that the most massive structures in the distant universe have a tremendous supply (≃10(11) solar masses) of cool dense (volume density ≃ 1 cm(-3)) gas, which is in conflict with current cosmological simulations.

  9. Addressing the Role of Conformational Diversity in Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Nicolas; Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tertiary structures has become of standard use to study proteins that lack experimental characterization. Unfortunately, 3D structure prediction methods and model quality assessment programs often overlook that an ensemble of conformers in equilibrium populates the native state of proteins. In this work we collected sets of publicly available protein models and the corresponding target structures experimentally solved and studied how they describe the conformational diversity of the protein. For each protein, we assessed the quality of the models against known conformers by several standard measures and identified those models ranked best. We found that model rankings are defined by both the selected target conformer and the similarity measure used. 70% of the proteins in our datasets show that different models are structurally closest to different conformers of the same protein target. We observed that model building protocols such as template-based or ab initio approaches describe in similar ways the conformational diversity of the protein, although for template-based methods this description may depend on the sequence similarity between target and template sequences. Taken together, our results support the idea that protein structure modeling could help to identify members of the native ensemble, highlight the importance of considering conformational diversity in protein 3D quality evaluations and endorse the study of the variability of the native structure for a meaningful biological analysis. PMID:27159429

  10. Addressing the Role of Conformational Diversity in Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tertiary structures has become of standard use to study proteins that lack experimental characterization. Unfortunately, 3D structure prediction methods and model quality assessment programs often overlook that an ensemble of conformers in equilibrium populates the native state of proteins. In this work we collected sets of publicly available protein models and the corresponding target structures experimentally solved and studied how they describe the conformational diversity of the protein. For each protein, we assessed the quality of the models against known conformers by several standard measures and identified those models ranked best. We found that model rankings are defined by both the selected target conformer and the similarity measure used. 70% of the proteins in our datasets show that different models are structurally closest to different conformers of the same protein target. We observed that model building protocols such as template-based or ab initio approaches describe in similar ways the conformational diversity of the protein, although for template-based methods this description may depend on the sequence similarity between target and template sequences. Taken together, our results support the idea that protein structure modeling could help to identify members of the native ensemble, highlight the importance of considering conformational diversity in protein 3D quality evaluations and endorse the study of the variability of the native structure for a meaningful biological analysis. PMID:27159429

  11. Biological Diversity Comprising Microbial Structures of Antarctic Ice Covered Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matys, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of microbial membrane lipids is a rapid and non-selective method for evaluating the composition of microbial communities. To fully realise the diagnostic potential of these lipids, we must first understand their structural diversity, biological sources, physiological functions, and pathways of preservation. Particular environmental conditions likely prompt the production of different membrane lipid structures. Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys host numerous ice-covered lakes with sharp chemical gradients that vary in illumination, geochemical structure, and benthic mat morphologies that are structured by nutrient availability and water chemistry. The lipid contents of these benthic mats have not received extensive study nor have the communities yet been thoroughly characterized. Accordingly, a combination of lipid biomarker and nucleic acid sequence data provides the means of assessing species diversity and environmental controls on the composition and diversity of membrane lipid assemblages. We investigated the richness and diversity of benthic microbial communities and accumulated organic matter in Lake Vanda of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. We have identified diverse glycolipids, aminolipids, and phospholipids in addition to many unknown compounds that may be specific to these particular environments. Light levels fluctuate seasonally, favoring low-light-tolerant cyanobacteria and specific lipid assemblages. Adaptations to nutrient limitations are reflected in contrasting intact polar lipid assemblages. For example, under P-limiting conditions, phospholipids are subsidiary to membrane-forming lipids that do not contain P (i.e. ornithine, betaine, and sulfolipids). The bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) composition is dominated by bacteriohopanetetrol (BHT), a ubiquitous BHP, and 2-methylhopanoids. The relative abundance of 2-methylhopanoids is unprecedented and may reflect the unusual seasonal light regime of this polar environment. By establishing correlations

  12. The vertical disk structure of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 3079

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan; Cecil, G.; Tully, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    NGC 3079 is an edge-on SB(s)c galaxy at a redshift of 1225 km/s relative to the Local Group. Earlier researchers found a spectacular 'figure-eight' radio structure aligned along the minor axis of the galaxy, centered on the nucleus, and extending 3 kpc above and below the plane. The geometry of this structure and the evidence of unusually high nuclear gas velocities suggest that a wind-type outflow from the nucleus is taking place. The disk of NGC 3079 is also remarkable: it is extremely rich in H 2 regions and is the only unambiguous example of a galaxy outside M31 and our own Galaxy to exhibit 'Heiles-like' shells. Other researchers have also identified a nebulosity with a ragged X-shaped morphology formed by a system of lumpy filaments with individual lengths of 3 - 5 kpc. They suggest that this material is ambient halo gas entrained into the boundary layers of the nuclear outflow. The complex structure of the line emission in NGC 3079 makes this object an ideal target for an imaging spectroscopic study. The present paper reports the preliminary results of such a study.

  13. Zinc-binding cysteines: diverse functions and structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Pace, Nicholas J; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine residues are known to perform essential functions within proteins, including binding to various metal ions. In particular, cysteine residues can display high affinity toward zinc ions (Zn2+), and these resulting Zn2+-cysteine complexes are critical mediators of protein structure, catalysis and regulation. Recent advances in both experimental and theoretical platforms have accelerated the identification and functional characterization of Zn2+-bound cysteines. Zn2+-cysteine complexes have been observed across diverse protein classes and are known to facilitate a variety of cellular processes. Here, we highlight the structural characteristics and diverse functional roles of Zn2+-cysteine complexes in proteins and describe structural, computational and chemical proteomic technologies that have enabled the global discovery of novel Zn2+-binding cysteines.

  14. Structural diversity promotes productivity of mixed, uneven-aged forests in southwestern Germany.

    PubMed

    Dănescu, Adrian; Albrecht, Axel T; Bauhus, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    Forest diversity-productivity relationships have been intensively investigated in recent decades. However, few studies have considered the interplay between species and structural diversity in driving productivity. We analyzed these factors using data from 52 permanent plots in southwestern Germany with more than 53,000 repeated tree measurements. We used basal area increment as a proxy for productivity and hypothesized that: (1) structural diversity would increase tree and stand productivity, (2) diversity-productivity relationships would be weaker for species diversity than for structural diversity, and (3) species diversity would also indirectly impact stand productivity via changes in size structure. We measured diversity using distance-independent indices. We fitted separate linear mixed-effects models for fir, spruce and beech at the tree level, whereas at the stand level we pooled all available data. We tested our third hypothesis using structural equation modeling. Structural and species diversity acted as direct and independent drivers of stand productivity, with structural diversity being a slightly better predictor. Structural diversity, but not species diversity, had a significant, albeit asymmetric, effect on tree productivity. The functioning of structurally diverse, mixed forests is influenced by both structural and species diversity. These sources of trait diversity contribute to increased vertical stratification and crown plasticity, which in turn diminish competitive interferences and lead to more densely packed canopies per unit area. Our research highlights the positive effects of species diversity and structural diversity on forest productivity and ecosystem dynamics. PMID:27059713

  15. Structural diversity promotes productivity of mixed, uneven-aged forests in southwestern Germany.

    PubMed

    Dănescu, Adrian; Albrecht, Axel T; Bauhus, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    Forest diversity-productivity relationships have been intensively investigated in recent decades. However, few studies have considered the interplay between species and structural diversity in driving productivity. We analyzed these factors using data from 52 permanent plots in southwestern Germany with more than 53,000 repeated tree measurements. We used basal area increment as a proxy for productivity and hypothesized that: (1) structural diversity would increase tree and stand productivity, (2) diversity-productivity relationships would be weaker for species diversity than for structural diversity, and (3) species diversity would also indirectly impact stand productivity via changes in size structure. We measured diversity using distance-independent indices. We fitted separate linear mixed-effects models for fir, spruce and beech at the tree level, whereas at the stand level we pooled all available data. We tested our third hypothesis using structural equation modeling. Structural and species diversity acted as direct and independent drivers of stand productivity, with structural diversity being a slightly better predictor. Structural diversity, but not species diversity, had a significant, albeit asymmetric, effect on tree productivity. The functioning of structurally diverse, mixed forests is influenced by both structural and species diversity. These sources of trait diversity contribute to increased vertical stratification and crown plasticity, which in turn diminish competitive interferences and lead to more densely packed canopies per unit area. Our research highlights the positive effects of species diversity and structural diversity on forest productivity and ecosystem dynamics.

  16. Plant species loss decreases arthropod diversity and shifts trophic structure.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nick M; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Gross, Kevin; Haarstad, John; Knops, Johannes M H; Tilman, David

    2009-10-01

    Plant diversity is predicted to be positively linked to the diversity of herbivores and predators in a foodweb. Yet, the relationship between plant and animal diversity is explained by a variety of competing hypotheses, with mixed empirical results for each hypothesis. We sampled arthropods for over a decade in an experiment that manipulated the number of grassland plant species. We found that herbivore and predator species richness were strongly, positively related to plant species richness, and that these relationships were caused by different mechanisms at herbivore and predator trophic levels. Even more dramatic was the threefold increase, from low- to high-plant species richness, in abundances of predatory and parasitoid arthropods relative to their herbivorous prey. Our results demonstrate that, over the long term, the loss of plant species propagates through food webs, greatly decreasing arthropod species richness, shifting a predator-dominated trophic structure to being herbivore dominated, and likely impacting ecosystem functioning and services.

  17. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Gilleard, J S; Redman, E

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is one of the most successful and problematic livestock parasites worldwide. From its apparent evolutionary origins in sub-Saharan Africa, it is now found in small ruminants in almost all regions of the globe, and can infect a range of different domestic and wildlife artiodactyl hosts. It has a remarkably high propensity to develop resistance to anthelmintic drugs, making control increasingly difficult. The success of this parasite is, at least in part, due to its extremely high levels of genetic diversity that, in turn, provide a high adaptive capacity. Understanding this genetic diversity is important for many areas of research including anthelmintic resistance, epidemiology, control, drug/vaccine development and molecular diagnostics. In this article, we review the current knowledge of H. contortus genetic diversity and population structure for both field isolates and laboratory strains. We highlight the practical relevance of this knowledge with a particular emphasis on anthelmintic resistance research. PMID:27238002

  18. Logarithmic Spiral Arm Pitch Angle of Spiral Galaxies: Measurement and Relationship to Galactic Structure and Nuclear Supermassive Black Hole Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Benjamin

    In this dissertation, I explore the geometric structure of spiral galaxies and how the visible structure can provide information about the central mass of a galaxy, the density of its galactic disk, and the hidden mass of the supermassive black hole in its nucleus. In order to quantitatively measure the logarithmic spiral pitch angle (a measurement of tightness of the winding) of galactic spiral arms, I led an effort in our research group (the Arkansas Galaxy Evolution Survey) to modify existing two-dimensional fast Fourier transform software to increase its efficacy and accuracy. Using this software, I was able to lead an effort to calculate a black hole mass function (BHMF) for spiral galaxies in our local Universe. This work effectively provides us with a census of local black holes and establishes an endpoint on the evolutionary history of the BHMF for spiral galaxies. Furthermore, my work has indicated a novel fundamental relationship between the pitch angle of a galaxy's spiral arms, the maximum density of neutral atomic hydrogen in its disk, and the stellar mass of its bulge. This result provides strong support for the density wave theory of spiral structure in disk galaxies and poses a critical question of the validity of rival theories for the genesis of spiral structure in disk galaxies.

  19. The structure of cross-cultural musical diversity

    PubMed Central

    Rzeszutek, Tom; Savage, Patrick E.; Brown, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Human cultural traits, such as languages, musics, rituals and material objects, vary widely across cultures. However, the majority of comparative analyses of human cultural diversity focus on between-culture variation without consideration for within-culture variation. In contrast, biological approaches to genetic diversity, such as the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) framework, partition genetic diversity into both within- and between-population components. We attempt here for the first time to quantify both components of cultural diversity by applying the AMOVA model to music. By employing this approach with 421 traditional songs from 16 Austronesian-speaking populations, we show that the vast majority of musical variability is due to differences within populations rather than differences between. This demonstrates a striking parallel to the structure of genetic diversity in humans. A neighbour-net analysis of pairwise population musical divergence shows a large amount of reticulation, indicating the pervasive occurrence of borrowing and/or convergent evolution of musical features across populations. PMID:22072606

  20. Using asteroseismology to probe the structure and evolution of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stello, Dennis

    2015-08-01

    Recent space missions have transformed our ability to use asteroseismology on vast numbers of stars. This advance has opened up for exploration of the structure and evolution of the Galaxy using oscillating red giant stars as distant tracers of stellar populations including the halo, the bulge and the thin and thick disks. Asteroseismology provides a powerful way to obtain precise estimates of stellar bulk properties such as radius, mass, and age. The radius, and hence distance, places a star accurately in the Galaxy, the mass reveals the mass function and, in combination with composition, provide ages for red giants. Initial results from the CoRoT and Kepler missions have demonstrated the enormous potential there is in the marriage between asteroseismology and contemporary Galactic Archaeology based on single-epoch spectroscopy, photometry, and parallax measurements. The scope for this research received a significant boost last year on several fronts. The re-purposed Kepler telescope, K2, started observing tens of thousands of red giants along the ecliptic covering all main constituents of the Galaxy, and in a few years time NASA's TESS mission will stars observing up to 1 mio red giants full sky. Finally, ESA's decision to fund PLATO guaranties that high quality seismic measurements will continue to flow beyond the nextdecade. In this talk I will give an overview of how seismology can aid the study of the structure and evolution of the Galaxy. I will include the most recent results that we have obtained with our K2 Galactic Archaeology Program.

  1. The Monte Carlo Milky Way: reverse engineering the dense gas structure of the Galaxy with ATLASGAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figura, Charles C.; Urquhart, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) is the most senstive sub-millimetre survey of the inner Galaxy, covering 420 square degrees of the Galactic plane at a wavelength of 870 um. As with nearly any survey, however, ATLASGAL presents an incomplete view of the Milky Way, as it is biased by observational limitations which can distort our view of both the structure and distribution of the dense molecular gas.In order to better understand the structure of matter in the Galaxy, we have used Monte Carlo methods to simulate the distribution of dense gas from a grid of input models. By taking account of the observational limitations of the survey, we are able to compare the output from these models with the results obtained from the observations and determine the most likely distribution of dense gas. We investigate a number of spiral arm models, and discuss the results in the context of their role in massive star formation in the Galaxy.

  2. MAJOR STRUCTURES OF THE INNER GALAXY DELINEATED BY 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. A.; Caswell, J. L.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Breen, S. L.; Voronkov, M. A.; Avison, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Gray, M. D.; Burton, M. G.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Pestalozzi, M.

    2011-05-20

    We explore the longitude-velocity distribution of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in the context of the inner structure of our Galaxy. We analyze the correlation in velocities within this distribution and identify density enhancements indicating large-scale regions of enhanced star formation. These are interpreted as the starting points of the spiral arms and the interaction of the Galactic bar with the 3 kpc arms. The methanol masers support the presence of a long thin bar with a 45{sup 0} orientation. Signatures of the full 3 kpc arm structure are seen, including a prominent tangent at approximately -22{sup 0} Galactic longitude. We compare this distribution with existing models of the gas dynamics of our Galaxy. The 3 kpc arm structure appears likely to correspond to the radius of corotation resonance of the bar, with the bar on its inner surface and the starting points of the spiral arms on its outer surface.

  3. The nearby Galaxy structure toward the Vela Gum nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, E. E.; Solivella, G. R.; Perren, G. I.; Vázquez, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    We report on UBVI photometry and spectroscopy for MK classification purposes carried out in the fields of five open clusters projected against the Vela Gum in the Third Galactic Quadrant of the Galaxy. They are Ruprecht 20, Ruprecht 47, Ruprecht 60, NGC 2660 and NGC 2910. We could improve/confirm the parameters of these objects derived before. Ruprecht 20 is not a real physical entity, in agreement with earlier suggestions. Ruprecht 47, a young cluster in the Galactic plane, at 4.4 kpc from the Sun is quite farther than in previous distance estimations and becomes, therefore, a member of the Puppis OB2 association. For the first time Ruprecht 60 was surveyed in UBVI photometry. We found it to be placed at 4.2 kpc from the Sun of about and 1 Gyr old. NGC 2660 is another old object in our survey for which distance and age are coincident with previous findings. NGC 2910 turns out to be a young cluster of Vela OB1 association at a distance of 1.4 kpc approximately and 60 Myr old. The spectroscopic parallax method has been applied to several stars located in the fields of four out of the five clusters to get their distances and reddenings. With this method we found two blue stars in the field of NGC 2910 at distances that make them likely members of Vela OB1 too. Also, projected against the fields of Ruprecht 20 and Ruprecht 47 we have detected other young stars favoring not only the existence of Puppis OB1 and OB2 but conforming a young stellar group at ∼ 1 kpc from the Sun and extending for more than 6 kpc outward the Galaxy. If this is the case, there is a thickening of the thin Galactic disk of more than 300 pc at just 2-3 kpc from the Sun. Ruprecht 60 and NGC 2660 are too old objects that have no physical relation with the associations under discussion. An astonishing result has been the detection in the background of Ruprecht 47 of a young star at the impressive distance of 9.5 kpc from the Sun that could be a member of the innermost part of the Outer Arm

  4. Revealing the structural and functional diversity of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Knox, J Paul

    2008-06-01

    The extensive knowledge of the chemistry of isolated cell wall polymers, and that relating to the identification and partial annotation of gene families involved in their synthesis and modification, is not yet matched by a sophisticated understanding of the occurrence of the polymers within cell walls of the diverse cell types within a growing organ. Currently, the main sets of tools that are used to determine cell-type-specific configurations of cell wall polymers and aspects of cell wall microstructures are antibodies, carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and microspectroscopies. As these tools are applied we see that cell wall polymers are extensively developmentally regulated and that there is a range of structurally distinct primary and secondary cell walls within organs and across species. The challenge now is to document cell wall structures in relation to diverse cell biological events and to integrate this knowledge with the emerging understanding of polymer functions.

  5. Structural basis of diverse membrane target recognitions by ankyrins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Keyu; Ye, Fei; Yu, Cong; Bennett, Vann; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-01-01

    Ankyrin adaptors together with their spectrin partners coordinate diverse ion channels and cell adhesion molecules within plasma membrane domains and thereby promote physiological activities including fast signaling in the heart and nervous system. Ankyrins specifically bind to numerous membrane targets through their 24 ankyrin repeats (ANK repeats), although the mechanism for the facile and independent evolution of these interactions has not been resolved. Here we report the structures of ANK repeats in complex with an inhibitory segment from the C-terminal regulatory domain and with a sodium channel Nav1.2 peptide, respectively, showing that the extended, extremely conserved inner groove spanning the entire ANK repeat solenoid contains multiple target binding sites capable of accommodating target proteins with very diverse sequences via combinatorial usage of these sites. These structures establish a framework for understanding the evolution of ankyrins' membrane targets, with implications for other proteins containing extended ANK repeat domains. PMID:25383926

  6. Structural diversity of eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs. Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sogin, M L; Gunderson, J H

    1987-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of the eukaryotic kingdom was assessed by comparing the structural and evolutionary diversity of 18-20S ribosomal RNA genes. The coding regions for cytoplasmic small subunit ribosomal RNA genes vary in length from 1753 to 2305 nucleotides, and they appear to be evolutionary mosaics in which highly and partially conserved sequences are interspersed among regions that display very high rates of genetic drift. Structural similarities between these gene sequences were used to establish a phylogenetic framework for the eukaryotes. The extent of sequence variation within the eukaryotes exceeds that displayed within the eubacterial or archaebacterial lines of descent. The kinetoplastids and euglenoids represent the earliest branchings among the eukaryotes. These branchings preceded the divergence of lineages leading to the slime molds and apicomplexans and far antedate a radiative period that gave rise to the plants, animals, fungi, and other protists.

  7. Kinematical evidence for secular evolution in Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Font, Joan; Beckman, John E.

    2015-03-01

    We present a study of the kinematics of a sample of isolated spiral galaxies in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). We use Hα Fabry-Perot data from the GHαFaS instrument at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, complemented with images at 3.6 microns, in the R band and in the Hα filter. The resulting data cubes and velocity field maps allow a complete study of the kinematics of a galaxy, including in-depth investigations of the rotation curve, velocity moment maps, velocity residual maps, gradient maps and position-velocity (PV) diagrams. We find clear evidence of the secular evolution processes going on in these galaxies, such as asymmetries in the velocity field in the bar zone, and non-circular motions, probably in response to the potential of the structural components of the galaxies, or to past or present interactions.

  8. Morphological parameters of a Spitzer survey of stellar structure in galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Holwerda, B. W.; Muñoz-Mateos, J.-C.; Sheth, K.; Kim, T.; Meidt, S.; Mizusawa, T.; Hinz, J. L.; Zaritsky, D.; Regan, M. W.; Gil de Paz, A.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Seibert, M.; Ho, L. C.; Gadotti, D. A.; Erroz-Ferrer, S. E-mail: benne.holwerda@gmail.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s and others

    2014-01-20

    The morphology of galaxies can be quantified to some degree using a set of scale-invariant parameters. Concentration (C), asymmetry (A), smoothness (S), the Gini index (G), the relative contribution of the brightest pixels to the second-order moment of the flux (M {sub 20}), ellipticity (E), and the Gini index of the second-order moment (G{sub M} ) have all been applied to morphologically classify galaxies at various wavelengths. Here, we present a catalog of these parameters for the Spitzer Survey of stellar structure in Galaxies, a volume-limited, near-infrared (NIR) imaging survey of nearby galaxies using the 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels of the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our goal is to provide a reference catalog of NIR quantified morphology for high-redshift studies and galaxy evolution models with enough detail to resolve stellar mass morphology. We explore where normal, non-interacting galaxies—those typically found on the Hubble tuning fork—lie in this parameter space and show that there is a tight relation between concentration (C {sub 82}) and M {sub 20} for normal galaxies. M {sub 20} can be used to classify galaxies into earlier and later types (i.e., to separate spirals from irregulars). Several criteria using these parameters exist to select systems with a disturbed morphology, i.e., those that appear to be undergoing a tidal interaction. We examine the applicability of these criteria to Spitzer NIR imaging. We find that four relations, based on the parameters A and S, G and M {sub 20}, G{sub M} , C, and M {sub 20}, respectively, select outliers in morphological parameter space, but each selects different subsets of galaxies. Two criteria (G{sub M} > 0.6, G > –0.115 × M {sub 20} + 0.384) seem most appropriate to identify possible mergers and the merger fraction in NIR surveys. We find no strong relation between lopsidedness and most of these morphological parameters, except for a weak dependence of lopsidedness on

  9. 8. GENERAL VIEW OF LARGE DIVERSION STRUCTURE ON LATERAL WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL VIEW OF LARGE DIVERSION STRUCTURE ON LATERAL WEST OF LOWER DERBY LAKE (SECTION 2). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  10. 26. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH FORMER BASIN F IN DISTANCE (SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH FORMER BASIN F IN DISTANCE (SECTION 26). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  11. 25. DIVERSION STRUCTURE EAST OF FORMER BASIN F IN SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DIVERSION STRUCTURE EAST OF FORMER BASIN F IN SECTION 26. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  12. Origin, genetic diversity, and population structure of Chinese domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Yuan; Duan, Zi-Yuan; Sha, Tao; Xiangyu, Jinggong; Wu, Shi-Fang; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2006-07-19

    To characterize the origin, genetic diversity, and phylogeographic structure of Chinese domestic sheep, we here analyzed a 531-bp fragment of mtDNA control region of 449 Chinese autochthonous sheep from 19 breeds/populations from 13 geographic regions, together with previously reported 44 sequences from Chinese indigenous sheep. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all three previously defined lineages A, B, and C were found in all sampled Chinese sheep populations, except for the absence of lineage C in four populations. Network profiles revealed that the lineages B and C displayed a star-like phylogeny with the founder haplotype in the centre, and that two star-like subclades with two founder haplotypes were identified in lineage A. The pattern of genetic variation in lineage A, together with the divergence time between the two central founder haplotypes suggested that two independent domestication events have occurred in sheep lineage A. Considerable mitochondrial diversity was observed in Chinese sheep. Weak structuring was observed either among Chinese indigenous sheep populations or between Asian and European sheep and this can be attributable to long-term strong gene flow induced by historical human movements. The high levels of intra-population diversity in Chinese sheep and the weak phylogeographic structuring indicated three geographically independent domestication events have occurred and the domestication place was not only confined to the Near East, but also occurred in other regions.

  13. Structural diversity in a human antibody germline library

    PubMed Central

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Obmolova, Galina; Malia, Thomas J.; Luo, Jinquan; Muzammil, Salman; Sweet, Raymond; Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To support antibody therapeutic development, the crystal structures of a set of 16 germline variants composed of 4 different kappa light chains paired with 4 different heavy chains have been determined. All four heavy chains of the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) have the same complementarity-determining region (CDR) H3 that was reported in an earlier Fab structure. The structure analyses include comparisons of the overall structures, canonical structures of the CDRs and the VH:VL packing interactions. The CDR conformations for the most part are tightly clustered, especially for the ones with shorter lengths. The longer CDRs with tandem glycines or serines have more conformational diversity than the others. CDR H3, despite having the same amino acid sequence, exhibits the largest conformational diversity. About half of the structures have CDR H3 conformations similar to that of the parent; the others diverge significantly. One conclusion is that the CDR H3 conformations are influenced by both their amino acid sequence and their structural environment determined by the heavy and light chain pairing. The stem regions of 14 of the variant pairs are in the ‘kinked’ conformation, and only 2 are in the extended conformation. The packing of the VH and VL domains is consistent with our knowledge of antibody structure, and the tilt angles between these domains cover a range of 11 degrees. Two of 16 structures showed particularly large variations in the tilt angles when compared with the other pairings. The structures and their analyses provide a rich foundation for future antibody modeling and engineering efforts. PMID:27210805

  14. The link between morphology and structure of brightest cluster galaxies: automatic identification of cDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongyao; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Conselice, Christopher J.

    2015-04-01

    We study a large sample of 625 low-redshift brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and link their morphologies to their structural properties. We derive visual morphologies and find that ˜57 per cent of the BCGs are cD galaxies, ˜13 per cent are ellipticals, and ˜21 per cent belong to the intermediate classes mostly between E and cD. There is a continuous distribution in the properties of the BCG's envelopes, ranging from undetected (E class) to clearly detected (cD class), with intermediate classes (E/cD and cD/E) showing the increasing degrees of the envelope presence. A minority (˜7 per cent) of BCGs have disc morphologies, with spirals and S0s in similar proportions, and the rest (˜2 per cent) are mergers. After carefully fitting the galaxies light distributions by using one-component (Sérsic) and two-component (Sérsic+Exponential) models, we find a clear link between the BCGs morphologies and their structures and conclude that a combination of the best-fitting parameters derived from the fits can be used to separate cD galaxies from non-cD BCGs. In particular, cDs and non-cDs show very different distributions in the Re-RFF plane, where Re is the effective radius and RFF (the residual flux fraction) measures the proportion of the galaxy flux present in the residual images after subtracting the models. In general, cDs have larger Re and RFF values than ellipticals. Therefore we find, in a statistically robust way, a boundary separating cD and non-cD BCGs in this parameter space. BCGs with cD morphology can be selected with reasonably high completeness (˜75 per cent) and low contamination (˜20 per cent). This automatic and objective technique can be applied to any current or future BCG sample with good-quality images.

  15. Complex central structures suggest complex evolutionary paths for barred S0 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Martínez-Lombilla, Cristina; Knapen, Johan H.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate three barred lenticular galaxies (NGC 2681, NGC 3945 and NGC 4371), which were previously reported to have complex central structures but without a detailed structural analysis of these galaxies' high-resolution data. We have therefore performed four- to six-component (pseudo-)bulge/disc/bar/ring/point source) decompositions of the composite (Hubble Space Telescope plus ground-based) surface brightness profiles. We find that NGC 2681 hosts three bars, while NGC 3945 and NGC 4371 are double- and single-barred galaxies, respectively, in agreement with past isophotal analysis. We find that the bulges in these galaxies are compact, and have Sérsic indices of n ˜ 2.2-3.6 and stellar masses of M* ˜ 0.28 × 1010-1.1 × 1010 M⊙. NGC 3945 and NGC 4371 have intermediate-scale `pseudo-bulges' that are well described by a Sérsic model with low n ≲ 0.5 instead of an exponential (n = 1) profile as done in the past. We measure emission line fluxes enclosed within nine different elliptical apertures, finding that NGC 2681 has a low-ionization nuclear emission region (LINER)-type emission inside R ˜ 3 arcsec, but the emission line due to star formation is significant when aperture size is increased. In contrast, NGC 3945 and NGC 4371 have composite (active galactic nucleus plus star-forming)- and LINER-type emissions inside and outside R ˜ 2 arcsec, respectively. Our findings suggest that the three galaxies have experienced a complex evolutionary path. The bulges appear to be consequences of an earlier violent merging event while subsequent disc formation via gas accretion and bar-driven perturbations may account for the build-up of pseudo-bulges, bars, rings and point sources.

  16. The evolution of galaxies at constant number density: a less biased view of star formation, quenching, and structural formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ownsworth, Jamie R.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Mundy, Carl J.; Mortlock, Alice; Hartley, William G.; Duncan, Kenneth; Almaini, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Due to significant galaxy contamination and impurity in stellar mass selected samples (up to 95 per cent from z = 0-3), we examine the star formation history, quenching time-scales, and structural evolution of galaxies using a constant number density selection with data from the United Kingdom Infra-Red Deep Sky Survey Ultra-Deep Survey field. Using this methodology, we investigate the evolution of galaxies at a variety of number densities from z = 0-3. We find that samples chosen at number densities ranging from 3 × 10-4 to 10-5 galaxies Mpc-3 (corresponding to z ˜ 0.5 stellar masses of M* = 1010.95-11.6 M0) have a star-forming blue fraction of ˜50 per cent at z ˜ 2.5, which evolves to a nearly 100 per cent quenched red and dead population by z ˜ 1. We also see evidence for number density downsizing, such that the galaxies selected at the lowest densities (highest masses) become a homogeneous red population before those at higher number densities. Examining the evolution of the colours for these systems furthermore shows that the formation redshift of galaxies selected at these number densities is zform > 3. The structural evolution through size and Sérsic index fits reveal that while there remains evolution in terms of galaxies becoming larger and more concentrated in stellar mass at lower redshifts, the magnitude of the change is significantly smaller than for a mass-selected sample. We also find that changes in size and structure continues at z < 1, and is coupled strongly to passivity evolution. We conclude that galaxy structure is driving the quenching of galaxies, such that galaxies become concentrated before they become passive.

  17. DETERMINING THE NATURE OF THE EXTENDED H I STRUCTURE AROUND LITTLE THINGS DWARF GALAXY NGC 1569

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Megan

    2013-06-15

    This work presents an extended, neutral hydrogen emission map around Magellanic-type dwarf irregular galaxy (dIm) NGC 1569. In the spring of 2010, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope was used to map a 9 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 2 Degree-Sign region in H I line emission that includes NGC 1569 and IC 342 as well as two other dwarf galaxies. The primary objective for these observations was to search for structures potentially connecting NGC 1569 with IC 342 group members in order to trace previous interactions and thus, provide an explanation for the starburst and peculiar kinematics prevalent in NGC 1569. A large, half-degree diameter H I cloud was detected that shares the same position and velocity as NGC 1569. Also, two long structures were discovered that are reminiscent of intergalactic filaments extending out in a V-shaped manner from NGC 1569 toward UGCA 92, a nearby dwarf galaxy. These filamentary structures extend for about 1. Degree-Sign 5, which is 77 kpc at NGC 1569. There is a continuous velocity succession with the 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud, filaments, and main body of the galaxy. The 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud and filamentary structures may be foreground Milky Way, but are suggestive as possible remnants of an interaction between NGC 1569 and UGCA 92. The data also show two tidal tails extending from UGCA 86 and IC 342, respectively. These structures may be part of a continuous H I bridge but more data are needed to determine if this is the case.

  18. The Interacting Galaxy Pair NGC 5394/95: Near-Infrared Photometry, Structure, and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puerari, Ivânio; Valdez-Gutiérrez, Margarita; Hernández-López, Izbeth

    2005-10-01

    We present near-infrared observations in the J, H, and K' passbands of the interacting pair of galaxies NGC 5394/95 (KPG 404). The total magnitudes, colors, surface brightnesses, and color profiles are calculated. In addition, aperture magnitudes are compared against previous determinations. We also perform a structural (disk + bulge) analysis, as well as a two-dimensional Fourier analysis, to gain insight into the morphology of the pair. The disk + bulge fit shows that NGC 5394 (KPG 404A) is more compact than normal galaxies, while NGC 5395 (KPG 404B) is less concentrated. The two-dimensional Fourier analysis shows that NGC 5394 is an H2β galaxy in the dust-penetrated (DP) classification by Block & Puerari. NGC 5395, in contrast, displays a very complex structure that needs a number of Fourier coefficients to be explained. A tightly wound m=1 coefficient (DP class H1α) is the main structure, but other m=1 and m=2 coefficients (suggesting modulation) are also present in the Fourier spectra. The m=1 coefficients represent a pseudo-ring-type structure, indicative of a collision rather than a passage. Based on our results we are able to assert that the scenario of the interaction between the galaxy members of KPG 404 should take into account a crossing of NGC 5394 through the disk of NGC 5395 in a Cartwheel-like encounter rather than a passage as in M51-type pairs. Numerical simulations could help to unravel the structural and morphological evolution of this interacting pair.

  19. Peculiar radio structures in the central regions of galaxy cluster Abell 585

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamrozy, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Marchenko, V.; Kuźmicz, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Sikora, M.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyse the peculiar radio structure observed across the central region of the galaxy cluster Abell 585 (z = 0.12). In the low-resolution radio maps, this structure appears uniform and diffuse on angular scales of ˜3 arcmin, and is seemingly related to the distant (z = 2.5) radio quasar B3 0727+409 rather than to the cluster itself. However, after a careful investigation of the unpublished archival radio data with better angular resolution, we resolve the structure into two distinct arcmin-scale features, which resemble typical lobes of cluster radio galaxies with no obvious connection to the background quasar. We support this conclusion by examining the spectral and polarization properties of the features, demonstrating in addition that the analysed structure can hardly be associated with any sort of a radio mini-halo or relics of the cluster. Yet at the same time we are not able to identify host galaxies of the radio lobes in the available optical and infrared surveys. We consider some speculative explanations for our findings, including gravitational wave recoil kicks of supermassive black holes responsible for the lobes' formation in the process of merging massive ellipticals within the central parts of a rich cluster environment, but we do not reach any robust conclusions regarding the origin of the detected radio features.

  20. Black Holes and the Central Structure of Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Tod R.

    Central massive black holes appear to have a strong role in determining the central structure of elliptical galaxies. The existence of cores in the more luminous ellipticals may be understood as the merger endpoint of two less-luminous galaxies, each harboring a massive black hole. As the two black holes spiral together at the center of the merger product, stars would be ejected from this region, creating a break in the stellar density profile and the shallow cusp in surface brightness characteristic of a core. Further, the resulting binary or merged black hole would preserve the core over subsequent mergers or cannibalism events by disrupting any incoming dense stellar system that would otherwise fill in the core. The effects of black holes are also strongly favored to explain central ``double-nuclei,'' such as that seen in M31, and a recently discovered class of ``hollow galaxies,'' which have local minima in their central stellar density profiles. In short, any discussion of the origin of galaxy morphology must include the ubiquitous presence of massive black holes.

  1. THICK DISKS OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES SEEN THROUGH THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): LAIR OF MISSING BARYONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Comeron, Sebastien; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Knapen, Johan H.; Salo, Heikki; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Hinz, Joannah L.; De Paz, Armando Gil; Menendez-Delmestre, KarIn; Seibert, Mark; Ho, Luis C.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.

    2011-11-01

    Most, if not all, disk galaxies have a thin (classical) disk and a thick disk. In most models thick disks are thought to be a necessary consequence of the disk formation and/or evolution of the galaxy. We present the results of a study of the thick disk properties in a sample of carefully selected edge-on galaxies with types ranging from T = 3 to T = 8. We fitted one-dimensional luminosity profiles with physically motivated functions-the solutions of two stellar and one gaseous isothermal coupled disks in equilibrium-which are likely to yield more accurate results than other functions used in previous studies. The images used for the fits come from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G). We found that thick disks are on average more massive than previously reported, mostly due to the selected fitting function. Typically, the thin and thick disks have similar masses. We also found that thick disks do not flare significantly within the observed range in galactocentric radii and that the ratio of thick-to-thin disk scale heights is higher for galaxies of earlier types. Our results tend to favor an in situ origin for most of the stars in the thick disk. In addition, the thick disk may contain a significant amount of stars coming from satellites accreted after the initial buildup of the galaxy and an extra fraction of stars coming from the secular heating of the thin disk by its own overdensities. Assigning thick disk light to the thin disk component may lead to an underestimate of the overall stellar mass in galaxies because of different mass-to-light ratios in the two disk components. On the basis of our new results, we estimate that disk stellar masses are between 10% and 50% higher than previously thought and we suggest that thick disks are a reservoir of 'local missing baryons'.

  2. BREAKS IN THIN AND THICK DISKS OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES IMAGED IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Comeron, Sebastien; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Laine, Jarkko; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Knapen, Johan H.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Sheth, Kartik; Munoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Hinz, Joannah L.; Regan, Michael W.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Seibert, Mark; Ho, Luis C.; Mizusawa, Trisha; Holwerda, Benne

    2012-11-10

    Breaks in the radial luminosity profiles of galaxies have until now been mostly studied averaged over disks. Here, we study separately breaks in thin and thick disks in 70 edge-on galaxies using imaging from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We built luminosity profiles of the thin and thick disks parallel to midplanes and we found that thin disks often truncate (77%). Thick disks truncate less often (31%), but when they do, their break radius is comparable with that in the thin disk. This suggests either two different truncation mechanisms-one of dynamical origin affecting both disks simultaneously and another one only affecting the thin disk-or a single mechanism that creates a truncation in one disk or in both depending on some galaxy property. Thin disks apparently antitruncate in around 40% of galaxies. However, in many cases, these antitruncations are an artifact caused by the superposition of a thin disk and a thick disk, with the latter having a longer scale length. We estimate the real thin disk antitruncation fraction to be less than 15%. We found that the ratio of the thick and thin stellar disk mass is roughly constant (0.2 < M{sub T} /M{sub t} < 0.7) for circular velocities v{sub c} > 120 km s{sup -1}, but becomes much larger at smaller velocities. We hypothesize that this is due to a combination of a high efficiency of supernova feedback and a slower dynamical evolution in lower-mass galaxies causing stellar thin disks to be younger and less massive than in higher-mass galaxies.

  3. HIERARCHICAL STELLAR STRUCTURES IN THE LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXY NGC 6822

    SciTech Connect

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Walter, Fabian; Schmeja, Stefan; Klessen, Ralf S.; De Blok, W. J. G. E-mail: walter@mpia-hd.mpg.d E-mail: rklessen@ita.uni-heidelberg.d

    2010-12-20

    We present a comprehensive study of the star cluster population and the hierarchical structure in the clustering of blue stars with ages {approx}<500 Myr in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Our observational material comprises the most complete optical stellar catalog of the galaxy from imaging with the Suprime-Cam at the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. We identify 47 distinct star clusters with the application of the nearest-neighbor density method to this catalog for a detection threshold of 3{sigma} above the average stellar density. The size distribution of the detected clusters can be very well approximated by a Gaussian with a peak at {approx}68 pc. The total stellar masses of the clusters are estimated by extrapolating the cumulative observed stellar mass function of all clusters to be in the range 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} M{sub sun}. Their number distribution is fitted very well by a power law with index {alpha} {approx} 1.5 {+-} 0.7, which is consistent with the cluster mass functions of other Local Group galaxies and the cluster initial mass function. In addition to the detected star clusters of the galaxy, the application of the nearest-neighbor density method for various density thresholds, other than 3{sigma}, enabled the identification of stellar concentrations in various lengthscales. The stellar density maps constructed with this technique provide a direct proof of hierarchically structured stellar concentrations in NGC 6822, in the sense that smaller dense stellar concentrations are located inside larger and looser ones. We illustrate this hierarchy by the so-called dendrogram, or structure tree of the detected stellar structures, which demonstrates that most of the detected structures split up into several substructures over at least three levels. We quantify the hierarchy of these structures with the use of the minimum spanning tree method. We find that structures detected at 1, 2, and 3{sigma} density thresholds are hierarchically constructed

  4. Molecular clouds and the large-scale structure of the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, Patrick; Stacy, J. Gregory

    1990-01-01

    The application of molecular radio astronomy to the study of the large-scale structure of the Galaxy is reviewed and the distribution and characteristic properties of the Galactic population of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs), derived primarily from analysis of the Columbia CO survey, and their relation to tracers of Population 1 and major spiral features are described. The properties of the local molecular interstellar gas are summarized. The CO observing programs currently underway with the Center for Astrophysics 1.2 m radio telescope are described, with an emphasis on projects relevant to future comparison with high-energy gamma-ray observations. Several areas are discussed in which high-energy gamma-ray observations by the EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope) experiment aboard the Gamma Ray Observatory will directly complement radio studies of the Milky Way, with the prospect of significant progress on fundamental issues related to the structure and content of the Galaxy.

