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Sample records for diverse point mutations

  1. Diverse point mutations in the human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene cause enzyme deficiency and mild or severe hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Vulliamy, T J; D'Urso, M; Battistuzzi, G; Estrada, M; Foulkes, N S; Martini, G; Calabro, V; Poggi, V; Giordano, R; Town, M

    1988-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD; EC 1.1.1.49) deficiency is a common genetic abnormality affecting an estimated 400 million people worldwide. Clinical and biochemical analyses have identified many variants exhibiting a range of phenotypes, which have been well characterized from the hematological point of view. However, until now, their precise molecular basis has remained unknown. We have cloned and sequenced seven mutant G6PD alleles. In the nondeficient polymorphic African variant G6PD A we have found a single point mutation. The other six mutants investigated were all associated with enzyme deficiency. In one of the commonest, G6PD Mediterranean, which is associated with favism among other clinical manifestations, a single amino acid replacement was found (serine----phenylalanine): it must be responsible for the decreased stability and the reduced catalytic efficiency of this enzyme. Single point mutations were also found in G6PD Metaponto (Southern Italy) and in G6PD Ilesha (Nigeria), which are asymptomatic, and in G6PD Chatham, which was observed in an Indian boy with neonatal jaundice. In G6PD "Matera," which is now known to be the same as G6PD A-, two separate point mutations were found, one of which is the same as in G6PD A. In G6PD Santiago, a de novo mutation (glycine----arginine) is associated with severe chronic hemolytic anemia. The mutations observed show a striking predominance of C----T transitions, with CG doublets involved in four of seven cases. Thus, diverse point mutations may account largely for the phenotypic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency. Images PMID:3393536

  2. Diverse mutational mechanisms cause pathogenic subtelomeric rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yue; Hermetz, Karen E.; Jackson, Jodi M.; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Dodd, Anne; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Ballif, Blake C.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Cody, Jannine D.; Ledbetter, David H.; Martin, Christa L.; Rudd, M. Katharine

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements are a significant cause of intellectual disability and birth defects. Subtelomeric rearrangements, including deletions, duplications and translocations of chromosome ends, were first discovered over 40 years ago and are now recognized as being responsible for several genetic syndromes. Unlike the deletions and duplications that cause some genomic disorders, subtelomeric rearrangements do not typically have recurrent breakpoints and involve many different chromosome ends. To capture the molecular mechanisms responsible for this heterogeneous class of chromosome abnormality, we coupled high-resolution array CGH with breakpoint junction sequencing of a diverse collection of subtelomeric rearrangements. We analyzed 102 breakpoints corresponding to 78 rearrangements involving 28 chromosome ends. Sequencing 21 breakpoint junctions revealed signatures of non-homologous end-joining, non-allelic homologous recombination between interspersed repeats and DNA replication processes. Thus, subtelomeric rearrangements arise from diverse mutational mechanisms. In addition, we find hotspots of subtelomeric breakage at the end of chromosomes 9q and 22q; these sites may correspond to genomic regions that are particularly susceptible to double-strand breaks. Finally, fine-mapping the smallest subtelomeric rearrangements has narrowed the critical regions for some chromosomal disorders. PMID:21729882

  3. Mitochondrial DNA exhibits resistance to induced point and deletion mutations

    PubMed Central

    Valente, William J.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Long, Alexandra S.; White, Paul A.; Marchetti, Francesco; Bielas, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contributes to the pathogenesis of human disease. Currently, mitochondrial mutations are largely considered results of inaccurate processing of its heavily damaged genome. However, mainly from a lack of methods to monitor mtDNA mutations with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy, a link between mtDNA damage and mutation has not been established. To test the hypothesis that mtDNA-damaging agents induce mtDNA mutations, we exposed MutaTMMouse mice to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), daily for 28 consecutive days, and quantified mtDNA point and deletion mutations in bone marrow and liver using our newly developed Digital Random Mutation Capture (dRMC) and Digital Deletion Detection (3D) assays. Surprisingly, our results demonstrate mutagen treatment did not increase mitochondrial point or deletion mutation frequencies, despite evidence both compounds increase nuclear DNA mutations and demonstrated B[a]P adduct formation in mtDNA. These findings contradict models of mtDNA mutagenesis that assert the elevated rate of mtDNA mutation stems from damage sensitivity and abridged repair capacity. Rather, our results demonstrate induced mtDNA damage does not readily convert into mutation. These findings suggest robust mitochondrial damage responses repress induced mutations after mutagen exposure. PMID:27550180

  4. The point mutation process in proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    An optimized scoring matrix for residue-by-residue comparisons of distantly related protein sequences has been developed. The scoring matrix is based on observed exchanges and mutabilities of amino acids in 1572 closely related sequences derived from a cross-section of protein groups. Very few superimposed or parallel mutations are included in the data. The scoring matrix is most useful for demonstrating the relatedness of proteins between 65 and 85% different.

  5. BRAF mutation: supporting diversity in HCL.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jan A

    2012-04-05

    In this issue of Blood, Xi and colleagues report on v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) mutations in hairy cell leukemia (HCL) subsets, demonstrating that BRAF V600E mutations are absent in variant HCL forms and in a subset of classic HCL (HCLc).

  6. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Precise excision of transposons and point mutations induced by chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rusina OYu; Mirskaya, E E; Andreeva, I V; Skavronskaya, A G

    1992-11-01

    The ability of 23 chemicals (carcinogens and non-carcinogens) to induce precise excision of Tn10 and point mutations was studied in experiments with a single strain. The mutation assay was shown to detect a wider spectrum of genotoxic agents than the assay of Tn10 precise excision. The latter was induced only by potent SOS mutagens, which is in accordance with data on the SOS dependence of the induction of precise excision of Tn10. The precise excision assay as an additional test contributing to the knowledge of particular features of the action of a tested mutagen is discussed. The induction of precise excision of Tn10 by pyrene (and its failure to induce point mutations in this strain) demonstrates the value of using the transposon excision assay in cases of 'problem' mutagens.

  9. The Y-chromosome point mutation rate in humans.

    PubMed

    Helgason, Agnar; Einarsson, Axel W; Guðmundsdóttir, Valdís B; Sigurðsson, Ásgeir; Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen D; Jagadeesan, Anuradha; Ebenesersdóttir, S Sunna; Kong, Augustine; Stefánsson, Kári

    2015-05-01

    Mutations are the fundamental source of biological variation, and their rate is a crucial parameter for evolutionary and medical studies. Here we used whole-genome sequence data from 753 Icelandic males, grouped into 274 patrilines, to estimate the point mutation rate for 21.3 Mb of male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) sequence, on the basis of 1,365 meioses (47,123 years). The combined mutation rate for 15.2 Mb of X-degenerate (XDG), X-transposed (XTR) and ampliconic excluding palindromes (rAMP) sequence was 8.71 × 10(-10) mutations per position per year (PPPY). We observed a lower rate (P = 0.04) of 7.37 × 10(-10) PPPY for 6.1 Mb of sequence from palindromes (PAL), which was not statistically different from the rate of 7.2 × 10(-10) PPPY for paternally transmitted autosomes. We postulate that the difference between PAL and the other MSY regions may provide an indication of the rate at which nascent autosomal and PAL de novo mutations are repaired as a result of gene conversion.

  10. Repository of mutations from Oman: The entry point to a national mutation database

    PubMed Central

    Rajab, Anna; Hamza, Nishath; Al Harasi, Salma; Al Lawati, Fatma; Gibbons, Una; Al Alawi, Intesar; Kobus, Karoline; Hassan, Suha; Mahir, Ghariba; Al Salmi, Qasim; Mons, Barend; Robinson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Sultanate of Oman is a rapidly developing Muslim country with well-organized government-funded health care services, and expanding medical genetic facilities. The preservation of tribal structures within the Omani population coupled with geographical isolation has produced unique patterns of rare mutations. In order to provide diagnosticians and researchers with access to an up-to-date resource that will assist them in their daily practice we collated and analyzed all of the Mendelian disease-associated mutations identified in the Omani population. By the 1 st of August 2015, the dataset contained 300 mutations detected in over 150 different genes. More than half of the data collected reflect novel genetic variations that were first described in the Omani population, and most disorders with known mutations are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. A number of novel Mendelian disease genes have been discovered in Omani nationals, and the corresponding mutations are included here. The current study provides a comprehensive resource of the mutations in the Omani population published in scientific literature or reported through service provision that will be useful for genetic care in Oman and will be a starting point for variation databases as next-generation sequencing technologies are introduced into genetic medicine in Oman. PMID:26594346

  11. A novel mitochondrial 12SrRNA point mutation in parkinsonism, deafness, and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, D; Bressman, S; Bruno, C; Przedborski, S; Shanske, S; Lynch, T; Fahn, S; DiMauro, S

    2000-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a mitochondrial DNA mutation and defective oxidative phosphorylation are present in a pedigree with maternally inherited sensorineural deafness, levodopa-responsive parkinsonism, and neuropathy. We sequenced the mitochondrial-encoded ribosomal RNA, cytochrome c oxidase, and transfer RNA genes by cycle sequencing. A polymerase chain reaction-based restriction enzyme assay with mismatched primers was employed to show heteroplasmy of a novel 12SrRNA mutation in the proband and to screen control subjects. Spectrophotometric mitochondrial respiratory chain assays were performed in transformed lymphoblasts from the proband and 12 normal controls. A novel, heteroplasmic, maternally inherited 12SrRNA point mutation (T1095C) was found in the pedigree. Respiratory chain enzyme analysis in cultured lymphocytes from the proband revealed a significant reduction in cytochrome c oxidase activity. Secondary structure predicts that this mutation disrupts a highly conserved loop in the small subunit ribosomal RNA, which is important in the initiation of mitochondrial protein synthesis. The mutation was not found in 270 controls of diverse ethnic origins. We conclude that this mutation is pathogenic and causes an oxidative phosphorylation defect by interfering with mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  12. AID and Apobec3G haphazard deamination and mutational diversity

    PubMed Central

    Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Pham, Phuong; Scharff, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) and Apobec 3G (Apo3G) cause mutational diversity by initiating mutations on regions of single-stranded (ss) DNA. Expressed in B cells, AID deaminates C → U in actively transcribed immunoglobulin (Ig) variable and switch regions to initiate the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) that are essential for antibody diversity. Apo3G expressed in T cells catalyzes C deaminations on reverse transcribed cDNA causing HIV-1 retroviral inactivation. When operating properly, AID- and Apo3G-initiated mutations boost human fitness. Yet, both enzymes are potentially powerful somatic cell “mutators”. Loss of regulated expression and proper genome targeting can cause human cancer. Here, we review well-established biological roles of AID and Apo3G. We provide a synopsis of AID partnering proteins during SHM and CSR, and describe how an Apo2 crystal structure provides “surrogate” insight for AID and Apo3G biochemical behavior. However, large gaps remain in our understanding of how dC deaminases search ssDNA to identify trinucleotide motifs to deaminate. We discuss two recent methods to analyze ssDNA scanning and deamination. Apo3G scanning and deamination is visualized in real-time using single-molecule FRET, and AID deamination efficiencies are determined with a random walk analysis. AID and Apo3G encounter many candidate deamination sites while scanning ssDNA. Generating mutational diversity is a principal aim of AID and an important ancillary property of Apo3G. Success seems likely to involve hit and miss deamination motif targeting, biased strongly toward miss. PMID:23178850

  13. VACTERL with the mitochondrial NP 3243 point mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, M.S.; Dorndorf, W.; Schachenmayr, W.; Seibel, P.; Reichmann, H.

    1996-04-24

    The VACTERL association of vertebral, anal, cardiovascular, tracheo-esophageal, renal, and limb defects is one of the more common congenital disorders with limb deficiency arising during blastogenesis. The cause is probably heterogeneous; a molecular basis has not been defined. We report on a family in which a female infant with VACTERL was born in 1977 and died at age 1 month due to renal failure. Because her mother and sister later developed classical mitochondrial cytopathy associated with the A-G point mutation at nucleotide position (np) 3243 of mitochondrial (mt) DNA, we performed a molecular analysis of mt DNA in preserved kidney tissue from the VACTERL case. We discovered 100% mutant mt DNA in multicystic and 32% mutant mt DNA in normal kidney tissue. Mild deficiency of complex I respiratory chain enzyme activity was found in the mother`s muscle biopsy. Other maternal relatives were healthy but had low levels of mutant mt DNA in blood. This is the first report to provide a precise molecular basis for a case of VACTERL. The differing tissue pathology depending on the percentage of mutant mt DNA suggests a causal connection between the mutation and symptoms. VACTERL, and this type of multicystic renal dysplasia, are new phenotypes for the np 3243 point mutation. The possibility of a mitochondrial disorder should be born in mind and also that VACTERL may occur as a first manifestation of a mutation that has been present for generations. This would have major implications for patient management and for genetic counselling regarding both the risk of recurrence and risk of other mitochondrial syndromes in affected families. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Multipyrene Tandem Probes for Point Mutations Detection in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kholodar, Svetlana A.; Novopashina, Darya S.; Meschaninova, Mariya I.; Venyaminova, Alya G.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report design, synthesis and characterization of highly sensitive, specific and stable in biological systems fluorescent probes for point mutation detection in DNA. The tandems of 3′- and 5′-mono- and bis-pyrene conjugated oligo(2′-O-methylribonucleotides), protected by 3′-“inverted” thymidine, were constructed and their potential as new instruments for genetic diagnostics was studied. Novel probes have been shown to exhibit an ability to form stable duplexes with DNA target due to the stabilizing effect of multiple pyrene units at the junction. The relationship between fluorescent properties of developed probes, the number of pyrene residues at the tandem junction, and the location of point mutation has been studied. On the basis of the data obtained, we have chosen the probes possessing the highest fluorescence intensity along with the best mismatch discrimination and deletion and insertion detection ability. Application of developed probes for detection of polymorphism C677T in MTHFR gene has been demonstrated on model systems. PMID:24455205

  15. Quantifying genetic diversity under a broad spectrum of deleterious mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Benjamin; Desai, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that selection against deleterious mutations may play a major role in shaping observed patterns of sequence variation in natural populations. However, our understanding of these patterns remains limited, since selection creates correlations along the genome that are difficult to disentangle from each other. Previous theoretical work has focused on the qualitative effects of selection on sequence diversity, using simplified models in which all selected mutations have the same fitness cost. Yet is known that deleterious mutations follow a wide distribution in most organisms, so it is necessary to extend our theoretical predictions to this more general case before we can make quantitative connections with existing data. The evolutionary dynamics of this regime are complicated: extant mutant lineages represent large, correlated fluctuations away from the background expectation, which hinders efforts to apply existing methods based on deterministic or ``mean-field'' approximations. Here, we will describe recent progress towards this goal, which is based on a ``coarse-graining'' of the underlying distribution of fitnesses in the population.

  16. Effects of point mutations on the thermostability of B. subtilis lipase: investigating nonadditivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bipin; Bulusu, Gopalakrishnan; Mitra, Abhijit

    2016-10-01

    Molecular level understanding of mutational effects on stability and activity of enzymes is challenging particularly when several point mutations are incorporated during the directed evolution experiments. In our earlier study, we have suggested the lack of consistency in the effect of point mutations incorporated during the initial generations of directed evolution experiments, towards conformational stabilization of B. subtilis lipase mutants of later generations. Here, we report that the cumulative point mutations incorporated in mutants 2M (with two point mutations) to 6M (with six point mutations) possibly do not retain their original stabilizing nature in the most thermostable 12M mutant (with 12 point mutations). We have carried out MD simulations using structures incorporating reversal of different sets of point mutations to assess their effect on the conformational stability and activity of 12M. Our analysis has revealed that reversal of certain point mutations in 12M had little effect on its conformational stability, suggesting that these mutations were probably inconsequential towards the thermostability of the 12M mutant. Interestingly these mutations involved evolutionarily conserved residues. On the other hand, some of the other point mutations incorporated in nonconserved regions, appeared to contribute significantly towards the conformational stability and/or activity of 12M. Based on the analysis of dynamics of in silico mutants generated using the consensus sequence, we identified experimentally verifiable residue positions to further increase the conformational stability and activity of the 12M mutant.

  17. Genome-wide mutational diversity in an evolving population of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Lenski, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    The level of genetic variation in a population is the result of a dynamic tension between evolutionary forces. Mutations create variation, certain frequency-dependent interactions may preserve diversity, and natural selection purges variation. New sequencing technologies offer unprecedented opportunities to discover and characterize the diversity present in evolving microbial populations on a whole-genome scale. By sequencing mixed-population samples, we have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms present at various points in the history of an Escherichia coli population that has evolved for almost 20 years from a founding clone. With 50-fold genome coverage we were able to catch beneficial mutations as they swept to fixation, discover contending beneficial alleles that were eliminated by clonal interference, and detect other minor variants possibly adapted to a new ecological niche. Additionally, there was a dramatic increase in genetic diversity late in the experiment after a mutator phenotype evolved. Still finer resolution details of the structure of genetic variation and how it changes over time in microbial evolution experiments will enable new applications and quantitative tests of population genetic theory. PMID:19776167

  18. Rapid Measurement of Individual Cone Photoreceptor Pointing using Focus Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Hugh J.; Codona, Johanan L.; Blanco, Leonardo; Doble, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A novel method is presented to rapidly measure the pointing direction of individual human cone photoreceptors using adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging. For a fixed entrance pupil position, the focal plane is rapidly modulated to image the guided light in various axial planes. For cones with different pointing directions, this focus diversity will cause a shift in their apparent position, allowing for their relative pointing to be determined. For four normal human subjects, retinal images were acquired, registered and the positions of individual cones tracked throughout the dataset. Variation in cone tilt was 0.02 radians, agreeing with other objective measurements on the same subjects at the same retinal locations. PMID:26368692

  19. Marcus model of spontaneous point mutation in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turaeva, N.; Brown-Kennerly, V.

    2015-11-01

    The theoretical model of Löwdin's mechanism of spontaneous mutation based on 2D Marcus theory of DPT has been proposed in this work. The equation for the kinetics of DPT during DNA replication has been established, and the expression for the probability of spontaneous mutation has been received. The probability of spontaneous mutation formation has been estimated for tautomeric G∗-C∗ complexes, which is in the range of experimental results. The probability of spontaneous mutation as a function of temperature, replication rate, and solvent effect has been discussed. It increases with temperature and decreases with replication rate. The solvent and pH effects on the probability of spontaneous mutation can also be discussed within the framework of the model.

  20. Missense point mutations of tau to segregate with FTDP-17 exhibit site-specific effects on microtubule structure in COS cells: a novel action of R406W mutation.

    PubMed

    Sahara, N; Tomiyama, T; Mori, H

    2000-05-01

    Missense and splicing point mutations have been found in the tau gene in families with frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Of these mutations, we examined four exonic missense point mutations (G272V, P301L, V337M and R406W) in 3-repeat or 4-repeat tau isoform on the transfection experiment. The effects of two mutations (G272V or P301L) on microtubules were subtle whereas those of two other mutations (V337M or R406W) were dramatically significant when these two mutations were constructed into 3-repeat tau but not into 4-repeat tau. The R406W mutation induced an alternation of microtubules to form dotted or fragmented forms retaining colocalization of tau with tubulin whereas the V337M mutation predominantly disrupted microtubule networks and diminished colocalization of tau and tubulin. The effect of the mutations on microtubules were thus site-dependent and isoform-dependent. Tau with R406W mutation was found to be colocalized with tubulin without filamentous structures on confocal views, suggesting that the carboxyl region of tau played a different role from tubulin-binding domain on microtubule assemble. Another abnormal property was identified in tau with R406W mutation that failed to suffer phosphorylation. Thus, diverse effects of tau mutations on microtubules may explain the various clinicopathologies of FTDP-17 and related tauopathies.

  1. A point mutation and a RNA processing mutation in a carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) deficient patient

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.; Summer, M.; Sierra-Rivera, E.; Freeman, M.

    1994-09-01

    Deficiency of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSID) results in a life-threatening disease due to hyperammonemia. A better understanding of the molecular basis of CPSID was achieved by studying the genetic defects in a CPSID patient. CPSI message was analyzed from hepatic tissue through Northern blot analysis, reverse transcription of liver mRNA followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification (RT-PCR), dideoxy fingerprinting, and direct DNA sequencing. Northern blot analysis of the patient revealed a diminished amount of normal sized CPSI message and multiple other bands not detected in controls. Analysis of the amplified coding region revealed a single point mutation leading to an asparagine to lysine substitution at codon 715. The patient`s cDNA was homozygous and genomic DNA heterozygous for the point mutation which was not found in ten unrelated CPSID patients. The point mutation causes a change from a highly-conserved neutral amino acid to a polar basic residue within a nucleotide/bicarbonate binding domain which points to its importance in normal CPSI function. The other allele which was absent in RT-PCR fragements presumably leads to the multi-form poly-A message detected by Northern blot analysis and allows the point mutation to become the dominant expressed allele. These mutations represent the second reported molecular defect in CPSI and the first to involve a mutation in a functional domain and in RNA processing.

  2. Impact of Mutation Type and Amplicon Characteristics on Genetic Diversity Measures Generated Using a High-Resolution Melting Diversity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Matthew M.; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2013-01-01

    We adapted high-resolution melting (HRM) technology to measure genetic diversity without sequencing. Diversity is measured as a single numeric HRM score. Herein, we determined the impact of mutation types and amplicon characteristics on HRM diversity scores. Plasmids were generated with single-base changes, insertions, and deletions. Different primer sets were used to vary the position of mutations within amplicons. Plasmids and plasmid mixtures were analyzed to determine the impact of mutation type, position, and concentration on HRM scores. The impact of amplicon length and G/C content on HRM scores was also evaluated. Different mutation types affected HRM scores to varying degrees (1-bp deletion < 1-bp change < 3-bp insertion < 9-bp insertion). The impact of mutations on HRM scores was influenced by amplicon length and the position of the mutation within the amplicon. Mutations were detected at concentrations of 5% to 95%, with the greatest impact at 50%. The G/C content altered melting temperature values of amplicons but had no impact on HRM scores. These data are relevant to the design of assays that measure genetic diversity using HRM technology. PMID:23178437

  3. Phylogenetic diversity, functional trait diversity and extinction: avoiding tipping points and worst-case losses.

    PubMed

    Faith, Daniel P

    2015-02-19

    The phylogenetic diversity measure, ('PD'), measures the relative feature diversity of different subsets of taxa from a phylogeny. At the level of feature diversity, PD supports the broad goal of biodiversity conservation to maintain living variation and option values. PD calculations at the level of lineages and features include those integrating probabilities of extinction, providing estimates of expected PD. This approach has known advantages over the evolutionarily distinct and globally endangered (EDGE) methods. Expected PD methods also have limitations. An alternative notion of expected diversity, expected functional trait diversity, relies on an alternative non-phylogenetic model and allows inferences of diversity at the level of functional traits. Expected PD also faces challenges in helping to address phylogenetic tipping points and worst-case PD losses. Expected PD may not choose conservation options that best avoid worst-case losses of long branches from the tree of life. We can expand the range of useful calculations based on expected PD, including methods for identifying phylogenetic key biodiversity areas.

  4. Label-free and high-sensitive detection for genetic point mutation based on hyperspectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Rongxin; Li, Qi; Zhang, Junqi; Wang, Ruliang; Lin, Xue; Xue, Ning; Su, Ya; Jiang, Kai; Huang, Guoliang

    2016-10-01

    Label free point mutation detection is particularly momentous in the area of biomedical research and clinical diagnosis since gene mutations naturally occur and bring about highly fatal diseases. In this paper, a label free and high sensitive approach is proposed for point mutation detection based on hyperspectral interferometry. A hybridization strategy is designed to discriminate a single-base substitution with sequence-specific DNA ligase. Double-strand structures will take place only if added oligonucleotides are perfectly paired to the probe sequence. The proposed approach takes full use of the inherent conformation of double-strand DNA molecules on the substrate and a spectrum analysis method is established to point out the sub-nanoscale thickness variation, which benefits to high sensitive mutation detection. The limit of detection reach 4pg/mm2 according to the experimental result. A lung cancer gene point mutation was demonstrated, proving the high selectivity and multiplex analysis capability of the proposed biosensor.

  5. G130V, a common FRDA point mutation, appears to have arisen from a common founder.

    PubMed

    Delatycki, M B; Knight, M; Koenig, M; Cossée, M; Williamson, R; Forrest, S M

    1999-10-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common inherited ataxia. About 98% of mutant alleles have an expansion of a GAA trinucleotide repeat in intron 1 of the affected gene, FRDA. The other 2% are point mutations. Of the 17 point mutations so far described, three appear to be more common. One of these is the G130V mutation in exon 4 of FRDA. G130V, when present with an expanded GAA repeat on the other allele, is associated with an atypical FRDA phenotype. Haplotype analysis was undertaken on the four families who have been described with this mutation. The results suggest a common founder for this mutation. Although marked differences in extragenic marker haplotypes were seen in one family, similar intragenic haplotyping suggests the same mutation founder for this family with the differences explicable by two recombination events.

  6. Ancient founder mutation is responsible for Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome among diverse ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) was described just over 50 years ago by Olga Imerslund and Ralph Gräsbeck and colleagues. IGS is caused by specific malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl) due to bi-allelic mutations in either the cubilin gene (CUBN) or the human amnionless homolog (AMN). Mutations in the two genes are commonly seen in founder populations or in societies with a high degree of consanguineous marriages. One particular mutation in AMN, c.208-2A>G, causing an out-of-frame loss of exon 4 in the mRNA, is responsible for some 15% of IGS cases globally. We present evidence that this founder mutation causes a substantial percentage of cases among diverse ethnicities and that the mutation is as old as human civilization. Methods Partial genotyping indicated a founder event but its presence in diverse peoples of Arabic, Turkish, Jewish, and Hispanic ancestry suggested that the mutation might be recurrent. We therefore studied the flanking sequence spanning 3.5 Mb to elucidate the origin of the haplotype and estimate the age of the mutation using a Bayesian inference method based on observed linkage disequilibrium. Results The mutation's distribution, the size of the shared haplotype, and estimates of growth rate and carrier frequency indicated that the mutation was a single prehistoric event. Dating back to the ancient Middle East around 11,600 BC, the mutation predates the advent of writing, farming, and the monotheistic religions of the region. Conclusions This mutation causes over 50% of the IGS cases among Arabic, Turkish, and Sephardic Jewish families, making it a primary target for genetic screening among diverse IGS cases originating from the Middle East. Thus, rare founder mutations may cause a substantial number of cases, even among diverse ethnicities not usually thought to be related. PMID:22078000

  7. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 siblings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances.

  8. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 silbings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances. PMID:26722549

  9. A novel point mutation in exon 20 of EGFR showed sensitivity to erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Xing, Kailin; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Xinmin; Sun, Si; Luo, Zhiguo; Wang, Huijie; Yu, Hui; Wang, Jialei; Chang, Jianhua; Wu, Xianghua; Hu, Aiqun

    2014-07-01

    Mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are good predictors of response to treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is well established that classic mutations, such as in-frame deletions in exon 19 and the point mutation L858R in exon 21, are associated with high sensitivity to EGFR TKIs. Though mutations in exon 20 are almost correlated with EGFR-TKIs resistance, the awareness that they might confer sensitivity to TKI treatment should be emphasized. Herein, we describe a novel mutation in exon 20 of EGFR in a Chinese male non-smoker, who was diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma and characterized by the codon 769 point mutation GTG>GCG, which translates into alanine instead of valine (p.V769A). In this case, the patient showed a good clinical response to erlotinib after paclitaxel/cisplatin first-line and docetaxel second-line chemotherapies. Therefore, we suggest that this rare mutation (p.V769A) may be a sensitive EGFR mutation in NSCLC. The identification of novel EGFR mutations provides new predictive biomarkers for TKI treatment and is essential to the successful use of targeted therapies.

  10. Large-scale discovery of induced point mutations with high-throughput TILLING.

    PubMed

    Till, Bradley J; Reynolds, Steven H; Greene, Elizabeth A; Codomo, Christine A; Enns, Linda C; Johnson, Jessica E; Burtner, Chris; Odden, Anthony R; Young, Kim; Taylor, Nicholas E; Henikoff, Jorja G; Comai, Luca; Henikoff, Steven

    2003-03-01

    TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes) is a general reverse-genetic strategy that provides an allelic series of induced point mutations in genes of interest. High-throughput TILLING allows the rapid and low-cost discovery of induced point mutations in populations of chemically mutagenized individuals. As chemical mutagenesis is widely applicable and mutation detection for TILLING is dependent only on sufficient yield of PCR products, TILLING can be applied to most organisms. We have developed TILLING as a service to the Arabidopsis community known as the Arabidopsis TILLING Project (ATP). Our goal is to rapidly deliver allelic series of ethylmethanesulfonate-induced mutations in target 1-kb loci requested by the international research community. In the first year of public operation, ATP has discovered, sequenced, and delivered >1000 mutations in >100 genes ordered by Arabidopsis researchers. The tools and methodologies described here can be adapted to create similar facilities for other organisms.

  11. Conformational SERS Classification of K-Ras Point Mutations for Cancer Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Morla-Folch, Judit; Gisbert-Quilis, Patricia; Masetti, Matteo; Garcia-Rico, Eduardo; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Guerrini, Luca

    2017-02-20

    Point mutations in Ras oncogenes are routinely screened for diagnostics and treatment of tumors (especially in colorectal cancer). Here, we develop an optical approach based on direct SERS coupled with chemometrics for the study of the specific conformations that single-point mutations impose on a relatively large fragment of the K-Ras gene (141 nucleobases). Results obtained offer the unambiguous classification of different mutations providing a potentially useful insight for diagnostics and treatment of cancer in a sensitive, fast, direct and inexpensive manner.

  12. One-Step Ligation on RNA Amplification for the Detection of Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jingjing; Coetzer, Mia; Angione, Stephanie; Kantor, Rami; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-11-01

    The detection of point mutations is required in the diagnosis of many human diseases. The conformal specificity of DNA ligases was elegantly used to distinguish single-nucleotide mismatches. However, to detect point mutations in RNA retroviruses, conventional ligase-mediated approaches require the reverse transcription of viral genomes before separate ligation and amplification steps. We developed one-step ligation on RNA amplification (LRA) for the direct detection of RNA point mutations. The process combines the ligase-mediated joining of two oligonucleotides and subsequent hot start amplification into a single-tube reaction. We report that modifications to the structure of the oligonucleotide ligation probes improve the rate of ligation and the specificity of mutation detection on RNA. We applied LRA to the detection of a common, clinically relevant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase drug-resistant point mutation, K103N, and compared it with allele-specific PCR and pyrosequencing. LRA achieved a limit of specific quantitation of 1:100 (1%), and a limit of specific detection for mutant K103N RNA transcripts among excess wild-type strands of 1:10,000 (0.01%). LRA also exhibited good detection threshold of 5 × 10(2) copies/μL K103N RNA transcripts. LRA is a novel point mutation detection method, with potential utilization in HIV drug resistance detection and early diagnostics of genetic disorders associated with other infectious diseases and cancer.

  13. Haplotype analysis of the 185delAG BRCA1 mutation in ethnically diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Laitman, Yael; Feng, Bing-Jian; Zamir, Itay M; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Duncan, Paul; Port, Danielle; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Evans, Gareth; Latif, Ayse; Newman, William G; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Zidan, Jamal; Shimon-Paluch, Shani; Goldgar, David; Friedman, Eitan

    2013-01-01

    The 185delAG* BRCA1 mutation is encountered primarily in Jewish Ashkenazi and Iraqi individuals, and sporadically in non-Jews. Previous studies estimated that this is a founder mutation in Jewish mutation carriers that arose before the dispersion of Jews in the Diaspora ∼2500 years ago. The aim of this study was to assess the haplotype in ethnically diverse 185delAG* BRCA1 mutation carriers, and to estimate the age at which the mutation arose. Ethnically diverse Jewish and non-Jewish 185delAG*BRCA1 mutation carriers and their relatives were genotyped using 15 microsatellite markers and three SNPs spanning 12.5 MB, encompassing the BRCA1 gene locus. Estimation of mutation age was based on a subset of 11 markers spanning a region of ∼5 MB, using a previously developed algorithm applying the maximum likelihood method. Overall, 188 participants (154 carriers and 34 noncarriers) from 115 families were included: Ashkenazi, Iraq, Kuchin-Indians, Syria, Turkey, Iran, Tunisia, Bulgaria, non-Jewish English, non-Jewish Malaysian, and Hispanics. Haplotype analysis indicated that the 185delAG mutation arose 750–1500 years ago. In Ashkenazim, it is a founder mutation that arose 61 generations ago, and with a small group of founder mutations was introduced into the Hispanic population (conversos) ∼650 years ago, and into the Iraqi–Jewish community ∼450 years ago. The 185delAG mutation in the non-Jewish populations in Malaysia and the UK arose at least twice independently. We conclude that the 185delAG* BRCA1 mutation resides on a common haplotype among Ashkenazi Jews, and arose about 61 generations ago and arose independently at least twice in non-Jews. PMID:22763381

  14. Rapid localization of point mutations in PCR products by chemical (HOT) modification.

    PubMed

    Tindall, K R; Whitaker, R A

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of mutational mechanisms in mammalian cells use the AS52 Chinese hamster ovary cell line. AS52 mutants can be selected as 6-thioguanine resistant colonies and mutations are studied at a chromosomally integrated gpt locus. Mutant gpt sequences are amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to distinguish deletions from putative point mutations. PCR is efficiently performed from a few thousand lysed cells or from isolated genomic DNA. Amplified mutant PCR fragments carrying putative point mutations are further characterized by localizing the site of the mutation using chemical modification. A heteroduplex molecule consisting of one wild-type and one mutant DNA strand is generated. A base mismatch will be produced at the site of the mutation. Mismatched cytosine or thymine residues are sensitive to modification by hydroxylamine or osmium tetroxide, respectively. The modified DNA heteroduplex is then sensitive to piperidine cleavage. If one strand is 32P-end labeled, then the cleavage product can be separated on a denaturing acrylamide sequencing gel and visualized using autoradiography. Thus, the site of a mutation can be localized to a specific region of the gene, thereby simplifying the DNA sequence analysis and facilitating the rapid generation of mutational sequence spectra.

  15. Interplay between DMD Point Mutations and Splicing Signals in Dystrophinopathy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Juan-Mateu, Jonàs; González-Quereda, Lidia; Rodríguez, Maria José; Verdura, Edgard; Lázaro, Kira; Jou, Cristina; Nascimento, Andrés; Jiménez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Colomer, Jaume; Monges, Soledad; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Foncuberta, Maria Eugenia; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel Ignacio; Molano, Jesús; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2013-01-01

    DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements. PMID:23536893

  16. Fly-TILL: reverse genetics using a living point mutation resource.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jennifer L; Till, Bradley J; Henikoff, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Mutagenesis with ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) has been the standard for traditional genetic screens, and in recent years has been applied to reverse genetics. However, reverse-genetic strategies require maintaining a viable germline library so that mutations that are discovered can subsequently be recovered. In applying our TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) method to establish a Drosophila reverse-genetic service (Fly-TILL), we chose to screen the Zuker lines, a large collection of EMS-mutagenized second- and third-chromosome balanced lines that had been established for forward-genetic screening. For the past four years, our Fly-TILL service has screened this collection to provide approximately 150 allelic series of point mutations for the fly community. Our analysis of >2000 point mutations and indels have provided a glimpse into the population dynamics of this valuable genetic resource. We found evidence for selection and differential recovery of mutations, depending on distance from balancer breakpoints. Although this process led to variable mutational densities, we have nevertheless been able to deliver potentially valuable mutations in genes selected by Fly-TILL users. We anticipate that our findings will help guide the future implementation of point-mutation resources for the Drosophila community.

  17. Analysis of any point mutation in DNA. The amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS).

    PubMed Central

    Newton, C R; Graham, A; Heptinstall, L E; Powell, S J; Summers, C; Kalsheker, N; Smith, J C; Markham, A F

    1989-01-01

    We have improved the "polymerase chain reaction" (PCR) to permit rapid analysis of any known mutation in genomic DNA. We demonstrate a system, ARMS (Amplification Refractory Mutation System), that allows genotyping solely by inspection of reaction mixtures after agarose gel electrophoresis. The system is simple, reliable and non-isotopic. It will clearly distinguish heterozygotes at a locus from homozygotes for either allele. The system requires neither restriction enzyme digestion, allele-specific oligonucleotides as conventionally applied, nor the sequence analysis of PCR products. The basis of the invention is that unexpectedly, oligonucleotides with a mismatched 3'-residue will not function as primers in the PCR under appropriate conditions. We have analysed DNA from patients with alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, from carriers of the disease and from normal individuals. Our findings are in complete agreement with allele assignments derived by direct sequencing of PCR products. Images PMID:2785681

  18. Pairwise contact energy statistical potentials can help to find probability of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, K M; Suvaithenamudhan, S; Parthasarathy, S; Selvaraj, S

    2017-01-01

    To adopt a particular fold, a protein requires several interactions between its amino acid residues. The energetic contribution of these residue-residue interactions can be approximated by extracting statistical potentials from known high resolution structures. Several methods based on statistical potentials extracted from unrelated proteins are found to make a better prediction of probability of point mutations. We postulate that the statistical potentials extracted from known structures of similar folds with varying sequence identity can be a powerful tool to examine probability of point mutation. By keeping this in mind, we have derived pairwise residue and atomic contact energy potentials for the different functional families that adopt the (α/β)8 TIM-Barrel fold. We carried out computational point mutations at various conserved residue positions in yeast Triose phosphate isomerase enzyme for which experimental results are already reported. We have also performed molecular dynamics simulations on a subset of point mutants to make a comparative study. The difference in pairwise residue and atomic contact energy of wildtype and various point mutations reveals probability of mutations at a particular position. Interestingly, we found that our computational prediction agrees with the experimental studies of Silverman et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci 2001;98:3092-3097) and perform better prediction than iMutant and Cologne University Protein Stability Analysis Tool. The present work thus suggests deriving pairwise contact energy potentials and molecular dynamics simulations of functionally important folds could help us to predict probability of point mutations which may ultimately reduce the time and cost of mutation experiments. Proteins 2016; 85:54-64. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Congenital long QT syndrome: severe torsades de pointes provoked by epinephrine in a digenic mutation carrier.

    PubMed

    Tan, Vern Hsen; Duff, Henry; Kuriachan, Vikas; Gerull, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Congenital Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is a potentially lethal cardiac channelopathy characterized by prolongation of the corrected QT (QTc) interval on the surface electrocardiogram. The hallmark phenotypic features are syncope, seizure or sudden death, however most of the mutation carriers are asymptomatic and their risk for arrhythmias such as Torsade de pointes (TdP) are low. We report a case of Long QT syndrome with a corrected QT of 520 ms. For symptom - arrhythmia correlation a loop recorder was implanted with no documented arrhythmias. Epinephrine testing was performed for clinical risk stratification leading to Torsades de pointes during recovery phase which required defibrillation. Genetic testing discovered two pathogenic heterozygous mutations in two different LQT genes (SCN5A and KCNQ1). We propose a calcium homeostasis mechanism for the interaction of both mutations that exaggerated the phenotype, while each mutation by itself is causing a relatively modest phenotype.

  20. Accurate detection and quantitation of heteroplasmic mitochondrial point mutations by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    White, Helen E; Durston, Victoria J; Seller, Anneke; Fratter, Carl; Harvey, John F; Cross, Nicholas C P

    2005-01-01

    Disease-causing mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are typically heteroplasmic and therefore interpretation of genetic tests for mitochondrial disorders can be problematic. Detection of low level heteroplasmy is technically demanding and it is often difficult to discriminate between the absence of a mutation or the failure of a technique to detect the mutation in a particular tissue. The reliable measurement of heteroplasmy in different tissues may help identify individuals who are at risk of developing specific complications and allow improved prognostic advice for patients and family members. We have evaluated Pyrosequencing technology for the detection and estimation of heteroplasmy for six mitochondrial point mutations associated with the following diseases: Leber's hereditary optical neuropathy (LHON), G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C; mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), A3243G; myoclonus epilepsy with ragged red fibers (MERRF), A8344G, and neurogenic muscle weakness, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP)/Leighs: T8993G/C. Results obtained from the Pyrosequencing assays for 50 patients with presumptive mitochondrial disease were compared to those obtained using the commonly used diagnostic technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction enzyme digestion. The Pyrosequencing assays provided accurate genotyping and quantitative determination of mutational load with a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. The MELAS A3243G mutation was detected reliably at a level of 1% heteroplasmy. We conclude that Pyrosequencing is a rapid and robust method for detecting heteroplasmic mitochondrial point mutations.

  1. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: assessment of point mutations and copy number variations in Brazilian patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and other susceptibility genes have been identified as genetic causes of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). To identify the disease-causing mutations in a cohort of 120 Brazilian women fulfilling criteria for HBOC, we carried out a comprehensive screening of BRCA1/2, TP53 R337H, CHEK2 1100delC, followed by an analysis of copy number variations in 14 additional breast cancer susceptibility genes (PTEN, ATM, NBN, RAD50, RAD51, BRIP1, PALB2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, TP53, CDKN2A, CDH1 and CTNNB1). Methods Capillary sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were used for detecting point mutations and copy number variations (CNVs), respectively, for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes; capillary sequencing was used for point mutation for both variants TP53 R337H and CHEK2 1100delC, and finally array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was used for identifying CNVs in the 14 additional genes. Results The positive detection rate in our series was 26%. BRCA1 pathogenic mutations were found in 20 cases, including two cases with CNVs, whereas BRCA2 mutations were found in 7 cases. We also found three patients with the TP53 R337H mutation and one patient with the CHEK2 1100delC mutation. Seven (25%) pathogenic mutations in BRCA1/2 were firstly described, including a splice-site BRCA1 mutation for which pathogenicity was confirmed by the presence of an aberrant transcript showing the loss of the last 62 bp of exon 7. Microdeletions of exon 4 in ATM and exon 2 in PTEN were identified in BRCA2-mutated and BRCA1/2-negative patients, respectively. Conclusions In summary, our results showed a high frequency of BRCA1/2 mutations and a higher prevalence of BRCA1 (64.5%) gene. Moreover, the detection of the TP53 R337H variant in our series and the fact that this variant has a founder effect in our population prompted us to suggest that all female breast cancer patients with clinical criteria

  2. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lei; Yarlagadda, Ramya; Reed, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find "hot spots" in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html) is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants' experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG) and melting temperature change (dTm) were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor) and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models.

  3. Rapid evolution of cis-regulatory sequences via local point mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.; Wray, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    Although the evolution of protein-coding sequences within genomes is well understood, the same cannot be said of the cis-regulatory regions that control transcription. Yet, changes in gene expression are likely to constitute an important component of phenotypic evolution. We simulated the evolution of new transcription factor binding sites via local point mutations. The results indicate that new binding sites appear and become fixed within populations on microevolutionary timescales under an assumption of neutral evolution. Even combinations of two new binding sites evolve very quickly. We predict that local point mutations continually generate considerable genetic variation that is capable of altering gene expression.

  4. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generation-Associated Point Mutations Arise during the Initial Stages of the Conversion of These Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Mayumi; Kasama, Yasuji; Araki, Ryoko; Hoki, Yuko; Sunayama, Misato; Uda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Miki; Ando, Shunsuke; Abe, Masumi

    2014-01-01

    Summary A large number of point mutations have been identified in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) genomes to date. Whether these mutations are associated with iPSC generation is an important and controversial issue. In this study, we approached this critical issue in different ways, including an assessment of iPSCs versus embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and an investigation of variant allele frequencies and the heterogeneity of point mutations within a single iPSC clone. Through these analyses, we obtained strong evidence that iPSC-generation-associated point mutations occur frequently in a transversion-predominant manner just after the onset of cell lineage conversion. The heterogeneity of the point mutation profiles within an iPSC clone was also revealed and reflects the history of the emergence of each mutation. Further, our results suggest a possible approach for establishing iPSCs with fewer point mutations. PMID:24511470

  5. Identification of eight point mutations in protein S deficiency type I--analysis of 15 pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Gómez, E; Poort, S R; Bertina, R M; Reitsma, P H

    1995-05-01

    We described molecular genetic studies of 15 patients with protein S deficiency type I (i.e. reduced total protein S antigen). All the exons of the PROS 1 gene were analyzed both by PCR and direct sequencing in all 15 probands. This analysis led to the identification of point mutations affecting eight individuals. One of these mutations (codon-25, insertion of T) has been described previously in a Dutch pedigree. The other mutations are novel and all are located in exons that code for the protein S domain that is homologous to the steroid hormone binding globulins. They include two amino acid replacements (one individual with 340 Gly--> Val, and two individuals with 467 Val --> Gly), and four frameshift mutations due to either one bp deletions (in codon 261 deletion of T and in codon 267 deletion of G) or insertions (in codon 565 insertion T and after codon 578 insertions of C). Studies performed in six families (totalling 43 subjects) showed cosegregation of the genetic abnormality with reduced plasma protein S levels, and provided genetic evidence for a heterozygous protein S deficiency in 25 of them. The yield of mutations in this study (53%) confirms that the percentage of protein S deficient cases in which a point mutation is found remains low.

  6. The point mutation induced by the low-energy N+ ion implantation in impatiens balsamine genome.

    PubMed

    Gao, W J; Su, J X; Xie, L; Deng, C L; Zhang, T; Lu, L D

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the effect of genome mutations induced by low energy ions implantation in higher plants, genome mutation of Impatiens balsamine mutant induced by low energy N+ ion implantation were analyzed by the RAPD, ISSR and genome sequence. Six out of the 121 ISSR primers and 6 out of the 135 RAPD primers showed that polymorphism ratios between mutants and wild type were 4.96% and 2.89%, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed that base deletions, insertions, and substitutions were observed in the mutant genome comparable to wild type. N+ induced point mutations were mostly base substitution (77.4%), no duplication, long fragments insertions and deletions was found. In all point mutation, adenine (A) was most sensitive to the N+ ion implantation in impatiens. The transition was mainly A --> guanine (G) (15.90%) and thymine (T) --> cytosine (C) (12.55%). Transversion happened in A <--> T (16.74%), which much higher than C <--> G(5.02%), G <--> T(6.69%), A <--> C (7.11%) bases. These findings indicate that low energy ions being a useful mutagen were mostly cause the point mutation in impatiens.

  7. A Truncating De Novo Point Mutation in a Young Infant with Severe Menkes Disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Jie; Ho, Che-Sheng; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Lin, Ju-Li; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Tsai, Jen-Daw; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Lin, Shuan-Pei

    2017-02-01

    Menkes disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in ATP7A gene. Deficiency in copper-dependent enzymes results in the unique kinky hair appearance, neurodegeneration, developmental delay, seizures, failure to thrive and other connective tissue or organ abnormalities. Other than biochemical tests, DNA-based diagnosis is now playing an important role. More than two hundred mutations in ATP7A gene were identified. Early copper supplementation can help improve neurological symptoms, but not non-neurological problems. Further molecular studies are needed to identify additional mutation types and to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis. This may help in discovering the possible treatment measures to cure the disease. We present a case with the clinical features and biochemical findings, abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging as well as the effects of treatment with copper-histidine. Direct sequencing of ATP7A gene revealed a de novo point mutation which resulted in an early stop codon with truncated protein.

  8. New real-time-PCR method to identify single point mutations in hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Belmonte, Irene; Buti, Maria; Nieto, Leonardo; Garcia-Cehic, Damir; Gregori, Josep; Perales, Celia; Ordeig, Laura; Llorens, Meritxell; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Esteban, Rafael; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Quer, Josep

    2016-01-01

    AIM To develop a fast, low-cost diagnostic strategy to identify single point mutations in highly variable genomes such as hepatitis C virus (HCV). METHODS In patients with HCV infection, resistance-associated amino acid substitutions within the viral quasispecies prior to therapy can confer decreased susceptibility to direct-acting antiviral agents and lead to treatment failure and virological relapse. One such naturally occurring mutation is the Q80K substitution in the HCV-NS3 protease gene, which confers resistance to PI inhibitors, particularly simeprevir. Low-cost, highly sensitive techniques enabling routine detection of these single point mutations would be useful to identify patients at a risk of treatment failure. LightCycler methods, based on real-time PCR with sequence-specific probe hybridization, have been implemented in most diagnostic laboratories. However, this technique cannot identify single point mutations in highly variable genetic environments, such as the HCV genome. To circumvent this problem, we developed a new method to homogenize all nucleotides present in a region except the point mutation of interest. RESULTS Using nucleotide-specific probes Q, K, and R substitutions at position 80 were clearly identified at a sensitivity of 10% (mutations present at a frequency of at least 10% were detected). The technique was successfully applied to identify the Q80K substitution in 240 HCV G1 serum samples, with performance comparable to that of direct Sanger sequencing, the current standard procedure for this purpose. The new method was then validated in a Catalonian population of 202 HCV G1-infected individuals. Q80K was detected in 14.6% of G1a patients and 0% of G1b in our setting. CONCLUSION A fast, low-cost diagnostic strategy based on real-time PCR and fluorescence resonance energy transfer probe melting curve analysis has been successfully developed to identify single point mutations in highly variable genomes such as hepatitis C virus. This

  9. Diversity, Mutation and Recombination Analysis of Cotton Leaf Curl Geminiviruses.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Huma; Nahid, Nazia; Shakir, Sara; Ijaz, Sehrish; Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Asif Ali; Mubin, Muhammad; Nawaz-Ul-Rehman, Muhammad Shah

    2016-01-01

    The spread of cotton leaf curl disease in China, India and Pakistan is a recent phenomenon. Analysis of available sequence data determined that there is a substantial diversity of cotton-infecting geminiviruses in Pakistan. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that recombination between two major groups of viruses, cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMuV) and cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV), led to the emergence of several new viruses. Recombination detection programs and phylogenetic analyses showed that CLCuMuV and CLCuKoV are highly recombinant viruses. Indeed, CLCuKoV appeared to be a major donor virus for the coat protein (CP) gene, while CLCuMuV donated the Rep gene in the majority of recombination events. Using recombination free nucleotide datasets the substitution rates for CP and Rep genes were determined. We inferred similar nucleotide substitution rates for the CLCuMuV-Rep gene (4.96X10-4) and CLCuKoV-CP gene (2.706X10-4), whereas relatively higher substitution rates were observed for CLCuMuV-CP and CLCuKoV-Rep genes. The combination of sequences with equal and relatively low substitution rates, seemed to result in the emergence of viral isolates that caused epidemics in Pakistan and India. Our findings also suggest that CLCuMuV is spreading at an alarming rate, which can potentially be a threat to cotton production in the Indian subcontinent.