  5. Lanthanide coordination polymers: Synthesis, diverse structure and luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xue-Qin Lei, Yao-Kun; Wang, Xiao-Run; Zhao, Meng-Meng; Peng, Yun-Qiao; Cheng, Guo-Quan

    2014-10-15

    The new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand incorporating furfurysalicylamide terminal groups, namely, 1,4-bis([(2′-furfurylaminoformyl)phenoxyl]methyl)-2,5-bismethylbenzene (L) was synthesized and used as building blocks for constructing lanthanide coordination polymers with luminescent properties. The series of lanthanide nitrate complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The semirigid ligand L, as a bridging ligand, reacts with lanthanide nitrates forming three distinct structure types: chiral noninterpenetrated two-dimensional (2D) honeycomblike (6,3) (hcb, Schläfli symbol 6{sup 3}, vertex symbol 6 6 6) topological network as type I, 1D zigzag chain as type II and 1D trapezoid ladder-like chain as type III. The structural diversities indicate that lanthanide contraction effect played significant roles in the structural self-assembled process. The luminescent properties of Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail. Due to the good match between the lowest triplet state of the ligand and the resonant energy level of the lanthanide ion, the lanthanide ions in Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes can be efficiently sensitized by the ligand. - Graphical abstract: We present herein six lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand which not only display diverse structures but also possess strong luminescence properties. - Highlights: • We present lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand. • The lanthanide coordination polymers exhibit diverse structures. • The luminescent properties of Tb{sup III}, Eu{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail.

  6. A convergent enantioselective route to structurally diverse 6-deoxytetracycline antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Charest, Mark G; Lerner, Christian D; Brubaker, Jason D; Siegel, Dionicio R; Myers, Andrew G

    2005-04-15

    Complex antibiotics based on natural products are almost invariably prepared by semisynthesis, or chemical transformation of the isolated natural products. This approach greatly limits the range of accessible structures that might be studied as new antibiotic candidates. Here we report a short and enantioselective synthetic route to a diverse range of 6-deoxytetracycline antibiotics. The common feature of this class is a scaffold of four linearly fused rings, labeled A through D. We targeted not a single compound but a group of structures with the D ring as a site of structural variability. A late-stage, diastereoselective C-ring construction was used to couple structurally varied D-ring precursors with an AB precursor containing much of the essential functionality for binding to the bacterial ribosome. Five derivatives were synthesized from benzoic acid in yields ranging from 5 to 7% over 14 to 15 steps, and a sixth, (-)-doxycycline, was synthesized in 8.3% yield over 18 steps.

  7. Molecular diversity and tools for deciphering the methanogen community structure and diversity in freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Prem Prashant; Brablcová, Lenka; Buriánková, Iva; Rulík, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Methanogenic archaeal communities existing in freshwater sediments are responsible for approximately 50 % of the total global emission of methane. This process contributes significantly to global warming and, hence, necessitates interventional control measures to limit its emission. Unfortunately, the diversity and functional interactions of methanogenic populations occurring in these habitats are yet to be fully characterized. Considering several disadvantages of conventional culture-based methodologies, in recent years, impetus is given to molecular biology approaches to determine the community structure of freshwater sedimentary methanogenic archaea. 16S rRNA and methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene-based cloning techniques are the first choice for this purpose. In addition, electrophoresis-based (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, temperature gradient gel electrophoresis, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction techniques have also found extensive applications. These techniques are highly sensitive, rapid, and reliable as compared to traditional culture-dependent approaches. Molecular diversity studies revealed the dominance of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales of methanogens in freshwater sediments. The present review discusses in detail the status of the diversity of methanogens and the molecular approaches applied in this area of research.

  8. Molecular diversity and tools for deciphering the methanogen community structure and diversity in freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Prem Prashant; Brablcová, Lenka; Buriánková, Iva; Rulík, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Methanogenic archaeal communities existing in freshwater sediments are responsible for approximately 50 % of the total global emission of methane. This process contributes significantly to global warming and, hence, necessitates interventional control measures to limit its emission. Unfortunately, the diversity and functional interactions of methanogenic populations occurring in these habitats are yet to be fully characterized. Considering several disadvantages of conventional culture-based methodologies, in recent years, impetus is given to molecular biology approaches to determine the community structure of freshwater sedimentary methanogenic archaea. 16S rRNA and methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene-based cloning techniques are the first choice for this purpose. In addition, electrophoresis-based (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, temperature gradient gel electrophoresis, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction techniques have also found extensive applications. These techniques are highly sensitive, rapid, and reliable as compared to traditional culture-dependent approaches. Molecular diversity studies revealed the dominance of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales of methanogens in freshwater sediments. The present review discusses in detail the status of the diversity of methanogens and the molecular approaches applied in this area of research. PMID:23877581

  9. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS GENERAL CATALOG: STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS FOR APPROXIMATELY HALF A MILLION GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Roger L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cooper, Michael C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Stern, Daniel; Comerford, Julia M.; Davis, Marc; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Barden, Marco; Conselice, Christopher J.; Capak, Peter L.; Scoville, Nick; Sheth, Kartik; Shopbell, Patrick; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; and others

    2012-05-01

    We present the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog (ACS-GC), a photometric and morphological database using publicly available data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. The goal of the ACS-GC database is to provide a large statistical sample of galaxies with reliable structural and distance measurements to probe the evolution of galaxies over a wide range of look-back times. The ACS-GC includes approximately 470,000 astronomical sources (stars + galaxies) derived from the AEGIS, COSMOS, GEMS, and GOODS surveys. GALAPAGOS was used to construct photometric (SEXTRACTOR) and morphological (GALFIT) catalogs. The analysis assumes a single Sersic model for each object to derive quantitative structural parameters. We include publicly available redshifts from the DEEP2, COMBO-17, TKRS, PEARS, ACES, CFHTLS, and zCOSMOS surveys to supply redshifts (spectroscopic and photometric) for a considerable fraction ({approx}74%) of the imaging sample. The ACS-GC includes color postage stamps, GALFIT residual images, and photometry, structural parameters, and redshifts combined into a single catalog.

  10. Cosmological N-body Simulation of Galaxy and Large-Scale Structure Formation: The Gravity Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly

    2015-04-01

    One of the first N-body simulations done almost 50 years ago had only 200 self-gravitating particles. Even this first baby step made substantial impact on understanding how astronomical objects should form. Now powerful supercomputers and new algorithms allow astronomers produce N-body simulations that employ up to a trillion dark matter particles and produce vital theoretical predictions regarding formation, evolution, structure and statistics of objects ranging from dwarf galaxies to clusters and superclusters of galaxies. With only gravity involved in these theoretical models, one would naively expect that by now we should know everything we need about N-body dynamics of cosmological fluctuations. Not the case. It appears that the Universe was not cooperative and gave us divergencies in the initial conditions generated during the Inflation epoch and subsequent expansion of the Universe - the infinite phase-space density and divergent density fluctuations. Ever increasing observational demands on statistics and accuracy of theoretical predictions is another driving force for more realistic and larger N-body simulations. Large current and new planned observational projects such as BOSS, eBOSS, Euclid, LSST will bring information on spatial distribution, motion, and properties of millions of galaxies at different redshifts. Direct simulations of evolution of gas and formation of stars for millions of forming galaxies will not be available for years leaving astronomers with the only option - to develop methods to combine large N-body simulations with models of galaxy formation to produce accurate theoretical predictions. I will discuss the current status of the field and directions of its development.

  11. Diversity, structure and convergent evolution of the global sponge microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Torsten; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Lurgi, Miguel; Björk, Johannes R.; Easson, Cole; Astudillo-García, Carmen; Olson, Julie B.; Erwin, Patrick M.; López-Legentil, Susanna; Luter, Heidi; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Costa, Rodrigo; Schupp, Peter J.; Steindler, Laura; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Gilbert, Jack; Knight, Rob; Ackermann, Gail; Victor Lopez, Jose; Taylor, Michael W.; Thacker, Robert W.; Montoya, Jose M.; Hentschel, Ute; Webster, Nicole S.

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are early-diverging metazoa renowned for establishing complex microbial symbioses. Here we present a global Porifera microbiome survey, set out to establish the ecological and evolutionary drivers of these host–microbe interactions. We show that sponges are a reservoir of exceptional microbial diversity and major contributors to the total microbial diversity of the world's oceans. Little commonality in species composition or structure is evident across the phylum, although symbiont communities are characterized by specialists and generalists rather than opportunists. Core sponge microbiomes are stable and characterized by generalist symbionts exhibiting amensal and/or commensal interactions. Symbionts that are phylogenetically unique to sponges do not disproportionally contribute to the core microbiome, and host phylogeny impacts complexity rather than composition of the symbiont community. Our findings support a model of independent assembly and evolution in symbiont communities across the entire host phylum, with convergent forces resulting in analogous community organization and interactions. PMID:27306690

  12. Diversity, structure and convergent evolution of the global sponge microbiome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Torsten; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Lurgi, Miguel; Björk, Johannes R; Easson, Cole; Astudillo-García, Carmen; Olson, Julie B; Erwin, Patrick M; López-Legentil, Susanna; Luter, Heidi; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Costa, Rodrigo; Schupp, Peter J; Steindler, Laura; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Gilbert, Jack; Knight, Rob; Ackermann, Gail; Victor Lopez, Jose; Taylor, Michael W; Thacker, Robert W; Montoya, Jose M; Hentschel, Ute; Webster, Nicole S

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are early-diverging metazoa renowned for establishing complex microbial symbioses. Here we present a global Porifera microbiome survey, set out to establish the ecological and evolutionary drivers of these host-microbe interactions. We show that sponges are a reservoir of exceptional microbial diversity and major contributors to the total microbial diversity of the world's oceans. Little commonality in species composition or structure is evident across the phylum, although symbiont communities are characterized by specialists and generalists rather than opportunists. Core sponge microbiomes are stable and characterized by generalist symbionts exhibiting amensal and/or commensal interactions. Symbionts that are phylogenetically unique to sponges do not disproportionally contribute to the core microbiome, and host phylogeny impacts complexity rather than composition of the symbiont community. Our findings support a model of independent assembly and evolution in symbiont communities across the entire host phylum, with convergent forces resulting in analogous community organization and interactions. PMID:27306690

  13. Diversity, structure and convergent evolution of the global sponge microbiome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Torsten; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Lurgi, Miguel; Björk, Johannes R; Easson, Cole; Astudillo-García, Carmen; Olson, Julie B; Erwin, Patrick M; López-Legentil, Susanna; Luter, Heidi; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Costa, Rodrigo; Schupp, Peter J; Steindler, Laura; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Gilbert, Jack; Knight, Rob; Ackermann, Gail; Victor Lopez, Jose; Taylor, Michael W; Thacker, Robert W; Montoya, Jose M; Hentschel, Ute; Webster, Nicole S

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are early-diverging metazoa renowned for establishing complex microbial symbioses. Here we present a global Porifera microbiome survey, set out to establish the ecological and evolutionary drivers of these host-microbe interactions. We show that sponges are a reservoir of exceptional microbial diversity and major contributors to the total microbial diversity of the world's oceans. Little commonality in species composition or structure is evident across the phylum, although symbiont communities are characterized by specialists and generalists rather than opportunists. Core sponge microbiomes are stable and characterized by generalist symbionts exhibiting amensal and/or commensal interactions. Symbionts that are phylogenetically unique to sponges do not disproportionally contribute to the core microbiome, and host phylogeny impacts complexity rather than composition of the symbiont community. Our findings support a model of independent assembly and evolution in symbiont communities across the entire host phylum, with convergent forces resulting in analogous community organization and interactions.

  14. Structural and Functional Diversity of Nairovirus-Encoded Nucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenming; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Xu; Dong, Hui; Ma, Chao; Wang, Jingmin; Liu, Baocheng; Mao, Yonghong; Wang, Ying; Li, Ting

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nairoviruses include assorted tick-borne bunyaviruses that are emerging as causative agents of infectious diseases among humans and animals. As negative-sense single-stranded RNA (−ssRNA) viruses, nairoviruses encode nucleoprotein (NP) that encapsidates the genomic RNA and further forms ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). We previously revealed that the monomeric NP encoded by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) presents a racket-shaped structure and shows unusual DNA-specific endonuclease activity. To examine the structural and biological variation of nairovirus-encoded NPs, here, we systematically solved the crystal structures of NPs encoded by various nairoviruses, including Hazara virus (HAZV), Kupe virus (KUPV), and Erve virus (ERVEV). Combined with biochemical analysis, our results generate a clearer picture to aid in the understanding of the functional diversity of nairovirus-encoded NPs and the formation of nairovirus RNPs. IMPORTANCE Nairoviruses comprise several tick-borne bunyaviruses that are emerging as causative agents of infectious diseases among humans and animals; however, little is known of the nairovirus genome assembly and transcription mechanisms. Based on the previous study of CCHFV NP reported by different research groups, we systematically investigate here the structural and functional diversity among three different nairoviruses. This work provides important information on nairovirus nucleoprotein function and the formation of RNPs. PMID:26246561

  15. Entropic forces stabilize diverse emergent structures in colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Gibaud, Thomas; Dogic, Zvonimir; Lubensky, T. C.

    The depletion interaction mediated by non-adsorbing polymers promotes condensation and assembly of repulsive colloidal particles into diverse higher-order structures and materials. One example, with particularly rich emergent behaviors, is the formation of two-dimensional colloidal membranes from a suspension of filamentous $\\it{fd}$ viruses, which act as rods with effective repulsive interactions, and dextran, which acts as a condensing, depletion-inducing agent. Colloidal membranes exhibit chiral twist even when the constituent virus mixture lacks macroscopic chirality, change from a circular shape to a striking starfish shape upon changing the chirality of constituent rods, and partially coalesce via domain walls through which the viruses twist by $180^\\circ$. We formulate an entropically-motivated theory that can quantitatively explain these experimental structures and measurements, both previously published and newly performed, over a wide range of experimental conditions. Our results elucidate how entropy alone, manifested through the viruses as Frank elastic energy and through the depletants as an effective surface tension, drives the formation and behavior of these diverse structures. Our generalizable principles propose the existence of analogous effects in molecular membranes and can be exploited in the design of reconfigurable colloidal structures.

  16. Entropic forces stabilize diverse emergent structures in colloidal membranes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Louis; Gibaud, Thomas; Dogic, Zvonimir; Lubensky, T C

    2016-01-14

    The depletion interaction mediated by non-adsorbing polymers promotes condensation and assembly of repulsive colloidal particles into diverse higher-order structures and materials. One example, with particularly rich emergent behaviors, is the formation of two-dimensional colloidal membranes from a suspension of filamentous fd viruses, which act as rods with effective repulsive interactions, and dextran, which acts as a condensing, depletion-inducing agent. Colloidal membranes exhibit chiral twist even when the constituent virus mixture lacks macroscopic chirality, change from a circular shape to a striking starfish shape upon changing the chirality of constituent rods, and partially coalesce via domain walls through which the viruses twist by 180°. We formulate an entropically-motivated theory that can quantitatively explain these experimental structures and measurements, both previously published and newly performed, over a wide range of experimental conditions. Our results elucidate how entropy alone, manifested through the viruses as Frank elastic energy and through the depletants as an effective surface tension, drives the formation and behavior of these diverse structures. Our generalizable principles propose the existence of analogous effects in molecular membranes and can be exploited in the design of reconfigurable colloidal structures. PMID:26472139

  17. Recent Structural Evolution of Early-Type Galaxies: Size Growth from z = 1 to z = 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wel, Arjen; Holden, Bradford P.; Zirm, Andrew W.; Franx, Marijn; Rettura, Alessandro; Illingworth, Garth D.; Ford, Holland C.

    2008-11-01

    Strong size and internal density evolution of early-type galaxies between z ~ 2 and the present has been reported by several authors. Here we analyze samples of nearby and distant (z ~ 1) galaxies with dynamically measured masses in order to confirm the previous, model-dependent results and constrain the uncertainties that may play a role. Velocity dispersion (σ) measurements are taken from the literature for 50 morphologically selected 0.8 < z < 1.2 field and cluster early-type galaxies with typical masses Mdyn = 2 × 1011 M⊙. Sizes (Reff) are determined with Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. We compare the distant sample with a large sample of nearby (0.04 < z < 0.08) early-type galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for which we determine sizes, masses, and densities in a consistent manner, using simulations to quantify systematic differences between the size measurements of nearby and distant galaxies. We find a highly significant difference between the σ - Reff distributions of the nearby and distant samples, regardless of sample selection effects. The implied evolution in Reff at fixed mass between z = 1 and the present is a factor of 1.97 +/- 0.15. This is in qualitative agreement with semianalytic models; however, the observed evolution is much faster than the predicted evolution. Our results reinforce and are quantitatively consistent with previous, photometric studies that found size evolution of up to a factor of 5 since z ~ 2. A combination of structural evolution of individual galaxies through the accretion of companions and the continuous formation of early-type galaxies through increasingly gas-poor mergers is one plausible explanation of the observations. Based on observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555, and observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  18. Plasmodium vivax Diversity and Population Structure across Four Continents

    PubMed Central

    Koepfli, Cristian; Rodrigues, Priscila T.; Antao, Tiago; Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Van den Eede, Peter; Gamboa, Dionicia; van Hong, Nguyen; Bendezu, Jorge; Erhart, Annette; Barnadas, Céline; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Menard, Didier; Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela; Nour, Bakri Y. M.; Karunaweera, Nadira; Mueller, Ivo; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the geographically most widespread human malaria parasite. To analyze patterns of microsatellite diversity and population structure across countries of different transmission intensity, genotyping data from 11 microsatellite markers was either generated or compiled from 841 isolates from four continents collected in 1999–2008. Diversity was highest in South-East Asia (mean allelic richness 10.0–12.8), intermediate in the South Pacific (8.1–9.9) Madagascar and Sudan (7.9–8.4), and lowest in South America and Central Asia (5.5–7.2). A reduced panel of only 3 markers was sufficient to identify approx. 90% of all haplotypes in South Pacific, African and SE-Asian populations, but only 60–80% in Latin American populations, suggesting that typing of 2–6 markers, depending on the level of endemicity, is sufficient for epidemiological studies. Clustering analysis showed distinct clusters in Peru and Brazil, but little sub-structuring was observed within Africa, SE-Asia or the South Pacific. Isolates from Uzbekistan were exceptional, as a near-clonal parasite population was observed that was clearly separated from all other populations (FST>0.2). Outside Central Asia FST values were highest (0.11–0.16) between South American and all other populations, and lowest (0.04–0.07) between populations from South-East Asia and the South Pacific. These comparisons between P. vivax populations from four continents indicated that not only transmission intensity, but also geographical isolation affect diversity and population structure. However, the high effective population size results in slow changes of these parameters. This persistency must be taken into account when assessing the impact of control programs on the genetic structure of parasite populations. PMID:26125189

  19. Plasmodium vivax Diversity and Population Structure across Four Continents.

    PubMed

    Koepfli, Cristian; Rodrigues, Priscila T; Antao, Tiago; Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Van den Eede, Peter; Gamboa, Dionicia; van Hong, Nguyen; Bendezu, Jorge; Erhart, Annette; Barnadas, Céline; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Menard, Didier; Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela; Nour, Bakri Y M; Karunaweera, Nadira; Mueller, Ivo; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the geographically most widespread human malaria parasite. To analyze patterns of microsatellite diversity and population structure across countries of different transmission intensity, genotyping data from 11 microsatellite markers was either generated or compiled from 841 isolates from four continents collected in 1999-2008. Diversity was highest in South-East Asia (mean allelic richness 10.0-12.8), intermediate in the South Pacific (8.1-9.9) Madagascar and Sudan (7.9-8.4), and lowest in South America and Central Asia (5.5-7.2). A reduced panel of only 3 markers was sufficient to identify approx. 90% of all haplotypes in South Pacific, African and SE-Asian populations, but only 60-80% in Latin American populations, suggesting that typing of 2-6 markers, depending on the level of endemicity, is sufficient for epidemiological studies. Clustering analysis showed distinct clusters in Peru and Brazil, but little sub-structuring was observed within Africa, SE-Asia or the South Pacific. Isolates from Uzbekistan were exceptional, as a near-clonal parasite population was observed that was clearly separated from all other populations (FST>0.2). Outside Central Asia FST values were highest (0.11-0.16) between South American and all other populations, and lowest (0.04-0.07) between populations from South-East Asia and the South Pacific. These comparisons between P. vivax populations from four continents indicated that not only transmission intensity, but also geographical isolation affect diversity and population structure. However, the high effective population size results in slow changes of these parameters. This persistency must be taken into account when assessing the impact of control programs on the genetic structure of parasite populations.

  20. Finding faint H I structure in and around galaxies: Scraping the barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzo, D.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Roerdink, J. B. T. M.

    2016-10-01

    Soon to be operational H I survey instruments such as APERTIF and ASKAP will produce large datasets. These surveys will provide information about the H I in and around hundreds of galaxies with a typical signal-to-noise ratio of ∼10 in the inner regions and ∼1 in the outer regions. In addition, such surveys will make it possible to probe faint H I structures, typically located in the vicinity of galaxies, such as extra-planar-gas, tails and filaments. These structures are crucial for understanding galaxy evolution, particularly when they are studied in relation to the local environment. Our aim is to find optimized kernels for the discovery of faint and morphologically complex H I structures. Therefore, using H I data from a variety of galaxies, we explore state-of-the-art filtering algorithms. We show that the intensity-driven gradient filter, due to its adaptive characteristics, is the optimal choice. In fact, this filter requires only minimal tuning of the input parameters to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of faint components. In addition, it does not degrade the resolution of the high signal-to-noise component of a source. The filtering process must be fast and be embedded in an interactive visualization tool in order to support fast inspection of a large number of sources. To achieve such interactive exploration, we implemented a multi-core CPU (OpenMP) and a GPU (OpenGL) version of this filter in a 3D visualization environment (SlicerAstro).

  1. Local density maxima - Progenitors of structure. [of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Y.; Shaham, J.

    1985-01-01

    Beginning with a short review of the observational data and of some previous theoretical ideas and numerical simulations, the question is addressed of how the large-scale structure that emerges around local density maxima depends on the nature of the primordial density perturbations field. The density contrast profile around local maxima is given, to a good approximation, by the primordial two-point correlation function. The mean number density of objects of a given core mass is calculated as a function of the primordial power spectrum, p(k). In an open universe, rich clusters should have halos steeper than galactic haloes. The observed structure is found to be consistent with omega-sub-zero less than 1.0 and n = -1.

  2. Quantifying the faint structure of galaxies: the late-type spiral NGC 2403

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Michael K.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Irwin, M. J.; Arimoto, N.; Jablonka, P.

    2012-01-01

    Ground-based surveys have mapped the stellar outskirts of Local Group disc galaxies in unprecedented detail, but extending this work to other galaxies is necessary in order to overcome stochastic variations in evolutionary history and provide more stringent constraints on cosmological galaxy formation models. As part of our continuing programme of ultra-deep imagery of galaxies beyond the Local Group, we present a wide-field analysis of the isolated late-type spiral NGC 2403 using data obtained with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope. The surveyed area reaches a maximum projected radius of 30 kpc or a deprojected radius of Rdp˜ 60 kpc. The colour-magnitude diagram reaches 1.5 mag below the tip of the metal-poor red giant branch (RGB) at a completeness rate >50 per cent for Rdp > rsim 12 kpc. Using the combination of diffuse light photometry and resolved star counts, we are able to trace the radial surface brightness (SB) profile over a much larger range of radii and SB than is possible with either technique alone. The exponential disc as traced by RGB stars dominates the SB profile out to ≳8 disc scalelengths, or Rdp˜ 18 kpc, and reaches a V-band SB of μV˜ 29 mag arcsec-2. Beyond this radius, we find evidence for an extended structural component with a significantly flatter SB profile than the inner disc and which we trace to Rdp˜ 40 kpc and μV˜ 32 mag arcsec-2. This component can be fit with a power-law index of γ˜ 3, has an axial ratio consistent with that of the inner disc and has a V-band luminosity integrated over all radii of 1-7 per cent that of the whole galaxy. At Rdp˜ 20 - 30 kpc, we estimate a peak metallicity [M/H] =-1.0 ± 0.3 assuming an age of 10 Gyr and zero α-element enhancement. Although the extant data are unable to discriminate between stellar halo or thick disc interpretations of this component, our results support the notion that faint, extended stellar structures are a common feature of all disc galaxies, even isolated, low

  3. Structural and Functional Diversity of the Microbial Kinome

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Natarajan; Taylor, Susan S; Zhai, Yufeng; Venter, J. Craig; Manning, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) domain mediates the majority of signaling and coordination of complex events in eukaryotes. By contrast, most bacterial signaling is thought to occur through structurally unrelated histidine kinases, though some ePK-like kinases (ELKs) and small molecule kinases are known in bacteria. Our analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) dataset reveals that ELKs are as prevalent as histidine kinases and may play an equally important role in prokaryotic behavior. By combining GOS and public databases, we show that the ePK is just one subset of a diverse superfamily of enzymes built on a common protein kinase–like (PKL) fold. We explored this huge phylogenetic and functional space to cast light on the ancient evolution of this superfamily, its mechanistic core, and the structural basis for its observed diversity. We cataloged 27,677 ePKs and 18,699 ELKs, and classified them into 20 highly distinct families whose known members suggest regulatory functions. GOS data more than tripled the count of ELK sequences and enabled the discovery of novel families and classification and analysis of all ELKs. Comparison between and within families revealed ten key residues that are highly conserved across families. However, all but one of the ten residues has been eliminated in one family or another, indicating great functional plasticity. We show that loss of a catalytic lysine in two families is compensated by distinct mechanisms both involving other key motifs. This diverse superfamily serves as a model for further structural and functional analysis of enzyme evolution. PMID:17355172

  4. Constraints on the Cosmic Structure Formation Models from Early Formation of Giant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, H. J.; Fukugita, M.

    1996-08-01

    A recent observation of Steidel and coworkers indicates that a substantial fraction of giant galaxies were formed at an epoch as early as redshift z > 3--3.5. We show that this early formation gives strong constraints on models of cosmic structure formation. Adopting the COBE normalization for the density perturbation spectrum, we argue that the following models do not have large enough power on galactic scales to yield the observed abundance: (1) standard cold dark matter (CDM) models (where mass density Omega 0 = 1 and power index n = 1) with the Hubble constant h <~ 0.35; (2) tilted CDM models with h = 0.5 and n <~ 0.75; (3) open CDM models with h <~ 0.8 and Omega 0 <~ 0.3; and (4) mixed dark matter models with h = 0.5 and Omega nu >~ 0.2. Flat CDM models with a cosmological constant lambda 0 ~ 0.7 are consistent with the observation, provided that h >~ 0.6. Combined with constraints from large-scale structure formation, these results imply that the flat CDM model with a low Omega 0 is the one fully consistent with observations. We predict that these high-redshift galaxies are more strongly clustered today than normal galaxies.

  5. The structure of the interstellar medium of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2012-04-01

    We develop and implement numerical methods for including stellar feedback in galaxy-scale numerical simulations. Our models include simplified treatments of heating by Type I and Type II supernovae, gas recycling from young stars and asymptotic giant branch winds, heating from the shocked stellar winds, H II photoionization heating and radiation pressure from stellar photons. The energetics and time dependence associated with the feedback are taken directly from stellar evolution models. We implement these stellar feedback models in smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with pc-scale resolution, modelling galaxies from Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) like dwarfs and Milky Way (MW) analogues to massive z˜ 2 star-forming discs. In the absence of stellar feedback, gas cools rapidly and collapses without limit into dense sub-units, inconsistent with observations. By contrast, in all cases with feedback, the interstellar medium (ISM) quickly approaches a statistical steady state in which giant molecular clouds (GMCs) continuously form, disperse and re-form, leading to a multiphase ISM. In this paper, we quantify the properties of the ISM and GMCs in this self-regulated state. In a companion paper we study the galactic winds driven by stellar feedback. Our primary results on the structure of the ISM in star-forming galaxies include the following. 1. Star-forming galaxies generically self-regulate so that the cool, dense gas maintains Toomre's Q˜ 1. Most of the volume is occupied by relatively diffuse hot gas, while most of the mass is in dense GMC complexes created by self-gravity. The phase structure of the gas and the gas mass fraction at high densities are much more sensitive probes of the physics of stellar feedback than integrated quantities such as the Toomre Q or gas velocity dispersion. 2. Different stellar feedback mechanisms act on different spatial (and density) scales. Radiation pressure and H II gas pressure are critical for preventing runaway collapse

  6. Structures and chaos in galaxies. An interview with A. M. Fridman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhin, R. R.

    A. M. Fridman is one of the distinguished astrophysicists of the modern times. He with his colleagues has brought a fundamental contribution to the explanation of the observed structure and stability of the planetary rings. Basing on the laboratory modeling of the vortex motion Fridman with his colleagues has developed the appropriate technique and predicted giant vortexes in galaxies which were revealed in observations. These researches produce the remarkable examples of the nonlinear phenomena in astronomy: on the one hand - self-organization, on the other hand - chaotic behavior. The Lyapunov characteristics numbers are used for description of the chaotic dynamics phenomena, its positive value for a family of nearby trajectories implies that they follow an exponential divergence, testify to a local instability and chaotic behavior. Phenomena having regular and chaotic nature were discovered in a gaseous disk of the spiral galaxy NGC 3631.

  7. Linear structures in the core of the Coma cluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, J S; Fabian, A C; Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A A; Simionescu, A; Walker, S A; Werner, N

    2013-09-20

    The hot x-ray-emitting plasma in galaxy clusters is predicted to have turbulent motion, which can contribute around 10% of the cluster's central energy density. We report deep Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the Coma cluster core, showing the presence of quasi-linear high-density arms spanning 150 kiloparsecs, consisting of low-entropy material that was probably stripped from merging subclusters. Two appear to be connected with a subgroup of galaxies at a 650-kiloparsec radius that is merging into the cluster, implying coherence over several hundred million years. Such a long lifetime implies that strong isotropic turbulence and conduction are suppressed in the core, despite the unrelaxed state of the cluster. Magnetic fields are presumably responsible. The structures seen in Coma present insight into the past billion years of subcluster merger activity.

  8. A Structural NIR Analysis of the Interacting Pair of Galaxies KPG 404 (NGC 5394/95)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez-Gutiérrez, M.; Puerari, I.; Hernández-López, I.

    2004-06-01

    We present near infrared observations in J, H and K' passbands of the interacting pair of galaxies KPG 404 (NGC 5394/95). We calculate total magnitudes, surface brightnesses and colour profiles. We present the growth curve to compare our photometry against earlier works in which circular aperture estimations were published. We also perform a structural (disk + bulge) analysis to get insight on the morphology of the pair. The disk+bulge fit shows that NGC 5394 (KPG 404A) is more compact than normal galaxies, while NGC 5395 (KPG 404B) is less concentrated. This suggests an interacting scenario in which NGC 5394 passes through the disk of NGC 5395 (a Cartwheel-type collision), rather than a passage as M51-type pairs.

  9. 27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, A SHORT DISTANCE WEST OF D STREET ABOUT ONE-QUARTER MILE SOUTH OF 9TH AVENUE (SECTION 26). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  10. 11. CONTINUATION OF LATERAL LEAVING THE DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. CONTINUATION OF LATERAL LEAVING THE DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF LOWER DERBY LAKE (SECTION 2), SHOWING MEASURING GAUGE. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  11. Structural Diversity of Self-Assembled Iridescent Arthropod Biophotonic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranathan, Vinod Kumar; Prum, Richard O.

    2015-03-01

    Many organisms, especially arthropods, produce vivid interference colors using diverse mesoscopic (100-350 nm) integumentary biophotonic nanostructures that are increasingly being investigated for technological applications. Despite a century of interest, we lack precise structural knowledge of many biophotonic nanostructures and mechanisms controlling their development, when such knowledge can open novel biomimetic routes to facilely self-assemble tunable, multi-functional materials. Here, we use synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy to characterize the photonic nanostructure of 140 iridescent integumentary scales and setae from 127 species of terrestrial arthropods in 85 genera from 5 orders. We report a rich nanostructural diversity, including triply-periodic bicontinuous networks, close-packed spheres, inverse columnar, perforated lamellar, and disordered sponge-like morphologies, commonly observed as stable phases of amphiphilic surfactants, block copolymer, and lyotropic lipid-water systems. Diverse arthropod lineages appear to have independently evolved to utilize the self-assembly of infolding bilayer membranes to develop biophotonic nanostructures that span the phase-space of amphiphilic morphologies, but at optical length scales.

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae).

    PubMed

    Massey, L; Hamrick, J

    1998-03-01

    Using 19 allozyme loci we studied genetic diversity in 18 populations of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae) from the southeastern United States. Of the 19 loci surveyed, 17 (89.5%) were polymorphic in at least one of the populations sampled. There was considerable variation among populations in the percentage of polymorphic loci (range = 31.6-84.2%, mean = 67.6%). Similar heterogeneity among populations was observed for mean number of alleles per polymorphic locus (range = 2.0-3.0; mean = 2.48) and mean expected heterozygosity (range = 0.113-0.288; mean = 0.213). On average, 83% of the total genetic diversity was found within populations. Duplications of three allozyme loci were detected in several populations. The life-history characteristics of Y. filamentosa (a long-lived, semiwoody, predominantly outcrossing monocot with a large geographical range) may contribute to the maintenance of such high levels of genetic diversity. These results contradict expectations of the genetic structure of Y. filamentosa based on observations of the dispersal and pollination behavior of its sole pollinator, Tegeticula yuccasella, the yucca moth. PMID:21684917

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae).

    PubMed

    Massey, L; Hamrick, J

    1998-03-01

    Using 19 allozyme loci we studied genetic diversity in 18 populations of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae) from the southeastern United States. Of the 19 loci surveyed, 17 (89.5%) were polymorphic in at least one of the populations sampled. There was considerable variation among populations in the percentage of polymorphic loci (range = 31.6-84.2%, mean = 67.6%). Similar heterogeneity among populations was observed for mean number of alleles per polymorphic locus (range = 2.0-3.0; mean = 2.48) and mean expected heterozygosity (range = 0.113-0.288; mean = 0.213). On average, 83% of the total genetic diversity was found within populations. Duplications of three allozyme loci were detected in several populations. The life-history characteristics of Y. filamentosa (a long-lived, semiwoody, predominantly outcrossing monocot with a large geographical range) may contribute to the maintenance of such high levels of genetic diversity. These results contradict expectations of the genetic structure of Y. filamentosa based on observations of the dispersal and pollination behavior of its sole pollinator, Tegeticula yuccasella, the yucca moth.

  14. TIGHT CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MASSIVE GALAXY STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES AND DYNAMICS: THE MASS FUNDAMENTAL PLANE WAS IN PLACE BY z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska

    2013-12-20

    The fundamental plane (FP) is an empirical relation between the size, surface brightness, and velocity dispersion of early-type galaxies. This relation has been studied extensively for early-type galaxies in the local universe to constrain galaxy formation mechanisms. The evolution of the zero point of this plane has been extended to high redshifts to study the luminosity evolution of massive galaxies, under the assumption of structural homology. In this work, we assess this assumption by replacing surface brightness with stellar mass density and present the evolution of the ''mass FP'' for massive, quiescent galaxies since z ∼ 2. By accounting for stellar populations, we thereby isolate and trace structural and dynamical evolution. Despite the observed dramatic evolution in the sizes and morphologies of massive galaxies since z ∼ 3, we find that quiescent galaxies lie on the mass FP out to z ∼ 2. In contrast with ∼1.4 dex evolution in the luminosity FP, average residuals from the z ∼ 0 mass FP are less than ∼0.15 dex since z ∼ 2. Assuming the Hyde and Bernardi mass FP slope, we find that this minimal offset scales as (1 + z){sup –0.095} {sup ±} {sup 0.043}. This result lends credence to previous studies that derived luminosity evolution from the FP. Therefore, despite their compact sizes and suggestions that massive galaxies are more disk-like at z ∼ 2, the relationship between their dynamics and structural properties are consistent with local early-type galaxies. Finally, we find no strong evidence for a tilt of the mass FP relative to the virial plane, but emphasize the need for full models including selection biases to fully investigate this issue.

  15. CONNECTING STAR FORMATION QUENCHING WITH GALAXY STRUCTURE AND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL HEATING OF COOLING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai

    2014-12-20

    Recent observations suggested that star formation quenching in galaxies is related to galaxy structure. Here we propose a new mechanism to explain the physical origin of this correlation. We assume that while quenching is maintained in quiescent galaxies by a feedback mechanism, cooling flows in the hot halo gas can still develop intermittently. We study cooling flows in a large suite of around 90 hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated galaxy group, and find that the flow development depends significantly on the gravitational potential well in the central galaxy. If the galaxy's gravity is not strong enough, cooling flows result in a central cooling catastrophe, supplying cold gas and feeding star formation to galactic bulges. When the bulge grows prominent enough, compressional heating starts to offset radiative cooling and maintains cooling flows in a long-term hot mode without producing a cooling catastrophe. Our model thus describes a self-limited growth channel for galaxy bulges and naturally explains the connection between quenching and bulge prominence. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate that M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5} is a good structural predictor of quenching. We further find that the gravity from the central supermassive black hole also affects the bimodal fate of cooling flows, and we predict a more general quenching predictor to be M{sub bh}{sup 1.6}M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5}, which may be tested in future observational studies.

  16. Population structure and genetic diversity of moose in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer I; Hundertmark, Kris J; Bowyer, R Terry; McCracken, Kevin G

    2009-01-01

    Moose (Alces alces) are highly mobile mammals that occur across arboreal regions of North America, Europe, and Asia. Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) range across much of Alaska and are primary herbivore consumers, exerting a prominent influence on ecosystem structure and functioning. Increased knowledge gained from population genetics provides insights into their population dynamics, history, and dispersal of these unique large herbivores and can aid in conservation efforts. We examined the genetic diversity and population structure of moose (n = 141) with 8 polymorphic microsatellites from 6 regions spanning much of Alaska. Expected heterozygosity was moderate (H(E) = 0.483-0.612), and private alleles ranged from 0 to 6. Both F(ST) and R(ST) indicated significant population structure (P < 0.001) with F(ST) < 0.109 and R(ST) < 0.125. Results of analyses from STRUCTURE indicated 2 prominent population groups, a mix of moose from the Yakutat and Tetlin regions versus all other moose, with slight substructure observed among the second population. Estimates of dispersal differed between analytical approaches, indicating a high level of historical or current gene flow. Mantel tests indicated that isolation-by-distance partially explained observed structure among moose populations (R(2) = 0.45, P < 0.01). Finally, there was no evidence of bottlenecks either at the population level or overall. We conclude that weak population structure occurs among moose in Alaska with population expansion from interior Alaska westward toward the coast.

  17. Kiloparsec-scale Radio Structures in Narrow-line Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Akihiro; Nagira, Hiroshi; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Asada, Keiichi

    2012-11-01

    We report the finding of kiloparsec (kpc)-scale radio structures in three radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimeters of the Very Large Array, which increases the number of known radio-loud NLS1s with kpc-scale structures to six, including two γ-ray-emitting NLS1s (PMN J0948+0022 and 1H 0323+342) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The detection rate of extended radio emissions in NLS1s is lower than that in broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with a statistical significance. We found both core-dominated (blazar-like) and lobe-dominated (radio-galaxy-like) radio structures in these six NLS1s, which can be understood in the framework of the unified scheme of radio-loud AGNs that considers radio galaxies as non-beamed parent populations of blazars. Five of the six NLS1s have (1) extended radio luminosities suggesting jet kinetic powers of >~ 1044 erg s-1, which is sufficient to make jets escape from hosts' dense environments; (2) black holes of >~ 107 M ⊙, which can generate the necessary jet powers from near-Eddington mass accretion; and (3) two-sided radio structures at kpc scales, requiring expansion rates of ~0.01c-0.3c and kinematic ages of >~ 107 years. On the other hand, most typical NLS1s would be driven by black holes of <~ 107 M ⊙ in a limited lifetime of ~107 years. Hence, the kpc-scale radio structures may originate in a small window of opportunity during the final stage of the NLS1 phase just before growing into broad-line AGNs.

  18. KILOPARSEC-SCALE RADIO STRUCTURES IN NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Akihiro; Kino, Motoki; Nagira, Hiroshi; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Nagai, Hiroshi; Asada, Keiichi

    2012-11-20

    We report the finding of kiloparsec (kpc)-scale radio structures in three radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimeters of the Very Large Array, which increases the number of known radio-loud NLS1s with kpc-scale structures to six, including two {gamma}-ray-emitting NLS1s (PMN J0948+0022 and 1H 0323+342) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The detection rate of extended radio emissions in NLS1s is lower than that in broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with a statistical significance. We found both core-dominated (blazar-like) and lobe-dominated (radio-galaxy-like) radio structures in these six NLS1s, which can be understood in the framework of the unified scheme of radio-loud AGNs that considers radio galaxies as non-beamed parent populations of blazars. Five of the six NLS1s have (1) extended radio luminosities suggesting jet kinetic powers of {approx}> 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}, which is sufficient to make jets escape from hosts' dense environments; (2) black holes of {approx}> 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }, which can generate the necessary jet powers from near-Eddington mass accretion; and (3) two-sided radio structures at kpc scales, requiring expansion rates of {approx}0.01c-0.3c and kinematic ages of {approx}> 10{sup 7} years. On the other hand, most typical NLS1s would be driven by black holes of {approx}< 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun} in a limited lifetime of {approx}10{sup 7} years. Hence, the kpc-scale radio structures may originate in a small window of opportunity during the final stage of the NLS1 phase just before growing into broad-line AGNs.

  19. Structural basis of diverse membrane target recognitions by ankyrins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Keyu; Ye, Fei; Yu, Cong; Bennett, Vann; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-01-01

    Ankyrin adaptors together with their spectrin partners coordinate diverse ion channels and cell adhesion molecules within plasma membrane domains and thereby promote physiological activities including fast signaling in the heart and nervous system. Ankyrins specifically bind to numerous membrane targets through their 24 ankyrin repeats (ANK repeats), although the mechanism for the facile and independent evolution of these interactions has not been resolved. Here we report the structures of ANK repeats in complex with an inhibitory segment from the C-terminal regulatory domain and with a sodium channel Nav1.2 peptide, respectively, showing that the extended, extremely conserved inner groove spanning the entire ANK repeat solenoid contains multiple target binding sites capable of accommodating target proteins with very diverse sequences via combinatorial usage of these sites. These structures establish a framework for understanding the evolution of ankyrins' membrane targets, with implications for other proteins containing extended ANK repeat domains. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04353.001 PMID:25383926

  20. Structure, Function and Diversity of the Healthy Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the human microbiome have revealed that even healthy individuals differ remarkably in the microbes that occupy habitats such as the gut, skin, and vagina. Much of this diversity remains unexplained, although diet, environment, host genetics, and early microbial exposure have all been implicated. Accordingly, to characterize the ecology of human-associated microbial communities, the Human Microbiome Project has analyzed the largest cohort and set of distinct, clinically relevant body habitats to date. We found the diversity and abundance of each habitat’s signature microbes to vary widely even among healthy subjects, with strong niche specialization both within and among individuals. The project encountered an estimated 81–99% of the genera, enzyme families, and community configurations occupied by the healthy Western microbiome. Metagenomic carriage of metabolic pathways was stable among individuals despite variation in community structure, and ethnic/racial background proved to be one of the strongest associations of both pathways and microbes with clinical metadata. These results thus delineate the range of structural and functional configurations normal in the microbial communities of a healthy population, enabling future characterization of the epidemiology, ecology, and translational applications of the human microbiome. PMID:22699609

  1. STRUCTURE IN THE 3D GALAXY DISTRIBUTION. II. VOIDS AND WATERSHEDS OF LOCAL MAXIMA AND MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D. E-mail: PGazis@sbcglobal.net

    2015-01-20

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  2. Structure in the 3D Galaxy Distribution. II. Voids and Watersheds of Local Maxima and Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  3. Unveiling the structure of barred galaxies at 3.6 μm with the Spitzer survey of stellar structure in galaxies (S{sup 4}G). I. Disk breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Sheth, Kartik; Madore, Barry F.; Ho, Luis C.; Elmegreen, Bruce; Knapen, Johan H.; Cisternas, Mauricio; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Zaritsky, Dennis; Comerón, Sébastien; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Holwerda, Benne; Hinz, Joannah L.; Buta, Ron; and others

    2014-02-20

    We have performed two-dimensional multicomponent decomposition of 144 local barred spiral galaxies using 3.6 μm images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Our model fit includes up to four components (bulge, disk, bar, and a point source) and, most importantly, takes into account disk breaks. We find that ignoring the disk break and using a single disk scale length in the model fit for Type II (down-bending) disk galaxies can lead to differences of 40% in the disk scale length, 10% in bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T), and 25% in bar-to-total luminosity ratios. We find that for galaxies with B/T ≥ 0.1, the break radius to bar radius, r {sub br}/R {sub bar}, varies between 1 and 3, but as a function of B/T the ratio remains roughly constant. This suggests that in bulge-dominated galaxies the disk break is likely related to the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar and thus moves outward as the bar grows. For galaxies with small bulges, B/T < 0.1, r {sub br}/R {sub bar} spans a wide range from 1 to 6. This suggests that the mechanism that produces the break in these galaxies may be different from that in galaxies with more massive bulges. Consistent with previous studies, we conclude that disk breaks in galaxies with small bulges may originate from bar resonances that may be also coupled with the spiral arms, or be related to star formation thresholds.

  4. The structure and environment of young stellar clusters in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, S. S.

    2004-03-01

    A search for stellar clusters has been carried out in 18 nearby spiral galaxies, using archive images from the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. All of the galaxies have previously been imaged from the ground in UBVI. A catalogue of structural parameters, photometry and comments based on visual inspection of the clusters is compiled and used to investigate correlations between cluster structure, environment, age and mass. Least-squares fits to the data suggest correlations between both the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and half-light radius (Reff) of the clusters and their masses (M) at about the 3σ level. Although both relations show a large scatter, the fits have substantially shallower slopes than for a constant-density relation (size ∝ M1/3). However, many of the youngest clusters have extended halos which make the Reff determinations uncertain. There is no evidence for galaxy-to-galaxy variations in the mean cluster sizes. In particular, the mean sizes do not appear to depend on the host galaxy star formation rate surface density. Many of the youngest objects (age < 107 years) are located in strongly crowded regions, and about 1/3-1/2 of them are double or multiple sources. The HST images are also used to check the nature of cluster candidates identified in a previous ground-based survey. The contamination rate in the ground-based sample is generally less than about 20%, but some cluster identifications remain ambiguous because of crowding even with HST imaging, especially for the youngest objects. Full Tables \\ref{tab:all}-\\ref{tab:hstphot}, and \\ref{tab:gb} are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/416/537 Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in

  5. Dissecting simulated disc galaxies - I. The structure of mono-age populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martig, Marie; Minchev, Ivan; Flynn, Chris

    2014-08-01

    We study seven simulated disc galaxies, three with a quiescent merger history, and four with mergers in their last 9 Gyr of evolution. We compare their structure at z = 0 by decomposing them into `mono-age populations' (MAPs) of stars within 500 Myr age bins. All studied galaxies undergo a phase of merging activity at high redshift, so that stars older than 9 Gyr are found in a centrally concentrated component, while younger stars are mostly found in discs. We find that most MAPs have simple exponential radial and vertical density profiles, with a scaleheight that typically increases with age. Because a large range of merger histories can create populations with simple structures, this suggests that the simplicity of the structure of mono-abundance populations observed in the Milky Way by Bovy et al. is not necessarily a direct indicator of a quiescent history for the Milky Way. Similarly, the anticorrelation between scalelength and scaleheight does not necessarily imply a merger-free history. However, mergers produce discontinuities between thin and thick disc components, and jumps in the age-velocity relation. The absence of a structural discontinuity between thin and thick disc observed in the Milky Way would seem to be a good indicator that no merger with a mass ratio larger than 1:15-1:10 occurred in the last 9 Gyr. Mergers at higher redshift might nevertheless be necessary to produce the thickest, hottest components of the Milky Way's disc.

  6. Galaxy Assembly and the Evolution of Structure over the First Third of Cosmic Time - I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey {CANDELS}is designed to document the |*|rst third of galactic evolution from z =8 to 1.5 via deep imaging of more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IRand ACS. It will also find the first Type Ia SNe beyond z > 1.5 andestablish their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Fivepremier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected from the SpitzerExtragalactic Deep Survey {SEDS} to provide complementary IRAC imagingdata down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource for stellar masses at allredshifts. The use of |*|ve widely separated |*|elds mitigates cosmicvariance and yields statistically robust and complete samples ofgalaxies down to 10^9 solar masses out to z 8.The program merges two originally separate MCT proposals. The Faberprogram incorporates a |*|Wide|*| imaging survey in three separate fieldsto 2 orbit depth over 0.2 sq. degrees, plus a |*|Deep|*| imaging surveyto 12 orbit depth in the two GOODS regions over 0.04 sq. degrees.In combination with ultra-deep imaging from the Hubble Ultradeep Fieldprogram {GO 11563}, the result is a three-tiered strategy that ef|*|cientlysamples both bright/rare and faint/common extragalactic objects. TheFerguson program adds an extensive high-redshift Type Ia SNe search,plus ultraviolet "daytime" UVIS exposures in GOODS-N to exploit theCVZ opportunity in that field.This program, GO 12064, is part of the Wide mosaic survey, which has thefollowing field centers and sizes: Field ID RA{2000} Dec{2000} WFC3 Dim. PA on sky UDS 02 17 38 -05 12 02 4x11 270 COSMOS 10 00 31 +02 24 00 4x11 180 EGS 14 19 31 +52 54 10 3x15 41 Science highlights from the Wide program: * Underlying structural properties of galaxies as revealed by WFC3-IR images sensitive to older stars {beyond the 4000-A break} and less affected by dust than ACS. A key redshift is z 2, where star-formation peaks, QSOs are most abundant, and where restframe B-band is still accessible to WFC3. Sample questions include

  7. STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF NON-SPHERICAL DARK HALOS IN MILKY WAY AND ANDROMEDA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kohei; Chiba, Masashi E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the non-spherical density structure of dark halos of the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies in the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies based on revised axisymmetric mass models from our previous work. The models we adopt here fully take into account velocity anisotropy of tracer stars confined within a flattened dark halo. Applying our models to the available kinematic data of the 12 bright dSphs, we find that these galaxies associate with, in general, elongated dark halos, even considering the effect of this velocity anisotropy of stars. We also find that the best-fit parameters, especially for the shapes of dark halos and velocity anisotropy, are susceptible to both the availability of velocity data in the outer regions and the effect of the lack of sample stars in each spatial bin. Thus, to obtain more realistic limits on dark halo structures, we require photometric and kinematic data over much larger areas in the dSphs than previously explored. The results obtained from the currently available data suggest that the shapes of dark halos in the dSphs are more elongated than those of ΛCDM subhalos. This mismatch needs to be solved by theory including baryon components and the associated feedback to dark halos as well as by further observational limits in larger areas of dSphs. It is also found that more diffuse dark halos may have undergone consecutive star formation history, thereby implying that dark-halo structure plays an important role in star formation activity.

  8. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; H. Tageldin, Mohammed.; Weir, William; Al-Fahdi, Amira; Johnson, Eugene H.; Bobade, Patrick; Alqamashoui, Badar; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Thompson, Joanne; Kinnaird, Jane; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Babiker, Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Background Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle. Methods Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites) representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman. Results We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia). A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST

  9. The complex structure of Abell 2345: a galaxy cluster with non-symmetric radio relics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschin, W.; Barrena, R.; Girardi, M.

    2010-10-01

    Context. The connection of cluster mergers with the presence of extended, diffuse radio sources in galaxy clusters is still debated. Aims: We aim to obtain new insights into the internal dynamics of the cluster Abell 2345. This cluster exhibits two non-symmetric radio relics well studied through recent, deep radio data. Methods: Our analysis is based on redshift data for 125 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and on new photometric data acquired at the Isaac Newton Telescope. We also use ROSAT/HRI archival X-ray data. We combine galaxy velocities and positions to select 98 cluster galaxies and analyze the internal dynamics of the cluster. Results: We estimate a mean redshift < z > = 0.1789 and a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion σV ~ 1070 km s-1. The two-dimensional galaxy distribution reveals the presence of three significant peaks within a region of ~1 h70-1 Mpc (the E, NW, and SW peaks). The spectroscopic catalog confirms the presence of these three clumps. The SW and NW clumps have similar mean velocities, while the E clump has a larger mean velocity (Δ Vrf ~ 800 km s-1); this structure causes the presence of the two peaks we find in the cluster velocity distribution. The difficulty in separating the galaxy clumps leads to a very uncertain mass estimate M ~ 2 × 1015 h70-1 M⊙. Moreover, the E clump well coincides with the main mass peak as recovered from the weak gravitational lensing analysis and is off-set to the east from the BCG by ~1.3´. The ROSAT X-ray data also show a very complex structure, mainly elongated in the E-W direction, with two (likely three) peaks in the surface brightness distribution, which, however, are off-set from the position of the peaks in the galaxy density. The observed phenomenology agrees with the hypothesis that we are looking at a complex cluster merger occurring along two directions: a major merger along the ~E-W direction (having a component along the LOS) and a minor merger in the western cluster

  10. A long-term space astrophysics research program: An x-ray perspective of the components and structure of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray studies of galaxies by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and MIT are described. Activities at SAO include ROSAT PSPC x-ray data reduction and analysis pipeline; x-ray sources in nearby Sc galaxies; optical, x-ray, and radio study of ongoing galactic merger; a radio, far infrared, optical, and x-ray study of the Sc galaxy NGC247; and a multiparametric analysis of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies. Activities at MIT included continued analysis of observations with ROSAT and ASCA, and continued development of new approaches to spectral analysis with ASCA and AXAF. Also, a new method for characterizing structure in galactic clusters was developed and applied to ROSAT images of a large sample of clusters. An appendix contains preprints generated by the research.

  11. REES-SCIAMA EFFECT AND IMPACT OF FOREGROUND STRUCTURES ON GALAXY REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan Hu

    2011-10-10

    We estimate the Rees-Sciama (RS) effect of super structures on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuations and identify a related effect on galaxy redshifts. By numerically solving the geodesic equation, we find that both superclusters and supervoids can decrease the temperature of the CMB by several micro Kelvin in the central region and increase the temperature slightly in the surrounding area due to the RS effect. The two components of the RS effect, redshift and gravitational time delay, largely cancel each other, leaving an equivalent but much smaller effect on the CMB photons that started out at the same time from the distorted last scattering surface. For galaxies, the time delay effect is separable from the redshift effect, and the slight change to the redshift induced by super structures can be at the percent level of large-scale rms bulk velocities, which might only be detected statistically. On much smaller scales, a tiny redshift difference between two images of a strongly lensed source should exist in general, which is related to the Hubble expansion rate at the source redshift. However, as Loeb pointed out, observational issues and the proper motion of the structure would make such a measurement impossible.

  12. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking.

    PubMed

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  13. Dark energy and the structure of the Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Byrd, G. G.; Merafina, M.

    2013-05-01

    Context. We consider the Coma cluster of galaxies as a gravitationally bound physical system embedded in the perfectly uniform static dark energy background as implied by ΛCDM cosmology. Aims: We ask if the density of dark energy is high enough to affect the structure of a large and rich cluster of galaxies. Methods: We base our work on recent observational data on the Coma cluster, and apply our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy, including the zero-gravity radius RZG of the local force field as the key parameter. Results: 1) Three masses are defined that characterize the structure of a regular cluster: the matter mass MM, the dark-energy effective mass MDE (<0), and the gravitating mass MG (=MM + MDE). 2) A new matter-density profile is suggested that reproduces the observational data well for the Coma cluster in the radius range from 1.4 Mpc to 14 Mpc and takes the dark energy background into account. 3) Using this profile, we calculate upper limits for the total size of the Coma cluster, R ≤ RZG ≈ 20 Mpc, and its total matter mass, MM ≲ MM(RZG) = 6.2 × 1015 M⊙. Conclusions: The dark energy antigravity affects the structure of the Coma cluster strongly at large radii R ≳ 14 Mpc and should be considered when its total mass is derived.

  14. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  15. Sponge derived bromotyrosines: structural diversity through natural combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Hendrik; Marmann, Andreas; Lin, Wenhan; Proksch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Sponge derived bromotyrosines are a multifaceted class of marine bioactive compounds that are important for the chemical defense of sponges but also for drug discovery programs as well as for technical applications in the field of antifouling constituents. These compounds, which are mainly accumulated by Verongid sponges, exhibit a diverse range of bioactivities including antibiotic, cytotoxic and antifouling effects. In spite of the simple biogenetic building blocks, which consist only of brominated tyrosine and tyramine units, an impressive diversity of different compounds is obtained through different linkages between these precursors and through structural modifications of the side chains and/or aromatic rings resembling strategies that are known from combinatorial chemistry. As examples for bioactive, structurally divergent bromotyrosines psammaplin A, Aplysina alkaloids featuring aerothionin, aeroplysinin-1 and the dienone, and the bastadins, including the synthetically derived hemibastadin congeners, have been selected for this review. Whereas all of these natural products are believed to be involved in the chemical defense of sponges, some of them may also be of particular relevance to drug discovery due to their interaction with specific molecular targets in eukaryotic cells. These targets involve important enzymes and receptors, such as histone deacetylases (HDAC) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), which are inhibited by psammaplin A, as well as ryanodine receptors that are targeted by bastadine type compounds. The hemibastadins such as the synthetically derived dibromohemibastadin are of particular interest due to their antifouling activity. For the latter, a phenoloxidase which catalyzes the bioglue formation needed for firm attachment of fouling organisms to a given substrate was identified as a molecular target. The Aplysina alkaloids finally provide a vivid example for dynamic wound induced bioconversions of natural products that generate highly

  16. Community structure and elevational diversity patterns of soil Acidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuguang; Cong, Jing; Lu, Hui; Li, Guangliang; Qu, Yuanyuan; Su, Xiujiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang

    2014-08-01

    Acidobacteria is one of the most dominant and abundant phyla in soil, and was believed to have a wide range of metabolic and genetic functions. Relatively little is known about its community structure and elevational diversity patterns. We selected four elevation gradients from 1000 to 2800 m with typical vegetation types of the northern slope of Shennongjia Mountain in central China. The vegetation types were evergreen broadleaved forest, deciduous broadleaved forest, coniferous forest and sub-alpine shrubs. We analyzed the soil acidobacterial community composition, elevational patterns and the relationship between Acidobacteria subdivisions and soil enzyme activities by using the 16S rRNA meta-sequencing technique and multivariate statistical analysis. The result found that 19 known subdivisions as well as an unclassified phylotype were presented in these forest sites, and Subdivision 6 has the highest number of detectable operational taxonomic units (OTUs). A significant single peak distribution pattern (P<0.05) between the OTU number and the elevation was observed. The Jaccard and Bray-Curtis index analysis showed that the soil Acidobacteria compositional similarity significantly decreased (P<0.01) with the increase in elevation distance. Mantel test analysis showed the most of the soil Acidobacteria subdivisions had the significant relationship (P<0.01) with different soil enzymes. Therefore, soil Acidobacteria may be involved in different ecosystem functions in global elemental cycles. Partial Mantel tests and CCA analysis showed that soil pH, soil temperature and plant diversity may be the key factors in shaping the soil Acidobacterial community structure.

  17. Genetic Structure and Diversity in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed Central

    Garris, Amanda J.; Tai, Thomas H.; Coburn, Jason; Kresovich, Steve; McCouch, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The population structure of domesticated species is influenced by the natural history of the populations of predomesticated ancestors, as well as by the breeding system and complexity of the breeding practices exercised by humans. Within Oryza sativa, there is an ancient and well-established divergence between the two major subspecies, indica and japonica, but finer levels of genetic structure are suggested by the breeding history. In this study, a sample of 234 accessions of rice was genotyped at 169 nuclear SSRs and two chloroplast loci. The data were analyzed to resolve the genetic structure and to interpret the evolutionary relationships between groups. Five distinct groups were detected, corresponding to indica, aus, aromatic, temperate japonica, and tropical japonica rices. Nuclear and chloroplast data support a closer evolutionary relationship between the indica and the aus and among the tropical japonica, temperate japonica, and aromatic groups. Group differences can be explained through contrasting demographic histories. With the availability of rice genome sequence, coupled with a large collection of publicly available genetic resources, it is of interest to develop a population-based framework for the molecular analysis of diversity in O. sativa. PMID:15654106

  18. Diverse plasma populations and structures in Jupiter's magnetotail.

    PubMed

    McComas, D J; Allegrini, F; Bagenal, F; Crary, F; Ebert, R W; Elliott, H; Stern, A; Valek, P

    2007-10-12

    Jupiter's magnetotail is the largest cohesive structure in the solar system and marks the loss of vast numbers of heavy ions from the Jupiter system. The New Horizons spacecraft traversed the magnetotail to distances exceeding 2500 jovian radii (R(J)) and revealed a remarkable diversity of plasma populations and structures throughout its length. Ions evolve from a hot plasma disk distribution at approximately 100 R(J) to slower, persistent flows down the tail that become increasingly variable in flux and mean energy. The plasma is highly structured-exhibiting sharp breaks, smooth variations, and apparent plasmoids-and contains ions from both Io and Jupiter's ionosphere with intense bursts of H(+) and H(+)(3). Quasi-periodic changes were seen in flux at approximately 450 and approximately 1500 R(J) with a 10-hour period. Other variations in flow speed at approximately 600 to 1000 R(J) with a 3- to 4-day period may be attributable to plasmoids moving down the tail. PMID:17932282

  19. Diverse plasma populations and structures in Jupiter's magnetotail.

    PubMed

    McComas, D J; Allegrini, F; Bagenal, F; Crary, F; Ebert, R W; Elliott, H; Stern, A; Valek, P

    2007-10-12

    Jupiter's magnetotail is the largest cohesive structure in the solar system and marks the loss of vast numbers of heavy ions from the Jupiter system. The New Horizons spacecraft traversed the magnetotail to distances exceeding 2500 jovian radii (R(J)) and revealed a remarkable diversity of plasma populations and structures throughout its length. Ions evolve from a hot plasma disk distribution at approximately 100 R(J) to slower, persistent flows down the tail that become increasingly variable in flux and mean energy. The plasma is highly structured-exhibiting sharp breaks, smooth variations, and apparent plasmoids-and contains ions from both Io and Jupiter's ionosphere with intense bursts of H(+) and H(+)(3). Quasi-periodic changes were seen in flux at approximately 450 and approximately 1500 R(J) with a 10-hour period. Other variations in flow speed at approximately 600 to 1000 R(J) with a 3- to 4-day period may be attributable to plasmoids moving down the tail.

  20. Hα3: an Hα imaging survey of HI selected galaxies from ALFALFA. IV. Structure of galaxies in the Local and Coma superclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, M.; Gavazzi, G.; Savorgnan, G.; Fumagalli, M.; Boselli, A.; Gutiérrez, L.; Hernández Toledo, H.; Giovanelli, R.; Haynes, M. P.

    2013-05-01

    Context. We present the analysis of the galaxy structural parameters from Hα3, an Hα narrow-band imaging follow-up survey of ~800 galaxies selected from the HI Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA) in the Local supercluster, including the Virgo cluster, and in the Coma supercluster. Aims: Taking advantage of Hα3, which provides the complete census of the recent star-forming, HI-rich galaxies in the local universe, we aim to investigate the structural parameters of the young (<10 Myr) and the old (>1 Gyr) stellar populations. By comparing the sizes of these stellar components, we investigated the spatial scale on which galaxies are growing at the present cosmological epoch and the role of the environment in quenching the star-formation activity. Methods: We computed the concentration, asymmetry, and clumpiness (CAS) structural parameters for recently born and old stars. To quantify the sizes we computed half-light radii and a new parameter dubbed EW/r based on the half-light radius of the Hα equivalent width map. To highlight the environmental perturbation, we adopt an updated calibration of the HI-deficiency parameter (DefHI) that we use to divide the sample in unperturbed galaxies (DefHI ≤ 0.3) and perturbed galaxies (DefHI > 0.3). Results: The concentration index computed in the r band depends on the stellar mass and on the Hubble type these variables are related because most massive galaxies are bulge dominated therefore highly concentrated. Going toward later spirals and irregulars the concentration index and the mass decrease along with the bulge-to-disk ratio. Blue compact dwarfs (BCDs) are an exception because they have similar mass, but they are more concentrated than dwarf irregulars. The asymmetry and the clumpiness increase along the spiral sequence up to Sc-Sd, but they decrease going in the dwarf regime, where the light distribution is smooth and more symmetric. When measured on Hα images, the CAS parameters show no obvious correlations with

  1. Structure and diversity in mammalian accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Meisami, E; Bhatnagar, K P

    1998-12-15

    The accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) is the first neural integrative center for the olfactory-like vomeronasal sensory system. In this article, we first briefly present an overview of vomeronasal system organization and review the history of the discovery of mammalian AOB. Next, we briefly review the evolution of the vomeronasal system in vertebrates, in particular the reptiles. Following these introductory aspects, the structure of the rodent AOB, as typical of the well-developed mammalian AOB, is presented, detailing laminar organization and cell types as well as aspects of the homology with the main olfactory bulb. Then, the evolutionary origin and diversity of the AOB in mammalian orders and species is discussed, describing structural, phylogenetic, and species-specific variation in the AOB location, shape, and size and morphologic differentiation and development. The AOB is believed to be absent in fishes but present in terrestrial tetrapods including amphibians; among the reptiles AOB is absent in crocodiles, present in turtles, snakes, and some lizards where it may be as large or larger than the main bulb. The AOB is absent in bird and in the aquatic mammals (whales, porpoises, manatees). Among other mammals, AOB is present in the monotremes and marsupials, edentates, and in the majority of the placental mammals like carnivores, herbivores, as well as rodents and lagomorphs. Most bat species do not have an AOB and among those where one is found, it shows marked variation in size and morphologic development. Among insectivores and primates, AOB shows marked variation in occurrence, size, and morphologic development. It is small in shrews and moles, large in hedgehogs and prosimians; AOB continues to persist in New World monkeys but is not found in the adults of the higher primates such as the Old World monkeys, apes, and humans. In many species where AOB is absent in the adult, it often develops in the embryo and fetus but regresses in later stages of

  2. Structural and Functional Diversity of Estrogen Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptors, comprised of ERα and ERβ isoforms in mammals, act as ligand-modulated transcription factors and orchestrate a plethora of cellular functions from sexual development and reproduction to metabolic homeostasis. Herein, I revisit the structural basis of the binding of ERα to DNA and estradiol in light of the recent discoveries and emerging trends in the field of nuclear receptors. A particular emphasis of this review is on the chemical and structural diversity of an ever-increasing repertoire of physiological, environmental and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors that ultimately modulate their interactions with cognate DNA located within the promoters of estrogen-responsive genes. In particular, modulation of estrogen receptors by small molecule ligands represents an important therapeutic goal toward the treatment of a wide variety of human pathologies including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and obesity. Collectively, this article provides an overview of a wide array of small organic and inorganic molecules that can fine-tune the physiological function of estrogen receptors, thereby bearing a direct impact on human health and disease. PMID:25866274

  3. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Ofelia Andrea; Sánchez-Sánchez, Odilón; Pérez-Vázquez, Arturo; Caplan, Joshua S.; Danjon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots). The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14 ± 5% (mean ± standard deviation). Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil. PMID:23844412

  4. Glycoconjugates from parasitic helminths: structure diversity and immunobiological implications.

    PubMed

    Khoo, K H; Dell, A

    2001-01-01

    We have provided an account of the progress we and others have made over the last decade on the structural characterization of glycans from parasitic helminths. We hope to have illustrated a few principles and patterns governing helminth glycosylation, as well as the experimental approaches adopted and their associated strengths and limitations. Schistosomes remain the best studied systems but are still punctuated with gaps of knowledge. An important theme developed here is the regulated developmental stage-specific expression of various glycan epitopes and their interplay with immediate host environments for successful parasitism. It is anticipated that more novel or unusual structures will continuously be uncovered in the future and that despite many difficulties, current analytical techniques should be well up to meet the challenge in at least elucidating the major or key glycoconjugates from each of the diverse range of worms. The bottle neck will in fact reside in finding suitable experimental models to test their putative immunobiological functions from which the intricate host-parasite interactions can be delineated and rational vaccine design be achieved. The glycobiology of parasitic helminths is an area waiting to be more fully explored and the rewards should be sweet. PMID:14533799

  5. Diversity and genetic structure among subpopulations of Gossypium mustelinum (Malvaceae).

    PubMed

    Alves, M F; Barroso, P A V; Ciampi, A Y; Hoffmann, L V; Azevedo, V C R; Cavalcante, U

    2013-02-27

    Gossypium mustelinum is the only cotton species native to Brazil; it is endemic to the semi-arid region of the northeast. The populations are found near perennial and semi-perennial sources of water, such as ponds or pools in intermittent streams. Problems with in situ conservation derive from human interference in its habitat, mainly because of excessive cattle grazing and deforestation. Establishing efficient strategies for in situ conservation requires knowledge of the genetic structure of the populations. We evaluated the structure and genetic variability of populations of G. mustelinum in the Tocó and Capivara Rivers (State of Bahia). Two hundred and eighteen mature G. mustelinum plants were genotyped with SSR markers. The molecular data were used to estimate the allelic frequencies, the heterozygosity, the F statistics, and the genetic distance among the populations and among individuals. We found high genetic diversity among the populations. The FST indexes for each population were also high and strongly correlated with physical distance. The high estimated level of endogamy and the low observed heterozygosity are indicative that the populations reproduce mainly by self-fertilization and crosses between related individuals. Consequently, strategies for in situ preservation should include at least three occurrence sites of G. mustelinum from each population. For ex situ conservation, the collections should include as many sites as possible.

  6. Genetic Diversity of Coastal Bottlenose Dolphins Revealed by Structurally and Functionally Diverse Hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Remington, Nicole; Stevens, Robert D.; Wells, Randall S.; Hohn, Aleta; Dhungana, Suraj; Taboy, Celine H.; Crumbliss, Alvin L.; Henkens, Robert; Bonaventura, Celia

    2007-01-01

    Studies of structure-function relationships in the respiratory proteins of marine mammals revealed unexpected variations in the number and types of hemoglobins (Hbs) present in coastal bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus. We obtained blood samples from free-ranging coastal bottlenose dolphins as a component of capture-release studies. We found that the oxygen-binding functions of bottlenose dolphin blood are poised between effector-saturated and unsaturated levels, enabling exercise-dependent shifts in oxygen transfer functions. Isolated bottlenose dolphin Hbs showed elevated pH sensitivities (Bohr effects) and appreciably lower oxygen affinities than adult human Hb in the absence of allosteric effectors. These properties may be an adaptive modification that enhance oxygen delivery during diving episodes when oxygen tensions and effector levels are low. The Hbs of individual dolphins showed similar oxygen affinities, responses to effectors, and expression of heme-heme interaction in oxygen binding, but differed in their redox potentials and rates of autoxidation. The heterogeneity suggested by these functional variations in Hbs of individual dolphins was born out by variations in the molecular weights and numbers of their α and β globin chains. Although coastal bottlenose dolphins were expected to have a single type of Hb, the mass differences observed revealed considerable genetic diversity. There were multiple Hb forms in some individuals and differences in Hb patterns among individuals within the same community. PMID:17604574

  7. VII Zw 403: H I STRUCTURE IN A BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Caroline E.; Ashley, Trisha; Hunter, Deidre A.; Nordgren, Tyler E.; Brinks, Elias; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Lynds, Roger; O'Neil, Earl J.; McIntyre, Vince J.; Oestlin, Goeran; Westpfahl, David J.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2011-09-15

    We present optical (UBVJ), ultraviolet (FUV, NUV), and high-resolution atomic hydrogen (H I) observations of the nearby blue compact dwarf (BCD), VII Zw 403. We find that VII Zw 403 has a relatively high H I mass-to-light ratio for a BCD. The rotation velocity is nominally 10-15 km s{sup -1}, but rises to {approx}20 km s{sup -1} after correction for the {approx}8-10 km s{sup -1} random motions present in the gas. The velocity field is complex, including a variation in the position angle of the major axis going from the northeast to the southwest parts of the galaxy. Our high-resolution H I maps reveal structure in the central gas, including a large, low-density H I depression or hole between the southern and northern halves of the galaxy, coincident with an unresolved X-ray source. Although interactions have been proposed as the triggering mechanism for the vigorous star formation occurring in BCDs, VII Zw 403 does not seem to have been tidally triggered by an external interaction, as we have found no nearby possible perturbers. It also does not appear to fall in the set of galaxies that exhibit a strong central mass density concentration, as its optical scale length is large in comparison to similar systems. However, there are some features that are compatible with an accretion event: optical/H I axis misalignment, a change in position angle of the kinematic axis, and a complex velocity field.

  8. Horizon Run 4 Simulation: Coupled Evolution of Galaxies and Large-Scale Structures of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhan; Park, Changbom; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Hong, Sungwook E.

    2015-08-01

    The Horizon Run 4 is a cosmological N-body simulation designed for the study of coupled evolution between galaxies and large-scale structures of the Universe, and for the test of galaxy formation models. Using 6300^3 gravitating particles in a cubic box of L_{box} = 3150 h^{-1} Mpc, we build a dense forest of halo merger trees to trace the halo merger history with a halo mass resolution scale down to M_s = 2.7 × 10^{11} h^{-1} M_⊙. We build a set of particle and halo data, which can serve as testbeds for comparison of cosmological models and gravitational theories with observations. We find that the FoF halo mass function shows a substantial deviation from the universal form with tangible redshift evolution of amplitude and shape. At higher redshifts, the amplitude of the mass function is lower, and the functional form is shifted toward larger values of ln (1/σ). We also find that the baryonic acoustic oscillation feature in the two-point correlation funct-ion of mock galaxies becomes broader with a peak position moving to smaller scales and the peak amplitude decreasing for increasing directional cosine mu compared to the linear predictions. From the halo merger trees built from halo data at 75 redshifts, we measure the half-mass epoch of halos and find that less massive halos tend to reach half of their current mass at higher redshifts. Simulation outputs including snapshot data, past lightcone space data, and halo merger data are available at http://sdss.kias.re.kr/astro/Horizon-Run4

  9. An assessment of the impact of water impoundment and diversion structures on vegetation in Southern Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conn, J. S.; Mouat, D. A.; Clark, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    High-altitude color infrared photography was used to survey existing conditions, both upstream and downstream, from nineteen diversion structures in Southern Arizona to determine their effect upon vegetation health, vigor, and cover. A diversion structure is defined as a man/made feature constructed to control storm runoff. The results are used to determine the policy for future structure design.

  10. Catalogue of the morphological features in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Endoqui, M.; Díaz-García, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.

    2015-10-01

    Context. A catalogue of the features for the complete Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G), including 2352 nearby galaxies, is presented. The measurements are made using 3.6 μm images, largely tracing the old stellar population; at this wavelength the effects of dust are also minimal. The measured features are the sizes, ellipticities, and orientations of bars, rings, ringlenses, and lenses. Measured in a similar manner are also barlenses (lens-like structures embedded in the bars), which are not lenses in the usual sense, being rather the more face-on counterparts of the boxy/peanut structures in the edge-on view. In addition, pitch angles of spiral arm segments are measured for those galaxies where they can be reliably traced. More than one pitch angle may appear for a single galaxy. All measurements are made in a human-supervised manner so that attention is paid to each galaxy. Aims: We create a catalogue of morphological features in the complete S4G. Methods: We used isophotal analysis, unsharp masking, and fitting ellipses to measured structures. Results: We find that the sizes of the inner rings and lenses normalized to barlength correlate with the galaxy mass: the normalized sizes increase toward the less massive galaxies; it has been suggested that this is related to the larger dark matter content in the bar region in these systems. Bars in the low mass galaxies are also less concentrated, likely to be connected to the mass cut-off in the appearance of the nuclear rings and lenses. We also show observational evidence that barlenses indeed form part of the bar, and that a large fraction of the inner lenses in the non-barred galaxies could be former barlenses in which the thin outer bar component has dissolved. Full Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A86

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy structural parameters from 3.6um images (Kim+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Gadotti, D. A.; Sheth, K.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Lee, M. G.; Madore, B. F.; Elmegreen, B.; Knapen, J. H.; Zaritsky, D.; Ho, L. C.; Comeron, S.; Holwerda, B.; Hinz, J. L.; Munoz-Mateos, J.-C.; Cisternas, M.; Erroz-Ferrer, S.; Buta, R.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Laine, J.; Menendez-Delmestre, K.; Regan, M. W.; de Swardt, B.; Gil de, Paz A.; Seibert, M.; Mizusawa, T.

    2016-03-01

    We select our samples from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G; Sheth et al. 2010, cat. J/PASP/122/1397). We chose galaxies that had already been processed by the first three S4G pipelines (Pipelines 1, 2, and 3; Sheth et al. 2010, cat. J/PASP/122/1397) at the moment of this study (2011 November). In brief, Pipeline processes images and provides science-ready images. Pipeline 2 prepares mask images (to exclude foreground and background objects) for further analysis, and Pipeline 3 derives surface brightness profiles and total magnitudes using IRAF ellipse fits. We excluded highly inclined (b/a<0.5), significantly disturbed, very faint, or irregular galaxies. Galaxies were also discarded if their images are unsuitable for decomposition due to contamination such as a bright foreground star or significant stray light from stars in the IRAC scattering zones. Then we chose barred galaxies from all Hubble types from S0 to Sdm using the numerical Hubble types from Hyperleda (Paturel et al. 2003, cat. VII/237, VII/238). The assessment of the presence of a bar was done visually by K. Sheth, T. Kim, and B. de Swardt. Later, we also confirmed the presence of a bar by checking the mid-infrared classification (Buta et al. 2010, cat. J/ApJS/190/147; Buta et al. 2015, cat. J/ApJS/217/32). A total of 144 barred galaxies were selected that satisfy our criteria, and we list our sample in Table1 with basic information. Table2 presents the measures of structural parameters for all galaxies in the sample obtained from the 2D model fit with BUDDA (BUlge/disk Decomposition Analysis, de Souza et al., 2004ApJS..153..411D; Gadotti, 2008MNRAS.384..420G) code. (2 data files).

  12. Strong Evidence for the Density-wave Theory of Spiral Structure in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour-Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Davis, Benjamin L.; Shields, Douglas W.; Shameer Abdeen, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    The density-wave theory of galactic spiral-arm structure makes a striking prediction that the pitch angle of spiral arms should vary with the wavelength of the galaxy’s image. The reason is that stars are born in the density wave but move out of it as they age. They move ahead of the density wave inside the co-rotation radius, and fall behind outside of it, resulting in a tighter pitch angle at wavelengths that image stars (optical and near-infrared) than those that are associated with star formation (far-infrared and ultraviolet). In this study we combined large sample size with wide range of wavelengths, from the ultraviolet to the infrared to investigate this issue. For each galaxy we used an optical wavelength image (B-band: 445 nm) and images from the Spitzer Space Telescope at two infrared wavelengths (infrared: 3.6 and 8.0 μm) and we measured the pitch angle with the 2DFFT and Spirality codes. We find that the B-band and 3.6 μm images have smaller pitch angles than the infrared 8.0 μm image in all cases, in agreement with the prediction of density-wave theory. We also used images in the ultraviolet from Galaxy Evolution Explorer, whose pitch angles agreed with the measurements made at 8 μm.

  13. Structure of Dark Matter and Baryons in AMIBA SZE Galaxy Clusters (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We propose deep BR_cz' imaging with Suprime-Cam of several hot X-ray (> 8 keV) clusters of galaxies for which Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) observations are underway at 3mm with the Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) and superb resolution HST/ACS strong lensing (SL) data are readily available. Joint weak lensing (WL), SL, multicolor imaging, and SZE observations, combined with archival X-ray data, will probe in a model-independent manner the structure of dark matter, member galaxies, and the hot cluster gas in rich cluster environments. Our targets are composed of a class of the most massive clusters at moderate redshifts (0.2 <~ z <~ 0.7), allowing us to derive reliable WL shape measurements and thus accurate mass profiles out to the cluster virial radius. Our proposal aims to (1) map out the mass distribution in clusters via WL techniques, and compare with the distributions of hot and cold baryonic components, (2) make an accurate determination of the cluster mass profile from a joint WL+SL analysis, (3) derive cluster gas-mass fraction profiles free from the hydrostatic equilibrium assumption, and (4) examine directly the cluster mass vs. SZE observable relation, which will provide an important basis for cosmological tests with upcoming blind SZE surveys.

  14. Structure of bacterial communities in diverse freshwater habitats.

    PubMed

    Aizenberg-Gershtein, Yana; Vaizel-Ohayon, Dalit; Halpern, Malka

    2012-03-01

    The structures and dynamics of bacterial communities from raw source water, groundwater, and drinking water before and after filtration were studied in four seasons of a year, with culture-independent methods. Genomic DNA from water samples was analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis system and by cloning of the 16S rRNA gene. Water samples exhibited complex denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis genetic profiles composed of many bands, corresponding to a great variety of bacterial taxa. The bacterial communities of different seasons from the four sampling sites clustered into two major groups: (i) water before and after filtration, and (ii) source water and groundwater. Phylogenetic analyses of the clones from the autumn sampling revealed 13 phyla, 19 classes, and 155 operational taxonomic units. Of the clones, 66% showed less than 97% similarities to known bacterial species. Representatives of the phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria were found at all four sampling sites. Species belonging to the phylum Firmicutes were an important component of the microbial community in filtered water. Representatives of Enterobacteriaceae were not detected, indicating the absence of fecal pollution in the drinking water. Differences were found in the bacterial populations that were sampled from the same sites in different seasons. Each water habitat had a unique bacterial profile. Drinking water harbors diverse and dynamic microbial communities, part of which may be active and resilient to chlorine disinfection. This study provides, for the first time, basic data for uncultivable drinking water bacteria in Israel.

  15. Structural diversity of signal recognition particle RNAs in plastids.

    PubMed

    Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Träger, Chantal; Schünemann, Danja

    2013-10-01

    One of the pathways for protein targeting to the plasma membrane in bacteria utilizes the co-translationally acting signal recognition particle (SRP), a universally conserved ribonucleoprotein complex consisting of a 54 kDa protein and a functional RNA. An interesting exception is the higher plant chloroplast SRP, which lacks the otherwise essential RNA component. Furthermore, green plant chloroplasts have an additional post-translational SRP-dependent transport system in which the chloroplast-specific cpSRP43 protein binds to imported substrate proteins and to the conserved 54 kDa SRP subunit (cpSRP54). While homologs to the bacterial SRP protein and RNA component previously have been identified in genome sequences of red algae and diatoms, a recent study investigated the evolution of the green plant SRP system.1 Analysis of hundreds of plastid and nuclear genomes showed a surprising pattern of multiple losses of the plastid SRP RNA during evolution and a widespread presence in all non-spermatophyte plants and green algae. Contrary to expectations, all green organisms that have an identified cpSRP RNA also contain a cpSRP43. Notably, the structure of the plastid SRP RNAs is much more diverse than that of bacterial SRP RNAs. The apical GNRA tetraloop is only conserved in organisms of the red lineage and basal organisms of the green lineage, whereas further chloroplast SRP RNAs are characterized by atypical, mostly enlarged apical loops.