  10. Diversity, Mutation and Recombination Analysis of Cotton Leaf Curl Geminiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Huma; Nahid, Nazia; Shakir, Sara; Ijaz, Sehrish; Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Asif Ali; Mubin, Muhammad; Nawaz-ul-Rehman, Muhammad Shah

    2016-01-01

    The spread of cotton leaf curl disease in China, India and Pakistan is a recent phenomenon. Analysis of available sequence data determined that there is a substantial diversity of cotton-infecting geminiviruses in Pakistan. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that recombination between two major groups of viruses, cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMuV) and cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV), led to the emergence of several new viruses. Recombination detection programs and phylogenetic analyses showed that CLCuMuV and CLCuKoV are highly recombinant viruses. Indeed, CLCuKoV appeared to be a major donor virus for the coat protein (CP) gene, while CLCuMuV donated the Rep gene in the majority of recombination events. Using recombination free nucleotide datasets the substitution rates for CP and Rep genes were determined. We inferred similar nucleotide substitution rates for the CLCuMuV-Rep gene (4.96X10-4) and CLCuKoV-CP gene (2.706X10-4), whereas relatively higher substitution rates were observed for CLCuMuV-CP and CLCuKoV-Rep genes. The combination of sequences with equal and relatively low substitution rates, seemed to result in the emergence of viral isolates that caused epidemics in Pakistan and India. Our findings also suggest that CLCuMuV is spreading at an alarming rate, which can potentially be a threat to cotton production in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:26963635

  11. Using Gel Electrophoresis To Illustrate Protein Diversity and Isoelectric Point.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Mark; Vanable, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates the differences in protein structures by focusing on isoelectric point with an experiment that is observable under certain pH levels in gel electrophoresis. Explains the electrophoresis procedure and reports results of the experiments. (YDS)

  12. Specific point mutations in key redox enzymes are associated with chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Nicole M; Belotte, Jimmy; Saed, Mohammed G; Memaj, Ira; Diamond, Michael P; Morris, Robert T; Saed, Ghassan M

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer. Resistance to chemotherapy presents a significant challenge for ovarian cancer treatment. Specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in key redox enzymes have been associated with ovarian cancer survival and progression. The objective of this study was to determine whether chemotherapy induces point mutations in key redox enzymes that lead to the acquisition of chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Human EOC cell lines and their chemoresistant counterpart were utilized for this study. Specific SNPs in key redox enzymes were analyzed by TaqMan SNP Genotyping. Activities and levels of key redox enzymes were determined by real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and a greiss assay. Point mutations in key redox enzymes were introduced into sensitive EOC cells via the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Cell viability and IC50 for cisplatin were determined by the MTT Cell Proliferation Assay. Data was analyzed with SPSS using Student's two-tailed t-tests and One-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's or Tukey's post hoc tests, p<0.05. Here, we demonstrate that chemoresistant EOC cells are characterized by a further enhancement in oxidative stress as compared to sensitive counterparts. Additionally, chemoresistant EOC cells manifested specific point mutations, which are associated with altered enzymatic activity, in key redox enzymes that are not detected in sensitive counterparts. Supplementation of an antioxidant was able to successfully sensitize EOC cells to chemotherapeutics. Causality was established by the induction of these point mutations in sensitive EOC cells, which resulted in a significant increase in the level of chemoresistance. These findings indicate that chemotherapy induces specific point mutations in key redox enzymes that contribute to the acquisition of chemoresistance in EOC cells, highlighting a potential novel mechanism. Identification of targets for chemoresistance with either

  13. Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) and infantile autism: Absence of previously reported point mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Fon, E.A.; Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1995-12-18

    Autism is a heterogeneous neuropsychiatric syndrome of unknown etiology. There is evidence that a deficiency in the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL), essential for de novo purine biosynthesis, could be involved in the pathogenesis of certain cases. A point mutation in the ADSL gene, resulting in a predicted serine-to-proline substitution and conferring structural instability to the mutant enzyme, has been reported previously in 3 affected siblings. In order to determine the prevalence of the mutation, we PCR-amplified the exon spanning the site of this mutation from the genomic DNA of patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria for autistic disorder. None of the 119 patients tested were found to have this mutation. Furthermore, on preliminary screening using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), no novel mutations were detected in the coding sequence of four ADSL exons, spanning approximately 50% of the cDNA. In light of these findings, it appears that mutations in the ADSL gene represent a distinctly uncommon cause of autism. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Method for detecting point mutations in DNA utilizing fluorescence energy transfer

    DOEpatents

    Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Parkhurst, Kay M.; Middendorf, Lyle

    2001-01-01

    A method for detecting point mutations in DNA using a fluorescently labeled oligomeric probe and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is disclosed. The selected probe is initially labeled at each end with a fluorescence dye, which act together as a donor/acceptor pair for FRET. The fluorescence emission from the dyes changes dramatically from the duplex stage, wherein the probe is hybridized to the complementary strand of DNA, to the single strand stage, when the probe is melted to become detached from the DNA. The change in fluorescence is caused by the dyes coming into closer proximity after melting occurs and the probe becomes detached from the DNA strand. The change in fluorescence emission as a function of temperature is used to calculate the melting temperature of the complex or T.sub.m. In the case where there is a base mismatch between the probe and the DNA strand, indicating a point mutation, the T.sub.m has been found to be significantly lower than the T.sub.m for a perfectly match probelstand duplex. The present invention allows for the detection of the existence and magnitude of T.sub.m, which allows for the quick and accurate detection of a point mutation in the DNA strand and, in some applications, the determination of the approximate location of the mutation within the sequence.

  15. Sensitive detection of point mutation by electrochemiluminescence and DNA ligase-based assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huijuan; Wu, Baoyan

    2008-12-01

    The technology of single-base mutation detection plays an increasingly important role in diagnosis and prognosis of genetic-based diseases. Here we reported a new method for the analysis of point mutations in genomic DNA through the integration of allele-specific oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) with magnetic beads-based electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection scheme. In this assay the tris(bipyridine) ruthenium (TBR) labeled probe and the biotinylated probe are designed to perfectly complementary to the mutant target, thus a ligation can be generated between those two probes by Taq DNA Ligase in the presence of mutant target. If there is an allele mismatch, the ligation does not take place. The ligation products are then captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and detected by measuring the ECL signal of the TBR label. Results showed that the new method held a low detection limit down to 10 fmol and was successfully applied in the identification of point mutations from ASTC-α-1, PANC-1 and normal cell lines in codon 273 of TP53 oncogene. In summary, this method provides a sensitive, cost-effective and easy operation approach for point mutation detection.

  16. Specific detection of Flt3 point mutations by highly sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Sebastian; Krause, Claudia; Loncarevic, Ivan F; Müller, Rouven; Kunert, Christa; Wedding, Ulrich; Sayer, Herbert G; Clement, Joachim H; Höffken, Klaus

    2005-06-01

    Among activating class III receptor tyrosine kinase (Flt3) mutations, internal tandem duplications of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD) are detected in about 25% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In contrast, mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain of Flt3 (Flt3-TKD mutations) are less frequent (approximately 7%), and there are only limited data on the frequency of recently demonstrated activating Flt3 point mutation at codon 592 (Flt3-V592A mutation). We evaluated a new approach for rapid screening of Flt3-TKD and Flt3-V592A mutations using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) principle in a group of 122 patients. Based on individual Flt3-TKD mutations, we designed patient-specific primers to perform a highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid detection of minimal residual disease (MRD). We also used a model system with MonoMac-6 cells carrying the Flt3-V592A mutation to establish a mutation-specific real-time PCR approach also for this molecular aberration. We identified 9 cases (8%) of Flt3-TKD mutations (5 cases of mutation D835Y, 3 cases of mutation D835H, and 1 case of mutation Del836), and no cases of Flt3-V592A mutation. Screening for Flt3-TKD mutations with fluorescent probes is equivalent to conventional screening using standard PCR followed by EcoRV restriction. We present a real-time PCR protocol that can be used for MRD analyses based on individual Flt3-TKD mutations. Examples of MRD analyses are presented for all 3 subtypes of Flt3-TKD mutation identified in this study. In summary, we demonstrate new methodological approaches for rapid screening of Flt3 point mutations and for detection of MRD based on patient-specific Flt3-TKD mutations.

  17. A cytosine methyltransferase homologue is essential for repeat-induced point mutation in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Michael; Williams, Rebecca L.; Kothe, Gregory O.; Selker, Eric U.

    2002-01-01

    During sexual development, Neurospora crassa inactivates genes in duplicated DNA segments by a hypermutation process, repeat-induced point mutation (RIP). RIP introduces C:G to T:A transition mutations and creates targets for subsequent DNA methylation in vegetative tissue. The mechanism of RIP and its relationship to DNA methylation are not fully understood. Mutations in DIM-2, a DNA methyltransferase (DMT) responsible for all known cytosine methylation in Neurospora, does not prevent RIP. We used RIP to disrupt a second putative DMT gene in the Neurospora genome and tested mutants for defects in DNA methylation and RIP. No effect on DNA methylation was detected in the tissues that could be assayed, but the mutants showed recessive defects in RIP. Duplications of the am and mtr genes were completely stable in crosses homozygous for the mutated potential DMT gene, which we call rid (RIP defective). The same duplications were inactivated normally in heterozygous crosses. Disruption of the rid gene did not noticeably affect fertility, growth, or development. In contrast, crosses homozygous for a mutation in a related gene in Ascobolus immersus, masc1, reportedly fail to develop and heterozygous crosses reduce methylation induced premeiotically [Malagnac, F., Wendel, B., Goyon, C., Faugeron, G., Zickler, D., et al. (1997) Cell 91, 281–290]. We isolated homologues of rid from Neurospora tetrasperma and Neurospora intermedia to identify conserved regions. Homologues possess all motifs characteristic of eukaryotic DMTs and have large distinctive C- and N-terminal domains. PMID:12072568

  18. Point mutation frequency in the FMR1 gene as revealed by fragile X syndrome screening.

    PubMed

    Handt, Maximilian; Epplen, Andrea; Hoffjan, Sabine; Mese, Kemal; Epplen, Jörg T; Dekomien, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a common cause of intellectual disability, developmental delay and autism spectrum disorders. This syndrome is due to a functional loss of the FMR1 gene product FMRP, and, in most cases, it is caused by CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 promoter. Yet, also other FMR1 mutations may cause a FXS-like phenotype. Since standard molecular testing does not include the analysis of the FMR1 coding region, the prevalence of point mutations causing FXS is not well known. Here, high resolution melting (HRM) was used to screen for FMR1 gene mutations in 508 males with clinical signs of mental retardation and developmental delay, but without CGG and GCC repeat expansions in the FMR1 gene and AFF2 genes, respectively. Sequence variations were identified by HRM analysis and verified by direct DNA sequencing. Two novel missense mutations (p.Gly482Ser in one patient and p.Arg534His in two unrelated patients), one intronic and two 3'-untranslated region (UTR) variations were identified in the FMR1 gene. Missense mutations in the FMR1 gene might account for a considerable proportion of cases in male patients with FXS-related symptoms, such as those linked to mental retardation and developmental delay.

  19. De novo point mutations in patients diagnosed with ataxic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Parolin Schnekenberg, Ricardo; Perkins, Emma M; Miller, Jack W; Davies, Wayne I L; D'Adamo, Maria Cristina; Pessia, Mauro; Fawcett, Katherine A; Sims, David; Gillard, Elodie; Hudspith, Karl; Skehel, Paul; Williams, Jonathan; O'Regan, Mary; Jayawant, Sandeep; Jefferson, Rosalind; Hughes, Sarah; Lustenberger, Andrea; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Jackson, Mandy; Tucker, Stephen J; Németh, Andrea H

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral palsy is a sporadic disorder with multiple likely aetiologies, but frequently considered to be caused by birth asphyxia. Genetic investigations are rarely performed in patients with cerebral palsy and there is little proven evidence of genetic causes. As part of a large project investigating children with ataxia, we identified four patients in our cohort with a diagnosis of ataxic cerebral palsy. They were investigated using either targeted next generation sequencing or trio-based exome sequencing and were found to have mutations in three different genes, KCNC3, ITPR1 and SPTBN2. All the mutations were de novo and associated with increased paternal age. The mutations were shown to be pathogenic using a combination of bioinformatics analysis and in vitro model systems. This work is the first to report that the ataxic subtype of cerebral palsy can be caused by de novo dominant point mutations, which explains the sporadic nature of these cases. We conclude that at least some subtypes of cerebral palsy may be caused by de novo genetic mutations and patients with a clinical diagnosis of cerebral palsy should be genetically investigated before causation is ascribed to perinatal asphyxia or other aetiologies.

  20. The fitness effects of a point mutation in Escherichia coli change with founding population density.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huansheng; Plague, Gordon R

    2016-08-01

    Although intraspecific competition plays a seminal role in organismal evolution, little is known about the fitness effects of mutations at different population densities. We identified a point mutation in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) gene in Escherichia coli that confers significantly higher fitness than the wildtype at low founding population density, but significantly lower fitness at high founding density. Because CRP is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of nearly 500 genes, we compared global gene expression profiles of the mutant and wildtype strains. This mutation (S63F) does not affect expression of crp itself, but it does significantly affect expression of 170 and 157 genes at high and low founding density, respectively. Interestingly, acid resistance genes, some of which are known to exhibit density-dependent effects in E. coli, were consistently differentially expressed at high but not low density. As such, these genes may play a key role in reducing the crp mutant's fitness at high density, although other differentially expressed genes almost certainly also contribute to the fluctuating fitness differences we observed. Whatever the causes, we suspect that many mutations may exhibit density-dependent fitness effects in natural populations, so the fate of new mutations may frequently depend on the effective population size when they originate.

  1. De novo point mutations in patients diagnosed with ataxic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Parolin Schnekenberg, Ricardo; Perkins, Emma M.; Miller, Jack W.; Davies, Wayne I. L.; D’Adamo, Maria Cristina; Pessia, Mauro; Fawcett, Katherine A.; Sims, David; Gillard, Elodie; Hudspith, Karl; Skehel, Paul; Williams, Jonathan; O’Regan, Mary; Jayawant, Sandeep; Jefferson, Rosalind; Hughes, Sarah; Lustenberger, Andrea; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a sporadic disorder with multiple likely aetiologies, but frequently considered to be caused by birth asphyxia. Genetic investigations are rarely performed in patients with cerebral palsy and there is little proven evidence of genetic causes. As part of a large project investigating children with ataxia, we identified four patients in our cohort with a diagnosis of ataxic cerebral palsy. They were investigated using either targeted next generation sequencing or trio-based exome sequencing and were found to have mutations in three different genes, KCNC3, ITPR1 and SPTBN2. All the mutations were de novo and associated with increased paternal age. The mutations were shown to be pathogenic using a combination of bioinformatics analysis and in vitro model systems. This work is the first to report that the ataxic subtype of cerebral palsy can be caused by de novo dominant point mutations, which explains the sporadic nature of these cases. We conclude that at least some subtypes of cerebral palsy may be caused by de novo genetic mutations and patients with a clinical diagnosis of cerebral palsy should be genetically investigated before causation is ascribed to perinatal asphyxia or other aetiologies. PMID:25981959

  2. Transforming the Energy Landscape of a Coiled-Coil Peptide via Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Röder, Konstantin; Wales, David J

    2017-03-14

    We analyze the effect of point mutations on the energy landscape of a coiled-coil peptide, GCN4-pLI, where the native state is a parallel tetrameric configuration formed from two identical dimers. Experimentally, a single mutation, E20S, supports both antiparallel and parallel structures. Here, we analyze the potential energy landscapes of the dimeric units for the parent sequence and four mutants, namely E20S, E20A, E20P, and E20G. Despite sharing characteristic funnels containing the parallel and antiparallel structures, the point mutations change some parts of the landscape quite dramatically, and we predict new intermediate structures and characterize the associated heat capacities. For the mutants we predict that kinked intermediate structures facilitate the transition between parallel and antiparallel morphologies, in contrast to the parent sequence. Furthermore, we predict a change from a multifunnel energy landscape in the E20S mutant to a landscape dominated by an underlying single funnel in the parent sequence, with accompanying heat capacity signatures. Our results imply that changes in the landscape due to mutations might provide useful tools for functional protein design.

  3. Single-Molecule Counting of Point Mutations by Transient DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xin; Li, Lidan; Wang, Shanshan; Hao, Dandan; Wang, Lei; Yu, Changyuan

    2017-01-01

    High-confidence detection of point mutations is important for disease diagnosis and clinical practice. Hybridization probes are extensively used, but are hindered by their poor single-nucleotide selectivity. Shortening the length of DNA hybridization probes weakens the stability of the probe-target duplex, leading to transient binding between complementary sequences. The kinetics of probe-target binding events are highly dependent on the number of complementary base pairs. Here, we present a single-molecule assay for point mutation detection based on transient DNA binding and use of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Statistical analysis of single-molecule kinetics enabled us to effectively discriminate between wild type DNA sequences and single-nucleotide variants at the single-molecule level. A higher single-nucleotide discrimination is achieved than in our previous work by optimizing the assay conditions, which is guided by statistical modeling of kinetics with a gamma distribution. The KRAS c.34 A mutation can be clearly differentiated from the wild type sequence (KRAS c.34 G) at a relative abundance as low as 0.01% mutant to WT. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method for analysis of clinically relevant biological samples, we used this technology to detect mutations in single-stranded DNA generated from asymmetric RT-PCR of mRNA from two cancer cell lines. PMID:28262827

  4. Single-Molecule Counting of Point Mutations by Transient DNA Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xin; Li, Lidan; Wang, Shanshan; Hao, Dandan; Wang, Lei; Yu, Changyuan

    2017-03-01

    High-confidence detection of point mutations is important for disease diagnosis and clinical practice. Hybridization probes are extensively used, but are hindered by their poor single-nucleotide selectivity. Shortening the length of DNA hybridization probes weakens the stability of the probe-target duplex, leading to transient binding between complementary sequences. The kinetics of probe-target binding events are highly dependent on the number of complementary base pairs. Here, we present a single-molecule assay for point mutation detection based on transient DNA binding and use of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Statistical analysis of single-molecule kinetics enabled us to effectively discriminate between wild type DNA sequences and single-nucleotide variants at the single-molecule level. A higher single-nucleotide discrimination is achieved than in our previous work by optimizing the assay conditions, which is guided by statistical modeling of kinetics with a gamma distribution. The KRAS c.34 A mutation can be clearly differentiated from the wild type sequence (KRAS c.34 G) at a relative abundance as low as 0.01% mutant to WT. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method for analysis of clinically relevant biological samples, we used this technology to detect mutations in single-stranded DNA generated from asymmetric RT-PCR of mRNA from two cancer cell lines.

  5. An ECL-PCR method for quantitative detection of point mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Debin; Xing, Da; Shen, Xingyan; Chen, Qun; Liu, Jinfeng

    2005-04-01

    A new method for identification of point mutations was proposed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a sequence from genomic DNA was followed by digestion with a kind of restriction enzyme, which only cut the wild-type amplicon containing its recognition site. Reaction products were detected by electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assay after adsorption of the resulting DNA duplexes to the solid phase. One strand of PCR products carries biotin to be bound on a streptavidin-coated microbead for sample selection. Another strand carries Ru(bpy)32+ (TBR) to react with tripropylamine (TPA) to emit light for ECL detection. The method was applied to detect a specific point mutation in H-ras oncogene in T24 cell line. The results show that the detection limit for H-ras amplicon is 100 fmol and the linear range is more than 3 orders of magnitude, thus, make quantitative analysis possible. The genotype can be clearly discriminated. Results of the study suggest that ECL-PCR is a feasible quantitative method for safe, sensitive and rapid detection of point mutation in human genes.

  6. Dew inspired breathing-based detection of genetic point mutation visualized by naked eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Liping; Wang, Tongzhou; Huang, Tianqi; Hou, Wei; Huang, Guoliang; Du, Yanan

    2014-09-01

    A novel label-free method based on breathing-induced vapor condensation was developed for detection of genetic point mutation. The dew-inspired detection was realized by integration of target-induced DNA ligation with rolling circle amplification (RCA). The vapor condensation induced by breathing transduced the RCA-amplified variances in DNA contents into visible contrast. The image could be recorded by a cell phone for further or even remote analysis. This green assay offers a naked-eye-reading method potentially applied for point-of-care liver cancer diagnosis in resource-limited regions.

  7. Does landscape diversity reduce the risk of catastrophic tipping points?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temme, Arnaud; Baartman, Jantiene; Saco, Patricia; Nijp, Jelmer; Langston, Abigail

    2016-04-01

    Most studies about tipping points are based on computer simulations. These simulations, based on first principles of vegetation growth and competition, are not only able to explain a surprising number of vegetation patterns occurring in natural ecosystems, but they also predict shifts between multiple stable states that may be catastrophic. Initially, such studies were performed on simplistic 'non-landscapes' - flats or straight slopes. Recently, we have been able to resolve geomorphic redistribution processes more accurately, so that vegetation patterning can be simulated in more complex landscapes. Here, we present a first look into how such 'real landscapes' affect the risk of catastrophic shifts. We test the hypothesis that increasing complexity and organisation in a landscape reduce the risk of catastrophic shifts by effectively creating mini-refugia where vegetation persists over a wider range of boundary conditions such as precipitation. Depending on the extent of a study area, large complexity could even change the system from one with multiple stable states into one with only one stable state.

  8. A point mutation in the HIV-1 Tat responsive element is associated with postintegration latency.

    PubMed Central

    Emiliani, S; Van Lint, C; Fischle, W; Paras, P; Ott, M; Brady, J; Verdin, E

    1996-01-01

    Study of the mechanism of HIV-1 postintegration latency in the ACH2 cell line demonstrates that these cells failed to increase HIV-1 production following treatment with exogenous Tat. Reasoning that the defect in ACH2 cells involves the Tat response, we analyzed the sequence of tat cDNA and Tat responsive element (TAR) from the virus integrated in ACH2. Tat cDNA sequence is closely related to that of HIV LAI, and the encoded protein is fully functional in terms of long terminal repeat (LTR) transactivation. Cloning of a region corresponding to the 5'-LTR from ACH2, however, identified a point mutation (C37 -> T) in TAR. This mutation impaired Tat responsiveness of the LTR in transient transfection assays, and the measured defect was complemented in cells that had been treated with tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate or tumor necrosis factor type alpha (TNF-alpha). A compensatory mutation in TAR (G28 -> A), designed to reestablish base pairing in the TAR hairpin, restored wild-type Tat responsiveness. When the (C37 -> T) mutation was introduced in an infectious clone of HIV-1, no viral production was measured in the absence of TNF-alpha, whereas full complementation was observed when the infection was conducted in the presence of TNF-alpha or when a compensatory mutation (G28 -> A) was introduced into TAR. These experiments identify a novel mutation associated with HIV-1 latency and suggest that alterations in the Tat-TAR axis can be a crucial determinant of the latent phenotype in infected individuals. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8692823

  9. Point mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in a Latvian population

    PubMed Central

    Baumane, Kristine; Zalite, Solveiga; Ranka, Renate; Zole, Egija; Pole, Ilva; Sepetiene, Svetlana; Laganovska, Guna; Baumanis, Viesturs; Pliss, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in patients suspected of having this mitochondrial disorder in a Latvian population. Additional aims were to determine the heteroplasmy status of all non-synonymous polymorphisms identified in the current study and to identify the mitochondrial haplogroups of the studied participants because these factors may contribute to the manifestation of LHON. Methods Twelve patients, including patients in two families, were enrolled in the current study. LHON was suspected based on the findings of ophthalmologic examinations. In clinically affected individuals, the presence of all previously reported LHON-associated mutations was assessed with sequencing analysis. Additionally, the SURVEYOR endonuclease assay was used to detect heteroplasmy. The mitochondrial haplogroups were identified with restriction analysis and the sequencing of hypervariable segment 1. Results In one family (mother and son), there was one primary LHON-associated mutation, G11778A. In addition, one rare previously reported LHON-associated polymorphism, A13637G, was detected in two unrelated patients. A non-synonymous polymorphism at T6253C was found in one individual. This mutation was reported in the background of the 3460 mutation among LHON patients in a Chinese population. No non-synonymous point mutations in mitochondrial DNA were found in five of the study participants. Conclusions Molecular analysis of 12 patients with suspected LHON confirmed the diagnosis in four patients and allowed the use of appropriate prophylactic measures and treatment. Further investigations and additional studies of different populations are necessary to confirm the role of the non-synonymous polymorphisms A13637G and T6253C in the manifestation of LHON and the associations of these polymorphisms with mitochondrial haplogroups and heteroplasmy. PMID:24319328

  10. Direct electrochemical genosensing for multiple point mutation detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during the development of rifampin resistance.

    PubMed

    Kara, Pinar; Cavusoglu, Cengiz; Cavdar, Seda; Ozsoz, Mehmet

    2009-02-15

    We present a robust and simple method for the direct detection of multiple point mutations in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis rpoB gene during the development of rifampin (RIF) resistance using an electrochemical genosensor. The device contained five different capture probes which are designed to hybridize with several sequence segments within the bacterial rpoB gene hotspot region. Point mutations were detected by monitoring the guanine oxidation with differential pulse voltammetry after hybridization between PCR amplicons and inosine modified capture probes at graphite surface. Changes in the peak voltage corresponding to guanine oxidation provide an electrochemical signal for hybridization that can be used to determine the presence of point mutations conferring rifampin resistance. The analytical parameters (sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility) were evaluated. High selective discrimination against point mutation of bacteria at hot-spot region was observed. Several mutations were detected at several parts of the amplicon from 21 positive samples.

  11. Four novel point mutations in the PMP22 gene with phenotypes of HNPP and Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Brožková, Dana; Mazanec, Radim; Rychlý, Zdeněk; Haberlová, Jana; Böhm, Jiří; Staněk, Jan; Plevová, Pavlína; Lisoňová, Jana; Sabová, Jana; Sakmaryová, Iva; Seeman, Pavel

    2011-11-01

    We report four novel point mutations in the PMP22 gene with two different phenotypes: mutation p.Ser79Thr arose de novo in a patient with the Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy (DSN) phenotype; and mutations c.78+5 G>A, c.320-1 G>C, and p.Trp140Stop segregated with HNPP in 5 families.Our findings show that point mutations in PMP22 may be more likely in HNPP patients than in CMT1 patients after exclusion of CMT1A/HNPP.

  12. Repeat induced point mutation in two asexual fungi, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Braumann, Ilka; van den Berg, Marco; Kempken, Frank

    2008-05-01

    Repeat induced point mutation (RIP) is a gene silencing mechanism present in fungal genomes. During RIP, duplicated sequences are efficiently and irreversibly mutated by transitions from C:G to T:A. For the first time, we have identified traces of RIP in transposable elements of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum, two biotechnologically relevant fungi. We found that RIP in P. chrysogenum has affected a large set of sequences, which also contain other mutations. On the other hand, RIP in A. niger is limited to only few sequences, but literally all mutations are RIP-like. Surprisingly, RIP occurred only in transposon sequences that have disrupted open reading frames in A. niger, a phenomenon not yet reported for other fungi. In both fungal species, we identified two sequences with strong sequence similarity to Neurospora crassa RID. RID is a putative DNA methyltransferase and the only known enzyme involved in the RIP process. Our findings suggest that both A. niger and P. chrysogenum either had a sexual past or have a sexual potential. These findings have important implications for future strain development of these fungi.

  13. Patterns of Repeat-Induced Point Mutation in Transposable Elements of Basidiomycete Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Horns, Felix; Petit, Elsa; Yockteng, Roxana; Hood, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are ubiquitous genomic parasites that have prompted the evolution of genome defense systems that restrict their activity. Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a homology-dependent genome defense that introduces C-to-T transition mutations in duplicated DNA sequences and is thought to control the proliferation of selfish repetitive DNA. Here, we determine the taxonomic distribution of hypermutation patterns indicative of RIP among basidiomycetes. We quantify C-to-T transition mutations in particular di- and trinucleotide target sites for TE-like sequences from nine fungal genomes. We find evidence of RIP-like patterns of hypermutation at TpCpG trinucleotide sites in repetitive sequences from all species of the Pucciniomycotina subphylum of the Basidiomycota, Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae, Puccinia graminis, Melampsora laricis-populina, and Rhodotorula graminis. In contrast, we do not find evidence for RIP-like hypermutation in four species of the Agaricomycotina and Ustilaginomycotina subphyla of the Basidiomycota. Our results suggest that a RIP-like process and the specific nucleotide context for mutations are conserved within the Pucciniomycotina subphylum. These findings imply that coevolutionary interactions between TEs and a hypermutating genome defense are stable over long evolutionary timescales. PMID:22250128

  14. Sensitivity of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis in detecting p53 point mutations in tumors with mixed cell populations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.K.; Zhen Ye; Darras, B.T. Tufts Univ., Boston, MA )

    1993-06-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor-suppressor gene are commonly found in human cancers of diverse origin. Once of a number of methods developed to analyze large numbers of DNA samples for specific mutations is the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. This method is particularly well suited for analysis of tissues, such as brain tumors, with mixed cell populations. It takes advantage of the fact that, in a mixed cell population containing DNA with and without a mutation (e.g., the p53 gene mutation), both molecular species will be amplified by the PCR. A mutation within a PCR-amplified DNA fragment will alter the secondary structure of the amplified fragment and affect its electrophoretic mobility in a nondenaturing gel. The DNA fragments with the mutation are detected as an aberrantly migrating allele that can be seen concurrently with the wild-type allele. Although many studies have used this technique to screen for p53 mutations in tumors, with detection of a number of different mutations the limit of detection of point mutations in a background of wild-type DNA is not known. To test this, mixtures of mutant DNA from tumor D317 with a G-to-A point mutation in codon 272 of the p53 gene; or from tumor D263 (with a G-to-A point mutation in codon 175 of the p53 gene) and wild-type DNA from leukocytes, in ratios of 1:100, 5:95, 10:90, 15:85, 50:50, and 30:70, were prepared. The mixtures containing 100 ng of DNA were amplified using standard PCR technique. After the double-stranded DNAs were denatured, the DNA samples were loaded and electrophoresed on a nondenaturing acrylamide gel. The mutant allele was detectable even when the ratio of mutant to wild-type DNA was 5:95 in tumor D317. For tumor D263, the mutant allele was detectable when the ratio of mutant to wild-type DNA was 15:85, and it was not detectable at 10:90.

  15. Electrochemical detection of point mutation based on surface ligation reaction and biometallization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Chu, Xia; Xu, Xiangmin; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2008-05-15

    A highly sensitive electrochemical method for point mutation detection based on surface enzymatic ligation reaction and biometallization is demonstrated. In this method the surface-immobilized allele-specific probe, complementary to the mutant target, undergoes allele-specific ligation with the 5'-phosphorylated ligation probe in the presence of the mutant oligonucleotide target and E. coli DNA ligase. If there is an allele mismatch, no ligation takes place. After thermal treatment at 90 degrees C, the formed duplex melts apart, which merely allows the ligation product to remain on the electrode surface. Then, biotinylated detection probes hybridize with the ligation product. With the binding of streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase (SA-ALP) to the biotinylated probes, a non-reductive substrate of alkaline phosphatase, ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA-P), can be converted into ascorbic acid (AA) at the electrode surface. Silver ions in solution are then reduced by AA, resulting in the deposition of silver metal onto the electrode surface. Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) is used to detect the amount of deposited silver. The proposed approach has been successfully implemented for the identification of single base mutation in codon 12 of K-ras oncogene target with a detection limit of 80fM, demonstrating that this method provides a highly specific, sensitive and cost-efficient approach for point mutation detection.

  16. Point Mutations in Centromeric Histone Induce Post-zygotic Incompatibility and Uniparental Inheritance.

    PubMed

    Kuppu, Sundaram; Tan, Ek Han; Nguyen, Hanh; Rodgers, Andrea; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W L; Britt, Anne B

    2015-09-01

    The centromeric histone 3 variant (CENH3, aka CENP-A) is essential for the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. To better define CENH3 functional constraints, we complemented a null allele in Arabidopsis with a variety of mutant alleles, each inducing a single amino acid change in conserved residues of the histone fold domain. Many of these transgenic missense lines displayed wild-type growth and fertility on self-pollination, but exhibited frequent post-zygotic death and uniparental inheritance when crossed with wild-type plants. The failure of centromeres marked by these missense mutation in the histone fold domain of CENH3 reproduces the genome elimination syndromes described with chimeric CENH3 and CENH3 from diverged species. Additionally, evidence that a single point mutation is sufficient to generate a haploid inducer provide a simple one-step method for the identification of non-transgenic haploid inducers in existing mutagenized collections of crop species. As proof of the extreme simplicity of this approach to create haploid-inducing lines, we performed an in silico search for previously identified point mutations in CENH3 and identified an Arabidopsis line carrying the A86V substitution within the histone fold domain. This A87V non-transgenic line, while fully fertile on self-pollination, produced postzygotic death and uniparental haploids when crossed to wild type.

  17. Mcl-1-Bim complexes accommodate surprising point mutations via minor structural changes

    SciTech Connect

    Fire, Emiko; Gullá, Stefano V.; Grant, Robert A.; Keating, Amy E.

    2010-06-25

    Mcl-1 is an antiapoptotic Bcl-2-family protein that protects cells against death. Structures of Mcl-1, and of other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, reveal a surface groove into which the {alpha}-helical BH3 regions of certain proapoptotic proteins can bind. Despite high overall structural conservation, differences in this groove afford binding specificity that is important for the mechanism of Bcl-2 family function. We report the crystal structure of human Mcl-1 bound to a BH3 peptide derived from human Bim and the structures for three complexes that accommodate large physicochemical changes at conserved Bim sites. The mutations had surprisingly modest effects on complex stability, and the structures show that Mcl-1 can undergo small changes to accommodate the mutant ligands. For example, a shift in a leucine side chain fills a hole left by an isoleucine-to-alanine mutation at the first hydrophobic buried position of Bim BH3. Larger changes are also observed, with shifting of helix {alpha}3 accommodating an isoleucine-to-tyrosine mutation at this same position. We surveyed the variation in available Mcl-1 and Bcl-x{sub L} structures and observed moderate flexibility that is likely critical for facilitating interactions of diverse BH3-only proteins with Mcl-1. With the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members attracting significant attention as therapeutic targets, these structures contribute to our growing understanding of how specificity is achieved and can help to guide the design of novel inhibitors that target Mcl-1.

  18. Clinical Sensitivity of Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Panels in a Diverse Population.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Erin E; Stevens, Colleen F; Saavedra-Matiz, Carlos A; Tavakoli, Norma P; Krein, Lea M; Parker, April; Zhang, Zhen; Maloney, Breanne; Vogel, Beth; DeCelie-Germana, Joan; Kier, Catherine; Anbar, Ran D; Berdella, Maria N; Comber, Paul G; Dozor, Allen J; Goetz, Danielle M; Guida, Louis; Kattan, Meyer; Ting, Andrew; Voter, Karen Z; van Roey, Patrick; Caggana, Michele; Kay, Denise M

    2016-02-01

    Infants are screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) in New York State (NYS) using an IRT-DNA algorithm. The purpose of this study was to validate and assess clinical validity of the US FDA-cleared Illumina MiSeqDx CF 139-Variant Assay (139-VA) in the diverse NYS CF population. The study included 439 infants with CF identified via newborn screening (NBS) from 2002 to 2012. All had been screened using the Abbott Molecular CF Genotyping Assay or the Hologic InPlex CF Molecular Test. All with CF and zero or one mutation were tested using the 139-VA. DNA extracted from dried blood spots was reliably and accurately genotyped using the 139-VA. Sixty-three additional mutations were identified. Clinical sensitivity of three panels ranged from 76.2% (23 mutations recommended for screening by ACMG/ACOG) to 79.7% (current NYS 39-mutation InPlex panel), up to 86.0% for the 139-VA. For all, sensitivity was highest in Whites and lowest in the Black population. Although the sample size was small, there was a nearly 20% increase in sensitivity for the Black CF population using the 139-VA (68.2%) over the ACMG/ACOG and InPlex panels (both 50.0%). Overall, the 139-VA is more sensitive than other commercially available panels, and could be considered for NBS, clinical, or research laboratories conducting CF screening.

  19. Specific point mutations in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27139 cause a phenotype switch from Lac- to Lac+.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Kuo; Chen, Hung-Wen; Lo, Ta-Chun; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2009-03-01

    Lactose metabolism is a changeable phenotype in strains of Lactobacillus casei. In this study, we found that L. casei ATCC 27139 was unable to utilize lactose. However, when exposed to lactose as the sole carbon source, spontaneous Lac(+) clones could be obtained. A gene cluster (lacTEGF-galKETRM) involved in the metabolism of lactose and galactose in L. casei ATCC 27139 (Lac(-)) and its Lac(+) revertant (designated strain R1) was sequenced and characterized. We found that only one nucleotide, located in the lacTEGF promoter (lacTp), of the two lac-gal gene clusters was different. The protein sequence identity between the lac-gal gene cluster and those reported previously for some L. casei (Lac(+)) strains was high; namely, 96-100 % identity was found and no premature stop codon was identified. A single point mutation located within the lacTp promoter region was also detected for each of the 41 other independently isolated Lac(+) revertants of L. casei ATCC 27139. The revertants could be divided into six classes based on the positions of the point mutations detected. Primer extension experiments conducted on transcription from lacTp revealed that the lacTp promoter of these six classes of Lac(+) revertants was functional, while that of L. casei ATCC 27139 was not. Northern blotting experiments further confirmed that the lacTEGF operon of strain R1 was induced by lactose but suppressed by glucose, whereas no blotting signal was ever detected for L. casei ATCC 27139. These results suggest that a single point mutation in the lacTp promoter was able to restore the transcription of a fully functional lacTEGF operon and cause a phenotype switch from Lac(-) to Lac(+) for L. casei ATCC 27139.

  20. Efficient Generation of Orthologous Point Mutations in Pigs via CRISPR-assisted ssODN-mediated Homology-directed Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kankan; Tang, Xiaochun; Liu, Yan; Xie, Zicong; Zou, Xiaodong; Li, Mengjing; Yuan, Hongming; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Jiao, Huping; Pang, Daxin

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome editing in livestock is of great value for the fundamental investigation of disease modeling. However, genetically modified pigs carrying subtle point mutations were still seldom reported despite the rapid development of programmable endonucleases. Here, we attempt to investigate single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssODN) mediated knockin by introducing two orthologous pathogenic mutations, p.E693G for Alzheimer's disease and p.G2019S for Parkinson's disease, into porcine APP and LRRK2 loci, respectively. Desirable homology-directed repair (HDR) efficiency was achieved in porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs) by optimizing the dosage and length of ssODN templates. Interestingly, incomplete HDR alleles harboring partial point mutations were observed in single-cell colonies, which indicate the complex mechanism of ssODN-mediated HDR. The effect of mutation-to-cut distance on incorporation rate was further analyzed by deep sequencing. We demonstrated that a mutation-to-cut distance of 11 bp resulted in a remarkable difference in HDR efficiency between two point mutations. Finally, we successfully obtained one cloned piglet harboring the orthologous p.C313Y mutation at the MSTN locus via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Our proof-of-concept study demonstrated efficient ssODN-mediated incorporation of pathogenic point mutations in porcine somatic cells, thus facilitating further development of disease modeling and genetic breeding in pigs. PMID:27898095

  1. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Comeron, Josep M.; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S.; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F.; Manak, J. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  2. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Comeron, Josep M; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F; Manak, J Robert

    2016-04-05

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation.

  3. HBV X gene point mutations are associated with the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YULAN; ZENG, LI; CHEN, WEIQING

    2016-01-01

    Previous evidence suggests that the accumulation of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) X gene region point mutations may be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the pathogenesis of HCC remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the association between the HBV X gene point mutations and the risk of HCC. Studies were collected regarding the association between HBV X gene point mutations and the risk of HCC, which were identified in PubMed, EMBASE and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. The results were evaluated by use of odds ratios (ORs) and its 95% confidence intervals (CIs), which were pooled by random or fixed effects. A total of 11 studies involving 2,502 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Statistical summary ORs of HBV X gene point mutations were obtained for T1653 (OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 2.22–4.36), V1753 (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.66–3.92), and T1762/A1764 (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 2.86–7.07). HBV X gene point mutations T1653, V1753 and T1762/A1764 could increase the risk of HCC significantly, particularly the T1762/A1764 double mutations. These mutations may be predictive for hepatocarcinogenesis. However, these results of the meta-analysis should be treated carefully due to a low level of evidence. PMID:27284442

  4. Ryanodine receptor point mutations confer diamide insecticide resistance in tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    PubMed

    Roditakis, Emmanouil; Steinbach, Denise; Moritz, Gerald; Vasakis, Emmanouil; Stavrakaki, Marianna; Ilias, Aris; García-Vidal, Lidia; Martínez-Aguirre, María Del Rosario; Bielza, Pablo; Morou, Evangelia; Silva, Jefferson E; Silva, Wellington M; Siqueira, Ηerbert A A; Iqbal, Sofia; Troczka, Bartlomiej J; Williamson, Martin S; Bass, Chris; Tsagkarakou, Anastasia; Vontas, John; Nauen, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Insect ryanodine receptors (RyR) are the molecular target-site for the recently introduced diamide insecticides. Diamides are particularly active on Lepidoptera pests, including tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). High levels of diamide resistance were recently described in some European populations of T. absoluta, however, the mechanisms of resistance remained unknown. In this study the molecular basis of diamide resistance was investigated in a diamide resistant strain from Italy (IT-GELA-SD4), and additional resistant field populations collected in Greece, Spain and Brazil. The genetics of resistance was investigated by reciprocally crossing strain IT-GELA-SD4 with a susceptible strain and revealed an autosomal incompletely recessive mode of inheritance. To investigate the possible role of target-site mutations as known from diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella), we sequenced respective domains of the RyR gene of T. absoluta. Genotyping of individuals of IT-GELA-SD4 and field-collected strains showing different levels of diamide resistance revealed the presence of G4903E and I4746M RyR target-site mutations. These amino acid substitutions correspond to those recently described for diamide resistant diamondback moth, i.e. G4946E and I4790M. We also detected two novel mutations, G4903V and I4746T, in some of the resistant T. absoluta strains. Radioligand binding studies with thoracic membrane preparations of the IT-GELA-SD4 strain provided functional evidence that these mutations alter the affinity of the RyR to diamides. In combination with previous work on P. xylostella our study highlights the importance of position G4903 (G4946 in P. xylostella) of the insect RyR in defining sensitivity to diamides. The discovery of diamide resistance mutations in T. absoluta populations of diverse geographic origin has serious implications for the efficacy of diamides under applied conditions. The implementation of appropriate resistance

  5. Effect of point mutations on Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA activity.

    PubMed

    Aquino, B; Stefanello, A A; Oliveira, M A S; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M; Monteiro, R A; Chubatsu, L S

    2015-08-01

    NifA is the transcriptional activator of the nif genes in Proteobacteria. It is usually regulated by nitrogen and oxygen, allowing biological nitrogen fixation to occur under appropriate conditions. NifA proteins have a typical three-domain structure, including a regulatory N-terminal GAF domain, which is involved in control by fixed nitrogen and not strictly required for activity, a catalytic AAA+ central domain, which catalyzes open complex formation, and a C-terminal domain involved in DNA-binding. In Herbaspirillum seropedicae, a β-proteobacterium capable of colonizing Graminae of agricultural importance, NifA regulation by ammonium involves its N-terminal GAF domain and the signal transduction protein GlnK. When the GAF domain is removed, the protein can still activate nif genes transcription; however, ammonium regulation is lost. In this work, we generated eight constructs resulting in point mutations in H. seropedicae NifA and analyzed their effect on nifH transcription in Escherichia coli and H. seropedicae. Mutations K22V, T160E, M161V, L172R, and A215D resulted in inactive proteins. Mutations Q216I and S220I produced partially active proteins with activity control similar to wild-type NifA. However, mutation G25E, located in the GAF domain, resulted in an active protein that did not require GlnK for activity and was partially sensitive to ammonium. This suggested that G25E may affect the negative interaction between the N-terminal GAF domain and the catalytic central domain under high ammonium concentrations, thus rendering the protein constitutively active, or that G25E could lead to a conformational change comparable with that when GlnK interacts with the GAF domain.

  6. A Point Mutation in Sec61α1 Leads to Diabetes and Hepatosteatosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, David J.; Wheeler, Matthew C.; Gekakis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 2 diabetes is caused by both environmental and genetic factors. To better understand the genetic factors we used forward genetics to discover genes that have not previously been implicated in the development of hyperglycemia or diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Offspring of ethylnitrosurea-mutagenized C57BL/6 mice were bred to homozygosity, maintained on high-fat diet, and screened for hyperglycemia. The phenotype in one diabetic family of mice was mapped among hybrid F2s with single nucleotide polymorphic markers, followed by candidate gene sequencing to identify the gene harboring the causative mutation. Subsequent analysis was done on wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mutant mice on a pure C57BL/6 background. RESULTS Diabetes mapped to a point mutation in the Sec61a1 gene that encodes a His to Tyr substitution at amino acid 344 (Y344H). Metabolic profiling, histological examination, and electron microscopy revealed that hyperglycemia was a result of insulin insufficiency due to β-cell apoptosis brought on by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Transgenic β-cell–specific expression of Sec61a1 in mutant mice rescued diabetes, β-cell apoptosis, and ER stress. In vitro experiments showed that Sec61α1 plays a critical role in the β-cell response to glucose. CONCLUSIONS Here we phenotypically characterize diabetes in mice with a novel point mutation in a basic component of the cell's ER protein translocation machinery, Sec61α1. Translocation by the mutant protein does not appear to be affected. Rather, ER homeostasis is perturbed leading to β-cell death and diabetes. PMID:19934005

  7. Posttranslational cleavage of proinsulin is blocked by a point mutation in familial hyperproinsulinemia.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Y; Kawakami, T; Kanazawa, Y; Akanuma, Y; Takaku, F

    1985-07-01

    Familial hyperproinsulinemia is characterized by the accumulation of proinsulin-like material (PLM) in the plasma of affected patients. This disorder is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. The accumulation of PLM is thought to be due to the impaired conversion of proinsulin to insulin. Although PLM has been suggested to have an amino acid substitution, it has been impossible to locate and identify a substituted amino acid, due to the difficulty in isolating sufficient amounts of PLM from plasma samples. Therefore, we analyzed leukocyte DNA from one member of a proinsulinemic family, and we found a point mutation that changed guanine to adenine in the insulin gene. This transition implies that a substitution of histidine for arginine has occurred at amino acid position 65. Furthermore, it indicates that arginine at 65 is essential for the conversion of proinsulin to insulin. Our results suggest a novel mechanism by which disease can be incurred: a heritable disorder can result from a posttranslational processing abnormality caused by a point mutation.

  8. Identification of two point mutations and a one base deletion in exon 19 of the dystrophin gene by heteroduplex formation.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartello, C; Mendell, J R

    1993-03-01

    Two thirds of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy population have either gene deletions or duplications. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of point mutations or small deletions and duplications that cannot be easily identified by current strategies. The major obstacle in identifying small mutations is due to the large size of the dystrophin gene. We selectively screened 5 DMD exons containing CpG dinucleotides in 110 DMD patients without detectable deletions or duplications. Nonsenses mutations are frequently due to a C- to -T transition within a CG dinucleotide pair. To screen for the nonsense mutations, we used the heteroduplex method. Utilizing this approach, we identified 2 different nonsense mutations and a single base deletion all occurring in exon 19. This is the first report of a clustering of small mutations in the dystrophin gene.

  9. The Roles of Competition and Mutation in Shaping Antigenic and Genetic Diversity in Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Zinder, Daniel; Bedford, Trevor; Gupta, Sunetra; Pascual, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A (H3N2) offers a well-studied, yet not fully understood, disease in terms of the interactions between pathogen population dynamics, epidemiology and genetics. A major open question is why the virus population is globally dominated by a single and very recently diverged (2–8 years) lineage. Classically, this has been modeled by limiting the generation of new successful antigenic variants, such that only a small subset of progeny acquire the necessary mutations to evade host immunity. An alternative approach was recently suggested by Recker et al. in which a limited number of antigenic variants are continuously generated, but most of these are suppressed by pre-existing host population immunity. Here we develop a framework spanning the regimes described above to explore the impact of rates of mutation and levels of competition on phylodynamic patterns. We find that the evolutionary dynamics of the subtype H3N2 influenza is most easily generated within this framework when it is mutation limited as well as being under strong immune selection at a number of epitope regions of limited diversity. PMID:23300455

  10. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity and Drug Resistance Mutations Among Treatment-Naive Adult Patients in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Abdoel Wahid, Firoz; Sno, Rachel; Darcissac, Edith; Lavergne, Anne; Adhin, Malti R; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    The molecular epidemiologic profile of HIV-1 in Suriname was determined through protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences obtained from HIV-1 strains collected from 100 drug-naive HIV-1-infected persons. Subtype determination revealed that most viruses were of subtype B (94.9%) in both PR and RT genomic regions, followed by B/D recombinants (5.1%). Analysis of drug resistance mutations showed only one transmitted dug resistance mutation (TDRM) (V75M) in a single strain. The genetic data obtained can serve as a baseline for Suriname to monitor emerging mutations. This study reveals that the HIV-1 epidemic in Suriname is still characterized by a low TDRM rate (1%) and a low level of subtype diversity. However, both genes display a high genetic polymorphism. This high polymorphism may ultimately lead to drug resistance. Continuous monitoring of the baseline resistance is therefore a prerequisite to safeguard effective long-term treatment for people living with HIV-1 in Suriname.

  11. Clonal expansion of early to mid-life mitochondrial DNA point mutations drives mitochondrial dysfunction during human ageing.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Laura C; Nooteboom, Marco; Elson, Joanna L; Tuppen, Helen A L; Taylor, Geoffrey A; Commane, Daniel M; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P; Khrapko, Konstantin; Taylor, Robert W; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; Mathers, John C; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2014-09-01

    Age-related decline in the integrity of mitochondria is an important contributor to the human ageing process. In a number of ageing stem cell populations, this decline in mitochondrial function is due to clonal expansion of individual mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations within single cells. However the dynamics of this process and when these mtDNA mutations occur initially are poorly understood. Using human colorectal epithelium as an exemplar tissue with a well-defined stem cell population, we analysed samples from 207 healthy participants aged 17-78 years using a combination of techniques (Random Mutation Capture, Next Generation Sequencing and mitochondrial enzyme histochemistry), and show that: 1) non-pathogenic mtDNA mutations are present from early embryogenesis or may be transmitted through the germline, whereas pathogenic mtDNA mutations are detected in the somatic cells, providing evidence for purifying selection in humans, 2) pathogenic mtDNA mutations are present from early adulthood (<20 years of age), at both low levels and as clonal expansions, 3) low level mtDNA mutation frequency does not change significantly with age, suggesting that mtDNA mutation rate does not increase significantly with age, and 4) clonally expanded mtDNA mutations increase dramatically with age. These data confirm that clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations, some of which are generated very early in life, is the major driving force behind the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with ageing of the human colorectal epithelium.

  12. Investigating the Impact of Asp181 Point Mutations on Interactions between PTP1B and Phosphotyrosine Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyuan; Wang, Lushan; Sun, Xun; Zhao, Xian

    2014-05-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of insulin and leptin signaling, which suggests that it is an attractive therapeutic target in type II diabetes and obesity. The aim of this research is to explore residues which interact with phosphotyrosine substrate can be affected by D181 point mutations and lead to increased substrate binding. To achieve this goal, molecular dynamics simulations were performed on wild type (WT) and two mutated PTP1B/substrate complexes. The cross-correlation and principal component analyses show that point mutations can affect the motions of some residues in the active site of PTP1B. Moreover, the hydrogen bond and energy decomposition analyses indicate that apart from residue 181, point mutations have influence on the interactions of substrate with several residues in the active site of PTP1B.

  13. BRCA1 and BRCA2 point mutations and large rearrangements in breast and ovarian cancer families in Northern Poland.

    PubMed

    Ratajska, Magdalena; Brozek, Izabela; Senkus-Konefka, Elzbieta; Jassem, Jacek; Stepnowska, Magdalena; Palomba, Grazia; Pisano, Marina; Casula, Milena; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Borg, Ake; Limon, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Sixty-four Polish families with a history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were screened for mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes using a combination of denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and sequencing. Two thirds (43/64; 67%) of the families were found to carry deleterious mutations, of which the most frequent were BRCA1 5382insC (n=22/43; 51%) and Cys61Gly (n=9/43; 20%). Two other recurrent mutations were BRCA1 185delAG (n=3) and 3819del5 (n=4), together accounting for 16% of the 43 mutation-positive cases. We also found three novel mutations (BRCA1 2991del5, BRCA2 6238ins2del21 and 8876delC) which combined with findings from our earlier study of 60 Northern Polish families. Moreover, screening of 43 BRCA1/2 negative families for the presence of large rearrangements by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) resulted in the finding of two additional BRCA1 mutations: a deletion of exons 1A, 1B and 2, and a deletion of exons 17-19, both present in single families. We conclude that the Polish population has a diverse mutation spectrum influenced by strong founder effects. However, families with strong breast/ovarian cancer history who are negative for these common mutations should be offered a complete BRCA gene screening, including MLPA analysis.