  16. Structure and diversity of Mexican axolotl lambda light chains.

    PubMed

    André, S; Guillet, F; Charlemagne, J; Fellah, J S

    2000-11-01

    We report here the structure of cDNA clones encoding axolotl light chains of the lambda type. A single IGLC gene and eight different potential IGLV genes belonging to four different families were detected. The axolotl Cgamma domain has several residues or stretches of residues that are typically conserved in mammalian, avian, and Xenopus Cgamma, but the KATLVCL stretch, which is well conserved in the Cgamma and T-cell receptor Cbeta domains of many vertebrate species, is not well conserved. All axolotl Vgamma sequences closely match several human and Xenopus Vgamma-like sequences and, although the axolotl Cgamma and Vgamma sequences are very like their tetrapod homologues, they are not closely related to nontetrapod L chains. Southern blot experiments suggested the presence of a single IGLC gene and of a limited number of IGLV genes, and analysis of IGLV-J junctions clearly indicated that at least three of the IGLJ segments can associate with IGLV1, IGLV2, or IGLV3 subgroup genes. The overall diversity of the axolotl Vgamma CDR3 junctions seems to be of the same order as that of mammalian Vgamma chains. However, a single IGLV4 segment was found among the 45 cDNAs analyzed. This suggests that the axolotl IGL locus may have a canonical tandem structure, like the mammalian IGK or IGH loci. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting, and microsequencing experiments strongly suggested that most, if not all L chains are of the gamma type. This may explain in part the poor humoral response of the axolotl. PMID:11132150

  17. GRAND DESIGN AND FLOCCULENT SPIRALS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Yau, Andrew; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Helou, George; Sheth, Kartik; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Menendez-Delmestre, KarIn; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Meidt, Sharon E.; Regan, Michael W.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Aravena, Manuel

    2011-08-10

    Spiral arm properties of 46 galaxies in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G) were measured at 3.6 {mu}m, where extinction is small and the old stars dominate. The sample includes flocculent, multiple arm, and grand design types with a wide range of Hubble and bar types. We find that most optically flocculent galaxies are also flocculent in the mid-IR because of star formation uncorrelated with stellar density waves, whereas multiple arm and grand design galaxies have underlying stellar waves. Arm-interarm contrasts increase from flocculent to multiple arm to grand design galaxies and with later Hubble types. Structure can be traced further out in the disk than in previous surveys. Some spirals peak at mid-radius while others continuously rise or fall, depending on Hubble and bar type. We find evidence for regular and symmetric modulations of the arm strength in NGC 4321. Bars tend to be long, high amplitude, and flat-profiled in early-type spirals, with arm contrasts that decrease with radius beyond the end of the bar, and they tend to be short, low amplitude, and exponential-profiled in late Hubble types, with arm contrasts that are constant or increase with radius. Longer bars tend to have larger amplitudes and stronger arms.

  18. HOT X-RAY CORONAE AROUND MASSIVE SPIRAL GALAXIES: A UNIQUE PROBE OF STRUCTURE FORMATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan, Akos; Forman, William R.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Sijacki, Debora; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jones, Christine; David, Laurence P.; Bourdin, Herve; Gilfanov, Marat; Churazov, Eugene

    2013-08-01

    Luminous X-ray gas coronae in the dark matter halos of massive spiral galaxies are a fundamental prediction of structure formation models, yet only a few such coronae have been detected so far. In this paper, we study the hot X-ray coronae beyond the optical disks of two 'normal' massive spirals, NGC 1961 and NGC 6753. Based on XMM-Newton X-ray observations, hot gaseous emission is detected to {approx}60 kpc-well beyond their optical radii. The hot gas has a best-fit temperature of kT {approx} 0.6 keV and an abundance of {approx}0.1 Solar, and exhibits a fairly uniform distribution, suggesting that the quasi-static gas resides in hydrostatic equilibrium in the potential well of the galaxies. The bolometric luminosity of the gas in the (0.05-0.15)r{sub 200} region (r{sub 200} is the virial radius) is {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} for both galaxies. The baryon mass fractions of NGC 1961 and NGC 6753 are f{sub b,NGC1961} {approx} 0.11 and f{sub b,NGC6753} {approx} 0.09, which values fall short of the cosmic baryon fraction. The hot coronae around NGC 1961 and NGC 6753 offer an excellent basis to probe structure formation simulations. To this end, the observations are confronted with the moving mesh code AREPO and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET. Although neither model gives a perfect description, the observed luminosities, gas masses, and abundances favor the AREPO code. Moreover, the shape and the normalization of the observed density profiles are better reproduced by AREPO within {approx}0.5r{sub 200}. However, neither model incorporates efficient feedback from supermassive black holes or supernovae, which could alter the simulated properties of the X-ray coronae. With the further advance of numerical models, the present observations will be essential in constraining the feedback effects in structure formation simulations.

  19. Optical and Near Infrared studies of the photometric structure and starburst activity of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noeske, K. G.

    2003-03-01

    This thesis describes three studies of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs), focussed on the structure of the stellar components, the star-forming activity, and the environment of such galaxies, as well as the physical background of their morphological variety. The analysis of deep Near Infrared (NIR) image data of a significant sample of BCDs allows to study the evolved stellar low surface brightness (LSB) components of BCDs more precisely than previous studies at visible wavelengths. Azimuthally averaged radial surface brightness profiles (SBPs) show an exponential intensity distribution of the stellar LSB components at large galactocentric radii. This result, along with the derived exponential scale lengths which are systematically smaller than those of dwarf Irregular and dwarf Elliptical galaxies, agrees with previous optical studies. Towards smaller radii, however, the NIR data reveal an inwards-flattening of the SBPs of the stellar LSB components with respect to their outer exponential slopes in more than half of the BCDs under study. Such inwards-flattening exponential SBPs are frequent in dwarf Irregulars and dwarf Ellipticals, but were hitherto largely undiscovered in the stellar hosts of BCDs. The physical origin of such SBPs in dwarf galaxies is to date not understood. Empirical approaches to their systematization and quantitative investigation are discussed, along with the various implications of the discovery of such SBPs in many BCDs for the understanding of such galaxies. Based on the derived structural information on the stellar LSB components and the starburst components, the hypothesis is raised that below a certain threshold density of the stellar LSB component, of the order of 0.4 solar masses per cubic parsec, burst-like star formation does not occur in gas-rich dwarf galaxies. On this hypothesis, the observed relations between the structure of the stellar LSB components of BCDs and their luminosity can be reproduced, as well as the systematic

  20. Spiral-like structure in the core of nearby galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Tatiana F.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Lima Neto, Gastao B.

    2010-07-15

    Not surprisingly, with the very high angular resolution of the Chandra telescope, results revealed fairly complex structures in cluster cores to be more common than expected. In particular, understanding the nature of spiral-like features at the center of some clusters is the major motivation of this work. We present results from Chandra deep observations of 15 nearby galaxy clusters (0.01

  1. Long-lived Spiral Structure for Galaxies with Intermediate-size Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Kanak; Elmegreen, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Spiral structure in disk galaxies is modeled with nine collisionless N-body simulations including live disks, halos, and bulges with a range of masses. Two of these simulations make long-lasting and strong two-arm spiral wave modes that last for ˜5 Gyr with constant pattern speed. These two had a light stellar disk and the largest values of the Toomre Q parameter in the inner region at the time the spirals formed, suggesting the presence of a Q-barrier to wave propagation resulting from the bulge. The relative bulge mass in these cases is about 10%. Models with weak two-arm spirals had pattern speeds that followed the radial dependence of the Inner Lindblad Resonance.

  2. Constraints on a possible variation of the fine structure constant from galaxy cluster data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Landau, S. J.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Sánchez G., I. E.; Busti, V. C.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new method to probe a possible time evolution of the fine structure constant α from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements of the gas mass fraction (fgas) in galaxy clusters. Taking into account a direct relation between variations of α and violations of the distance-duality relation, we discuss constraints on α for a class of dilaton runaway models. Although not yet competitive with bounds from high-z quasar absorption systems, our constraints, considering a sample of 29 measurements of fgas, in the redshift interval 0.14 < z < 0.89, provide an independent estimate of α variation at low and intermediate redshifts. Furthermore, current and planned surveys will provide a larger amount of data and thus allow to improve the limits on α variation obtained in the present analysis.

  3. Broad-line region structure and kinematics in the radio galaxy 3C 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollatschny, W.; Ulbrich, K.; Zetzl, M.; Kaspi, S.; Haas, M.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Broad emission lines originate in the surroundings of supermassive black holes in the centers of active galactic nuclei (AGN). These broad-line emitting regions are spatially unresolved even for the nearest AGN. The origin and geometry of broad-line region (BLR) gas and their connection with geometrically thin or thick accretion disks is of fundamental importance for the understanding of AGN activity. Aims: One method to investigate the extent, structure, and kinematics of the BLR is to study the continuum and line profile variability in AGN. We selected the radio-loud Seyfert 1 galaxy 3C 120 as a target for this study. Methods: We took spectra with a high signal-to-noise ratio of 3C 120 with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope between Sept. 2008 and March 2009. In parallel, we photometrically monitored the continuum flux at the Wise observatory. We analyzed the continuum and line profile variations in detail (1D and 2D reverberation mapping) and modeled the geometry of the line-emitting regions based on the line profiles. Results: We show that the BLR in 3C 120 is stratified with respect to the distance of the line-emitting regions from the center with respect to the line widths (FWHM) of the rms profiles and with respect to the variability amplitude of the emission lines. The emission line wings of Hα and Hβ respond much faster than their central region. This is explained by accretion disk models. In addition, these lines show a stronger response in the red wings. However, the velocity-delay maps of the helium lines show a stronger response in the blue wing. Furthermore, the He ii λ4686 line responds faster in the blue wing in contradiction to observations made one and a half years later when the galaxy was in a lower state. The faster response in the blue wing is an indication for central outflow motions when this galaxy was in a bright state during our observations. The vertical BLR structure in 3C 120 coincides with that of other AGN. We confirm the

  4. Global-, local-, and intermediate-scale structures in prototype spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between galactic spiral structure and the matter in the underlying disk constitutes one of the central problems in galactic dynamics. In Bertin et al. (1989), disk matter characterized by a low-dispersive speed is shown to be capable of playing a key role in the generation of large-scale spiral structure. In Roberts et al. (1992), this self-gravitating, low-dispersion disk matter is shown to be capable of playing an essential role in the formation of structure on local and intermediate scales. Both in computed cases where large-scale spiral structure is present and in those where it is not, the same dominant physical processes and fundamental dynamical mechanisms are active on local scales. The new perception, in which large-scale and small-scale phenomena operate somewhat independently as evidenced in the computational studies, permits a range of flocculent, multiarmed, and grand design spiral types to be simulated. In particular, grand design galaxies with ragged appearances exhibiting spurs, arm branchings, and interarm bridges in addition to the major spiral arms, similar to those often observed, can be generated.

  5. Clonal structure and genetic diversity of three desert phreatophytes.

    PubMed

    Vonlanthen, Beatrix; Zhang, Ximing; Bruelheide, Helge

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper was to assess clone sizes of three perennial desert plant species with AFLP markers and to relate them to clonal and genetic diversity and to hydroecology. The study was carried out at the southern rim of the Taklamakan Desert, where sexual regeneration is only possible shortly after rare flooding events, resulting in rarely established cohorts with subsequent extensive vertical growth and horizontal clonal spread. In this environment, repeated seedling establishment is excluded. We expected decreasing clonal and genetic diversity with increasing clone size and increasing distance to the groundwater table and a common response pattern among all study species. Maximum sizes of Populus euphratica and Alhagi sparsifolia clones were 121 ha and 6.1 ha, respectively, while Tamarix ramosissima clones reached a maximum size of only 38 m(2). In P. euphratica and A. sparsifolia, clonal diversity declined with increasing clone size and increasing distance to the groundwater table, while genetic diversity remained unaffected. Tamarix ramosissima differed from the other species because of a much smaller clonality. Clone size and clonal diversity were found to be good proxy variables for clone age. Despite the considerable age of the clones, genetic diversity is maintained in the populations.

  6. Exploring Optically Compact Dwarf Galaxies for Kinematic Structures and Extended HI Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Most, Hans; Cannon, J. M.; Salzer, J. J.; Rosenberg, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    We present Very Large Array H I spectral line and optical imaging of eight optically compact (optical radii <1 kpc), star-forming dwarf galaxies. These galaxies were chosen because of their optically compact stellar distributions, faint blue magnitudes, ongoing star formation, and relative proximity. The sample includes ADBS 113845+2008, which was found to have an HI halo that extends nearly 40 optical scale lengths from the stellar body (Cannon et al. 2009). Using this larger sample, we are working to discern if the "giant gas disk" dwarf galaxy is common or rare. We are also exploring the kinematics and dark matter contents of each of the sample galaxies.

  7. The physical structure of radio galaxies explored with three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Justin; Smith, Michael D.

    2016-05-01

    We present a large systematic study of hydrodynamic simulations of supersonic adiabatic jets in three dimensions to provide a definitive set of results on exploring jet density, Mach number and precession angle as variables. We restrict the set-up to non-relativistic pressure-equilibrium flows into a homogeneous environment. We first focus on the distribution and evolution of physical parameters associated with radio galaxies. We find that the jet density has limited influence on the structure for a given jet Mach number. The speed of advance varies by a small factor for jet densities between 0.1 and 0.0001 of the ambient density while the cocoon and cavity evolution change from narrow pressure balanced to wide overpressure as the ratio falls. We also find that the fraction of energy transferred to the ambient medium increases with decreasing jet-ambient density ratio, reaching ≈80 per cent. This energy is predominantly in thermal energy with almost all the remainder in ambient kinetic form. The total energy remaining in the lobe is typically under 5 per cent. We find that radio galaxies with wide transverse cocoons can be generated through slow precession at low Mach numbers. We explore a slow precession model in which the jet direction changes very slowly relative to the jet flow dynamical time. This reveals two separated bow shocks propagating into the ambient medium, one associated with the entire lobe expansion and the other with the immediate impact zone. The lobes generated are generally consistent with observations, displaying straight jets but asymmetric lobes.

  8. The Structure and Dark Halo Core Properties of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.

    2015-08-01

    The structure and dark matter halo core properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are investigated. A double-isothermal (DIS) model of an isothermal, non-self-gravitating stellar system embedded in an isothermal dark halo core provides an excellent fit to the various observed stellar surface density distributions. The stellar core scale length a* is sensitive to the central dark matter density ρ0,d. The maximum stellar radius traces the dark halo core radius {r}c,d. The concentration c* of the stellar system, determined by a King profile fit, depends on the ratio of the stellar-to-dark-matter velocity dispersion {σ }*/{σ }d. Simple empirical relationships are derived that allow us to calculate the dark halo core parameters ρ0,d, {r}c,d, and σd given the observable stellar quantities σ*, a*, and c*. The DIS model is applied to the Milky Way’s dSphs. All dSphs closely follow the same universal dark halo scaling relations {ρ }0,d× {r}c,d={75}-45+85 M⊙ pc‑2 that characterize the cores of more massive galaxies over a large range in masses. The dark halo core mass is a strong function of core radius, {M}c,d∼ {r}c,d2. Inside a fixed radius of ∼400 pc the total dark matter mass is, however, roughly constant with {M}d=2.6+/- 1.4× {10}7 M⊙, although outliers are expected. The dark halo core densities of the Galaxy’s dSphs are very high, with {ρ }0,d ≈ 0.2 M⊙ pc‑3. dSphs should therefore be tidally undisturbed. Evidence for tidal effects might then provide a serious challenge for the CDM scenario.

  9. Structural parameters and blue stragglers in Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Jílková, Lucie; Carraro, Giovanni; Catelan, Márcio; Amigo, Pía.

    2012-04-01

    We present BV photometry of four Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy globular clusters: Arp 2, NGC 5634, Palomar 12 and Terzan 8, obtained with the Danish Telescope at ESO La Silla. We measure the structural parameters of the clusters using a King profile fitting, obtaining the first reliable measurements of the tidal radius of Arp 2 and Terzan 8. These two clusters are remarkably extended and with low concentrations; with a concentration of only c= 0.41 ± 0.02, Terzan 8 is less concentrated than any cluster in our Galaxy. Blue stragglers are identified in the four clusters, and their spatial distribution is compared to those of horizontal branch and red giant branch stars. The blue straggler properties do not provide evidence of mass segregation in Terzan 8, while Arp 2 probably shares the same status, although with less confidence. In the case of NGC 5634 and Palomar 12, blue stragglers are significantly less populous, and their analysis suggests that the two clusters have probably undergone mass segregation. References: (1) Peterson (1976); (2) Kron, Hewitt & Wasserman (1984); (3) Chernoff & Djorgovski (1989); (4) Trager, Djorgovski & King (1993); (5) Trager et al. (1995); (6) Rosenberg et al. (1998); (7) Mackey & Gilmore (2003b); (8) McLaughlin & van der Marel (2005) and (9) Carballo-Bello et al. (2012).

  10. EVIDENCE OF QUASI-LINEAR SUPER-STRUCTURES IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND AND GALAXY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kaiki Taro; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Kenji

    2010-11-20

    Recent measurements of hot and cold spots on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky suggest the presence of super-structures on (>100 h {sup -1} Mpc) scales. We develop a new formalism to estimate the expected amplitude of temperature fluctuations due to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect from prominent quasi-linear structures. Applying the developed tools to the observed ISW signals from voids and clusters in catalogs of galaxies at redshifts z < 1, we find that they indeed imply a presence of quasi-linear super-structures with a comoving radius of 100 {approx} 300 h {sup -1} Mpc and a density contrast |{delta}| {approx} O(0.1). We also find that the observed ISW signals are at odds with the concordant {Lambda} cold dark matter model that predicts Gaussian primordial perturbations at {approx}>3{sigma} level. We confirm that the mean temperature around the CMB cold spot in the southern Galactic hemisphere filtered by a compensating top-hat filter deviates from the mean value at {approx}3{sigma} level, implying that a quasi-linear supervoid or an underdensity region surrounded by a massive wall may reside at low redshifts z < 0.3 and the actual angular size (16{sup 0}-17{sup 0}) may be larger than the apparent size (4{sup 0}-10{sup 0}) discussed in literature. Possible solutions are briefly discussed.

  11. A Deep New View of Thermal and Magnetic Structure in the Radio Galaxy Fornax A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Craig; Gaensler, Bryan; Feain, Ilana

    2012-10-01

    Feedback processes in radio lobes are a critical ingredient in out understanding of galactic formation and evolution, and cosmology more broadly. The detailed way in which these processes operate is critically dependent on the magnetic structure and thermal particle content of the lobes, but our understanding in this regard is still poor. Using the powerful new combination of the broad observing bandwidth provided by CABB and modern spectropolarimetric techniques, we intend to substantially improve our knowledge of thermal and magnetic structure in radio lobes by performing and analysing mosaiced observations of the radio galaxy Fornax A from 1.1-3.1GHz. We will measure the thermal material content of the lobes to a limit three orders of magnitude lower than previous observations, discern between existing models for the magnetic structure of radio lobes and, as a secondary objective, of foreground objects backlit by the lobe emission. This will be among the very first comprehensive, broadband spectropolarimetric studies of this class of object. Our total time request for this project is 108 hours split over three array configurations.

  12. A New Outer Galaxy Molecular Cloud Catalog: Applications to Galactic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerton, C. R.; Brunt, C. M.; Pomerleau, C.

    2001-12-01

    We have generated a new molecular cloud catalog from a reprocessed version of the Five College Radio Astronomy (FCRAO) Observatory Outer Galaxy Survey (OGS) of 12CO (J=1--0) emission. The catalog has been used to develop a technique that uses the observed angular size-linewidth relation (ASLWR) as a distance indicator to molecular cloud ensembles. The new technique is a promising means to map out the large-scale structure of our Galaxy using the new high spatial dynamic range CO surveys currently available. The catalog was created using a two-stage object-identification algorithm. We first identified contiguous emission structures of a specified minimum number of pixels above a specified temperature threshold. Each structure so defined was then examined and localized emission enhancements within each structure were identified as separate objects. The resulting cloud catalog, contains basic data on 14595 objects. From the OGS we identified twenty-three cloud ensembles. For each, bisector fits to angular size vs. linewidth plots were made. The fits vary in a systematic way that allows a calibration of the fit parameters with distance to be made. Our derived distances to the ensembles are consistent with the distance to the Perseus Arm, and the accurate radial velocity measurements available from the same data are in accord with the known non-circular motions at the location of the Perseus Arm. The ASLWR method was also successfully applied to data from the Boston University/FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) of 13CO(J=1--0) emission. Based upon our experience with the GRS and OGS, the ASLWR technique should be usable in any data set with sufficient spatial dynamic range to allow it to be properly calibrated. C.P. participated in this study through the Women in Engineering and Science (WES) program of NRC Canada. The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory is a National Facility operated by the National Research Council. The Canadian Galactic Plane Survey is a Canadian

  13. Prochlorococcus: the structure and function of collective diversity.

    PubMed

    Biller, Steven J; Berube, Paul M; Lindell, Debbie; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2015-01-01

    The marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is the smallest and most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth. In this Review, we summarize our understanding of the diversity of this remarkable phototroph and describe its role in ocean ecosystems. We discuss the importance of interactions of Prochlorococcus with the physical environment, with phages and with heterotrophs in shaping the ecology and evolution of this group. In light of recent studies, we have come to view Prochlorococcus as a 'federation' of diverse cells that sustains its broad distribution, stability and abundance in the oceans via extensive genomic and phenotypic diversity. Thus, it is proving to be a useful model system for elucidating the forces that shape microbial populations and ecosystems. PMID:25435307

  14. Genetic diversity and structure in two protected Posidonia oceanica meadows.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Carla; D'Esposito, Daniela; Belmonte, Alessandro; Peirano, Andrea; Valiante, Luigi Maria; Procaccini, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Posidonia oceanica meadows growing along the west Mediterranean coastline are under continuous anthropogenic pressure. The way meadow health correlates with genetic and genotypic diversity in P. oceanica, is still under debate. Here we report a microsatellite analysis of two P. oceanica meadows living in protected areas of the Ligurian (Monterosso al Mare, MPA of "Cinque Terre") and central Tyrrhenian Sea (Santa Marinella, regional Site of Community Importance). Both meadows were recently classified as "disturbed", according to shoot density and other phenological parameters. Between the two meadows, Santa Marinella showed higher genetic diversity, while clear genetic substructure was present in both sites, reflecting high spatial heterogeneity. The present study suggests that genetic diversity does not match unequivocally with shoot density and leaf morphology and that small scale intra-meadow heterogeneity is an important factor to consider for establishing the relation between genetic/genotypic variability and health of natural seagrass meadows. PMID:26164681

  15. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. III. GALAXY PHOTOMETRIC MEASUREMENTS AND THE SPATIALLY RESOLVED COLOR PROPERTIES OF EARLY- AND LATE-TYPE SATELLITES IN DIVERSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cibinel, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Miniati, F.; Pipino, A.; Cameron, E.; Peng, Y.; Rudick, C. S.; Bonoli, S.; Silverman, J. D.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Finoguenov, A.; Norberg, P. E-mail: marcella@phys.ethz.ch

    2013-11-10

    We present photometric measurements for the galaxies—and when possible their bulges and disks—in the 0.05 < z < 0.0585 groups of the Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS); these measurements include (B – I) colors, color gradients and maps, color dispersions, as well as stellar masses and star formation rates. The ZENS galaxies are classified into quenched, moderately star-forming, and strongly star-forming using a combination of spectral features and far-UV-to-optical colors; this approach optimally distinguishes quenched systems from dust-reddened star-forming galaxies. The latter contribute up to 50% to the (B – I) 'red sequence' at ∼10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}. At fixed morphological or spectral type, we find that galaxy stellar masses are largely independent of environment, and especially of halo mass. As a first utilization of our photometric database, we study, at fixed stellar mass and Hubble type, how (B – I) colors, color gradients, and color dispersion of disk satellites depend on group mass M{sub GROUP}, group-centric distance R/R{sub 200}, and large-scale structure overdensity δ{sub LSS}. The strongest environmental trend is found for disk-dominated satellites with M{sub GROUP} and R/R{sub 200}. At M ∼< 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, disk-dominated satellites are redder in the inner regions of the groups than in the outer parts. At M ∼> 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, these satellites have shallower color gradients in higher mass groups and in the cores of groups compared with lower mass groups and the outskirts of groups. Stellar population analyses and semi-analytic models suggest that disk-dominated satellites undergo quenching of star formation in their outer disks, on timescales τ{sub quench} ∼ 2 Gyr, as they progressively move inside the group potential.

  16. Galaxy morphologies in the era of big-data surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas-Company, M.

    Galaxy morphology is a first-order descriptor of a galaxy and a useful proxy to identify physical processes. The 100 years old Hubble fork describes the structural diversity of galaxies in the local universe. Unveiling the origins of this galaxy zoology is a key challenge in galaxy evolution. In this review talk, I first summarized some key advances in our understanding of the morphological evolution of galaxies from z ~ 0 to z ~ 3, thank you in particular to the SDSS and HST legacies. In the second part, I focused on the classification techniques. With the emergence in the last years of large surveys the samples of study have increased by several orders of magnitude going from a few tens to several millions of objects. This trend will clearly continue in the next decade with coming surveys/missions such as EUCLID and WFIRST. While galaxy classification is still a required step in any survey, visual inspection of galaxies is becoming prohibitively time-consuming. Under these circumstances, the techniques used to estimate galaxy morphologies need to be updated.

  17. Genetic diversity and population structure of begomoviruses infecting sweet potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Begomoviruses infecting sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) exhibit high genetic diversity, and approximately eight species including Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) have been described from different regions around the world. In this study, the complete genomic sequences of 17 geographically dist...

  18. Structural Evolution of Early-type Galaxies to z = 2.5 in CANDELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Yen; van der Wel, Arjen; Rix, Hans-Walter; Holden, Bradford; Bell, Eric F.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Wuyts, Stijn; Häussler, Boris; Barden, Marco; Faber, S. M.; Mozena, Mark; Ferguson, Henry C.; Guo, Yicheng; Galametz, Audrey; Grogin, Norman A.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Dekel, Avishai; Huang, Kuang-Han; Hathi, Nimish P.; Donley, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    Projected axis ratio measurements of 880 early-type galaxies at redshifts 1 < z < 2.5 selected from CANDELS are used to reconstruct and model their intrinsic shapes. The sample is selected on the basis of multiple rest-frame colors to reflect low star-formation activity. We demonstrate that these galaxies as an ensemble are dust-poor and transparent and therefore likely have smooth light profiles, similar to visually classified early-type galaxies. Similar to their present-day counterparts, the z > 1 early-type galaxies show a variety of intrinsic shapes; even at a fixed mass, the projected axis ratio distributions cannot be explained by the random projection of a set of galaxies with very similar intrinsic shapes. However, a two-population model for the intrinsic shapes, consisting of a triaxial, fairly round population, combined with a flat (c/a ~ 0.3) oblate population, adequately describes the projected axis ratio distributions of both present-day and z > 1 early-type galaxies. We find that the proportion of oblate versus triaxial galaxies depends both on the galaxies' stellar mass, and—at a given mass—on redshift. For present-day and z < 1 early-type galaxies the oblate fraction strongly depends on galaxy mass. At z > 1, this trend is much weaker over the mass range explored here (1010 < M */M ⊙ < 1011), because the oblate fraction among massive (M * ~ 1011 M ⊙) was much higher in the past: 0.59 ± 0.10 at z > 1, compared to 0.20 ± 0.02 at z ~ 0.1. When combined with previous findings that the number density and sizes of early-type galaxies substantially increase over the same redshift range, this can be explained by the gradual emergence of merger-produced elliptical galaxies, at the expense of the destruction of pre-existing disks that were common among their high-redshift progenitors. In contrast, the oblate fraction among low-mass early-type galaxies (log (M */M ⊙) < 10.5) increased toward the present, from z = 0 to 0.38 ± 0.11 at z > 1 to 0

  19. Magnetic field structure due to the global velocity field in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotarba, H.; Lesch, H.; Dolag, K.; Naab, T.; Johansson, P. H.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2009-08-01

    We present a set of global, self-consistent N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations of the dynamic evolution of galactic discs with gas, including magnetic fields. We have implemented a description to follow the evolution of magnetic fields with the ideal induction equation in the SPH part of the VINE code. Results from a direct implementation of the field equations are compared to a representation by Euler potentials, which pose a ∇ . B-free description, a constraint not fulfilled for the direct implementation. All simulations are compared to an implementation of magnetic fields in the GADGET code which also includes cleaning methods for ∇ . B. Starting with a homogeneous seed field, we find that by differential rotation and spiral structure formation of the disc the field is amplified by one order of magnitude within five rotation periods of the disc. The amplification is stronger for higher numerical resolution. Moreover, we find a tight connection of the magnetic field structure to the density pattern of the galaxy in our simulations, with the magnetic field lines being aligned with the developing spiral pattern of the gas. Our simulations clearly show the importance of non-axisymmetry for the evolution of the magnetic field.

  20. Star formation quenching in high-redshift large-scale structure: post-starburst galaxies in the Cl 1604 supercluster at z ∼ 0.9

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Po-Feng; Gal, Roy R.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lubin, Lori M.; Rumbaugh, Nicholas; Squires, Gordon K.

    2014-09-01

    The Cl 1604 supercluster at z ∼ 0.9 is one of the most extensively studied high-redshift large-scale structures, with more than 500 spectroscopically confirmed members. It consists of eight clusters and groups, with members numbering from a dozen to nearly a hundred, providing a broad range of environments for investigating the large-scale environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Here we examine the properties of 48 post-starburst galaxies in Cl 1604, comparing them to other galaxy populations in the same supercluster. Incorporating photometry from ground-based optical and near-infrared imaging, along with Spitzer mid-infrared observations, we derive stellar masses for all Cl 1604 members. The colors and stellar masses of the K+A galaxies support the idea that they are progenitors of red sequence galaxies. Their morphologies, residual star formation rates, and spatial distributions suggest that galaxy mergers may be the principal mechanism producing post-starburst galaxies. Interaction between galaxies and the dense intracluster medium (ICM) is also effective, but only in the cores of dynamically evolved clusters. The prevalence of post-starburst galaxies in clusters correlates with the dynamical state of the host cluster, as both galaxy mergers and the dense ICM produce post-starburst galaxies. We also investigate the incompleteness and contamination of K+A samples selected by means of Hδ and [O II] equivalent widths. K+A samples may be up to ∼50% incomplete due to the presence of LINERs/Seyferts, and up to ∼30% of K+A galaxies could have substantial star formation activity.

  1. Quantifying the (X/peanut)-shaped structure in edge-on disc galaxies: length, strength, and nested peanuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambur, Bogdan C.; Graham, Alister W.

    2016-06-01

    X-shaped or peanut-shaped (X/P) bulges are observed in more than 40 per cent of (nearly) edge-on disc galaxies, though to date a robust method to quantify them is lacking. Using Fourier harmonics to describe the deviation of galaxy isophotes from ellipses, we demonstrate with a sample of 11 such galaxies (including NGC 128) that the sixth Fourier component (B6) carries physical meaning by tracing this X/P structure. We introduce five quantitative diagnostics based on the radial B6 profile, namely: its `peak' amplitude (Πmax); the (projected major-axis) `length' where this peak occurs (RΠ, max); its vertical `height' above the disc plane (zΠ, max); a measure of the B6 profile's integrated `strength' (SΠ); and the B6 peak `width' (WΠ). We also introduce different `classes' of B6 profile shape. Furthermore, we convincingly detect and measure the properties of multiple (nested) X/P structures in individual galaxies which additionally display the signatures of multiple bars in their surface brightness profiles, thus consolidating further the scenario in which peanuts are associated with bars. We reveal that the peanut parameter space (`length', `strength' and `height') for real galaxies is not randomly populated, but the three metrics are inter-correlated (both in kpc and disc scalelength h). Additionally, the X/P `length' and `strength' appear to correlate with (vrot/σ⋆), lending further support to the notion that peanuts `know' about the galactic disc in which they reside. Such constraints are important for numerical simulations, as they provide a direct link between peanuts and their host disc. Our diagnostics reveal a spectrum of X/P properties and could provide a means of distinguishing between different peanut formation scenarios discussed in the literature. Moreover, nested peanuts, as remnants of bar buckling events, can provide insights into the disc and bar instability history.

  2. LYα FOREST TOMOGRAPHY FROM BACKGROUND GALAXIES: THE FIRST MEGAPARSEC-RESOLUTION LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MAP AT z > 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Eilers, Anna-Christina; Stark, Casey; White, Martin; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Schlegel, David J.; Arinyo-i-Prats, Andreu; Suzuki, Nao; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Caputi, Karina I.; Cassata, Paolo; Ilbert, Olivier; Le Brun, Vincent; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Garilli, Bianca; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Maccagni, Dario; Nugent, Peter; and others

    2014-11-01

    We present the first observations of foreground Lyα forest absorption from high-redshift galaxies, targeting 24 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with z ∼ 2.3-2.8 within a 5' × 14' region of the COSMOS field. The transverse sightline separation is ∼2 h {sup –1} Mpc comoving, allowing us to create a tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) Lyα forest absorption field over the redshift range 2.20 ≤ z ≤ 2.45. The resulting map covers 6 h {sup –1} Mpc × 14 h {sup –1} Mpc in the transverse plane and 230 h {sup –1} Mpc along the line of sight with a spatial resolution of ≈3.5 h {sup –1} Mpc, and is the first high-fidelity map of a large-scale structure on ∼Mpc scales at z > 2. Our map reveals significant structures with ≳ 10 h {sup –1} Mpc extent, including several spanning the entire transverse breadth, providing qualitative evidence for the filamentary structures predicted to exist in the high-redshift cosmic web. Simulated reconstructions with the same sightline sampling, spectral resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio recover the salient structures present in the underlying 3D absorption fields. Using data from other surveys, we identified 18 galaxies with known redshifts coeval with our map volume, enabling a direct comparison with our tomographic map. This shows that galaxies preferentially occupy high-density regions, in qualitative agreement with the same comparison applied to simulations. Our results establish the feasibility of the CLAMATO survey, which aims to obtain Lyα forest spectra for ∼1000 SFGs over ∼1 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, in order to map out the intergalactic medium large-scale structure at (z) ∼ 2.3 over a large volume (100 h {sup –1} Mpc){sup 3}.

  3. "No. 182. Grand Valley Diversion Dam. June, 1917. R.B.D." Structures ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "No. 182. Grand Valley Diversion Dam. June, 1917. R.B.D." Structures on the west side of the river below the dam are three bunkhouses, a mess hall, hospital, doctor's residence, engineer's residence, and outbuildings." - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  4. Genetic diversity and population structure of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic diversity of cowpea was analyzed and the population structure was estimated in a diverse set of 768 cultivated cowpea genotypes from USDA GRIN cowpea collection, originally collected from 56 countries worldwide. Genotyping by sequencing was used to discover single nucleotide polymorphism...

  5. IR Fine-Structure Line Signatures of Central Dust-Bounded Nebulae in Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, J.; Allen, R.; Dudley, C. C.; Satyapal, S.; Luhman, M.; Wolfire, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2004-01-01

    To date, the only far-infrared spectroscopic observations of ultraluminous infrared galaxies have been obtained with the European Space Agency s Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer. The spectra of these galaxies are characterized by molecular absorption lines and weak emission lines from photodissociation regions (PDRs), but no far-infrared (greater than 40 microns) lines from ionized regions have been detected. ESA s Herschel Space Observatory, slated for launch in 2007, will likely be able to detect these lines in samples of local and moderate redshift ultra luminous galaxies and to enable measurement of the ionization parameters, the slope of the ionizing continuum, and densities present in the ionized regions of these galaxies. The higher spatial resolution of proposed observatories discussed in this workshop will enable isolation of the central regions of local galaxies and detection of these lines in high-redshift galaxies for study of the evolution of galaxies. Here we discuss evidence for the e.ects of absorption by dust within ionized regions and present the spectroscopic signatures predicted by photoionization modeling of dust-bounded regions.

  6. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    DOE PAGES

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; et al

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets formore » which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.« less

  7. Investigating bar structure of disc galaxies via PRIMAL: a particle-by-particle M2M algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jason A. S.; Kawata, Daisuke; Martel, Hugo

    2013-07-01

    We have modified our particle-by-particle adaptation of the made-to-measure (M2M) method, with the aim of modelling the Galactic disc from upcoming Galactic stellar survey data. In our new particle-by-particle M2M algorithm, PRIMAL, the observables of the target system are compared with those of the model galaxy at the position of the target stars, i.e. particles. The mass of the model particles are adjusted to reproduce the observables of the target system, and the gravitational potential is automatically adjusted by the changing mass of the particles. This paper builds upon our previous work, introducing likelihood-based velocity constraints in PRIMAL. In this paper, we apply PRIMAL to barred disc galaxies created by an N-body simulation in a known dark matter potential, with no error in the observables. This paper demonstrates that PRIMAL can recover the radial profiles of the surface density, velocity dispersion in the radial and perpendicular directions, and the rotational velocity of the target discs, along with the apparent bar structure and pattern speed of the bar, especially when the reference frame is adjusted so that the bar angle of the target galaxy is aligned to that of the model galaxy at every timestep.

  8. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco -Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastian E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.

  9. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12: galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; White, Martin; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. The code used, designated MKSAMPLE, is released with this paper.

  10. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure of cottons (Gossypium spp.) of the New World assessed by SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A global analysis of cotton (Gossypium spp.) genetic diversity is the first step to understand its geographical distribution, dissemination, genetic relatedness, and population structure. To assess the genetic diversity and population structure in Gossypium species, 111 cotton accessions representin...

  12. How similar is the stellar structure of low-mass late-type galaxies to that of early-type dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Laine, J.; Salo, H.; Lisker, T.

    2016-09-01

    We analyse structural decompositions of 500 late-type galaxies (Hubble T-type ≥6) from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G; Salo et al.), spanning stellar mass range of about 107 to a few times 1010 M⊙. Their decomposition parameters are compared with those of the early-type dwarfs in the Virgo cluster from Janz et al. They have morphological similarities, including the fact that the fraction of simple one-component galaxies in both samples increases towards lower galaxy masses. We find that in the late-type two-component galaxies both the inner and outer structures are by a factor of 2 larger than in the early-type dwarfs, for the same stellar mass of the component. While dividing the late-type galaxies to low- and high-density environmental bins, it is noticeable that both the inner and outer components of late types in the high local density galaxies are smaller, and lie closer in size to those of the early-type dwarfs. This suggests that, although structural differences between the late- and early-type dwarfs are observed, environmental processes can plausibly transform their sizes sufficiently, thus linking them evolutionarily.

  13. Structure Analysis Uncovers a Highly Diverse but Structurally Conserved Effector Family in Phytopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Jérome; Fournier, Elisabeth; Kroj, Thomas; Padilla, André

    2015-01-01

    Phytopathogenic ascomycete fungi possess huge effector repertoires that are dominated by hundreds of sequence-unrelated small secreted proteins. The molecular function of these effectors and the evolutionary mechanisms that generate this tremendous number of singleton genes are largely unknown. To get a deeper understanding of fungal effectors, we determined by NMR spectroscopy the 3-dimensional structures of the Magnaporthe oryzae effectors AVR1-CO39 and AVR-Pia. Despite a lack of sequence similarity, both proteins have very similar 6 β-sandwich structures that are stabilized in both cases by a disulfide bridge between 2 conserved cysteins located in similar positions of the proteins. Structural similarity searches revealed that AvrPiz-t, another effector from M. oryzae, and ToxB, an effector of the wheat tan spot pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis have the same structures suggesting the existence of a family of sequence-unrelated but structurally conserved fungal effectors that we named MAX-effectors (Magnaporthe Avrs and ToxB like). Structure-informed pattern searches strengthened this hypothesis by identifying MAX-effector candidates in a broad range of ascomycete phytopathogens. Strong expansion of the MAX-effector family was detected in M. oryzae and M. grisea where they seem to be particularly important since they account for 5–10% of the effector repertoire and 50% of the cloned avirulence effectors. Expression analysis indicated that the majority of M. oryzae MAX-effectors are expressed specifically during early infection suggesting important functions during biotrophic host colonization. We hypothesize that the scenario observed for MAX-effectors can serve as a paradigm for ascomycete effector diversity and that the enormous number of sequence-unrelated ascomycete effectors may in fact belong to a restricted set of structurally conserved effector families. PMID:26506000

  14. WAXS studies of the structural diversity of hemoglobin in solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, L.; Bardhan, J.; Gore, D.; Lal, J.; Mandava, S.; Park, S.; Rodi, D. J.; Ho, N. T.; Ho, C.; Fischetti, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    Specific ligation states of hemoglobin are, when crystallized, capable of taking on multiple quaternary structures. The relationship between these structures, captured in crystal lattices, and hemoglobin structure in solution remains uncertain. Wide-angle X-ray solution scattering (WAXS) is a sensitive probe of protein structure in solution that can distinguish among similar structures and has the potential to contribute to these issues. We used WAXS to assess the relationships among the structures of human and bovine hemoglobins in different liganded forms in solution. WAXS data readily distinguished among the various forms of hemoglobins. WAXS patterns confirm some of the relationships among hemoglobin structures that have been defined through crystallography and NMR and extend others. For instance, methemoglobin A in solution is, as expected, nearly indistinguishable from HbCO A. Interestingly, for bovine hemoglobin, the differences between deoxy-Hb, methemoglobin and HbCO are smaller than the corresponding differences in human hemoglobin. WAXS data were also used to assess the spatial extent of structural fluctuations of various hemoglobins in solution. Dynamics has been implicated in allosteric control of hemoglobin, and increased dynamics has been associated with lowered oxygen affinity. Consistent with that notion, WAXS patterns indicate that deoxy-Hb A exhibits substantially larger structural fluctuations than HbCO A. Comparisons between the observed WAXS patterns and those predicted on the basis of atomic coordinate sets suggest that the structures of Hb in different liganded forms exhibit clear differences from known crystal structure.

  15. International Conference: Milky Way Surveys: The Structure and Evolution of Our Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, Dan

    2004-01-01

    We were granted NASA support for partial sponsorship of an international conference on Galactic science, held June 15-17, 2003 and hosted by the Institute for Astrophysical Research at Boston University. This conference, entitled 'Milky Way Surveys: The Structure and Evolution of Our Galaxy' drew some 125 scientific experts, researchers, and graduate students to Boston to: (1) Present large area survey plans and findings; (2) Discuss important remaining questions and puzzles in Galactic science; and (3) To inform and excite students and researchers about the potential for using large area survey databases to address key Galactic science questions. An international Scientific Organizing Committee for this conference crafted a tightly packed two-day conference designed to highlight many recent and upcoming large area surveys (including 2MASS, SDSS, MSX, VLA-HI, GRS, and SIRTF/GLIMPSE) and current theoretical understandings and questions. By bringing together experts in the conduct of Galactic surveys and leading theorists, new ways of attacking long-standing scientific questions were encouraged. The titles of most of the talks and posters presented are attached to the end of this report.

  16. Structure of the X-ray source in the Virgo cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Fabricant, D.; Topka, K.; Tucker, W.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    High-angular-resolution observations in the 0.15-1.5-keV band with an imaging X-ray telescope shows the extended X-ray source in the Virgo cluster of galaxies to be a diffuse halo of about 15 arcmin core radius surrounding M87. The angular structure of the surface brightness is marginally consistent with either of two simple models: (1) an isothermal (or adiabatic or hydrostatic) sphere plus a point source at M87 accounting for 12% of the total 0.5-1.5-keV intensity or (2) a power-law function without a discrete point source. No evidence for a point source is seen in the 0.15-0.28-keV band, which is consistent with self-absorption by about 10 to the 21st power per sq cm of matter having a cosmic abundance. The power-law models are motivated by the idea that radiation losses regulate the accretion of matter onto M87 and can account for the observed difference in the size of the X-ray source as seen in the present measurements and at higher energies.

  17. STREGA: STRucture and Evolution of the GAlaxy - I. Survey overview and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Cignoni, M.; Dall'Ora, M.; Bono, G.; Ripepi, V.; Brocato, E.; Raimondo, G.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Coppola, G.; Moretti, M. I.; Stetson, P. B.; Calamida, A.; Cantiello, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Cappellaro, E.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; De Martino, D.; Di Cecco, A.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Silvotti, R.; Buonanno, R.; Getman, F.; Napolitano, N. R.; Pulone, L.; Schipani, P.

    2014-11-01

    STREGA (STRucture and Evolution of the GAlaxy) is a guaranteed time survey being performed at the VST (the ESO Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope) to map about 150 square degrees in the Galactic halo, in order to constrain the mechanisms of galactic formation and evolution. The survey is built as a 5 yr project, organized in two parts: a core programme to explore the surrounding regions of selected stellar systems and a second complementary part to map the southern portion of the Fornax orbit and extend the observations of the core programme. The adopted stellar tracers are mainly variable stars (RR Lyraes and long-period variables) and main-sequence turn-off stars for which observations in the g, r, i bands are obtained. We present an overview of the survey and some preliminary results for three observing runs that have been completed. For the region centred on ω Cen (37 deg2), covering about three tidal radii, we also discuss the detected stellar density radial profile and angular distribution, leading to the identification of extratidal cluster stars. We also conclude that the cluster tidal radius is about 1.2 deg, in agreement with values in the literature based on the Wilson model.

  18. Relationships between adaptive and neutral genetic diversity and ecological structure and functioning: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Raj

    2014-07-01

    Understanding the effects of intraspecific genetic diversity on the structure and functioning of ecological communities is a fundamentally important part of evolutionary ecology and may also have conservation relevance in identifying the situations in which genetic diversity coincides with species-level diversity.Early studies within this field documented positive relationships between genetic diversity and ecological structure, but recent studies have challenged these findings. Conceptual synthesis has been hampered because studies have used different measures of intraspecific variation (phenotypically adaptive vs. neutral) and have considered different measures of ecological structure in different ecological and spatial contexts. The aim of this study is to strengthen conceptual understanding by providing an empirical synthesis quantifying the relationship between genetic diversity and ecological structure.Here, I present a meta-analysis of the relationship between genetic diversity within plant populations and the structure and functioning of associated ecological communities (including 423 effect sizes from 70 studies). I used Bayesian meta-analyses to examine (i) the strength and direction of this relationship, (ii) the extent to which phenotypically adaptive and neutral (molecular) measures of diversity differ in their association with ecological structure and (iii) variation in outcomes among different measures of ecological structure and in different ecological contexts.Effect sizes measuring the relationship between adaptive diversity (genotypic richness) and both community- and ecosystem-level ecological responses were small, but significantly positive. These associations were supported by genetic effects on species richness and productivity, respectively.There was no overall association between neutral genetic diversity and measures of ecological structure, but a positive correlation was observed under a limited set of demographic conditions. These

  19. Relationships between adaptive and neutral genetic diversity and ecological structure and functioning: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of intraspecific genetic diversity on the structure and functioning of ecological communities is a fundamentally important part of evolutionary ecology and may also have conservation relevance in identifying the situations in which genetic diversity coincides with species-level diversity.Early studies within this field documented positive relationships between genetic diversity and ecological structure, but recent studies have challenged these findings. Conceptual synthesis has been hampered because studies have used different measures of intraspecific variation (phenotypically adaptive vs. neutral) and have considered different measures of ecological structure in different ecological and spatial contexts. The aim of this study is to strengthen conceptual understanding by providing an empirical synthesis quantifying the relationship between genetic diversity and ecological structure.Here, I present a meta-analysis of the relationship between genetic diversity within plant populations and the structure and functioning of associated ecological communities (including 423 effect sizes from 70 studies). I used Bayesian meta-analyses to examine (i) the strength and direction of this relationship, (ii) the extent to which phenotypically adaptive and neutral (molecular) measures of diversity differ in their association with ecological structure and (iii) variation in outcomes among different measures of ecological structure and in different ecological contexts.Effect sizes measuring the relationship between adaptive diversity (genotypic richness) and both community- and ecosystem-level ecological responses were small, but significantly positive. These associations were supported by genetic effects on species richness and productivity, respectively.There was no overall association between neutral genetic diversity and measures of ecological structure, but a positive correlation was observed under a limited set of demographic conditions. These

  20. Microsatellite diversity and genetic structure among common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces in Brazil, a secondary center of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Burle, Marília Lobo; Fonseca, Jaime Roberto; Kami, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Brazil is the largest producer and consumer of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), which is the most important source of human dietary protein in that country. This study assessed the genetic diversity and the structure of a sample of 279 geo-referenced common bean landraces from Brazil, using molecular markers. Sixty-seven microsatellite markers spread over the 11 linkage groups of the common bean genome, as well as Phaseolin, PvTFL1y, APA and four SCAR markers were used. As expected, the sample showed lower genetic diversity compared to the diversity in the primary center of diversification. Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools were both present but the latter gene pool was four times more frequent than the former. The two gene pools could be clearly distinguished; limited admixture was observed between these groups. The Mesoamerican group consisted of two sub-populations, with a high level of admixture between them leading to a large proportion of stabilized hybrids not observed in the centers of domestication. Thus, Brazil can be considered a secondary center of diversification of common bean. A high degree of genome-wide multilocus associations even among unlinked loci was observed, confirming the high level of structure in the sample and suggesting that association mapping should be conducted in separate Andean and Mesoamerican Brazilian samples. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1350-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20502861

  1. Microsatellite diversity and genetic structure among common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces in Brazil, a secondary center of diversity.

    PubMed

    Burle, Marília Lobo; Fonseca, Jaime Roberto; Kami, James A; Gepts, Paul

    2010-09-01

    Brazil is the largest producer and consumer of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), which is the most important source of human dietary protein in that country. This study assessed the genetic diversity and the structure of a sample of 279 geo-referenced common bean landraces from Brazil, using molecular markers. Sixty-seven microsatellite markers spread over the 11 linkage groups of the common bean genome, as well as Phaseolin, PvTFL1y, APA and four SCAR markers were used. As expected, the sample showed lower genetic diversity compared to the diversity in the primary center of diversification. Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools were both present but the latter gene pool was four times more frequent than the former. The two gene pools could be clearly distinguished; limited admixture was observed between these groups. The Mesoamerican group consisted of two sub-populations, with a high level of admixture between them leading to a large proportion of stabilized hybrids not observed in the centers of domestication. Thus, Brazil can be considered a secondary center of diversification of common bean. A high degree of genome-wide multilocus associations even among unlinked loci was observed, confirming the high level of structure in the sample and suggesting that association mapping should be conducted in separate Andean and Mesoamerican Brazilian samples. PMID:20502861

  2. The structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E. (Editor); Stecker, F. W. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Gamma radiation investigations by COS-B and SAS-2 satellite are reported. Data from CO surveys of the galaxy and the galactic distribution of pulsars are analyzed. Theories of galactic gamma ray emission are explored.

  3. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    of galaxy clusters will be at locations of the peaks in the true underlying (mostly) dark matter density field. Kaiser (1984) [19] called this the high-peak model, which we demonstrate in Figure 16.1. We show a two-dimensional representation of a density field created by summing plane-waves with a predetermined power and with random wave-vector directions. In the left panel, we plot only the largest modes, where we see the density peaks (black) and valleys (white) in the combined field. In the right panel, we allow for smaller modes. You can see that the highest density peaks in the left panel contain smaller-scale, but still high-density peaks. These are the locations of future galaxy clusters. The bottom panel shows just these cluster-scale peaks. As you can see, the peaks themselves are clustered, and instead of just one large high-density peak in the original density field (see the left panel), the smaller modes show that six peaks are "born" within the broader, underlying large-scale density modes. This exemplifies the "bias" or amplified structure that is traced by galaxy clusters [19]. Clusters are rare, easy to find, and their member galaxies provide good distance estimates. In combination with their amplified clustering signal described above, galaxy clusters are considered an efficient and precise tracer of the large-scale matter density field in the Universe. Galaxy clusters can also be used to measure the baryon content of the Universe [43]. They can be used to identify gravitational lenses [38] and map the distribution of matter in clusters. The number and spatial distribution of galaxy clusters can be used to constrain cosmological parameters, like the fraction of the energy density in the Universe due to matter (Omega_matter) or the variation in the density field on fixed physical scales (sigma_8) [26,33]. The individual clusters act as “Island Universes” and as such are laboratories here we can study the evolution of the properties of the cluster

  4. Structural Evolution of Early-type Galaxies to z=2.5 in CANDELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Yen; van der Wel, A.; Rix, H.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Projected axis ratio measurements of 880 early-type galaxies at redshifts 1 < z < 2.5 selected from CANDELS are used to reconstruct and model their intrinsic shapes. The sample is selected on the basis of multiple rest-frame colors to reflect low star-formation activity. Similar to their present-day counterparts, the z > 1 early-type galaxies show a variety of intrinsic shapes; even at a fixed mass, the projected axis ratio distributions cannot be explained by the random projection of a set of galaxies with very similar intrinsic shapes. However, a two-population model for the intrinsic shapes, consisting of a triaxial, fairly round population, combined with a flat (c/a ~ 0.3) oblate population, adequately describes the projected axis ratio distributions of both present-day and z > 1 early-type galaxies. However, the oblate fraction among massive (M* ~ 10^11 Msun) objects was much higher in the past: 0.59 ± 0.10 at z > 1, compared to 0.20 ± 0.02 at z ~ 0.1. When combined with previous findings that the number density and sizes of early-type galaxies substantially increase over the same redshift range, this can be explained by the gradual emergence of merger-produced elliptical galaxies, at the expense of the destruction of pre-existing disks that were common among their high-redshift progenitors.

  5. Two spectroscopically confirmed galaxy structures at z = 0.61 and 0.74 in the CFHTLS Deep 3 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Cypriano, E. S.; Durret, F.; Le Brun, V.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Martinet, N.; Perez, F.; Rouze, B.; Sodré, L.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Galaxy evolution is known to depend on environment since it differs in clusters and in the field, but studies are sometimes limited to the relatively nearby Universe (z < 0.5). It is still necessary to increase our knowledge of cluster galaxy properties above z = 0.5. Aims: In a previous paper we have detected several cluster candidates at z> 0.5 as part of a systematic search for clusters in the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey by applying the Adami & MAzure Cluster FInder (AMACFI), based on photometric redshifts. We focus here on two of them, located in the Deep 3 (hereafter D3) field: D3-6 and D3-43. Methods: We have obtained spectroscopy with Gemini/GMOS instrument and measured redshifts for 23 and 14 galaxies in the two structures. These redshifts were combined with those available in the literature. A dynamical and a weak lensing analysis were also performed, together with the study of X-ray Chandra archive data. Results: Cluster D3-6 is found to be a single structure of eight spectroscopically confirmed members at an average redshift z = 0.607, with a velocity dispersion of 423 km s-1. It appears to be a relatively low-mass cluster. D3-43-S3 has 46 spectroscopically confirmed members at an average redshift z = 0.739. The cluster can be decomposed into two main substructures, having a velocity dispersion of about 600 and 350 km s-1. An explanation of the fact that D3-43-S3 is detected through weak lensing (only marginally, at the ~3σ level) but not in X-rays could be that the two substructures are just beginning to merge more or less along the line of sight. We also show that D3-6 and D3-43-S3 have similar global galaxy luminosity functions, stellar mass functions, and star formation rate (SFR) distributions. The only differences are that D3-6 exhibits a lack of faint early-type galaxies, a deficit of extremely high stellar mass galaxies compared to D3-43-S3, and an excess of very high SFR galaxies. Conclusions: This study shows the

  6. Combining Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Youngsoo; Krause, Elisabeth; Dodelson, Scott; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Amara, Adam; Becker, Matt; Bridle, Sarah; Clampitt, Joseph; Crocce, Martin; Honscheid, Klaus; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Sanchez, Carles; Wechsler, Risa

    2015-01-01

    Combining galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth rate of large scale structure, a quantity that will shed light on the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a prime candidate for such an analysis, with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies on the sky and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. By constructing an end-to-end analysis that combines large-scale galaxy clustering and small-scale galaxy-galaxy lensing, we also forecast the potential of a combined probes analysis on DES datasets. In particular, we develop a practical approach to a DES combined probes analysis by jointly modeling the assumptions and systematics affecting the different components of the data vector, employing a shared halo model, HOD parametrization, photometric redshift errors, and shear measurement errors. Furthermore, we study the effect of external priors on different subsets of these parameters. We conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/ optimistically constraining the growth function to 8%/4.9% with its first-year data covering 1000 square degrees, and to 4%/2.3% with its full five-year data covering 5000 square degrees.

  7. THE RESOLVED STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF AN ISOLATED DWARF GALAXY: A VLT AND KECK SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF WLM

    SciTech Connect

    Leaman, Ryan; Venn, Kim A.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Brooks, Alyson M.; Cole, Andrew A.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Irwin, Mike J.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tolstoy, Eline

    2012-05-01

    We present spectroscopic data for 180 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the isolated dwarf irregular galaxy Wolf-Lundmark-Mellote (WLM). Observations of the calcium II triplet lines in spectra of RGB stars covering the entire galaxy were obtained with FORS2 at the Very Large Telescope and DEIMOS on Keck II, allowing us to derive velocities, metallicities, and ages for the stars. With accompanying photometric and radio data we have measured the structural parameters of the stellar and gaseous populations over the full galaxy. The stellar populations show an intrinsically thick configuration with 0.39 {<=} q{sub 0} {<=} 0.57. The stellar rotation in WLM is measured to be 17 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1}; however, the ratio of rotation to pressure support for the stars is V/{sigma} {approx} 1, in contrast to the gas, whose ratio is seven times larger. This, along with the structural data and alignment of the kinematic and photometric axes, suggests we are viewing WLM as a highly inclined oblate spheroid. Stellar rotation curves, corrected for asymmetric drift, are used to compute a dynamical mass of (4.3 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} at the half-light radius (r{sub h} = 1656 {+-} 49 pc). The stellar velocity dispersion increases with stellar age in a manner consistent with giant molecular cloud and substructure interactions producing the heating in WLM. Coupled with WLM's isolation, this suggests that the extended vertical structure of its stellar and gaseous components and increase in stellar velocity dispersion with age are due to internal feedback, rather than tidally driven evolution. These represent some of the first observational results from an isolated Local Group dwarf galaxy that can offer important constraints on how strongly internal feedback and secular processes modulate star formation and dynamical evolution in low-mass isolated objects.

  8. The Resolved Structure and Dynamics of an Isolated Dwarf Galaxy: A VLT and Keck Spectroscopic Survey of WLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaman, Ryan; Venn, Kim A.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Cole, Andrew A.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Irwin, Mike J.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Tolstoy, Eline

    2012-05-01

    We present spectroscopic data for 180 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the isolated dwarf irregular galaxy Wolf-Lundmark-Mellote (WLM). Observations of the calcium II triplet lines in spectra of RGB stars covering the entire galaxy were obtained with FORS2 at the Very Large Telescope and DEIMOS on Keck II, allowing us to derive velocities, metallicities, and ages for the stars. With accompanying photometric and radio data we have measured the structural parameters of the stellar and gaseous populations over the full galaxy. The stellar populations show an intrinsically thick configuration with 0.39 <= q 0 <= 0.57. The stellar rotation in WLM is measured to be 17 ± 1 km s-1 however, the ratio of rotation to pressure support for the stars is V/σ ~ 1, in contrast to the gas, whose ratio is seven times larger. This, along with the structural data and alignment of the kinematic and photometric axes, suggests we are viewing WLM as a highly inclined oblate spheroid. Stellar rotation curves, corrected for asymmetric drift, are used to compute a dynamical mass of (4.3 ± 0.3) × 108 M ⊙ at the half-light radius (rh = 1656 ± 49 pc). The stellar velocity dispersion increases with stellar age in a manner consistent with giant molecular cloud and substructure interactions producing the heating in WLM. Coupled with WLM's isolation, this suggests that the extended vertical structure of its stellar and gaseous components and increase in stellar velocity dispersion with age are due to internal feedback, rather than tidally driven evolution. These represent some of the first observational results from an isolated Local Group dwarf galaxy that can offer important constraints on how strongly internal feedback and secular processes modulate star formation and dynamical evolution in low-mass isolated objects.

  9. MULTIPLE SHOCK STRUCTURES IN A RADIO-SELECTED CLUSTER OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.; Duesterhoeft, J.; Rudnick, L.

    2011-01-20

    We present a new radio-selected cluster of galaxies, 0217+70, using observations from the Very Large Array and archival optical and X-ray data. The new cluster is one of only seven known that has candidate double peripheral radio relics, and the second of those with a giant radio halo (GRH), as well. It also contains unusual diffuse radio filaments interior to the peripheral relics and a clumpy, elongated X-ray structure. All of these indicate a very actively evolving system, with ongoing accretion and merger activity, illuminating a network of shocks, such as those first seen in numerical simulations. The peripheral relics are most easily understood as outgoing spherical merger shocks with large variations in brightness along them, likely reflecting the inhomogeneities in the shocks' magnetic fields. The interior filaments could be projections of substructures from the sheet-like peripheral shocks or they might be separate structures due to multiple accretion events. ROSAT images show large-scale diffuse X-ray emission coincident with the GRH and additional patchy diffuse emission that suggests a recent merger event. This uniquely rich set of radio shocks and halo offer the possibility, with deeper X-ray and optical data and higher resolution radio observations, of testing the models of how shocks and turbulence couple to the relativistic plasma. The cluster 0217+70 is also overluminous in the radio compared with the empirical radio-X-ray correlation for clusters-the third example of such a system. This new population of diffuse radio emission opens up the possibility of probing low-mass cluster mergers with upcoming deep radio continuum surveys.

  10. Numerical simulations of galaxy formation: Angular momentum distribution and phase space structure of galactic halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sanjib

    Within the past decade, the L CDM model has emerged as a standard paradigm of structure formation. While it has been very successful in explaining the structure of the Universe on large scales, on smaller (galactic) scales problems have surfaced. In this thesis, we investigate several of these problems in more detail. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we give a brief introduction about structure formation in the universe and discuss some of the problems being faced by the current CDM paradigm of galaxy formation. In Chapter 2, we analyze the angular momentum properties of virialized halos obtained from hydrodynamical simulations. We describe an analytical function that can be used to describe a wide variety of angular momentum distributions (AMDs), with just one parameter a. About 90-95% of halos turn out to have a < 1.3, while exponential disks in cosmological halos would require 1.3 < a < 1.6. This implies that a typical halo in simulations has an excess of low angular momentum material as compared to that of observed exponential disks, a result which is consistent with the findings of earlier works. In Chapter 3, we perform controlled numerical experiments of merging galactic halos in order to shed light on the results obtained in cosmological simulations. We explore the properties of shape parameter a of AMDs and the spin ratio l Gas /l DM in merger remnants and also their dependence on orbital parameters. We find that the shape parameter a is typically close to 1 for a wide range of orbital parameters, less than what is needed to form an exponential disk. The last chapter of the thesis (Chapter 4) is devoted to the analysis of phase space structure of dark matter halos. We first present a method to numerically estimate the densities of discretely sampled data based on a binary space partitioning tree. We implement an entropy-based node splitting criterion that results in a significant improvement in the estimation of densities compared to

  11. THE GEMINI/HST CLUSTER PROJECT: STRUCTURAL AND PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF GALAXIES IN THREE z = 0.28-0.89 CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Joergensen, Inger; Barr, Jordi; Collobert, Maela; Davies, Roger; Flint, Kathleen E-mail: ijorgensen@gemini.edu E-mail: maela.collobert@gmail.com E-mail: kflint@nationalpostdoc.org

    2009-10-01

    We present the data processing and analysis techniques we are using to determine the structural and photometric properties of galaxies in our Gemini/HST Galaxy Cluster Project sample. The goal of this study is to understand cluster galaxy evolution in terms of scaling relations and structural properties of cluster galaxies at redshifts 0.15 < z < 1.0. To derive parameters such as total magnitude, half-light radius, effective surface brightness, and Sersic n, we fit r {sup 1/4} law and Sersic function two-dimensional surface brightness profiles to each of the galaxies in our sample. Using simulated galaxies, we test how the assumed profile affects the derived parameters and how the uncertainties affect our Fundamental Plane results. We find that while fitting galaxies that have Sersic index n < 4 with r {sup 1/4} law profiles systematically overestimates the galaxy radius and flux, the combination of profile parameters that enter the Fundamental Plane has uncertainties that are small. Average systematic offsets and associated random uncertainties in magnitude and log r{sub e} for n>2 galaxies fitted with r {sup 1/4} law profiles are -0.1 {+-} 0.3 and 0.1 {+-} 0.2, respectively. The combination of effective radius and surface brightness, log r{sub e} - {beta}log (I) {sub e}, that enters the Fundamental Plane produces offsets smaller than -0.02 {+-} 0.10. This systematic error is insignificant and independent of galaxy magnitude or size. A catalog of photometry and surface brightness profile parameters is presented for three of the clusters in our sample, RX J0142.0+2131, RX J0152.7-1357, and RX J1226.9+3332 at redshifts 0.28, 0.83, and 0.89, respectively.

  12. Whirlpool Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Scientists are seeing unprecedented detail of the spiral arms and dust clouds in the nearby Whirlpool galaxy, thanks to a new Hubble Space Telescope image, available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc/wfpc.html. The image uses data collected January 15 and 24, 1995, and July 21, 1999, by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by JPL. Using the image, a research group led by Dr. Nick Scoville of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, clearly defined the structure of the galaxy's cold dust clouds and hot hydrogen, and they linked star clusters within the galaxy to their parent dust clouds.

    The Whirlpool galaxy is one of the most photogenic galaxies. This celestial beauty is easily seen and photographed with smaller telescopes and studied extensively from large ground- and space-based observatories. The new composite image shows visible starlight and light from the emission of glowing hydrogen, which is associated with the most luminous young stars in the spiral arms.

    The galaxy is having a close encounter with a nearby companion galaxy, NGC 5195, just off the upper edge of the image. The companion's gravitational pull is triggering star formation in the main galaxy, lit up by numerous clusters of young and energetic stars in brilliant detail. Luminous clusters are highlighted in red by their associated emission from glowing hydrogen gas.

    This image was composed by the Hubble Heritage Team from Hubble archive data and was superimposed onto data taken by Dr. Travis Rector of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory at the .9-meter (35-inch) telescope at the National Science Foundation's Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, Ariz. Scoville's team includes M. Polletta of the University of Geneva, Switzerland; S. Ewald and S. Stolovy of Caltech; and R. Thompson and M. Rieke of the University of Arizona, Tucson.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space operations for the Hubble Space

  13. Structural diversity repertoire of gene silencing small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chan Il; Kim, Helena Andrade; Dua, Pooja; Kim, Soyoun; Li, Chiang J; Lee, Dong-ki

    2011-06-01

    Since the discovery of double-stranded (ds) RNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) phenomenon in Caenorhabditis elegans, specific gene silencing based upon RNAi mechanism has become a novel biomedical tool that has extended our understanding of cell biology and opened the door to an innovative class of therapeutic agents. To silence genes in mammalian cells, short dsRNA referred to as small interfering RNA (siRNA) is used as an RNAi trigger to avoid nonspecific interferon responses induced by long dsRNAs. An early structure-activity relationship study performed in Drosophila melanogaster embryonic extract suggested the existence of strict siRNA structural design rules to achieve optimal gene silencing. These rules include the presence of a 3' overhang, a fixed duplex length, and structural symmetry, which defined the structure of a classical siRNA. However, several recent studies performed in mammalian cells have hinted that the gene silencing siRNA structure could be much more flexible than that originally proposed. Moreover, many of the nonclassical siRNA structural variants reported improved features over the classical siRNAs, including increased potency, reduced nonspecific responses, and enhanced cellular delivery. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the development of gene silencing siRNA structural variants and discuss these in light of the flexibility of the RNAi machinery in mammalian cells. PMID:21749289

  14. Protein structure prediction enhanced with evolutionary diversity : SPEED.

    SciTech Connect

    DeBartolo, J.; Hocky, G.; Wilde, M.; Xu, J.; Freed, K. F.; Sosnick, T. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Toyota Technological Inst. at Chicago

    2010-03-01

    For naturally occurring proteins, similar sequence implies similar structure. Consequently, multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) often are used in template-based modeling of protein structure and have been incorporated into fragment-based assembly methods. Our previous homology-free structure prediction study introduced an algorithm that mimics the folding pathway by coupling the formation of secondary and tertiary structure. Moves in the Monte Carlo procedure involve only a change in a single pair of {phi},{psi} backbone dihedral angles that are obtained from a Protein Data Bank-based distribution appropriate for each amino acid, conditional on the type and conformation of the flanking residues. We improve this method by using MSAs to enrich the sampling distribution, but in a manner that does not require structural knowledge of any protein sequence (i.e., not homologous fragment insertion). In combination with other tools, including clustering and refinement, the accuracies of the predicted secondary and tertiary structures are substantially improved and a global and position-resolved measure of confidence is introduced for the accuracy of the predictions. Performance of the method in the Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP8) is discussed.

  15. Galactic Winds and Structure of z ~ 2 Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Sarah F.

    Galactic-scale outflows are a key driver of galaxy evolution through their feedback effect on star-formation and their ejection of metals and energy into the inter-galactic medium (IGM). While it is known that outflows likely play an important role in the quenching of star-formation - transforming actively star-forming, blue galaxies into their 'red and dead' counterparts - this role is currently not well understood. In particular, at z ˜ 2, during the most active epoch of star-formation, the mass and energy in these outflows is poorly constrained, as is the mechanism for launching them. Furthermore, active-galactic nuclei (AGN) in the centers of massive star-forming galaxies (SFGs) likely play an important role in star-formation quenching, but we do not have a clear understanding of how this AGN feedback compares with that of star-formation driven feedback, and it is not known how many of these massive SFGs at z ˜ 2 even have AGN. This issue is complicated by the fact that many high-z AGN are likely highly obscured, and have strong nebular emission line contributions from both star-formation and the AGN. In this dissertation, I explore these issues using high-spatial and spectral resolution integral field unit spectroscopic data of z ˜ 2 SFGs. The observations are obtained with the instrument SINFONI on the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Cerro Paranal. These high-quality data allow spatially-resolved studies of the gas-phase kinematics of these galaxies, as well dynamical information on their outflows. In this work, I explore outflow properties in one galaxy with exceptionally deep data, allowing detailed examination of the outflow energetics, spatial extent and underlying ISM properties, as well those from a larger sample of galaxies. I also probe the fraction of SFGs in our sample which contain (possibly obscured) AGN, and study how this affects our determination of galaxy properties, such as gas-phase metallicity. Finally

  16. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey - III. Structural parameters of galaxies using single Sérsic fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Guzmán, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Graham, Alister W.; Hammer, Derek; Karick, Arna M.; Lucey, John R.; Matković, Ana; Merritt, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Valentijn, Edwin

    2011-03-01

    We present a catalogue of structural parameters for 8814 galaxies in the 25 fields of the Hubble Space Telescope/ACS Coma Treasury Survey. Parameters from Sérsic fits to the two-dimensional surface brightness distributions are given for all galaxies from our published Coma photometric catalogue with mean effective surface brightness brighter than 26.0 mag arcsec-2 and brighter than 24.5 mag (equivalent to absolute magnitude -10.5), as given by the fits, all in F814W(AB). The sample comprises a mixture of Coma members and background objects; 424 galaxies have redshifts and of these 163 are confirmed members. The fits were carried out using both the GIM2D and GALFIT codes. We provide the following parameters: galaxy ID, RA, Dec., the total corrected automatic magnitude from the photometric catalogue, the total magnitude of the model (F814WAB), the geometric mean effective radius Re, the mean surface brightness within the effective radius <μ>e, the Sérsic index n, the ellipticity and the source position angle. The selection limits of the catalogue and the errors listed for the Sérsic parameters come from extensive simulations of the fitting process using synthetic galaxy models. The agreement between GIM2D and GALFIT parameters is sensitive to details of the fitting procedure; for the settings employed here the agreement is excellent over the range of parameters covered in the catalogue. We define and present two goodness-of-fit indices which quantify the degree to which the image can be approximated by a Sérsic model with concentric, coaxial elliptical isophotes; such indices may be used to objectively select galaxies with more complex structures such as bulge-disc, bars or nuclear components. We make the catalogue available in electronic format at ASTRO-WISE and MAST. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in

  17. STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES TO z = 2.5 IN CANDELS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Yen; Van der Wel, Arjen; Rix, Hans-Walter; Holden, Bradford; Faber, S. M.; Mozena, Mark; Guo Yicheng; Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Wuyts, Stijn; Haeussler, Boris; Barden, Marco; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Galametz, Audrey; Dekel, Avishai; Hathi, Nimish P.; and others

    2013-08-20

    Projected axis ratio measurements of 880 early-type galaxies at redshifts 1 < z < 2.5 selected from CANDELS are used to reconstruct and model their intrinsic shapes. The sample is selected on the basis of multiple rest-frame colors to reflect low star-formation activity. We demonstrate that these galaxies as an ensemble are dust-poor and transparent and therefore likely have smooth light profiles, similar to visually classified early-type galaxies. Similar to their present-day counterparts, the z > 1 early-type galaxies show a variety of intrinsic shapes; even at a fixed mass, the projected axis ratio distributions cannot be explained by the random projection of a set of galaxies with very similar intrinsic shapes. However, a two-population model for the intrinsic shapes, consisting of a triaxial, fairly round population, combined with a flat (c/a {approx} 0.3) oblate population, adequately describes the projected axis ratio distributions of both present-day and z > 1 early-type galaxies. We find that the proportion of oblate versus triaxial galaxies depends both on the galaxies' stellar mass, and-at a given mass-on redshift. For present-day and z < 1 early-type galaxies the oblate fraction strongly depends on galaxy mass. At z > 1, this trend is much weaker over the mass range explored here (10{sup 10} < M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 10{sup 11}), because the oblate fraction among massive (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) was much higher in the past: 0.59 {+-} 0.10 at z > 1, compared to 0.20 {+-} 0.02 at z {approx} 0.1. When combined with previous findings that the number density and sizes of early-type galaxies substantially increase over the same redshift range, this can be explained by the gradual emergence of merger-produced elliptical galaxies, at the expense of the destruction of pre-existing disks that were common among their high-redshift progenitors. In contrast, the oblate fraction among low-mass early-type galaxies (log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 10

  18. Kdo2-lipid A: structural diversity and impact on immunopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyuan; Quinn, Peter J; Yan, Aixin

    2015-01-01

    3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid-lipid A (Kdo2-lipid A) is the essential component of lipopolysaccharide in most Gram-negative bacteria and the minimal structural component to sustain bacterial viability. It serves as the active component of lipopolysaccharide to stimulate potent host immune responses through the complex of Toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 2. The entire biosynthetic pathway of Escherichia coli Kdo2-lipid A has been elucidated and the nine enzymes of the pathway are shared by most Gram-negative bacteria, indicating conserved Kdo2-lipid A structure across different species. Yet many bacteria can modify the structure of their Kdo2-lipid A which serves as a strategy to modulate bacterial virulence and adapt to different growth environments as well as to avoid recognition by the mammalian innate immune systems. Key enzymes and receptors involved in Kdo2-lipid A biosynthesis, structural modification and its interaction with the TLR4 pathway represent a clear opportunity for immunopharmacological exploitation. These include the development of novel antibiotics targeting key biosynthetic enzymes and utilization of structurally modified Kdo2-lipid A or correspondingly engineered live bacteria as vaccines and adjuvants. Kdo2-lipid A/TLR4 antagonists can also be applied in anti-inflammatory interventions. This review summarizes recent knowledge on both the fundamental processes of Kdo2-lipid A biosynthesis, structural modification and immune stimulation, and applied research on pharmacological exploitations of these processes for therapeutic development. PMID:24838025

  19. The Impact of Spatial Structure on Viral Genomic Diversity Generated during Adaptation to Thermal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Dilara; Wiss, Valorie R.; Deckert, Gail E.; Green, Danielle; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Wichman, Holly A.; Brown, Celeste J.; Krone, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Most clinical and natural microbial communities live and evolve in spatially structured environments. When changes in environmental conditions trigger evolutionary responses, spatial structure can impact the types of adaptive response and the extent to which they spread. In particular, localized competition in a spatial landscape can lead to the emergence of a larger number of different adaptive trajectories than would be found in well-mixed populations. Our goal was to determine how two levels of spatial structure affect genomic diversity in a population and how this diversity is manifested spatially. Methodology/Principal Findings We serially transferred bacteriophage populations growing at high temperatures (40°C) on agar plates for 550 generations at two levels of spatial structure. The level of spatial structure was determined by whether the physical locations of the phage subsamples were preserved or disrupted at each passage to fresh bacterial host populations. When spatial structure of the phage populations was preserved, there was significantly greater diversity on a global scale with restricted and patchy distribution. When spatial structure was disrupted with passaging to fresh hosts, beneficial mutants were spread across the entire plate. This resulted in reduced diversity, possibly due to clonal interference as the most fit mutants entered into competition on a global scale. Almost all substitutions present at the end of the adaptation in the populations with disrupted spatial structure were also present in the populations with structure preserved. Conclusions/Significance Our results are consistent with the patchy nature of the spread of adaptive mutants in a spatial landscape. Spatial structure enhances diversity and slows fixation of beneficial mutants. This added diversity could be beneficial in fluctuating environments. We also connect observed substitutions and their effects on fitness to aspects of phage biology, and we provide

  20. EVOLUTION OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS IN THE LAST {approx}6 Gyr: FEEDBACK PROCESSES VERSUS MERGER EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ascaso, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Moles, M.

    2011-01-10

    We present results on the evolution of the structural parameters of two samples of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the last 6 Gyr. The nearby sample of BCGs consists of 69 galaxies from the WINGS survey spanning a redshift range of 0.04 < z < 0.07. The intermediate-redshift (0.3 < z < 0.6) sample is formed by 20 BCGs extracted from the Hubble Space Telescope archive. Both samples have similar spatial resolution and their host clusters have similar X-ray luminosities. We report an increase in the size of the BCGs from intermediate to local redshift. However, we do not detect any variation in the Sersic shape parameter in both samples. These results prove to be robust since the observed tendencies are model independent. We also obtain significant correlations between some of the BCG parameters and the main properties of the host clusters. More luminous, larger, and centrally located BCGs are located in more massive and dominant galaxy clusters. These facts indicate that the host galaxy cluster has played an important role in the formation of their BCGs. We discuss the possible mechanisms that can explain the observed evolution of the structural parameters of the BCGs. We conclude that the main mechanisms that can explain the increase in size and the non-evolution in the Sersic shape parameter of the BCGs in the last 6 Gyr are feedback processes. This result disagrees with semi-analytical simulation results supporting the idea that merging processes are the main mechanism responsible for the evolution of the BCGs up until the present epoch.

  1. Parsec-scale H I absorption structure in a low-redshift galaxy seen against a compact symmetric object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, A. D.; Zwaan, M. A.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Péroux, C.; Liske, J.

    2016-11-01

    We present global VLBI observations of the 21-cm transition of atomic hydrogen seen in absorption against the radio source J0855+5751. The foreground absorber (SDSS J085519.05+575140.7) is a dwarf galaxy at z = 0.026. As the background source is heavily resolved by VLBI, the data allow us to map the properties of the foreground H I gas with a spatial resolution of 2 pc. The absorbing gas corresponds to a single coherent structure with an extent >35 pc, but we also detect significant and coherent variations, including a change in the H I optical depth by a factor of 5 across a distance of ≲ 6 pc. The large size of the structure provides support for the Heiles & Troland model of the interstellar medium, as well as its applicability to external galaxies. The large variations in H I optical depth also suggest that caution should be applied when interpreting TS measurements from radio-detected DLAs. In addition, the distorted appearance of the background radio source is indicative of a strong jet-cloud interaction in its host galaxy. We have measured its redshift (z = 0.541 86) using optical spectroscopy on the William Herschel Telescope and this confirms that J0855+5751 is an FR II radio source with a physical extent of <1 kpc and supports the previous identification of this source as a compact symmetric object. These sources often show absorption associated with the host galaxy and we suggest that both H I and OH should be searched for in J0855+5751.

  2. Measuring the Fraction of Bars and Offset Bars Using the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Using the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies at 3.6 and 4.5μm, I have measured a preliminary bar fraction and offset bar fraction in the local universe by visually identifying bar structure within a sample of 2,140 local galaxies. A sample this large has not been used since 1963, when Gerard de Vaucouleurs found the bar fraction to be roughly fbar ˜ 0.6 in the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies. Since then, there has been much debate over the true value of the bar fraction. The purpose of finding a bar fraction using S4G is to provide a final say in this debate. I have found that the bar fraction in the local universe is fbar = 0.69 when including both definite bars (SB) and candidate bars (SAB). I have also measured a preliminary value for the fraction of offset bars using the same sample. Offset bars are a very rare phenomenon. Of the sample used, 91 galaxies are found to be definite offset bars while an additional 39 are found to be candidate offset bars. When including both definite offset bars and candidate offset bars, the offset bar fraction in the local universe becomes fob = 0.12. I also measure the fraction of offset bars as a function of Hubble type and stellar mass. We find that 54% of offset bars are found in disks having a stellar mass of M ≤ 108 M⊙. Late-type disks possess significantly more offset bars than early-type with 60% of offset bars being found in disks having a Hubble type t ≥ 6.

  3. Structural Differences Explain Diverse Functions of Plasmodium Actins

    PubMed Central

    Vahokoski, Juha; Martinez, Silvia Muñico; Ignatev, Alexander; Lepper, Simone; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Sidén-Kiamos, Inga; Sachse, Carsten; Kursula, Inari

    2014-01-01

    Actins are highly conserved proteins and key players in central processes in all eukaryotic cells. The two actins of the malaria parasite are among the most divergent eukaryotic actins and also differ from each other more than isoforms in any other species. Microfilaments have not been directly observed in Plasmodium and are presumed to be short and highly dynamic. We show that actin I cannot complement actin II in male gametogenesis, suggesting critical structural differences. Cryo-EM reveals that Plasmodium actin I has a unique filament structure, whereas actin II filaments resemble canonical F-actin. Both Plasmodium actins hydrolyze ATP more efficiently than α-actin, and unlike any other actin, both parasite actins rapidly form short oligomers induced by ADP. Crystal structures of both isoforms pinpoint several structural changes in the monomers causing the unique polymerization properties. Inserting the canonical D-loop to Plasmodium actin I leads to the formation of long filaments in vitro. In vivo, this chimera restores gametogenesis in parasites lacking actin II, suggesting that stable filaments are required for exflagellation. Together, these data underline the divergence of eukaryotic actins and demonstrate how structural differences in the monomers translate into filaments with different properties, implying that even eukaryotic actins have faced different evolutionary pressures and followed different paths for developing their polymerization properties. PMID:24743229

  4. Structural diversity in hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide materials.

    PubMed

    Weber, Oliver J; Marshall, Kayleigh L; Dyson, Lewis M; Weller, Mark T

    2015-12-01

    The structural chemistry of hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide materials has become of increasing significance for energy applications since the discovery and development of perovskite solar cells based on methylammonium lead iodide. Seven new hybrid lead iodide compounds have been synthesized and structurally characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The lead iodide units in materials templated with bipyridyl, 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane, 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene and imidazole adopt one-dimensional chain structures, while crystallization from solutions containing piperazinium cations generates a salt containing isolated [PbI6](4-) octahedral anions. Templating with 4-chlorobenzylammonium lead iodide adopts the well known two-dimensional layered perovskite structure with vertex shared sheets of composition [PbI4](2-) separated by double layers of organic cations. The relationships between the various structures determined, their compositions, stability and hydrogen bonding between the protonated amine and the iodide ions of the PbI6 octahedra are described. PMID:26634723

  5. Diverse Family Structures and the Care of Older Persons.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Karen A; Blieszner, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    Demographic and social trends lead to a variety of micro-level and internal structural contexts that influence caregiving in families with older members. The results of macro-level changes have received little focused attention in the aging literature, where much of the caregiving research has addressed issues within the context of traditional family structure. Yet the conventional nuclear family model is increasingly uncommon as new, pluralistic models of family life are emerging in contemporary society. The majority of elder care is provided by relatives, albeit with varying patterns of involvement and responsibility across family structures. Both conventional and pluralistic families face challenges in meeting the care needs of their oldest members, leaving some older adults at risk of having unmet needs. Additional research on family risk and resilience related to the care of older relatives is warranted, particularly with respect to pluralistic models of family life.