  14. Kinase inhibitor-responsive genotypes in EGFR mutated lung adenocarcinomas: moving past common point mutations or indels into uncommon kinase domain duplications and rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations found by traditional or comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinomas include indels of exon 19 (the exon 19 deletion delE746_A750 being the most common) and the exon 21 L858R point mutation. The current approval labels for first line palliative gefitinib 250 mg/day, erlotinib 150 mg/day and afatinib 40 mg/day for advanced lung cancers require the presence of the aforementioned classical/sensitizing EGFR mutations. Other gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib sensitizing mutations include exon 18 indels, G719X, exon 19 insertions, A763_Y764insFQEA, S768I and L861Q; for which off-label EGFR kinase inhibitor use is generally agreed upon by thoracic oncologists. The main biological mechanism of resistance to approved first line EGFR inhibitors is the selection/acquisition of EGFR-T790M that in itself can be inhibited by osimertinib 80 mg/day, a 3rd generation EGFR inhibitor that is bypassed by EGFR-C797X mutations. Another class of de novo inhibitor insensitive mutation includes EGFR exon 20 insertions. More recently, the dichotomy of only point mutations or indels explaining aberrant kinase activation of EGFR plus inhibitor response has been shattered by the discovery of uncommon (<0.5% of all EGFR mutations) genomic events involving exon 18–25 kinase domain duplications (KDD) and rearrangements (EGFR-RAD51 or EGFR-PURB). The latter lead to oncogene addiction, enhanced sensitivity to kinase inhibitors in vitro and clinical responses to approved EGFR inhibitors. The enhanced landscape of EGFR inhibitor-responsive genotypes highlights that comprehensive molecular profiling may be necessary to maximize the identification of all cases that can benefit from precision oncology. PMID:27413714

  15. Kinase inhibitor-responsive genotypes in EGFR mutated lung adenocarcinomas: moving past common point mutations or indels into uncommon kinase domain duplications and rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel B

    2016-06-01

    The most frequent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations found by traditional or comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinomas include indels of exon 19 (the exon 19 deletion delE746_A750 being the most common) and the exon 21 L858R point mutation. The current approval labels for first line palliative gefitinib 250 mg/day, erlotinib 150 mg/day and afatinib 40 mg/day for advanced lung cancers require the presence of the aforementioned classical/sensitizing EGFR mutations. Other gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib sensitizing mutations include exon 18 indels, G719X, exon 19 insertions, A763_Y764insFQEA, S768I and L861Q; for which off-label EGFR kinase inhibitor use is generally agreed upon by thoracic oncologists. The main biological mechanism of resistance to approved first line EGFR inhibitors is the selection/acquisition of EGFR-T790M that in itself can be inhibited by osimertinib 80 mg/day, a 3(rd) generation EGFR inhibitor that is bypassed by EGFR-C797X mutations. Another class of de novo inhibitor insensitive mutation includes EGFR exon 20 insertions. More recently, the dichotomy of only point mutations or indels explaining aberrant kinase activation of EGFR plus inhibitor response has been shattered by the discovery of uncommon (<0.5% of all EGFR mutations) genomic events involving exon 18-25 kinase domain duplications (KDD) and rearrangements (EGFR-RAD51 or EGFR-PURB). The latter lead to oncogene addiction, enhanced sensitivity to kinase inhibitors in vitro and clinical responses to approved EGFR inhibitors. The enhanced landscape of EGFR inhibitor-responsive genotypes highlights that comprehensive molecular profiling may be necessary to maximize the identification of all cases that can benefit from precision oncology.

  16. Evolution of Salmonella enterica Virulence via Point Mutations in the Fimbrial Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Kisiela, Dagmara I.; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Libby, Stephen J.; Karlinsey, Joyce E.; Fang, Ferric C.; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Kramer, Jeremy J.; Beskhlebnaya, Viktoriya; Samadpour, Mansour; Grzymajlo, Krzysztof; Ugorski, Maciej; Lankau, Emily W.; Mackie, Roderick I.; Clegg, Steven; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas the majority of pathogenic Salmonella serovars are capable of infecting many different animal species, typically producing a self-limited gastroenteritis, serovars with narrow host-specificity exhibit increased virulence and their infections frequently result in fatal systemic diseases. In our study, a genetic and functional analysis of the mannose-specific type 1 fimbrial adhesin FimH from a variety of serovars of Salmonella enterica revealed that specific mutant variants of FimH are common in host-adapted (systemically invasive) serovars. We have found that while the low-binding shear-dependent phenotype of the adhesin is preserved in broad host-range (usually systemically non-invasive) Salmonella, the majority of host-adapted serovars express FimH variants with one of two alternative phenotypes: a significantly increased binding to mannose (as in S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi C, S. Dublin and some isolates of S. Choleraesuis), or complete loss of the mannose-binding activity (as in S. Paratyphi B, S. Choleraesuis and S. Gallinarum). The functional diversification of FimH in host-adapted Salmonella results from recently acquired structural mutations. Many of the mutations are of a convergent nature indicative of strong positive selection. The high-binding phenotype of FimH that leads to increased bacterial adhesiveness to and invasiveness of epithelial cells and macrophages usually precedes acquisition of the non-binding phenotype. Collectively these observations suggest that activation or inactivation of mannose-specific adhesive properties in different systemically invasive serovars of Salmonella reflects their dynamic trajectories of adaptation to a life style in specific hosts. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that point mutations are the target of positive selection and, in addition to horizontal gene transfer and genome degradation events, can contribute to the differential pathoadaptive evolution of Salmonella. PMID:22685400

  17. Screening of point mutations by multiple SSCP analysis in the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lasa, A.; Baiget, M.; Gallano, P.

    1994-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked neuromuscular disorder. The population frequency of DMD is one in approximately 3500 boys, of which one third is thought to be a new mutant. The DMD gene is the largest known to date, spanning over 2,3 Mb in band Xp21.2; 79 exons are transcribed into a 14 Kb mRNA coding for a protein of 427 kD which has been named dystrophin. It has been shown that about 65% of affected boys have a gene deletion with a wide variation in localization and size. The remaining affected individuals who have no detectable deletions or duplications would probably carry more subtle mutations that are difficult to detect. These mutations occur in several different exons and seem to be unique to single patients. Their identification represents a formidable goal because of the large size and complexity of the dystrophin gene. SSCP is a very efficient method for the detection of point mutations if the parameters that affect the separation of the strands are optimized for a particular DNA fragment. The multiple SSCP allows the simultaneous study of several exons, and implies the use of different conditions because no single set of conditions will be optimal for all fragments. Seventy-eight DMD patients with no deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene were selected for the multiple SSCP analysis. Genomic DNA from these patients was amplified using the primers described for the diagnosis procedure (muscle promoter and exons 3, 8, 12, 16, 17, 19, 32, 45, 48 and 51). We have observed different mobility shifts in bands corresponding to exons 8, 12, 43 and 51. In exons 17 and 45, altered electrophoretic patterns were found in different samples identifying polymorphisms already described.

  18. Somatic mutations contribute to genotypic diversity in sterile and fertile populations of the threatened shrub, Grevillea rhizomatosa (Proteaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, C. L.; Nelson, Penelope A.; Haddadchi, Azadeh; Fatemi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Grevillea rhizomatosa is a spreading shrub which exhibits multiple breeding strategies within a narrow area in the fire-prone heathlands of eastern Australia. Reproductive strategies include self-compatibility, self-incompatibility and clonality (with and without sterility). The close proximity of contrasting breeding systems provides an opportunity to explore the evolution of sterility and to compare and contrast the origins of genotypic diversity (recombinant or somatic) against degrees of sexual expression. Methods ISSR markers for 120 band positions (putative loci) were used to compare genetic diversity among five populations at a macro-scale of 5 m between samples (n = 244 shrubs), and at a micro-scale of nearest neighbours for all plants in five 25-m2 quadrats with contrasting fertilities (n = 162 shrubs). Nearest-neighbour sampling included several clusters of connected ramets. Matrix incompatibility (MIC) analyses were used to evaluate the relative contribution of recombination and somatic mutation to genotype diversity. Key Results High levels of genotypic diversity were found in all populations regardless of fertilities (fertile populations, G/N ≥ 0·94; sterile populations, G/N ≥ 0·97) and most sterile populations had a unique genetic profile. Somatic mutations were detected along connected ramets in ten out of 42 ramet clusters. MIC analyses showed that somatic mutations have contributed to diversity in all populations and particularly so in sterile populations. Conclusions Somatic mutations contribute significantly to gene diversity in sterile populations of Grevillea rhizomatosa, the accumulation of which is the likely cause of male and female sterility. High levels of genetic diversity therefore may not always be synonymous with sexual fitness and genetic health. We hypothesize that frequent fires drive selection for clonal reproduction, at the cost of flowering such that sexual functions are not maintained through selection

  19. Point mutation impairs centromeric CENH3 loading and induces haploid plants

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Ishii, Takayoshi; Niessen, Markus; Stein, Nils; Heckmann, Stefan; Gurushidze, Maia; Banaei-Moghaddam, Ali Mohammad; Fuchs, Jörg; Schubert, Veit; Koch, Kerstin; Weiss, Oda; Demidov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Klaus; Kumlehn, Jochen; Houben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal position of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENH3 (also called “CENP-A”) is the assembly site for the kinetochore complex of active centromeres. Any error in transcription, translation, modification, or incorporation can affect the ability to assemble intact CENH3 chromatin and can cause centromere inactivation [Allshire RC, Karpen GH (2008) Nat Rev Genet 9 (12):923–937]. Here we show that a single-point amino acid exchange in the centromere-targeting domain of CENH3 leads to reduced centromere loading of CENH3 in barley, sugar beet, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Haploids were obtained after cenh3 L130F-complemented cenh3-null mutant plants were crossed with wild-type A. thaliana. In contrast, in a noncompeting situation (i.e., centromeres possessing only mutated or only wild-type CENH3), no uniparental chromosome elimination occurs during early embryogenesis. The high degree of evolutionary conservation of the identified mutation site offers promising opportunities for application in a wide range of crop species in which haploid technology is of interest. PMID:26294252

  20. Point mutation impairs centromeric CENH3 loading and induces haploid plants.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Ishii, Takayoshi; Niessen, Markus; Stein, Nils; Heckmann, Stefan; Gurushidze, Maia; Banaei-Moghaddam, Ali Mohammad; Fuchs, Jörg; Schubert, Veit; Koch, Kerstin; Weiss, Oda; Demidov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Klaus; Kumlehn, Jochen; Houben, Andreas

    2015-09-08

    The chromosomal position of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENH3 (also called "CENP-A") is the assembly site for the kinetochore complex of active centromeres. Any error in transcription, translation, modification, or incorporation can affect the ability to assemble intact CENH3 chromatin and can cause centromere inactivation [Allshire RC, Karpen GH (2008) Nat Rev Genet 9 (12):923-937]. Here we show that a single-point amino acid exchange in the centromere-targeting domain of CENH3 leads to reduced centromere loading of CENH3 in barley, sugar beet, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Haploids were obtained after cenh3 L130F-complemented cenh3-null mutant plants were crossed with wild-type A. thaliana. In contrast, in a noncompeting situation (i.e., centromeres possessing only mutated or only wild-type CENH3), no uniparental chromosome elimination occurs during early embryogenesis. The high degree of evolutionary conservation of the identified mutation site offers promising opportunities for application in a wide range of crop species in which haploid technology is of interest.

  1. New point mutation in Golga3 causes multiple defects in spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bentson, Lisa F.; Agbor, Valentine A.; Agbor, Larry N.; Lopez, Anita C.; Nfonsam, Landry E.; Bornstein, Sheila S.; Handel, Mary Ann; Linder, Carol C.

    2014-01-01

    repro27 mice exhibit fully penetrant male-specific infertility associated with a nonsense mutation in the golgin subfamily A member 3 gene (Golga3). GOLGA3 is a Golgi complex-associated protein implicated in protein trafficking, apoptosis, positioning of the Golgi, and spermatogenesis. In repro27 mutant mice, a point mutation in exon 18 of the Golga3 gene that inserts a premature termination codon leads to an absence of GOLGA3 protein expression. GOLGA3 protein was undetectable in the brain, heart, and liver in both mutant and control mice. While spermatogenesis in Golga3repro27 mutant mice appears to initiate normally, development is disrupted in late meiosis during the first wave of spermatogenesis, leading to significant germ cell loss between 15 and 18 days postpartum (dpp). Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase dUTP-mediated nick end labeling analysis showed elevated DNA fragmentation in meiotic germ cells by 12 dpp, suggesting apoptosis as a mechanism of germ cell loss. The few surviving postmeiotic round spermatids exhibited abnormal spermiogenesis with defects in acrosome formation, head and tail development, and extensive vacuolization in the seminiferous epithelium. Analysis of epididymal sperm showed significantly low sperm concentration and motility, and in vitro fertilization with mutant sperm was unsuccessful. Golga3repro27 mice lack GOLGA3 protein and thus provide an in vivo tool to aid in deciphering the role of GOLGA3 in Golgi complex positioning, cargo trafficking, and apoptosis signaling in male germ cells. PMID:23495255

  2. Deletions and Point Mutations of LRRC50 Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Due to Dynein Arm Defects

    PubMed Central

    Loges, Niki Tomas; Olbrich, Heike; Becker-Heck, Anita; Häffner, Karsten; Heer, Angelina; Reinhard, Christina; Schmidts, Miriam; Kispert, Andreas; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Knowles, Michael R.; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Seithe, Horst; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Richard; Omran, Heymut

    2009-01-01

    Genetic defects affecting motility of cilia and flagella cause chronic destructive airway disease, randomization of left-right body asymmetry, and, frequently, male infertility in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The most frequent defects involve outer and inner dynein arms (ODAs and IDAs) that are large multiprotein complexes responsible for cilia-beat generation and regulation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that large genomic deletions, as well as point mutations involving LRRC50, are responsible for a distinct PCD variant that is characterized by a combined defect involving assembly of the ODAs and IDAs. Functional analyses showed that LRRC50 deficiency disrupts assembly of distally and proximally DNAH5- and DNAI2-containing ODA complexes, as well as DNALI1-containing IDA complexes, resulting in immotile cilia. On the basis of these findings, we assume that LRRC50 plays a role in assembly of distinct dynein-arm complexes. PMID:19944400

  3. Abnormal behavior associated with a point mutation in the structural gene for monoamine oxidase A

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, H.G. ); Nelen, M.; Ropers, H.H.; van Oost, B.A. )

    1993-10-22

    Genetic and metabolic studies have been done on a large kindred in which several males are affected by a syndrome of borderline mental retardation and abnormal behavior. The types of behavior that occurred include impulsive aggression, arson, attempted rape, and exhibitionism. Analysis of 24-hour urine samples indicated markedly disturbed monoamine metabolism. This syndrome was associated with a complete and selective deficiency of enzymatic activity of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). In each of five affected males, a point mutation was identified in the eighth exon of the MAOA structural gene, which changes a glutamine to a termination codon. Thus, isolated complete MAOA deficiency in this family is associated with a recognizable behavioral phenotype that includes disturbed regulation of impulsive aggression.

  4. [Hemoglobin Woodville associated with double point mutation in the gene of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Mansini, Adrián P; Fernández, Diego A; Aguirre, Fernando M; Pepe, Carolina; Milanesio, Berenice; Chaves, Alejandro; Eandi Eberle, Silvia; Feliú Torres, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    The co-inheritance of erythrocyte defects, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, and membranopathies is not an unusual event. For the diagnosis, a laboratory strategy, including screening and confirmatory tests, additional to molecular characterization, was designed. As the result of this approach, a 24-year-old man carrying a hemoglobinopathy (Hemoglobin Woodville) and an enzymopathy (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency) was identified. In the heterozygous state hemoglobin Woodville, is asymptomatic, and homozygous or double heterozygous individuals have not been reported thus far. On the other hand, previously described double point mutation in the gene for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase c. [202G>A; 376A>G], p. [Val 68Met; Asn126Asp], causes hemolysis of varying severity after food or drug intake or infections. This case highlights the importance of the methodology carried out for the diagnosis, treatment, and proper genetic counseling.

  5. Identification of two different point mutations associated with the fluoride-resistant phenotype for human butyrylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Nogueira, C.P.; McGuire, M.C.; Adkins, S.; Van Der Spek, A.F.L.; La Du, B.N. ); Bartels, C.F.; Lockridge, O. Eppley Institute, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE ); Lubrano, T.; Rubinstein, H.M. Loyola Univ. Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL ); Lightstone, H. )

    1992-10-01

    The fluoride variant of human butyrylcholinesterase owes its name to the observation that it is resistant to inhibition by 0.050 mM sodium fluoride in the in vitro assay. Individuals who are heterozygous for the fluoride and atypical alleles experience about 30 min of apnea, rather than the usual 3-5 min, after receiving succinyldicholine. Earlier the authors reported that the atypical variant has a nucleotide substitution which changes Asp 70 to Gly. In the present work they have identified two different point mutations associated with the fluoride-resistant phentotype. Fluoride-1 has a nucleotide substitution which changes Thr 243 to Met (ACG to ATG). Fluoride-2 has a substitution which changes Gly 390 to Val (GGT to GTT). These results were obtained by DNA sequence analysis of the butyrylcholinesterase gene after amplification by PCR. The subjects for these analyses were 4 patients and 21 family members. 36 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Molecular analysis of point mutations in a barley genome exposed to MNU and gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Kurowska, Marzena; Labocha-Pawłowska, Anna; Gnizda, Dominika; Maluszynski, Miroslaw; Szarejko, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    We present studies aimed at determining the types and frequencies of mutations induced in the barley genome after treatment with chemical (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, MNU) and physical (gamma rays) mutagens. We created M(2) populations of a doubled haploid line and used them for the analysis of mutations in targeted DNA sequences and over an entire barley genome using TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes) and AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) technique, respectively. Based on the TILLING analysis of the total DNA sequence of 4,537,117bp in the MNU population, the average mutation density was estimated as 1/504kb. Only one nucleotide change was found after an analysis of 3,207,444bp derived from the highest dose of gamma rays applied. MNU was clearly a more efficient mutagen than gamma rays in inducing point mutations in barley. The majority (63.6%) of the MNU-induced nucleotide changes were transitions, with a similar number of G>A and C>T substitutions. The similar share of G>A and C>T transitions indicates a lack of bias in the repair of O(6)-methylguanine lesions between DNA strands. There was, however, a strong specificity of the nucleotide surrounding the O(6)-meG at the -1 position. Purines formed 81% of nucleotides observed at the -1 site. Scanning the barley genome with AFLP markers revealed ca. a three times higher level of AFLP polymorphism in MNU-treated as compared to the gamma-irradiated population. In order to check whether AFLP markers can really scan the whole barley genome for mutagen-induced polymorphism, 114 different AFLP products, were cloned and sequenced. 94% of bands were heterogenic, with some bands containing up to 8 different amplicons. The polymorphic AFLP products were characterised in terms of their similarity to the records deposited in a GenBank database. The types of sequences present in the polymorphic bands reflected the organisation of the barley genome.

  7. Direct Molecular Diagnosis of CYP21A2 Point Mutations in Macedonian and Serbian Patients with 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Anastasovska, Violeta; Milenković, Tatjana; Kocova, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency is present in 90–95% of all cases with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), an autosomal recessive disorder. It can present as the severe classical salt wasting (SW) or simple virilising (SV) form, or the milder, nonclassical form. Nine pseudogene-derived point mutations account for about 80% of all defects in the CYP21A2 gene coding the 21-hydroxylase enzyme. Methods We have studied nine CYP21A2 point mutations in 61 Macedonian and 24 Serbian patients with different clinical presentations of CAH, using the PCR/ACRS method. Results Six different mutations were detected in 71.3% of alleles of the Macedonian patients. The most prevalent mutation was IVS2. Mutations were detected in 85.4% of the SW, 83.4% SV and 47.7% LO alleles. In the Macedonian patients the most common genotype was IVS2/IVS2. Five different mutations were detected in 64.6% of alleles of the Serbian patients. The most prevalent was P30L. Mutations were present in 83.3% SW, 80% SV and 50% of the LO alleles. In the Serbian patients, the P30L/P30L genotype was the most frequent. Conclusions Specific CYP21A2 mutations are involved in different clinical forms of CAH. High frequency of P30L was found in both populations. Also, high prevalence of the mild P30L mutation was found in both the Macedonian and Serbian classical SV patients. Our findings support the role of the P30L mutation in pronounced virilisation. An unusual finding is the low frequency of V281L in the Macedonian non-classical patients and its absence in the ones from Serbia. PMID:28356824

  8. Reconstruction of thermotolerant yeast by one-point mutation identified through whole-genome analyses of adaptively-evolved strains.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Atsushi; Miura, Natsuko; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-03-17

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a host strain in bioproduction, because of its rapid growth, ease of genetic manipulation, and high reducing capacity. However, the heat produced during the fermentation processes inhibits the biological activities and growth of the yeast cells. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 19 intermediate strains previously obtained during adaptation experiments under heat stress; 49 mutations were found in the adaptation steps. Phylogenetic tree revealed at least five events in which these strains had acquired mutations in the CDC25 gene. Reconstructed CDC25 point mutants based on a parental strain had acquired thermotolerance without any growth defects. These mutations led to the downregulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling pathway, which controls a variety of processes such as cell-cycle progression and stress tolerance. The one-point mutations in CDC25 were involved in the global transcriptional regulation through the cAMP/PKA pathway. Additionally, the mutations enabled efficient ethanol fermentation at 39 °C, suggesting that the one-point mutations in CDC25 may contribute to bioproduction.

  9. Structural Stability of Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ρ Catalytic Domain: Effect of Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Stefan; Alfano, Ivan; Ardini, Matteo; Stefanini, Simonetta; Chiaraluce, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ (PTPρ) belongs to the classical receptor type IIB family of protein tyrosine phosphatase, the most frequently mutated tyrosine phosphatase in human cancer. There are evidences to suggest that PTPρ may act as a tumor suppressor gene and dysregulation of Tyr phosphorylation can be observed in diverse diseases, such as diabetes, immune deficiencies and cancer. PTPρ variants in the catalytic domain have been identified in cancer tissues. These natural variants are nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, variations of a single nucleotide occurring in the coding region and leading to amino acid substitutions. In this study we investigated the effect of amino acid substitution on the structural stability and on the activity of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ. We expressed and purified as soluble recombinant proteins some of the mutants of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ identified in colorectal cancer and in the single nucleotide polymorphisms database. The mutants show a decreased thermal and thermodynamic stability and decreased activation energy relative to phosphatase activity, when compared to wild- type. All the variants show three-state equilibrium unfolding transitions similar to that of the wild- type, with the accumulation of a folding intermediate populated at ∼4.0 M urea. PMID:22389709

  10. Targeted point mutations of p53 lead to dominant-negative inhibition of wild-type p53 function.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Annemieke; Flores, Elsa R; Miranda, Barbara; Hsieh, Harn-Mei; van Oostrom, Conny Th M; Sage, Julien; Jacks, Tyler

    2002-03-05

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers, and germ-line p53 mutations cause a familial predisposition for cancer. Germ-line or sporadic p53 mutations are usually missense and typically affect the central DNA-binding domain of the protein. Because p53 functions as a tetrameric transcription factor, mutant p53 is thought to inhibit the function of wild-type p53 protein. Here, we studied the possible dominant-negative inhibition of wild-type p53 protein by two different, frequently occurring point mutations. The R270H and P275S mutations were targeted into the genome of mouse embryonic stem cells to allow the analysis of the effects of the mutant proteins expressed in normal cells at single-copy levels. In embryonic stem cells, the presence of a heterozygous point-mutated allele resulted in delayed transcriptional activation of several p53 downstream target genes on exposure to gamma irradiation. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis was severely affected in the mutant embryonic stem cells compared with wild-type cells. Heterozygous mutant thymocytes had a severe defect in p53-dependent apoptotic pathways after treatment with gamma irradiation or doxorubicin, whereas p53-independent apoptotic pathways were intact. Together these data demonstrate that physiological expression of point-mutated p53 can strongly limit overall cellular p53 function, supporting the dominant-negative action of such mutants. Also, cells heterozygous for such mutations may be compromised in terms of tumor suppression and response to chemotherapeutic agents.

  11. Genetic interaction analysis of point mutations enables interrogation of gene function at a residue-level resolution: exploring the applications of high-resolution genetic interaction mapping of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Moehle, Erica A; Shales, Michael; Guthrie, Christine; Krogan, Nevan J

    2014-07-01

    We have achieved a residue-level resolution of genetic interaction mapping - a technique that measures how the function of one gene is affected by the alteration of a second gene - by analyzing point mutations. Here, we describe how to interpret point mutant genetic interactions, and outline key applications for the approach, including interrogation of protein interaction interfaces and active sites, and examination of post-translational modifications. Genetic interaction analysis has proven effective for characterizing cellular processes; however, to date, systematic high-throughput genetic interaction screens have relied on gene deletions or knockdowns, which limits the resolution of gene function analysis and poses problems for multifunctional genes. Our point mutant approach addresses these issues, and further provides a tool for in vivo structure-function analysis that complements traditional biophysical methods. We also discuss the potential for genetic interaction mapping of point mutations in human cells and its application to personalized medicine.

  12. Point mutations in the murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene: Animalmodels for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Aponte, Jennifer; Sega, Gary A; Hauser, Loren John; Dhar, Madhu; Withrow, Catherine; Carpenter, D A; Rinchik, Eugene M.; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Johnson, Dabney K

    2001-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease associated with point mutations in the human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) gene that disrupt tyrosine catabolism. An acute form of HT1 results in death during the first months of life because of hepatic failure, whereas a chronic form leads to gradual development of liver disease often accompanied by renal dysfunction, childhood rickets, neurological crisis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mice homozygous for certain chromosome 7 deletions of the albino Tyr; c locus that also include Fah die perinatally as a result of liver dysfunction and exhibit a complex syndrome characterized by structural abnormalities and alterations in gene expression in the liver and kidney. Here we report that two independent, postnatally lethal mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and mapped near Tyr are alleles of Fah. The Fah6287SB allele is a missense mutation in exon 6, and Fah5961SB is a splice mutation causing loss of exon 7, a subsequent frameshift in the resulting mRNA, and a severe reduction of Fah mRNA levels. Increased levels of the diagnostic metabolite succinylacetone in the urine of the Fah6287SB and Fah5961SB mutants indicate that these mutations cause a decrease in Fah enzymatic activity. Thus, the neonatal phenotype present in both mutants is due to a deficiency in Fah caused by a point mutation, and we propose Fah5961SB and Fah6287SB as mouse models for acute and chronic forms of human HT1, respectively.

  13. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  14. High rate of A2142G point mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance among Iranian Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Khashei, Reza; Dara, Mahintaj; Bazargani, Abdollah; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Taghavi, Alireza; Moeini, Maryam; Dehghani, Behzad; Sohrabi, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clarithromycin resistance and its associated molecular mechanisms among Helicobacter pylori isolates from dyspeptic patients in Shiraz, Iran. From January to May 2014, 100 H. pylori strains were isolated from patients with gastroduodenal disorders. The resistance to clarithromycin was quantitatively evaluated, using Epsilometer (E-test) method. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed on all the isolates to detect A2143G and A2142G mutations in 23S rRNA gene. The H. pylori isolation rate was found to be 31.4%. E-test showed that 20% of isolates were resistant to clarithromycin (MIC ≥ 1 mg/L). MIC of clarithromycin ranged between 0.016 and 24 mg/L. Findings of PCR-RFLP showed that the A2142G was the most (90%) frequently point mutation, followed by the A2143G (10%). No statistically significant difference was found between H. pylori clarithromycin resistance point mutations and patients' gender or age. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high frequency of A2142G point mutation in Iran and probably in other regions of the world. Considering the increasing trend of H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin due to these mutations, it is crucial to investigate the new therapeutic approaches against H. pylori infection.

  15. A novel point mutation promotes growth phase-dependent daptomycin tolerance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mechler, Lukas; Herbig, Alexander; Paprotka, Kerstin; Fraunholz, Martin; Nieselt, Kay; Bertram, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    Recalcitrance of genetically susceptible bacteria to antibiotic killing is a hallmark of bacterial drug tolerance. This phenomenon is prevalent in biofilms, persisters, and also planktonic cells and is associated with chronic or relapsing infections with pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Here we report the in vitro evolution of an S. aureus strain that exhibits a high degree of nonsusceptibility to daptomycin as a result of cyclic challenges with bactericidal concentrations of the drug. This phenotype was attributed to stationary growth phase-dependent drug tolerance and was clearly distinguished from resistance. The underlying genetic basis was revealed to be an adaptive point mutation in the putative inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporter gene pitA. Drug tolerance caused by this allele, termed pitA6, was abrogated when the upstream gene pitR was inactivated. Enhanced tolerance toward daptomycin, as well as the acyldepsipeptide antibiotic ADEP4 and various combinations of other drugs, was accompanied by elevated intracellular concentrations of Pi and polyphosphate, which may reversibly interfere with critical cellular functions. The evolved strain displayed increased rates of survival within human endothelial cells, demonstrating the correlation of intracellular persistence and drug tolerance. These findings will be useful for further investigations of S. aureus drug tolerance, toward the development of additional antipersister compounds and strategies.

  16. A Point Mutation in a Herpesvirus Co-Determines Neuropathogenicity and Viral Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Mathias; Goodman, Laura B.; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R.; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2017-01-01

    A point mutation in the DNA polymerase gene in equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is one determinant for the development of neurological disease in horses. Three recently conducted infection experiments using domestic horses and ponies failed to detect statistically significant differences in viral shedding between the neuropathogenic and non-neuropathogenic variants. These results were interpreted as suggesting the absence of a consistent selective advantage of the neuropathogenic variant and therefore appeared to be inconsistent with a systematic increase in the prevalence of neuropathogenic strains. To overcome potential problems of low statistical power related to small group sizes in these infection experiments, we integrated raw data from all three experiments into a single statistical analysis. The results of this combined analysis showed that infection with the neuropathogenic EHV-1 variant led to a statistically significant increase in viral shedding. This finding is consistent with the idea that neuropathogenic strains could have a selective advantage and are therefore systematically increasing in prevalence in domestic horse populations. However, further studies are required to determine whether a selective advantage indeed exists for neuropathogenic strains. PMID:28075374

  17. Sdt97: A Point Mutation in the 5′ Untranslated Region Confers Semidwarfism in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jiping; Han, Zhengshu; Han, Aonan; Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Shiyong; Fu, Binying; Hu, Jun; Su, Jingping; Li, Shaoqing; Wang, Shengjun; Zhu, Yingguo

    2016-01-01

    Semidwarfism is an important agronomic trait in rice breeding programs. The semidwarf mutant gene Sdt97 was previously described. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the mutant is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we identified the mutant gene by a map-based cloning method. Using a residual heterozygous line (RHL) population, Sdt97 was mapped to the long arm of chromosome 6 in the interval of nearly 60 kb between STS marker N6 and SNP marker N16 within the PAC clone P0453H04. Sequencing of the candidate genes in the target region revealed that a base transversion from G to C occurred in the 5′ untranslated region of Sdt97. qRT-PCR results confirmed that the transversion induced an obvious change in the expression pattern of Sdt97 at different growth and developmental stages. Plants transgenic for Sdt97 resulted in the restoration of semidwarfism of the mutant phenotype, or displayed a greater dwarf phenotype than the mutant. Our results indicate that a point mutation in the 5′ untranslated region of Sdt97 confers semidwarfism in rice. Functional analysis of Sdt97 will open a new field of study for rice semidwarfism, and also expand our knowledge of the molecular mechanism of semidwarfism in rice. PMID:27172200

  18. Point mutation of H3/H4 histones affects acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of acetic acid tolerance in yeast remains unclear despite of its importance for efficient cellulosic ethanol production. In this study, we examined the effects of histone H3/H4 point mutations on yeast acetic acid tolerance by comprehensively screening a histone H3/H4 mutant library. A total of 24 histone H3/H4 mutants (six acetic acid resistant and 18 sensitive) were identified. Compared to the wild-type strain, the histone acetic acid-resistant mutants exhibited improved ethanol fermentation performance under acetic acid stress. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that changes in the gene expression in the acetic acid-resistant mutants H3 K37A and H4 K16Q were mainly related to energy production, antioxidative stress. Our results provide novel insights into yeast acetic acid tolerance on the basis of histone, and suggest a novel approach to improve ethanol production by altering the histone H3/H4 sequences.

  19. PCR-based screening for cystic fibrosis carrier mutations in an ethnically diverse pregnant population.

    PubMed Central

    Grody, W W; Dunkel-Schetter, C; Tatsugawa, Z H; Fox, M A; Fang, C Y; Cantor, R M; Novak, J M; Bass, H N; Crandall, B F

    1997-01-01

    As the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in North America, cystic fibrosis (CF) is an obvious candidate for general population carrier screening. Although the identification of the causative gene has made detection of asymptomatic carriers possible, the extreme heterogeneity of its mutations has limited the sensitivity of the available DNA screening tests and has called into question their utility when they are applied to patients with no family history of the disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the technical feasibility, patient acceptance and understanding, and psychosocial impact of large-scale CF carrier screening in an ethnically diverse pregnant population. A total of 4,739 pregnant women attending prenatal clinics located in both an academic medical center and a large HMO were invited in person to participate. Of this group, 3,543 received CF instruction and assessments of knowledge and mood, and 3,192 underwent DNA testing for the six most common CF mutations, by means of a noninvasive PCR-based reverse-dot-blot method. Overall participation rates (ranging from 53% at the HMO to 77% at the academic center) and consent rates for DNA testing after CF instruction (>98%) exceeded those of most other American studies. The PCR-based screening method worked efficiently on large numbers of samples, and 55 carriers and one at-risk couple were identified. Understanding of residual risk, anxiety levels, and overall satisfaction with the program were acceptable across all ethnic groups. Our strategy of approaching a motivated pregnant population in person with a rapid and noninvasive testing method may provide a practical model for developing a larger CF screening program targeting appropriate high-risk groups at the national level, and may also serve as a paradigm for population-based screening of other genetically heterogeneous disorders in the future. Images Figure 1 PMID:9106541

  20. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: application to point mutation and carrier detection.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartolo, C; Moxley, R T; Mendell, J R

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, we identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. We conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing.

  1. Mapping Point Mutations in the Drosophila Rosy Locus Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Blots

    PubMed Central

    Gray, M.; Charpentier, A.; Walsh, K.; Wu, P.; Bender, W.

    1991-01-01

    Mutations within the rosy locus of Drosophila were mapped using blots of genomic DNA fragments separated on denaturing gradient gels. DNA sequence differences between otherwise identical small rosy DNA fragments were detected among the mutants as mobility shifts on the blots. Mutations were mapped to within a few hundred base pairs of rosy sequence in 100 of 130 mutants tested--a 77% detection rate. The sequence changes in 43 rosy mutations are presented; all but six of these were single base changes. Thirty-four of 36 sequenced mutations induced by the alkylating agents N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and ethyl methanesulfonate were transitions. All of the mutations mapped in the rosy transcription unit. Twenty-three of the 43 sequenced mutations change the predicted rosy gene polypeptide sequence; the remainder would interrupt protein translation (17), or disrupt mRNA processing (3). PMID:1901817

  2. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: Application to point mutation and carrier detection

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.; Western, L.M.; Bartolo, C.; Mendell, J.R.; Moxley, R.T.

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, the authors identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. The authors conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Identification of known p53 point mutations by capillary electrophoresis using unique mobility profiles in a blinded study.

    PubMed

    Wenz, H M; Ramachandra, S; O'Connell, C D; Atha, D H

    1998-05-01

    This study is part of an ongoing project at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) that generates a panel of DNA clones containing the most common mutations found in the human p53 tumor suppressor gene. This panel will be made available as a reference source for evaluation and testing for p53 mutations. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis has found widespread acceptance as a tool for simply and rapidly screening for mutations, albeit with a detection rate that can be below 100%. We have begun to analyze mutations found in exon 7 of the p53 gene by SSCP using laser induced fluorescence capillary electrophoresis (LIF-CE). PCR fragments, containing single point mutations, were amplified from genomic DNA isolated from cell lines using primers labeled with two different fluorophores. This dual labeling approach allowed better traceability of mobility shifts as a function of the experimental conditions. While analyzing the clones H596, Colo320, Namalwa and wild type (reference samples) at different temperatures, ranging from 25 to 45 degrees C, it was observed that each mutation responded in a unique way to changes in temperature both in magnitude and direction of shifts relative to the wild type sample. In a blinded study, ten p53 exon 7 samples were matched automatically, using ABI PRISM Genotyper software, against the four reference samples. From these 10 samples, six were correctly identified as containing one of the reference mutations, two corresponded to wild type, and two were correctly identified as non-reference mutations. This approach should prove helpful in the rapid screening of target sequences that are known to bear a limited number of mutations.

  4. Relevance of BRAFV600E Mutation Testing Versus RAS Point Mutations and RET/PTC Rearrangements Evaluation in the Diagnosis of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Martina; Buratto, Mattia; Tagliati, Federico; Rossi, Roberta; Lupo, Sabrina; Trasforini, Giorgio; Lanza, Giovanni; Franceschetti, Paola; Bruni, Stefania; degli Uberti, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    Background: A molecular profile including BRAF and RAS mutations as well as RET/PTC rearrangement evaluation has been proposed to provide an accurate presurgical assessment of thyroid nodules and to reduce the number of unnecessary diagnostic surgeries, sparing patients' health and saving healthcare resources. However, the application of such molecular analyses may provide different results among different centers and populations in real-life settings. Our aims were to evaluate the diagnostic utility of assessing the presence of BRAF and RAS mutations and RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements in all cytological categories in an Italian group of thyroid nodule patients assessed prospectively, and to understand whether and which mutation testing might be helpful in cytologically indeterminate nodules. Methods: A total of 911 patients were submitted to ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration biopsy examination. Cytological evaluation was performed in parallel with molecular testing and compared to pathological results in 940 thyroid nodules, including 140 indeterminate lesions. Results: BRAF mutation testing provided the best contribution to cancer diagnosis, allowing the disease to be detected at an early stage, and identifying indeterminate nodules in which diagnostic lobectomy could be spared. On the contrary, RAS and RET/PTC analysis did not further increase diagnostic sensitivity for thyroid cancer. In addition, we found RET/PTC rearrangements in benign lesions, indicating that this molecular marker might not be useful for the detection of thyroid cancer. Conclusion: BRAFV600E mutation analysis is superior to RAS point mutations and evaluation of RET/PTC rearrangements in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer, even in indeterminate lesions. PMID:25333496

  5. Diverse Phenotypic Expression of Cardiomyopathies in a Family with TNNI3 p.Arg145Trp Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji-won; Jang, Mi-Ae; Jang, Shin Yi; Seo, Soo Hyun; Seong, Moon-Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Genetic diagnosis of cardiomyopathies is challenging, due to the marked genetic and allelic heterogeneity and the lack of knowledge of the mutations that lead to clinical phenotypes. Here, we present the case of a large family, in which a single TNNI3 mutation caused variable phenotypic expression, ranging from restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCMP) to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP) to near-normal phenotype. The proband was a 57-year-old female with HCMP. Examining the family history revealed that her elder sister had expired due to severe RCMP. Using a next-generation sequencing-based gene panel to analyze the proband, we identified a known TNNI3 gene mutation, c.433C>T, which is predicted to cause an amino acid substitution (p.Arg145Trp) in the highly conserved inhibitory region of the cardiac troponin I protein. Sanger sequencing confirmed that six relatives with RCMP or near-normal phenotypes also carried this mutation. To our knowledge, this is the first genetically confirmed family with diverse phenotypic expression of cardiomyopathies in Korea. Our findings demonstrate familial implications, where a single mutation in a sarcomere protein can cause diverse phenotypic expression of cardiomyopathies. PMID:28382084

  6. Single point mutation in tick-borne encephalitis virus prM protein induces a reduction of virus particle secretion.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Kentarou; Konno, Akihiro; Goto, Akiko; Nio, Junko; Obara, Mayumi; Ueki, Tomotaka; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Takashima, Ikuo

    2004-10-01

    Flaviviruses are assembled to bud into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted through the vesicle transport pathway. Virus envelope proteins play important roles in this process. In this study, the effect of mutations in the envelope proteins of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus on secretion of virus-like particles (VLPs), using a recombinant plasmid expression system was analysed. It was found that a single point mutation at position 63 in prM induces a reduction in secretion of VLPs. The mutation in prM did not affect the folding of the envelope proteins, and chaperone-like activity of prM was maintained. As observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, viral envelope proteins with the mutation in prM were scarce in the Golgi complex, and accumulated in the ER. Electron microscopic analysis of cells expressing the mutated prM revealed that many tubular structures were present in the lumen. The insertion of the prM mutation at aa 63 into the viral genome reduced the production of infectious virus particles. This data suggest that prM plays a crucial role in the virus budding process.

  7. Absence of RET proto-oncogene point mutations in sporadic hyperplastic and neoplastic lesions of the parathyroid gland.

    PubMed Central

    Padberg, B. C.; Schröder, S.; Jochum, W.; Kastendieck, H.; Roth, J.; Heitz, P. U.; Komminoth, P.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the possible role of RET proto-oncogene mutations in the development of sporadic hyperplastic, benign, and malignant parathyroid lesions. DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded specimens of forty parathyroid lesions was screened for RET proto-oncogene point mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 by nonisotopic polymerase chain reaction-based single-strand conformation polymorphism and heteroduplex gel electrophoresis. The nucleotide sequence of samples with aberrant band patterns was identified by nonisotopic direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA. Parathyroids of seven patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) and MEN 2B served as positive controls. None of the eight hyperplastic lesions, three cases of parathyromatosis, ten parathyroid adenomas, eleven carcinomas or one normal parathyroid gland contained mutations in each of the three RET exons tested. Six MEN-2A-associated hyperplastic glands exhibited identical band shifts in the polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of exon 11, which corresponded to a Cys 634-->Arg substitution in the nucleotide sequence analysis (TGC-->CGC), whereas in the MEN 2B parathyroid specimen a point mutation was found at codon 918 of exon 16 (ATG-->ACG), causing a Met 918-->Thr substitution. Our data indicate that RET mutations of the MEN 2 loci in exons 10, 11, and 16 are not involved in the development of sporadically occurring benign or malignant parathyroid lesions. Furthermore, our results are in accordance with the observation that MEN 2A patients with Cys 634-->Arg (germline) mutations have a higher risk of developing parathyroid disease than those with other mutations at codon 634. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7495285

  8. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-03-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candida species known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei--A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. krusei demands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates.

  9. Extended screening for major mitochondrial DNA point mutations in patients with hereditary hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tomofumi; Nishigaki, Yutaka; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Fuku, Noriyuki; Ito, Taku; Mikami, Eri; Kitamura, Ken; Tanaka, Masashi

    2012-12-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is the most common sensory disorder in humans. Many patients with mitochondrial diseases have sensorineural HL (SNHL). The HL of these patients manifests as a consequence of either syndromic or nonsyndromic mitochondrial diseases. Furthermore, the phenotypes vary among patients even if they are carrying the same mutation. Therefore, these features make it necessary to analyze every presumed mutation in patients with hereditary HL, but the extensive analysis of various mutations is laborious. We analyzed 373 patients with suspected hereditary HL by using an extended suspension-array screening system for major mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, which can detect 32 other mtDNA mutations in addition to the previously analyzed 29 mutations. In the present study, we detected 2 different mtDNA mutations among these 373 patients; m.7444G>A in the MT-CO1 gene and m.7472insC in the MT-TS1 gene in 1 patient (0.3%) for each. As these two patients had no clinical features other than HL, they had not been suspected of having mtDNA mutations. This extended screening system together with the previous one is useful for the genetic diagnosis and epidemiological study of both syndromic and nonsyndromic HL.

  10. A single-point mutation enhances dual functionality of a scorpion toxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueli; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom represents a tremendous, hitherto partially explored peptide library that has been proven to be useful not only for understanding ion channels but also for drug design. MeuTXKα3 is a functionally unknown scorpion toxin-like peptide. Here we describe new transcripts of this gene arising from alternative polyadenylation and its biological function as well as a mutant with a single-point substitution at site 30. Native-like MeuTXKα3 and its mutant were produced in Escherichia coli and their toxic function against Drosophila Shaker K(+) channel and its mammalian counterparts (rKv1.1-rKv1.3) were assayed by two-electrode voltage clamp technique. The results show that MeuTXKα3 is a weak toxin with a wide-spectrum of activity on both Drosophila and mammalian K(+) channels. The substitution of a proline at site 30 by an asparagine, an evolutionarily conserved functional residue in the scorpion α-KTx family, led to an increased activity on rKv1.2 and rKv1.3 but a decreased activity on the Shaker channel without changing the potency on rKv1.1, suggesting a key role of this site in species selectivity of scorpion toxins. MeuTXKα3 was also active on a variety of bacteria with lethal concentrations ranging from 4.66 to 52.01μM and the mutant even had stronger activity on some of these bacterial species. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a bi-functional short-chain peptide in the lesser Asian scorpion venom. Further extensive mutations of MeuTXKα3 at site 30 could help improve its K(+) channel-blocking and antibacterial functions.

  11. Relics of repeat-induced point mutation direct heterochromatin formation in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Zachary A.; Honda, Shinji; Khlafallah, Tamir K.; Jeffress, Jennifer K.; Freitag, Michael; Mohn, Fabio; Schübeler, Dirk; Selker, Eric U.

    2009-01-01

    Both RNAi-dependent and -independent mechanisms have been implicated in the establishment of heterochromatin domains, which may be stabilized by feedback loops involving chromatin proteins and modifications of histones and DNA. Neurospora crassa sports features of heterochromatin found in higher eukaryotes, namely cytosine methylation (5mC), methylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me), and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), and is a model to investigate heterochromatin establishment and maintenance. We mapped the distribution of HP1, 5mC, H3K9me3, and H3K4me2 at 100 bp resolution and explored their interplay. HP1, H3K9me3, and 5mC were extensively co-localized and defined 44 heterochromatic domains on linkage group VII, all relics of repeat-induced point mutation. Interestingly, the centromere was found in an ∼350 kb heterochromatic domain with no detectable H3K4me2. 5mC was not found in genes, in contrast to the situation in plants and animals. H3K9me3 is required for HP1 localization and DNA methylation in N. crassa. In contrast, we found that localization of H3K9me3 was independent of 5mC or HP1 at virtually all heterochromatin regions. In addition, we observed complete restoration of DNA methylation patterns after depletion and reintroduction of the H3K9 methylation machinery. These data show that A:T-rich RIP'd DNA efficiently directs methylation of H3K9, which in turn, directs methylation of associated cytosines. PMID:19092133

  12. A distinctive oral phenotype points to FAM20A mutations not identified by Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Smith, Claire E L; Murrillo, Gina; Silva, Sandra; Feather, Sally; Howell, Marianella; Crinnion, Laura; Bonthron, David T; Carr, Ian M; Watson, Christopher M; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2015-11-01

    Biallelic FAM20A mutations cause two conditions where Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) is the presenting feature: Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Gingival Fibromatosis Syndrome; and Enamel Renal Syndrome. A distinctive oral phenotype is shared in both conditions. On Sanger sequencing of FAM20A in cases with that phenotype, we identified two probands with single, likely pathogenic heterozygous mutations. Given the recessive inheritance pattern seen in all previous FAM20A mutation-positive families and the potential for renal disease, further screening was carried out to look for a second pathogenic allele. Reverse transcriptase-PCR on cDNA was used to determine transcript levels. CNVseq was used to screen for genomic insertions and deletions. In one family, FAM20A cDNA screening revealed only a single mutated FAM20A allele with the wild-type allele not transcribed. In the second family, CNV detection by whole genome sequencing (CNVseq) revealed a heterozygous 54.7 kb duplication encompassing exons 1 to 4 of FAM20A. This study confirms the link between biallelic FAM20A mutations and the characteristic oral phenotype. It highlights for the first time examples of FAM20A mutations missed by the most commonly used mutation screening techniques. This information informed renal assessment and ongoing clinical care.

  13. Fatty acid analogue N-arachidonoyl taurine restores function of IKs channels with diverse long QT mutations

    PubMed Central

    Liin, Sara I; Larsson, Johan E; Barro-Soria, Rene; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Larsson, H Peter

    2016-01-01

    About 300 loss-of-function mutations in the IKs channel have been identified in patients with Long QT syndrome and cardiac arrhythmia. How specific mutations cause arrhythmia is largely unknown and there are no approved IKs channel activators for treatment of these arrhythmias. We find that several Long QT syndrome-associated IKs channel mutations shift channel voltage dependence and accelerate channel closing. Voltage-clamp fluorometry experiments and kinetic modeling suggest that similar mutation-induced alterations in IKs channel currents may be caused by different molecular mechanisms. Finally, we find that the fatty acid analogue N-arachidonoyl taurine restores channel gating of many different mutant channels, even though the mutations are in different domains of the IKs channel and affect the channel by different molecular mechanisms. N-arachidonoyl taurine is therefore an interesting prototype compound that may inspire development of future IKs channel activators to treat Long QT syndrome caused by diverse IKs channel mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20272.001 PMID:27690226

  14. The Molecular Basis of Muscular Dystrophy in the mdx Mouse: A Point Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, Piotr; Geng, Yan; Ryder-Cook, Allan S.; Barnard, Eric A.; Darlison, Mark G.; Barnard, Pene J.

    1989-06-01

    The mdx mouse is an X-linked myopathic mutant, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In both mouse and man the mutations lie within the dystrophin gene, but the phenotypic differences of the disease in the two species confer much interest on the molecular basis of the mdx mutation. The complementary DNA for mouse dystrophin has been cloned, and the sequence has been used in the polymerase chain reaction to amplify normal and mdx dystrophin transcripts in the area of the mdx mutation. Sequence analysis of the amplification products showed that the mdx mouse has a single base substitution within an exon, which causes premature termination of the polypeptide chain.

  15. Congenital adrenal hypoplasia: clinical spectrum, experience with hormonal diagnosis, and report on new point mutations of the DAX-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Peter, M; Viemann, M; Partsch, C J; Sippell, W G

    1998-08-01

    X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC) is a rare developmental disorder of the human adrenal cortex and is caused by deletion or mutation of the DAX-1 gene, a recently discovered member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is frequently associated with AHC. AHC occurs as part of a contiguous gene syndrome together with glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. The present series, collected over the past 2 decades, includes 18 AHC boys from 16 families: 4 with AHC, GKD, and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy; 2 with AHC and GKD; and 12 with AHC (5 young adults with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). Most of the boys presented with salt wasting and hyperpigmentation during the neonatal period. Plasma steroid determinations performed in the first weeks of life often showed confusing results, probably caused by steroids produced in the neonates' persisting fetocortex. Aldosterone deficiency usually preceded cortisol deficiency, which explains why the patients more often presented with salt-wasting rather than with hypoglycemic symptoms. An ACTH test was often necessary to detect cortisol deficiency in the very young infants. In some patients, serial testing was necessary to establish the correct diagnosis. In 4 boys studied during the first 3 months after birth, we found pubertal LH, FSH, and testosterone plasma levels indicating postnatal transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis as in normal boys. Previous studies have shown that the DAX-1 gene is deleted in the AHC patients with a contiguous gene syndrome and is mutated in nondeletion patients. Most of the point mutations identified in AHC patients were frameshift mutations and stop mutations. In the 15 patients available for molecular analysis of the DAX-1 gene, there were large deletions in 6 patients and point mutations in another 7 patients. All of the point mutations identified in the present study resulted in a nonfunctional

  16. Electrochemical biosensors for detection of point mutation based on surface ligation reaction and oligonucleotides modified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Lijuan; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; He, Leiliang; Zhu, Jinqing

    2011-03-04

    An electrochemical method for point mutation detection based on surface ligation reaction and oligonucleotides (ODNs) modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was demonstrated. Point mutation identification was achieved using Escherichia coli DNA ligase. This system for point mutation detection relied on a sandwich assay comprising capture ODN immobilized on Au electrodes, target ODN and ligation ODN. Because of the sequence-specific surface reactions of E. coli DNA ligase, the ligation ODN covalently linked to the capture ODN only in the presence of a perfectly complementary target ODN. The presence of ligation products on Au electrode was detected using chronocoulometry through hybridization with reporter ODN modified AuNPs. The use of AuNPs improved the sensitivity of chronocoulometry in this approach, a detection limit of 0.9 pM complementary ODN was obtained. For single base mismatched ODN (smODN), a negligible signal was observed. Even if the concentration ratio of complementary ODN to smODN was decreased to 1:1000, a detectable signal was observed. This work may provide a specific, sensitive and cost-efficient approach for point mutant detection.