  6. Diverse Family Structures and the Care of Older Persons.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Karen A; Blieszner, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    Demographic and social trends lead to a variety of micro-level and internal structural contexts that influence caregiving in families with older members. The results of macro-level changes have received little focused attention in the aging literature, where much of the caregiving research has addressed issues within the context of traditional family structure. Yet the conventional nuclear family model is increasingly uncommon as new, pluralistic models of family life are emerging in contemporary society. The majority of elder care is provided by relatives, albeit with varying patterns of involvement and responsibility across family structures. Both conventional and pluralistic families face challenges in meeting the care needs of their oldest members, leaving some older adults at risk of having unmet needs. Additional research on family risk and resilience related to the care of older relatives is warranted, particularly with respect to pluralistic models of family life. PMID:26300190

  7. Structural Properties and Evidence for Interactions in a Sample of Luminous Blue Compact Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Cassidy L.; Fanelli, M.; Marcum, P.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the life cycles of galaxies over cosmic time is a primary effort in modern astrophysics. Here we explore the nature of luminous blue compact galaxies (LBCGs), a class of galaxy in the local (z < 0.05) universe exhibiting blue optical colors [(B-V) < 0.5], high luminosity (MB < -19), one or more high surface brightness regions, and moderate to high star formation rates [> 5 M(sun) per year]. LBCGs appear to be similar in their global properties to the early evolutionary phases of most galaxies, but are more amenable to detailed analysis due to their low redshifts. We describe an ultraviolet and optical investigation of a sample of 50 LBCGs using UBVR & Hα imagery obtained at McDonald Observatory, ultraviolet photometry from GALEX, and correlative data from IRAS, 2MASS, and SDSS. Using these data, we explore the evolutionary state of LBCGs. In particular, we determine the radial and azimuthal light distributions, explore the spatial extent of ionized gas (e.g., centrally- concentrated versus spatially diffuse), compare multiwavelength measures of the high-mass star formation rate, and quantify the interaction strength using a variety of merger diagnostics. Although selected independent of their environment, most systems display either a close companion or the signature of an interaction such as tails, bridges, and possible polar rings. Interpretation of the assembly history of LBCGs provides insight on massive galaxy evolution at earlier epochs.

  8. Galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P J

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z approximately 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation.

  9. Galaxy formation

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. J. E.

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z ∼ 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation. PMID:9419326

  10. Effects of Spiral Arms on Gaseous Structures and Mass Drift in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Stellar spiral arms play a key role in the formation and evolution of gaseous structures in disk galaxies as well as mass drift in the radial direction. Using hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate nonlinear responses of self-gravitating gas to an imposed stellar spiral potential in galactic disks. By considering various models with different arm strength and pattern speed, we find that the physical properties of imposed spiral potential have profound influences on the shapes and extent of gaseous arms as well as the related mass drift rate. To produce quasi-steady spiral shocks, the gas has to not only move faster than the local sound speed relative to the perturbing potential, but also have sufficient time to respond to one arm before encountering the next arm. From our numerical results, we provide a simple expression for the existence of quasi-steady spiral shocks depending on the pitch angle and pattern speed of stellar spiral arms, which appears consistent to the previous study. We also measure the mass drift rates which are in the range of ~0.5-3.0 M⊙/yr inside the corotation radius, and further quantify the relative contribution of shock dissipation (~50%), external torque (~40%), and self-gravitational torque (~10%) to them. The offset between the pitch angles of stellar and gaseous arms is larger for smaller arm strength and larger pattern speed, since a deeper potential tends to form shocks closer to the potential minima of the arms. We demonstrate that the distributions of line-of-sight velocities and spiral shock densities can be a diagnostic tool in distinguishing whether the spiral pattern rotates fast or not.

  11. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters - V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-10-01

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. We present constraints on the concentration-mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = -0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions. For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = -0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ˜50 kpc-1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to -1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.

  12. W.W. Morgan and the Discovery of the Spiral Arm Structure of our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, William

    2008-03-01

    William Wilson Morgan was one of the great astronomers of the twentieth century. He considered himself a morphologist, and was preoccupied throughout his career with matters of classification. Though, his early life was difficult, and his pursuit of astronomy as a career was opposed by his father, he took a position at Yerkes Observatory in 1926 and remained there for the rest of his working life. Thematically, his work was also a unified whole. Beginning with spectroscopic studies under Otto Struve at Yerkes Observatory, by the late 1930s he concentrated particularly on the young O and B stars. His work an stellar classification led to the Morgan-Keenan-Kellman [MKK] system of classification of stars, and later - as he grappled with the question of the intrinsic color and brightness of stars at great distances - to the Johnson-Morgan UBV system for measuring stellar colors. Eventually these concerns with classification and method led to his greatest single achievement - the recognition of the nearby spiral arms of our Galaxy by tracing the OB associations and HII regions that outline them. After years of intensive work on the problem of galactic structure, the discovery came in a blinding flash of Archimedean insight as he walked under the night sky between his office and his house in the autumn of 1951. His optical discovery of the spiral arms preceded the radio-mapping of the spiral arms by more than a year. Morgan suffered a nervous breakdown soon after he announced his discovery, however, and so was prevented from publishing a complete account of his work. As a result of that, and the announcement soon afterward of the first radio maps of the spiral arms, the uniqueness of his achievement was not fully appreciated at the time.

  13. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP MODELS FOR PREDICTION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING AFFINITY OF STRUCTURALLY DIVERSE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The demonstrated ability of a variety of structurally diverse chemicals to bind to the estrogen receptor has raised the concern that chemicals in the environment may be causing adverse effects through interference with nuclear receptor pathways. Many structure-activity relationsh...

  14. Convergent structural responses of tropical forests to diverse disturbance regimes.

    PubMed

    Kellner, James R; Asner, Gregory P

    2009-09-01

    Size frequency distributions of canopy gaps are a hallmark of forest dynamics. But it remains unknown whether legacies of forest disturbance are influencing vertical size structure of landscapes, or space-filling in the canopy volume. We used data from LiDAR remote sensing to quantify distributions of canopy height and sizes of 434,501 canopy gaps in five tropical rain forest landscapes in Costa Rica and Hawaii. The sites represented a wide range of variation in structure and natural disturbance history, from canopy gap dynamics in lowland Costa Rica and Hawaii, to stages and types of stand-level dieback on upland Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes. Large differences in vertical canopy structure characterized these five tropical rain forest landscapes, some of which were related to known disturbance events. Although there were quantitative differences in the values of scaling exponents within and among sites, size frequency distributions of canopy gaps followed power laws at all sites and in all canopy height classes. Scaling relationships in gap size at different heights in the canopy were qualitatively similar at all sites, revealing a remarkable similarity despite clearly defined differences in species composition and modes of prevailing disturbance. These findings indicate that power-law gap-size frequency distributions are ubiquitous features of these five tropical rain forest landscapes, and suggest that mechanisms of forest disturbance may be secondary to other processes in determining vertical and horizontal size structure in canopies. PMID:19614757

  15. Convergent structural responses of tropical forests to diverse disturbance regimes.

    PubMed

    Kellner, James R; Asner, Gregory P

    2009-09-01

    Size frequency distributions of canopy gaps are a hallmark of forest dynamics. But it remains unknown whether legacies of forest disturbance are influencing vertical size structure of landscapes, or space-filling in the canopy volume. We used data from LiDAR remote sensing to quantify distributions of canopy height and sizes of 434,501 canopy gaps in five tropical rain forest landscapes in Costa Rica and Hawaii. The sites represented a wide range of variation in structure and natural disturbance history, from canopy gap dynamics in lowland Costa Rica and Hawaii, to stages and types of stand-level dieback on upland Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes. Large differences in vertical canopy structure characterized these five tropical rain forest landscapes, some of which were related to known disturbance events. Although there were quantitative differences in the values of scaling exponents within and among sites, size frequency distributions of canopy gaps followed power laws at all sites and in all canopy height classes. Scaling relationships in gap size at different heights in the canopy were qualitatively similar at all sites, revealing a remarkable similarity despite clearly defined differences in species composition and modes of prevailing disturbance. These findings indicate that power-law gap-size frequency distributions are ubiquitous features of these five tropical rain forest landscapes, and suggest that mechanisms of forest disturbance may be secondary to other processes in determining vertical and horizontal size structure in canopies.

  16. Metal-line absorption around z ≈ 2.4 star-forming galaxies in the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Monica L.; Schaye, Joop; Steidel, Charles C.; Rudie, Gwen C.; Strom, Allison L.

    2014-11-01

    We study metal absorption around 854 z ≈ 2.4 star-forming galaxies taken from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey. The galaxies examined in this work lie in the fields of 15 hyperluminous background quasi-stellar objects, with galaxy impact parameters ranging from 35 proper kpc (pkpc) to 2 proper Mpc (pMpc). Using the pixel optical depth technique, we present the first galaxy-centred 2D maps of the median absorption by O VI, N V, C IV, C III, and Si IV, as well as updated results for H I. At small galactocentric radii we detect a strong enhancement of the absorption relative to randomly located regions that extend out to at least 180 pkpc in the transverse direction, and ±240 km s-1 along the line of sight (LOS, ˜1 pMpc in the case of pure Hubble flow) for all ions except N V. For C IV (and H I) we detect a significant enhancement of the absorption signal out to 2 pMpc in the transverse direction, corresponding to the maximum impact parameter in our sample. After normalizing the median absorption profiles to account for variations in line strengths and detection limits, in the transverse direction we find no evidence for a sharp drop-off in metals distinct from that of H I. We argue instead that non-detection of some metal-line species in the extended circumgalactic medium is consistent with differences in the detection sensitivity. Along the LOS, the normalized profiles reveal that the enhancement in the absorption is more extended for O VI, C IV, and Si IV than for H I. We also present measurements of the scatter in the pixel optical depths, covering fractions, and equivalent widths as a function of projected galaxy distance. Limiting the sample to the 340 galaxies with redshifts measured from nebular emission lines does not decrease the extent of the enhancement along the LOS compared to that in the transverse direction. This rules out redshift errors as the source of the observed redshift-space anisotropy and thus implies that we have detected the signature

  17. Sclerotic Rings in Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae): Structures and Taxonomic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Momo; Konishi, Takuya; Sato, Tamaki

    2015-01-01

    Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae) were a highly diverse, globally distributed group of aquatic lizards in the Late Cretaceous (98–66 million years ago) that exhibited a high degree of adaptation to life in water. To date, despite their rich fossil record, the anatomy of complete mosasaur sclerotic rings, embedded in the sclera of the eyeball, has not been thoroughly investigated. We here describe and compare sclerotic rings of four mosasaur genera, Tylosaurus, Platecarpus, Clidastes, and Mosasaurus, for the first time. Two specimens of Tylosaurus and Platecarpus share an exact scleral ossicle arrangement, excepting the missing portion in the specimen of Platecarpus. Furthermore, the exact arrangement and the total count of 14 ossicles per ring are shared between Tylosaurus and numerous living terrestrial lizard taxa, pertaining to both Iguania and Scleroglossa. In contrast, two species of Mosasaurus share the identical count of 12 ossicles and the arrangement with each other, while no living lizard taxa share exactly the same arrangement. Such a mosaic distribution of these traits both among squamates globally and among obligatorily aquatic mosasaurs specifically suggests that neither the ossicle count nor their arrangement played major roles in the aquatic adaptation in mosasaur eyes. All the mosasaur sclerotic rings examined consistently exhibit aperture eccentricity and the scleral ossicles with gently convex outer side. Hitherto unknown to any squamate taxa, one specimen of Platecarpus unexpectedly shows a raised, concentric band of roughened surface on the inner surface of the sclerotic ring. It is possible that one or both of these latter features may have related to adaptation towards aquatic vision in mosasaurs, but further quantitative study of extant reptilian clades containing both terrestrial and aquatic taxa is critical and necessary in order to understand possible adaptive significances of such osteological features. PMID:25692667

  18. "Presumed fair: Ironic effects of organizational diversity structures": Correction to Kaiser et al. (2013).

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Reports an error in "Presumed fair: Ironic effects of organizational diversity structures" by Cheryl R. Kaiser, Brenda Major, Ines Jurcevic, Tessa L. Dover, Laura M. Brady and Jenessa R. Shapiro (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2013[Mar], Vol 104[3], 504-519). In the article, a raw data merging error in one racial discrimination claim condition from Experiment 6 inadvertently resulted in data analyses on an inaccurate data set. When the error was discovered by the authors and corrected, all analyses reported in Experiment 6 for claim validity, seriousness of the claim, and support for the claimant were inaccurate and none were statistically significant. The conclusions should be altered to indicate that participants with management experience who reflected on their own workplace diversity policies did not show the predicted effects. The literature review, remaining five studies, and remaining conclusions in the article are unaffected by this error. Experiment 6 should also report that 26.4% (not 26.4.7%) of participants had a graduate degree and eight participants (not 8%) did not provide educational data. Experiment 5 should have referred to the claim validity measure as a six-item measure ( .92) rather than a five-item measure; analyses on claim validity are accurate in text. Table 2's note should have said standard errors, not standard deviations. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2012-31077-001.) This research tests the hypothesis that the presence (vs. absence) of organizational diversity structures causes high-status group members (Whites, men) to perceive organizations with diversity structures as procedurally fairer environments for underrepresented groups (racial minorities, women), even when it is clear that underrepresented groups have been unfairly disadvantaged within these organizations. Furthermore, this illusory sense of fairness derived from the mere presence of diversity structures causes high

  19. "Presumed fair: Ironic effects of organizational diversity structures": Correction to Kaiser et al. (2013).

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Reports an error in "Presumed fair: Ironic effects of organizational diversity structures" by Cheryl R. Kaiser, Brenda Major, Ines Jurcevic, Tessa L. Dover, Laura M. Brady and Jenessa R. Shapiro (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2013[Mar], Vol 104[3], 504-519). In the article, a raw data merging error in one racial discrimination claim condition from Experiment 6 inadvertently resulted in data analyses on an inaccurate data set. When the error was discovered by the authors and corrected, all analyses reported in Experiment 6 for claim validity, seriousness of the claim, and support for the claimant were inaccurate and none were statistically significant. The conclusions should be altered to indicate that participants with management experience who reflected on their own workplace diversity policies did not show the predicted effects. The literature review, remaining five studies, and remaining conclusions in the article are unaffected by this error. Experiment 6 should also report that 26.4% (not 26.4.7%) of participants had a graduate degree and eight participants (not 8%) did not provide educational data. Experiment 5 should have referred to the claim validity measure as a six-item measure ( .92) rather than a five-item measure; analyses on claim validity are accurate in text. Table 2's note should have said standard errors, not standard deviations. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2012-31077-001.) This research tests the hypothesis that the presence (vs. absence) of organizational diversity structures causes high-status group members (Whites, men) to perceive organizations with diversity structures as procedurally fairer environments for underrepresented groups (racial minorities, women), even when it is clear that underrepresented groups have been unfairly disadvantaged within these organizations. Furthermore, this illusory sense of fairness derived from the mere presence of diversity structures causes high

  20. Dynamical evolution of topology of large-scale structure. [in distribution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear effects of statistical biasing and gravitational evolution on the genus are studied. The biased galaxy subset is picked for the first time by actually identifying galaxy-sized peaks above a fixed threshold in the initial conditions, and their subsequent evolution is followed. It is found that in the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model the statistical biasing in the locations of galaxies produces asymmetry in the genus curve and coupling with gravitational evolution gives rise to a shift in the genus curve to the left in moderately nonlinear regimes. Gravitational evolution alone reduces the amplitude of the genus curve due to strong phase correlations in the density field and also produces asymmetry in the curve. Results on the genus of the mass density field for both CDM and hot dark matter models are consistent with previous work by Melott, Weinberg, and Gott (1987).

  1. Genome-wide characterization of genetic diversity and population structure in Secale

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous rye accessions are stored in ex situ genebanks worldwide. Little is known about the extent of genetic diversity contained in any of them and its relation to contemporary varieties, since to date rye genetic diversity studies had a very limited scope, analyzing few loci and/ or few accessions. Development of high throughput genotyping methods for rye opened the possibility for genome wide characterizations of large accessions sets. In this study we used 1054 Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers with defined chromosomal location to characterize genetic diversity and population structure in a collection of 379 rye accessions including wild species, landraces, cultivated materials, historical and contemporary rye varieties. Results Average genetic similarity (GS) coefficients and average polymorphic information content (PIC) values varied among chromosomes. Comparison of chromosome specific average GS within and between germplasm sub-groups indicated regions of chromosomes 1R and 4R as being targeted by selection in current breeding programs. Bayesian clustering, principal coordinate analysis and Neighbor Joining clustering demonstrated that source and improvement status contributed significantly to the structure observed in the analyzed set of Secale germplasm. We revealed a relatively limited diversity in improved rye accessions, both historical and contemporary, as well as lack of correlation between clustering of improved accessions and geographic origin, suggesting common genetic background of rye accessions from diverse geographic regions and extensive germplasm exchange. Moreover, contemporary varieties were distinct from the remaining accessions. Conclusions Our results point to an influence of reproduction methods on the observed diversity patterns and indicate potential of ex situ collections for broadening the genetic diversity in rye breeding programs. Obtained data show that DArT markers provide a realistic picture of the genetic

  2. The rest-frame ultraviolet structure of 0.5 < z < 1.5 galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; De Mello, Duilia F.; Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Coe, Dan; Grogin, Norman; Gawiser, Eric; Ravindranath, Swara; Scarlata, Claudia

    2014-08-10

    We present the rest-frame UV wavelength dependence of the Petrosian-like half-light radius (r{sub 50}), and the concentration parameter for a sample of 198 star-forming galaxies at 0.5 < z < 1.5. We find a ∼5% decrease in r{sub 50} from 1500 Å to 3000 Å, with half-light radii at 3000 Å ranging from 0.6 kpc to 6 kpc. We also find a decrease in concentration of ∼0.07 (1.9 < C{sub 3000} < 3.9). The lack of a strong relationship between r{sub 50} and wavelength is consistent with a model in which clumpy star formation is distributed over length scales comparable to the galaxy's rest-frame optical light. While the wavelength dependence of r{sub 50} is independent of size at all redshifts, concentration decreases more sharply in the far-UV (∼1500 Å) for large galaxies at z ∼ 1. This decrease in concentration is caused by a flattening of the inner ∼20% of the light profile in disk-like galaxies, indicating that the central regions have different UV colors than the rest of the galaxy. We interpret this as a bulge component with older stellar populations and/or more dust. The size-dependent decrease in concentration is less dramatic at z ∼ 2, suggesting that bulges are less dusty, younger, and/or less massive than the rest of the galaxy at higher redshifts.

  3. H I Structure and Kinematics in the LITTLE THINGS Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Nau Raj; Simpson, Caroline E.; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog and analysis of the properties of neutral hydrogen gas (H I) holes/shells in the LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey) galaxies. LITTLE THINGS uses high angular resolution (~6''), high spectral resolution (≤ 2.6 km s-1), and high sensitivity (≤ 1.1 mJy beam-1 channel-1) H I observations of 41 nearby (≤ 10.3 Mpc) gas-rich dwarf galaxies. We are interested in dwarf galaxies because they are the most common types of galaxies in the local universe and they are believed to be the first galaxies to form in the universe. Here we study the interaction between star formation evolution and the interstellar medium from which stars form. In the sample, we detected 306 holes with sizes ranging from about 38 pc to 2.3 kpc, the expansion rates varying from 5 to 30 km s-1, and the estimated kinetic age varying from 1 Myr to 127 Myr. The distribution of the holes per unit area is found nearly constant both inside (51%) and outside (49%) of the V-band break radius, where the radial luminosity function changes slope. We derived surface and volume porosity and found that porosity doesn't correlate with star formation rate (SFR) for the LITTLE THINGS sample. Assuming that the holes are formed from the stellar feedback, we calculated the supernova rate (SNR) and the SFR. We did find a correlation between the SFR calculated from Hα (a star formation tracer) and the SFR estimated from the SNR, consistent with hole formation from stellar feedback. The relation between the estimated kinetic ages of the holes with the SNR gives the indication of the star formation history.

  4. Accessing the structural diversity of pyridone alkaloids: concise total synthesis of rac-citridone A.

    PubMed

    Fotiadou, Anna D; Zografos, Alexandros L

    2011-09-01

    A unique route to the structural diversity of pyridone alkaloids is described based on the concept of a common synthetic strategy. Three different core structure analogues corresponding to akanthomycin, septoriamycin A, and citridone A have been prepared by using a highly selective and novel carbocyclization reaction.

  5. Global mammal beta diversity shows parallel assemblage structure in similar but isolated environments.

    PubMed

    Penone, Caterina; Weinstein, Ben G; Graham, Catherine H; Brooks, Thomas M; Rondinini, Carlo; Hedges, S Blair; Davidson, Ana D; Costa, Gabriel C

    2016-08-31

    The taxonomic, phylogenetic and trait dimensions of beta diversity each provide us unique insights into the importance of historical isolation and environmental conditions in shaping global diversity. These three dimensions should, in general, be positively correlated. However, if similar environmental conditions filter species with similar trait values, then assemblages located in similar environmental conditions, but separated by large dispersal barriers, may show high taxonomic, high phylogenetic, but low trait beta diversity. Conversely, we expect lower phylogenetic diversity, but higher trait biodiversity among assemblages that are connected but are in differing environmental conditions. We calculated all pairwise comparisons of approximately 110 × 110 km grid cells across the globe for more than 5000 mammal species (approx. 70 million comparisons). We considered realms as units representing geographical distance and historical isolation and biomes as units with similar environmental conditions. While beta diversity dimensions were generally correlated, we highlight geographical regions of decoupling among beta diversity dimensions. Our analysis shows that assemblages from tropical forests in different realms had low trait dissimilarity while phylogenetic beta diversity was significantly higher than expected, suggesting potential convergent evolution. Low trait beta diversity was surprisingly not found between isolated deserts, despite harsh environmental conditions. Overall, our results provide evidence for parallel assemblage structure of mammal assemblages driven by environmental conditions at a global scale. PMID:27559061

  6. WFPC2 Imaging of Dust Structures and Star Formation in the Disk-Halo Interface of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Blair

    1999-07-01

    WFPC2 images of five edge-on spirals to study star formation and dusty interstellar clouds in the disk-halo interface of these galaxies. Ground-based and HST images of the nearby {9 Mpc} edge-on spiral NGC 891 show an unexpected web of hundreds of dust structures at heights 0.4 <= z <= 1.7 kpc {Howk & Savage 1997}. With masses >10^5-10^6 M{sun}, the more prominent extraplanar dust complexes may be sites of star formation at high-z, and there is evidence for H II regions associated with unresolved continuum sources far above the plane of NGC 891. We have established that such high-z dust features and H II regions are not unique to NGC 891. We propose to image five edge-on spiral galaxies {D 17 - 70 Mpc} with the WFPC2. The proposed BVI images will be used to identify sites of on- going star formation in the thick disks of these galaxies, all of which show evidence for high-z dust complexes, and with ground-based H Alpha images will be used to study the stellar content o f any such regions. The resolution and point-source sensitivity of the WFPC2 are crucial for studying these star-forming regions. We will also use these images to study interstellar matter in the thick disks of these galaxies with unprecedented detail and derive the fundamental properties of high-z dusty clouds-including sizes, extinctions, column densities, masses, and gravitational potential energies.

  7. Structure and Evolution of Interstellar Gas in Flattened, Rotating Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brighenti, Fabrizio; Mathews, William G.

    1996-10-01

    We study the time-dependent evolution of interstellar gas in a family of elliptical galaxies having identical masses and central densities but various ellipticities and total angular momenta. Dark halos are assumed to be flattened in the same manner as the stars. Normal mass loss from evolving galactic stars is sufficient to account for the amount of hot interstellar gas observed. Gas ejected from stars shares the random motions of the stars and the bulk stellar velocity relative to the local interstellar medium; the ejected gas thermalizes to a temperature similar to the virial temperature of the stellar system. The random stellar motions and galactic rotation are found by solving Jeans's equations in cylindrical geometry. For a sequence of galaxies differing only in degree of flattening-E0, E2, and E4-we find that the X-ray images and luminosities are not very different. As the hot interstellar gas loses energy by radiation, it cools to the very center of these nonrotating galaxies regardless of flattening. The X-ray surface brightness is generally slightly steeper than the optical surface brightness of starlight. However, when a small but typical galactic rotation is introduced, the evolution of the interstellar medium is radically altered. The average X- ray surface brightness {SIGMA}_X_ is lower in the galactic center compared to nonrotating galaxies. This lower {SIGMA}_X_ can be achieved without invoking an ad hoc mass dropout from the hot gas. As the gas cools in rotating galaxies, it is deposited in a large disk comparable in size to the effective radius. Alter evolving for several gigayears, most of the new gas in the cooling flow is constrained by angular momentum conservation to arrive at the outer edge of the disk, Causing a local enhancement in the X-ray surface brightness. This results in flattened inner X-ray surface brightness contours that have peanut shapes when viewed nearly perpendicular to the axis of galactic rotation. As gas approaches the

  8. Euphorbesulins A-P, Structurally Diverse Diterpenoids from Euphorbia esula.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Wu, Yan; Dalal, Seema; Cassera, Maria B; Yue, Jian-Min

    2016-08-26

    Aqueous ethanol extracts of powdered twigs of Euphorbia esula afforded 16 new diterpenoids, named euphorbesulins A-P. These euphorbesulins included presegetane (1-3), jatrophane (4-14), paraliane (15), and isopimarane (16) diterpenoids as well as six known analogues. Compounds 1-3 represent a rare type of presegetane diterpenoid. Their structures were determined by analysis of the spectroscopic data, and the absolute configuration of 1 was established by X-ray crystallography. Diterpenoid 7 showed low nanomolar antimalarial activity, while the remaining compounds showed only moderate or no antimalarial activity. PMID:27447736

  9. Diversity and spatial distribution of surname structure in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Okyu; Son, Woo-Sik

    2015-11-01

    We studied the population structure of South Korea by using the distributions of surnames for all 246 administrative regions. Every 4,177 surnames are distinguished by their bon-gwan which indicates the place of their family clans. Using Fisher's Alpha, we found that the level of inbreeding increases as the distance from the capital Seoul increases. We introduced the Shannon index to measure the level of spatial diffusion for each surname population, and the geographical clusters based on similarities of the surname compositions among the regions show almost exact agreement with those at the administrative districts.

  10. Human LDL Structural Diversity Studied by IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Higuero, José A.; Salvador, Ana M.; Martín, Cesar; Milicua, José Carlos G.; Arrondo, José L. R.

    2014-01-01

    Lipoproteins are responsible for cholesterol traffic in humans. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) delivers cholesterol from liver to peripheral tissues. A misleading delivery can lead to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. LDL has a single protein, apoB-100, that binds to a specific receptor. It is known that the failure associated with a deficient protein-receptor binding leads to plaque formation. ApoB-100 is a large single lipid-associated polypeptide difficulting the study of its structure. IR spectroscopy is a technique suitable to follow the different conformational changes produced in apoB-100 because it is not affected by the size of the protein or the turbidity of the sample. We have analyzed LDL spectra of different individuals and shown that, even if there are not big structural changes, a different pattern in the intensity of the band located around 1617 cm−1 related with strands embedded in the lipid monolayer, can be associated with a different conformational rearrangement that could affect to a protein interacting region with the receptor. PMID:24642788

  11. The morphology of faint galaxies in Medium Deep Survey images using WFPC2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Casertano, S.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G. F.; Glazebrook, K.; Santiago, B.; Huchra, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    First results from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey images taken with Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) demonstrate that galaxy classifications can be reliably performed to magnitudes I814 approximately less than 22.0 in the F815W band. Published spectroscopic surveys to this depth indicate a mean redshift of bar-z approximately 0.5. We have classified over 200 galaxies in nine WFPC2 fields according to a basic morphological scheme. The majority of these faint galaxies appear to be similar to regular Hubble-sequence examples observed at low redshift. To the precision of our classification scheme, the relative proportion of spheroidal and disk systems of normal appearance is as expected from nearby samples, indicating that the bulk of the local galaxy population was in place at half the Hubble time. However, the most intriguing result is the relatively high proportion (approximately 40%) of objects which are in some way anomalous, and which may be of relevance in understanding the origin of the familiar excess population of faint galaxies established by others. These diverse objects include apparently interacting pairs whose multiple structure is only revealed with HST's angular resolution, galaxies with superluminous star-forming regions, diffuse low surface brightness galaxies of various forms, and compact galaxies. These anomalous galaxies contribute a substantial fraction of the excess counts at our limiting magnitude, and may provide insights into the 'faint blue galaxy' problem.

  12. Structural Diversity and Function of Xyloglucan Sidechain Substituents

    PubMed Central

    Schultink, Alex; Liu, Lifeng; Zhu, Lei; Pauly, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Xyloglucan (XyG) is a hemicellulose found in the cell walls of all land plants including early-divergent groups such as liverworts, hornworts and mosses. The basic structure of XyG, a xylosylated glucan, is similar in all of these plants but additional substituents can vary depending on plant family, tissue, and developmental stage. A comprehensive list of known XyG sidechain substituents is assembled including their occurrence within plant families, thereby providing insight into the evolutionary origin of the various sidechains. Recent advances in DNA sequencing have enabled comparative genomics approaches for the identification of XyG biosynthetic enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana as well as in non-model plant species. Characterization of these biosynthetic genes not only allows the determination of their substrate specificity but also provides insights into the function of the various substituents in plant growth and development. PMID:27135518

  13. Initial genetic diversity enhances population establishment and alters genetic structuring of a newly established Daphnia metapopulation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christopher J; Pantel, Jelena H; Schulz, Kimberly L; Cáceres, Carla E

    2016-07-01

    When newly created habitats are initially colonized by genotypes with rapid population growth rates, later arriving colonists may be prevented from establishing. Although these priority effects have been documented in multiple systems, their duration may be influenced by the diversity of the founding population. We conducted a large-scale field manipulation to investigate how initial clonal diversity influences temporal and landscape patterns of genetic structure in a developing metapopulation. Six genotypes of obligately asexual Daphnia pulex were stocked alone (no clonal diversity) or in combination ('high' clonal diversity) into newly created experimental woodland ponds. We also measured the population growth rate of all clones in the laboratory when raised on higher-quality and lower-quality resources. Our predictions were that in the 3 years following stocking, clonally diverse populations would be more likely to persist than nonclonally diverse populations and exhibit evidence for persistent founder effects. We expected that faster growing clones would be found in more pools and comprise a greater proportion of individuals genotyped from the landscape. Genetic composition, both locally and regionally, changed significantly following stocking. Six of 27 populations exhibited evidence for persistent founder effects, and populations stocked with 'high' clonal diversity were more likely to exhibit these effects than nonclonally diverse populations. Performance in the laboratory was not predictive of clonal persistence or overall dominance in the field. Hence, we conclude that although laboratory estimates of fitness did not fully explain metapopulation genetic structure, initial clonal diversity did enhance D. pulex population establishment and persistence in this system.

  14. BaLROG: The Influence of Bars on the Dynamical Structure in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, M. K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Díaz-García, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Knapen, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    Using the BaLROG (Bars in Low Redshift Optical Galaxies) sample of 16 morphologically distinct barred spirals, we constrain the influence of bars on nearby galaxies observationally. Our sample appears small compared to ongoing IFU surveys, but offers a tenfold sharper spatial resolution (˜100 pc) as each galaxy is a mosaic of several pointings observed with the IFU spectrograph SAURON. We demonstrate a correlation between the bar strength Qb determined from classical torque analysis using 3.6 μm Spitzer (S4G) images, with Qkin, a kinematic torque, calculated via our new method based solely on the kinematics. Using a large number of N-body simulations, we verify this correlation and the measurement of Qb. We also determine bar strengths from ionized gas kinematics and find that they are ˜2.5 larger than those measured from stellar kinematics. Further, inner kinematic features related to bars as predicted by simulations seem to be stronger for stronger bars. We find a stellar angular momentum dip at 0.2±0.1 bar lengths. In these central regions, about half of our sample also exhibits an anti-correlation of h3 - stellar velocity (v/σ). An increased flattening of the stellar σ gradient with increasing bar strength supports the notion of bar-induced orbit mixing. Our results constrain the spatial scales and magnitude of a kinematic influence of bar-driven secular evolution in present day galaxies.

  15. Structural diversity and defensive properties of norditerpenoid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    González-Coloma, Azucena; Reina, Matías; Medinaveitia, Alberto; Guadaño, Ana; Santana, Omar; Martínez-Díaz, Rafael; Ruiz-Mesía, Lastenia; Alva, Allenger; Grandez, Maritza; Díaz, Rafael; Gavín, José A; De la Fuente, Gabriel

    2004-07-01

    We have tested the insect antifeedant and toxic activity of 43 norditerpenoid alkaloids on Spodoptera littoralis and Leptinotarsa decemlineata including eserine (physostigmine), anabasine, and atropine. Antifeedant effects of the test compounds were structure- and species-dependent. The most active antifeedants to L. decemlineata were 1,14-diacetylcardiopetaline (9) and 18-hydroxy- 14-O-methylgadesine (33), followed by 8-O-methylconsolarine (12), 14-O-acetyldelectinine (27), karakoline (7), cardiopetaline (8), 18-O-demethylpubescenine (13), 14-O-acetyldeltatsine (18), takaosamine (21), ajadine (24), and 8-O-methylcolumbianine (6) (EC50 < 1 microg/cm2). This insect showed a moderate response to atropine. S. littoralis had the strongest antifeedant response to 24, 18, 14-O-acetyldelcosine (19), and delphatine (29) (EC50 < 3 microg/cm2). None of the model substances affected the feeding behavior of this insect. The most toxic compound to L. decemlineata was aconitine (1), followed by cardiopetalidine (10) (% mortality > 60), 14-deacetylpubescenine (14), 18-O-benzoyl-18-O-demethyl-14-O-deacetylpubescenine (17), 14-O-acetyldelcosine (19), 14-deacetylajadine (25) and methyllycaconitine (30) (% mortality > 45). Orally injected S. littoralis larvae were negatively affected by 1, cardiopetaline (8), 10, 1,14-O-acetylcardiopetalidina (11), 12, 14, 1,18-O-diacetyl-19-oxo-gigactonine (41), olivimine (43), and eserine in varying degrees. Their antifeedant or insecticidal potencies did not parallel their reported nAChR binding activity, but did correlate with the agonist/antagonist insecticidal/antifeedant model proposed for nicotininc insecticides. A few compounds [14, tuguaconitine (38), 14-demethyldelboxine (40), 19, dehydrodelsoline (36), 18-O-demethylpubescenine (13), 41, 9, and delcosine (23)] had selective cytotoxic effects to ward insect-derived Sf9 cells. None were cytotoxic to mammalian CHO cells and none increased Trypanosoma cruzi mortality. The selective cytotoxic

  16. Structure and substructure analysis of DAFT/FADA galaxy clusters in the [0.4-0.9] redshift range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guennou, L.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Ulmer, M. P.; Clowe, D.; LeBrun, V.; Martinet, N.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Basa, S.; Benoist, C.; Biviano, A.; Cappi, A.; Cypriano, E. S.; Gavazzi, R.; Halliday, C.; Ilbert, O.; Jullo, E.; Just, D.; Limousin, M.; Márquez, I.; Mazure, A.; Murphy, K. J.; Plana, H.; Rostagni, F.; Russeil, D.; Schirmer, M.; Slezak, E.; Tucker, D.; Zaritsky, D.; Ziegler, B.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The DAFT/FADA survey is based on the study of ~90 rich (masses found in the literature >2 × 1014 M⊙) and moderately distant clusters (redshifts 0.4 < z < 0.9), all with HST imaging data available. This survey has two main objectives: to constrain dark energy (DE) using weak lensing tomography on galaxy clusters and to build a database (deep multi-band imaging allowing photometric redshift estimates, spectroscopic data, X-ray data) of rich distant clusters to study their properties. Aims: We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range are available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. Methods: In X-rays, we analysed the XMM-Newton data available, fit a β-model, and subtracted it to identify residuals. We used Chandra data, when available, to identify point sources. In the optical, we applied a Serna & Gerbal (SG) analysis to clusters with at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts available in the cluster range. We discuss the substructure detection efficiencies of both methods. Results: XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a β-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. The choice of a minimum number of 15 redshifts implies that only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first

  17. Integrative phenomics reveals insight into the structure of phenotypic diversity in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Skelly, Daniel A.; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Riffle, Michael; Connelly, Caitlin F.; Kerr, Emily O.; Johansson, Marnie; Jaschob, Daniel; Graczyk, Beth; Shulman, Nicholas J.; Wakefield, Jon; Cooper, Sara J.; Fields, Stanley; Noble, William S.; Muller, Eric G.D.; Davis, Trisha N.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Akey, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the quantitative characteristics and structure of phenotypic diversity, we measured over 14,000 transcript, protein, metabolite, and morphological traits in 22 genetically diverse strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. More than 50% of all measured traits varied significantly across strains [false discovery rate (FDR) = 5%]. The structure of phenotypic correlations is complex, with 85% of all traits significantly correlated with at least one other phenotype (median = 6, maximum = 328). We show how high-dimensional molecular phenomics data sets can be leveraged to accurately predict phenotypic variation between strains, often with greater precision than afforded by DNA sequence information alone. These results provide new insights into the spectrum and structure of phenotypic diversity and the characteristics influencing the ability to accurately predict phenotypes. PMID:23720455

  18. Genetic diversity and structure in Asian native goat analyzed by newly developed SNP markers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bang Zhong; Kato, Taiki; Kaneda, Makoto; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Sasazaki, Shinji; Mannen, Hideyuki

    2013-08-01

    In the current study, a total of 65 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the intron region were developed in goat (Capra hircus) by utilizing genomic information of cattle and sheep due to poor available genomic information on goat. Using these markers, we carried out genetic diversity and structure analyses for 10 Asian goat populations. The phylogenetic tree and principal components analysis showed good correspondence between clustered populations and their geographic locations. The STRUCTURE software analysis illustrated six divergent genetic structures among 10 populations. Myanmar and Cambodia populations showed high admixture patterns with different ancestry, suggesting genetic introgression into native goat populations. We also investigated the correlation between genetic diversity and geographic distance from a domestication center. This result showed a decreasing trend of genetic diversity according to the distance (P = 0.014). This result supported common consensus that western Asia is one of the centers of origin for modern Asian domestic goat.

  19. A Multidimensional Diversity‐Oriented Synthesis Strategy for Structurally Diverse and Complex Macrocycles

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Feilin; Kunciw, Dominique L.; Wilcke, David; Stokes, Jamie E.; Galloway, Warren R. J. D.; Bartlett, Sean; Sore, Hannah F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Synthetic macrocycles are an attractive area in drug discovery. However, their use has been hindered by a lack of versatile platforms for the generation of structurally (and thus shape) diverse macrocycle libraries. Herein, we describe a new concept in library synthesis, termed multidimensional diversity‐oriented synthesis, and its application towards macrocycles. This enabled the step‐efficient generation of a library of 45 novel, structurally diverse, and highly‐functionalized macrocycles based around a broad range of scaffolds and incorporating a wide variety of biologically relevant structural motifs. The synthesis strategy exploited the diverse reactivity of aza‐ylides and imines, and featured eight different macrocyclization methods, two of which were novel. Computational analyses reveal a broad coverage of molecular shape space by the library and provides insight into how the various diversity‐generating steps of the synthesis strategy impact on molecular shape. PMID:27484830

  20. Studying the large scale structure and interstellar medium of galaxies during the epochs of peak cosmic star formation and Reionization with infrared fine structure lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzgil, Bade D.

    Infrared (IR) fine-structure (FS) lines from trace metals in the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies are valuable diagnostics of the physical conditions in a broad range of astrophysical environments, such gas irradiated by stellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons or X-rays from accreting supermassive black holes, called active galactic nuclei (AGN). The transparency of these lines to dust and their high escape fractions into the intergalactic medium (IGM) render them as useful probes to study the epochs of peak cosmic star formation (SF) and Reionization. Chapter 1 of this thesis is a study of the ISM of the Cloverleaf quasar. Observations of IR FS lines from singly ionized carbon and neutral oxygen have allowed us to assess the physical conditions---parametrized by their gas density and the impingent FUV flux---prevalent in atomic gas heated by stellar FUV photons. We find that UV heating from local SF is not sufficient to explain the measured FS and molecular luminosities, and suggest that X-ray heating from the AGN is required to simultaneously explain both sets of data. The general picture of the Cloverleaf ISM that emerges from our composite model is one where the [CII] and [OI]63 line emission is produced primarily within PDRs and HII regions of a 1.3-kpc wide starburst, which is embedded in a denser XDR component that is the dominant source of heating for the CO gas. The fact that the star-forming PDR and HII region gas is co-spatial with the XDR---and within ˜ 650 pc of the accreting black hole---provides strong evidence that SF is ongoing while immersed in a strong X-ray radiation field provided by the nearby AGN. This finding has implications for the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. The work in this chapter will be submitted for first-author publication imminently. In Chapter 2, we explore the possibility of studying the redshifted far-IR fine-structure line emission using the three-dimensional (3-D) power spectra

  1. Superluminous Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Patrick M.; Lanz, Lauranne; Nader, Cyril; Helou, George

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of spiral galaxies that are as optically luminous as elliptical brightest cluster galaxies, with r-band monochromatic luminosity Lr = 8-14L* (4.3-7.5 × 1044 erg s-1). These super spiral galaxies are also giant and massive, with diameter D = 57-134 kpc and stellar mass Mstars = 0.3-3.4 × 1011M⊙. We find 53 super spirals out of a complete sample of 1616 SDSS galaxies with redshift z < 0.3 and Lr > 8L*. The closest example is found at z = 0.089. We use existing photometry to estimate their stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs). The SDSS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer colors are consistent with normal star-forming spirals on the blue sequence. However, the extreme masses and rapid SFRs of 5-65 M⊙ yr-1 place super spirals in a sparsely populated region of parameter space, above the star-forming main sequence of disk galaxies. Super spirals occupy a diverse range of environments, from isolation to cluster centers. We find four super spiral galaxy systems that are late-stage major mergers—a possible clue to their formation. We suggest that super spirals are a remnant population of unquenched, massive disk galaxies. They may eventually become massive lenticular galaxies after they are cut off from their gas supply and their disks fade.