  17. Changes in apparent free energy of helix-helix dimerization in a biological membrane due to point mutations

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Mylinh T.; Jaszewski, Todd M.; Fleming, Karen G.; MacKenzie, Kevin R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We present an implementation of the TOXCAT membrane protein self-association assay that measures the change in apparent free energy of transmembrane helix dimerization caused by point mutations. Quantifying the reporter gene expression from cells carrying wild type and mutant constructs shows that single point mutations that disrupt dimerization of the transmembrane domain of glycophorin A reproducibly lower the TOXCAT signal more than one hundred-fold. Replicate cultures can show up to three-fold changes in the level of expression of the membrane bound fusion construct, and correcting for these variations improves the precision of the calculated apparent free energy change. The remarkably good agreement between our TOXCAT apparent free energy scale and free energy differences from sedimentation equilibrium studies for point mutants of the glycophorin A transmembrane domain dimer indicate that sequence changes usually affect membrane helix-helix interactions quite similarly in these two very different environments. However, the effects of point mutations at threonine 87 suggest that intermonomer polar contacts by this side chain contribute significantly to dimer stability in membranes but not in detergents. Our findings demonstrate that a comparison of quantitative measurements of helix-helix interactions in biological membranes and genuine thermodynamic data from biophysical measurements on purified proteins can elucidate how changes in the lipidic environment modulate membrane protein stability. PMID:17570394

  18. Macrolide resistance in Helicobacter pylori: rapid detection of point mutations and assays of macrolide binding to ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Occhialini, A; Urdaci, M; Doucet-Populaire, F; Bébéar, C M; Lamouliatte, H; Mégraud, F

    1997-01-01

    Resistance of Helicobacter pylori to macrolides is a major cause of failure of eradication therapies. Single base substitutions in the H. pylori 23S rRNA genes have been associated with macrolide resistance in the United States. Our goal was to extend this work to European strains, to determine the consequence of this mutation on erythromycin binding to H. pylori ribosomes, and to find a quick method to detect the mutation. Seven pairs of H. pylori strains were used, the parent strain being naturally susceptible to macrolides and the second strain having acquired an in vivo resistance during a treatment regimen that included clarithromycin. The identity of the strains was confirmed by random amplified polymorphic DNA testing with two different primers, indicating that resistance was the result of the selection of variants of the infecting strain. All resistant strains were found to have point mutations at position 2143 (three cases) or 2144 (four cases) but never on the opposite DNA fragment of domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. The mutation was A-->G in all cases except one (A-->C) at position 2143. Using BsaI and BbsI restriction enzymes on the amplified products, we confirmed the mutations of A-->G at positions 2144 and 2143, respectively. Macrolide binding was tested on purified ribosomes isolated from four pairs of strains with [14C]erythromycin. Erythromycin binding increased in a dose-dependent manner for the susceptible strain but not for the resistant one. In conclusion we suggest that the limited disruption of the peptidyltransferase loop conformation, caused by a point mutation, reduces drug binding and consequently confers resistance to macrolides. Finally, the macrolide resistance could be detected without sequencing by performing restriction fragment length polymorphism with appropriate restriction enzymes. PMID:9420046

  19. Macrolide resistance in Helicobacter pylori: rapid detection of point mutations and assays of macrolide binding to ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Occhialini, A; Urdaci, M; Doucet-Populaire, F; Bébéar, C M; Lamouliatte, H; Mégraud, F

    1997-12-01

    Resistance of Helicobacter pylori to macrolides is a major cause of failure of eradication therapies. Single base substitutions in the H. pylori 23S rRNA genes have been associated with macrolide resistance in the United States. Our goal was to extend this work to European strains, to determine the consequence of this mutation on erythromycin binding to H. pylori ribosomes, and to find a quick method to detect the mutation. Seven pairs of H. pylori strains were used, the parent strain being naturally susceptible to macrolides and the second strain having acquired an in vivo resistance during a treatment regimen that included clarithromycin. The identity of the strains was confirmed by random amplified polymorphic DNA testing with two different primers, indicating that resistance was the result of the selection of variants of the infecting strain. All resistant strains were found to have point mutations at position 2143 (three cases) or 2144 (four cases) but never on the opposite DNA fragment of domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. The mutation was A-->G in all cases except one (A-->C) at position 2143. Using BsaI and BbsI restriction enzymes on the amplified products, we confirmed the mutations of A-->G at positions 2144 and 2143, respectively. Macrolide binding was tested on purified ribosomes isolated from four pairs of strains with [14C]erythromycin. Erythromycin binding increased in a dose-dependent manner for the susceptible strain but not for the resistant one. In conclusion we suggest that the limited disruption of the peptidyltransferase loop conformation, caused by a point mutation, reduces drug binding and consequently confers resistance to macrolides. Finally, the macrolide resistance could be detected without sequencing by performing restriction fragment length polymorphism with appropriate restriction enzymes.

  20. RAI1 point mutations, CAG repeat variation, and SNP analysis in non-deletion Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bi, Weimin; Saifi, G Mustafa; Girirajan, Santhosh; Shi, Xin; Szomju, Barbara; Firth, Helen; Magenis, R Ellen; Potocki, Lorraine; Elsea, Sarah H; Lupski, James R

    2006-11-15

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation disorder characterized by distinct craniofacial features and neurobehavioral abnormalities usually associated with an interstitial deletion in 17p11.2. Heterozygous point mutations in the retinoic acid induced 1 gene (RAI1) have been reported in nine SMS patients without a deletion detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), implicating RAI1 haploinsufficiency as the cause of the major clinical features in SMS. All of the reported point mutations are unique and de novo. RAI1 contains a polymorphic CAG repeat and encodes a plant homeo domain (PHD) zinc finger-containing transcriptional regulator. We report a novel RAI1 frameshift mutation, c.3103delC, in a non-deletion patient with many SMS features. The deletion of a single cytosine occurs in a heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC), the longest mononucleotide repeat in the RAI1 coding region. Interestingly, we had previously reported a frameshift mutation, c.3103insC, in the same mononucleotide repeat. Furthermore, all five single base frameshift mutations preferentially occurred in polyC but not polyG tracts. We also investigated the distribution of the polymorphic CAG repeats in both the normal population and the SMS patients as one potential molecular mechanism for variability of clinical expression. In this limited data set, there was no significant association between the length of CAG repeats and the SMS phenotype. However, we identified a 5-year-old girl with an apparent SMS phenotype who was a compound heterozygote for an RAI1 missense mutation inherited from her father and a polyglutamine repeat of 18 copies, representing the largest known CAG repeat in this gene, inherited from her mother.

  1. Disentangling the effects of mating systems and mutation rates on cytoplamic diversity in gynodioecious Silene nutans and dioecious Silene otites

    PubMed Central

    Lahiani, E; Dufaÿ, M; Castric, V; Le Cadre, S; Charlesworth, D; Van Rossum, F; Touzet, P

    2013-01-01

    Many flowering plant species exhibit a variety of distinct sexual morphs, the two most common cases being the co-occurrence of females and males (dioecy) or the co-occurrence of hermaphrodites and females (gynodioecy). In this study, we compared DNA sequence variability of the three genomes (nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplastic) of a gynodioecious species, Silene nutans, with that of a closely related dioecious species, Silene otites. In the light of theoretical models, we expect cytoplasmic diversity to differ between the two species due to the selective dynamics that acts on cytoplasmic genomes in gynodioecious species: under an epidemic scenario, the gynodioecious species is expected to exhibit lower cytoplasmic diversity than the dioecious species, while the opposite is expected in the case of balancing selection maintaining sterility cytoplasms in the gynodioecious species. We found no difference between the species for nuclear gene diversity, but, for the cytoplasmic loci, the gynodioecious S. nutans had more haplotypes, and higher nucleotide diversity, than the dioecious relative, S. otites, even though the latter has a relatively high rate of mitochondrial synonymous substitutions, and therefore presumably a higher mutation rate. Therefore, as the mitochondrial mutation rate cannot account for the higher cytoplasmic diversity found in S. nutans, our findings support the hypothesis that gynodioecy in S. nutans has been maintained by balancing selection rather than by epidemic-like dynamics. PMID:23591518

  2. Identification of a Novel GJA8 (Cx50) Point Mutation Causes Human Dominant Congenital Cataracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiang-Lian; Zhang, Yilan; Wu, Yaming; Lv, Jineng; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary cataracts are clinically and genetically heterogeneous lens diseases that cause a significant proportion of visual impairment and blindness in children. Human cataracts have been linked with mutations in two genes, GJA3 and GJA8, respectively. To identify the causative mutation in a family with hereditary cataracts, family members were screened for mutations by PCR for both genes. Sequencing the coding regions of GJA8, coding for connexin 50, revealed a C > A transversion at nucleotide 264, which caused p.P88T mutation. To dissect the molecular consequences of this mutation, plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant mouse ORFs of Gja8 were generated and ectopically expressed in HEK293 cells and human lens epithelial cells, respectively. The recombinant proteins were assessed by confocal microscopy and Western blotting. The results demonstrate that the molecular consequences of the p.P88T mutation in GJA8 include changes in connexin 50 protein localization patterns, accumulation of mutant protein, and increased cell growth.

  3. Modified Proofreading PCR for Detection of Point Mutations, Insertions and Deletions Using a ddNTP-Blocked Primer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Weiming; Fan, Lujuan; Chen, Qianqian; Chen, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Sichao; Lan, Ke; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Chiyu

    2015-01-01

    The development of simple, accurate, rapid and cost-effective technologies for mutation detection is crucial to the early diagnosis and prevention of numerous genetic diseases, pharmacogenetics, and drug resistance. Proofreading PCR (PR-PCR) was developed for mutation detection in 1998 but is rarely applied due to its low efficiency in allele discrimination. Here we developed a modified PR-PCR method using a ddNTP-blocked primer and a mixture of DNA polymerases with and without the 3'-5' proofreading function. The ddNTP-blocked primer exhibited the best blocking efficiency to avoid nonspecific primer extension while the mixture of a tiny amount of high-fidelity DNA polymerase with a routine amount of Taq DNA polymerase provided the best discrimination and amplification effects. The modified PR-PCR method is quite capable of detecting various mutation types, including point mutations and insertions/deletions (indels), and allows discrimination amplification when the mismatch is located within the last eight nucleotides from the 3'-end of the ddNTP-blocked primer. The modified PR-PCR has a sensitivity of 1-5 × 102 copies and a selectivity of 5 × 10-5 mutant among 107 copies of wild-type DNA. It showed a 100% accuracy rate in the detection of P72R germ-line mutation in the TP53 gene among 60 clinical blood samples, and a high potential to detect rifampin-resistant mutations at low frequency in Mycobacterium tuberculosis using an adaptor and a fusion-blocked primer. These results suggest that the modified PR-PCR technique is effective in detection of various mutations or polymorphisms as a simple, sensitive and promising approach.

  4. A new point mutation in the iron-sulfur subunit of succinate dehydrogenase confers resistance to boscalid in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Duan, Yabing; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    Research has established that mutations in highly conserved amino acids of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex in various fungi confer SDH inhibitor (SDHI) resistance. For Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, a necrotrophic fungus with a broad host range and a worldwide distribution, boscalid resistance has been attributed to the mutation H132R in the highly conserved SdhD subunit protein of the SDH complex. In our previous study, however, only one point mutation, A11V in SdhB (GCA to GTA change in SdhB), was detected in S. sclerotiorum boscalid-resistant (BR) mutants. In the current study, replacement of the SdhB gene in a boscalid-sensitive (BS) S. sclerotiorum strain with the mutant SdhB gene conferred resistance. Compared with wild-type strains, BR and GSM (SdhB gene in the wild-type strain replaced by the mutant SdhB gene) mutants were more sensitive to osmotic stress, lacked the ability to produce sclerotia and exhibited lower expression of the pac1 gene. Importantly, the point mutation was not located in the highly conserved sequence of the iron-sulfur subunit of SDH. These results suggest that resistance based on non-conserved vs. conserved protein domains differs in mechanism. In addition to increasing our understanding of boscalid resistance in S. sclerotiorum, the new information will be useful for the development of alternative antifungal drugs.

  5. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family’s phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  6. Diversity of [beta]-globin mutations in Israeli ethnic groups reflects recent historic events

    SciTech Connect

    Filon, D.; Oron, V.; Krichevski, S.; Shaag, A.; Goldfarb, A.; Aker, M.; Rachmilewitz, E.A.; Rund, D.; Oppenheim, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors characterized nearly 500 [beta]-thalassemia genes from the Israeli population representing a variety of ethnic subgroups. They found 28 different mutations in the [beta]-globin gene, including three mutations ([beta][sup S], [beta][sup C], and [beta][sup O-Arab]) causing hemoglobinopathies. Marked genetic heterogeneity was observed in both the Arab (20 mutations) and Jewish (17 mutations) populations. On the other hand, two ethnic isolates - Druze and Samaritans - had a single mutation each. Fifteen of the [beta]-thalassemia alleles are Mediterranean in type, 5 originated in Kurdistan, 2 are of Indian origin, and 2 sporadic alleles came from Europe. Only one mutant allele-nonsense codon 37-appears to be indigenous to Israel. While human habitation in Israel dates back to early prehistory, the present-day spectrum of [beta]-globin mutations can be largely explained by migration events that occurred in the past millennium. 26 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. MFN2 point mutations occur in 3.4% of Charcot-Marie-Tooth families. An investigation of 232 Norwegian CMT families

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Point mutations in the mitofusin 2 (MFN2) gene has been identified exclusively in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 (CMT2), and in a single family with intermediate CMT. MFN2 point mutations are probably the most common cause of CMT2. Methods Two-hundred and thirty-two consecutive unselected and unrelated CMT families with available DNA from all regions in Norway were included. We screened for point mutations in the MFN2 gene. Results We identified four known and three novel point mutations in 8 unrelated CMT families. The novel point mutations were not found in 100 healthy controls. This corresponds to 3.4% (8/232) of CMT families have point mutations in the MFN2 gene. The phenotypes were compatible with CMT1 in two families, CMT2 in four families, intermediate CMT in one family and distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathy (dHMN) in one family. This corresponds to 2.3% of CMT1, 5.5% of CMT2, 12.5% of intermediate CMT and 6.7% of dHMN families have a point mutation in the MFN2 gene. Point mutations in the MFN2 gene is likely to be the fourth most common cause to CMT after duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene, and point mutations in the Connexin32 (Cx32) and myelin protein zero (MPZ) genes. Conclusions The identified known and novel point mutations in the MFN2 gene expand the clinical spectrum from CMT2 and intermediate CMT to also include possibly CMT1 and the dHMN phenotypes. Thus, genetic analyses of the MFN2 gene should not be restricted to persons with CMT2. PMID:20350294

  8. Effects of point mutation on enzymatic activity: correlation between protein electronic structure and motion in chorismate mutase reaction.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2010-05-26

    Assignment of particular roles to catalytic residues is an important requirement in clearly understanding enzyme functions. Therefore, predicting the catalytic activities of mutant variants is a fundamental challenge in computational biochemistry. Although site-directed mutagenesis is widely used for studying enzymatic activities and other important classes of protein function, interpreting mutation experiments is usually difficult mainly due to side effects induced by point mutations. Because steric and, in many cases, electrostatic effects may affect the local, fine geometries conserved in wild-type proteins that are usually believed to be thermodynamically stable, simply reducing a loss in catalytic activity into clear elements is difficult. To address these important but difficult issues, we performed a systematic ab initio QM/MM computational analysis combined with MD-FEP simulations and all-electron QM calculations for the entire protein matrix. We selected chorismate mutase, one of the simplest and well-known enzymes, to discuss the details of mutational effects on the enzymatic reaction process. On the basis of the reliable free energy profiles of the wild-type enzyme and several mutant variants, we analyzed the effects of point mutations relative to electronic structure and protein dynamics. In general, changes in geometrical parameters introduced by a mutation were usually limited to the local mutational site. However, this local structural modification could affect the global protein dynamics through correlated motions of particular amino acid residues even far from the mutation site. Even for mutant reactions with low catalytic activity, transition state stabilization was observed as a result of conformational modifications and reorganization around the active site. As for the electrostatic effect created by the polar protein environment, the wild-type enzyme was most effectively designed to stabilize the transition state of the reactive substrate, and

  9. Point mutations in the Theileria annulata cytochrome b gene is associated with buparvaquone treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Sharifiyazdi, Hassan; Namazi, Fatemah; Oryan, Ahmad; Shahriari, Reza; Razavi, Mostafa

    2012-07-06

    Theileriosis is an economically important haemoprotozoal disease with high morbidity and mortality in cattle. Buparvaquone is very effective in the treatment of Theileria infections in cattle. The present study reported an outbreak of bovine tropical theileriosis in Fars Province, southern Iran with buparvaquone treatment failure associated with mutations in drug-binding sites of its causative agent. The infected animals (n=8) exhibited poor condition, fever, anemia, rough coat and superficial lymph node enlargement. Both blood smears and lymph nodes punctures were positive and further molecular examination revealed that these animals were infected with Theileria annulata. Death occurred in seven of the eight infected animals in spite of the buparvaquone treatment. At molecular study, two types of important single-base mutations were observed in the cytochrome b gene of the parasite. These changes resulted in amino acid mutations in the parasite cytochrome b from serine (AGT) 109 to glycine (GGT) for the six dead cases and proline (CCT) 233 to serine (TCT) for one dead case within strongly Q(o) drug-binding sites. In contrast, neither of these mutations was found in the parasite cytochrome b for the buvarvaquone-treated animal. It seems that these mutation sites are associated with resistance to buparvaquone, a hydroxynaphthoquinone compound.

  10. A Gene-Specific Method for Predicting Hemophilia-Causing Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki-Katagiri, Nobuko; Salari, Raheleh; Wu, Andrew; Qi, Yini; Schiller, Tal; Filiberto, Amanda C.; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Komar, Anton A.; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental goal of medical genetics is the accurate prediction of genotype–phenotype correlations. As an approach to develop more accurate in silico tools for prediction of disease-causing mutations of structural proteins, we present a gene- and disease-specific prediction tool based on a large systematic analysis of missense mutations from hemophilia A (HA) patients. Our HA-specific prediction tool, HApredictor, showed disease prediction accuracy comparable to other publicly available prediction software. In contrast to those methods, its performance is not limited to non-synonymous mutations. Given the role of synonymous mutations in disease and drug codon optimization, we propose that utilizing a gene- and disease-specific method can be highly useful to make functional predictions possible even for synonymous mutations. Incorporating computational metrics at both nucleotide and amino acid levels along with multiple protein sequence/structure alignment significantly improved the predictive performance of our tool. HApredictor is freely available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Przytycka/HA_Predict/index.htm. PMID:23920358

  11. Tribenuron-methyl resistance and mutation diversity of Pro197 in flixweed (Descurainia Sophia L.) accessions from China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei; Liu, Ming Jie; Yang, Qian; Mei, Yu; Li, Xue Feng; Zheng, Ming Qi

    2015-01-01

    Flixweed (Descurainia Sophia L.) is a problematic weed in winter wheat fields in China, which causes great loss of wheat yield. A total of 46 flixweed accessions from winter wheat-planting areas were collected and used for the survey of resistance to tribenuron-methyl and Pro197 mutation diversity. According to the "R" resistance rating system, 16 flixweed accessions have evolved resistance to tribenuron-methyl, 13 accessions have high risk of developing resistance to this herbicide and 17 accessions are susceptible. The mutation of Pro197 codon (CCT) changed proline (Pro) into leucine (Leu) (homozygous, RR), serine (Ser, RR), histidine (His, RR), threonine (Thr, RR), Pro/Leu (heterozygous, RS), Pro/Ser (RS), Pro/His, Pro/Thr (RS) and Pro/Tyr (RS). Among these amino acid changes, a Pro197-Pro/Tyr (heterozygous, RS) substitution caused by the mutation of two successive nucleotides was identified for the first time in resistant weed species. In addition, the Pro197-His and Pro197-Pro/His mutations have not been reported previously in flixweed. Finally, a CPAS marker was developed to identify flixweed plants with or without Pro197 mutation.

  12. Oncogenic mutations produce similar phenotypes in Drosophila tissues of diverse origins

    PubMed Central

    Stickel, Stefanie; Su, Tin Tin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT An emerging interest in oncology is to tailor treatment to particular cancer genotypes, i.e. oncogenic mutations present in the tumor, and not the tissue of cancer incidence. Integral to such a practice is the idea that the same oncogenic mutation(s) produces similar outcomes in different tissues. To test this idea experimentally, we studied tumors driven by a combination of RasV12 and scrib1 mutations in Drosophila larvae. We found that tumors induced in tissues of neural ectodermal and mesodermal origins behaved similarly in every manner examined: cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis, cellular morphology, increased aneuploidy and response to Taxol. We conclude that oncogenic effects override tissue-specific differences, at least for the mutations, tissues, and phenotypes studied herein. PMID:24570398

  13. 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis: new SRY point mutation in two siblings with paternal germ line mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Stoppa-Vaucher, S; Ayabe, T; Paquette, J; Patey, N; Francoeur, D; Vuissoz, J-M; Deladoëy, J; Samuels, M E; Ogata, T; Deal, C L

    2012-12-01

    Familial recurrence risks are poorly understood in cases of de novo mutations. In the event of parental germ line mosaicism, recurrence risks can be higher than generally appreciated, with implications for genetic counseling and clinical practice. In the course of treating a female with pubertal delay and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, we identified a new missense mutation in the SRY gene, leading to somatic feminization of this karyotypically normal XY individual. We tested a younger sister despite a normal onset of puberty, who also possessed an XY karyotype and the same SRY mutation. Imaging studies in the sister revealed an ovarian tumor, which was removed. DNA from the father's blood possessed the wild type SRY sequence, and paternity testing was consistent with the given family structure. A brother was 46, XY with a wild type SRY sequence strongly suggesting paternal Y-chromosome germline mosaicism for the mutation. In disorders of sexual development (DSDs), early diagnosis is critical for optimal psychological development of the affected patients. In this case, preventive karyotypic screening allowed early diagnosis of a gonadal tumor in the sibling prior to the age of normal puberty. Our results suggest that cytological or molecular diagnosis should be applied for siblings of an affected DSD individual.

  14. [Point mutations of genes encoding proteins involvedin RNA splicing in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Barańska, Marta; Czerwińska-Rybak, Joanna; Gil, Lidia; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2015-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) constitute heterogeneous group of clonal disorders, characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenia and increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia development. Molecular mechanisms behind MDS have not been fully explained, however recent studies based on new technologies confirmed that epigenetic abnormalities and somatic mutation in the spliceasome machinery are crucial in pathogenesis of these diseases. Abnormal mRNA splicing (excision of intronic sequences from mRNA) has been found in over half of all MDS patients and resulted in accumulation of cytogenetical and molecular changes. The biological impact of splicing factor genes mutations has been evaluated only in a limited extend and current studies concentrate on analysis of MDS transcriptome. Molecular characteristic of classical and alternative splicing is presented in the paper, according to current knowledge. We review the most prominent findings from recent years concerning mutation in the spliceasome machinery with respect to MDS phenotype and disease prognosis. Perspectives in applying of novel diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities for myelodysplasia, based on spliceosome mutations identification are also presented.

  15. Point mutations in murine Nkx2-5 phenocopy human congenital heart disease and induce pathogenic Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Milena B.; Wilmanns, Julia C.; Chandran, Anjana; Perera, Joelle; Hon, Olivia; Biben, Christine; Willow, Taylor J.; Nim, Hieu T.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Simonds, Stephanie; Willians, David; Salimova, Ekaterina; Plachta, Nicolas; Denegre, James M.; Murray, Stephen A.; Cowley, Michael; Pearson, James T.; Kaye, David; Ramialison, Mirana; Rosenthal, Nadia A.; Costa, Mauro W.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the Nkx2-5 gene are a main cause of congenital heart disease. Several studies have addressed the phenotypic consequences of disrupting the Nkx2-5 gene locus, although animal models to date failed to recapitulate the full spectrum of the human disease. Here, we describe a new Nkx2-5 point mutation murine model, akin to its human counterpart disease–generating mutation. Our model fully reproduces the morphological and physiological clinical presentations of the disease and reveals an understudied aspect of Nkx2-5–driven pathology, a primary right ventricular dysfunction. We further describe the molecular consequences of disrupting the transcriptional network regulated by Nkx2-5 in the heart and show that Nkx2-5–dependent perturbation of the Wnt signaling pathway promotes heart dysfunction through alteration of cardiomyocyte metabolism. Our data provide mechanistic insights on how Nkx2-5 regulates heart function and metabolism, a link in the study of congenital heart disease, and confirms that our models are the first murine genetic models to our knowledge to present all spectra of clinically relevant adult congenital heart disease phenotypes generated by NKX2-5 mutations in patients. PMID:28352650

  16. Point mutations in murine Nkx2-5 phenocopy human congenital heart disease and induce pathogenic Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Milena B; Wilmanns, Julia C; Chandran, Anjana; Perera, Joelle; Hon, Olivia; Biben, Christine; Willow, Taylor J; Nim, Hieu T; Kaur, Gurpreet; Simonds, Stephanie; Wu, Qizhu; Willians, David; Salimova, Ekaterina; Plachta, Nicolas; Denegre, James M; Murray, Stephen A; Fatkin, Diane; Cowley, Michael; Pearson, James T; Kaye, David; Ramialison, Mirana; Harvey, Richard P; Rosenthal, Nadia A; Costa, Mauro W

    2017-03-23

    Mutations in the Nkx2-5 gene are a main cause of congenital heart disease. Several studies have addressed the phenotypic consequences of disrupting the Nkx2-5 gene locus, although animal models to date failed to recapitulate the full spectrum of the human disease. Here, we describe a new Nkx2-5 point mutation murine model, akin to its human counterpart disease-generating mutation. Our model fully reproduces the morphological and physiological clinical presentations of the disease and reveals an understudied aspect of Nkx2-5-driven pathology, a primary right ventricular dysfunction. We further describe the molecular consequences of disrupting the transcriptional network regulated by Nkx2-5 in the heart and show that Nkx2-5-dependent perturbation of the Wnt signaling pathway promotes heart dysfunction through alteration of cardiomyocyte metabolism. Our data provide mechanistic insights on how Nkx2-5 regulates heart function and metabolism, a link in the study of congenital heart disease, and confirms that our models are the first murine genetic models to our knowledge to present all spectra of clinically relevant adult congenital heart disease phenotypes generated by NKX2-5 mutations in patients.

  17. Hypertension-associated point mutations in the adducin alpha and beta subunits affect actin cytoskeleton and ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Tripodi, G; Valtorta, F; Torielli, L; Chieregatti, E; Salardi, S; Trusolino, L; Menegon, A; Ferrari, P; Marchisio, P C; Bianchi, G

    1996-01-01

    The adducin heterodimer is a protein affecting the assembly of the actin-based cytoskeleton. Point mutations in rat adducin alpha (F316Y) and beta (Q529R) subunits are involved in a form of rat primary hypertension (MHS) associated with faster kidney tubular ion transport. A role for adducin in human primary hypertension has also been suggested. By studying the interaction of actin with purified normal and mutated adducin in a cell-free system and the actin assembly in rat kidney epithelial cells (NRK-52E) transfected with mutated rat adducin cDNA, we show that the adducin isoforms differentially modulate: (a) actin assembly both in a cell-free system and within transfected cells; (b) topography of alpha V integrin together with focal contact proteins; and (c) Na-K pump activity at V(max) (faster with the mutated isoforms, 1281 +/- 90 vs 841 +/- 30 nmol K/h.mg pt., P < 0.0001). This co-modulation suggests a role for adducin in the constitutive capacity of the epithelia both to transport ions and to expose adhesion molecules. These findings may also lead to the understanding of the relation between adducin polymorphism and blood pressure and to the development of new approaches to the study of hypertension-associated organ damage. PMID:8675693

  18. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James B; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Samuelsson, Tore; Gorodkin, Jan; Gustafsson, Claes M; Larsson, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3' to 5' direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems.

  19. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Samuelsson, Tore; Gorodkin, Jan; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3′ to 5′ direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems. PMID:26125550

  20. Development of a Magnetic Electrochemical Bar Code Array for Point Mutation Detection in the H5N1 Neuraminidase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Krejcova, Ludmila; Hynek, David; Kopel, Pavel; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Adam, Vojtech; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Trnkova, Libuse; Kizek, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Since its first official detection in the Guangdong province of China in 1996, the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of H5N1 subtype (HPAI H5N1) has reportedly been the cause of outbreaks in birds in more than 60 countries, 24 of which were European. The main issue is still to develop effective antiviral drugs. In this case, single point mutation in the neuraminidase gene, which causes resistance to antiviral drug and is, therefore, subjected to many studies including ours, was observed. In this study, we developed magnetic electrochemical bar code array for detection of single point mutations (mismatches in up to four nucleotides) in H5N1 neuraminidase gene. Paramagnetic particles Dynabeads® with covalently bound oligo (dT)25 were used as a tool for isolation of complementary H5N1 chains (H5N1 Zhejin, China and Aichi). For detection of H5N1 chains, oligonucleotide chains of lengths of 12 (+5 adenine) or 28 (+5 adenine) bp labeled with quantum dots (CdS, ZnS and/or PbS) were used. Individual probes hybridized to target molecules specifically with efficiency higher than 60%. The obtained signals identified mutations present in the sequence. Suggested experimental procedure allows obtaining further information from the redox signals of nucleic acids. Moreover, the used biosensor exhibits sequence specificity and low limits of detection of subnanogram quantities of target nucleic acids. PMID:23860384

  1. Dynamic Harmony Search with Polynomial Mutation Algorithm for Valve-Point Economic Load Dispatch.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, M; Raja, T Sree Ranga

    2015-01-01

    Economic load dispatch (ELD) problem is an important issue in the operation and control of modern control system. The ELD problem is complex and nonlinear with equality and inequality constraints which makes it hard to be efficiently solved. This paper presents a new modification of harmony search (HS) algorithm named as dynamic harmony search with polynomial mutation (DHSPM) algorithm to solve ORPD problem. In DHSPM algorithm the key parameters of HS algorithm like harmony memory considering rate (HMCR) and pitch adjusting rate (PAR) are changed dynamically and there is no need to predefine these parameters. Additionally polynomial mutation is inserted in the updating step of HS algorithm to favor exploration and exploitation of the search space. The DHSPM algorithm is tested with three power system cases consisting of 3, 13, and 40 thermal units. The computational results show that the DHSPM algorithm is more effective in finding better solutions than other computational intelligence based methods.

  2. Dynamic Harmony Search with Polynomial Mutation Algorithm for Valve-Point Economic Load Dispatch

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, M.; Sree Ranga Raja, T.

    2015-01-01

    Economic load dispatch (ELD) problem is an important issue in the operation and control of modern control system. The ELD problem is complex and nonlinear with equality and inequality constraints which makes it hard to be efficiently solved. This paper presents a new modification of harmony search (HS) algorithm named as dynamic harmony search with polynomial mutation (DHSPM) algorithm to solve ORPD problem. In DHSPM algorithm the key parameters of HS algorithm like harmony memory considering rate (HMCR) and pitch adjusting rate (PAR) are changed dynamically and there is no need to predefine these parameters. Additionally polynomial mutation is inserted in the updating step of HS algorithm to favor exploration and exploitation of the search space. The DHSPM algorithm is tested with three power system cases consisting of 3, 13, and 40 thermal units. The computational results show that the DHSPM algorithm is more effective in finding better solutions than other computational intelligence based methods. PMID:26491710

  3. A point mutation in influenza B neuraminidase confers resistance to peramivir and loss of slow binding.

    PubMed

    Baum, Ellen Z; Wagaman, Pamela C; Ly, Linh; Turchi, Ignatius; Le, Jianhua; Bucher, Doris; Bush, Karen

    2003-06-01

    The influenza neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors peramivir, oseltamivir, and zanamivir are potent inhibitors of NAs from both influenza A and B strains. In general, these inhibitors are slow, tight binders of NA, exhibiting time-dependent inhibition. A mutant of influenza virus B/Yamagata/16/88 which was resistant to peramivir was generated by passage of the virus in tissue culture, in the presence of increasing concentrations (0.1-120 microM over 15 passages) of the compound. Whereas the wild type (WT) virus was inhibited by peramivir with an EC(50) value of 0.10 microM, virus isolated at passages 3 and 15 displayed EC(50) values of 10 and >50 microM, respectively. Passage 3 virus contained 3 hemagglutinin (HA) mutations, but no NA mutation. Passage 15 (P15R) virus contained an additional 3 HA mutations, plus the NA mutation His273Tyr. The mechanism of inhibition of WT and P15R NA by peramivir was examined in enzyme assays. The WT and P15R NAs displayed IC(50) values of 8.4+/-0.4 and 127+/-16 nM, respectively, for peramivir. Peramivir inhibited the WT enzyme in a time-dependent fashion, with a K(i) value of 0.066+/-0.002nM. In contrast, the P15R enzyme did not display the property of slow binding and was inhibited competitively with a K(i) value of 4.69+/-0.44nM. Molecular modeling suggested that His273 was relatively distant from peramivir (>5A) in the NA active site, but that Tyr273 introduced a repulsive interaction between the enzyme and inhibitor, which may have been responsible for peramivir resistance.

  4. Depolarizing bipolar cell dysfunction due to a Trpm1 point mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pearring, Jillian N.; Bojang, Pasano; Hirschtritt, Matthew E.; Sturgill-Short, Gwen; Ray, Thomas A.; Furukawa, Takahisa; Koike, Chieko; Goldberg, Andrew F. X.; Shen, Yin; McCall, Maureen A.; Nawy, Scott; Nishina, Patsy M.; Gregg, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in TRPM1 are found in humans with an autosomal recessive form of complete congenital stationary night blindness (cCSNB). The Trpm1−/− mouse has been an important animal model for this condition. Here we report a new mouse mutant, tvrm27, identified in a chemical mutagenesis screen. Genetic mapping of the no b-wave electroretinogram (ERG) phenotype of tvrm27 localized the mutation to a chromosomal region that included Trpm1. Complementation testing with Trpm1−/− mice confirmed a mutation in Trpm1. Sequencing identified a nucleotide change in exon 23, converting a highly conserved alanine within the pore domain to threonine (p.A1068T). Consistent with prior studies of Trpm1−/− mice, no anatomical changes were noted in the Trpm1tvrm27/tvrm27 retina. The Trpm1tvrm27/tvrm27 phenotype is distinguished from that of Trpm1−/− by the retention of TRPM1 expression on the dendritic tips of depolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs). While ERG b-wave amplitudes of Trpm1+/− heterozygotes are comparable to wild type, those of Trpm1+/tvrm27 mice are reduced by 32%. A similar reduction in the response of Trpm1+/tvrm27 DBCs to LY341495 or capsaicin is evident in whole cell recordings. These data indicate that the p.A1068T mutant TRPM1 acts as a dominant negative with respect to TRPM1 channel function. Furthermore, these data indicate that the number of functional TRPM1 channels at the DBC dendritic tips is a key factor in defining DBC response amplitude. The Trpm1tvrm27/tvrm27 mutant will be useful for elucidating the role of TRPM1 in DBC signal transduction, for determining how Trpm1 mutations impact central visual processing, and for evaluating experimental therapies for cCSNB. PMID:22896717

  5. Exploration of Structural and Functional Variations Owing to Point Mutations in α-NAGA.

    PubMed

    Meshach Paul, D; Rajasekaran, R

    2016-05-02

    Schindler disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused due to deficiency or defective activity of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (α-NAGA). Mutations in gene encoding α-NAGA cause wide range of diseases, characterized with mild to severe clinical features. Molecular effects of these mutations are yet to be explored in detail. Therefore, this study was focused on four missense mutations of α-NAGA namely, S160C, E325K, R329Q and R329W. Native and mutant structures of α-NAGA were analysed to determine geometrical deviations such as the contours of root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuation, percentage of residues in allowed regions of Ramachandran plot and solvent accessible surface area, using conformational sampling technique. Additionally, global energy-minimized structures of native and mutants were further analysed to compute their intra-molecular interactions, hydrogen bond dilution and distribution of secondary structure. In addition, docking studies were also performed to determine variations in binding energies between native and mutants. The deleterious effects of mutants were evident due to variations in their active site residues pertaining to spatial conformation and flexibility, comparatively. Hence, variations exhibited by mutants, namely S160C, E325K, R329Q and R329W to that of native, consequently, lead to the detrimental effects causing Schindler disease. This study computationally explains the underlying reasons for the pathogenesis of the disease, thereby aiding future researchers in drug development and disease management.

  6. Kanamycin-resistant alfalfa has a point mutation in the 16S plastid rRNA.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, D; LaFayette, P R; Barone, P; Veronesi, F; Parrott, W A

    2004-05-01

    Genes conferring resistance to kanamycin are frequently used to obtain transgenic plants as spontaneous resistance to kanamycin is not known to exist in higher plants. Nevertheless, mutations conferring kanamycin resistance have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, raising the question as to why kanamycin-resistant mutants have not been found in higher plants. While attempting plastid transformation of alfalfa, we obtained non-transgenic but kanamycin-resistant somatic embryos following 2 months of culture in the presence of 50 mg l(-1) kanamycin. Sequencing of the plastid DNA region corresponding to the decoding site of the 16S rRNA in ten independent resistant events revealed an A to C transversion at position 1357 of the 16S plastid rDNA, the same site at which an A to G conversion confers kanamycin resistance to C. reinhardtii by reducing the ability of the antibiotic to bind to its target site. All plants derived from the resistant embryos through additional cycles of somatic embryogenesis in the absence of kanamycin retained the mutant phenotype, suggesting that the mutation was homoplastomic. Resistant plants produced 85% less biomass than controls; their leaves were chlorotic during early development and over time slowly turned green. The absence of kanamycin- resistant mutants in higher plants might be explained by the requirement for a regeneration system capable of resulting in homoplastomic individuals, or it may be the result of the detrimental effect of the mutation on the phenotype.

  7. Phenotypic diversity of breast cancer-related mutations in metalloproteinase-disintegrin ADAM12.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yue; Duhachek-Muggy, Sara; Li, Hui; Zolkiewska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Six different somatic missense mutations in the human ADAM12 gene have been identified so far in breast cancer. Five of these mutations involve highly conserved residues in the extracellular domain of the transmembrane ADAM12-L protein. Two of these extracellular mutations, D301H and G479E, have been previously characterized in the context of mouse ADAM12. Three other mutations, T596A, R612Q, and G668A, have been reported more recently, and their effects on ADAM12-L protein structure/function are not known. Here, we show that ADAM12-L bearing the G668A mutation is largely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum in its nascent, full-length form, with an intact N-terminal pro-domain. The T596A and R612Q mutants are efficiently trafficked to the cell surface and proteolytically processed to remove their pro-domains. However, the T596A mutant shows decreased catalytic activity at the cell surface, while the R612Q mutant is fully active and comparable to the wild-type ADAM12-L. The D301H and G479E mutants, consistent with the corresponding D299H and G477E mutants of mouse ADAM12 described earlier, are not proteolytically processed and do not exhibit catalytic activity at the cell surface. Among all six breast cancer-associated mutations in ADAM12-L, mutations that preserve the activity--R612Q and L792F--occur in triple-negative breast cancers, while loss-of-function mutations--D301H, G479E, T596A, and G668A--are found in non-triple negative cancers. This apparent association between the catalytic activity of the mutants and the type of breast cancer supports a previously postulated role of an active ADAM12-L in the triple negative breast cancer disease.

  8. Galactosemia caused by a point mutation that activates cryptic donor splice site in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wadelius, C.; Lagerkvist, A. Uppsala Univ. ); Molin, A.K.; Larsson, A. ); Von Doebeln, U. )

    1993-08-01

    Galactosemia affects 1/84,000 in Sweden and is manifested in infancy when the child is exposed to galactose in the diet. If untreated there is a risk of severe early symptoms and, even with a lactose-free diet, late symptoms such as mental retardation and ovarial dysfunction may develop. In classical galactosemia, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) (EC 2.7.7.12) is defective and the normal cDNA sequence of this enzyme has been characterized. Recently eight mutations leading to galactosemia were published. Heparinized venous blood was drawn from a patient with classical galactosemia. In the cDNA from the patient examined, an insertion of 54 bp was found at position 1087. Amplification of the relevant genomic region of the patient's DNA was performed. Exon-intron boundaries and intronic sequences thus determined revealed that the 54-bp insertion was located immediately downstream of exon 10. It was further found that the patient was heterozygous for a point mutation, changing a C to a T (in 5 of 9 clones) at the second base in the intron downstream of the insertion. This alteration creates a sequence which, as well as the ordinary splice site, differs in only two positions from the consensus sequence. It was found that the mutation occurred in only one of the 20 alleles from galactosemic patients and in none of the 200 alleles from normal controls. The mutation is inherited from the mother, who also was found to express the 54-bp-long insertion at the mRNA level. Sequences from the 5[prime] end of the coding region were determined after genomic amplification, revealing a sequence identical to that reported. The mutation on the paternal allele has not been identified. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  9. A Human Disease-causing Point Mutation in Mitochondrial Threonyl-tRNA Synthetase Induces Both Structural and Functional Defects*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Liu, Ru-Juan; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria require all translational components, including aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), to complete organelle protein synthesis. Some aaRS mutations cause mitochondrial disorders, including human mitochondrial threonyl-tRNA synthetase (hmtThrRS) (encoded by TARS2), the P282L mutation of which causes mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. However, its catalytic and structural consequences remain unclear. Herein, we cloned TARS2 and purified the wild-type and P282L mutant hmtThrRS. hmtThrRS misactivates non-cognate Ser and uses post-transfer editing to clear erroneously synthesized products. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that the mutation induces a decrease in Thr activation, aminoacylation, and proofreading activities and a change in the protein structure and/or stability, which might cause reduced catalytic efficiency. We also identified a splicing variant of TARS2 mRNA lacking exons 8 and 9, the protein product of which is targeted into mitochondria. In HEK293T cells, the variant does not dimerize and cannot complement the ThrRS knock-out strain in yeast, suggesting that the truncated protein is inactive and might have a non-canonical function, as observed for other aaRS fragments. The present study describes the aminoacylation and editing properties of hmtThrRS, clarifies the molecular consequences of the P282L mutation, and shows that the yeast ThrRS-deletion model is suitable to test pathology-associated point mutations or alternative splicing variants of mammalian aaRS mRNAs. PMID:26811336

  10. Genome and transcriptome sequencing of lung cancers reveal diverse mutational and splicing events

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; Lee, William; Jiang, Zhaoshi; Chen, Zhongqiang; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Haverty, Peter M.; Gnad, Florian; Guan, Yinghui; Gilbert, Houston N.; Stinson, Jeremy; Klijn, Christiaan; Guillory, Joseph; Bhatt, Deepali; Vartanian, Steffan; Walter, Kimberly; Chan, Jocelyn; Holcomb, Thomas; Dijkgraaf, Peter; Johnson, Stephanie; Koeman, Julie; Minna, John D.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Stern, Howard M.; Hoeflich, Klaus P.; Wu, Thomas D.; Settleman, Jeff; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Gentleman, Robert C.; Neve, Richard M.; Stokoe, David; Modrusan, Zora; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Shames, David S.; Zhang, Zemin

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease in terms of both underlying genetic lesions and response to therapeutic treatments. We performed deep whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing on 19 lung cancer cell lines and three lung tumor/normal pairs. Overall, our data show that cell line models exhibit similar mutation spectra to human tumor samples. Smoker and never-smoker cancer samples exhibit distinguishable patterns of mutations. A number of epigenetic regulators, including KDM6A, ASH1L, SMARCA4, and ATAD2, are frequently altered by mutations or copy number changes. A systematic survey of splice-site mutations identified 106 splice site mutations associated with cancer specific aberrant splicing, including mutations in several known cancer-related genes. RAC1b, an isoform of the RAC1 GTPase that includes one additional exon, was found to be preferentially up-regulated in lung cancer. We further show that its expression is significantly associated with sensitivity to a MAP2K (MEK) inhibitor PD-0325901. Taken together, these data present a comprehensive genomic landscape of a large number of lung cancer samples and further demonstrate that cancer-specific alternative splicing is a widespread phenomenon that has potential utility as therapeutic biomarkers. The detailed characterizations of the lung cancer cell lines also provide genomic context to the vast amount of experimental data gathered for these lines over the decades, and represent highly valuable resources for cancer biology. PMID:23033341

  11. The identification of point mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients by using reverse-transcription PCR and the protein truncation test

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, R.J.; Bobrow, M.; Roberts, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    The protein truncation test (PTT) is a mutation-detection method that monitors the integrity of the open reading frame (ORF). More than 60% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) result from gross frameshifting deletions in the dystrophin gene that are detectable by multiplex PCR system. It has become apparent that virtually all of the remaining DMD mutations also disrupt the translational reading frame, making the PTT a logical next step toward a comprehensive strategy for the identification of all DMD mutations. We report here a pilot study involving 22 patients and describe the mutations characterized. These constitute 12 point mutations or small insertions/deletions and 4 gross rearrangements. We also have a remaining five patients in whom there does not appear to be mutation in the ORF. We believe that reverse-transcription-PCR/PTT is an efficient method by which to screen for small mutations in DMD patients with no deletion. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Diverse Functional Consequences of Mutations in the Na+/K+-ATPase α2-Subunit Causing Familial Hemiplegic Migraine Type 2*

    PubMed Central

    Tavraz, Neslihan N.; Friedrich, Thomas; Dürr, Katharina L.; Koenderink, Jan B.; Bamberg, Ernst; Freilinger, Tobias; Dichgans, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in ATP1A2, the gene coding for the Na+/K+-ATPase α2-subunit, are associated with both familial hemiplegic migraine and sporadic cases of hemiplegic migraine. In this study, we examined the functional properties of 11 ATP1A2 mutations associated with familial or sporadic hemiplegic migraine, including missense mutations (T263M, T376M, R383H, A606T, R763H, M829R, R834Q, R937P, and X1021R), a deletion mutant (del(K935-S940)ins(I)), and a frameshift mutation (S966fs). According to the Na+/K+-ATPase crystal structure, a subset of the mutated residues (Ala606, Arg763, Met829, and Arg834) is involved in important interdomain H-bond networks, and the C terminus of the enzyme, which is elongated by the X1021R mutation, has been implicated in voltage dependence and formation of a third Na+-binding site. Upon heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes, the analysis of electrogenic transport properties, Rb+ uptake, and protein expression revealed pronounced and markedly diverse functional alterations in all ATP1A2 mutants. Abnormalities included a complete loss of function (T376M), impaired plasma membrane expression (del(K935-S940)ins(I) and S966fs), and altered apparent affinities for extracellular cations or reduced enzyme turnover (R383H, A606T, R763H, R834Q, and X1021R). In addition, changes in the voltage dependence of pump currents and the increased rate constants of the voltage jump-induced redistribution between E1P and E2P states were observed. Thus, mutations that disrupt distinct interdomain H-bond patterns can cause abnormal conformational flexibility and exert long range consequences on apparent cation affinities or voltage dependence. Of interest, the X1021R mutation severely impaired voltage dependence and kinetics of Na+-translocating partial reactions, corroborating the critical role of the C terminus of Na+/K+-ATPase in these processes. PMID:18728015

  13. Gene Coexpression Analyses Differentiate Networks Associated with Diverse Cancers Harboring TP53 Missense or Null Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oros Klein, Kathleen; Oualkacha, Karim; Lafond, Marie-Hélène; Bhatnagar, Sahir; Tonin, Patricia N.; Greenwood, Celia M. T.

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of solid cancers, missense mutations in the well-established TP53 tumor suppressor gene may lead to the presence of a partially-functioning protein molecule, whereas mutations affecting the protein encoding reading frame, often referred to as null mutations, result in the absence of p53 protein. Both types of mutations have been observed in the same cancer type. As the resulting tumor biology may be quite different between these two groups, we used RNA-sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) from four different cancers with poor prognosis, namely ovarian, breast, lung and skin cancers, to compare the patterns of coexpression of genes in tumors grouped according to their TP53 missense or null mutation status. We used Weighted Gene Coexpression Network analysis (WGCNA) and a new test statistic built on differences between groups in the measures of gene connectivity. For each cancer, our analysis identified a set of genes showing differential coexpression patterns between the TP53 missense- and null mutation-carrying groups that was robust to the choice of the tuning parameter in WGCNA. After comparing these sets of genes across the four cancers, one gene (KIR3DL2) consistently showed differential coexpression patterns between the null and missense groups. KIR3DL2 is known to play an important role in regulating the immune response, which is consistent with our observation that this gene's strongly-correlated partners implicated many immune-related pathways. Examining mutation-type-related changes in correlations between sets of genes may provide new insight into tumor biology. PMID:27536319

  14. Point mutations in firefly luciferase C-domain demonstrate its significance in green color of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Modestova, Yulia; Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2014-09-01

    Firefly luciferase is a two-domain enzyme that catalyzes the bioluminescent reaction of firefly luciferin oxidation. Color of the emitted light depends on the structure of the enzyme, yet the exact color-tuning mechanism remains unknown by now, and the role of the C-domain in it is rarely discussed, because a very few color-shifting mutations in the C-domain were described. Recently we reported a strong red-shifting mutation E457K in the C-domain; the bioluminescence spectra of this enzyme were independent of temperature or pH. In the present study we investigated the role of the residue E457 in the enzyme using the Luciola mingrelica luciferase with a thermostabilized N-domain as a parent enzyme for site-directed mutagenesis. We obtained a set of mutants and studied their catalytic properties, thermal stability and bioluminescence spectra. Experimental spectra were represented as a sum of two components (bioluminescence spectra of putative "red" and "green" emitters); λmax of these components were constant for all the mutants, but the ratio of these emitters was defined by temperature and mutations in the C-domain. We suggest that each emitter is stabilized by a specific conformation of the active site; thus, enzymes with two forms of the active site coexist in the reactive media. The rigid structure of the C-domain is crucial for maintaining the conformation corresponding to the "green" emitter. We presume that the emitters are the keto- and enol forms of oxyluciferin.

  15. Identification of a point mutation impairing the binding between aquaporin-4 and neuromyelitis optica autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Simone, Laura; Rosito, Stefania; Alberga, Domenico; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Nicolotti, Orazio; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria; Nicchia, Grazia Paola

    2014-10-31

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies (NMO-IgGs) against supra-molecular assemblies of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), known as orthogonal array of particles (OAPs). NMO-IgGs have a polyclonal origin and recognize different conformational epitopes involving extracellular AQP4 loops A, C, and E. Here we hypothesize a pivotal role for AQP4 transmembrane regions (TMs) in epitope assembly. On the basis of multialignment analysis, mutagenesis, NMO-IgG binding, and cytotoxicity assay, we have disclosed the key role of aspartate 69 (Asp(69)) of TM2 for NMO-IgG epitope assembly. Mutation of Asp(69) to histidine severely impairs NMO-IgG binding for 85.7% of the NMO patient sera analyzed here. Although Blue Native-PAGE, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and water transport assays indicate that the OAP Asp(69) mutant is similar in structure and function to the wild type, molecular dynamic simulations have revealed that the D(69)H mutation has the effect of altering the structural rearrangements of extracellular loop A. In conclusion, Asp(69) is crucial for the spatial control of loop A, the particular molecular conformation of which enables the assembly of NMO-IgG epitopes. These findings provide additional clues for new strategies for NMO treatment and a wealth of information to better approach NMO pathogenesis.

  16. Identification of a Point Mutation Impairing the Binding between Aquaporin-4 and Neuromyelitis Optica Autoantibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Simone, Laura; Rosito, Stefania; Alberga, Domenico; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Nicolotti, Orazio; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria; Nicchia, Grazia Paola

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies (NMO-IgGs) against supra-molecular assemblies of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), known as orthogonal array of particles (OAPs). NMO-IgGs have a polyclonal origin and recognize different conformational epitopes involving extracellular AQP4 loops A, C, and E. Here we hypothesize a pivotal role for AQP4 transmembrane regions (TMs) in epitope assembly. On the basis of multialignment analysis, mutagenesis, NMO-IgG binding, and cytotoxicity assay, we have disclosed the key role of aspartate 69 (Asp69) of TM2 for NMO-IgG epitope assembly. Mutation of Asp69 to histidine severely impairs NMO-IgG binding for 85.7% of the NMO patient sera analyzed here. Although Blue Native-PAGE, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and water transport assays indicate that the OAP Asp69 mutant is similar in structure and function to the wild type, molecular dynamic simulations have revealed that the D69H mutation has the effect of altering the structural rearrangements of extracellular loop A. In conclusion, Asp69 is crucial for the spatial control of loop A, the particular molecular conformation of which enables the assembly of NMO-IgG epitopes. These findings provide additional clues for new strategies for NMO treatment and a wealth of information to better approach NMO pathogenesis. PMID:25239624

  17. Diversity and Convergence of Sodium Channel Mutations Involved in Resistance to Pyrethroids

    PubMed Central

    Rinkevich, Frank D.; Du, Yuzhe; Dong, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides target voltage-gated sodium channels, which are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system. The intensive use of pyrethroids in controlling arthropod pests and disease vectors has led to many instances of pyrethroid resistance around the globe. In the past two decades, studies have identified a large number of sodium channel mutations that are associated with resistance to pyrethroids. The purpose of this review is to summarize both common and unique sodium channel mutations that have been identified in arthropod pests of importance to agriculture or human health. Identification of these mutations provides valuable molecular markers for resistance monitoring in the field and helped the discovery of the elusive pyrethroid receptor site(s) on the sodium channel. PMID:24019556

  18. A single point mutation of the influenza C virus glycoprotein (HEF) changes the viral receptor-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Szepanski, S; Gross, H J; Brossmer, R; Klenk, H D; Herrler, G

    1992-05-01

    From strain JHB/1/66 of influenza C virus a mutant was derived with a change in the cell tropism. The mutant was able to grow in a subline of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK II) which is resistant to infection by the parent virus due to a lack of receptors. Inactivation of cellular receptors by either neuraminidase or acetylesterase and generation of receptors by resialylation of cells with N-acetyl-9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2) indicated that 9-O-acetylated sialic acid is a receptor determinant for both parent and mutant virus. However, the mutant required less Neu5,9Ac2 on the cell surface for virus attachment than the parent virus. The increased binding efficiency enabled the mutant to infect cells with a low content of 9-O-acetylated sialic acid which were resistant to the parent virus. By comparing the nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein (HEF) genes of the parent and the mutant virus only a single point mutation could be identified on the mutant gene. This mutation at nucleotide position 872 causes an amino acid exchange from threonine to isoleucine at position 284 on the amino acid sequence. Sequence similarity with a stretch of amino acids involved in the receptor-binding pocket of the influenza A hemagglutinin suggests that the mutation site on the influenza C glycoprotein (HEF) is part of the receptor-binding site.

  19. Point mutation of adenosine triphosphate-binding motif generated rigor kinesin that selectively blocks anterograde lysosome membrane transport

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In the study of motor proteins, the molecular mechanism of mechanochemical coupling, as well as the cellular role of these proteins, is an important issue. To assess these questions we introduced cDNA of wild-type and site-directed mutant kinesin heavy chains into fibroblasts, and analyzed the behavior of the recombinant proteins and the mechanisms involved in organelle transports. Overexpression of wild-type kinesin significantly promoted elongation of cellular processes. Wild-type kinesin accumulated at the tips of the long processes, whereas the kinesin mutants, which contained either a T93N- or T93I mutation in the ATP-binding motif, tightly bound to microtubules in the center of the cells. These mutant kinesins could bind to microtubules in vitro, but could not dissociate from them even in the presence of ATP, and did not support microtubule motility in vitro, thereby indicating rigor-type mutations. Retrograde transport from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum, as well as lysosome dispersion, was shown to be a microtubule-dependent, plus-end- directed movement. The latter was selectively blocked in the rigor- mutant cells, although the microtubule minus-end-directed motion of lysosomes was not affected. We found the point mutations that make kinesin motor in strong binding state with microtubules in vitro and showed that this mutant causes a dominant effect that selectively blocks anterograde lysosome membrane transports in vivo. PMID:7490281

  20. Building diversity in REU programs through MIMSUP at the Shannon Point Marine Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, B. L.; Sulkin, S.

    2011-12-01

    The road to a career in the ocean sciences can be long and challenging, particularly for students from racial/ethnic groups underrepresented in the field. For the past 21 years, faculty and staff at the Shannon Point Marine Center, Western Washington University have annually administered the NSF-funded Multicultural Initiative in the Marine Sciences: Undergraduate Participation (MIMSUP) program. The goal of MIMSUP is to increase diversity in the ocean sciences by moving students though their undergraduate programs into advanced education and leadership positions in the field. Helping students find positions in REU and other focused research programs is an important step along this path. Primary obstacles for the students include 1) a lack of knowledge about opportunities available to them, 2) a lack of experience preparing quality applications and 3) a lack of confidence in their ability to compete for positions. Focused mentoring, with an emphasis on skills development is important in helping outstanding, though inexperienced, students find and excel in REU programs.

  1. Impacts of two point mutations of RPE65 from Leber's congenital amaurosis on the stability, subcellular localization and isomerohydrolase activity of RPE65.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Takahashi, Yusuke; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2006-07-24

    RPE65, a membrane-associated protein in the retinal pigment epithelium, is the isomerohydrolase essential for regenerating 11-cis retinal, the chromophore for visual pigments. RPE65 mutations are associated with inherited retinal dystrophies. Here we report that single point mutations of RPE65, Y144D and P363T, identified in patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), significantly decreased the stability of RPE65. Moreover, these mutations altered subcellular localization of RPE65 and abolished its isomerohydrolase activity. These observations suggest that the decreased protein stability and altered subcellular localization of RPE65 may represent a mechanism for these mutations to lead to vision loss in LCA patients.

  2. Distance from sub-Saharan Africa predicts mutational load in diverse human genomes.

    PubMed

    Henn, Brenna M; Botigué, Laura R; Peischl, Stephan; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Lipatov, Mikhail; Maples, Brian K; Martin, Alicia R; Musharoff, Shaila; Cann, Howard; Snyder, Michael P; Excoffier, Laurent; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-01-26

    The Out-of-Africa (OOA) dispersal ∼ 50,000 y ago is characterized by a series of founder events as modern humans expanded into multiple continents. Population genetics theory predicts an increase of mutational load in populations undergoing serial founder effects during range expansions. To test this hypothesis, we have sequenced full genomes and high-coverage exomes from seven geographically divergent human populations from Namibia, Congo, Algeria, Pakistan, Cambodia, Siberia, and Mexico. We find that individual genomes vary modestly in the overall number of predicted deleterious alleles. We show via spatially explicit simulations that the observed distribution of deleterious allele frequencies is consistent with the OOA dispersal, particularly under a model where deleterious mutations are recessive. We conclude that there is a strong signal of purifying selection at conserved genomic positions within Africa, but that many predicted deleterious mutations have evolved as if they were neutral during the expansion out of Africa. Under a model where selection is inversely related to dominance, we show that OOA populations are likely to have a higher mutation load due to increased allele frequencies of nearly neutral variants that are recessive or partially recessive.

  3. Distance from sub-Saharan Africa predicts mutational load in diverse human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Brenna M.; Botigué, Laura R.; Peischl, Stephan; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Lipatov, Mikhail; Maples, Brian K.; Martin, Alicia R.; Musharoff, Shaila; Cann, Howard; Snyder, Michael P.; Excoffier, Laurent; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2016-01-01

    The Out-of-Africa (OOA) dispersal ∼50,000 y ago is characterized by a series of founder events as modern humans expanded into multiple continents. Population genetics theory predicts an increase of mutational load in populations undergoing serial founder effects during range expansions. To test this hypothesis, we have sequenced full genomes and high-coverage exomes from seven geographically divergent human populations from Namibia, Congo, Algeria, Pakistan, Cambodia, Siberia, and Mexico. We find that individual genomes vary modestly in the overall number of predicted deleterious alleles. We show via spatially explicit simulations that the observed distribution of deleterious allele frequencies is consistent with the OOA dispersal, particularly under a model where deleterious mutations are recessive. We conclude that there is a strong signal of purifying selection at conserved genomic positions within Africa, but that many predicted deleterious mutations have evolved as if they were neutral during the expansion out of Africa. Under a model where selection is inversely related to dominance, we show that OOA populations are likely to have a higher mutation load due to increased allele frequencies of nearly neutral variants that are recessive or partially recessive. PMID:26712023

  4. Genotyping of Intron Inversions and Point Mutations in Exon 14 of the FVIII Gene in Iranian Azeri Turkish Families with Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Shekari Khaniani, Mahmoud; Ebrahimi, Abdollah; Daraei, Setareh; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori

    2016-12-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a variety of mutations that are distributed throughout the large FVIII gene (F8). The most common mutations in studied populations with severe HA are introns 22 and 1 inversions, gross exon deletions and point mutations in exon 14. The aim of this study was to define the frequency of these common mutations in Iranian population of Azeri Turkish in North West of Iran. Fifty patients with severe HA and forty-three female potential carriers were genotyped by inverse shifting polymerase chain reaction (IS-PCR), long-range PCR, multiplex PCR, and sequencing methods for the detection of Intron 22 and 1 inversions, gross exon deletions, and exon 14 point mutations, respectively. F8 intron 22 inversion was detected in 22 (44 %) out of 50 patients. Moreover, we detected one intron 1 inversion (2 %), and one point mutation in exon 14 (2 %). In this population, 52 % of the patients with hemophilia A did not show to carry a mutation in the analyzed regions by three mentioned methods. F8 intron 22 inversion was the major causative mutation in nearly 50 % of severe HA cases in an Azerbaijani Turkish population, which is similar to the incidence of other populations. IS-PCR is a robust, rapid, efficient, and cost-effective method for the genetic analysis of patients with severe HA and for HA carrier detection, especially in developing countries.

  5. Positive fragile X microsatellite associations point to a common mechanism of dynamic mutation evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Zhong, N.; Dobkin, C.

    1996-03-01

    We recently reported that the size of fragile X gene (FMR1) triplet repeats and two nearby microsatellites show positive allele-size associations. The larger alleles of microsatellite DXS548, located {approximately}150 kb proximal to the FMR1 CGG repeat, and of FRAXAC1 (AC1), located 7 kb proximal to the FMR1 CGG repeat, tend to occur together, and smaller alleles also tend to occur together. Also, fragile X chromosomes are more commonly found on the larger combined microsatellite-allele haplotypes. We now have extended these observations to include two other nearby repeats, FRAXAC2 (AC2), a complex three-part polymorphism located 12 kb distal, and the FRAXE triplet repeat, located 600 kb distal. We divided the chromosomes into controls with FMR1 repeats of <60 and fragile X chromosomes with repeats {>=}60, since FMR1 alleles with repeats {>=}60 show high intergenerational instability. In the 133 controls, previously analyzed for AGG interspersions, and in 119 fragile X chromosomes, we found that these repeats show nonrandom size associations. To describe this numerically, we calculated correlation coefficients for the repeat lengths. These repeats showed significantly positive correlations with each other. Although FRAXE alleles showed no correlation with the control repeats, they did have positive correlations with fragile X chromosome microsatellites (AC1 and AC2 but not DXS548), which may reflect the larger recombinational distances involved and the possibly more recent origin of the fragile X mutations. The correlations tended to be higher for the number of 3{prime} pure CGGs than for total FMR1 repeats in controls. These findings strengthen our hypothesis that there may be a common underlying mutational mechanism that simultaneously affects these repeat loci. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Point mutations at the catalytic site of PCSK9 inhibit folding, autoprocessing, and interaction with the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Colin W; Fraley, Cara V; Elowe, Nadine H; Culyba, Elizabeth K; Lemke, Christopher T; Hubbard, Brian K; Kaushik, Virendar K; Daniels, Douglas S

    2016-11-01

    Circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is regulated by membrane-bound LDL receptor (LDLr). Upon LDLc and LDLr interaction the complex is internalized by the cell, leading to LDLc degradation and LDLr recycling back to the cell surface. The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) protein regulates this cycling. PCSK9 is secreted from the cell and binds LDLr. When the complex is internalized, PCSK9 prevents LDLr from shuttling back to the surface and instead targets it for degradation. PCSK9 is a serine protease expressed as a zymogen that undergoes autoproteolysis, though the two resulting protein domains remain stably associated as a heterodimer. This PCSK9 autoprocessing is required for the protein to be secreted from the cell. To date, direct analysis of PCSK9 autoprocessing has proven challenging, as no catalytically active zymogen has been isolated. A PCSK9 loss-of-function point mutation (Q152H) that reduces LDLc levels two-fold was identified in a patient population. LDLc reduction was attributed to a lack of PCSK9(Q152H) autoprocessing preventing secretion of the protein. We have isolated a zymogen form of PCSK9, PCSK9(Q152H), and a related mutation (Q152N), that can undergo slow autoproteolysis. We show that the point mutation prevents the formation of the mature form of PCSK9 by hindering folding, reducing the rate of autoproteolysis, and destabilizing the heterodimeric form of the protein. In addition, we show that the zymogen form of PCSK9 adopts a structure that is distinct from the processed form and is unable to bind a mimetic peptide based on the EGF-A domain of the LDLr.

  7. [Effectiveness of expression of tdh gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus depends on two point mutations in promoter region].

    PubMed

    Shalu, O A; Pisanov, R V; Monakhova, E V

    2012-12-01

    A molecular-biological study of the clinical strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain genes of thermostable direct hemolysin Tdh) and Tdh-related hemolysin (Trh). Using Southern blot hybridization, it is shown that genomes of strains that carry determinants of both hemolysins (tdh(+)-trh+) represent a single copy, whereas in tdh2+RH+ strains, there are two copies (tdh1 and tdh2). All of the examined tdh+trh+ and some of the tdh+trh strains either did not express the tdh gene or did not express the tdh gene (Kanagawa negative or KP-) or expressed it weakly and not often (Kanagawa intermediate, KP+), unlike several Kanagawa positive tdh+trh- strains. To establish the reasons for KP -/+ phenotypes, tdh, tdh11, and tdh2 genes of 13 strains isolated in Russia and neighboring foreign countries were sequenced, followed by the biotransformation analysis of the obtained sequences, as well as a comparison with those of a number of strains presented in GenBank. The results revealed that the weak expression of the tdh gene depends, not only on one point mutation in the promoter region (substitution of A for G in the -35 region), as was thought previously, but also on the second substitution (G for A in the -3 position relative to the -10 sequence), which is quite sufficient when the former is absent. Therefore, the reversion of KP -/+ strains that contain one of these substitutions can take place as a result of a single reverse point mutation, and they should be considered potentially dangerous. Strains that contain both substitutions may revert with lesser probability because, in this case, both mutations are necessary.

  8. Structural analysis of chloroplast DNA in Prunus (Rosaceae): evolution, genetic diversity and unequal mutations.

    PubMed

    Katayama, H; Uematsu, C

    2005-11-01

    In order to understand the evolutionary aspects of the chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) structures in Rosaceous plants, a physical map of peach (Prunus persica cv. Hakuhou) cpDNA was constructed. Fourteen lambda phage clones which covered the entire sequence of the peach cpDNA were digested by restriction enzymes (SalI, XhoI, BamHI, SacI, and PstI) used singly or in combination. The molecular size of peach cpDNA was estimated to be about 152 kb. The gene order and contents were revealed to be equivalent to those of standard type of angiosperms by the localization of 31 genes on the physical map. Eighteen accessions from 14 Prunus species (P. persica, P. mira, P. davidiana, P. cerasis, P. cerasifera, P. domestica, P. insititia, P. spinosa, P. salicina, P. maritima, P. armeniaca, P. mume, P. tomentosa, P. zippeliana, and P. salicifolia) and one interspecific hybrid were used for the structural analysis of cpDNAs. Seventeen mutations (16 recognition site changes and one length mutation) were found in the cpDNA of these 18 accessions by RFLP analysis allowing a classification into 11 genome types. Although the base substitution rate in the recognition site (100p = 0.72) of cpDNA in Prunus was similar to that of other plants, i.e., Triticum-Aegilops, Brassica, and Pisum, it differed from Pyrus (100p = 0.15) in Rosaceae. Seven mutations including one length mutation were densely located within a region of about 9.1 kb which includes psbA and atpA in the left border of a large single-copy region of Prunus cpDNAs. The length mutation was detected only in P. persica and consisted of a 277 bp deletion which occurred in a spacer region between the trnS and trnG genes within the 9.1 kb region. Additional fragment length mutations (insertion/deletion), which were not detected by RFLP analysis, were revealed by PCR and sequence analyses in P. zippeliana and P. salicifolia. All of these length mutations occurred within the 9.1 kb region between psbA and atpA. This region could be an intra

  9. Inactivation of erythropoietin receptor function by point mutations in a region having homology with other cytokine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Miura, O; Cleveland, J L; Ihle, J N

    1993-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) contains a region, proximal to the transmembrane domain, that is essential for function and has homology with other members of the cytokine receptor family. To explore the functional significance of this region and to identify critical residues, we introduced several amino acid substitutions and examined their effects on erythropoietin-induced mitogenesis, tyrosine phosphorylation, and expression of immediate-early (c-fos, c-myc, and egr-1) and early (ornithine decarboxylase and T-cell receptor gamma) genes in interleukin-3-dependent cell lines. Amino acid substitution of W-282, which is strictly conserved at the middle portion of the homology region, completely abolished all the functions of the EpoR. Point mutation at L-306 or E-307, both of which are in a conserved LEVL motif, drastically impaired the function of the receptor in all assays. Other point mutations, introduced into less conserved amino acid residues, did not significantly impair the function of the receptor. These results demonstrate that conserved amino acid residues in this domain of the EpoR are required for mitogenesis, stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylation, and induction of immediate-early and early genes. Images PMID:8382775

  10. Genetic diversity estimates point to immediate efforts for conserving the endangered Tibetan sheep of India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rekha; Kumar, Brijesh; Arora, Reena; Ahlawat, Sonika; Mishra, A.K.; Tantia, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan is a valuable Himalayan sheep breed classified as endangered. Knowledge of the level and distribution of genetic diversity in Tibetan sheep is important for designing conservation strategies for their sustainable survival and to preserve their evolutionary potential. Thus, for the first time, genetic variability in the Tibetan population was accessed with twenty five inter-simple sequence repeat markers. All the microsatellites were polymorphic and a total of 148 alleles were detected across these loci. The observed number of alleles across all the loci was more than the effective number of alleles and ranged from 3 (BM6506) to 11 (BM6526) with 5.920 ± 0.387 mean number of alleles per locus. The average observed heterozygosity was less than the expected heterozygosity. The observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.150 (BM1314) to 0.9 (OarCP20) with an overall mean of 0.473 ± 0.044 and from 0.329 (BM8125) to 0.885 (BM6526) with an overall mean 0.672 ± 0.030, respectively. The lower heterozygosity pointed towards diminished genetic diversity in the population. Thirteen microsatellite loci exhibited significant (P < 0.05) departures from the Hardy–Weinberg proportions in the population. The estimate of heterozygote deficiency varied from − 0.443 (OarCP20) to 0.668 (OarFCB128) with a mean positive value of 0.302 ± 0.057. A normal ‘L’ shaped distribution of mode-shift test and non-significant heterozygote excess on the basis of different models suggested absence of recent bottleneck in the existing Tibetan population. In view of the declining population of Tibetan sheep (less than 250) in the breeding tract, need of the hour is immediate scientific management of the population so as to increase the population hand in hand with retaining the founder alleles to the maximum possible extent. PMID:27014586

  11. Low nucleotide diversity for the expanded organelle and nuclear genomes of Volvox carteri supports the mutational-hazard hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, David Roy; Lee, Robert W

    2010-10-01

    The noncoding-DNA content of organelle and nuclear genomes can vary immensely. Both adaptive and nonadaptive explanations for this variation have been proposed. This study addresses a nonadaptive explanation called the mutational-hazard hypothesis and applies it to the mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear genomes of the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri. Given the expanded architecture of the V. carteri organelle and nuclear genomes (60-85% noncoding DNA), the mutational-hazard hypothesis would predict them to have less silent-site nucleotide diversity (π(silent)) than their more compact counterparts from other eukaryotes-ultimately reflecting differences in 2N(g)μ (twice the effective number of genes per locus in the population times the mutation rate). The data presented here support this prediction: Analyses of mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear DNAs from seven V. carteri forma nagariensis geographical isolates reveal low values of π(silent) (0.00038, 0.00065, and 0.00528, respectively), much lower values than those previously observed for the more compact organelle and nuclear DNAs of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (a close relative of V. carteri). We conclude that the large noncoding-DNA content of the V. carteri genomes is best explained by the mutational-hazard hypothesis and speculate that the shift from unicellular to multicellular life in the ancestor that gave rise to V. carteri contributed to a low V. carteri population size and thus a reduced 2N(g)μ. Complete mitochondrial and plastid genome maps for V. carteri are also presented and compared with those of C. reinhardtii.

  12. Construction of a novel bifunctional biogenic amine receptor by two point mutations of the H2-histamine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    DelValle, J.; Gantz, I.; Wang, L.; Guo, Y. J.; Munzert, G.; Tashiro, T.; Konda, Y.; Yamada, T.

    1995-01-01

    -adrenergic receptor. L cells transfected with the Ala186-Ser187 mutant H2 receptor also responded to epinephrine in a cimetidine and propranolol inhibitable manner. CONCLUSIONS: We converted the H2-histamine receptor into a bifunctional one that has characteristics of both histamine and adrenergic receptors by two simple mutations. These results support the hypothesis that ligand specificity is determined by only a few key points on a receptor regardless of the structure of the remainder of the molecule. Our studies have important implications on the design of pharmacological agents targeted for action at physiological receptors. PMID:8529106

  13. Genetic diversity and mutation of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (Newcastle disease virus) in wild birds and evidence for intercontinental spread.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Andrew M; Reeves, Andrew B; Ogawa, Haruko; Ip, Hon S; Imai, Kunitoshi; Bui, Vuong Nghia; Yamaguchi, Emi; Silko, Nikita Y; Afonso, Claudio L

    2013-12-01

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), or Newcastle disease virus, is the causative agent of Newcastle disease, one of the most economically important diseases for poultry production worldwide and a cause of periodic epizootics in wild birds in North America. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity of APMV-1 isolated from migratory birds sampled in Alaska, Japan, and Russia and assessed the evidence for intercontinental virus spread using phylogenetic methods. Additionally, we predicted viral virulence using deduced amino acid residues for the fusion protein cleavage site and estimated mutation rates for the fusion gene of class I and class II migratory bird isolates. All 73 isolates sequenced as part of this study were most closely related to virus genotypes previously reported for wild birds; however, five class II genotype I isolates formed a monophyletic clade exhibiting previously unreported genetic diversity, which met criteria for the designation of a new sub-genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of wild-bird isolates provided evidence for intercontinental virus spread, specifically viral lineages of APMV-1 class II genotype I sub-genotypes Ib and Ic. This result supports migratory bird movement as a possible mechanism for the redistribution of APMV-1. None of the predicted deduced amino acid motifs for the fusion protein cleavage site of APMV-1 strains isolated from migratory birds in Alaska, Japan, and Russia were consistent with those of previously identified virulent viruses. These data therefore provide no support for these strains contributing to the emergence of avian pathogens. The estimated mutation rates for fusion genes of class I and class II wild-bird isolates were faster than those reported previously for non-virulent APMV-1 strains. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into the diversity, spread, and evolution of APMV-1 in wild birds.

  14. Genetic diversity and mutation of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (Newcastle disease virus) in wild birds and evidence for intercontinental spread

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew B.; Ogawa, Haruko; Ip, Hon S.; Imai, Kunitoshi; Bui, V. N.; Yamaguchi, Emi; Silko, N. Y.; Afonso, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), or Newcastle disease virus, is the causative agent of Newcastle disease, one of the most economically important diseases for poultry production worldwide and a cause of periodic epizootics in wild birds in North America. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity of APMV-1 isolated from migratory birds sampled in Alaska, Japan, and Russia and assessed the evidence for intercontinental virus spread using phylogenetic methods. Additionally, we predicted viral virulence using deduced amino acid residues for the fusion protein cleavage site and estimated mutation rates for the fusion gene of class I and class II migratory bird isolates. All 73 isolates sequenced as part of this study were most closely related to virus genotypes previously reported for wild birds; however, five class II genotype I isolates formed a monophyletic clade exhibiting previously unreported genetic diversity, which met criteria for the designation of a new sub-genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of wild-bird isolates provided evidence for intercontinental virus spread, specifically viral lineages of APMV-1 class II genotype I sub-genotypes Ib and Ic. This result supports migratory bird movement as a possible mechanism for the redistribution of APMV-1. None of the predicted deduced amino acid motifs for the fusion protein cleavage site of APMV-1 strains isolated from migratory birds in Alaska, Japan, and Russia were consistent with those of previously identified virulent viruses. These data therefore provide no support for these strains contributing to the emergence of avian pathogens. The estimated mutation rates for fusion genes of class I and class II wild-bird isolates were faster than those reported previously for non-virulent APMV-1 strains. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into the diversity, spread, and evolution of APMV-1 in wild birds.

  15. A point mutation in transthyretin increases affinity for thyroxine and produces euthyroid hyperthyroxinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Moses, A C; Rosen, H N; Moller, D E; Tsuzaki, S; Haddow, J E; Lawlor, J; Liepnieks, J J; Nichols, W C; Benson, M D

    1990-01-01

    In a family expressing euthyroid hyperthyroxinemia, an increased association of plasma thyroxine (T4) with transthyretin (TTR) is transmitted by autosomal dominant inheritance and is secondary to a mutant TTR molecule with increased affinity for T4. Eight individuals spanning three generations exhibited the abnormality. Although five of eight individuals had elevated total T4 concentrations, all affected individuals were clinically euthyroid and all had normal free T4 levels. Purified TTR from the propositus had an affinity for 125I-T4 three times that of control TTR. Exons 2, 3, and 4 (representing greater than 97% of the coding sequence) of the TTR gene of DNA prepared from the propositus' peripheral blood leukocytes were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and were sequenced after subcloning. Exons 2 and 3 were indistinguishable from normal. In 50% of clones amplified from exon 4, a substitution of adenine (ACC) for guanine (GCC) in codon 109 resulted in the replacement of threonine-for-alanine, a mutation confirmed by amino acid sequencing of tryptic peptides derived from purified plasma TTR. The adenine-for-guanine substitution abolishes one of two Fnu 4H I restriction sites in exon 4. PCR amplification of exon 4 of TTR and restriction digestion with Fnu 4H I confirmed that five affected family members with increased binding of 125I-T4 to TTR are heterozygous for the threonine 109 substitution that increases the affinity of this abnormal TTR for T4. Images PMID:1979335

  16. Predicting the impact of deleterious single point mutations in SMAD gene family using structural bioinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    George Priya Doss, C; Nagasundaram, N; Tanwar, Himani

    2012-06-01

    Functional alteration in SMAD proteins leads to dis-regulation of its mechanism results in possibilities of high risk diseases like fibrosis, cancer, juvenile polyposis etc. Studying single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in SMAD genes helps understand the malfunction of these proteins. In this study, we focused on deleterious effects of nsSNPs in both structural and functional level using publically available bioinformatics tools. We have mainly focused on identifying deleterious nsSNPs in both structural and functional level in SMAD genes by using SIFT, PolyPhen, SNPs&GO, I-Mutant 3.0, MUpro and PANTHER. Structure analysis was carried out with the major mutation that occurred in the native protein coded by SMAD genes and its amino acid positions (R358W, K306S, R310G, S433R and R361C). SRide was used to check the stability of the native and mutant modelled proteins. In addition, we used MAPPER to identify SNPs present in transcription factor binding sites. These findings demonstrate that the in silico approaches can be used efficiently to identify potential candidate SNPs in large scale analysis.

  17. Activation of diverse signaling pathways by oncogenic PIK3CA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinyan; Renuse, Santosh; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A.; Zahari, Muhammad Saddiq; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kim, Min-Sik; Nirujogi, Raja S.; Mohseni, Morassa; Kumar, Praveen; Raju, Rajesh; Zhong, Jun; Yang, Jian; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Jeong, Jun-Seop; Newman, Robert; Powers, Maureen A.; Somani, Babu Lal; Gabrielson, Edward; Sukumar, Saraswati; Stearns, Vered; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng; Vogelstein, Bert; Park, Ben Ho; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    The PIK3CA gene is frequently mutated in human cancers. Here we carry out a SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis using isogenic knockin cell lines containing ‘driver’ oncogenic mutations of PIK3CA to dissect the signaling mechanisms responsible for oncogenic phenotypes induced by mutant PIK3CA. From 8,075 unique phosphopeptides identified, we observe that aberrant activation of PI3K pathway leads to increased phosphorylation of a surprisingly wide variety of kinases and downstream signaling networks. Here, by integrating phosphoproteomic data with human protein microarray-based AKT1 kinase assays, we discover and validate six novel AKT1 substrates, including cortactin. Through mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of cortactin by AKT1 is important for mutant PI3K enhanced cell migration and invasion. Our study describes a quantitative and global approach for identifying mutation-specific signaling events and for discovering novel signaling molecules as readouts of pathway activation or potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25247763

  18. Comparison of mitochondrial mutation spectra in ageing human colonic epithelium and disease: absence of evidence for purifying selection in somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Laura C; Elson, Joanna L; Nooteboom, Marco; Grady, John P; Taylor, Geoffrey A; Taylor, Robert W; Mathers, John C; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; Turnbull, Doug M

    2012-01-01

    Human ageing has been predicted to be caused by the accumulation of molecular damage in cells and tissues. Somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been documented in a number of ageing tissues and have been shown to be associated with cellular mitochondrial dysfunction. It is unknown whether there are selective constraints, which have been shown to occur in the germline, on the occurrence and expansion of these mtDNA mutations within individual somatic cells. Here we compared the pattern and spectrum of mutations observed in ageing human colon to those observed in the general population (germline variants) and those associated with primary mtDNA disease. The pathogenicity of the protein encoding mutations was predicted using a computational programme, MutPred, and the scores obtained for the three groups compared. We show that the mutations associated with ageing are randomly distributed throughout the genome, are more frequently non-synonymous or frameshift mutations than the general population, and are significantly more pathogenic than population variants. Mutations associated with primary mtDNA disease were significantly more pathogenic than ageing or population mutations. These data provide little evidence for any selective constraints on the occurrence and expansion of mtDNA mutations in somatic cells of the human colon during human ageing in contrast to germline mutations seen in the general population.

  19. Extremely high genetic diversity in a single tumor points to prevalence of non-Darwinian cell evolution

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Shaoping; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Zuyu; Yang, Fang; Li, Yawei; Lin, Pei; Chen, Ke; Dong, Lili; Cao, Lihua; Tao, Yong; Hao, Lingtong; Chen, Qingjian; Gong, Qiang; Wu, Dafei; Li, Wenjie; Zhao, Wenming; Tian, Xiuyun; Hao, Chunyi; Hungate, Eric A.; Catenacci, Daniel V. T.; Hudson, Richard R.; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Lu, Xuemei; Wu, Chung-I

    2015-01-01

    The prevailing view that the evolution of cells in a tumor is driven by Darwinian selection has never been rigorously tested. Because selection greatly affects the level of intratumor genetic diversity, it is important to assess whether intratumor evolution follows the Darwinian or the non-Darwinian mode of evolution. To provide the statistical power, many regions in a single tumor need to be sampled and analyzed much more extensively than has been attempted in previous intratumor studies. Here, from a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor, we evaluated multiregional samples from the tumor, using either whole-exome sequencing (WES) (n = 23 samples) or genotyping (n = 286) under both the infinite-site and infinite-allele models of population genetics. In addition to the many single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) present in all samples, there were 35 “polymorphic” SNVs among samples. High genetic diversity was evident as the 23 WES samples defined 20 unique cell clones. With all 286 samples genotyped, clonal diversity agreed well with the non-Darwinian model with no evidence of positive Darwinian selection. Under the non-Darwinian model, MALL (the number of coding region mutations in the entire tumor) was estimated to be greater than 100 million in this tumor. DNA sequences reveal local diversities in small patches of cells and validate the estimation. In contrast, the genetic diversity under a Darwinian model would generally be orders of magnitude smaller. Because the level of genetic diversity will have implications on therapeutic resistance, non-Darwinian evolution should be heeded in cancer treatments even for microscopic tumors. PMID:26561581

  20. Extremely high genetic diversity in a single tumor points to prevalence of non-Darwinian cell evolution.

    PubMed

    Ling, Shaoping; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Zuyu; Yang, Fang; Li, Yawei; Lin, Pei; Chen, Ke; Dong, Lili; Cao, Lihua; Tao, Yong; Hao, Lingtong; Chen, Qingjian; Gong, Qiang; Wu, Dafei; Li, Wenjie; Zhao, Wenming; Tian, Xiuyun; Hao, Chunyi; Hungate, Eric A; Catenacci, Daniel V T; Hudson, Richard R; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Lu, Xuemei; Wu, Chung-I

    2015-11-24

    The prevailing view that the evolution of cells in a tumor is driven by Darwinian selection has never been rigorously tested. Because selection greatly affects the level of intratumor genetic diversity, it is important to assess whether intratumor evolution follows the Darwinian or the non-Darwinian mode of evolution. To provide the statistical power, many regions in a single tumor need to be sampled and analyzed much more extensively than has been attempted in previous intratumor studies. Here, from a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor, we evaluated multiregional samples from the tumor, using either whole-exome sequencing (WES) (n = 23 samples) or genotyping (n = 286) under both the infinite-site and infinite-allele models of population genetics. In addition to the many single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) present in all samples, there were 35 "polymorphic" SNVs among samples. High genetic diversity was evident as the 23 WES samples defined 20 unique cell clones. With all 286 samples genotyped, clonal diversity agreed well with the non-Darwinian model with no evidence of positive Darwinian selection. Under the non-Darwinian model, MALL (the number of coding region mutations in the entire tumor) was estimated to be greater than 100 million in this tumor. DNA sequences reveal local diversities in small patches of cells and validate the estimation. In contrast, the genetic diversity under a Darwinian model would generally be orders of magnitude smaller. Because the level of genetic diversity will have implications on therapeutic resistance, non-Darwinian evolution should be heeded in cancer treatments even for microscopic tumors.

  1. A vertically-stacked, polymer, microfluidic point mutation analyzer: Rapid, high accuracy detection of low-abundance K-ras mutations

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyudong; Lee, Tae Yoon; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.; Soper, Steven A.; Murphy, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of point mutations in the K-ras gene can be used for the clinical management of several types of cancers. Unfortunately, several assay and hardware concerns must be addressed to allow users not well-trained in performing molecular analyses the opportunity to undertake these measurements. To provide for a larger user-base for these types of molecular assays, a vertically-stacked microfluidic analyzer with a modular architecture and process automation was developed. The analyzer employed a primary PCR coupled to an allele-specific ligase detection reaction (LDR). Each functional device, including continuous flow thermal reactors for the PCR and LDR, passive micromixers and ExoSAP-IT® purification, was designed and tested. Individual devices were fabricated in polycarbonate using hot embossing and assembled using adhesive bonding for system assembly. The system produced LDR products from a DNA sample in ~1 h, an 80% reduction in time compared to conventional bench-top instrumentation. Purifying the post-PCR products with the ExoSAP-IT® enzyme led to optimized LDR performance minimizing false positive signals and producing reliable results. Mutant alleles in genomic DNA were quantified to the level of 0.25 ng of mutant DNA in 50 ng of wild-type DNA for a 25 μL sample, equivalent to DNA from 42 mutant cells. PMID:21771577

  2. A unique point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3) defines a new craniosynostosis syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Muenke, M.; Gripp, K.W.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.

    1997-03-01

    The underlying basis of many forms of syndromic craniosynostosis has been defined on a molecular level. However, many patients with familial or sporadic craniosynostosis do not have the classical findings of those craniosynostosis syndromes. Here we present 61 individuals from 20 unrelated families where coronal synostosis is due to an amino acid substitution (Pro250Arg) that results from a single point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene on chromosome 4p. In this instance, a new clinical syndrome is being defined on the basis of the molecular finding. In addition to the skull findings, some patients had abnormalities on radiographs of hands and feet, including thimble-like middle phalanges, coned epiphyses, and carpal and tarsal fusions. Brachydactyly was seen in some cases; none had clinically significant syndactyly or deviation of the great toe. Sensorineural hearing loss was present in some, and developmental delay was seen in a minority. While the radiological findings of hands and feet can be very helpful in diagnosing this syndrome, it is not in all cases clearly distinguishable on a clinical basis from other craniosynostosis syndromes. Therefore, this mutation should be tested for in patients with coronal synostosis. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Predicting protein thermal stability changes upon point mutations using statistical potentials: Introducing HoTMuSiC

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Bourgeas, Raphaël; Rooman, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The accurate prediction of the impact of an amino acid substitution on the thermal stability of a protein is a central issue in protein science, and is of key relevance for the rational optimization of various bioprocesses that use enzymes in unusual conditions. Here we present one of the first computational tools to predict the change in melting temperature ΔTm upon point mutations, given the protein structure and, when available, the melting temperature Tm of the wild-type protein. The key ingredients of our model structure are standard and temperature-dependent statistical potentials, which are combined with the help of an artificial neural network. The model structure was chosen on the basis of a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the system. The parameters of the model were identified on a set of more than 1,600 mutations with experimentally measured ΔTm. The performance of our method was tested using a strict 5-fold cross-validation procedure, and was found to be significantly superior to that of competing methods. We obtained a root mean square deviation between predicted and experimental ΔTm values of 4.2 °C that reduces to 2.9 °C when ten percent outliers are removed. A webserver-based tool is freely available for non-commercial use at soft.dezyme.com. PMID:26988870

  4. A unique point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3) defines a new craniosynostosis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muenke, M.; Gripp, K. W.; McDonald-McGinn, D. M.; Gaudenz, K.; Whitaker, L. A.; Bartlett, S. P.; Markowitz, R. I.; Robin, N. H.; Nwokoro, N.; Mulvihill, J. J.; Losken, H. W.; Mulliken, J. B.; Guttmacher, A. E.; Wilroy, R. S.; Clarke, L. A.; Hollway, G.; Adès, L. C.; Haan, E. A.; Mulley, J. C.; Cohen, M. M.; Bellus, G. A.; Francomano, C. A.; Moloney, D. M.; Wall, S. A.; Wilkie, A. O. M.; Zackai, E. H.

    1997-01-01

    The underlying basis of many forms of syndromic craniosynostosis has been defined on a molecular level. However, many patients with familial or sporadic craniosynostosis do not have the classical findings of those craniosynostosis syndromes. Here we present 61 individuals from 20 unrelated families where coronal synostosis is due to an amino acid substitution (Pro250Arg) that results from a single point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene on chromosome 4p. In this instance, a new clinical syndrome is being defined on the basis of the molecular finding. In addition to the skull findings, some patients had abnormalities on radiographs of hands and feet, including thimble-like middle phalanges, coned epiphyses, and carpal and tarsal fusions. Brachydactyly was seen in some cases; none had clinically significant syndactyly or deviation of the great toe. Sensorineural hearing loss was present in some, and developmental delay was seen in a minority. While the radiological findings of hands and feet can be very helpful in diagnosing this syndrome, it is not in all cases clearly distinguishable on a clinical basis from other craniosynostosis syndromes. Therefore, this mutation should be tested for in patients with coronal synostosis. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:9042914

  5. Understanding the lid movements of LolA in Escherichia coli using molecular dynamics simulation and in silico point mutation.

    PubMed

    Murahari, Priyadarshini; Anishetty, Sharmila; Pennathur, Gautam

    2013-12-01

    The Lol system in Escherichia coli is involved in localization of lipoproteins and hence is essential for growth of the organism. LolA is a periplasmic chaperone that binds to outer-membrane specific lipoproteins and transports them from inner membrane to outer membrane through LolB. The hydrophobic lipid-binding cavity of LolA consists of α-helices which act as a lid in regulating the transfer of lipoproteins from LolA to LolB. The current study aims to investigate the structural changes observed in LolA during the transition from open to closed conformation in the absence of lipoprotein. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for two LolA crystal structures; LolA(R43L), and in silico mutated MsL43R for a simulation time of 50 ns in water environment. We have performed an in silico point mutation of leucine to arginine in MsL43R to evaluate the importance of arginine to induce structural changes and impact the stability of protein structure. A complete dynamic analysis of open to closed conformation reveals the existence of two distinct levels; closing of lid and closing of entrance of hydrophobic cavity. Our analysis reveals that the structural flexibility of LolA is an important factor for its role as a periplasmic chaperone.

  6. Point mutations in Staphylococcus aureus PBP 2 gene affect penicillin-binding kinetics and are associated with resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Hackbarth, C J; Kocagoz, T; Kocagoz, S; Chambers, H F

    1995-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2) has been implicated in non-PBP 2a-mediated methicillin resistance. The PBP 2 gene (pbpB) was cloned from an expression library of a methicillin-susceptible strain of S. aureus (209P), and its entire sequence was compared with that of the pbpB gene from strains BB255, BB255R, and CDC6. Point mutations that resulted in amino acid substitutions near the conserved penicillin-binding motifs were detected in BB255R and CDC6, two low-level methicillin-resistant strains. Penicillin binding to PBP 2 in both BB255R and CDC6 is altered, and kinetic analysis indicated that altered binding of PBP 2 by penicillin was due to both lower binding affinity and more rapid release of bound drug. These structural and biochemical changes may contribute to the strains' resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:7695289

  7. Oseltamivir activity against avian influenza H9N2 strain with different point mutations in their neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Kumosani, Taha; Ahmadieh, Diana; Shaib, Houssam; Hamadeh, Shadi; Jaber, Lina; Harakeh, Steve; Iyer, Archana; Azhar, Esam; Barbour, Elie

    2015-01-01

    The present study has two aims: to optimize the antiviral activity of oseltamivir in chicken embryos against an avian influenza-H9N2 strain (P0) and to apply the optimized protocol for studying the drug susceptibility of 4 H9N2 mutants (M1, M2, M3, and M4). As for the first aim, oseltamivir antiviral activity was monitored upon its delivery into 9-day-old chicken embryo at a concentration of 0.27 mg/100 μl, against 7 doses of the P0 strain, ranging between 1.2 x 10(-5) and 2.0 Hemagglutination (HA) units. Oseltamivir showed its highest efficacy in reduction of viral propagation (95% reduction in HA titer) (P 〈0.05), when the inoculum level contained a minimum HA units of 1.2 x 10(-5). For the second aim of this study, the application of the 1.2 x 10-(5) HA units of the virus in inocula for the evaluation of oseltamivir-antiviral effect against the 4 H9N2 mutants revealed an emergence of a resistant mutant (M1), associated with 2 adjacent point mutations in its neuraminidase (N) amino acid (aa) sequence at positions 46 and 47. The other 3 mutants maintained a variable sensitivity to oseltamivir, resulting in the following reduction in HA titers: M2 (82.9%), M3 (61.5%), and M4 (100.0%). How the point mutations of the neuraminidase sequences affected the susceptibility of H9N2 virus to oseltamivir is still to be determined and deserve further investigations.

  8. A new point mutation in the luteinising hormone receptor gene in familial and sporadic male limited precocious puberty: genotype does not always correlate with phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, B A; Bowen, D J; Smith, P J; Clayton, P E; Gregory, J W

    1996-01-01

    Genomic DNA from two families with male limited precocious puberty was examined for mutations of the LH receptor gene. In family 1, several members of the pedigree have FMPP, whereas in family 2 there is only one affected subject. A point mutation (T --> C at nucleotide 1192) resulting in substitution of threonine for methionine 398 in the second transmembrane domain of the LH receptor protein was found in both families. In addition, one member of family 1 has the mutation, but no evidence of precocious puberty. All obligate carriers within this family were shown to have the mutation, and it was not detected in 94 chromosomes from unaffected and unrelated white subjects. In family 2, the index case was the only one to have the mutation. A previously unreported neutral dimorphism (C --> T at nucleotide 1065) is also described. Images PMID:8929952

  9. Locus control region HS2 point mutations are generally not responsible for elevated fetal hemoglobin expression of sickle cell patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    The locus control region (LCR), composed of four hypersensitive sites (HS1-4) 5{prime} of the {epsilon} globin gene, confers strong, copy-number dependent expression on globin genes in transgenic mice. Several {beta}-globin gene cluster haplotypes carry the sickle cell gene, and show variable levels of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) expression in association with DNA sequence differences in HS2, {gamma} and {beta} globin promoters, and {gamma}IVSII: The Senegal (SEN or No. 3) haplotype generally has high (>10%) Hb F, Benin (BEN or No. 19) has intermediate Hb F (but some low and some high), and Banu (BAN or No. 20) generally has low Hb F. Huisman and colleagues have proposed that `factors produced under conditions of hematopoietic stress, together with genetic determinants on the haplotype-3 like LCR sequences, allow for high level expression of {gamma} globin genes`. We have now used slot blot to screen high Hb F (>9.5%) and low Hb F cases for two of the three HS2 point mutations described by Oener et al. Comparing eight high Hb F BEN/BEN with two low Hb F BEN/BEN, all ten had the BEN mutations considered by Oener et al. to be associated with low Hb F. Comparing three high Hb F BEN/BAN with two low Hb F BEN/BAN, all five were heterozygous at three positions; this is consistent with BEN having G and T and BAN having A at both positions. DNA sequencing of HS2 for BAN, which is generally associated with low HB F, showed that the point mutations at all three positions were those seen in SEN (generally high Hb F); only the AT repeat region showed major differences, confirming results of Huisman and colleagues. Hence, if there is any effect of HS2 of the Senegal sickle cell haplotype in causing elevated Hb F under hematopoietic stress, it must be due to specific variation in the AT repeat region, which Oener et al. have suggested may bind a silencer.

  10. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-05

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present.

  11. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L.; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S.; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R.M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Simpson, Peter T.; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Clouston, Andrew D.; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A.; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F.; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Davis, Sean R.; Walker, Robert L.; Calzone, Kathleen A.; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Weissman, Scott M.; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sampson, Jone E.; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K.; Huntsman, David G.; Foulkes, William D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M.; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S.; Worthley, Daniel L.; Schrader, Kasmintan A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  12. High prevalence of the point mutation in exon 6 of the xeroderma pigmentosum group A-complementing (XPAC) gene in xeroderma pigmentosum group A patients in Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Nishigori, Chikako; Imamura, Sadao; Yagi, Takashi; Takebe, Hiraku ); Zghal, M.; Komoun, M.R.

    1993-11-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients in Tunisia who belong to the genetic complementation group A (XPA) have milder skin symptoms than do Japanese XPA patients. Such difference in the clinical features might be caused by the difference in the site of mutation in the XP A-complementing (XPAC) gene. The purpose of this study is to identify the genetic alterations in the XPAC gene in the Tunisian XPA patients and to investigate the relationship between the clinical symptoms and the genetic alterations. Three sites of mutation in the XPAC gene have been identified in the Japanese XPA patients, and about 85% of them have a G [yields] C point mutation at the splicing acceptor site of intron 3. The authors found that six (86%) of seven Tunisian XPA patients had a nonsense mutation in codon 228 in exon 6, because of a CGA [yields] TGA point mutation, which can be detected by the HphI RFLP. This type of mutation is the same as those found in two Japanese XPA patients with mild clinical RFLP. Milder skin symptoms in the XPA patients in Tunisia than in those in Japan, despite mostly sunny weather and the unsatisfactory sun protection in Tunisia, should be due to the difference in the mutation site. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Development of a PCR/ligase detection reaction/nanogold-based universal array approach for the detection of low-abundant DNA point mutations.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ping; Lu, Weiping; Guo, Jianxin; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Zhuqin; Han, Jian; Li, Li

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of combining PCR and ligase detection reaction (LDR) with a novel nano-gold-based universal array for the detection of low abundance point mutations from fetal DNA in maternal plasma samples. The sequence with the target point mutation was first amplified by PCR and then used as a template for LDR in which the upstream specific primer contains a tag sequence at the 5'-end. After hybridization to the probes of a universal array containing anti-tag sequences, the ligated products were bound to streptavidin-labeled nano-gold particles and the hybridization signals were amplified by silver staining. The PCR/LDR/universal array was first tested for sensitivity with nano-gold-based detection, and then this system was applied to detect the low abundance specific mutation IVS2 654(C→T) of the β-globin gene in a model using maternal plasma samples. The nano-gold-based method unambiguously identified a single mutation at a sensitivity of 1:1000. This approach was applied to detect the paternally inherited IVS2 654(C→T) mutation from thirty maternal plasma samples. The results were consistent with those obtained by PCR/reverse dot blot of amniotic fluid cell DNA. The PCR/LDR/nano-gold-based universal array is able to detect low-abundance point mutations with high sensitivity.

  14. Introduction of specific point mutations into RNA polymerase II by gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells: evidence for a DNA mismatch repair mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Steeg, C M; Ellis, J; Bernstein, A

    1990-01-01

    We have introduced two specific point mutations, located 20 base pairs apart, into the endogenous murine gene that encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPII215). The first mutation conferred resistance to the mushroom toxin alpha-amanitin (amar), and the second mutation generated a restriction fragment length polymorphism without altering the protein sequence. Targeted amar clones were generated at a frequency of 1 in 30 totipotent embryonic stem cells that expressed stably integrated DNA vectors after electroporation. Thirty to 40% of these clones had acquired both mutations, whereas, surprisingly, the remaining clones had acquired the specific amar point mutation but lacked the restriction fragment length polymorphism. We suggest that the latter clones were generated by independent DNA mismatch repair rather than by double crossover or gene conversion. These results demonstrate that it is possible to introduce specific point mutations into an endogenous gene in embryonic stem cells. Thus it should be possible to introduce single base substitutions into other cellular genes, including nonselectable genes, by optimizing the efficiency of gene transfer and/or the sensitivity of screening for targeted clones. Images PMID:1972278

  15. A Point Mutation in Myh10 Causes Major Defects in Heart Development and Body Wall Closure

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuefei; Adelstein, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The three isoforms of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII-A, NMII-B and NMII-C) play various roles during mouse embryonic development. Previous work, using knockout and hypomorphic mice, showed that MYH10 encoding myosin heavy chain II-B is critical for cardiac and brain development. Ablating or decreasing NMII-B by 80% results in cardiac (ventricular septal defect, double outlet of the right ventricle) and brain defects but not midline fusion defects. Neither NMII-A nor II-C appear to play roles in early myocardial development. Methods and Results We had previously generated point mutant knock-in mice and now report novel findings due to expressing motor deficient NMII-B at wild-type levels. Homozygous mice die at E14.5 in cardiac failure exhibiting abnormalities not seen in NMII-B null and hypomorphic mice: a failure in midline fusion resulting in a cleft palate, ectopia cordis, and a large omphalocele. Fusion of the sternum and endocardial cushions is impaired in the mutant mice associated with a failure in apoptosis of the mesenchyme cells. Failure to disassemble myocyte cell-cell adhesions during cardiac outflow tract development contributes to impaired outflow tract myocardialization and displacement of the aorta to the right ventricle. Conclusions Expression of motor impaired NMII-B disrupts normal ventral body wall closure, due to a dominant negative effect. This is not due to the loss of NMII-B function but rather to a gain-of-function resulting from prolonged crosslinking of NMII-B to actin-filaments thereby interfering with the dynamics of actomyosin cytoskeletal structure. Moreover impaired NMII-B motor activity inhibits outflow tract myocardialization leading to mis-localization of the aorta. PMID:24825879

  16. Identification and characterization of the novel point mutation m.3634A>G in the mitochondrial MT-ND1 gene associated with LHON syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carreño-Gago, Lidia; Gamez, Josep; Cámara, Yolanda; Alvarez de la Campa, Elena; Aller-Alvarez, Juan Sebastian; Moncho, Dulce; Salvado, Maria; Galan, Alicia; de la Cruz, Xavier; Pinós, Tomàs; García-Arumí, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial genetic disease characterized by bilateral acute or subacute progressive central visual loss. Most cases of LHON syndrome are caused by point mutations in the MT-ND1, MT-ND4, and MT-ND6 genes. Here, we report a novel homoplasmic mutation in the MT-ND1 gene (m.3634A>G, p.Ser110Gly) in a patient with the classical clinical features of LHON syndrome. Several observations support the idea that the mutation is pathogenic and involved in the clinical phenotype of the patient: 1) The mutation affected a highly conserved amino acid, 2) A pathogenic mutation in the same amino acid (m.3635G>A, p.Ser110Asn) was previously reported in a patient with LHON syndrome, 3) The mutation is not recorded in the Mitomap or Human Mitochondrial Genome Database, 4) In silico predictors classified the mutation as "probably damaging", and 5) Cybrids carrying the mutation showed decreased Complex I enzyme activity, lower cell proliferation, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential relative to control cybrids.