  2. Diversity in the Strength and Structure of Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Anne M.; Duan, Xinjie; Aziz, Khaled M.; Hill, Michael R.; Watkins, Simon C.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are pathological enlargements of brain arteries that are believed to arise from progressive wall degeneration and remodeling. Earlier work using classical histological approaches identified variability in cerebral aneurysm mural content, ranging from layered walls with intact endothelium and aligned smooth muscle cells, to thin, hypocellular walls. Here, we take advantage of recent advances in multiphoton microscopy, to provide novel results for collagen fiber architecture in 15 human aneurysm domes without staining or fixation as well as in 12 control cerebral arteries. For all aneurysm samples, the elastic lamina was absent and the abluminal collagen fibers had similar diameters to control arteries. In contrast, the collagen fibers on the luminal side showed great variability in both diameter and architecture ranging from dense fiber layers to sparse fiber constructs suggestive of ineffective remodeling efforts. The mechanical integrity of eight aneurysm samples was assessed using uniaxial experiments, revealing two sub-classes (i) vulnerable unruptured aneurysms (low failure stress and failure pressure), and (ii) strong unruptured aneurysms (high failure stress and failure pressure). These results suggest a need to refine the end-point of risk assessment studies that currently do not distinguish risk levels among unruptured aneurysms. We propose that a measure of wall integrity that identifies this vulnerable wall subpopulation will be useful for interpreting future biological and structural data. PMID:25632891

  3. The gut microbiota of insects - diversity in structure and function.

    PubMed

    Engel, Philipp; Moran, Nancy A

    2013-09-01

    Insect guts present distinctive environments for microbial colonization, and bacteria in the gut potentially provide many beneficial services to their hosts. Insects display a wide range in degree of dependence on gut bacteria for basic functions. Most insect guts contain relatively few microbial species as compared to mammalian guts, but some insects harbor large gut communities of specialized bacteria. Others are colonized only opportunistically and sparsely by bacteria common in other environments. Insect digestive tracts vary extensively in morphology and physicochemical properties, factors that greatly influence microbial community structure. One obstacle to the evolution of intimate associations with gut microorganisms is the lack of dependable transmission routes between host individuals. Here, social insects, such as termites, ants, and bees, are exceptions: social interactions provide opportunities for transfer of gut bacteria, and some of the most distinctive and consistent gut communities, with specialized beneficial functions in nutrition and protection, have been found in social insect species. Still, gut bacteria of other insects have also been shown to contribute to nutrition, protection from parasites and pathogens, modulation of immune responses, and communication. The extent of these roles is still unclear and awaits further studies. PMID:23692388

  4. Structural and functional diversity of ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases.

    PubMed

    Aliverti, Alessandro; Pandini, Vittorio; Pennati, Andrea; de Rosa, Matteo; Zanetti, Giuliana

    2008-06-15

    Although all ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases (FNRs) catalyze the same reaction, i.e. the transfer of reducing equivalents between NADP(H) and ferredoxin, they belong to two unrelated families of proteins: the plant-type and the glutathione reductase-type of FNRs. Aim of this review is to provide a general classification scheme for these enzymes, to be used as a framework for the comparison of their properties. Furthermore, we report on some recent findings, which significantly increased the understanding of the structure-function relationships of FNRs, i.e. the ability of adrenodoxin reductase and its homologs to catalyze the oxidation of NADP(+) to its 4-oxo derivative, and the properties of plant-type FNRs from non-photosynthetic organisms. Plant-type FNRs from bacteria and Apicomplexan parasites provide examples of novel ways of FAD- and NADP(H)-binding. The recent characterization of an FNR from Plasmodium falciparum brings these enzymes into the field of drug design.

  5. Necrosis avid contrast agents: functional similarity versus structural diversity.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yicheng; Bormans, Guy; Chen, Feng; Verbruggen, Alfons; Marchal, Guy

    2005-08-01

    Two categories of necrosis-avid contrast agents (NACAs), namely porphyrin- and nonporphyrin-based complexes, have thus far been discovered as necrosis-targeting markers for noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identification of acute myocardial infarction, assessment of tissue or organ viability, and therapeutic evaluation after interventional therapies. In addition to necrosis labeling, other less-specific functions, such as first-pass perfusion, blood pool contrast effect, hepatobiliary contrast enhancement (CE), adrenal and spleen CE, and renal functional imaging, also are demonstrated with NACAs. Despite various investigations with a collection of clues in favor of certain hypotheses, the mechanisms of such a unique targetability for NACAs still remain to be elucidated. However, a few things have become clear that porphyrin-like structures are not necessary for necrosis avidity and the albumin binding is not the supposed driving force but only a parallel nonspecific feature shared by both NACAs and non-NACA substances. Although the research and development of NACAs still remain in preclinical stage at a relatively small scale, their significance rests upon striking enhancement effects, which may warrant their eventual versatile clinical applications. The present review article is intended to summarize the cumulated facts about the evolving research on this topic, to demonstrate experimental observations for better understanding of the mechanisms, to trigger broader public interests and more intensive research activities, and to advocate, toward both academics and industries, further promotion of preclinical and clinical development of this unique and promising class of contrast agents. PMID:16024991

  6. Experimental warming effects on the bacterial community structure and diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Han, S.; Adams, J.; Son, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the responses of soil bacterial community to future temperature increase by conducting open-field warming experiment. We conducted an open-field experimental warming system using infra-red heater in 2011 and regulated the temperature of warmed plots by 3oC higher than that of control plots constantly. The seeds of Pinus densiflora, Abies holophylla, Abies koreana, Betula costata, Quercus variabilis, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, and Zelkova serrata were planted in each 1 m × 1 m plot (n=3) in April, 2012. We collected soil samples from the rhizosphere of 7 tree species. DNA was extracted and PCR-amplified for the bacterial 16S gene targeting V1-V3 region. The paired-end sequencing was performed at Beijing Genome Institute (BGI, Hong Kong, China) using 2× 100 bp Hiseq2000 (Illumina). This study aimed to answer the following prediction/hypothesis: 1) Experimental warming will change the structure of soil bacterial community, 2) There will be distinct 'indicator group' which response to warming treatment relatively more sensitive than other groups. 3) Warming treatment will enhance the microbial activity in terms of soil respiration. 4) The rhizoplane bacterial communities for each of 7 tree species will show different response pattern to warming treatment. Since the sequence data does not arrive before the submission deadline, therefore, we would like to present the results and discussions on December 2014, AGU Fall Meeting.

  7. Diversity in the Strength and Structure of Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Anne M; Duan, Xinjie; Aziz, Khaled M; Hill, Michael R; Watkins, Simon C; Cebral, Juan R

    2015-07-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are pathological enlargements of brain arteries that are believed to arise from progressive wall degeneration and remodeling. Earlier work using classical histological approaches identified variability in cerebral aneurysm mural content, ranging from layered walls with intact endothelium and aligned smooth muscle cells, to thin, hypocellular walls. Here, we take advantage of recent advances in multiphoton microscopy, to provide novel results for collagen fiber architecture in 15 human aneurysm domes without staining or fixation as well as in 12 control cerebral arteries. For all aneurysm samples, the elastic lamina was absent and the abluminal collagen fibers had similar diameters to control arteries. In contrast, the collagen fibers on the luminal side showed great variability in both diameter and architecture ranging from dense fiber layers to sparse fiber constructs suggestive of ineffective remodeling efforts. The mechanical integrity of eight aneurysm samples was assessed using uniaxial experiments, revealing two sub-classes (i) vulnerable unruptured aneurysms (low failure stress and failure pressure), and (ii) strong unruptured aneurysms (high failure stress and failure pressure). These results suggest a need to refine the end-point of risk assessment studies that currently do not distinguish risk levels among unruptured aneurysms. We propose that a measure of wall integrity that identifies this vulnerable wall subpopulation will be useful for interpreting future biological and structural data. PMID:25632891

  8. Scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities using functional diversity and community deconstruction approaches.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro Giovâni da; Hernández, Malva Isabel Medina

    2015-01-01

    Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass) for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae) community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in the distribution

  9. Scale-Dependence of Processes Structuring Dung Beetle Metacommunities Using Functional Diversity and Community Deconstruction Approaches

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Pedro Giovâni; Hernández, Malva Isabel Medina

    2015-01-01

    Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass) for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae) community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in the distribution

  10. Analysis of population structure and genetic diversity of Egyptian and exotic rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Salem, Khaled F M; Sallam, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the population structure and genetic diversity is a very important goal to improve the economic value of crops. In rice, a loss of genetic diversity in the last few centuries is observed. To address this challenge, a set of 22 lines from three different regions - India (two), and Philippines (six), and Egypt (14) - were used to assess the genetic diversity and the features of population structure. These genotypes were analyzed using 106 SSR alleles that showed a clear polymorphism among the lines. Genetic diversity was estimated based on the number of different alleles, polymorphism information content (PIC), and gene diversity. A total of 106 SSR alleles was identified from the 23 SSR loci and used to study the population structure and carry out a cluster analysis. All SSR loci showed a wide range of the number of different alleles extended from two (one loci) to seven alleles (three loci). Five and eight loci showed high PIC and gene diversity (≥0.70), respectively. The results of population structure are in agreement with cluster analysis results. Both analyses revealed two different subpopulations (G1 and G2) with different genetic properties in number of private alleles, number of different alleles (Na), number of effective alleles (Ne), expected heterozygosity (He), and Shannon's Information Index (SII). Our findings indicate that five SSR loci (RM 111, RM 307, RM 22, RM 19, and RM 271) could be used in breeding programs to enhance the marker-assisted selection through QTL mapping and association studies. A high genetic diversity found between genotypes which can be exploited to improve and produce rice cultivars for important traits (e.g. high agronomic features and tolerance to biotic or/and abiotic stresses).

  11. FAR-INFRARED FINE-STRUCTURE LINE DIAGNOSTICS OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Farrah, D.; Petty, S. M.; Harris, K.; Lebouteiller, V.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Pearson, C.; Rigopoulou, D.; Smith, H. A.; González-Alfonso, E.; Clements, D. L.; Efstathiou, A.; Cormier, D.; Afonso, J.; Hurley, P.; Borys, C.; Verma, A.; Cooray, A.; Salvatelli, V.

    2013-10-10

    We present Herschel observations of 6 fine-structure lines in 25 ultraluminous infrared galaxies at z < 0.27. The lines, [O III]52 μm, [N III]57 μm, [O I]63 μm, [N II]122 μm, [O I]145 μm, and [C II]158 μm, are mostly single Gaussians with widths <600 km s{sup –1} and luminosities of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} L{sub ☉}. There are deficits in the [O I]63/L{sub IR}, [N II]/L{sub IR}, [O I]145/L{sub IR}, and [C II]/L{sub IR} ratios compared to lower luminosity systems. The majority of the line deficits are consistent with dustier H II regions, but part of the [C II] deficit may arise from an additional mechanism, plausibly charged dust grains. This is consistent with some of the [C II] originating from photodissociation regions or the interstellar medium (ISM). We derive relations between far-IR line luminosities and both the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We find that [N II] and both [O I] lines are good tracers of the IR luminosity and star formation rate. In contrast, [C II] is a poor tracer of the IR luminosity and star formation rate, and does not improve as a tracer of either quantity if the [C II] deficit is accounted for. The continuum luminosity densities also correlate with the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We derive ranges for the gas density and ultraviolet radiation intensity of 10{sup 1} < n < 10{sup 2.5} and 10{sup 2.2} < G{sub 0} < 10{sup 3.6}, respectively. These ranges depend on optical type, the importance of star formation, and merger stage. We do not find relationships between far-IR line properties and several other parameters: active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity, merger stage, mid-IR excitation, and SMBH mass. We conclude that these far-IR lines arise from gas heated by starlight, and that they are not strongly influenced by AGN activity.

  12. Structural Diversity and Biological Activities of Indole Diketopiperazine Alkaloids from Fungi.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yang-Min; Liang, Xi-Ai; Kong, Yang; Jia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Indole diketopiperazine alkaloids are secondary metabolites of microorganisms that are widely distributed in filamentous fungi, especially in the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium of the phylum Ascomycota or sac fungi. These alkaloids represent a group of natural products characterized by diversity in both chemical structures and biological activities. This review aims to summarize 166 indole diketopiperazine alkaloids from fungi published from 1944 to mid-2015. The emphasis is on diverse chemical structures within these alkaloids and their relevant biological activities. The aim is to assess which of these compounds merit further study for purposes of drug development. PMID:27538469

  13. Nematode community structure and diversity pattern in sandy beaches of Qingdao, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Er; Mu, Fanghong; Zhang, Zhinan; Yang, Shichao; Zhang, Ting; Li, Jia

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the diversity and structure of free-living marine nematode communities at three sandy beaches representing typical intertidal environments of a temperate zone in Qingdao, Shandong Province, China. Average nematode abundance ranged from 1006 to 2170 ind. 10 cm-2, and a total of 34 nematode genera were recorded, of which only 8 were common in all the studied beaches. Pielou's evenness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index were the lowest at the second beach where nematode abundance was the highest. The highest species diversity index coincided with the lowest nematode abundance at Shilaoren beach. Sediment median grain size, sorting coefficient, and chlorophyll-a content were essential for differentiation in nematode abundance and species diversity, whereas taxonomic diversity of nematode was homogeneous across the three beaches. In 0-20 cm sediment profile, nematode abundance declined abruptly with depth, whereas nematode diversity changed gently with obvious difference in 16-20 cm layer. Sediment granulometry and chlorophyll- a content were the two foremost factors which influenced the vertical distribution pattern of nematode generic diversity. Non-selective deposit feeders constituted the most dominant trophic group, followed by epistratum feeders. Bathylaimus (family: Tripyloididae) dominated at the second and Yangkou beach, while Theristus (family: Xyalidae) prevailed at Shilaoren beach. Omnivores and predators became important at Shilaoren beach because of the high proportion of Enoplolaimus. Even though, nematode community of the studied beaches did not differ significantly from each other.

  14. Characterizing Croatian Wheat Germplasm Diversity and Structure in a European Context by DArT Markers

    PubMed Central

    Novoselović, Dario; Bentley, Alison R.; Šimek, Ruđer; Dvojković, Krešimir; Sorrells, Mark E.; Gosman, Nicolas; Horsnell, Richard; Drezner, Georg; Šatović, Zlatko

    2016-01-01

    Narrowing the genetic base available for future genetic progress is a major concern to plant breeders. In order to avoid this, strategies to characterize and protect genetic diversity in regional breeding pools are required. In this study, 89 winter wheat cultivars released in Croatia between 1936 and 2006 were genotyped using 1,229 DArT (diversity array technology) markers to assess the diversity and population structure. In order to place Croatian breeding pool (CBP) in a European context, Croatian wheat cultivars were compared to 523 European cultivars from seven countries using a total of 166 common DArT markers. The results show higher genetic diversity in the wheat breeding pool from Central Europe (CE) as compared to that from Northern and Western European (NWE) countries. The most of the genetic diversity was attributable to the differences among cultivars within countries. When the geographical criterion (CE vs. NWE) was applied, highly significant difference between regions was obtained that accounted for 16.19% of the total variance, revealing that the CBP represents genetic variation not currently captured in elite European wheat. The current study emphasizes the important contribution made by plant breeders to maintaining wheat genetic diversity and suggests that regional breeding is essential to the maintenance of this diversity. The usefulness of open-access wheat datasets is also highlighted. PMID:26941756

  15. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria malaccensis revealed potential for future conservation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pradeep; Nag, Akshay; Parmar, Rajni; Ghosh, Sneha; Bhau, Brijmohan Singh; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis,is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A. malaccensis accessions from 10 home gardens of three states of northeast India were assessed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Of the 1153 fragments amplified with four AFLP primer combinations, 916 (79.4%) were found to be polymorphic. Polymorphic information content (PIC) and marker index (MI) of each primer combination correlate significantly with the number of genotypes resolved. Overall, a high genetic diversity (avg. 71.85%) was recorded. Further, high gene flow (Nm: 3.37), low genetic differentiation (FST: 0.069) and high within population genetic variation (93%) suggests that most of the genetic diversity is restricted within population. Neighbour joining (NJ), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and Bayesian-based STRUCTURE grouped all the accessions in two clusters with significant intermixing between populations, therefore, revealed that two genetically distinct gene pools are operating in the A. malaccensis populations cultivated in home gardens. Based on the various diversity inferences, five diverse populations (JOH, FN, HLF, DHM and ITN) were identified, which can be potentially exploited to develop conservation strategies for A. malaccensis.

  16. VIPERS: Unveiling the Combined Evolution of Galaxies and Large Scale Structure at 0.5≤z ≤1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovino, A.; Vipers Team

    2016-10-01

    The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) is the largest redshift survey ever conducted with the ESO telescopes. It has used the Very Large Telescope to collect nearly 100,000 redshifts from the general galaxy population at 0.5≤ z ≤1.2. With a combination of volume and sampling density that is unique for these redshifts, VIPERS allows statistical measurements of galaxy clustering and related cosmological quantities to be obtained on an equal footing with classic results from local redshift surveys. At the same time, the broad selection function and ancillary photometric data provide detailed information on the physical properties of the galaxy population and their relation to large-scale structure. This talk presents an overview of the results obtained so far, mostly based on the ˜ 55,000 galaxies forming the first public data release (PDR-1).

  17. STAR FORMATION AND UV COLORS OF THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE REPRESENTATIVE XMM-NEWTON CLUSTER STRUCTURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Megan; Bruch, Seth; Wang, Emily; Voit, G. Mark; Hicks, Amalia K.; Haarsma, Deborah B.; Croston, Judith H.; Pratt, Gabriel W.; O'Connell, Robert W.

    2010-06-01

    We present UV broadband photometry and optical emission-line measurements for a sample of 32 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in clusters of the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) with z = 0.06-0.18. The REXCESS clusters, chosen to study scaling relations in clusters of galaxies, have X-ray measurements of high quality. The trends of star formation and BCG colors with BCG and host properties can be investigated with this sample. The UV photometry comes from the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor, supplemented by existing archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer photometry. We detected H{alpha} and forbidden line emission in seven (22%) of these BCGs, in optical spectra obtained using the Southern Astrophysical Research Goodman spectrograph. All of these emission-line BCGs occupy clusters classified as cool cores (CCs) based on the central cooling time in the cluster core, for an emission-line incidence rate of 70% for BCGs in REXCESS CC clusters. Significant correlations between the H{alpha} equivalent widths, excess UV production in the BCG, and the presence of dense, X-ray bright intracluster gas with a short cooling time are seen, including the fact that all of the H{alpha} emitters inhabit systems with short central cooling times and high central intracluster medium densities. Estimates of the star formation rates based on H{alpha} and UV excesses are consistent with each other in these seven systems, ranging from 0.1to8 solar masses per year. The incidence of emission-line BCGs in the REXCESS sample is intermediate, somewhat lower than in other X-ray-selected samples ({approx}35%), and somewhat higher than but statistically consistent with optically selected, slightly lower redshift BCG samples ({approx}10%-15%). The UV-optical colors (UVW1 - R {approx}4.7 {+-} 0.3) of REXCESS BCGs without strong optical emission lines are consistent with those predicted from templates and observations of ellipticals dominated by old stellar populations. We see no

  18. TRACING THE PECULIAR DARK MATTER STRUCTURE IN THE GALAXY CLUSTER Cl 0024+17 WITH INTRACLUSTER STARS AND GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, M. J.

    2010-07-01

    Intracluster light (ICL) is believed to originate from the stars stripped from cluster galaxies. They are no longer gravitationally bound to individual galaxies, but to the cluster, and their smooth distribution potentially makes them serve as much denser tracers of the cluster dark matter than the sparsely distributed cluster galaxies. We present our study of the ICL in the galaxy cluster Cl 0024+17 using both Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Subaru data, where we previously reported the discovery of a ring-like dark matter structure with gravitational lensing. The ACS images provide much lower sky levels than ground-based data, and enable us to measure relative variation of surface brightness reliably. This analysis is repeated with the Subaru images to examine if consistent features are recovered despite a different reduction scheme and different instrumental characteristics. We find that the ICL profile clearly resembles the peculiar mass profile, which stops decreasing at r {approx} 50'' ({approx}265 kpc) and slowly increases until it turns over at r {approx} 75'' ({approx}397 kpc). This feature is seen in both ACS and Subaru images for nearly all available passband images while the features are in general stronger in red filters. The consistency across different filters and instruments strongly rules out the possibility that the feature might come from any residual, uncorrected calibration errors. In addition, our re-analysis of the cluster X-ray data shows that the peculiar mass structure is also indicated by a non-negligible (3.7{sigma} in Chandra and 2.4{sigma} in XMM-Newton) bump in the intracluster gas profile when the geometric center of the dark matter ring, not the peak of the X-ray emission, is chosen as the center of the radial bin. The location of the gas ring is closer to the center by {approx}15'' ({approx}80 kpc), raising an interesting possibility that the ring-like structure is expanding and the gas ring is lagging behind perhaps because

  19. Synthetic HI observations of spiral structure in the outer disk in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoperskov, Sergey A.; Bertin, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    > By means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, in a separate paper we have discussed the properties of non-axisymmetric density wave trains in the outermost regions of galaxy disks, based on the picture that self-excited global spiral modes in the bright optical stellar disk are accompanied by low-amplitude short trailing wave signals outside corotation; in the gas, such wave trains can penetrate through the outer Lindblad resonance and propagate outwards, forming prominent spiral patterns. In this paper we present the synthetic 21 cm velocity maps expected from simulated models of the outer gaseous disk, focusing on the case when the disk is dominated by a two-armed spiral pattern, but considering also other more complex situations. We discuss some aspects of the spiral pattern in the gaseous periphery of galaxy disks noted in our simulations that might be interesting to compare with specific observed cases.

  20. Structure and Formation of cD Galaxies: NGC 6166 in ABELL 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Ralf; Kormendy, John; Cornell, Mark E.; Fisher, David B.

    2015-07-01

     Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy is used to measure the velocity dispersion profile of the nearest prototypical cD galaxy, NGC 6166 in the cluster Abell 2199. We also present composite surface photometry from many telescopes. We confirm the defining feature of a cD galaxy; i.e., (we suggest), a halo of stars that fills the cluster center and that is controlled dynamically by cluster gravity, not by the central galaxy. Our HET spectroscopy shows that the velocity dispersion of NGC 6166 rises from σ ≃ 300 km s-1 in the inner r˜ 10\\prime\\prime to σ =865+/- 58 km s-1 at r ˜ 100″ in the cD halo. This extends published observations of an outward σ increase and shows for the first time that σ rises all the way to the cluster velocity dispersion of 819 ± 32 km s-1. We also observe that the main body of NGC 6166 moves at +206 ± 39 km s-1 with respect to the cluster mean velocity, but the velocity of the inner cD halo is ˜70 km s-1 closer to the cluster velocity. These results support our picture that cD halos consist of stars that were stripped from individual cluster galaxies by fast tidal encounters.  However, our photometry does not confirm the widespread view that cD halos are identifiable as an extra, low-surface-brightness component that is photometrically distinct from the inner, steep-Sérsic-function main body of an otherwise-normal giant elliptical galaxy. Instead, all of the brightness profile of NGC 6166 outside its core is described to ±0.037 V mag arcsec-2 by a single Sérsic function with index n≃ 8.3. The cD halo is not recognizable from photometry alone. This blurs the distinction between cluster-dominated cD halos and the similarly-large-Sérsic-index halos of giant, core-boxy-nonrotating ellipticals. These halos are believed to be accreted onto compact, high-redshift progenitors (“red nuggets”) by large numbers of minor mergers. They belong dynamically to their central galaxies. Still, cDs and core-boxy-nonrotating Es

  1. Does the habitat structure control the distribution and diversity of the Odonatofauna?

    PubMed

    Souza, A M; Fogaça, F N O; Cunico, A M; Higuti, J

    2015-08-01

    The statement that the habitat complexity and structure govern the abundance and diversity of biological communities has been widely investigated. In this context, we assumed the hypothesis of habitat heterogeneity, that is, the higher habitat complexity leads to greater diversity of Odonata. In addition, we analyzed the influence of habitat structure on the distribution of this community, and evaluated the effects of abiotic variables. Odonata larvae were collected with sieves and by electrofishing in ten neotropical streams belonging to the Pirapó River basin. Forty species of Odonata were registered, which were distributed in eight families, Libellulidae stood out with the highest richness. The high gamma diversity and distribution of Odonata were associated with habitat heterogeneity in these streams. However, the abiotic variables also seem to affect the distribution of Odonata species, in view of the impact of the land use in the vicinity of streams. PMID:26421772

  2. Does the habitat structure control the distribution and diversity of the Odonatofauna?

    PubMed

    Souza, A M; Fogaça, F N O; Cunico, A M; Higuti, J

    2015-08-01

    The statement that the habitat complexity and structure govern the abundance and diversity of biological communities has been widely investigated. In this context, we assumed the hypothesis of habitat heterogeneity, that is, the higher habitat complexity leads to greater diversity of Odonata. In addition, we analyzed the influence of habitat structure on the distribution of this community, and evaluated the effects of abiotic variables. Odonata larvae were collected with sieves and by electrofishing in ten neotropical streams belonging to the Pirapó River basin. Forty species of Odonata were registered, which were distributed in eight families, Libellulidae stood out with the highest richness. The high gamma diversity and distribution of Odonata were associated with habitat heterogeneity in these streams. However, the abiotic variables also seem to affect the distribution of Odonata species, in view of the impact of the land use in the vicinity of streams.

  3. A Portrait of Cold Gas in Galaxies at 60 pc Resolution and a Simple Method to Test Hypotheses That Link Small-scale ISM Structure to Galaxy-scale Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Hughes, Annie; Schruba, Andreas; Rosolowsky, Erik; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Colombo, Dario; Escala, Andres; Kramer, Carsten; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Meidt, Sharon; Pety, Jerome; Querejeta, Miguel; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Sliwa, Kazimierz; Usero, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The cloud-scale density, velocity dispersion, and gravitational boundedness of the interstellar medium (ISM) vary within and among galaxies. In turbulent models, these properties play key roles in the ability of gas to form stars. New high-fidelity, high-resolution surveys offer the prospect to measure these quantities across galaxies. We present a simple approach to make such measurements and to test hypotheses that link small-scale gas structure to star formation and galactic environment. Our calculations capture the key physics of the Larson scaling relations, and we show good correspondence between our approach and a traditional “cloud properties” treatment. However, we argue that our method is preferable in many cases because of its simple, reproducible characterization of all emission. Using, low-J 12CO data from recent surveys, we characterize the molecular ISM at 60 pc resolution in the Antennae, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), M31, M33, M51, and M74. We report the distributions of surface density, velocity dispersion, and gravitational boundedness at 60 pc scales and show galaxy-to-galaxy and intragalaxy variations in each. The distribution of flux as a function of surface density appears roughly lognormal with a 1σ width of ∼0.3 dex, though the center of this distribution varies from galaxy to galaxy. The 60 pc resolution line width and molecular gas surface density correlate well, which is a fundamental behavior expected for virialized or free-falling gas. Varying the measurement scale for the LMC and M31, we show that the molecular ISM has higher surface densities, lower line widths, and more self-gravity at smaller scales.

  4. Considering Future Potential Regarding Structural Diversity in Selection of Forest Reserves.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    A rich structural diversity in forests promotes biodiversity. Forests are dynamic and therefore it is crucial to consider future structural potential when selecting reserves, to make robust conservation decisions. We analyzed forests in boreal Sweden based on 17,599 National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots with the main aim to understand how effectiveness of reserves depends on the time dimension in the selection process, specifically by considering future structural diversity. In the study both the economic value and future values of 15 structural variables were simulated during a 100 year period. To get a net present structural value (NPSV), a single value covering both current and future values, we used four discounting alternatives: (1) only considering present values, (2) giving equal importance to values in each of the 100 years within the planning horizon, (3) applying an annual discount rate considering the risk that values could be lost, and (4) only considering the values in year 100. The four alternatives were evaluated in a reserve selection model under budget-constrained and area-constrained selections. When selecting young forests higher structural richness could be reached at a quarter of the cost over almost twice the area in a budget-constrained selection compared to an area-constrained selection. Our results point to the importance of considering future structural diversity in the selection of forest reserves and not as is done currently to base the selection on existing values. Targeting future values increases structural diversity and implies a relatively lower cost. Further, our results show that a re-orientation from old to young forests would imply savings while offering a more extensive reserve network with high structural qualities in the future. However, caution must be raised against a drastic reorientation of the current old-forest strategy since remnants of ancient forests will need to be prioritized due to their role for disturbance

  5. Considering Future Potential Regarding Structural Diversity in Selection of Forest Reserves.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    A rich structural diversity in forests promotes biodiversity. Forests are dynamic and therefore it is crucial to consider future structural potential when selecting reserves, to make robust conservation decisions. We analyzed forests in boreal Sweden based on 17,599 National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots with the main aim to understand how effectiveness of reserves depends on the time dimension in the selection process, specifically by considering future structural diversity. In the study both the economic value and future values of 15 structural variables were simulated during a 100 year period. To get a net present structural value (NPSV), a single value covering both current and future values, we used four discounting alternatives: (1) only considering present values, (2) giving equal importance to values in each of the 100 years within the planning horizon, (3) applying an annual discount rate considering the risk that values could be lost, and (4) only considering the values in year 100. The four alternatives were evaluated in a reserve selection model under budget-constrained and area-constrained selections. When selecting young forests higher structural richness could be reached at a quarter of the cost over almost twice the area in a budget-constrained selection compared to an area-constrained selection. Our results point to the importance of considering future structural diversity in the selection of forest reserves and not as is done currently to base the selection on existing values. Targeting future values increases structural diversity and implies a relatively lower cost. Further, our results show that a re-orientation from old to young forests would imply savings while offering a more extensive reserve network with high structural qualities in the future. However, caution must be raised against a drastic reorientation of the current old-forest strategy since remnants of ancient forests will need to be prioritized due to their role for disturbance

  6. Considering Future Potential Regarding Structural Diversity in Selection of Forest Reserves

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    A rich structural diversity in forests promotes biodiversity. Forests are dynamic and therefore it is crucial to consider future structural potential when selecting reserves, to make robust conservation decisions. We analyzed forests in boreal Sweden based on 17,599 National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots with the main aim to understand how effectiveness of reserves depends on the time dimension in the selection process, specifically by considering future structural diversity. In the study both the economic value and future values of 15 structural variables were simulated during a 100 year period. To get a net present structural value (NPSV), a single value covering both current and future values, we used four discounting alternatives: (1) only considering present values, (2) giving equal importance to values in each of the 100 years within the planning horizon, (3) applying an annual discount rate considering the risk that values could be lost, and (4) only considering the values in year 100. The four alternatives were evaluated in a reserve selection model under budget-constrained and area-constrained selections. When selecting young forests higher structural richness could be reached at a quarter of the cost over almost twice the area in a budget-constrained selection compared to an area-constrained selection. Our results point to the importance of considering future structural diversity in the selection of forest reserves and not as is done currently to base the selection on existing values. Targeting future values increases structural diversity and implies a relatively lower cost. Further, our results show that a re-orientation from old to young forests would imply savings while offering a more extensive reserve network with high structural qualities in the future. However, caution must be raised against a drastic reorientation of the current old-forest strategy since remnants of ancient forests will need to be prioritized due to their role for disturbance

  7. Galaxy structure from multiple tracers - I. A census of M87's globular cluster populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, L. J.; Auger, M. W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new photometric catalogue of the rich globular cluster (GC) system around M87, the brightest cluster galaxy in Virgo. Using archival Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey images in the ugriz bands, observed with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaPrime, we perform a careful subtraction of the galaxy's halo light in order to detect objects at small galactocentric radii as well as in the wider field, and find 17 620 GC candidates over a radius range from 1.3 to 445 kpc with g < 24 mag. By inferring their colour, radial and magnitude distributions in a Bayesian way, we find that they are well described as a mixture of two GC populations and two distinct contaminant populations, but confirm earlier findings of radius-dependent colour gradients in both GC populations. This is consistent with a picture in which the more enriched GCs reside deeper in the galaxy's potential well, indicating a role for dissipative collapse in the formation of both the red and the blue GCs.

  8. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68), which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G”ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively) and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands. PMID:26079603

  9. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68), which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G"ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively) and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands. PMID:26079603

  10. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II - The IRAS faint source survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.; Conrow, T. P.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1990-01-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling.

  11. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II. The IRAS faint source survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Hacking, P.B.; Conrow, T.P.; Rowan-Robinson, M. Queen Mary College, London )

    1990-07-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling. 105 refs.

  12. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  13. Diverse Narrative Structures in Contemporary Picturebooks: Opportunities for Children's Meaning-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleo, Sylvia; Sipe, Lawrence R.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors situate their discussion of diverse narrative structures in the context of oral storytelling practices and postmodern picturebooks. They focus on three contemporary picturebooks: "Don't Read This Book!" (Lewis, 2009), "Abe Lincoln Crosses a Creek: A Tall Thin Tale" (Hopkins, 2008), and "The Stinky Cheese Man and Other…

  14. Population structure and genetic diversity of Fusicladium effusum in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scab (Fusicladium effusum) is the most destructive disease of pecan in the Southeast US. Infection is thought to occur solely through asexually produced conidia. To explore the population structure and genetic diversity of F. effusum, populations were hierarchically sampled from 11 orchards in Alaba...

  15. Application of resistance gene analog markers to analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juansheng; Yu, Yuchao; Gao, Fangyuan; Zeng, Lihua; Lu, Xianjun; Wu, Xianting; Yan, Wengui; Ren, Guangjun

    2013-07-01

    Plant disease resistance gene analog (RGA) markers were designed according to the conserved sequence of known RGAs and used to map resistance genes. We used genome-wide RGA markers for genetic analyses of structure and diversity in a global rice germplasm collection. Of the 472 RGA markers, 138 were polymorphic and these were applied to 178 entries selected from the USDA rice core collection. Results from the RGA markers were similar between two methods, UPGMA and STRUCTURE. Additionally, the results from RGA markers in our study were agreeable with those previously reported from SSR markers, including cluster of ancestral classification, genetic diversity estimates, genetic relatedness, and cluster of geographic origins. These results suggest that RGA markers are applicable for analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice. However, unlike SSR markers, the RGA markers failed to differentiate temperate japonica, tropical japonica, and aromatic subgroups. The restricted way for developing RGA markers from the cDNA sequence might limit the polymorphism of RGA markers in the genome, thus limiting the discriminatory power in comparison with SSR markers. Genetic differentiation obtained using RGA markers may be useful for defining genetic diversity of a suite of random R genes in plants, as many studies show a differentiation of resistance to a wide array of pathogens. They could also help to characterize the genetic structure and geographic distribution in crops, including rice, wheat, barley, and banana.

  16. Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Resistance to Phytophthora capsici of a Worldwide Collection of Eggplant Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Naegele, Rachel P.; Boyle, Samantha; Quesada-Ocampo, Lina M.; Hausbeck, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is an important solanaceous crop with high phenotypic diversity and moderate genotypic diversity. Ninety-nine genotypes of eggplant germplasm (species (S. melongena, S. incanum, S. linnaeanum and S. gilo), landraces and heirloom cultivars) from 32 countries and five continents were evaluated for genetic diversity, population structure, fruit shape, and disease resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot. Fruits from each line were measured for fruit shape and evaluated for resistance to two Phytophthora capsici isolates seven days post inoculation. Only one accession (PI 413784) was completely resistant to both isolates evaluated. Partial resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot was found in accessions from all four eggplant species evaluated in this study. Genetic diversity and population structure were assessed using 22 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The polymorphism information content (PIC) for the population was moderate (0.49) in the population. Genetic analyses using the program STRUCTURE indicated the existence of four genetic clusters within the eggplant collection. Population structure was detected when eggplant lines were grouped by species, continent of origin, country of origin, fruit shape and disease resistance. PMID:24819601

  17. The Diverse Social and Economic Structure of Nonmetropolitan America. Rural Development Research Report No. 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Lloyd D.; And Others

    Effective rural development planning depends on facts and analysis based, not on rural averages, but on the diverse social and economic structure of rural America. Programs tailored to particular types of rural economies may be more effective than generalized programs. Because of their unique characteristics, government policies and economic…

  18. Interracial Friendship and Structural Diversity: Trends for Greek, Religious, and Ethnic Student Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Julie J.; Kim, Young K.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how peer interactions in college organizations (Greek, ethnic, and religious) affect interracial friendships, including whether peer interaction in student organizations mediates the relationship between structural diversity and interracial friendship. Involvement in ethnic student organizations was non-significant;…

  19. Genetic diversity, population structure, and formulation of a core collection of 1,197 Citrullus accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been continuing interests in breeding of watermelon for economic benefits, but information on the scope and utilization of genetic variations in this genus (Citrullus) is still limited. We evaluated the genetic diversity and population structure of 1,197 watermelon collections, which belon...

  20. Genetic diversity, population structure, and resistance to Phytophthora capsici of a worldwide collection of eggplant germplasm.

    PubMed

    Naegele, Rachel P; Boyle, Samantha; Quesada-Ocampo, Lina M; Hausbeck, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is an important solanaceous crop with high phenotypic diversity and moderate genotypic diversity. Ninety-nine genotypes of eggplant germplasm (species (S. melongena, S. incanum, S. linnaeanum and S. gilo), landraces and heirloom cultivars) from 32 countries and five continents were evaluated for genetic diversity, population structure, fruit shape, and disease resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot. Fruits from each line were measured for fruit shape and evaluated for resistance to two Phytophthora capsici isolates seven days post inoculation. Only one accession (PI 413784) was completely resistant to both isolates evaluated. Partial resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot was found in accessions from all four eggplant species evaluated in this study. Genetic diversity and population structure were assessed using 22 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The polymorphism information content (PIC) for the population was moderate (0.49) in the population. Genetic analyses using the program STRUCTURE indicated the existence of four genetic clusters within the eggplant collection. Population structure was detected when eggplant lines were grouped by species, continent of origin, country of origin, fruit shape and disease resistance.

  1. Microbial community structure and diversity as indicators for evaluating soil quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review addresses two critical questions regarding soil quality: (1) which soil microbial properties, in particular diversity and community structure, most effectively characterize soil quality and should be used as indicators, and (2) how can soil quality assessed by such indicators be improved...

  2. Application of resistance gene analog markers to analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juansheng; Yu, Yuchao; Gao, Fangyuan; Zeng, Lihua; Lu, Xianjun; Wu, Xianting; Yan, Wengui; Ren, Guangjun

    2013-07-01

    Plant disease resistance gene analog (RGA) markers were designed according to the conserved sequence of known RGAs and used to map resistance genes. We used genome-wide RGA markers for genetic analyses of structure and diversity in a global rice germplasm collection. Of the 472 RGA markers, 138 were polymorphic and these were applied to 178 entries selected from the USDA rice core collection. Results from the RGA markers were similar between two methods, UPGMA and STRUCTURE. Additionally, the results from RGA markers in our study were agreeable with those previously reported from SSR markers, including cluster of ancestral classification, genetic diversity estimates, genetic relatedness, and cluster of geographic origins. These results suggest that RGA markers are applicable for analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice. However, unlike SSR markers, the RGA markers failed to differentiate temperate japonica, tropical japonica, and aromatic subgroups. The restricted way for developing RGA markers from the cDNA sequence might limit the polymorphism of RGA markers in the genome, thus limiting the discriminatory power in comparison with SSR markers. Genetic differentiation obtained using RGA markers may be useful for defining genetic diversity of a suite of random R genes in plants, as many studies show a differentiation of resistance to a wide array of pathogens. They could also help to characterize the genetic structure and geographic distribution in crops, including rice, wheat, barley, and banana. PMID:24099390

  3. Genomic diversity, population structure, and migration following rapid range expansion in the Balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stephen R; Olson, Matthew S; Silim, Salim; Schroeder, William; Tiffin, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Rapid range expansions can cause pervasive changes in the genetic diversity and structure of populations. The postglacial history of the Balsam Poplar, Populus balsamifera, involved the colonization of most of northern North America, an area largely covered by continental ice sheets during the last glacial maximum. To characterize how this expansion shaped genomic diversity within and among populations, we developed 412 SNP markers that we assayed for a range-wide sample of 474 individuals sampled from 34 populations. We complemented the SNP data set with DNA sequence data from 11 nuclear loci from 94 individuals, and used coalescent analyses to estimate historical population size, demographic growth, and patterns of migration. Bayesian clustering identified three geographically separated demes found in the Northern, Central, and Eastern portions of the species' range. These demes varied significantly in nucleotide diversity, the abundance of private polymorphisms, and population substructure. Most measures supported the Central deme as descended from the primary refuge of diversity. Both SNPs and sequence data suggested recent population growth, and coalescent analyses of historical migration suggested a massive expansion from the Centre to the North and East. Collectively, these data demonstrate the strong influence that range expansions exert on genomic diversity, both within local populations and across the range. Our results suggest that an in-depth knowledge of nucleotide diversity following expansion requires sampling within multiple populations, and highlight the utility of combining insights from different data types in population genomic studies.

  4. Zika virus NS1 structure reveals diversity of electrostatic surfaces among flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Haywood, Joel; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-05-01

    The association of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections with microcephaly has resulted in an ongoing public-health emergency. Here we report the crystal structure of a C-terminal fragment of ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), a major host-interaction molecule that functions in flaviviral replication, pathogenesis and immune evasion. Comparison with West Nile and dengue virus NS1 structures reveals conserved features but diverse electrostatic characteristics at host-interaction interfaces, thus possibly implying different modes of flavivirus pathogenesis.

  5. Structurally Diverse Polyamines: Solid-Phase Synthesis and Interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Naoki; Horai, Yuhei; Imamura, Yuki; Kawakubo, Makoto; Nakahira, Mariko; Kato, Nobuki; Muramatsu, Akira; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Higuchi, Tsunehiko

    2015-08-17

    A versatile solid-phase approach based on peptide chemistry was used to construct four classes of structurally diverse polyamines with modified backbones: linear, partially constrained, branched, and cyclic. Their effects on DNA duplex stability and structure were examined. The polyamines showed distinct activities, thus highlighting the importance of polyamine backbone structure. Interestingly, the rank order of polyamine ability for DNA compaction was different to that for their effects on circular dichroism and melting temperature, thus indicating that these polyamines have distinct effects on secondary and higher-order structures of DNA.