  17. RNF213 Mutations in an Ethnically Diverse Population with Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, Alana C.; Guo, Dongchuan; Ren, Zhao; Flynn, Kelly; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Wang, Gao T.; Regalado, Ellen S.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J.; Grotta, James C.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare, genetically heterogeneous cerebrovascular disease resulting from occlusion of the distal internal carotid arteries. A variant in the Ring Finger 213 gene (RNF213), altering arginine at position 4810 (p.R4810K), is associated with MMD in Asian populations. However, there is a lack of data on the role of RNF213 in MMD patients of additional ethnicities and diasporic Asian populations. We investigate the contribution of RNF213 alterations to MMD in an ethnically diverse population based in the United States (U.S). Methods We initially sequenced RNF213 exons 43, 44, 45 (encoding the eponymous RING finger domain), and exon 60 (encoding p.R4810K), in 86 ethnically diverse patients with MMD. Comprehensive exome sequencing data from 24 additional MMD patients was then analyzed to globally identify RNF213 variants. Segregation of variants with MMD and other vascular diseases was assessed in families. Results RNF213 p.R4810K was identified in 56% (9/16) of MMD patients of Asian descent, and not in 94 patients of non-Asian descent. 3.6% (4/110) of patients had variants in the exons encoding the RING finger domain. Seven additional variants were identified in 29% (7/24) of MMD patients who underwent exome sequencing. Segregation analysis supported an association with MMD for two variants, and a lack of association with disease for one variant. Conclusions These results confirm that alterations in RNF213 predispose patients of diverse ethnicities to MMD, and that the p.R4810K variant predisposes individuals of Asian descent in the U.S. to MMD. PMID:25278557

  18. Modeling the effects of point and non-point source pollution on a diversion channel from Yellow River to an artificial lake in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, X P; Li, G N; Li, G R; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01

    The Dragon lake diversion channel (DLDC) is the only river that recharges Dragon Lake, an artificial lake in China. This paper examines the main factors influencing water quality by investigating point source and non-point source pollutants along the main route. Based on the complicated system of rivers and desilting basins, a three-dimensional water quality model using environmental fluid dynamics code (EFDC) was developed. The model of DLDC was calibrated and verified using observed data. The error ranges of river water level, total phosphorus, total nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand were within 5%, 10%, 16% and 20%, respectively, all of which meet the precision requirement. The model was employed to predict the concentrations of pollutants in the main stream under current pollution loads within a year and a flood lasting for 24 hours. The results revealed that the main pollution sources that influence the water quality of waterways were the point sources followed by the non-point pollution sources. Water quality improved when large water quantities were delivered and this trend can be described as dilution. The water quality of the Dongfeng main channel meets the requirement; however, the water quality of the Dongfeng River is somewhat poor, and the water quality of the Wei River is seriously contaminated. To address these problems, we suggest that the Dongfeng River and Wei River adopt a culvert under its riverbeds.

  19. Point mutation of the xylose reductase (XR) gene reduces xylitol accumulation and increases citric acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Weyda, István; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Peter S

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius accumulates xylitol when it grows on D-xylose. In fungi, D-xylose is reduced to xylitol by the NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR). Xylitol is then further oxidized by the NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). The cofactor impairment between the XR and XDH can lead to the accumulation of xylitol under oxygen-limiting conditions. Most of the XRs are NADPH dependent and contain a conserved Ile-Pro-Lys-Ser motif. The only known naturally occurring NADH-dependent XR (from Candida parapsilosis) carries an arginine residue instead of the lysine in this motif. In order to overcome xylitol accumulation in A. carbonarius a Lys-274 to Arg point mutation was introduced into the XR with the aim of changing the specificity toward NADH. The effect of the genetic engineering was examined in fermentation for citric acid production and xylitol accumulation by using D-xylose as the sole carbon source. Fermentation with the mutant strain showed a 2.8-fold reduction in xylitol accumulation and 4.5-fold increase in citric acid production compared to the wild-type strain. The fact that the mutant strain shows decreased xylitol levels is assumed to be associated with the capability of the mutated XR to use the NADH generated by the XDH, thus preventing the inhibition of XDH by the high levels of NADH and ensuring the flux of xylose through the pathway. This work shows that enhanced production of citric acid can be achieved using xylose as the sole carbon source by reducing accumulation of other by-products, such as xylitol.

  20. A point mutation in Euglene gracilis chloroplast tRNA{sup Glu} uncouples protein and chlorophyll biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stange-Thomann, N.; Thomann, H.U.; Lloyd, A.J.; Soell, D.; Lyman, H.

    1994-08-16

    The universal precursor of tetrapyrrole pigments (e.g., chlorophylls and hemes) is 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), which in Euglena gracilis chloroplasts is derived via the two-step C{sub 5} pathway from glutamate charged to tRNA{sup Glu}. The first enzyme in this pathway, Glu-tRNA reductase (GluTR) catalyzes the reduction of glutamyl-tRNA{sup Glu} (Glu-tRNA) to glutamate 1-semialdehyde (GSA) with the release of the uncharged tRNA{sup Glu}. The second enzyme, GSA-2, 1-aminomutase, converts GSA to ALA. tRNA{sup Glu} is a specific cofactor for the NADPH-dependent reduction by GluTR, an enzyme that recognizes the tRNA in a sequence-specific manner. This RNA is the normal tRNA{sup Glu}, a dual-function molecule participating both in protein and in ALA and, hence, chlorophyll biosynthesis. A chlorophyll-deficient mutant of E. gracilis (Y{sub 9}ZNaIL) does not synthesize ALA from glutamate, although it contains GluTR and GSA-2,1-aminomutase activity. The tRNA{sup Glu} isolated from the mutant can still be acrylated with glutamate in vitro and in vitro. Furthermore, it supports chloroplast protein synthesis; however, it is a poor substrate for GluTR. Sequence analysis of the tRNA and of its gene revealed a C56 {yields} U mutation in the resulting gene product. C56 is therefore an important identity element for GluTR. Thus, a point mutation in the T loop of tRNA uncouples protein from chlorophyll biosynthesis.

  1. A genomic point mutation in the extracellular domain of the thyrotropin receptor in patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bahn, R.S.; Dutton, C.M.; Heufelder, A.E.; Sarkar, G. |

    1994-02-01

    Orbital and pretibial fibroblasts are targets of autoimmune attack in Graves` ophthalmopathy (GO) and pretibial dermopathy (PTD). The fibroblast autoantigen involved in these peripheral manifestations of Graves` disease and the reason for the association of GO and PTD with hyperthyroidism are unknown. RNA encoding the full-length extracellular domain of the TSH receptor has been demonstrated in orbital and dermal fibroblasts from patients with GO and normal subjects, suggesting a possible antigenic link between fibroblasts and thyrocytes. RNA was isolated from cultured orbital, pretibial, and abdominal fibroblasts obtained from patients with severe GO (n = 22) and normal subjects (n = 5). RNA was reverse transcribed, and the resulting cDNA was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, using primers spanning overlapping regions of the entire extracellular domain of the TSH receptor. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed an A for C substitution in the first position of codon 52 in 2 of the patients, both of whom had GO, PTD, and acropachy. Genomic DNA isolated from the 2 affected patients, and not from an additional 12 normal subjects, revealed the codon 52 mutation by direct sequencing and AciI restriction enzyme digestions. In conclusion, the authors have demonstrated the presence of a genomic point mutation, leading to a threonine for proline amino acid shift in the predicted peptide, in the extracellular domain of the TSH receptor in two patients with severe GO, PTD, acropachy, and high thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin levels. RNA encoding this mutant product was demonstrated in the fibroblasts of these patients. They suggest that the TSH receptor may be an important fibroblast autoantigen in GO and PTD, and that this mutant form of the receptor may have unique immunogenic properties. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Exceptionally high and diverse mutation rates in insects small rRNA.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y X; Krupp, G; Gross, J H

    1985-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of 5S rRNA from the posterior silk gland of the silk worm Philosamia cynthia ricini has been determined. The comparison with other insect 5S rRNAs revealed an exceptionally conserved secondary structure, in spite of an extremely high mutation rate: Thirteen nucleotides are different in Philosamia and Drosophila 5S rRNA, but all substitutions are either compensatory or occur in loops or introduce G:U base pairs. The rates of base substitution per site per year of several insect species (diptera and lepidoptera) 5S and 5.8S rRNAs are compared with those occurring in vertebrate rRNAs. In the latter cases the rates are remarkably constant, whereas their value is not only about twofold higher in insect rRNAs, but is found to be extremely large in the 5S rRNA of the silkworm Bombyx mori. These data demonstrate that phylogenetic conclusions derived from small rRNA sequence comparisons are only of limited value.

  3. Discovery of Point Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel from African Aedes aegypti Populations: Potential Phylogenetic Reasons for Gene Introgression

    PubMed Central

    Muranami, Yuto; Kawashima, Emiko; Osei, Joseph H. N.; Sakyi, Kojo Yirenkyi; Dadzie, Samuel; de Souza, Dziedzom K.; Appawu, Maxwell; Ohta, Nobuo; Minakawa, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Background Yellow fever is endemic in some countries in Africa, and Aedes aegpyti is one of the most important vectors implicated in the outbreak. The mapping of the nation-wide distribution and the detection of insecticide resistance of vector mosquitoes will provide the beneficial information for forecasting of dengue and yellow fever outbreaks and effective control measures. Methodology/Principal Findings High resistance to DDT was observed in all mosquito colonies collected in Ghana. The resistance and the possible existence of resistance or tolerance to permethrin were suspected in some colonies. High frequencies of point mutations at the voltage-gated sodium channel (F1534C) and one heterozygote of the other mutation (V1016I) were detected, and this is the first detection on the African continent. The frequency of F1534C allele and the ratio of F1534C homozygotes in Ae. aegypti aegypti (Aaa) were significantly higher than those in Ae. aegypti formosus (Aaf). We could detect the two types of introns between exon 20 and 21, and the F1534C mutations were strongly linked with one type of intron, which was commonly found in South East Asian and South and Central American countries, suggesting the possibility that this mutation was introduced from other continents or convergently selected after the introgression of Aaa genes from the above area. Conclusions/Significance The worldwide eradication programs in 1940s and 1950s might have caused high selection pressure on the mosquito populations and expanded the distribution of insecticide-resistant Ae. aegypti populations. Selection of the F1534C point mutation could be hypothesized to have taken place during this period. The selection of the resistant population of Ae. aegypti with the point mutation of F1534C, and the worldwide transportation of vector mosquitoes in accordance with human activity such as trading of used tires, might result in the widespread distribution of F1534C point mutation in tropical countries

  4. A two level mutation-selection model of cultural evolution and diversity.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac

    2010-11-21

    Cultural evolution is a complex process that can happen at several levels. At the level of individuals in a population, each human bears a set of cultural traits that he or she can transmit to its offspring (vertical transmission) or to other members of his or her society (horizontal transmission). The relative frequency of a cultural trait in a population or society can thus increase or decrease with the relative reproductive success of its bearers (individual's level) or the relative success of transmission (called the idea's level). This article presents a mathematical model on the interplay between these two levels. The first aim of this article is to explore when cultural evolution is driven by the idea's level, when it is driven by the individual's level and when it is driven by both. These three possibilities are explored in relation to (a) the amount of interchange of cultural traits between individuals, (b) the selective pressure acting on individuals, (c) the rate of production of new cultural traits, (d) the individual's capacity to remember cultural traits and to the population size. The aim is to explore the conditions in which cultural evolution does not lead to a better adaptation of individuals to the environment. This is to contrast the spread of fitness-enhancing ideas, which make individual bearers better adapted to the environment, to the spread of "selfish" ideas, which spread well simply because they are easy to remember but do not help their individual bearers (and may even hurt them). At the same time this article explores in which conditions the adaptation of individuals is maximal. The second aim is to explore how these factors affect cultural diversity, or the amount of different cultural traits in a population. This study suggests that a larger interchange of cultural traits between populations could lead to cultural evolution not improving the adaptation of individuals to their environment and to a decrease of cultural diversity.

  5. Mutations in cardiac T-box factor gene TBX20 are associated with diverse cardiac pathologies, including defects of septation and valvulogenesis and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Edwin P; Sunde, Margaret; Costa, Mauro W; Rankin, Scott A; Wolstein, Orit; Castro, M Leticia; Butler, Tanya L; Hyun, Changbaig; Guo, Guanglan; Otway, Robyn; Mackay, Joel P; Waddell, Leigh B; Cole, Andrew D; Hayward, Christopher; Keogh, Anne; Macdonald, Peter; Griffiths, Lyn; Fatkin, Diane; Sholler, Gary F; Zorn, Aaron M; Feneley, Michael P; Winlaw, David S; Harvey, Richard P

    2007-08-01

    The T-box family transcription factor gene TBX20 acts in a conserved regulatory network, guiding heart formation and patterning in diverse species. Mouse Tbx20 is expressed in cardiac progenitor cells, differentiating cardiomyocytes, and developing valvular tissue, and its deletion or RNA interference-mediated knockdown is catastrophic for heart development. TBX20 interacts physically, functionally, and genetically with other cardiac transcription factors, including NKX2-5, GATA4, and TBX5, mutations of which cause congenital heart disease (CHD). Here, we report nonsense (Q195X) and missense (I152M) germline mutations within the T-box DNA-binding domain of human TBX20 that were associated with a family history of CHD and a complex spectrum of developmental anomalies, including defects in septation, chamber growth, and valvulogenesis. Biophysical characterization of wild-type and mutant proteins indicated how the missense mutation disrupts the structure and function of the TBX20 T-box. Dilated cardiomyopathy was a feature of the TBX20 mutant phenotype in humans and mice, suggesting that mutations in developmental transcription factors can provide a sensitized template for adult-onset heart disease. Our findings are the first to link TBX20 mutations to human pathology. They provide insights into how mutation of different genes in an interactive regulatory circuit lead to diverse clinical phenotypes, with implications for diagnosis, genetic screening, and patient follow-up.

  6. From Whole Gene Deletion to Point Mutations of EP300-Positive Rubinstein-Taybi Patients: New Insights into the Mutational Spectrum and Peculiar Clinical Hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Negri, Gloria; Magini, Pamela; Milani, Donatella; Colapietro, Patrizia; Rusconi, Daniela; Scarano, Emanuela; Bonati, Maria Teresa; Priolo, Manuela; Crippa, Milena; Mazzanti, Laura; Wischmeijer, Anita; Tamburrino, Federica; Pippucci, Tommaso; Finelli, Palma; Larizza, Lidia; Gervasini, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a rare congenital neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by growth deficiency, skeletal abnormalities, dysmorphic features, and intellectual disability. Causative mutations in CREBBP and EP300 genes have been identified in ∼55% and ∼8% of affected individuals. To date, only 28 EP300 alterations in 29 RSTS clinically described patients have been reported. EP300 analysis of 22 CREBBP-negative RSTS patients from our cohort led us to identify six novel mutations: a 376-kb deletion depleting EP300 gene; an exons 17-19 deletion (c.(3141+1_3142-1)_(3590+1_3591-1)del/p.(Ile1047Serfs*30)); two stop mutations, (c.3829A>T/p.(Lys1277*) and c.4585C>T/p.(Arg1529*)); a splicing mutation (c.1878-12A>G/p.(Ala627Glnfs*11)), and a duplication (c.4640dupA/p.(Asn1547Lysfs*3)). All EP300-mutated individuals show a mild RSTS phenotype and peculiar findings including maternal gestosis, skin manifestation, especially nevi or keloids, back malformations, and a behavior predisposing to anxiety. Furthermore, the patient carrying the complete EP300 deletion does not show a markedly severe clinical picture, even if a more composite phenotype was noticed. By characterizing six novel EP300-mutated patients, this study provides further insights into the EP300-specific clinical presentation and expands the mutational repertoire including the first case of a whole gene deletion. These new data will enhance EP300-mutated cases identification highlighting distinctive features and will improve the clinical practice allowing a better genotype-phenotype correlation.

  7. Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD): Taking Advantage from Founder Mutations in Genetics Diagnosis, Genetic Diversity and Migration History of the Mediterranean Population.

    PubMed

    Charoute, Hicham; Bakhchane, Amina; Benrahma, Houda; Romdhane, Lilia; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Abdelhak, Sonia; Lenaers, Guy; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2015-11-01

    The Mediterranean basin has been the theater of migration crossroads followed by settlement of several societies and cultures in prehistoric and historical times, with important consequences on genetic and genomic determinisms. Here, we present the Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD), established to offer web-based access to founder mutation information in the Mediterranean population. Mutation data were collected from the literature and other online resources and systematically reviewed and assembled into this database. The information provided for each founder mutation includes DNA change, amino-acid change, mutation type and mutation effect, as well as mutation frequency and coalescence time when available. Currently, the database contains 383 founder mutations found in 210 genes related to 219 diseases. We believe that MFMD will help scientists and physicians to design more rapid and less expensive genetic diagnostic tests. Moreover, the coalescence time of founder mutations gives an overview about the migration history of the Mediterranean population. MFMD can be publicly accessed from http://mfmd.pasteur.ma.

  8. Diffusion-collision of foldons elucidates the kinetic effects of point mutations and suggests control strategies of the folding process of helical proteins.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Emidio; Compiani, Mario

    2006-07-01

    In this article we use mutation studies as a benchmark for a minimal model of the folding process of helical proteins. The model ascribes a pivotal role to the collisional dynamics of a few crucial residues (foldons) and predicts the folding rates by exploiting information drawn from the protein sequence. We show that our model rationalizes the effects of point mutations on the kinetics of folding. The folding times of two proteins and their mutants are predicted. Stability and location of foldons have a critical role as the determinants of protein folding. This allows us to elucidate two main mechanisms for the kinetic effects of mutations. First, it turns out that the mutations eliciting the most notable effects alter protein stability through stabilization or destabilization of the foldons. Secondly, the folding rate is affected via a modification of the foldon topology by those mutations that lead to the birth or death of foldons. The few mispredicted folding rates of some mutants hint at the limits of the current version of the folding model proposed in the present article. The performance of our folding model declines in case the mutated residues are subject to strong long-range forces. That foldons are the critical targets of mutation studies has notable implications for design strategies and is of particular interest to address the issue of the kinetic regulation of single proteins in the general context of the overall dynamics of the interactome.

  9. The identification of point mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients by using reverse-transcription PCR and the protein truncation test.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, R J; Bobrow, M; Roberts, R G

    1995-01-01

    The protein truncation test (PTT) is a mutation-detection method that monitors the integrity of the open reading frame (ORF). More than 60% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) result from gross frame-shifting deletions in the dystrophin gene that are detectable by a multiplex PCR system. It has become apparent that virtually all of the remaining DMD mutations also disrupt the translational reading frame, making the PTT a logical next step toward a comprehensive strategy for the identification of all DMD mutations. We report here a pilot study involving 22 patients and describe the mutations characterized. These constitute 12 point mutations or small insertions/deletions and 4 gross rearrangements. We also have a remaining five patients in whom there does not appear to be a mutation in the ORF. We believe that reverse-transcription--PCR/PTT is an efficient method by which to screen for small mutations in DMD patients with no deletion. Images Figure 2 PMID:7668256

  10. One Hundred Twenty-One Dystrophin Point Mutations Detected from Stored DNA Samples by Combinatorial Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Annalaura; Trimarco, Amelia; Del Vecchio Blanco, Francesca; Cuomo, Anna; Aurino, Stefania; Piluso, Giulio; Minetti, Carlo; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by a large number of different mutations in the dystrophin gene. Outside of the deletion/duplication “hot spots,” small mutations occur at unpredictable positions. These account for about 15 to 20% of cases, with the major group being premature stop codons. When the affected male is deceased, carrier testing for family members and prenatal diagnosis become difficult and expensive. We tailored a cost-effective and reliable strategy to discover point mutations from stored DNA samples in the absence of a muscle biopsy. Samples were amplified in combinatorial pools and tested by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. An anomalous elution profile belonging to two different pools univocally addressed the allelic variation to an unambiguous sample. Mutations were then detected by sequencing. We identified 121 mutations of 99 different types. Fifty-six patients show stop codons that represent the 46.3% of all cases. Three non-obvious single amino acid mutations were considered as causative. Our data support combinatorial denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis as a clear-cut strategy for time and cost-effective identification of small mutations when only DNA is available. PMID:19959795

  11. Synergistic and compensatory effects of two point mutations conferring target-site resistance to fipronil in the insect GABA receptor RDL

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixi; Meng, Xiangkun; Yang, Yuanxue; Li, Hong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Baojun; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Chunrui; Millar, Neil S.; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance can arise from a variety of mechanisms, including changes to the target site, but is often associated with substantial fitness costs to insects. Here we describe two resistance-associated target-site mutations that have synergistic and compensatory effects that combine to produce high and persistent levels of resistance to fipronil, an insecticide targeting on γ-aminobytyric acid (GABA) receptors. In Nilaparvata lugens, a major pest of rice crops in many parts of Asia, we have identified a single point mutation (A302S) in the GABA receptor RDL that has been identified previously in other species and which confers low levels of resistance to fipronil (23-fold) in N. lugans. In addition, we have identified a second resistance-associated RDL mutation (R300Q) that, in combination with A302S, is associated with much higher levels of resistance (237-fold). The R300Q mutation has not been detected in the absence of A302S in either laboratory-selected or field populations, presumably due to the high fitness cost associated with this mutation. Significantly, it appears that the A302S mutation is able to compensate for deleterious effects of R300Q mutation on fitness cost. These findings identify a novel resistance mechanism and may have important implications for the spread of insecticide resistance. PMID:27557781

  12. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Alatorre Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Cortés-Enríquez, Fernando; Célis de la Rosa, Alfredo; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III) forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II) in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12%) harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO) AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn't been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD.

  13. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Alatorre Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Cortés-Enríquez, Fernando; Célis de la Rosa, Alfredo; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III) forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II) in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12%) harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO) AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn't been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24701363

  14. Cancer-Associated SF3B1 Hotspot Mutations Induce Cryptic 3' Splice Site Selection through Use of a Different Branch Point.

    PubMed

    Darman, Rachel B; Seiler, Michael; Agrawal, Anant A; Lim, Kian H; Peng, Shouyong; Aird, Daniel; Bailey, Suzanna L; Bhavsar, Erica B; Chan, Betty; Colla, Simona; Corson, Laura; Feala, Jacob; Fekkes, Peter; Ichikawa, Kana; Keaney, Gregg F; Lee, Linda; Kumar, Pavan; Kunii, Kaiko; MacKenzie, Crystal; Matijevic, Mark; Mizui, Yoshiharu; Myint, Khin; Park, Eun Sun; Puyang, Xiaoling; Selvaraj, Anand; Thomas, Michael P; Tsai, Jennifer; Wang, John Y; Warmuth, Markus; Yang, Hui; Zhu, Ping; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Furman, Richard R; Yu, Lihua; Smith, Peter G; Buonamici, Silvia

    2015-11-03

    Recurrent mutations in the spliceosome are observed in several human cancers, but their functional and therapeutic significance remains elusive. SF3B1, the most frequently mutated component of the spliceosome in cancer, is involved in the recognition of the branch point sequence (BPS) during selection of the 3' splice site (ss) in RNA splicing. Here, we report that common and tumor-specific splicing aberrations are induced by SF3B1 mutations and establish aberrant 3' ss selection as the most frequent splicing defect. Strikingly, mutant SF3B1 utilizes a BPS that differs from that used by wild-type SF3B1 and requires the canonical 3' ss to enable aberrant splicing during the second step. Approximately 50% of the aberrantly spliced mRNAs are subjected to nonsense-mediated decay resulting in downregulation of gene and protein expression. These findings ascribe functional significance to the consequences of SF3B1 mutations in cancer.

  15. Discriminative detection of low-abundance point mutations using a PCR/ligase detection reaction/capillary gel electrophoresis method and fluorescence dual-channel monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mariko; Shimase, Koji; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2014-04-01

    We applied a facile LIF dual-channel monitoring system recently developed and reported by our group to the polymerase chain reaction/ligase detection reaction/CGE method for detecting low-abundance point mutations present in a wild-type sequence-dominated population. Mutation discrimination limits and signaling fidelity of the analytical system were evaluated using three mutant variations in codon 12 of the K-ras oncogene that have high diagnostic value for colorectal cancer. We demonstrated the high sensitivity of the present method by detecting rare mutations present among an excess of wild-type alleles (one mutation among ~100 normal sequences). This method also simultaneously interrogated the allelic compositions of the test samples with high specificity through spectral discrimination of the dye-tagged ligase detection reaction products using the dual-channel monitoring system.

  16. An identical, complex TP53 mutation arising independently in two unrelated families with diverse cancer profiles: the complexity of interpreting cancer risk in carriers

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, E M; Ribeiro, R C; Li, J; Taja-Chayeb, L; Carrasco, L F; de Lourdes Peña-Torres, M; Vidal-Millán, S; Maldonado-Mtz, H; Dueñas-González, A; McGregor, L; Zambetti, G P

    2012-01-01

    Most inherited TP53 mutations have been identified in individuals with a family cancer predisposition syndrome, in which the activity of p53 mutants is severely reduced. However, germline p53 mutants in children with ‘sporadic' adrenocortical or choroid plexus tumors exhibit a wide range of functional activity. Here, we demonstrate the occurrence of a complex germline TP53 mutation in two unrelated families with different cancer phenotypes, neither fulfilling the classic criteria for Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The TP53 mutation consists of a duplication of 7 bp in exon 4, resulting in a frame shift and premature stop signal. Haplotype analysis indicated that the mutation arose independently in the two families. Analysis of the DNA secondary structure predicts the TP53 mutation occurred within a hairpin loop. Additional germline complex mutations occurring within the same region of exon 4 have been identified in the IARC database. Our findings suggest that certain TP53 regions are prone to intrinsic genetic alterations, possibly through defects in DNA replication or repair. Further, carriers of the same TP53 mutation can have diverse cancer profiles, illustrating the complexity of genetic counseling and risk prediction. PMID:23552518

  17. Altering a gene involved in nuclear distribution increases the repeat-induced point mutation process in the fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhouche, Khaled; Zickler, Denise; Debuchy, Robert; Arnaise, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a homology-dependent gene-silencing mechanism that introduces C:G-to-T:A transitions in duplicated DNA segments. Cis-duplicated sequences can also be affected by another mechanism called premeiotic recombination (PR). Both are active over the sexual cycle of some filamentous fungi, e.g., Neurospora crassa and Podospora anserina. During the sexual cycle, several developmental steps require precise nuclear movement and positioning, but connections between RIP, PR, and nuclear distributions have not yet been established. Previous work has led to the isolation of ami1, the P. anserina ortholog of the Aspergillus nidulans apsA gene, which is required for nuclear positioning. We show here that ami1 is involved in nuclear distribution during the sexual cycle and that alteration of ami1 delays the fruiting-body development. We also demonstrate that ami1 alteration affects loss of transgene functions during the sexual cycle. Genetically linked multiple copies of transgenes are affected by RIP and PR much more frequently in an ami1 mutant cross than in a wild-type cross. Our results suggest that the developmental slowdown of the ami1 mutant during the period of RIP and PR increases time exposure to the duplication detection system and thus increases the frequency of RIP and PR. PMID:15166143

  18. Characterization of a point mutation in the parC gene of Mycoplasma bovirhinis associated with fluoroquinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Kawasaki, Y; Kotani, K; Abiko, K; Sato, H

    2004-05-01

    Quinolone-resistant (QR) mutants of Mycoplasma bovirhinis strain PG43 (type strain) were generated by stepwise selection in increasing concentrations of enrofloxacin (ENR). An alteration was found in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the parC gene coding for the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV from these mutants, but not in the gyrA, gyrB, and parE gene coding for the GyrA and GyrB subunits of DNA gyrase and the ParE subunit of topoisomerase IV. Similarly, such an alteration in QRDR of parC was found in the field isolates of M. bovirhinis, which possessed various levels of QR. The substitution of leucine (Leu) by serine (Ser) at position 80 of QRDR of ParC was observed in both QR-mutants and QR-isolates. This is the first report of QR based on a point mutation of the parC gene in M. bovirhinis.

  19. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27609304

  20. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2016-09-09

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9.

  1. Analgesia and unwanted benzodiazepine effects in point-mutated mice expressing only one benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Ralvenius, William T; Benke, Dietmar; Acuña, Mario A; Rudolph, Uwe; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich

    2015-04-13

    Agonists at the benzodiazepine-binding site of GABAA receptors (BDZs) enhance synaptic inhibition through four subtypes (α1, α2, α3 and α5) of GABAA receptors (GABAAR). When applied to the spinal cord, they alleviate pathological pain; however, insufficient efficacy after systemic administration and undesired effects preclude their use in routine pain therapy. Previous work suggested that subtype-selective drugs might allow separating desired antihyperalgesia from unwanted effects, but the lack of selective agents has hitherto prevented systematic analyses. Here we use four lines of triple GABAAR point-mutated mice, which express only one benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAAR subtype at a time, to show that targeting only α2GABAARs achieves strong antihyperalgesia and reduced side effects (that is, no sedation, motor impairment and tolerance development). Additional pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses in these mice explain why clinically relevant antihyperalgesia cannot be achieved with nonselective BDZs. These findings should foster the development of innovative subtype-selective BDZs for novel indications such as chronic pain.

  2. Point mutations in EBV gH that abrogate or differentially affect B cell and epithelial cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Liguo; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M. . E-mail: lhuttf@lsuhsc.edu

    2007-06-20

    Cell fusion mediated by Epstein-Barr virus requires three conserved glycoproteins, gB and gHgL, but activation is cell type specific. B cell fusion requires interaction between MHC class II and a fourth virus glycoprotein, gp42, which complexes non-covalently with gHgL. Epithelial cell fusion requires interaction between gHgL and a novel epithelial cell coreceptor and is blocked by excess gp42. We show here that gp42 interacts directly with gH and that point mutations in the region of gH recognized by an antibody that differentially inhibits epithelial and B cell fusion significantly impact both the core fusion machinery and cell-specific events. Substitution of alanine for glycine at residue 594 completely abrogates fusion with either B cells or epithelial cells. Substitution of alanine for glutamic acid at residue 595 reduces fusion with epithelial cells, greatly enhances fusion with B cells and allows low levels of B cell fusion even in the absence of gL.

  3. A simple extension to the CMASA method for the prediction of catalytic residues in the presence of single point mutations.

    PubMed

    Flores, David I; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Brizuela, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    The automatic identification of catalytic residues still remains an important challenge in structural bioinformatics. Sequence-based methods are good alternatives when the query shares a high percentage of identity with a well-annotated enzyme. However, when the homology is not apparent, which occurs with many structures from the structural genome initiative, structural information should be exploited. A local structural comparison is preferred to a global structural comparison when predicting functional residues. CMASA is a recently proposed method for predicting catalytic residues based on a local structure comparison. The method achieves high accuracy and a high value for the Matthews correlation coefficient. However, point substitutions or a lack of relevant data strongly affect the performance of the method. In the present study, we propose a simple extension to the CMASA method to overcome this difficulty. Extensive computational experiments are shown as proof of concept instances, as well as for a few real cases. The results show that the extension performs well when the catalytic site contains mutated residues or when some residues are missing. The proposed modification could correctly predict the catalytic residues of a mutant thymidylate synthase, 1EVF. It also successfully predicted the catalytic residues for 3HRC despite the lack of information for a relevant side chain atom in the PDB file.

  4. Functional effect of point mutations in the alpha-folate receptor gene of CABA I ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, F; Miotti, S; Galmozzi, E; Mazzi, M; Sforzini, S; Canevari, S; Tomassetti, A

    2001-01-01

    The alpha-folate receptor (alpha FR) is overexpressed in 90% of nonmucinous ovarian carcinomas. In addition to the known role of alpha FR binding and mediating the internalization of folates, functional interaction of alpha FR with signaling molecules was recently shown. To identify a model to study the role of alpha FR in ovarian carcinoma, we characterized the alpha FR gene in the ovarian carcinoma cell line CABA I in comparison to a reference line, IGROV1. In CABA I cells, Northern blot analysis revealed an alpha FR transcript of the expected length and FACS analysis indicated receptor expression on the cell membrane; however, RNase protection assay revealed no specific signals. Southern blot and genomic PCR analysis suggested the presence of a rearrangement(s) involving the 5' region of the gene in CABA I cells as compared to IGROV1 cells. Cloning and sequencing of CABA I alpha FR cDNA revealed several point mutations. The partitioning of alpha FR in membrane microdomains from CABA I cells and its association with regulatory molecules was comparable to that of IGROV1 cells. By contrast, the alpha FR expressed on the CABA I cell membrane bound folic acid with lower affinity, and ectopic expression of the corresponding cDNA in CHO cells confirmed impaired folic acid binding. Thus, CABA I cells may provide a tool to delineate functional domains of the alpha FR.

  5. A Simple Extension to the CMASA Method for the Prediction of Catalytic Residues in the Presence of Single Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Flores, David I.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Brizuela, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The automatic identification of catalytic residues still remains an important challenge in structural bioinformatics. Sequence-based methods are good alternatives when the query shares a high percentage of identity with a well-annotated enzyme. However, when the homology is not apparent, which occurs with many structures from the structural genome initiative, structural information should be exploited. A local structural comparison is preferred to a global structural comparison when predicting functional residues. CMASA is a recently proposed method for predicting catalytic residues based on a local structure comparison. The method achieves high accuracy and a high value for the Matthews correlation coefficient. However, point substitutions or a lack of relevant data strongly affect the performance of the method. In the present study, we propose a simple extension to the CMASA method to overcome this difficulty. Extensive computational experiments are shown as proof of concept instances, as well as for a few real cases. The results show that the extension performs well when the catalytic site contains mutated residues or when some residues are missing. The proposed modification could correctly predict the catalytic residues of a mutant thymidylate synthase, 1EVF. It also successfully predicted the catalytic residues for 3HRC despite the lack of information for a relevant side chain atom in the PDB file. PMID:25268770

  6. Co-occurrence of Point Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Aedes aegypti Populations in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Hitoshi; Oo, Sai Zaw Min; Thaung, Sein; Kawashima, Emiko; Maung, Yan Naung Maung; Thu, Hlaing Myat; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Minakawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Background Single amino acid substitutions in the voltage-gated sodium channel associated with pyrethroid resistance constitute one of the main causative factors of knockdown resistance in insects. The kdr gene has been observed in several mosquito species; however, point mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar have not been fully characterized. The aim of the present study was to determine the types and frequencies of mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti collected from used tires in Yangon City, Myanmar. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined high pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti larvae at all collection sites in Yangon City, by using a simplified knockdown bioassay. We showed that V1016G and S989P mutations were widely distributed, with high frequencies (84.4% and 78.8%, respectively). By contrast, we were unable to detect I1011M (or I1011V) or L1014F mutations. F1534C mutations were also widely distributed, but with a lower frequency than the V1016G mutation (21.2%). High percentage of co-occurrence of the homozygous V1016G/S989P mutations was detected (65.7%). Additionally, co-occurrence of homozygous V1016G/F1534C mutations (2.9%) and homozygous V1016G/F1534C/S989P mutations (0.98%) were detected in the present study. Conclusions/Significance Pyrethroid insecticides were first used for malaria control in 1992, and have since been constantly used in Myanmar. This intensive use may explain the strong selection pressure toward Aedes aegypti, because this mosquito is generally a domestic and endophagic species with a preference for indoor breeding. Extensive use of DDT for malaria control before the use of this chemical was banned may also explain the development of pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti. PMID:25077956

  7. SOE-LRed: a simple and time-efficient method to localize genes with point mutations onto the Escherichia coli chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Ryan W.; Cafarelli, Tiziana M.; Godoy, Veronica G.

    2011-01-01

    We report a powerful method to replace wild type genes on the chromosome of Escherichia coli. Employing a unique form of PCR, we generate easily constructible gene fusions bearing single point mutations. Used in conjunction with homologous recombination, this method eliminates cloning procedures previously used for this purpose. PMID:21185880

  8. A point mutation in NEMO associated with anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency pathology results in destabilization of the oligomer and reduces lipopolysaccharide- and tumor necrosis factor-mediated NF-kappa B activation.

    PubMed

    Vinolo, Emilie; Sebban, Hélène; Chaffotte, Alain; Israël, Alain; Courtois, Gilles; Véron, Michel; Agou, Fabrice

    2006-03-10

    The NEMO (NF-kappaB essential modulator) protein plays a crucial role in the canonical NF-kappaB pathway as the regulatory component of the IKK (IkappaB kinase) complex. The human disease anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (EDA-ID) has been recently linked to mutations in NEMO. We investigated the effect of an alanine to glycine substitution found in the NEMO polypeptide of an EDA-ID patient. This pathogenic mutation is located within the minimal oligomerization domain of the protein, which is required for the IKK activation in response to diverse stimuli. The mutation does not dramatically change the native-like state of the trimer, but temperature-induced unfolding studied by circular dichroism showed that it leads to an important loss in the oligomer stability. Furthermore, fluorescence studies showed that the tyrosine located in the adjacent zinc finger domain, which is possibly required for NEMO ubiquitination, exhibits an alteration in its spectral properties. This is probably due to a conformational change of this domain, providing evidence for a close interaction between the oligomerization domain and the zinc finger. In addition, functional complementation assays using NEMO-deficient pre-B and T lymphocytes showed that the pathogenic mutation reduced TNF-alpha and LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation by altering the assembly of the IKK complex. Altogether, our findings provide understanding as to how a single point mutation in NEMO leads to the observed EDA-ID phenotype in relation to the NEMO-dependent mechanism of IKK activation.

  9. Highly diverse, massive organic data as explored by a composite QSPR strategy: an advanced study of boiling point.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, A A; Ivanov, A A; Oliferenko, A A; Palyulin, V A; Zefirov, N S

    2005-06-01

    An improved strategy of quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies of diverse and inhomogeneous organic datasets has been proposed. A molecular connectivity term was successively corrected for different structural features encoded in fragmental descriptors. The so-called solvation index 1chis (a weighted Randic index) was used as a "leading" variable and standardized molecular fragments were employed as "corrective" class-specific variables. Performance of the new approach was illustrated by modelling a dataset of experimental normal boiling points of 833 organic compounds belonging to 20 structural classes. Firstly, separate QSPR models were derived for each class and for eight groups of structurally similar classes. Finally, a general model formed by combining all the classes together was derived (r2=0.957, s=12.9degreesC). The strategy outlined can find application in QSPR analyses of massive, highly diverse databases of organic compounds.

  10. Diversity of LTR-retrotransposons and Enhancer/Suppressor Mutator-like transposons in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Gbadegesin, Michael A; Wills, Matthew A; Beeching, John R

    2008-10-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz), though a major world crop with enormous potential, is very under studied. Little is known about its genome structure and organisation. Transposable elements have a key role in the evolution of genome structure, and can be used as important tools in applied genetics. This paper sets out to survey the diversity of members of three major classes of transposable element within the cassava genome and in relation to similar elements in other plants. Members of two classes of LTR-retrotransposons, Ty1/copia-like and Ty3/gypsy-like, and of Enhancer/Suppressor Mutator (En/Spm)-like transposons were isolated and characterised. Analyses revealed 59 families of Ty1/copia, 26 families of Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons, and 40 families of En/Spm in the cassava genome. In the comparative analyses, the predicted amino acid sequences for these transposon classes were compared with those of related elements from other plant species. These revealed that there were multiple lineages of Ty1/copia-like retrotransposons in the genome of cassava and suggested that vertical and horizontal transmission as the source of cassava Mecops may not be mutually exclusive. For the Ty3/gypsy elements network, two groups of cassava Megyps were evident including the Arabidopsis Athila lineage. However, cassava En/Spm-like elements (Meens) constituted a single group within a network of plant En/Spm-like elements. Hybridisation analysis supported the presence of transposons in the genome of cassava in medium (Ty3/gypsy and En/Spm) to high (Ty1/copia) copy numbers. Thus the cassava genome was shown to contain diverse members of three major classes of transposable element; however, the different classes exhibited contrasting evolutionary histories.

  11. Connecting Online Learners with Diverse Local Practices: The Design of Effective Common Reference Points for Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend Wise, Alyssa; Padmanabhan, Poornima; Duffy, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    This mixed-methods study probed the effectiveness of three kinds of objects (video, theory, metaphor) as common reference points for conversations between online learners (student teachers). Individuals' degree of detail-focus was examined as a potentially interacting covariate and the outcome measure was learners' level of tacit knowledge related…

  12. Beyond the Tipping Point: Issues of Racial Diversity in Magnet Schools Following Unitary Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smrekar, Claire

    2009-01-01

    This article uses qualitative case study methodology to examine why the racial composition of magnet schools in Nashville, Tennessee, has shifted to predominantly African American in the aftermath of unitary status. The article compares the policy contexts and parents' reasons for choosing magnet schools at two points in time--under court order…

  13. Expressed antibody repertoires in human cord blood cells: 454 sequencing and IMGT/HighV-QUEST analysis of germline gene usage, junctional diversity, and somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Prabakaran, Ponraj; Chen, Weizao; Singarayan, Maria G; Stewart, Claudia C; Streaker, Emily; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-05-01

    Human cord blood cell-derived IgM antibodies are important for the neonate immune responses and construction of germline-based immunoglobulin libraries. Several previous studies of a relatively small number of sequences found that they exhibit restrictions in the usage of germline genes and in the diversity of the variable heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 compared to adults. To further characterize such restrictions on a larger scale and to compare the early B-cell diversity to adult IgM repertoires, we performed 454 sequencing and IMGT/HighV-QUEST analysis of cord blood IG libraries from two babies and determined germline gene usage, V-D-J rearrangement, VHCDR3 diversity, and somatic mutations to characterize human neonate repertoire. Most of the germline subgroups were identified with frequencies comparable to those present in the adult IgM repertoire except for the IGHV1-2 gene that was preferentially expressed in the cord blood cells. The gene usage diversity contributed to 1,430 unique IGH V-D-J rearrangement patterns while the exonuclease trimming and N region addition at the V-D-J junctions along with gene diversity created a wide range of VHCDR3 with different lengths and sequence variability. We observed a lower degree of somatic mutations in the CDR and framework regions of antibodies from cord blood cells compared to adults. These results provide insights into the characteristics of human cord blood antibody repertoires, which have gene usage diversity and VHCDR3 lengths similar to that of the adult IgM repertoire but differ significantly in some of the gene usages, V-D-J rearrangements, junctional diversity, and somatic mutations.

  14. Diversity of stroke presentation in CADASIL: study from patients harboring the predominant NOTCH3 mutation R544C.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jay Chol; Song, Sook-Keun; Lee, Jung Seok; Kang, Sa-Yoon; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a single-gene disorder of the cerebral small blood vessels caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. Several characteristic population-specific clinical phenotypes and neuroimaging features have been reported in CADASIL. This study investigated the clinical stroke presentation and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a group of patients with CADASIL. We reviewed the clinical stroke presentation and brain MRI findings in 73 consecutive Korean patients aged >18 years diagnosed with CADASIL between May 2004 and April 2009. Brain MRI images were also scored for lacunar infarction and cerebral microbleeds. Intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS) was assessed by magnetic resonance angiography. Disability was measured with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and classified as good (mRS score 0-2) or poor (mRS score 3-5). In this study, 65 of the 73 patients (90.3%) had the same R544C genotype. A total of 40 episodes of cerebral infarction were confirmed in 31 patients, with a mean age at onset of 58.8 ± 11.4 years (range, 38-76 years). Twelve patients (16.9%) had ICAS, and 5 of these patients had symptomatic stenoses. Intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 9 patients (12.3%). Both intracerebral hemorrhage and ICAS were associated with poor clinical outcome. Our data demonstrate the diversity of clinical stroke presentation according to ethnicity and vascular risk factors.

  15. X inactivation phenotype in carriers of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: skewed in carriers of a duplication and random in carriers of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Woodward, K; Kirtland, K; Dlouhy, S; Raskind, W; Bird, T; Malcolm, S; Abeliovich, D

    2000-06-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked recessive disease caused by coding sequence mutations in the PLP gene, sub-microscopic duplications of variable sizes including the PLP gene or very rarely deletions of the PLP gene. We analysed the X inactivation pattern in blood of PMD female carriers with duplications and with point mutations. In the majority of duplication carriers (7/11), the X chromosome bearing the duplication was preferentially inactivated, whereas a random pattern of X inactivation was detected in point mutation carriers (3/3), a deletion carrier (1/1), affected females (4/4) who did not have a recognised mutation and normal control females. However 2/5 non-carrier female relatives of patients with a duplication, had skewed X inactivation. The skewed pattern of inactivation observed in most duplication carriers and not in mutation carriers suggests a) that there is selection against those cells in which the duplicated X chromosome is active and b) other expressed sequences within the duplicated region rather than mutant PLP may be responsible. Since the skewed X inactivation did not segregate with the disease in two families and the pattern of X inactivation was variable among the duplication carriers, the pattern X inactivation is an unsuitable diagnostic tool for female carriers of PMD.

  16. Detection of RET proto-oncogene point mutations in paraffin-embedded pheochromocytoma specimens by nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Komminoth, P.; Kunz, E.; Hiort, O.; Schröder, S.; Matias-Guiu, X.; Christiansen, G.; Roth, J.; Heitz, P. U.

    1994-01-01

    The suitability of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumor material was evaluated for molecular analysis of the RET proto-oncogene. We analyzed exons 10, 11, and 16 for point mutations in seven sporadic and six multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A-associated pheochromocytomas by a nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism assay followed by nonradioactive direct sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA using an automated DNA sequencer. All MEN 2A-associated pheochromocytomas contained a heterozygous missense germline mutation within cystine codons of the cysteine-rich extracellular domain encoded by exons 10 and 11. Mutations were located in codon 619 (TGC-->TCC; Cys-->Ser) in one, in codon 635 (TGC-->CGC; Cys--Arg) in three, and in codon 635 (TGC-->TAC; Cys-->Tyr) in two pheochromocytomas. No tumor-specific (somatic) mutations were detected in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the sporadic pheochromocytomas. These data support recent findings that germline point mutations that are clustered in distinct cysteine codons of the RET proto-oncogene are involved in the neoplastic phenotype of the MEN 2A syndrome. Our results demonstrate that both nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing are suitable methods to detect single base substitutions in DNA extracted from archival material. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7943181

  17. Somatic Point Mutations in mtDNA Control Region Are Influenced by Genetic Background and Associated with Healthy Aging: A GEHA Study

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; Bruni, Amalia C.; Hervonen, Antti; Majamaa, Kari; Sevini, Federica; Franceschi, Claudio; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Tissue specific somatic mutations occurring in the mtDNA control region have been proposed to provide a survival advantage. Data on twins and on relatives of long-lived subjects suggested that the occurrence/accumulation of these mutations may be genetically influenced. To further investigate control region somatic heteroplasmy in the elderly, we analyzed the segment surrounding the nt 150 position (previously reported as specific of Leukocytes) in various types of leukocytes obtained from 195 ultra-nonagenarians sib-pairs of Italian or Finnish origin collected in the frame of the GEHA Project. We found a significant correlation of the mtDNA control region heteroplasmy between sibs, confirming a genetic influence on this phenomenon. Furthermore, many subjects showed heteroplasmy due to mutations different from the C150T transition. In these cases heteroplasmy was correlated within sibpairs in Finnish and northern Italian samples, but not in southern Italians. This suggested that the genetic contribution to control region mutations may be population specific. Finally, we observed a possible correlation between heteroplasmy and Hand Grip strength, one of the best markers of physical performance and of mortality risk in the elderly. Our study provides new evidence on the relevance of mtDNA somatic mutations in aging and longevity and confirms that the occurrence of specific point mutations in the mtDNA control region may represent a strategy for the age-related remodelling of organismal functions. PMID:20976236

  18. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-02-10

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  19. Analysis of PolSK based FSO system using wavelength and time diversity over strong atmospheric turbulence with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, K.; Cheepalli, Shashidhar; Kumar, D. Sriram

    2014-08-01

    Free space optics (FSO) or wireless optical communication systems is an evolving alternative to the current radio frequency (RF) links due to its high and secure datarates, large license free bandwidth access, ease of installation, and lower cost for shorter range distances. These systems are largely influenced by atmospheric conditions due to wireless transmission; requirement of line of sight (LOS) propagation may lead to alignment problems in turn pointing errors. In this paper, we consider atmospheric turbulence and pointing errors are the major limitations. We tried to address these difficulties by considering polarization shift keying (PolSK) modulated FSO communication system with wavelength and time diversity. We derived the closed form expressions for estimation of the average bit error rate (BER) and outage probability, which are vital system performance metrics. Analytical results are shown considering different practical cases.

  20. A protein-targeting strategy used to develop a selective inhibitor of the E17K point mutation in the PH domain of Akt1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyle, Kaycie M.; Farrow, Blake; Qiao Hee, Ying; Work, Jeremy; Wong, Michelle; Lai, Bert; Umeda, Aiko; Millward, Steven W.; Nag, Arundhati; Das, Samir; Heath, James R.

    2015-05-01

    Ligands that can bind selectively to proteins with single amino-acid point mutations offer the potential to detect or treat an abnormal protein in the presence of the wild type (WT). However, it is difficult to develop a selective ligand if the point mutation is not associated with an addressable location, such as a binding pocket. Here we report an all-chemical synthetic epitope-targeting strategy that we used to discover a 5-mer peptide with selectivity for the E17K-transforming point mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of the Akt1 oncoprotein. A fragment of Akt1 that contained the E17K mutation and an I19[propargylglycine] substitution was synthesized to form an addressable synthetic epitope. Azide-presenting peptides that clicked covalently onto this alkyne-presenting epitope were selected from a library using in situ screening. One peptide exhibits a 10:1 in vitro selectivity for the oncoprotein relative to the WT, with a similar selectivity in cells. This 5-mer peptide was expanded into a larger ligand that selectively blocks the E17K Akt1 interaction with its PIP3 (phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate) substrate.

  1. Folding, Assembly, and Aggregation of Recombinant Murine Amelogenins with T21I and P41T Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Lei, Ya-Ping; Snead, Malcolm L.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Two point mutations (T21I and P40T) within amelogenin have been identified from human DNA sequences in 2 instances of amelogenesis imperfecta. We studied the folding and self-assembly of recombinant amelogenin (rM180) compared to the T21I and P40T mutants analogs. At pH 5.8 and 25°C, rM180 and the P41T mutant existed as monomers, whereas the T21I mutant formed small oligomers. At pH 8 and 25°C, all of the amelogenin samples formed nanospheres with hydrodynamic radii (RH) of around 15–16 nm. Upon heating to 37°C, particles of P41T increased in size (RH = 18 nm). During thermal denaturation at pH 5.8, both of the mutant proteins refolded more slowly than the wild-type (WT) rM180. Variable temperature tryptophan fluorescence and dynamic light scattering studies showed that the WT transformed to a partially folded conformation upon heating and remained stable. Thermal denaturation and refolding studies indicated that the mutants were less stable and exhibit a greater ability to prematurely aggregate compared to the WT. Our data suggest that in the case of P41T, alterations in the self-assembly of amelogenin are a consequence of destabilization of the secondary structure, while in the case of T21I they are a consequence of change in the overall hydrophobicity at the N-terminal region. We propose that alterations in the assembly (i.e. premature aggregation) of mutant amelogenins may have a profound effect on intra- and extracellular processes such as amelogenin secretion, proteolysis, and its interactions with nonamelogenins as well as with the forming mineral. PMID:21540557

  2. A Single Point Mutation within the Coding Sequence of Cholera Toxin B Subunit Will Increase Its Expression Yield

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Bita; Boustanshenas, Mina; Ghorbani, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) has been extensively considered as an immunogenic and adjuvant protein, but its yield of expression is not satisfactory in many studies. The aim of this study was to compare the expression of native and mutant recombinant CTB (rCTB) in pQE vector. Methods: ctxB fragment from Vibrio cholerae O1 ATCC14035 containing the substitution of mutant ctxB for amino acid S128T was amplified by PCR and cloned in pGETM-T easy vector. It was then transformed to E. coli Top 10F' and cultured on LB agar plate containing ampicillin. Sequence analysis confirmed the mature ctxB gene sequence and the mutant one in both constructs which were further subcloned to pQE-30 vector. Both constructs were subsequently transformed to E. coli M15 (pREP4) for expression of mature and mutant rCTB. Results: SDS-PAGE analysis showed the maximum expression of rCTB in both systems at 5 hours after induction and Western-blot analysis confirmed the presence of rCTB in blotting membranes. The expression of mutant rCTB was much higher than mature rCTB, which may be the result of serine-to-threonine substitution at position 128 of mature rCTB amino acid sequence created by PCR mutagenesis. The mutant rCTB retained pentameric stability and its ability to bind to anti- cholera toxin IgG antibodies. Conclusion: Point mutation in ctxB sequence resulted in over-expression of rCTB, probably due to the increase of solubility of produced rCTB. Consequently, this expression system can be used to produce rCTB in high yield. PMID:24842138

  3. A desmoplakin point mutation with enhanced keratin association ameliorates pemphigus vulgaris autoantibody-mediated loss of cell cohesion.

    PubMed

    Dehner, Carina; Rötzer, Vera; Waschke, Jens; Spindler, Volker

    2014-09-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) serves to anchor intermediate filaments in desmosomal complexes. Recent data suggest that a specific DP point mutation (S2849G) exhibits increased keratin filament association and fosters Ca(2+) insensitivity of desmosomes in keratinocytes, presumably by rendering DP inaccessible for protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation. Previously, we have reported that depletion of the desmosomal adhesion molecule desmoglein (Dsg)3 induced by autoantibodies from patients with the blistering skin disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV) IgG is reduced in maturated desmosomes and dependent on PKC signaling. We investigated the role of DP-S2849G for loss of cell cohesion mediated by PV-IgG. In cell dissociation assays, expression of green fluorescent protein-tagged DP-S2849G (DP-S2849G-GFP) increased cell cohesion in two different human keratinocyte cell lines and ameliorated loss of cell adhesion induced by pemphigus autoantibodies. Depletion of Dsg3 was inhibited by DP-S2849G-GFP in the cytoskeletal (Triton X-100 insoluble) fraction, and keratin filament retraction, a hallmark of PV, was efficiently blocked similar to treatment with the PKC inhibitor Bim-X. We found that DP is phosphorylated after incubation with PV-IgG in a PKC-dependent manner and that DP-S2849G-GFP expression prevents DP phosphorylation and increases association of PKC-α with PKC scaffold receptor for activated C-kinase 1. Taken together, our data indicate that DP phosphorylation at S2849 represents an important mechanism in pemphigus pathogenesis, which, by reversing Ca(2+) insensitivity, promotes Dsg3 depletion.

  4. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila melanogaster genes. Report I. The vestigial gene: molecular characteristic of "point" mutations].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, I D; Afanas'eva, K P; Aleksandrova, M V; Lapidus, I L

    2012-01-01

    The screening of PCR-detected DNA alterations in 9 spontaneous and 59 gamma-ray-, neutron - or neutron + gamma-ray-induced Drosophila vestigial (vg) gene/"point" mutations was carried out. The detected patterns of existence or absence of either of 16 overlapping fragments into which vg gene (15.1 kb, 8 exons, 7 introns) was divided enable us to subdivide all mutants into 4 classes: (i) PCR+ (40.7%) without the detected changes; (ii) "single-site" (33.9%) with the loss of a single fragment; (iii) partial detections (15.2%) as a loss of 2-9 adjacent fragments and (iv) "cluster" mutants (10.2%) having 2-3 independent changes of(ii) and/or (iii) classes. All spontaneous mutants except one were found to be classified as (ii) whereas radiation-induced mutants are represented by all 4 classes whose interrelation is determined by the dose and radiation quality. In particular, the efficacy of neutrons was found to be nine times as large as that of gamma-rays under the "cluster" mutant induction. Essentially, the distribution of DNA changes along the gene is uneven. CSGE-assay of PCR+-exon 3 revealed DNA heteroduplexes in 5 out of 17 PCR+-mutants studied, 2 of which had small deletions (5 and 11 b) and 3 others made transitions (A --> G) as shown by the sequencing. Therefore, gamma-rays and neutrons seem to be significant environmental agents increasing the SNP risk for the population through their action on the germ cells. The results obtained are also discussed within the framework of the track structure theory and the notion of quite different chromatin organization in somatic and germ cells.

  5. Point mutation in activated c-Ha-ras gene of a chemically induced transplantable human pancreas carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, K.K.; Parsa, I.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have reported a model of human pancreas carcinogenesis where repeated treatment with MNU of explants results in the development of transplantable carcinoma. This report compares the endonuclease digests of DNAs from normal human pancreas (HP) and MNU-induced transplantable tumor (HP-T1) analyzed with /sup 32/P-labelled Ha-ras probe prepared from clone BS-9. The hybridization patterns of BamHI, BglII, EcoRI and HindIII digests of HP were significantly different from those of HP-T1. In EcoRI digests a 3.0 kb fragments of HP-T1 DNA hybridized with Ha-ras probe instead of a 4.3 kb fragments seen in HP DNA. The pattern for HindIII digests was similar to those of EcoRI. The BgIII digests of HP DNA revealed two hybridizing fragments of 8.0 and 4.3 kb whereas those of HP-T1 DNA fragments measured 8.5 and 4.0 kb. BamHI treated HP DNA showed only hybridizing fragments of 6.6 kb while the HP-T1 DNA showed to hybridizing fragments of 6.8 and 7.2 kb. The digested DNAs by HhaI, HinfI, KpnI, pstI, PvuII, SaII, SstI, TaqI and XbaI showed similar hybridization profiles. The point mutation in c-Ha-ras was examined in the HpaII and MspI double digests of both DNAs by 0.6 Kb SmaI fragments of pEJ. The hybridized fragments measured 412 and 355 bp in DNA digests from tumor and normal pancreas respectively.

  6. Sphingosine kinase: a point of convergence in the action of diverse neutrophil priming agents.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Alison C; Buckley, Avril; Chilvers, Edwin R; Rossi, Adriano G; Haslett, Christopher; Sethi, Tariq

    2002-12-01

    Neutrophils are a vital component of the early acute inflammatory response, but can cause profound tissue damage when activated to excess or prevented from undergoing apoptosis. However, much remains unknown about the intracellular signaling pathways regulating neutrophil activity. The structurally diverse neutrophil-priming agents platelet-activating factor, TNF-alpha, and the substance P analog [D-Arg(6), D-Trp(7,9),N(me)Phe(8)]-substance P(6-11) (SP-G) stimulated a rapid increase in sphingosine kinase activity in freshly isolated human neutrophils. This activity was blocked by preincubation with the sphingosine kinase inhibitor N,N-dimethylsphingosine (DMS). DMS also inhibited the increase in intracellular calcium concentration stimulated by platelet-activating factor, fMLP, and SP-G. This suggests that the increase in intracellular calcium concentration by these agents is dependent on sphingosine kinase activation and the generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate. Changes in cell polarization and the augmentation of the fMLP-induced superoxide anion generation, by all priming agents were also inhibited by DMS, while only the superoxide anion release was blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. Moreover, SP-G and GM-CSF inhibited constitutive neutrophil apoptosis which was completely blocked by DMS. These results suggest a novel role for sphingosine kinase in the regulation of neutrophil priming.

  7. Novel point mutation in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene causes congenital erythropoietic porphyria of a Japanese family.

    PubMed

    Takamura, N; Hombrados, I; Tanigawa, K; Namba, H; Nagayama, Y; de Verneuil, H; Yamashita, S

    1997-06-13

    The molecular basis of the uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROIIIS) deficiency was investigated in a member of a Japanese family. This defect in heme biosynthesis is responsible for a rare autosomal recessive disease: congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) or Günther's disease. The patient was homozygous for a novel missense mutation: a G to T transition of nucleotide 7 that predicted a valine to phenylalanine substitution at residue 3 (V3F). The parents were heterozygous for the same mutation. The loss of UROIIIS activity was verified by an in vitro assay system. The corresponding mutated protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and no residual activity was observed. Further studies are needed to determine whether the mutations of the UROIIIS gene (UROS) have a specific profile in Japan compared to European or American countries.

  8. Rapid mutation of Spirulina platensis by a new mutagenesis system of atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) and generation of a mutant library with diverse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9(th) subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae.

  9. Rapid Mutation of Spirulina platensis by a New Mutagenesis System of Atmospheric and Room Temperature Plasmas (ARTP) and Generation of a Mutant Library with Diverse Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9th subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae. PMID:24319517

  10. Multiple point mutations in a shuttle vector propagated in human cells: evidence for an error-prone DNA polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, M.M.; Bredberg, A.; Seetharam, S.; Kraemer, K.H.

    1987-07-01

    Mutagenesis was studied at the DNA-sequence level in human fibroblast and lymphoid cells by use of a shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, containing a suppressor tRNA marker gene. In a series of experiments, 62 plasmids were recovered that had two to six base substitutions in the 160-base-pair marker gene. Approximately 20-30% of the mutant plasmids that were recovered after passing ultraviolet-treated pZ189 through a repair-proficient human fibroblast line contained these multiple mutations. In contrast, passage of ultraviolet-treated pZ189 through an excision-repair-deficient (xeroderma pigmentosum) line yielded only 2% multiple base substitution mutants. Introducing a single-strand nick in otherwise unmodified pZ189 adjacent to the marker, followed by passage through the xeroderma pigmentosum cells, resulted in about 66% multiple base substitution mutants. The multiple mutations were found in a 160-base-pair region containing the marker gene but were rarely found in an adjacent 170-base-pair region. Passing ultraviolet-treated or nicked pZ189 through a repair-proficient human B-cell line also yielded multiple base substitution mutations in 20-33% of the mutant plasmids. An explanation for these multiple mutations is that they were generated by an error-prone polymerase while filling gaps. These mutations share many of the properties displayed by mutations in the immunoglobulin hypervariable regions.

  11. Episodic ataxia/myokymia syndrome is associated with point mutations in the human potassium channel gene-KCNA1 (Kv1.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, D.L.; Gancher, S.T.; Nutt, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, familial disorder producing attacks of generalized ataxia, with normal or near-normal neurological function between attacks. One type of EA (MIM No.160120) displays autosomal dominant inheritance and is characterized by episodes of ataxia lasting seconds to minutes with myokymia (rippling of small muscles) evident between attacks. Genetic linkage studies in 4 families suggested localization of an EA/myokymia gene near the K{sup +} channel gene KCNA1 (Kv1.1) on chromosome 12p. Chemical cleavage mismatch and DNA sequence analysis of the KCNA1 coding region in these families identified 4 different missense point mutations present in the heterozygous state. The mutations found were Val174Phe, Arg239Ser, Phe249Ile and Val408Ala; the residue numbers correspond to those in the published amino acid sequence of KCNA1 (Genbank Accession No. L02750). Each of these mutations affects an amino acid residue that is invariant among Drosophila melanogaster, mouse, rat and human, The mutations were present in the affected members of the family and absent in all of the unaffected members and in at least 70 unrelated control individuals. These data strongly suggest that EA/myokymia can result from mutations in the KCNA1 gene.

  12. A Point Mutation in DNA Polymerase β (POLB) Gene Is Associated with Increased Progesterone Receptor (PR) Expression and Intraperitoneal Metastasis in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaohui; Wu, Xiaoling; Ren, Shuyang; Wang, Hongyi; Li, Zhongwu; Alshenawy, Weaam; Li, Wenmei; Cui, Jiantao; Luo, Guangbin; Siegel, Robert S.; Fu, Sidney W.; Lu, Youyong

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of progesterone receptor (PR) has been reported in gastric cancer (GC). We have previously identified a functional T889C point mutation in DNA polymerase beta (POLB), a DNA repair gene in GC. To provide a detailed analysis of molecular changes associated with the mutation, human cDNA microarrays focusing on 18 signal transduction pathways were used to analyze differential gene expression profiles between GC tissues with T889C mutant in POLB gene and those with wild type. Among the differentially expressed genes, notably, PR was one of the significantly up-regulated genes in T889C mutant POLB tissues, which were subsequently confirmed in POLB gene transfected AGS cell line. Interestingly, patients with T889C mutation and PR positivity were associated with higher incidence of intraperitoneal metastasis (IM). In vitro studies indicate that PR expression was upregulated in AGS cell line when transfected with T889C mutant expression vector. Cotransfection of T889C mutant allele and PR gene induced cell migration in the cell line. These data demonstrated that T889C mutation-associated PR overexpression results in increased IM. Therefore, T889C mutation-associated PR overexpression may serve as a biomarker for an adverse prognosis for human GC. PMID:27471563

  13. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations.

    PubMed

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease's high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics' assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions' setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning.

  14. Point mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus enhancer identify a lymphoid-specific viral core motif and 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate-inducible element.

    PubMed Central

    Speck, N A; Renjifo, B; Hopkins, N

    1990-01-01

    The transcriptional enhancer of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is organized as a 75-base-pair repeat, and in each copy of the repeat there are multiple binding sites for nuclear factors. We have introduced point mutations into each of the known nuclear factor-binding sites in the MoMLV enhancer, in both copies of the direct repeat, and have analyzed the transcriptional activity conferred by the mutated enhancers by transient-expression assays in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell lines. Mutation of individual binding sites in the MoMLV enhancer has moderate effects (less than 2-fold to 20-fold) on transcription in six independent cell lines. Several mutations decreased transcription from the MoMLV enhancer ubiquitously (the leukemia virus factor b site and the glucocorticoid response element), whereas others affected transcription specifically in lymphoid cell lines (core motif) or, more significantly, in fibroblasts (nuclear factor 1 site). The transcriptional activity of the MoMLV enhancer can be induced 8- to 10-fold by 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate in Jurkat T cells. Mutations in any of three adjacent binding sites (leukemia virus factor b and c sites and the core motif) within a 28-base-pair region in the center of the direct repeat sequence of the MoMLV enhancer completely attenuate the response to 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate. Images PMID:2104942

  15. Palmoplantar keratosis in oculodentodigital dysplasia with a GJA1 point mutation out of the C-terminal region of connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Kogame, Toshiaki; Dainichi, Teruki; Shimomura, Yutaka; Tanioka, Miki; Kabashima, Kenji; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2014-12-01

    Gap junction proteins are composed of 21 genes of the connexin (Cx) family. They play important roles in cell-cell contact by exchange of small molecules through hemichannels. Hence, mutations of Cx family genes affect various tissues of a body. The mutation of the GJA1 gene, which codes Cx43, causes oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD), commonly in an autosomal dominant manner with phenotypic variability. It has been believed that gene mutations causing truncation of the Cx43 C-terminus is necessary and sufficient for palmoplantar keratosis (PPK) development in ODDD patients. Here, we report a case of an ODDD patient developing PPK with a GJA1 gene mutation (c.412G>A/p.Gly138Ser), which was previously reported in a case of ODDD without PPK and expected not to result in C-terminal truncation of Cx43. This case suggests not only C-terminal truncation, but also that a point mutation in the cytoplasmic region of Cx43 can cause PPK in ODDD patients.

  16. The Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal Syndrome Point Mutation F231L in the ERCC1 DNA Repair Protein Causes Dissociation of the ERCC1-XPF Complex.

    PubMed

    Faridounnia, Maryam; Wienk, Hans; Kovačič, Lidija; Folkers, Gert E; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Kaptein, Robert; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Boelens, Rolf

    2015-08-14

    The ERCC1-XPF heterodimer, a structure-specific DNA endonuclease, is best known for its function in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The ERCC1 point mutation F231L, located at the hydrophobic interaction interface of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) and XPF (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F), leads to severe NER pathway deficiencies. Here, we analyze biophysical properties and report the NMR structure of the complex of the C-terminal tandem helix-hairpin-helix domains of ERCC1-XPF that contains this mutation. The structures of wild type and the F231L mutant are very similar. The F231L mutation results in only a small disturbance of the ERCC1-XPF interface, where, in contrast to Phe(231), Leu(231) lacks interactions stabilizing the ERCC1-XPF complex. One of the two anchor points is severely distorted, and this results in a more dynamic complex, causing reduced stability and an increased dissociation rate of the mutant complex as compared with wild type. These data provide a biophysical explanation for the severe NER deficiencies caused by this mutation.

  17. Genomic rearrangements of the CDKN2A locus are infrequent in Italian malignant melanoma families without evidence of CDKN2A/CDK4 point mutations.

    PubMed

    Vignoli, Marina; Scaini, Maria Chiara; Ghiorzo, Paola; Sestini, Roberta; Bruno, William; Menin, Chiara; Gensini, Francesca; Piazzini, Mauro; Testori, Alessandro; Manoukian, Siranoush; Orlando, Claudio; D'Andrea, Emma; Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2008-12-01

    Predisposition to familial cutaneous malignant melanoma has been associated with mutations in the CDKN2A and CDK4 genes. However, only a small subgroup of melanoma pedigrees harbour CDKN2A or CDK4 germline mutations. It is possible that other types of CDKN2A rearrangements, not detectable by routine PCR-based approaches, are involved in a fraction of melanoma cases negative for point sequence changes. In order to gain insights on the possible role of CDKN2A large deletions or duplications in melanoma susceptibility in the Italian population, we screened a series of 124 cutaneous malignant melanoma families referred to five national medical/cancer genetics centres. All probands were negative for point mutations in CDKN2A and CDK4. All samples were tested by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification), and the results were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR in a subset of 53 cases. No genomic rearrangements were detected in this series, one of the largest so far investigated. These data suggest that large deletions/duplications in the CDKN2A locus are infrequently involved in the development of familial melanoma in the Italian population. Based on these results, routine search for these rearrangements in CDKN2A- and CDK4-mutation negative melanoma families is not warranted, although it would be reasonable to pursue it in selected cases with very strong family history and/or showing linkage to 9p21.

  18. Fast capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence analysis of ligase chain reaction products: human mitochondrial DNA point mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Muth, J; Williams, P M; Williams, S J; Brown, M D; Wallace, D C; Karger, B L

    1996-12-01

    High speed capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) has been used to separate and detect point mutations using the ligase chain reaction (LCR). The method utilizes short capillary columns (7.5 cm effective length) and fields of 400 V/cm to analyze DNA-ethidium bromide complexes using an He/Ne laser. The method was first demonstrated with a commercially available kit for LCR based on a lacI gene fragment inserted in a Bluescript II phagemid. LCR-CE-LIF was then applied to detect point mutations in human mitochondrial DNA, resulting in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Three severe mutations were analyzed in which the original base is substituted by a thymidine base at positions 3460, 11778 and 14459. Appropriate primers were designed with polyT tails for length discrimination of pooled samples. Successful detection of mutated samples was achieved, with appropriate correction for small amounts of nonspecific ligated product. The method is rapid, easy to implement, and automatable.

  19. Microbial Diversity of Source and Point-of-Use Water in Rural Haiti – A Pyrosequencing-Based Metagenomic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Nabanita; Bartelli, Debra; Patra, Cyril; Chauhan, Bhavin V.; Dowd, Scot E.

    2016-01-01

    Haiti endures the poorest water and sanitation infrastructure in the Western Hemisphere, where waterborne diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality. Most of these diseases are reported to be caused by waterborne pathogens. In this study, we examined the overall bacterial diversity of selected source and point-of-use water from rural areas in Central Plateau, Haiti using pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA genes. Taxonomic composition of water samples revealed an abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A total of 38 bacterial families and 60 genera were identified. The presence of several Klebsiella spp. (tentatively, K. pneumoniae, K. variicola and other Klebsiella spp.) was detected in most water samples. Several other human pathogens such as Aeromonas, Bacillus, Clostridium, and Yersinia constituted significantly higher proportion of bacterial communities in the point-of-use water samples compared to source water. Bacterial genera traditionally associated with biofilm formation, such as Chryseobacterium, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, Pseudomonas were found in the point-of-use waters obtained from water filters or domestic water storage containers. Although the pyrosequencing method utilized in this study did not reveal the viability status of these pathogens, the abundance of genetic footprints of the pathogens in water samples indicate the probable risk of bacterial transmission to humans. Therefore, the importance of appropriate handling, purification, and treatment of the source water needed to be clearly communicated to the communities in rural Haiti to ensure the water is safe for their daily use and intake. PMID:27936055

  20. Phenotypic diversity associated with the MT-TV gene m.1644G>A mutation, a matter of quantity.

    PubMed

    Fraidakis, Matthew J; Jardel, Claude; Allouche, Stéphane; Nelson, Isabelle; Auré, Karine; Slama, Abdelhamid; Lemière, Isabelle; Thenint, Jean Philippe; Hamon, Jean Baptiste; Zagnoli, Fabien; Heron, Delphine; Sedel, Frédéric; Lombès, Anne

    2014-03-01

    We describe four patients from three independent families with the m.1644G>A in the MT-TV gene, previously reported without demonstration of its deleterious impact. Very high mutation proportion co-segregated with cytochrome oxidase defect in single muscle fibers and respiratory defect in cybrids as shown by spectrophotometric assays and polarography. The mutation appeared to have a very steep threshold effect with asymptomatic life up to 70% mutation proportion, progressive encephalopathy above 80% and severe Leigh-like syndrome above 95% mutation. One patient did not fit within that frame but presented with characteristics suggesting the presence of an additional disease.

  1. A smart device for label-free and real-time detection of gene point mutations based on the high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqi; Fu, Rongxin; Xie, Liping; Li, Qi; Zhou, Wenhan; Wang, Ruliang; Ye, Jiancheng; Wang, Dong; Xue, Ning; Lin, Xue; Lu, Ying; Huang, Guoliang

    2015-10-07

    A smart device for label-free and real-time detection of gene point mutation-related diseases was developed based on the high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation. The main components of the device included a Peltier cooler and a mini PC board for image processing. Heat from the hot side of the Peltier cooler causes the fluid in a copper chamber to evaporate, and the vapor condenses on the surface of a microarray chip placed on the cold side of the cooler. The high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation relative to the analytes on the microarray chip was explored. Combined with rolling circle amplification, the device visualizes less-to-more hydrophilic transitions caused by gene trapping and DNA amplification. A lung cancer gene point mutation was analysed, proving the high selectivity and multiplex analysis capability of this low-cost device.

  2. Amelogenesis Imperfecta Caused by N-Terminal Enamelin Point Mutations in Mice and Men is driven by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Steven J; Barron, Martin J; Smith, Claire E L; Poulter, James A; Mighell, Alan J; Inglehearn, Chris F; Brown, Catriona J; Rodd, Helen; Kirkham, Jennifer; Dixon, Michael J

    2017-03-11

    "Amelogenesis imperfecta" (AI) describes a group of inherited diseases of dental enamel that have major clinical impact. Here, we identify the aetiology driving AI in mice carrying a p.S55I mutation in enamelin; one of the most commonly mutated proteins underlying AI in humans. Our data indicate that the mutation inhibits the ameloblast secretory pathway leading to ER stress and an activated unfolded protein response (UPR). Initially, with the support of the UPR acting in pro-survival mode, Enamp.S55I heterozygous mice secreted structurally normal enamel. However, enamel secreted thereafter was structurally abnormal; presumably due to the UPR modulating ameloblast behaviour and function in an attempt to relieve ER stress. Homozygous mutant mice failed to produce enamel. We also identified a novel heterozygous ENAMp.L31R mutation causing AI in humans. We hypothesise that ER stress is the aetiological factor in this case of human AI as it shared the characteristic phenotype described above for the Enamp.S55I mouse. We previously demonstrated that AI in mice carrying the Amelxp.Y64H mutation is a proteinopathy. The current data indicate that AI in Enamp.S55I mice is also a proteinopathy, and based on comparative phenotypic analysis, we suggest that human AI resulting from the ENAMp.L31R mutation is another proteinopathic disease. Identifying a common aetiology for AI resulting from mutations in two different genes opens the way for developing pharmaceutical interventions designed to relieve ER stress or modulate the UPR during enamel development to ameliorate the clinical phenotype.

  3. Increased yield of actionable mutations using multi-gene panels to assess hereditary cancer susceptibility in an ethnically diverse clinical cohort.

    PubMed

    Ricker, Charité; Culver, Julie O; Lowstuter, Katrina; Sturgeon, Duveen; Sturgeon, Julia D; Chanock, Christopher R; Gauderman, William J; McDonnell, Kevin J; Idos, Gregory E; Gruber, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to assess multi-gene panel testing in an ethnically diverse clinical cancer genetics practice. We conducted a retrospective study of individuals with a personal or family history of cancer undergoing clinically indicated multi-gene panel tests of 6-110 genes, from six commercial laboratories. The 475 patients in the study included 228 Hispanics (47.6%), 166 non-Hispanic Whites (35.4%), 55 Asians (11.6%), 19 Blacks (4.0%), and seven others (1.5%). Panel testing found that 15.6% (74/475) of patients carried deleterious mutations for a total of 79 mutations identified. This included 7.4% (35/475) of patients who had a mutation identified that would not have been tested with a gene-by-gene approach. The identification of a panel-added mutation impacted clinical management for most of cases (69%, 24/35), and genetic testing was recommended for the first degree relatives of nearly all of them (91%, 32/35). Variants of uncertain significance (VUSs) were identified in a higher proportion of tests performed in ethnic minorities. Multi-gene panel testing increases the yield of mutations detected and adds to the capability of providing individualized cancer risk assessment. VUSs represent an interpretive challenge due to less data available outside of White, non-Hispanic populations. Further studies are necessary to expand understanding of the implementation and utilization of panels across broad clinical settings and patient populations.

  4. Catalase-negative Staphylococcus lugdunensis strain with a novel point mutation in the catalase gene isolated from a patient with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Wang, Yiping; Ling, Buzhi; Ke, Xianfu; Ying, Jianfei; Yu, Yanhong; He, Mingyang; Li, Xiangyang

    2013-04-01

    This report describes the results of the sequence analysis of a methicillin-susceptible strain of catalase-negative Staphylococcus lugdunensis. Molecular characterization of the deduced sequence revealed a novel point mutation in the catalase gene. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a catalase-negative S. lugdunensis strain, although catalase-negative isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis have been previously reported.

  5. Genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus and mutations associated to hepatocellular carcinoma in patients from Venezuela, with different stages of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Puche, Mary L; Kay-Valero, Sharon; Michelli, Pedro; Oropeza, Maria D; Loureiro, Carmen L; Devesa, Marisol; Dagher, Lucy; Pujol, Flor H

    2016-03-01

    Globally, about 50% of liver cancer originates as a result of long term infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), and some genotypes and mutations have been associated with an increased severity of infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity of HBV in patients from Venezuela, with chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to compare the occurrence of mutations in all patient groups. Samples from patients with different pathologies of the liver, associated with HBV infection, were collected. The HBV S region was analyzed for genotype determination and, when available, the whole genome sequence was examined for mutations analysis. Genotype F was the most common genotype (87%). While the HBV subgenotype F3 was the most frequent genotype in the whole group of samples (44%), the subgenotype F2 predominated in HCC patients (56%). Mutations were more common in HCC and cirrhosis cases (p=0.01). The A1762T mutation was significantly associated with the advanced stage of liver disease (p=0.008). Additionally, mutations were more common in early stages of liver disease in HBV subgenotype F2-infected patients, and a significant association between this subgenotype and the emergence of T 1753C, A1762T, A1762T/G1764A (p=0.04) and C1773T (p=0.001) mutations in chronic patients was found, when compared to the HBV subgenotype F3. By comparing F2 with all other HBV subgenotypes, a positive association for the three basal core promoter (BCP) mutants (A1762T, A1762T/G1764A p=0.01, G1764A p=0.04) was found. These results suggest that the HBV subgenotype F2 might be associated to more severe forms of liver disease in comparison with the HBV subgenotype F3.

  6. Rapid detection of six common Mediterranean and three non-Mediterranean alpha-thalassemia point mutations by reverse dot blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Foglietta, Enrica; Bianco, Ida; Maggio, Aurelio; Giambona, Antonino

    2003-11-01

    We describe the implementation of reverse dot blot (RDB) hybridization as a rapid nonradioactive method for the identification of six frequent globin gene point mutations in the Mediterranean population: alpha(Hph)alpha: alpha2 IVS I donor site GGTGAGG --> GG-----; alpha(NcoI)alpha: alpha2 initiation codon ATG --> ACG; alpha(TSaudi)alpha: alpha2Poly A signal AATAA --> AATAAG; alpha(Icaria)alpha: alpha2 termination codon TAA --> AAA (Ter --> LYS); alpha(CS)alpha: alpha2 termination codon TAA --> CAA (Ter --> gly); alphaalpha(NcoI): alpha1 initiation codon ATG --> GTG; and three alpha2 globin gene point mutations found in immigrants in Italy: alpha(T-Quongsze)alpha: alpha2 codon 12 CTG --> CCG (Leu --> Pro); alpha(Seal Rock)alpha: alpha2 termination codon TAA --> GAA (TER --> GLU); and alpha(Koyadora)alpha: alpha2 termination codon TAA --> TCA (TER --> SER). The method uses the principle of allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization, but it is a nonradioactive method and permits rapid and simultaneous typing of point mutations and small deletions.

  7. Benzimidazole resistance allele haplotype diversity in United Kingdom isolates of Teladorsagia circumcincta supports a hypothesis of multiple origins of resistance by recurrent mutation.

    PubMed

    Skuce, Philip; Stenhouse, Lindsay; Jackson, Frank; Hypsa, Václav; Gilleard, John

    2010-09-01

    Polymorphisms in the isotype I beta-tubulin gene are important genetic determinants of benzimidazole (BZ) resistance in a number of parasitic nematode species including Teladorsagia circumcincta, a major gastrointestinal nematode of sheep. This study investigates the genetic diversity at this locus in a BZ-resistant isolate of T. circumcincta (MTci5) derived from a sheep farm in the United Kingdom (UK) that was open to animal, and therefore parasite, migration. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) known to be associated with BZ resistance. This was followed by a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and nucleotide sequencing to sample allelic diversity in a 276bp fragment immediately surrounding the isotype I beta-tubulin F200Y mutation. The genetic diversity at this locus was extremely high, with seven different haplotypes found to contain the resistant F200Y polymorphism in this single resistant isolate. Genotyping by SSCP interfaced with pyrosequencing demonstrated that the P200(Y) mutation is also present on multiple haplotypes in two other BZ-resistant T. circumcincta isolates from the UK. This contrasts with much lower levels of haplotype diversity in BZ-resistant alleles present in T. circumcincta isolates from French goat farms that are closed to parasite migration. Taken together with our knowledge of T. circumcincta population genetic structure, these results are most consistent with multiple independent origins of resistance and mixing of alleles due to the large amount of livestock movement in the UK.

  8. CDH23 Mutation and Phenotype Heterogeneity: A Profile of 107 Diverse Families with Usher Syndrome and Nonsyndromic Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Astuto, L. M.; Bork, J. M.; Weston, M. D.; Askew, J. W.; Fields, R. R.; Orten, D. J.; Ohliger, S. J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R. J.; Khan, S.; Riazuddin, S.; Kremer, H.; van Hauwe, P.; Moller, C. G.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.; Ayuso, C.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Rohrschneider, K.; Spandau, U.; Greenberg, J.; Ramesar, R.; Reardon, W.; Bitoun, P.; Millan, J.; Legge, R.; Friedman, T. B.; Kimberling, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deafness. Specific CDH23 mutational defects have been identified that differentiate these two phenotypes. Only missense mutations of CDH23 have been observed in families with nonsyndromic deafness, whereas nonsense, frameshift, splice-site, and missense mutations have been identified in families with Usher syndrome. In the present study, a panel of 69 probands with Usher syndrome and 38 probands with recessive nonsyndromic deafness were screened for the presence of mutations in the entire coding region of CDH23, by heteroduplex, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct sequence analyses. A total of 36 different CDH23 mutations were detected in 45 families; 33 of these mutations were novel, including 18 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splicing defects, 5 microdeletions, and 2 insertions. A total of seven mutations were common to more than one family. Numerous exonic and intronic polymorphisms also were detected. Results of ophthalmologic examinations of the patients with nonsyndromic deafness have found asymptomatic RP–like manifestations, indicating that missense mutations may have a subtle effect in the retina. Furthermore, patients with mutations in CDH23 display a wide range of hearing loss and RP phenotypes, differing in severity, age at onset, type, and the presence or absence of vestibular areflexia. PMID:12075507

  9. A point mutation in the RNA-binding domain of human parainfluenza virus type 2 nucleoprotein elicits an abnormally enhanced polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yusuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Kolakofsky, Daniel; Nishio, Machiko

    2017-02-08

    The genome RNA of human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2) that acts as template for the polymerase complex is entirely encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (NP). Recently, the crystal structure of NP of PIV5, a virus closely related to hPIV2, was resolved in association with RNA. Ten amino acids that contact the bound RNA-binding were identified, and are strictly conserved between PIV5 and hPIV2 NP. Mutation of hPIV2 NP Q202 (that contacts a base rather than the RNA backbone) to some amino acids resulted in an over thirty-fold increase of polymerase activity as evidenced by a minireplicon assay, even though RNA-binding affinity was unaltered. Using various modified minireplicons, we found that enhanced reporter gene expression could be accounted for by increased minigenome replication, whereas mRNA synthesis itself was not affected by Q202 mutation. Moreover, the enhanced activities were still observed in minigenomes partially lacking the leader sequence and which were not of hexamer genome length. Unexpectedly, recombinant hPIV2 possessing the NP Q202A mutation could not be recovered from cDNA.IMPORTANCE We examined the importance of amino acids in the putative RNA-binding domain of hPIV2 NP for polymerase activity using minireplicons. Abnormally enhanced genome replication was observed by the substitution in NP Q202 position to various amino acids. Surprisingly, this mutation enabled polymerase to use minigenomes partially lacking the leader sequence and not of hexamer genome length. This mutation does not affect fundamental properties of NP, e.g., recognition of gene junctional and editing signals. However, the strongly enhanced polymerase activity may not be viable for infectious life-cycle. This report highlights the potential of the polymerase complex with point mutations in NP, and helps our detailed understanding of the molecular basis of gene expression.

  10. Urea lesion formation in DNA as a consequence of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine oxidation and hydrolysis provides a potent source of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Paul T; Neeley, William L; Delaney, James C; Gu, Feng; Niles, Jacquine C; Hah, Sang Soo; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Essigmann, John M

    2005-01-01

    The DNA oxidation product 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) forms several mutagenic oxidation products, including a metastable oxaluric acid (Oa) derivative. We report here that a synthetic oligonucleotide containing Oa hydrolyzes under simulated "in vivo" conditions to form a mutagenic urea (Ua) lesion. Using the Oa 2'-deoxyribonucleoside as a model, the hydrolysis rate depended strongly upon the concentrations of bicarbonate and divalent magnesium. In buffered solutions containing physiologically relevant levels of these species, the half-life of Oa nucleoside was approximately 40 h at 37 degrees C. The mutagenic properties of Ua in DNA were investigated using a M13mp7L2 bacteriophage genome containing Ua at a specific site. Transfection of the lesion-containing genome into wild-type AB1157 Escherichia coli allowed determination of the mutation frequency and DNA polymerase bypass efficiency from the resulting progeny phage. Ua was bypassed with an efficiency of 11% as compared to a guanine control and caused a 99% G-->T mutation frequency, assuming the lesion originated from G, which is at least an order of magnitude higher than the mutation frequency of 8-oxoG under the same conditions. SOS induction of bypass DNA polymerase(s) in the bacteria prior to transfection caused the mutation frequency and type to shift to 43% G-->T, 46% G-->C, and 10% G-->A mutations. We suggest that Ua is instructional, meaning that the shape of the lesion and its interactions with DNA polymerases influence which nucleotide is inserted opposite the lesion during replication and that the instructional nature of the lesion is modulated by the size of the binding pocket of the DNA polymerase. Replication past Ua, when formed by hydrolysis of the 8-oxoG oxidation product Oa, denotes a pathway that nearly quantitatively generates point mutations in vivo.

  11. Predicting Binding Free Energy Change Caused by Point Mutations with Knowledge-Modified MM/PBSA Method

    PubMed Central

    Petukh, Marharyta; Li, Minghui; Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    A new methodology termed Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE) was developed to predict the changes of the binding free energy caused by mutations. The method utilizes 3D structures of the corresponding protein-protein complexes and takes advantage of both approaches: sequence- and structure-based methods. The method has two components: a MM/PBSA-based component, and an additional set of statistical terms delivered from statistical investigation of physico-chemical properties of protein complexes. While the approach is rigid body approach and does not explicitly consider plausible conformational changes caused by the binding, the effect of conformational changes, including changes away from binding interface, on electrostatics are mimicked with amino acid specific dielectric constants. This provides significant improvement of SAAMBE predictions as indicated by better match against experimentally determined binding free energy changes over 1300 mutations in 43 proteins. The final benchmarking resulted in a very good agreement with experimental data (correlation coefficient 0.624) while the algorithm being fast enough to allow for large-scale calculations (the average time is less than a minute per mutation). PMID:26146996

  12. A novel point mutation (R840S) in the androgen receptor in a Brazilian family with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Melo, K F; Latronico, A C; Costa, E M; Billerbeck, A E; Mendonca, B B; Arnhold, I J

    1999-10-01

    Mutations of the androgen receptor gene causing androgen insensitivity syndrome in 46, XY individuals, result in phenotypes ranging from complete female to ambiguous genitalia to males with minor degrees of undervirilization. We studied two Brazilian brothers with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. They were born with perineal hypospadias, bifid scrotum, small penis and cryptorchidism, and developed gynecomastia at puberty. Genomic DNA was extracted and denaturinggradient gel electrophoresis of exon 7 of the androgen receptor gene followed by sequence analysis revealed a new mutation, a C A transversion, altering codon 840 from arginine (CGT) to serine (AGT). R840 is located in the androgen binding domain, in a "hot spot" region, important for the formation and function of the hormone receptor-complex and within the region that is involved in androgen receptor dimerization. Replacement of arginine (basic) by serine (neutral and polar) is a nonconservative substitution. Three mutations in this residue (R840C, R840G nonconservative and R840H, conservative) were previously reported in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and when expressed "in vitro" lead to a subnormal transactivation of a reporter gene. We conclude that the novel R840 mutation in the androgen receptor is the cause of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome in this Brazilian family.

  13. Selective control of oligosaccharide transfer efficiency for the N-glycosylation sequon by a point mutation in oligosaccharyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Igura, Mayumi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2011-04-15

    Asn-linked glycosylation is the most ubiquitous posttranslational protein modification in eukaryotes and archaea, and in some eubacteria. Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. Inefficient oligosaccharide transfer results in glycoprotein heterogeneity, which is particularly bothersome in pharmaceutical glycoprotein production. Amino acid variation at the X position of the Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon is known to modulate the glycosylation efficiency. The best amino acid at X is valine, for an archaeal Pyrococcus furiosus OST. We performed a systematic alanine mutagenesis study of the archaeal OST to identify the essential and dispensable amino acid residues in the three catalytic motifs. We then investigated the effects of the dispensable mutations on the amino acid preference in the N-glycosylation sequon. One residue position was found to selectively affect the amino acid preference at the X position. This residue is located within the recently identified DXXKXXX(M/I) motif, suggesting the involvement of this motif in N-glycosylation sequon recognition. In applications, mutations at this position may facilitate the design of OST variants adapted to particular N-glycosylation sites to reduce the heterogeneity of glycan occupancy. In fact, a mutation at this position led to 9-fold higher activity relative to the wild-type enzyme, toward a peptide containing arginine at X in place of valine. This mutational approach is potentially applicable to eukaryotic and eubacterial OSTs for the production of homogenous glycoproteins in engineered mammalian and Escherichia coli cells.

  14. Point mutation of Arg440 to his in cytochrome P450c17 causes severe 17{alpha}-hydroxylase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fardella, C.E.; Hum, D.W.; Miller, W.L.; Homoki, J.

    1994-07-01

    Genetic disorders in the gene encoding P450c17 cause 17{alpha}-hydroxylase deficiency. The consequent defects in the synthesis of cortisol and sex steroids cause sexual infantilism and a female phenotype in both genetic sexes as well as mineralorcorticoid excess and hypertension. A 15-yr-old patient from Germany was seen for absent pubertal development and mild hypertension with hypokalemia, high concentrations of 17-deoxysteroids, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Analysis of her P450c17 gene by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing showed mutation of codon 440 from CGC (Arg) to CAC (His). Expression of a vector encoding this mutated form of P450c17 in transfected nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells showed that the mutant P450c17 protein was produced, but it lacked both 17{alpha}-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities. To date, 15 different P450c17 mutations have been described in 23 patients with 17{alpha}-hydroxylase deficiency, indicating that mutations in this gene are due to random events. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. A new point mutation in the ND1 mitochondrial gene identified in a type II diabetic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, V.N.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K.

    1995-08-01

    A novel mutation in a mitochondrial gene was identified in a patient with type II diabetes mellitus. G-to-A transition was localized at the nt3316 position of gene ND1 and resulted in alanine threonine replacement at position 4 of mitochondrial NAD-H-dehydrogenase. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Point mutations in bovine opsin can be classified in four groups with respect to their effect on the biosynthetic pathway of opsin.

    PubMed Central

    DeCaluwé, G L; DeGrip, W J

    1996-01-01

    Expression in vitro with the recombinant baculovirus expression system showed correct biosynthesis and post-translational processing of "wild-type' bovine opsin with regard to translocation, glycosylation, palmitoylation and targeting. However, several of these processes were severely affected by point mutations. From the overall results of 16 mutants reported here, four groups were distinguished. One group significantly affected neither biosynthesis nor folding of opsin (D83N, P291A, A299C-V300A-P303G). A second group produced a truncated protein (R69H, Y301F), suggesting that these positions are essential for a correct translational process. A third group affected membrane translocation as well as glycosylation, which can be interpreted as interference with the function of a transfer signal. Substitutions at positions Glu-113, Glu-122, Glu-134, Arg-135 and Lys-248 belong to this category. A fourth group induced structural changes in the protein that led to heterogeneous distribution in the plasma membrane (E113Q/D, W265F, Y268S). Taking any functional consequences of these mutations into consideration, it seems that point mutations can have mosaic effects and therefore should be examined at several levels (folding, targeting, functional parameters). PMID:9003366

  17. Ionic leakage underlies a gain-of-function effect of dominant disease mutations affecting diverse P-type ATPases.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Maki; Desai, Bela S; Cook, Boaz

    2014-02-01

    Type II P-type ATPases (PAIIs) constitute a family of conserved proteins that actively generate ionic gradients across membranes. Mutations in genes encoding PAIIs can cause heritable dominant diseases, with suggested etiology of haploinsufficiency. Using a Drosophila melanogaster genetic screen, we identified a dominant mutation altering the PAII member sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA). This mutation conferred temperature-sensitive uncoordination in a gain-of-function manner. We established that this gain-of-function phenotype is linked to dominant disease-causing mutations affecting various human PAIIs. We further found that heterologous expression of mutant PAIIs elicited ion leakage that was exacerbated at elevated temperatures. Therefore, these dominant mutations result in ionic leakage and render PAIIs susceptible to deleterious effects from elevated temperatures. Accordingly, it was recently reported that missense mutations affecting the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase can elicit ionic leakage. We propose that ionic leakage is a pervasive gain-of-function mechanism that can underlie a variety of dominant PAII-related diseases.

  18. Familial Dysalbuminemic Hyperthyroxinemia in a Japanese Man Caused by a Point Albumin Gene Mutation (R218P)

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Katsumi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Fukazawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH) is a familial autosomal dominant disease caused by mutation in the albumin gene that produces a condition of euthyroid hyperthyroxinemia. In patients with FDH, serum-free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations as measured by several commercial methods are often falsely increased with normal thyrotropin (TSH). Therefore, several diagnostic steps are needed to differentiate TSH-secreting tumor or generalized resistance to thyroid hormone from FDH. We herein report a case of a Japanese man born in Aomori prefecture, with FDH caused by a mutant albumin gene (R218P). We found that a large number of FDH patients reported in Japan to date might have been born in Aomori prefecture and have shown the R218P mutation. In conclusion, FDH needs to be considered among the differential diagnoses in Japanese patients born in Aomori prefecture and showing normal TSH levels and elevated FT4 levels. PMID:27081329

  19. A novel point mutation in the hormone binding domain of the androgen receptor associated with partial and minimal androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina; Hiort, Olaf; Schuster, Tobias; Messer, Gerald; Kuhnle, Ursula

    2003-02-01

    Mutations in the coding sequence of the androgen receptor (AR) gene result in a wide range of androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS). We report an extended family in which at least five male individuals in different generations suffer from partial AIS. The index patient presented at birth with ambiguous genitalia; the karyotype was 46,XY and subsequent sex assignment male. Elevated stimulated testosterone (T) and normal baseline gonadotropins were found. Family history revealed four additional adult males affected with various abnormalities of their external genitalia. Molecular analysis of the coding sequence of the AR gene revealed in all a novel point mutation in exon 6, changing threonine to isoleucine at codon position 800 in the hormone-binding domain. We conclude that phenotypic variations in mild AR defects are striking and can remain undetected even until late in life.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum: in vitro activity of sulfadoxine and dapsone in field isolates from Kenya: point mutations in dihydropteroate synthase may not be the only determinants in sulfa resistance.

    PubMed

    Mberu, Edward K; Nzila, Alexis M; Nduati, Eunice; Ross, Amanda; Monks, Stephanie M; Kokwaro, Gilbert O; Watkins, William M; Hopkins Sibley, Carol

    2002-01-01

    We have determined the relationship between point mutations in the gene that encodes the sulfa target, dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) and the chemosensitivity profile to sulfadoxine and dapsone in 67 isolates from Kilifi, Kenya. We assessed the presence of mutations at codons 436, 437, 540, 581, and 613 of dhps. The results showed that the dhps genotype had a strong influence on the sensitivity to sulfadoxine and dapsone, but that the correlation was far from perfect. Eleven isolates carried a wild-type dhps allele, but were resistant to sulfadoxine (IC(50) values >10 microg/ml), and 4/28 isolates were classed as sensitive to sulfadoxine (IC(50) values <10 microg/ml), but carried a triple mutant (436/437/613) allele of dhps. These data show that in low folate medium in vitro, the dhps genotype alone did not account completely for sulfadoxine or dapsone resistance; other factors such as the utilisation of exogenous folate must also be considered.

  1. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor transmembrane point mutation (G275E) associated with resistance to spinosad in Frankliniella occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Puinean, Alin M; Lansdell, Stuart J; Collins, Toby; Bielza, Pablo; Millar, Neil S

    2013-01-01

    High levels of resistance to spinosad, a macrocyclic lactone insecticide, have been reported previously in western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, an economically important insect pest of vegetables, fruit and ornamental crops. We have cloned the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α6 subunit from F. occidentalis (Foα6) and compared the nucleotide sequence of Foα6 from susceptible and spinosad-resistant insect populations (MLFOM and R1S respectively). A single nucleotide change has been identified in Foα6, resulting in the replacement of a glycine (G) residue in susceptible insects with a glutamic acid (E) in resistant insects. The resistance-associated mutation (G275E) is predicted to lie at the top of the third α-helical transmembrane domain of Foα6. Although there is no direct evidence identifying the location of the spinosad binding site, the analogous amino acid in the C. elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel lies in close proximity (4.4 Å) to the known binding site of ivermectin, another macrocyclic lactone pesticide. The functional consequences of the resistance-associated mutation have been examined in the human nAChR α7 subunit. Introduction of an analogous (A272E) mutation in α7 abolishes the modulatory effects of spinosad whilst having no significant effect upon activation by acetylcholine, consistent with spinosad having an allosteric mechanism of action. PMID:23016960

  2. Functional characterization of two novel point mutations in the CYP21 gene causing simple virilizing forms of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krone, Nils; Riepe, Felix G; Grötzinger, Joachim; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G

    2005-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a group of autosomal recessive disorders most often caused by deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase due to mutations in the CYP21 gene. We studied the functional and structural consequences of two novel missense mutations in the CYP21 gene, detected in two simple virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients. Both the male and female patient were compound heterozygous for the novel I77T and A434V point mutations, respectively. The in vitro expression analysis in COS-7 cells revealed a reduced 21-hydroxylase activity in the I77T mutant of 3 +/- 2% (sd) for the conversion of 17-hydroxyprogesterone to 11-deoxycortisol and of 5 +/- 3% for the conversion of progesterone to 11-deoxycorticosterone. The A434V mutant had a residual enzyme activity of 14 +/- 2% for 17-hydroxyprogesterone and 12 +/- 6% for progesterone. Substrate affinity was similar in the mutants as in the CYP21 wild-type protein, whereas reaction velocity was markedly decreased in both mutants. These effects could be readily explained by structural changes induced by the mutations, which were rationalized by a three-dimensional-model structure of the CYP21 protein. We hypothesize that the I77T mutation markedly decreases the reaction product release and/or substrate entrance to the enzyme's active site, whereas the A434V mutant reduces both the catalytic capacity and reaction velocity. Studying the enzyme function in vitro helps to understand the phenotypical expression and disease severity of 21-hydroxylase deficiency and also provides new insights into cytochrome P450 structure-function relationships.

  3. Assessing the risk that Phytophthora melonis can develop a point mutation (V1109L) in CesA3 conferring resistance to carboxylic acid amide fungicides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhu, Shusheng; Lu, Xiaohong; Pang, Zhili; Cai, Meng; Liu, Xili

    2012-01-01

    The risk that the plant pathogen Phytophthora melonis develops resistance to carboxylic acid amide (CAA) fungicides was determined by measuring baseline sensitivities of field isolates, generating resistant mutants, and measuring the fitness of the resistant mutants. The baseline sensitivities of 80 isolates to flumorph, dimethomorph and iprovalicarb were described by unimodal curves, with mean EC(50) values of 0.986 (±0.245), 0.284 (±0.060) and 0.327 (±0.068) µg/ml, respectively. Seven isolates with different genetic background (as indicated by RAPD markers) were selected to generate CAA-resistance. Fifty-five resistant mutants were obtained from three out of seven isolates by spontaneous selection and UV-mutagenesis with frequencies of 1×10(-7) and 1×10(-6), respectively. CAA-resistance was stable for all mutants. The resistance factors of these mutants ranged from 7 to 601. The compound fitness index (CFI  =  mycelial growth × zoospore production × pathogenicity) was often lower for the CAA-resistant isolates than for wild-type isolates, suggesting that the risk of P. melonis developing resistance to CAA fungicides is low to moderate. Among the CAA-resistant isolates, a negative correlation between EC(50) values was found for iprovalicarb vs. flumorph and for iprovalicarb vs. dimethomorph. Comparison of the full-length cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) between wild-type and CAA-resistant isolates revealed only one point mutation at codon position 1109: a valine residue (codon GTG in wild-type isolates) was converted to leucine (codon CTG in resistant mutants). This represents a novel point mutation with respect to mutations in CesA3 conferring resistance to CAA fungicides. Based on this mutation, an efficient allelic-specific PCR (AS-PCR) method was developed for rapid detection of CAA-resistance in P. melonis populations.