  6. Population Structure and Genetic Diversity of Native and Invasive Populations of Solanum rostratum (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiali; Solís-Montero, Lislie; Lou, Anru; Vallejo-Marín, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Aims We investigate native and introduced populations of Solanum rostratum, an annual, self-compatible plant that has been introduced around the globe. This study is the first to compare the genetic diversity of Solanum rostratum between native and introduced populations. We aim to (1) determine the level of genetic diversity across the studied regions; (2) explore the likely origins of invasive populations in China; and (3) investigate whether there is the evidence of multiple introductions into China. Methods We genotyped 329 individuals at 10 microsatellite loci to determine the levels of genetic diversity and to investigate population structure of native and introduced populations of S. rostratum. We studied five populations in each of three regions across two continents: Mexico, the U.S.A. and China. Important Findings We found the highest genetic diversity among Mexican populations of S. rostratum. Genetic diversity was significantly lower in Chinese and U.S.A. populations, but we found no regional difference in inbreeding coefficients (FIS) or population differentiation (FST). Population structure analyses indicate that Chinese and U.S.A. populations are more closely related to each other than to sampled Mexican populations, revealing that introduced populations in China share an origin with the sampled U.S.A. populations. The distinctiveness between some introduced populations indicates multiple introductions of S. rostratum into China. PMID:24224008

  7. Genetic diversity and structure of the threatened species Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) Ying.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Wang, J; Yin, D X; Yang, M; Wang, P; Han, Q S; Ma, Q Q; Liu, J J; Wang, J X

    2016-01-01

    Sinopodophyllum hexandrum is an important medicinal plant that has been listed as an endangered species, making the conservation of its genetic diversity a priority. Therefore, the genetic diversity and population structure of S. hexandrum was investigated through inter-simple sequence repeat analysis of eight natural populations. Eleven selected primers generated 141 discernible fragments. The percentage of polymorphic bands was 37.59% at the species level, and 7.66-24.32% at the population level. Genetic diversity of S. hexandrum was low within populations (average HE = 0.0366), but higher at the species level (HE = 0.0963). Clear structure and high genetic differentiation were detected between populations using unweighted pair groups mean arithmetic and principle coordinate analysis. Clustering approaches clustered the eight sampled populations into three major groups, and AMOVA confirmed there to be significant variation between populations (63.27%). Genetic differentiation may have arisen through limited gene flow (Nm = 0.3317) in this species. Isolation by distance among populations was determined by comparing genetic distance versus geographical distance using the Mantel test. The results revealed no correlation between spatial pattern and geographic location. Given the low within-population genetic diversity, high differentiation among populations, and the increasing anthropogenic pressure on this species, in situ conservation measures, in addition to sampling and ex situ preservation, are recommended to preserve S. hexandrum populations and to retain their genetic diversity. PMID:27323174

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure in the tomato-like nightshades Solanum lycopersicoides and S. sitiens

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Elena; Escobar, Miguel; Chetelat, Roger T.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Two closely related, wild tomato-like nightshade species, Solanum lycopersicoides and Solanum sitiens, inhabit a small area within the Atacama Desert region of Peru and Chile. Each species possesses unique traits, including abiotic and biotic stress tolerances, and can be hybridized with cultivated tomato. Conservation and utilization of these tomato relatives would benefit from an understanding of genetic diversity and relationships within and between populations. Methods Levels of genetic diversity and population genetic structure were investigated by genotyping representative accessions of each species with a set of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and allozyme markers. Key Results As expected for self-incompatible species, populations of S. lycopersicoides and S. sitiens were relatively diverse, but contained less diversity than the wild tomato Solanum chilense, a related allogamous species native to this region. Populations of S. lycopersicoides were slightly more diverse than populations of S. sitiens according to SSRs, but the opposite trend was found with allozymes. A higher coefficient of inbreeding was noted in S. sitiens. A pattern of isolation by distance was evident in both species, consistent with the highly fragmented nature of the populations in situ. The populations of each taxon showed strong geographical structure, with evidence for three major groups, corresponding to the northern, central and southern elements of their respective distributions. Conclusions This information should be useful for optimizing regeneration strategies, for sampling of the populations for genes of interest, and for guiding future in situ conservation efforts. PMID:20154348

  9. A Reassessment of the Impact of European Contact on the Structure of Native American Genetic Diversity.

    PubMed

    Hunley, Keith; Gwin, Kiela; Liberman, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Our current understanding of pre-Columbian history in the Americas rests in part on several trends identified in recent genetic studies. The goal of this study is to reexamine these trends in light of the impact of post-Columbian admixture and the methods used to study admixture. The previously-published data consist of 645 autosomal microsatellite genotypes from 1046 individuals in 63 populations. We used STRUCTURE to estimate ancestry proportions and tested the sensitivity of these estimates to the choice of the number of clusters, K. We used partial correlation analyses to examine the relationship between gene diversity and geographic distance from Beringia, controlling for non-Native American ancestry (from Africa, Europe and East Asia), and taking into account alternative paths of migration. Principal component analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to investigate the relationships between Andean and non-Andean populations and to explore gene-language correspondence. We found that 1) European and East Asian ancestry estimates decline as K increases, especially in Native Canadian populations, 2) a north-south decline in gene diversity is driven by low diversity in Amazonian and Paraguayan populations, not serial founder effects from Beringia, 3) controlling for non-Native American ancestry, populations in the Andes and Mesoamerica have higher gene diversity than populations in other regions, and 4) patterns of genetic and linguistic diversity are poorly correlated. We conclude that patterns of diversity previously attributed to pre-Columbian processes may in part reflect post-Columbian admixture and the choice of K in STRUCTURE analyses. Accounting for admixture, the pattern of diversity is inconsistent with a north-south founder effect process, though the genetic similarities between Mesoamerican and Andean populations are consistent with rapid dispersal along the western coast of the Americas. Further, even setting aside the disruptive effects of

  10. A Reassessment of the Impact of European Contact on the Structure of Native American Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hunley, Keith; Gwin, Kiela; Liberman, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Our current understanding of pre-Columbian history in the Americas rests in part on several trends identified in recent genetic studies. The goal of this study is to reexamine these trends in light of the impact of post-Columbian admixture and the methods used to study admixture. The previously-published data consist of 645 autosomal microsatellite genotypes from 1046 individuals in 63 populations. We used STRUCTURE to estimate ancestry proportions and tested the sensitivity of these estimates to the choice of the number of clusters, K. We used partial correlation analyses to examine the relationship between gene diversity and geographic distance from Beringia, controlling for non-Native American ancestry (from Africa, Europe and East Asia), and taking into account alternative paths of migration. Principal component analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to investigate the relationships between Andean and non-Andean populations and to explore gene-language correspondence. We found that 1) European and East Asian ancestry estimates decline as K increases, especially in Native Canadian populations, 2) a north-south decline in gene diversity is driven by low diversity in Amazonian and Paraguayan populations, not serial founder effects from Beringia, 3) controlling for non-Native American ancestry, populations in the Andes and Mesoamerica have higher gene diversity than populations in other regions, and 4) patterns of genetic and linguistic diversity are poorly correlated. We conclude that patterns of diversity previously attributed to pre-Columbian processes may in part reflect post-Columbian admixture and the choice of K in STRUCTURE analyses. Accounting for admixture, the pattern of diversity is inconsistent with a north-south founder effect process, though the genetic similarities between Mesoamerican and Andean populations are consistent with rapid dispersal along the western coast of the Americas. Further, even setting aside the disruptive effects of

  11. A Reassessment of the Impact of European Contact on the Structure of Native American Genetic Diversity.

    PubMed

    Hunley, Keith; Gwin, Kiela; Liberman, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Our current understanding of pre-Columbian history in the Americas rests in part on several trends identified in recent genetic studies. The goal of this study is to reexamine these trends in light of the impact of post-Columbian admixture and the methods used to study admixture. The previously-published data consist of 645 autosomal microsatellite genotypes from 1046 individuals in 63 populations. We used STRUCTURE to estimate ancestry proportions and tested the sensitivity of these estimates to the choice of the number of clusters, K. We used partial correlation analyses to examine the relationship between gene diversity and geographic distance from Beringia, controlling for non-Native American ancestry (from Africa, Europe and East Asia), and taking into account alternative paths of migration. Principal component analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to investigate the relationships between Andean and non-Andean populations and to explore gene-language correspondence. We found that 1) European and East Asian ancestry estimates decline as K increases, especially in Native Canadian populations, 2) a north-south decline in gene diversity is driven by low diversity in Amazonian and Paraguayan populations, not serial founder effects from Beringia, 3) controlling for non-Native American ancestry, populations in the Andes and Mesoamerica have higher gene diversity than populations in other regions, and 4) patterns of genetic and linguistic diversity are poorly correlated. We conclude that patterns of diversity previously attributed to pre-Columbian processes may in part reflect post-Columbian admixture and the choice of K in STRUCTURE analyses. Accounting for admixture, the pattern of diversity is inconsistent with a north-south founder effect process, though the genetic similarities between Mesoamerican and Andean populations are consistent with rapid dispersal along the western coast of the Americas. Further, even setting aside the disruptive effects of

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of Arabidopsis thaliana along an altitudinal gradient

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Antariksh; Singh, Shivani; Mishra, Parneeta; Singh, Akanksha; Tripathi, Abhinandan Mani; Jena, Satya Narayan; Roy, Sribash

    2016-01-01

    The natural genetic variation within a plant species is primarily a consequence of its phylogeography and evolutionary history. This variation largely determines its present-day population structure. Arabidopsis thaliana, as a model plant, has been studied in great detail including its probable origin, local as well as global genetic diversity pattern, population structure, adaptation, etc. However, no such studies have so far been reported from the Indian Himalayan region. Here, we describe a comprehensive study on the genetic diversity and population structure of A. thaliana from an altitudinal range of 700–3400 m above mean sea level the highest altitudinal range reported so far. We also compare these populations with previously reported worldwide populations. A total of 48 accessions representing six populations were analysed using 19 microsatellites and 11 chloroplast markers. Genetic diversity analysis indicated populations to be highly diverse and comparable with worldwide populations. STRUCTURE, principal coordinate and isolation by distance (IBD) analyses showed that genetic variation in different populations is structured at geographical and altitudinal level. Further analyses indicate that these populations are genetically distinct from the rest of the world populations. Different parameters of the demographic expansion model support a rapid expansion. Based on mismatch distribution, the initial time of expansion of west Himalayan populations was found to be about 130 000 years. Bayesian analysis of divergence time indicated that these populations have a long evolutionary history in this region. Based on the results of genetic diversity parameters, demographic expansion and divergence time estimation, it appears that west Himalayan populations may be the source of the west–east expansion model. PMID:26672075

  13. THE ORIENTATION OF GALAXIES IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Godlowski, Wlodzimierz; Piwowarska, Paulina; Panko, Elena; Flin, Piotr E-mail: paoletta@interia.p E-mail: sfflin@cyf-kr.edu.p

    2010-11-10

    We present an analysis of the spatial orientations of galaxies in 247 optically selected rich Abell clusters which have at least 100 members in the considered area. We investigated the relation between angles that give information about galaxy angular momenta and the number of members in each structure. The position angles of the galaxies' major axes, as well as two angles describing the spatial orientation of the galaxy plane, were tested for isotropy by applying three different statistical tests. It is found that the values of the statistics increase with the amount of the galaxies' members, which is equivalent to the existence of a relation between anisotropy and the number of galaxies in a cluster. The search for connection between the galaxies' alignments and Bautz-Morgan (BM) morphological types of examined clusters showed a weak dependence. A statistically marginal relation between velocity dispersion and cluster richness was observed. In addition, it was found that the velocity dispersion decreases with BM type at almost 3{sigma} level. These results show the dependence of alignments with respect to clusters' richness, which can be regarded as an environmental effect.

  14. Using Galaxy Winds to Constrain Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Klypin, A.; Ceverino, D.; Kacprzak, G.; Klimek, E.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of mock quasar spectra of metal absorption lines in the proximity of formed galaxies in cosmological simulation is a highly promising for understanding the role of galaxies in IGM physics, or IGM physics in the role of galaxy formation in context of the cosmic web. Such analysis using neutral hydrogen in the cosmic web has literally revolutionized our understanding of the Lyman alpha forest. We are undertaking a wholesale approach to use powerful Lambda-CDM simulations to interpret absorption line data from redshift 1-3 starbursting galaxies e.g. Lyman break galaxies, etc) The data with which direct quantitative comparison is made are from the DEEP survey (Weiner et al.) and the collective work of Steidel et al. and collaborators. The simulations are performed using the Eulerian Gasdynamics plus N-body Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code, which has gas cell resolutions of 20-50 pc. Physical processes implemented in the code include realistic radiative cooling, star formation, metal enrichment and thermal feedback due to type II and type Ia supernovae. We quantitatively compare the spatial and kinematic distribution of HI, MgII, CIV, and OVI of absorption lines over a range of impact parameters for various simulated galaxies as a function of redshift, and discuss key insights for interpreting the underlying temperature, density, and ionization structure of the halo/cosmic-web interface, and the influence of galaxies on its chemical enrichment.

  15. Ontogenetic functional diversity: size structure of a keystone predator drives functioning of a complex ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Rasmussen, Nick L

    2013-05-01

    A central challenge in community ecology is to understand the connection between biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems. While traditional approaches have largely focused on species-level diversity, increasing evidence indicates that there exists substantial ecological diversity among individuals within species. By far, the largest source of this intraspecific diversity stems from variation among individuals in ontogenetic stage and size. Although such ontogenetic shifts are ubiquitous in natural communities, whether and how they scale up to influence the structure and functioning of complex ecosystems is largely unknown. Here we take an experimental approach to examine the consequences of ontogenetic niche shifts for the structure of communities and ecosystem processes. In particular we experimentally manipulated the stage structure in a keystone predator, larvae of the dragonfly Anax junius, in complex experimental pond communities to test whether changes in the population stage or size structure of a keystone species scale up to alter community structure and ecosystem processes, and how functional differences scale with relative differences in size among stages. We found that the functional role of A. junius was stage-specific. Altering what stages were present in a pond led to concurrent changes in community structure, primary producer biomass (periphyton and phytoplankton), and ultimately altered ecosystem processes (respiration and net primary productivity), indicating a strong, but stage-specific, trophic cascade. Interestingly, the stage-specific effects did not simply scale with size or biomass of the predator, but instead indicated clear ontogenetic niche shifts in ecological interactions. Thus, functional differences among stages within a keystone species scaled up to alter the functioning of entire ecosystems. Therefore, our results indicate that the classical approach of assuming an average functional role of a species can be misleading because

  16. Morphological diversity and evolution of egg and clutch structure in amphibians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Altig, Ronald; McDiarmid, Roy W.

    2007-01-01

    The first part of this synthesis summarizes the morphology of the jelly layers surrounding an amphibian ovum. We propose a standard terminology and discuss the evolution of jelly layers. The second part reviews the morphological diversity and arrangement of deposited eggs?the ovipositional mode; we recognize 5 morphological classes including 14 modes. We discuss some of the oviductal, ovipositional, and postovipositional events that contribute to these morphologies. We have incorporated data from taxa from throughout the world but recognize that other types will be discovered that may modify understanding of these modes. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary context of the diversity of clutch structure and present a first estimate of its evolution.

  17. Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in the Forest State of Artikutza (Navarra: Spain): Diversity and Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Jesica; Oltra-Moscardó, Teresa; Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier; Jiménez-Peydró, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Microgastrinae is one of the largest subfamilies of the Braconidae with about 2,000 described species worldwide. These wasps are of enormous ecological interest due to their role in controlling the caterpillar populations. This study analyses diversity and community structure within the Microgastrinae in the Artikutza Forest, located in the Peñas de Aia Natural Park, western Pyrenees, Spain. The specimens were collected in two different habitats: mixed forest and beech forest. A total of 524 specimens, belonging to nine separate genera and 27 species were captured. Alpha, beta and gamma diversity were analyzed. Additionally, the relationship between Microgastrinae phenology and climatic conditions were studied. PMID:26462432

  18. Genetic diversity and population structure of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Sudan, Madagascar, French Guiana and Armenia.

    PubMed

    Menegon, Michela; Durand, Patrick; Menard, Didier; Legrand, Eric; Picot, Stéphane; Nour, Bakri; Davidyants, Vladimir; Santi, Flavia; Severini, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Polymorphic genetic markers and especially microsatellite analysis can be used to investigate multiple aspects of the biology of Plasmodium species. In the current study, we characterized 7 polymorphic microsatellites in a total of 281 Plasmodium vivax isolates to determine the genetic diversity and population structure of P. vivax populations from Sudan, Madagascar, French Guiana, and Armenia. All four parasite populations were highly polymorphic with 3-32 alleles per locus. Mean genetic diversity values was 0.83, 0.79, 0.78 and 0.67 for Madagascar, French Guiana, Sudan, and Armenia, respectively. Significant genetic differentiation between all four populations was observed.

  19. ON THE ORIGIN OF LOPSIDEDNESS IN GALAXIES AS DETERMINED FROM THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L.; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Comeron, Sebastien; Laine, Jarkko; Elmegreen, Debra; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Elmegreen, Bruce; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Kim, Taehyun; De Paz, Armando Gil; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Laine, Seppo; Meidt, Sharon; and others

    2013-08-01

    We study the m = 1 distortions (lopsidedness) in the stellar components of 167 nearby galaxies that span a wide range of morphologies and luminosities. We confirm the previous findings of (1) a high incidence of lopsidedness in the stellar distributions, (2) increasing lopsidedness as a function of radius out to at least 3.5 exponential scale lengths, and (3) greater lopsidedness, over these radii, for galaxies of later type and lower surface brightness. Additionally, the magnitude of the lopsidedness (1) correlates with the character of the spiral arms (stronger arm patterns occur in galaxies with less lopsidedness), (2) is not correlated with the presence or absence of a bar, or the strength of the bar when one is present, (3) is inversely correlated to the stellar mass fraction, f{sub *}, within one radial scale length, and (4) correlates directly with f{sub *} measured within the radial range over which we measure lopsidedness. We interpret these findings to mean that lopsidedness is a generic feature of galaxies and does not, generally, depend on a rare event, such as a direct accretion of a satellite galaxy onto the disk of the parent galaxy. While lopsidedness may be caused by several phenomena, moderate lopsidedness ((A{sub 1}){sub i} + (A{sub 1}){sub o})/2 < 0.3) is likely to reflect halo asymmetries to which the disk responds or a gravitationally self-generated mode. We hypothesize that the magnitude of the stellar response depends both on how centrally concentrated the stars are with respect to the dark matter and whether there are enough stars in the region of the lopsidedness that self-gravity is dynamically important.

  20. Genetic diversity, population structure and association analysis in cut chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.).

    PubMed

    Li, Pirui; Zhang, Fei; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Wang, Haibin; Su, Jiangshuo; Fang, Weimin; Guan, Zhiyong; Chen, Fadi

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing the genetic diversity present in a working set of plant germplasm can contribute to its effective management and genetic improvement. The cut flower chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) is an economically important ornamental species. With the repeated germplasm exchange and intensive breeding activities, it remains a major task in genetic research. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the genetic diversity and the population structure of a worldwide collection of 159 varieties, and to apply an association mapping approach to identify DNA-based markers linked to five plant architecture traits and six inflorescence traits. The genotyping demonstrated that there was no lack of genetic diversity in the collection and that pair-wise kinship values were relatively low. The clustering based on a Bayesian model of population structure did not reflect known variation in either provenance or inflorescence type. A principal coordinate analysis was, however, able to discriminate most of the varieties according to both of these criteria. About 1 in 100 marker pairs exhibited a degree of linkage disequilibrium. The association analysis identified a number of markers putatively linked to one or more of the traits. Some of these associations were robust over two seasons. The findings provide an in-depth understanding of genetic diversity and population structure present in cut flower chrysanthemum varieties, and an insight into the genetic control of plant architecture and inflorescence-related traits. PMID:26780102

  1. Structure and genetic diversity of natural Brazilian pepper populations (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi).

    PubMed

    Álvares-Carvalho, S V; Duarte, J F; Santos, T C; Santos, R M; Silva-Mann, R; Carvalho, D

    2016-01-01

    In the face of a possible loss of genetic diversity in plants due the environmental changes, actions to ensure the genetic variability are an urgent necessity. The extraction of Brazilian pepper fruits is a cause of concern because it results in the lack of seeds in soil, hindering its distribution in space and time. It is important to address this concern and explore the species, used by riparian communities and agro-factories without considering the need for keeping the seeds for natural seed banks and for species sustainability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the structure and the genetic diversity in natural Brazilian pepper populations (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi). Twenty-two alleles in 223 individuals were identified from eight forest remnants located in the states of Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo, and Sergipe. All populations presented loci in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deviation. Four populations presented six combinations of loci in linkage disequilibrium. Six exclusive alleles were detected in four populations. Analysis of molecular variance showed the absence of diversity between regions and that between the populations (GST) was 41%. Genetic diversity was structured in seven clusters (ΔK7). Brazilian pepper populations were not structured in a pattern of isolation by distance and present genetic bottleneck. The populations São Mateus, Canastra, Barbacena, and Ilha das Flores were identified as management units and may support conservation projects, ecological restoration and in implementation of management plans for Brazilian pepper in the State of Sergipe. PMID:27323193

  2. SSR-based genetic diversity and structure of garlic accessions from Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Camila Pinto; Resende, Francisco Vilela; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Pinheiro, José Baldin

    2014-10-01

    Garlic is a spice and a medicinal plant; hence, there is an increasing interest in 'developing' new varieties with different culinary properties or with high content of nutraceutical compounds. Phenotypic traits and dominant molecular markers are predominantly used to evaluate the genetic diversity of garlic clones. However, 24 SSR markers (codominant) specific for garlic are available in the literature, fostering germplasm researches. In this study, we genotyped 130 garlic accessions from Brazil and abroad using 17 polymorphic SSR markers to assess the genetic diversity and structure. This is the first attempt to evaluate a large set of accessions maintained by Brazilian institutions. A high level of redundancy was detected in the collection (50 % of the accessions represented eight haplotypes). However, non-redundant accessions presented high genetic diversity. We detected on average five alleles per locus, Shannon index of 1.2, HO of 0.5, and HE of 0.6. A core collection was set with 17 accessions, covering 100 % of the alleles with minimum redundancy. Overall FST and D values indicate a strong genetic structure within accessions. Two major groups identified by both model-based (Bayesian approach) and hierarchical clustering (UPGMA dendrogram) techniques were coherent with the classification of accessions according to maturity time (growth cycle): early-late and midseason accessions. Assessing genetic diversity and structure of garlic collections is the first step towards an efficient management and conservation of accessions in genebanks, as well as to advance future genetic studies and improvement of garlic worldwide.

  3. The Structure of the Circumgalactic Medium of Galaxies: Cool Accretion Inflow Around NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, David V.; Chelouche, Doron; Jenkins, Edward B.; Tripp, Todd M.; Pettini, Max; York, Donald G.; Frye, Brenda L.

    2016-07-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope far-UV spectra of four QSOs whose sightlines pass through the halo of NGC 1097 at impact parameters of ρ = 48–165 kpc. NGC 1097 is a nearby spiral galaxy that has undergone at least two minor merger events, but no apparent major mergers, and is relatively isolated with respect to other nearby bright galaxies. This makes NGC 1097 a good case study for exploring baryons in a paradigmatic bright-galaxy halo. Lyα absorption is detected along all sightlines and Si iii λ1206 is found along the three sightlines with the smallest ρ metal lines of C ii, Si ii, and Si iv are only found with certainty toward the innermost sightline. The kinematics of the absorption lines are best replicated by a model with a disk-like distribution of gas approximately planar to the observed 21 cm H i disk, which is rotating more slowly than the inner disk, and into which gas is infalling from the intergalactic medium. Some part of the absorption toward the innermost sightline may arise either from a small-scale outflow or from tidal debris associated with the minor merger that gives rise to the well known “dog-leg” stellar stream that projects from NGC 1097. When compared to other studies, NGC 1097 appears to be a “typical” absorber, although the large dispersion in absorption line column density and equivalent width in a single halo goes perhaps some way toward explaining the wide range of these values seen in higher-z studies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  4. The Structure of the Circumgalactic Medium of Galaxies: Cool Accretion Inflow Around NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, David V.; Chelouche, Doron; Jenkins, Edward B.; Tripp, Todd M.; Pettini, Max; York, Donald G.; Frye, Brenda L.

    2016-07-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope far-UV spectra of four QSOs whose sightlines pass through the halo of NGC 1097 at impact parameters of ρ = 48-165 kpc. NGC 1097 is a nearby spiral galaxy that has undergone at least two minor merger events, but no apparent major mergers, and is relatively isolated with respect to other nearby bright galaxies. This makes NGC 1097 a good case study for exploring baryons in a paradigmatic bright-galaxy halo. Lyα absorption is detected along all sightlines and Si iii λ1206 is found along the three sightlines with the smallest ρ metal lines of C ii, Si ii, and Si iv are only found with certainty toward the innermost sightline. The kinematics of the absorption lines are best replicated by a model with a disk-like distribution of gas approximately planar to the observed 21 cm H i disk, which is rotating more slowly than the inner disk, and into which gas is infalling from the intergalactic medium. Some part of the absorption toward the innermost sightline may arise either from a small-scale outflow or from tidal debris associated with the minor merger that gives rise to the well known “dog-leg” stellar stream that projects from NGC 1097. When compared to other studies, NGC 1097 appears to be a “typical” absorber, although the large dispersion in absorption line column density and equivalent width in a single halo goes perhaps some way toward explaining the wide range of these values seen in higher-z studies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  5. Aedes aegypti in Senegal: genetic diversity and genetic structure of domestic and sylvatic populations.

    PubMed

    Huber, Karine; Ba, Yamar; Dia, Ibrahima; Mathiot, Christian; Sall, Amadou A; Diallo, Mawlouth

    2008-08-01

    Aedes aegypti is the main vector of dengue viruses. The epidemiology of dengue fever remains poorly understood in Senegal. A sylvatic transmission seems to predominate. However, despite the sylvatic circulation of the dengue virus and the presence of vectors in urban areas, only sporadic cases have been reported. Ae. aegypti is a polytypic species. In Senegal, a purely sylvatic form is found in the forest gallery areas and a domestic form is found in the villages in savannah and sahelian areas and in urban areas. Using allozymes, we analyzed the genetic diversity and the genetic structure of Ae. aegypti populations differing in their ecological characteristics. Populations from Senegal were significantly structured but with a low level of genetic differentiation. Ae. aegypti from the "domestic" populations show a decreased genetic diversity and a lower genetic differentiation compared with "sylvatic" populations. These findings suggest that environmental conditions, ecological factors, and human activities may impact the genetic structure of Ae. aegypti populations in Senegal.

  6. Identify the diversity of mesoscopic structures in networks: A mixed random walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yifang; Jiang, Xin; Li, Meng; Shen, Xin; Guo, Quantong; Lei, Yanjun; Zheng, Zhiming

    2013-10-01

    Community or cluster structure, which can provide insight into the natural partitions and inner connections of a network, is a key feature in studying the mesoscopic structure of complex systems. Although numerous methods for community detection have been proposed ever since, there is still a lack of understanding on how to quantify the diversity of pre-divided community structures, or rank the roles of communities in participating in specific dynamic processes. Inspired by the Law of Mass Action in chemical kinetics, we introduce here the community random walk energy (CRWE), which reflects a potential based on the diffusion phase of a mixed random walk process taking place on the network, to identify the configuration of community structures. The difference of CRWE allows us to distinguish the intrinsic topological diversity between individual communities, on condition that all the communities are pre-arranged in the network. We illustrate our method by performing numerical simulations on constructive community networks and a real social network with distinct community structures. As an application, we apply our method to characterize the diversity of human genome communities, which provides a possible use of our method in inferring the genetic similarity between human populations.

  7. Galaxies on FIRE: Stellar Feedback Explains Inefficient Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2014-06-01

    Many of the most fundamental unsolved questions in star and galaxy formation revolve around star formation and "feedback" from both massive stars and accretion onto super-massive black holes. I'll present new simulations which attempt to realistically model the diverse physics of the interstellar medium, star formation, and feedback from stellar radiation pressure, supernovae, stellar winds, and photo-ionization. These mechanisms lead to 'self-regulated' galaxy and star formation, in which global correlations such as the Schmidt-Kennicutt law and the global inefficiency of star formation -- the stellar mass function -- emerge naturally. Within galaxies, feedback regulates the structure of the interstellar medium, and many observed properties of the ISM, star formation, and galaxies can be understood as a fundamental consequence of super-sonic turbulence in a rapidly cooling, self-gravitating medium. But feedback also produces galactic super-winds that can dramatically alter the cosmological evolution of galaxies, their behavior in galaxy mergers, and structure of the inter-galactic medium: these winds depend non-linearly on multiple feedback mechanisms in a way that explains why they have been so difficult to model in previous "sub-grid" approaches.

  8. Population structure and genetic diversity of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) in a highly fragmented watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, S.M.; Wilson, C.C.; Mandrak, N.E.; Carl, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dams have the potential to affect population size and connectivity, reduce genetic diversity, and increase genetic differences among isolated riverine fish populations. Previous research has reported adverse effects on the distribution and demographics of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), a threatened fish species in Canada. However, effects on genetic diversity and population structure are unknown. We used microsatellite DNA markers to assess the number of genetic populations in the Grand River (Ontario) and to test whether dams have resulted in a loss of genetic diversity and increased genetic differentiation among populations. Three hundred and seventy-seven individuals from eight Grand River sites were genotyped at eight microsatellite loci. Measures of genetic diversity were moderately high and not significantly different among populations; strong evidence of recent population bottlenecks was not detected. Pairwise FST and exact tests identified weak (global FST = 0.011) but statistically significant population structure, although little population structuring was detected using either genetic distances or an individual-based clustering method. Neither geographic distance nor the number of intervening dams were correlated with pairwise differences among populations. Tests for regional equilibrium indicate that Grand River populations were either in equilibrium between gene flow and genetic drift or that gene flow is more influential than drift. While studies on other species have identified strong dam-related effects on genetic diversity and population structure, this study suggests that barrier permeability, river fragment length and the ecological characteristics of affected species can counterbalance dam-related effects. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  9. Overstory structure and soil nutrients effect on plant diversity in unmanaged moist tropical forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Mukesh Kumar; Manhas, Rajesh Kumar; Tripathi, Ashutosh Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Forests with intensive management past are kept unmanaged to restore diversity and ecosystem functioning. Before perpetuating abandonment after protracted restitution, understanding its effect on forest vegetation is desirable. We studied plant diversity and its relation with environmental variables and stand structure in northern Indian unmanaged tropical moist deciduous forest. We hypothesized that post-abandonment species richness would have increased, and the structure of contemporary forest would be heterogeneous. Vegetation structure, composition, and diversity were recorded, in forty 0.1 ha plots selected randomly in four forest ranges. Three soil samples per 0.1 ha were assessed for physicochemistry, fine sand, and clay mineralogy. Contemporary forest had less species richness than pre-abandonment reference period. Fourteen species were recorded as either seedling or sapling, suggesting reappearance or immigration. For most species, regeneration was either absent or impaired. Ordination and multiple regression results showed that exchangeable base cations and phosphorous affected maximum tree diversity and structure variables. Significant correlations between soil moisture and temperature, and shrub layer was observed, besides tree layer correspondence with shrub richness, suggesting that dense overstory resulting from abandonment through its effect on soil conditions, is responsible for dense shrub layer. Herb layer diversity was negatively associated with tree layer and shrub overgrowth (i.e. Mallotus spp.). Protracted abandonment may not reinforce species richness and heterogeneity; perhaps result in high tree and shrub density in moist deciduous forests, which can impede immigrating or reappearing plant species establishment. This can be overcome by density/basal area reduction strategies, albeit for both tree and shrub layer.

  10. Gas in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, Kathryn Joyce

    Void galaxies, residing within the deepest underdensities of the Cosmic Web, present an ideal population for the study of galaxy formation and evolution in an environment undisturbed by the complex processes modifying galaxies in clusters and groups, and provide an observational test for theories of cosmological structure formation. We investigate the neutral hydrogen properties (i.e. content, morphology, kinematics) of void galaxies, both individually and systematically, using a combination of observations and simulations, to form a more complete understanding of the nature of these systems. We investigate in detail the H I morphology and kinematics of two void galaxies. One is an isolated polar disk galaxy in a diffuse cosmological wall situated between two voids. The considerable gas mass and apparent lack of stars in the polar disk, coupled with the general underdensity of the environment, supports recent theories of cold flow accretion as an alternate formation mechanism for polar disk galaxies. We also examine KK 246, the only confirmed galaxy located within the nearby Tully Void. It is a dwarf galaxy with an extremely extended H I disk and signs of an H I cloud with anomalous velocity. It also exhibits clear misalignment between the kinematical major and minor axes, and a general misalignment between the H I and optical major axes. The relative isolation and extreme underdense environment make these both very interesting cases for examining the role of gas accretion in galaxy evolution. To study void galaxies as a population, we have carefully selected a sample of 60 galaxies that reside in the deepest underdensities of geometrically identified voids within the SDSS. We have imaged this new Void Galaxy Survey in H I at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope with a typical resolution of 8 kpc, probing a volume of 1.2 Mpc and 12,000 km s^-1 surrounding each galaxy. We reach H I mass limits of 2 x 10^8 M_sun and column density sensitivities of 5 x 10^19 cm^-2

  11. Detection and Mapping of Decoupled Stellar and Ionized Gas Structures in the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 12112+0305.

    PubMed

    Colina; Arribas; Borne; Monreal

    2000-04-10

    Integral field optical spectroscopy with the INTEGRAL fiber-fed system and Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging are used to map the complex stellar and warm ionized gas structure in the ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 12112+0305. Images reconstructed from wavelength-delimited extractions of the integral field spectra reveal that the observed ionized gas distribution is decoupled from the stellar main body of the galaxy, with the dominant continuum and emission-line regions separated by projected distances of up to 7.5 kpc. The two optical nuclei are detected as apparently faint emission-line regions, and their optical properties are consistent with being dust-enshrouded weak [O i] LINERs. The brightest emission-line region is associated with a faint (mI=20.4), giant H ii region of 600 pc diameter, in which a young ( approximately 5 Myr) massive cluster of about 2x107 M middle dot in circle dominates the ionization. Internal reddening toward the line-emitting regions and the optical nuclei ranges from 1 to 8 mag in the visual. Taking the reddening into account, the overall star formation in IRAS 12112+0305 is dominated by starbursts associated with the two nuclei and corresponds to a star formation rate of 80 M middle dot in circle yr-1. PMID:10727379

  12. High genetic diversity and population structure in the endangered Canarian endemic Ruta oreojasme (Rutaceae).

    PubMed

    Meloni, Marilena; Reid, Andrea; Caujapé-Castells, Juli; Soto, Moisés; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Conti, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Insular species are expected to have low genetic diversity, for their populations are often small and isolated, and characterized by restricted gene flow and increased incidence of inbreeding. However, empirical results do not always match this expectation. For example, population genetic analyses of several Canarian endemics, based mainly on allozymes, show levels of genetic diversity exceptionally high for insular species. To investigate whether genetic variation in rare species endemic to Canary Islands is low, as predicted by theoretical expectations, or high, as documented in some previous studies, we analysed genetic diversity of the endangered Ruta oreojasme, a rare endemic of the island of Gran Canaria, using microsatellite markers, which are more variable than allozymes. Our analyses identified very high levels of genetic diversity (A = 7.625, P = 0.984, H o = 0.558, H e = 0.687) for R. oreojasme. Even though the distribution of the species is restricted to the South of Gran Canaria, only one population shows low genetic diversity, isolation and signs of a recent bottleneck/founder event. Some intrinsic characteristics of R. oreojasme (hermaphroditism, proterandry and polyploidy), the relative climatic stability of the Canarian archipelago during Quaternary glacials/interglacials, the size of most populations (thousands of individuals), its age, and the relative proximity of the archipelago to the mainland might have contributed to the high diversity that characterises this endemic. As expected, given the marked topographic complexity of Gran Canaria, we found marked genetic structure in R. oreojasme populations. Our results support the observation that Canarian endemics are characterised by unexpectedly high genetic diversity and provides important insights for potential applications to the conservation of R. oreojasme.

  13. Forest structure in low-diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests.

    PubMed

    Ostertag, Rebecca; Inman-Narahari, Faith; Cordell, Susan; Giardina, Christian P; Sack, Lawren

    2014-01-01

    The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai'i Island. We compared the species diversity, tree density, basal area, biomass, and size class distributions between the two forest types. We then examined these variables across tropical forests within the CTFS network. Consistent with other island forests, the Hawai'i forests were characterized by low species richness and very high relative dominance. The two Hawai'i forests were floristically distinct, yet similar in species richness (15 vs. 21 species) and stem density (3078 vs. 3486/ha). While these forests were selected for their low invasive species cover relative to surrounding forests, both forests averaged 5->50% invasive species cover; ongoing removal will be necessary to reduce or prevent competitive impacts, especially from woody species. The montane wet forest had much larger trees, resulting in eightfold higher basal area and above-ground biomass. Across the CTFS network, the Hawaiian montane wet forest was similar to other tropical forests with respect to diameter distributions, density, and aboveground biomass, while the Hawai'i lowland dry forest was similar in density to tropical forests with much higher diversity. These findings suggest that forest structural variables can be similar across tropical forests independently of species richness. The inclusion of low-diversity Pacific Island forests in the CTFS network provides an ∼80-fold range in species richness (15-1182 species), six-fold variation in mean annual rainfall (835-5272 mm yr(-1)) and 1.8-fold variation in mean annual temperature (16.0-28.4°C). Thus, the Hawaiian forest plots expand the global forest plot network to enable testing of ecological theory for

  14. Spatial clustering of habitat structure effects patterns of community composition and diversity.

    PubMed

    Altermatt, Florian; Holyoak, Marcel

    2012-05-01

    Natural ecosystems often show highly productive habitats that are clustered in space. Environmental disturbances are also often nonrandomly distributed in space and are either intrinsically linked to habitat quality or independent in occurrence. Theoretical studies predict that configuration and aggregation of habitat patch quality and disturbances can affect metacommunity composition and diversity, but experimental evidence is largely lacking. In a metacommunity experiment, we tested the effects of spatially autocorrelated disturbance and spatial aggregation of patch quality on regional and local richness, among-community dissimilarity, and community composition. We found that spatial aggregation of patch quality generally increased among-community dissimilarity (based on two measures of beta diversity) of communities containing protozoa and rotifers in microcosms. There were significant interacting effects of landscape structure and location of disturbances on beta diversity, which depended in part on the specific beta diversity measures used. Effects of disturbance on composition and richness in aggregated landscapes were generally dependent on distance and connectivity among habitat patches of different types. Our results also show that effects of disturbances in single patches cannot directly be extrapolated to the landscape scale: the predictions may be correct when only species richness is considered, but important changes in beta diversity may be overlooked. There is a need for biodiversity and conservation studies to consider the spatial aggregation of habitat quality and disturbance, as well as connectivity among spatial aggregations.

  15. Community structure and diversity of tropical forest mammals: data from a global camera trap network.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, Jorge A; Silva, Carlos E F; Gajapersad, Krisna; Hallam, Chris; Hurtado, Johanna; Martin, Emanuel; McWilliam, Alex; Mugerwa, Badru; O'Brien, Tim; Rovero, Francesco; Sheil, Douglas; Spironello, Wilson R; Winarni, Nurul; Andelman, Sandy J

    2011-09-27

    Terrestrial mammals are a key component of tropical forest communities as indicators of ecosystem health and providers of important ecosystem services. However, there is little quantitative information about how they change with local, regional and global threats. In this paper, the first standardized pantropical forest terrestrial mammal community study, we examine several aspects of terrestrial mammal species and community diversity (species richness, species diversity, evenness, dominance, functional diversity and community structure) at seven sites around the globe using a single standardized camera trapping methodology approach. The sites-located in Uganda, Tanzania, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Suriname, Brazil and Costa Rica-are surrounded by different landscape configurations, from continuous forests to highly fragmented forests. We obtained more than 51 000 images and detected 105 species of mammals with a total sampling effort of 12 687 camera trap days. We find that mammal communities from highly fragmented sites have lower species richness, species diversity, functional diversity and higher dominance when compared with sites in partially fragmented and continuous forest. We emphasize the importance of standardized camera trapping approaches for obtaining baselines for monitoring forest mammal communities so as to adequately understand the effect of global, regional and local threats and appropriately inform conservation actions. PMID:21844049

  16. Genetic diversity and population structure of leafy kale and Brassica rupestris Raf. in south Italy.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, Lorenzo; von Bothmer, Roland; Poulsen, Gert; Branca, Ferdinando; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    2014-12-01

    Local varieties of leafy kales (Brassica oleracea L.) are grown in home gardens in Calabria and Sicily for self-consumption, in the same area where the wild relative Brassica rupestris Raf. also grows. With the use of AFLP markers, comparisons were made of the genetic diversity and population structure of ten wild and 22 cultivated populations, as well as of a hybrid population and of four commercial cultivars of different B. oleracea crops. The level of genetic diversity was higher in leafy kales than in wild populations and this diversity was mainly distributed within populations. Wild populations remained distinct from cultivated material. Additionally, most wild populations were distinctively isolated from each other. On the other hand, it was not possible to molecularly distinguish even geographically distant leafy kale populations from each other or from different B. oleracea crops. It was possible to detect inter-crossing between leafy kales and B. rupestris. Findings from this study illustrate the existing level of genetic diversity in the B. oleracea gene pool. Individual populations (either wild or leafy kales) with higher levels of genetic diversity have been identified and suggestions are given for an informed conservation strategy. Domestication hypotheses are also discussed.

  17. Architectural design influences the diversity and structure of the built environment microbiome.

    PubMed

    Kembel, Steven W; Jones, Evan; Kline, Jeff; Northcutt, Dale; Stenson, Jason; Womack, Ann M; Bohannan, Brendan Jm; Brown, G Z;