  4. Introduction of a point mutation into the mouse genome by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells using a replacement type vector with a selectable marker.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M; Japón, M A; Low, M J

    1993-06-11

    The introduction of small mutations instead of null alleles into the mouse genome has broad applications to the study of protein structure-function relationships and the creation of animal models of human genetic diseases. To test a simple mutational strategy we designed a targeting vector for the mouse proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene containing a single nucleotide insertion that converts the initial tyrosine codon of beta-endorphin 1-31 to a premature translational termination codon and introduces a unique Hpal endonuclease restriction site. The targeting vector also contains a neo cassette immediately 3' to the last POMC exon and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase cassette to allow positive and negative selection. Homologous recombination occurred at a frequency of 1/30 clones of electroporated embryonic stem cells selected in G418 and gancyclovir. 10/11 clones identified initially by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy had the predicted structure without evidence of concatemer formation by Southern blot analysis. We used a combination of Hpa I digestion of PCR amplified fragments and direct nucleotide sequencing to further confirm that the point mutation was retained in 9/10 clones. The POMC gene was transcriptionally silent in embryonic stem cells and the targeted allele was not activated by the downstream phosphoglycerate kinase-1 promoter that transcribed the neo gene. Under the electroporation conditions used, we have demonstrated that a point mutation can be introduced with high efficiency and precision into the POMC gene using a replacement type vector containing a retained selectable marker without affecting expression of the allele in the embryonic stem cells. A similar strategy may be useful for a wide range of genes.

  5. A point mutation in the polymerase protein PB2 allows a reassortant H9N2 influenza isolate of wild-bird origin to replicate in human cells.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Islam T M; Ma, Eric J; Hill, Nichola J; Meixell, Brandt W; Lindberg, Mark; Albrecht, Randy A; Bahl, Justin; Runstadler, Jonathan A

    2016-07-01

    H9N2 influenza A viruses are on the list of potentially pandemic subtypes. Therefore, it is important to understand how genomic reassortment and genetic polymorphisms affect phenotypes of H9N2 viruses circulating in the wild bird reservoir. A comparative genetic analysis of North American H9N2 isolates of wild bird origin identified a naturally occurring reassortant virus containing gene segments derived from both North American and Eurasian lineage ancestors. The PB2 segment of this virus encodes 10 amino acid changes that distinguish it from other H9 strains circulating in North America. G590S, one of the 10 amino acid substitutions observed, was present in ~12% of H9 viruses worldwide. This mutation combined with R591 has been reported as a marker of pathogenicity for human pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses. Screening by polymerase reporter assay of all the natural polymorphisms at these two positions identified G590/K591 and S590/K591 as the most active, with the highest polymerase activity recorded for the SK polymorphism. Rescued viruses containing these two polymorphic combinations replicated more efficiently in MDCK cells and they were the only ones tested that were capable of establishing productive infection in NHBE cells. A global analysis of all PB2 sequences identified the K591 signature in six viral HA/NA subtypes isolated from several hosts in seven geographic locations. Interestingly, introducing the K591 mutation into the PB2 of a human-adapted H3N2 virus did not affect its polymerase activity. Our findings demonstrate that a single point mutation in the PB2 of a low pathogenic H9N2 isolate could have a significant effect on viral phenotype and increase its propensity to infect mammals. However, this effect is not universal, warranting caution in interpreting point mutations without considering protein sequence context.

  6. A point mutation in the polymerase protein PB2 allows a reassortant H9N2 influenza isolate of wild-bird origin to replicate in human cells.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hussein, Islam T.M.; Ma, Eric J.; Meixell, Brandt; Hill, Nichola J.; Lindberg, Mark S.; Albrecht , Randy A.; Bahl, Justin; Runstadler, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 influenza A viruses are on the list of potentially pandemic subtypes. Therefore, it is important to understand how genomic reassortment and genetic polymorphisms affect phenotypes of H9N2 viruses circulating in the wild bird reservoir. A comparative genetic analysis of North American H9N2 isolates of wild bird origin identified a naturally occurring reassortant virus containing gene segments derived from both North American and Eurasian lineage ancestors. The PB2 segment of this virus encodes 10 amino acid changes that distinguish it from other H9 strains circulating in North America. G590S, one of the 10 amino acid substitutions observed, was present in ~ 12% of H9 viruses worldwide. This mutation combined with R591 has been reported as a marker of pathogenicity for human pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses. Screening by polymerase reporter assay of all the natural polymorphisms at these two positions identified G590/K591 and S590/K591 as the most active, with the highest polymerase activity recorded for the SK polymorphism. Rescued viruses containing these two polymorphic combinations replicated more efficiently in MDCK cells and they were the only ones tested that were capable of establishing productive infection in NHBE cells. A global analysis of all PB2 sequences identified the K591 signature in six viral HA/NA subtypes isolated from several hosts in seven geographic locations. Interestingly, introducing the K591 mutation into the PB2 of a human-adapted H3N2 virus did not affect its polymerase activity. Our findings demonstrate that a single point mutation in the PB2 of a low pathogenic H9N2 isolate could have a significant effect on viral phenotype and increase its propensity to infect mammals. However, this effect is not universal, warranting caution in interpreting point mutations without considering protein sequence context.

  7. The role of point mutations in the genes, predisposing inherited thrombophilia in the pathogeneses of proximal and distal deep vein thrombosis in Georgian population.

    PubMed

    Pirtskhelani, N; Kochiashvili, N; Makhaldiani, L; Pargalava, N; Gaprindashvili, E; Kartvelishvili, K

    2014-02-01

    Duration of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and prevention of its recurrence represent significant problems of contemporary medicine, as the basic method of treatment - anticoagulation is frequently complicated by hemorrhage. Therefore, its duration is strictly defined and depends on existence of risk factors related to recurrence of thrombosis. Purpose of the conducted study was to establish the role of point mutations of prothrombin (PHG) - 20210G/A; Factor V Leiden (FVL) - 1691G/A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) - 677C/T genes, i.e. inherited thrombophilia in the pathogenesis of proximal and distal lower extremity deep vein thrombosis in patients of the Georgian population, as in case of proximal thrombosis there is a higher risk of recurrent thrombosis. The above mutations were detected by PCR and single nucleotide primer extension reaction, followed by Enzyme Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA) in 61 patients with venous thromboembolism of various localizations, out of which: 49 patients were diagnosed with unprovoked proximal thromboembolism confirmed by objective studies and 12 patients were diagnosed with distal thromboembolism. The difference between the groups was evaluated by F (Fisher) precise criterion. According to statistical analysis of the results, incidence of FVL mutation in the group of patients with proximal thrombosis was significantly higher compared to patients with distal thrombosis 0.43 and 0.08 (p=0.0256), respectively. Similar tendencies were observed in case of carriage of prothrombin gene and MTHFR gene mutations, as their presence was higher in the group of patients having proximal thrombosis than in patients with distal thrombosis, however, this difference was not found to be statistically significant. It should be particularly mentioned that double or triple heterozygous or homozygous carriage of studied mutations with various options was confirmed in 15 of 61 patients and the above genotypes were observed

  8. Analysis of point mutations in an ultraviolet-irradiated shuttle vector plasmid propagated in cells from Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum patients in complementation groups A and F

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, T.; Tatsumi-Miyajima, J.; Sato, M.; Kraemer, K.H.; Takebe, H. )

    1991-06-15

    To assess the contribution to mutagenesis by human DNA repair defects, a UV-treated shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, was passed through fibroblasts derived from Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients in two different DNA repair complementation groups (A and F). Patients with XP have clinical and cellular UV hypersensitivity, increased frequency of skin cancer, and defects in DNA repair. The XP DNA repair defects represented by complementation groups A (XP-A) and F (XP-F) are more common in Japan than in Europe or the United States. In comparison to results with DNA repair-proficient human cells (W138-VA13), UV-treated pZ189 passed through the XP-A (XP2OS(SV)) or XP-F (XP2YO(SV)) cells showed fewer surviving plasmids (XP-A less than XP-F) and a higher frequency of mutated plasmids (XP-A greater than XP-F). Base sequence analysis of more than 200 mutated plasmids showed the major type of base substitution mutation to be the G:C----A:T transition with all three cell lines. The XP-A and XP-F cells revealed a higher frequency of G:C----A:T transitions and a lower frequency of transversions among plasmids with single or tandem mutations and a lower frequency of plasmids with multiple point mutations compared to the normal line. The spectrum of mutations in pZ189 with the XP-A cells was similar to that with the XP-F cells. Seventy-six to 91% of the single base substitution mutations occurred at G:C base pairs in which the 5{prime}-neighboring base of the cytosine was thymine or cytosine. These studies indicate that the DNA repair defects in Japanese XP patients in complementation groups A and F result in different frequencies of plasmid survival and mutagenesis but in similar types of mutagenic abnormalities despite marked differences in clinical features.

  9. Predicting the Effect of Amino Acid Single-Point Mutations on Protein Stability-Large-Scale Validation of MD-Based Relative Free Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, Thomas; Zhu, Chongkai; Wang, Lingle; Abel, Robert; Negron, Christopher; Pearlman, David; Feyfant, Eric; Duan, Jianxin; Sherman, Woody

    2017-04-07

    The stability of folded proteins is critical to their biological function and for the efficacy of protein therapeutics. Predicting the energetic effects of protein mutations can improve our fundamental understanding of structural biology, the molecular basis of diseases, and possible routes to addressing those diseases with biological drugs. Identifying the effect of single amino acid point mutations on the thermodynamic equilibrium between the folded and unfolded states of a protein can pinpoint residues of critical importance that should be avoided in the process of improving other properties (affinity, solubility, viscosity, etc.) and suggest changes at other positions for increasing stability in protein engineering. Multiple computational tools have been developed for in silico predictions of protein stability in recent years, ranging from sequence-based empirical approaches to rigorous physics-based free energy methods. In this work, we show that FEP+, which is a free energy perturbation method based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, can provide accurate thermal stability predictions for a wide range of biologically relevant systems. Significantly, the FEP+ approach, while originally developed for relative binding free energies of small molecules to proteins and not specifically fitted for protein stability calculations, performs well compared to other methods that were fitted specifically to predict protein stability. Here, we present the broadest validation of a rigorous free energy-based approach applied to protein stability reported to date: 700+ single-point mutations spanning 10 different protein targets. Across the entire data set, we correctly classify the mutations as stabilizing or destabilizing in 84% of the cases, and obtain statistically significant predictions as compared with experiment [average error of ~1.6kcal/mol and coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.40]. This study demonstrates, for the first time in a large

  10. A Substantial Fraction of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Low Phytic Acid Mutations Have Little or No Effect on Yield across Diverse Production Environments.

    PubMed

    Raboy, Victor; Peterson, Kevin; Jackson, Chad; Marshall, Juliet M; Hu, Gongshe; Saneoka, Hirofumi; Bregitzer, Phil

    2015-04-29

    The potential benefits of the low phytic acid (lpa) seed trait for human and animal nutrition, and for phosphorus management in non-ruminant animal production, are well documented. However, in many cases the lpa trait is associated with impaired seed or plant performance, resulting in reduced yield. This has given rise to the perception that the lpa trait is tightly correlated with reduced yield in diverse crop species. Here we report a powerful test of this correlation. We measured grain yield in lines homozygous for each of six barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) lpa mutations that greatly differ in their seed phytic acid levels. Performance comparisons were between sibling wild-type and mutant lines obtained following backcrossing, and across two years in five Idaho (USA) locations that greatly differ in crop yield potential. We found that one lpa mutation (Hvlpa1-1) had no detectable effect on yield and a second (Hvlpa4-1) resulted in yield losses of only 3.5%, across all locations. When comparing yields in three relatively non-stressful production environments, at least three lpa mutations (Hvlpa1-1, Hvlpa3-1, and Hvlpa4-1) typically had yields similar to or within 5% of the wild-type sibling isoline. Therefore in the case of barley, lpa mutations can be readily identified that when simply incorporated into a cultivar result in adequately performing lines, even with no additional breeding for performance within the lpa line. In conclusion, while some barley lpa mutations do impact field performance, a substantial fraction appears to have little or no effect on yield.

  11. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zuowei; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Sahin, Orhan; Yaeger, Michael; Plummer, Paul; Zhai, Weiwei; Shen, Zhangqi; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-01-01

    Infections due to clonal expansion of highly virulent bacterial strains are clear and present threats to human and animal health. Association of genetic changes with disease is now a routine, but identification of causative mutations that enable disease remains difficult. Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic pathogen transmitted to humans mainly via the foodborne route. C. jejuni typically colonizes the gut, but a hypervirulent and rapidly expanding clone of C. jejuni recently emerged, which is able to translocate across the intestinal tract, causing systemic infection and abortion in pregnant animals. The genetic basis responsible for this hypervirulence is unknown. Here, we developed a strategy, termed “directed genome evolution,” by using hybridization between abortifacient and nonabortifacient strains followed by selection in an animal disease model and whole-genome sequence analysis. This strategy successfully identified SNPs in porA, encoding the major outer membrane protein, are responsible for the hypervirulence. Defined mutagenesis verified that these mutations were both necessary and sufficient for causing abortion. Furthermore, sequence analysis identified porA as the gene with the top genome-wide signal of adaptive evolution using Fu’s Fs, a population genetic metric for recent population size changes, which is consistent with the recent expansion of clone “sheep abortion.” These results identify a key virulence factor in Campylobacter and a potential target for the control of this zoonotic pathogen. Furthermore, this study provides general, unbiased experimental and computational approaches that are broadly applicable for efficient elucidation of disease-causing mutations in bacterial pathogens. PMID:27601641

  12. Peripartum cardiomyopathy presenting with syncope due to Torsades de pointes: a case of long QT syndrome with a novel KCNH2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Orie; Matsuda, Morihiro; Nakamoto, Kei; Nishiyama, Hirohiko; Kuraoka, Kazuya; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Tamura, Ritsu; Shimizu, Wataru; Kawamoto, Toshiharu

    2012-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a cardiomyopathy of unknown cause that occurs in the peripartum period. We report a case of PPCM presenting with syncope 1 month after an uncomplicated delivery. Electrocardiography showed Torsades de pointes (TdP) and QT interval prolongation. Echocardiography showed left ventricular systolic dysfunction and endomyocardial biopsy showed myocyte degeneration and fibrosis. Administration of magnesium sulfate and temporary pacing eliminated recurrent TdP. Genetic analyses revealed that recurrent TdP occurred via electrolyte disturbance and cardiac failure due to PPCM on the basis of a novel mutation in KCNH2, a gene responsible for inherited type 2 long QT syndrome.

  13. Point mutations within the fatty acid synthase type II dehydratase components HadA or HadC contribute to isoxyl resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gannoun-Zaki, Laila; Alibaud, Laeticia; Kremer, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which the antitubercular drug isoxyl (ISO) inhibits mycolic acid biosynthesis has not yet been reported. We found that point mutations in either the HadA or HadC component of the type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II) are associated with increased levels of resistance to ISO in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Overexpression of the HadAB, HadBC, or HadABC heterocomplex also produced high-level resistance. These results show that the FAS-II dehydratases are involved in ISO resistance.

  14. Combination of a modified block PCR and endonuclease IV-based signal amplification system for ultra-sensitive detection of low-abundance point mutations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xianjin; Xu, Anqin; Zhai, Junqiu; Zhao, Meiping

    2013-12-15

    By combination of a modified block PCR and endonuclease IV-based signal amplification system, we have developed a novel approach for ultra-sensitive detection of point mutations. The method can effectively identify mutant target sequence immersed in a large background of wild-type sequences with abundance down to 0.03% (for C→A) and 0.005% (for C→G). This sensitivity is among the highest in comparison with other existing approaches and the operating procedures are simple and time saving. The method holds great potential for future application in clinical diagnosis and biomedical research.

  15. A Single Point Mutation Resulting in Cadherin Mislocalization Underpins Resistance against Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin in Cotton Bollworm.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yutao; Dai, Qing; Hu, Ruqin; Pacheco, Sabino; Yang, Yongbo; Liang, Gemei; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Liu, Kaiyu; Wu, Kongming

    2017-02-17

    Transgenic plants that produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystalline (Cry) toxins are cultivated worldwide to control insect pests. Resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins threatens this technology, and although different resistance mechanisms have been identified, some have not been completely elucidated. To gain new insights into these mechanisms, we performed multiple back-crossing from a 3000-fold Cry1Ac-resistant BtR strain from cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), isolating a 516-fold Cry1Ac-resistant strain (96CAD). Cry1Ac resistance in 96CAD was tightly linked to a mutant cadherin allele (mHaCad) that contained 35 amino acid substitutions compared with HaCad from a susceptible strain (96S). We observed significantly reduced levels of the mHaCad protein on the surface of the midgut epithelium in 96CAD as compared with 96S. Expression of both cadherin alleles from 96CAD and 96S in insect cells and immunofluorescence localization in insect midgut tissue sections showed that the HaCAD protein from 96S localizes on the cell membrane, whereas the mutant 96CAD-mHaCad was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mapping of the mutations identified a D172G substitution mainly responsible for cadherin mislocalization. Our finding of a mutation affecting membrane receptor trafficking represents an unusual and previously unrecognized B. thuringiensis resistance mechanism.

  16. The L1014F point mutation in the house fly Vssc1 sodium channel confers knockdown resistance to pyrethroids.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Lee, S H; Ingles, P J; Knipple, D C; Soderlund, D M

    1997-10-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels encoded by a full-length cDNA corresponding to the Vssc1 gene of the house fly (Musca domestica) were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes either alone or in combination with the tipE gene product of Drosophila melanogaster and were characterized by two-electrode voltage clamp. Vssc1 cRNA alone produced very small (50-150 nA) sodium currents, whereas the combination of Vssc1 and tipE cRNAs produced robust (0.5-3 microA), rapidly inactivating sodium currents. The pyrethroid insecticide cismethrin prolonged the sodium current carried by Vssc1/tipE sodium channels during a depolarizing pulse and induced a tail current after repolarization. The Vssc1 cDNA was specifically mutated to substitute phenylalanine for leucine at position 1014 of the inferred amino acid sequence (L1014F), a polymorphism shown previously to be associated with the kdr (knockdown resistance) trait of the house fly. The L1014F substitution reduced the sensitivity of expressed house fly sodium channels to cismethrin at least 10-fold and increased the rate of decay of pyrethroid-induced sodium tail currents. These results demonstrate that the resistance-associated L1014F mutation confers a reduction in the sensitivity of house fly sodium channels to pyrethroids that is sufficient to account for the kdr resistance trait.

  17. The Ec-NhaA antiporter switches from antagonistic to synergistic antiport upon a single point mutation

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Manish; Sukenik, Shahar; Friedler, Assaf; Padan, Etana

    2016-01-01

    The Na+, Li+/H+ antiporter of Escherichia coli (Ec-NhaA) maintains pH, Na+ homeostasis in enterobacteria. We used isothermal titration calorimetry to perform a detailed thermodynamic analysis of Li+ binding to Ec-NhaA and several of its mutants. We found that, in line with the canonical alternative access mechanistic model of secondary transporters, Li+/H+ binding to the antiporter is antagonistically coupled. Binding of Li+ displaces 2 H+ from the binding site. The process is enthalpically driven, the enthalpic gain just compensating for an entropic loss and the buffer-associated enthalpic changes dominate the overall free-energy change. Li+ binding, H+ release and antiporter activity were all affected to the same extent by mutations in the Li+ binding site (D163E, D163N, D164N, D164E), while D133C changed the H+/Li+ stoichiometry to 4. Most striking, however, was the mutation, A167P, which converted the Ec-NhaA antagonistic binding into synergistic binding which is only known to occur in Cl−/H+ antiporter. PMID:27021484

  18. Point mutations in the West Nile virus (Flaviviridae; Flavivirus) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase alter viral fitness in a host-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Van Slyke, Greta A; Ciota, Alexander T; Willsey, Graham G; Jaeger, Joachim; Shi, Pei-Yong; Kramer, Laura D

    2012-05-25

    The West Nile virus (WNV) genome contains a single RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene, which is responsible for replication of the viral genome and, as such, is an important target for antiviral therapy. Viral RdRps are known to lack proofreading capabilities and as a result viruses such as WNV exist as a mixture of viral genotypes within an infection, enabling the virus to readily emerge and adapt to new host environments. To test the consequences of subtle structural alterations remote from the RdRp active-site, the following single point mutations were engineered in the WNV NS5 RdRp coding region: T363N, A365N, and T537I; these mutations were selected in an effort to stabilize the secondary structural elements near the rNTP binding pocket of the RdRp. Mutant viruses were tested in vitro on Vero, C6/36, Culex tarsalis and DF-1 cell types and in vivo in one day old chickens and Culex pipiens mosquitoes. Plaque morphology was affected by each mutation and growth and RNA replication kinetics were altered as well. Our results demonstrate that subtle alteration of the RdRp protein away from the active site can have a significant overall biological effect on WNV fitness, and that this effect can be host-dependent.

  19. Point Mutations in FimH Adhesin of Crohn's Disease-Associated Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Enhance Intestinal Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Dreux, Nicolas; Denizot, Jérémy; Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Mellmann, Alexander; Billig, Maria; Kisiela, Dagmara; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Neut, Christel; Gower-Rousseau, Corinne; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Bonnet, Richard; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Barnich, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are abnormally predominant on Crohn's disease (CD) ileal mucosa. AIEC reference strain LF82 adheres to ileal enterocytes via the common type 1 pili adhesin FimH and recognizes CEACAM6 receptors abnormally expressed on CD ileal epithelial cells. The fimH genes of 45 AIEC and 47 non-AIEC strains were sequenced. The phylogenetic tree based on fimH DNA sequences indicated that AIEC strains predominantly express FimH with amino acid mutations of a recent evolutionary origin - a typical signature of pathoadaptive changes of bacterial pathogens. Point mutations in FimH, some of a unique AIEC-associated nature, confer AIEC bacteria a significantly higher ability to adhere to CEACAM-expressing T84 intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, in the LF82 strain, the replacement of fimHLF82 (expressing FimH with an AIEC-associated mutation) with fimHK12 (expressing FimH of commensal E. coli K12) decreased the ability of bacteria to persist and to induce severe colitis and gut inflammation in infected CEABAC10 transgenic mice expressing human CEACAM receptors. Our results highlight a mechanism of AIEC virulence evolution that involves selection of amino acid mutations in the common bacterial traits, such as FimH protein, and leads to the development of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a genetically susceptible host. The analysis of fimH SNPs may be a useful method to predict the potential virulence of E. coli isolated from IBD patients for diagnostic or epidemiological studies and to identify new strategies for therapeutic intervention to block the interaction between AIEC and gut mucosa in the early stages of IBD. PMID:23358328

  20. Enzymatic formation of a resorcylic acid by creating a structure-guided single-point mutation in stilbene synthase.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Namita; Li, Lingyun; Cai, Chao; Xu, Peng; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2015-02-01

    A novel C17 resorcylic acid was synthesized by a structure-guided Vitis vinifera stilbene synthase (STS) mutant, in which threonine 197 was replaced with glycine (T197G). Altering the architecture of the coumaroyl binding and cyclization pocket of the enzyme led to the attachment of an extra acetyl unit, derived from malonyl-CoA, to p-coumaroyl-CoA. The resulting novel pentaketide can be produced strictly by STS-like enzymes and not by Chalcone synthase-like type III polyketide synthases; due to the unique thioesterase like activity of STS-like enzymes. We utilized a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based data analysis approach to directly compare the reaction products of the mutant and wild type STS. The findings suggest an easy to employ platform for precursor-directed biosynthesis and identification of unnatural polyketides by structure-guided mutation of STS-like enzymes.

  1. A point mutation of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor that blocks coupling to potassium but not calcium currents.

    PubMed

    Surprenant, A; Horstman, D A; Akbarali, H; Limbird, L E

    1992-08-14

    The alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor (adrenoceptor) was stably expressed in AtT20 mouse pituitary tumor cells; adrenoceptor agonists inhibited adenylyl cyclase, inhibited voltage-dependent calcium currents, and increased inwardly rectifying potassium currents. An aspartic acid residue (Asp79) highly conserved among guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors was mutated to asparagine; in cells transfected with the mutant alpha 2-receptor, agonists inhibited adenylyl cyclase and calcium currents but did not increase potassium currents. Because distinct G proteins appear to couple adrenoceptors to potassium and calcium currents, the present findings suggest that the mutant alpha 2-adrenoceptor cannot achieve the conformation necessary to activate G proteins that mediate potassium channel activation.

  2. A point mutation in the glutamate-gated chloride channel of Plutella xylostella is associated with resistance to abamectin.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wang, R; Yang, Y; Wu, S; O'Reilly, A O; Wu, Y

    2016-04-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is a global pest of cruciferous vegetables. Abamectin resistance in a field population of P. xylostella was introgressed into the susceptible Roth strain. The resulting introgression strain Roth-Abm showed 11 000-fold resistance to abamectin compared with Roth. An A309V substitution at the N-terminus of the third transmembrane helix (M3) of the glutamate-gated chloride channel of P. xylostella (PxGluCl) was identified in Roth-Abm. The frequency of the V309 allele of PxGluCl was 94.7% in Roth-Abm, whereas no such allele was detected in Roth. A subpopulation of Roth-Abm was kept without abamectin selection for 20 generations to produce a revertant strain, Roth-Abm-D. Abamectin resistance in Roth-Abm-D declined to 1150-fold compared with Roth, with the V309 allele frequency decreased to 9.6%. After treatment of the Roth-Abm-D strain with 80 mg/l abamectin the V309 allele frequency in the survivors increased to 55%. This demonstrates that the A309V mutation in PxGluCl is strongly associated with a 10-fold increase in abamectin resistance in Roth-Abm relative to Roth-Abm-D. Homology modelling and automated ligand docking results suggest that the A309V substitution allosterically modifies the abamectin-binding site, as opposed to directly eliminating a key binding contact. Other resistance mechanisms to abamectin in Roth-Abm are discussed besides the A309V mutation of PxGluCl.

  3. Molecular cloning of the human UMP synthase gene and characterization of point mutations in two hereditary orotic aciduria families.

    PubMed Central

    Suchi, M; Mizuno, H; Kawai, Y; Tsuboi, T; Sumi, S; Okajima, K; Hodgson, M E; Ogawa, H; Wada, Y

    1997-01-01

    Uridine monophosphate (UMP) synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the last two steps of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) and orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODC). Loss of either enzymatic activity results in hereditary orotic aciduria, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retarded growth, anemia, and excessive urinary excretion of orotic acid. We have isolated the UMP synthase chromosomal gene from a lambdaEMBL-3 human genomic library and report a single-copy gene spanning approximately 15 kb. The UMP synthase genomic structure encodes six exons ranging in size from 115 bp to 672 bp, and all splicing junctions adhere to the canonical GT/AG rule. Cognate promoter elements implicated in glucocorticoid- and cAMP-mediated regulation as well as in liver-, myeloid-, and lymphocyte-specific expression are located within the 5' flanking sequence. Molecular investigation of UMP synthase deficiency in a Japanese orotic aciduria patient revealed mutations R96G (A-to-G transition; nt 286) and G429R (G-to-C transversion; nt 1285) in one allele and V109G (T-to-G transversion; nt 326) in the other allele. Expression of human UMP synthase cDNAs containing these mutations in pyrimidine auxotrophic Escherichia coli and in recombinant baculovirus-infected Sf21 cells demonstrates impaired activity presumably associated with the urinary orotic acid substrate accumulations observed in vivo. We further establish the identity of two polymorphisms, G213A (v = .26) and 440Gpoly (v = .27) located in exons 3 and 6, respectively, which did not significantly compromise either OPRT or ODC function. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9042911

  4. A single point mutation reveals gating of the human ClC-5 Cl-/H+ antiporter.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Silvia; Pusch, Michael; Zifarelli, Giovanni

    2013-12-01

    ClC-5 is a 2Cl(-)/1H(+) antiporter highly expressed in endosomes of proximal tubule cells. It is essential for endocytosis and mutations in ClC-5 cause Dent's disease, potentially leading to renal failure. However, the physiological role of ClC-5 is still unclear. One of the main issues is whether the strong rectification of ClC-5 currents observed in heterologous systems, with currents elicited only at positive voltages, is preserved in vivo and what is the origin of this rectification. In this work we identified a ClC-5 mutation, D76H, which, besides the typical outward currents of the wild-type (WT), shows inward tail currents at negative potentials that allow the estimation of the reversal of ClC-5 currents for the first time. A detailed analysis of the dependence of these inward tail currents on internal and external pH and [Cl(-)] shows that they are generated by a coupled transport of Cl(-) and H(+) with a 2 : 1 stoichiometry. From this result we conclude that the inward tail currents are caused by a gating mechanism that regulates ClC-5 transport activity and not by a major alteration of the transport mechanism itself. This implies that the strong rectification of the currents of WT ClC-5 is at least in part caused by a gating mechanism that activates the transporter at positive potentials. These results elucidate the biophysical properties of ClC-5 and contribute to the understanding of its physiological role.

  5. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M.; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  6. Latex bead immobilisation in PDMS matrix for the detection of p53 gene point mutation and anti-HIV-1 capsid protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Marquette, Christophe A; Degiuli, Agnès; Imbert-Laurenceau, Emmanuelle; Mallet, Francois; Chaix, Carole; Mandrand, Bernard; Blum, Loïc J

    2005-03-01

    Two diagnostic chemiluminescent biochips were developed for either the detection of p53 gene point mutation or the serological detection of anti-HIV-1 p24 capsid protein. Both biochips were composed of 24 microarrays of latex beads spots (4x4) (150 microm in diameter, 800 microm spacing) entrapped in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer (PDMS). The latex beads, bearing oligonucleotide sequences or capsid protein, were spotted with a conventional piezoelectric spotter and subsequently transferred at the PDMS interface. The electron microscopy observation of the biochips showed how homogeneous and well distributed the spots could be. Point mutation detection on the codon 273 of the p53 gene was performed on the basis of the melting temperature difference between the perfect match sequence and the one base pair mismatch sequence. The hybridisation of a 20-mer oligonucleotide form the codon 273 including a one base pair mutation in its sequence on a biochip arrayed with non-muted and the muted complementary sequences, enabled a clear discrimination at 56 degrees C between muted and wild sequences. Moreover, the quantitative measurement of the amount of muted sequence in a sample was possible in the range 0.4-4 pmol. Serological measurement of anti-HIV-1 p24 capsid protein on the biochip, prepared with 1-microm-diameter latex beads, enabled the detection of monoclonal antibodies in the range 1.55-775 ng mL(-1). Such a range could be lowered to 0.775 ng mL(-1) when using 50-nm-diameter beads, which generated a higher specific surface. The validation of the biochip for the detection of anti-HIV-1 capsid protein antibodies was performed in human sera from seropositive and seronegative patients. The positivity of the sera was easily discriminated at serum dilutions below 1:1,000.

  7. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Banas, Kelly; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M; Kmiec, Eric B

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  8. First insights into the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from HIV-infected Mexican patients and mutations causing multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species in HIV-infected patients in Mexico is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of MTb and NTM species in HIV-infected patients from Mexico City, to evaluate the genotypic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains, to determine their drug resistance profiles by colorimetric microplate Alamar Blue assay (MABA), and finally, to detect mutations present in katG, rpoB and inhA genes, resulting in isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF) resistance. Results Of the 67 mycobacterial strains isolated, 48 were identified as MTb, 9 as M. bovis, 9 as M. avium and 1 as M. intracellulare. IS6110-RFLP of 48 MTb strains showed 27 profiles. Spoligotyping of the 48 MTb strains yielded 21 patterns, and 9 M. bovis strains produced 7 patterns. Eleven new spoligotypes patterns were found. A total of 40 patterns were produced from the 48 MTb strains when MIRU-VNTR was performed. Nineteen (39.6%) MTb strains were resistant to one or more drugs. One (2.1%) multidrug-resistant (MDR) strain was identified. A novel mutation was identified in a RIF-resistant strain, GAG → TCG (Glu → Ser) at codon 469 of rpoB gene. Conclusions This is the first molecular analysis of mycobacteria isolated from HIV-infected patients in Mexico, which describe the prevalence of different mycobacterial species in this population. A high genetic diversity of MTb strains was identified. New spoligotypes and MIRU-VNTR patterns as well as a novel mutation associated to RIF-resistance were found. This information will facilitate the tracking of different mycobacterial species in HIV-infected individuals, and monitoring the spread of these microorganisms, leading to more appropriate measures for tuberculosis control. PMID:20236539

  9. A theoretical study to establish the relationship between the three-dimensional structure of triose-phosphate isomerase of Giardia duodenalis and point mutations in the respective gene.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Matthew J; Hofmann, Andreas; Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B

    2010-10-01

    Predicting how point mutations in genes alter the tertiary and quarternary structure of proteins is central to a number of areas of molecular biology and has implications in relation to the function and evolution of molecules. In the present study, we theoretically assessed the effects of 20 point mutations detected previously in a region of the triose-phosphate isomerase gene (tpi) of the protozoan Giardia duodenalis on the three-dimensional structure of the 'wild-type' protein (TPI). Amino acid substitutions arising from codon variations were mainly located at surface-accessible sites or in hydrophobic pockets of TPI. None of the substitutions was predicted to exert a significant change to the fold or functionality of the enzyme, with the exception of one alteration (Arg100). Almost all substitutions were either conservative or semi-conservative, and retained or even improved the expected stability of the fold. Overall, the findings provide support for the "neutral theory", which contends that evolution at the molecular level is not solely shaped by "Darwinian selection but also by random drift of selectively neutral or nearly neutral mutants".

  10. Novel mutatıons and diverse clinical phenotypes in recombınase-activating gene 1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe combined immunodeficiency is within a heterogeneous group of inherited defects throughout the development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Mutations in recombinase-activating genes 1 or 2 (RAG1/2) represent approximately 10% of all SCID cases. RAG1/2 are essential for V(D)J rearrangement of the B- and T-cell receptors. Objectives The aim of this study was to review clinical, immunological and molecular findings of Turkish SCID patients with RAG1 defects and to draw attention to novel mutations, genotype-phenotype correlations and the high rate of BCG infections within this group. Methods Eleven patients (F/M: 6/5) were included. Molecular, immunological and clinical data were evaluated. Results Five patients were classified as T-B-NK + SCID, four patients as T + B-NK + SCID (two of these patients were diagnosed as classical Omenn syndrome) and two patients as T + B + NK + SCID with respect to clinical presentations and immunological data. Mean age of the whole study group, mean age at onset of symptoms and mean age at diagnosis were: 33.0 ± 42.8, 3.1 ± 3.3 and 10.4 ± 13.5 months, respectively. Consanguinity rate was 54%. Some novel mutations were found in RAG1 gene in addition to previously reported mutations. Genotype-phenotype correlation was not significantly apparent in most of the cases. BCG infection was observed in 36.4% of patients (two BCG-osis and two BCG-itis). Conclusion Epigenetic factors such as compound genetic defects, enviromental factors, and exposure to recurrent infections may modify phenotypical characteristics of RAG deficiencies. Inoculation of live vaccines such as BCG should be postponed until primary immunodeficiency disease is excluded with appropriate screening tests in suspected cases. PMID:22424479

  11. High-Throughput Analysis of Human Cytomegalovirus Genome Diversity Highlights the Widespread Occurrence of Gene-Disrupting Mutations and Pervasive Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Thys, Kim; Mbong Ngwese, Mirabeau; Van Damme, Ellen; Dvorak, Jan; Van Loock, Marnix; Li, Guangdi; Tachezy, Ruth; Busson, Laurent; Aerssens, Jeroen; Van Ranst, Marc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus is a widespread pathogen of major medical importance. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals, and congenital infections can result in severe disabilities or stillbirth. Development of a vaccine is prioritized, but no candidate is close to release. Although correlations of viral genetic variability with pathogenicity are suspected, knowledge about the strain diversity of the 235-kb genome is still limited. In this study, 96 full-length human cytomegalovirus genomes from clinical isolates were characterized, quadrupling the amount of information available for full-genome analysis. These data provide the first high-resolution map of human cytomegalovirus interhost diversity and evolution. We show that cytomegalovirus is significantly more divergent than all other human herpesviruses and highlight hot spots of diversity in the genome. Importantly, 75% of strains are not genetically intact but contain disruptive mutations in a diverse set of 26 genes, including the immunomodulatory genes UL40 and UL111A. These mutants are independent of culture passage artifacts and circulate in natural populations. Pervasive recombination, which is linked to the widespread occurrence of multiple infections, was found throughout the genome. The recombination density was significantly higher than those of other human herpesviruses and correlated with strain diversity. While the overall effects of strong purifying selection on virus evolution are apparent, evidence of diversifying selection was found in several genes encoding proteins that interact with the host immune system, including UL18, UL40, UL142, and UL147. These residues may present phylogenetic signatures of past and ongoing virus-host interactions. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus has the largest genome of all viruses that infect humans. Currently, there is a great interest in establishing associations between genetic variants and strain pathogenicity of

  12. Selection in the Making: A Worldwide Survey of Haplotypic Diversity Around a Causative Mutation in Porcine IGF2

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, A.; Huang, L.-S.; Ren, J.; Angiolillo, A.; Cho, I.-C.; Soto, H.; Lemús-Flores, C.; Makuza, S. M.; Folch, J. M.; Pérez-Enciso, M.

    2008-01-01

    Domestic species allow us to study dramatic evolutionary changes at an accelerated rate due to the effectiveness of modern breeding techniques and the availability of breeds that have undergone distinct selection pressures. We present a worldwide survey of haplotype variability around a known causative mutation in porcine gene IGF2, which increases lean content. We genotyped 34 SNPs spanning 27 kb in 237 domestic pigs and 162 wild boars. Although the selective process had wiped out variability for at least 27 kb in the haplotypes carrying the mutation, there was no indication of an overall reduction in genetic variability of international vs. European local breeds; there was also no evidence of a reduction in variability caused by domestication. The haplotype structure and a plot of Tajima's D against the frequency of the causative mutation across breeds suggested a temporal pattern, where each breed corresponded to a different selective stage. This was observed comparing the haplotype neighbor-joining (NJ) trees of breeds that have undergone increasing selection pressures for leanness, e.g., European local breeds vs. Pietrain. These results anticipate that comparing current domestic breeds will decisively help to recover the genetic history of domestication and contemporary selective processes. PMID:18245828

  13. Analysis of clustered point mutations in the human ribosomal RNA gene promoter by transient expression in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, M H; Learned, R M; Tjian, R

    1988-01-01

    We have mapped the cis regulatory elements required in vivo for initiation at the human rRNA promoter by RNA polymerase I. Transient expression in COS-7 cells was used to evaluate the transcription phenotype of clustered base substitution mutations in the human rRNA promoter. The promoter consists of two major elements: a large upstream region, composed of several domains, that lies between nucleotides -234 and -107 relative to the transcription initiation site and affects transcription up to 100-fold and a core element that lies between nucleotides -45 and +20 and affects transcription up to 1000-fold. The upstream region is able to retain partial function when positioned within 100-160 nucleotides of the transcription initiation site, but it cannot stimulate transcription from distances of greater than or equal to 600 nucleotides. In addition, we demonstrate, using mouse-human hybrid rRNA promoters, that the sequences responsible for human species-specific transcription in vivo appear to reside in both the core and upstream elements, and sequences from the mouse rRNA promoter cannot be substituted for them. Images PMID:3422449

  14. Conversion of human 5-lipoxygenase to a 15-lipoxygenase by a point mutation to mimic phosphorylation at Serine-663

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Nathaniel C.; Rui, Zhe; Neau, David B.; Waight, Maria T.; Bartlett, Sue G.; Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.; Newcomer, Marcia E.

    2012-08-31

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) initiates biosynthesis of the proinflammatory leukotriene lipid mediators and, together with 15-LOX, is also required for synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxins. The catalytic activity of 5-LOX is regulated through multiple mechanisms, including Ca{sup 2+}-targeted membrane binding and phosphorylation at specific serine residues. To investigate the consequences of phosphorylation at S663, we mutated the residue to the phosphorylation mimic Asp, providing a homogenous preparation suitable for catalytic and structural studies. The S663D enzyme exhibits robust 15-LOX activity, as determined by spectrophotometric and HPLC analyses, with only traces of 5-LOX activity remaining; synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 from arachidonic acid is also detected. The crystal structure of the S663D mutant in the absence and presence of arachidonic acid (in the context of the previously reported Stable-5-LOX) reveals substantial remodeling of helices that define the active site so that the once fully encapsulated catalytic machinery is solvent accessible. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of 5-LOX at S663 could not only down-regulate leukotriene synthesis but also stimulate lipoxin production in inflammatory cells that do not express 15-LOX, thus redirecting lipid mediator biosynthesis to the production of proresolving mediators of inflammation.

  15. Response to inhibition of smoothened in diverse epithelial cancer cells that lack smoothened or patched 1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    GALIMBERTI, FABRIZIO; BUSCH, ALEXANDER M.; CHINYENGETERE, FADZAI; MA, TIAN; SEKULA, DAVID; MEMOLI, VINCENT A.; DRAGNEV, KONSTANTIN H.; LIU, FANG; JOHNSON, KEVIN C.; GUO, YONGLI; FREEMANTLE, SARAH J.; ANDREW, ANGELINE S.; GRENINGER, PATRICIA; ROBBINS, DAVID J.; SETTLEMAN, JEFF; BENES, CYRIL; DMITROVSKY, ETHAN

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) pathway Smoothened (Smo) inhibitors are active against Gorlin syndrome-associated basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and medulloblastoma where Patched (Ptch) mutations occur. We interrogated 705 epithelial cancer cell lines for growth response to the Smo inhibitor cyclopamine and for expressed HH pathway-regulated species in a linked genetic database. Ptch and Smo mutations that respectively conferred Smo inhibitor response or resistance were undetected. Previous studies revealed HH pathway activation in lung cancers. Therefore, findings were validated using lung cancer cell lines, transgenic and transplantable murine lung cancer models, and human normal-malignant lung tissue arrays in addition to testing other Smo inhibitors. Cyclopamine sensitivity most significantly correlated with high cyclin E (P=0.000009) and low insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP6) (P=0.000004) levels. Gli family members were associated with response. Cyclopamine resistance occurred with high GILZ (P=0.002) expression. Newer Smo inhibitors exhibited a pattern of sensitivity similar to cyclopamine. Gain of cyclin E or loss of IGFBP6 in lung cancer cells significantly increased Smo inhibitor response. Cyclin E-driven transgenic lung cancers expressed a gene profile implicating HH pathway activation. Cyclopamine treatment significantly reduced proliferation of murine and human lung cancers. Smo inhibition reduced lung cancer formation in a syngeneic mouse model. In human normal-malignant lung tissue arrays cyclin E, IGFBP6, Gli1 and GILZ were each differentially expressed. Together, these findings indicate that Smo inhibitors should be considered in cancers beyond those with activating HH pathway mutations. This includes tumors that express genes indicating basal HH pathway activation. PMID:22923130

  16. EGFR, p16INK4a and E-cadherin immuno-histochemistry and EGFR point mutations analyses in invasive cervical cancer specimens from Moroccan women.

    PubMed

    El Hamdani, W; Amrani, M; Attaleb, M; Laantri, N; Ennaji, M M; Khyatti, M; El Mzibri, M

    2010-09-11

    The involvement of human papillomavirus in the development of cervical cancer has been firmly established. However, better management of cervical cancer rests on good diagnosis and an effective therapy. In this study we evaluated the frequency of point mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for future use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in clinical treatment and to assess the use of EGFR, p16INK4a and E-cadherin as biomarkers in cervical cancer diagnosis with immunohistochemistry. Fifty-three patient specimens of cervical cancer were analysed for HPV infection, for EGFR mutations in exons 18 through 21, and for expression of EGFR, p16INK4a and E-cadherin by immunostaining. Results showed that 79.24% of the cases (42/53) are HPV positive and the HPV types more closely associated with risk are HPV 16 and 18. In all 53 analysed specimens, any mutation affecting the EGFR kinase domain in exons 18 through 21 was observed. Expressions of EGFR, p16INK4a and E-cadherin were detected in 88,67% (47/53), 92,45% (49/53) and 79,24% (42/53) of analysed specimens respectively. Thus, EGFR, p16INK4a and E-cadherin would be excellent tools for IHC analysis during the cervical cancer development. EGFR and p16INK4a can be used for early diagnosis and E-cadherin for cancer progression and cell migration. However, treatment of cervical cancer with TKIs may not be effective and the identification of other EGFR inhibitors is needed.

  17. A new point mutation (C446R) in the thyroid hormone receptor-{beta} gene of a family with resistance to thyroid hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.E.; Chyna, B.; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Sunthornthepvarakul, T.; Refetoff, S.; Duell, P.B.

    1994-05-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a condition of impaired end-organ responsiveness to thyroid hormone characterized by goiter and elevated thyroid hormone levels with an appropriately normal TSH. RTH has been associated with mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor-{beta} (TR{beta}) gene. The authors report studies carried out in 21 members of a family (F119), 12 of whom exhibited the RTH phenotype. A point mutation was detected in the T{sub 3}-binding domain of the TR{beta} gene. It resulted in replacement of the normal cysteine-446 with an arginine (C446R) that has not been previously reported. The clinical characteristics of this family are similar to those reported in other families with RTH, namely goiter, tachycardia, and learning disabilities. Thyroid function tests are also typical of other subjects with RTH. The mean values ({+-}SD) in untreated affected subjects compared to those in unaffected family members were: free T{sub 4} index, 250 {+-} 21 vs. 108 {+-} 13; total T{sub 3}, 4.3 {+-} 0.4 vs. 2.4 {+-} 0.4 nmol/L; and TSH, 4.5 {+-} 1.1 vs. 2.4 {+-} 1.1 mU/L. DNA samples from 18 family members were screened for the TR{beta} mutation, which results in the loss of a BsmI restriction site, and each of the 11 subjects with abnormal thyroid function tests were heterozygous for the mutant allele. The mutant TR{beta} expressed in Cos-I cells did not bind T{sub 3} (K{sub a} of C446R/wild-type, <0.05). T{sub 3} at a concentration up to 100 nmol/L failed to enhance the transactivation of a reporter gene, and the mutant receptor inhibited the T{sub 3}-mediated transcriptional activation of the wild-type TR{beta}. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Coproporphyrin Excretion and Low Thiol Levels Caused by Point Mutation in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides S-Adenosylmethionine Synthetase Gene ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sabaty, Monique; Adryanczyk, Géraldine; Roustan, Chloë; Cuiné, Stephan; Lamouroux, Christine; Pignol, David

    2010-01-01

    A spontaneous mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL-106 was found to excrete a large amount of a red compound identified as coproporphyrin III, an intermediate in bacteriochlorophyll and heme synthesis. The mutant, named PORF, is able to grow under phototrophic conditions but has low levels of intracellular cysteine and glutathione and overexpresses the cysteine synthase CysK. The expression of molybdoenzymes such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and nitrate reductases is also affected under certain growth conditions. Excretion of coproporphyrin and overexpression of CysK are not directly related but were both found to be consequences of a diminished synthesis of the key metabolite S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). The wild-type phenotype is restored when the gene metK encoding SAM synthetase is supplied in trans. The metK gene in the mutant strain has a mutation leading to a single amino acid change (H145Y) in the encoded protein. This point mutation is responsible for a 70% decrease in intracellular SAM content which probably affects the activities of numerous SAM-dependent enzymes such as coproporphyrinogen oxidase (HemN); uroporphyrinogen III methyltransferase (CobA), which is involved in siroheme synthesis; and molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein A (MoaA). We propose a model showing that the attenuation of the activities of SAM-dependent enzymes in the mutant could be responsible for the coproporphyrin excretion, the low cysteine and glutathione contents, and the decrease in DMSO and nitrate reductase activities. PMID:20038586

  19. “Occult” mastocytosis with activating c‐kit point mutation evolving into systemic mastocytosis associated with plasma cell myeloma and secondary amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sotlar, K; Saeger, W; Stellmacher, F; Stahmer, J; Jäckle, S; Valent, P; Horny, H‐P

    2006-01-01

    A case of a 70‐year‐old man presenting with exsudative enteropathy due to light‐chain‐associated amyloidosis is reported. The diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis associated with IgG/λ plasma cell myeloma and secondary generalised amyloidosis was carried out by morphological evaluation of bone marrow biopsy. The c‐kit point mutation D816Y was detected by molecular analysis. Two years before, a cystadenolymphoma of the left parotid gland had been removed. A moderate increase of loosely scattered spindle‐shaped mast cells, a subpopulation of them expressing CD25, an antigen that is not expressed by normal or reactive mast cells, was shown by retrospective analysis carried out on an intraparotideal lymph node. The c‐kit mutation D816Y was shown by the molecular analysis of the lymph node. In summary, the notion that systemic mastocytosis may very rarely be associated with B cell neoplasms and that neoplastic mast cell infiltrates may be obscured because of only a minimal increase of atypical mast cells, which are outnumbered by other non‐neoplastic cells in the same tissue, is supported by this case. This finding was preliminarily termed “occult” mastocytosis. PMID:16873565

  20. Evidence of ectopic recombination and a repeat-induced point (RIP) mutation in the genome of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, the agent responsible for white mold

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Míriam; Santana, Mateus Ferreira; Salomão, Tânia Maria Fernandes; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira; de Barros, Everaldo Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two retrotransposons from the superfamilies Copia and Gypsy named as Copia-LTR_SS and Gypsy-LTR_SS, respectively, were identified in the genomic bank of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. These transposable elements (TEs) contained direct and preserved long terminal repeats (LTR). Domains related to codified regions for gag protein, integrase, reverse transcriptase and RNAse H were identified in Copia-LTR_SS, whereas in Gypsy-LTR_SS only domains for gag, reverse transcriptase and RNAse H were found. The abundance of identified LTR-Solo suggested possible genetic recombination events in the S. sclerotiorum genome. Furthermore, alignment of the sequences for LTR elements from each superfamily suggested the presence of a RIP (repeat-induced point mutation) silencing mechanism that may directly affect the evolution of this species. PMID:27560652

  1. Production of Gene-Corrected Adult Beta Globin Protein in Human Erythrocytes Differentiated from Patient iPSCs After Genome Editing of the Sickle Point Mutation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaosong; Wang, Ying; Yan, Wei; Smith, Cory; Ye, Zhaohui; Wang, Jing; Gao, Yongxing; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Cheng, Linzhao

    2015-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and genome editing provide a precise way to generate gene-corrected cells for disease modeling and cell therapies. Human iPSCs generated from sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have a homozygous missense point mutation in the HBB gene encoding adult β-globin proteins, and are used as a model system to improve strategies of human gene therapy. We demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system designer nuclease is much more efficient in stimulating gene targeting of the endogenous HBB locus near the SCD point mutation in human iPSCs than zinc finger nucleases and TALENs. Using a specific guide RNA and Cas9, we readily corrected one allele of the SCD HBB gene in human iPSCs by homologous recombination with a donor DNA template containing the wild-type HBB DNA and a selection cassette that was subsequently removed to avoid possible interference of HBB transcription and translation. We chose targeted iPSC clones that have one corrected and one disrupted SCD allele for erythroid differentiation assays, using an improved xeno-free and feeder-free culture condition we recently established. Erythrocytes from either the corrected or its parental (uncorrected) iPSC line were generated with similar efficiencies. Currently ∼6%-10% of these differentiated erythrocytes indeed lacked nuclei, characteristic of further matured erythrocytes called reticulocytes. We also detected the 16-kDa β-globin protein expressed from the corrected HBB allele in the erythrocytes differentiated from genome-edited iPSCs. Our results represent a significant step toward the clinical applications of genome editing using patient-derived iPSCs to generate disease-free cells for cell and gene therapies. Stem Cells 2015;33:1470-1479.

  2. Functional Assessment of Residues in the Amino- and Carboxyl-Termini of Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) in the Mud Crab Scylla olivacea Using Point-Mutated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Huang, Shiau-Shan; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Yun-Ru; Huang, Wen-San; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    To assess functional importance of the residues in the amino- and carboxyl-termini of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the mud crab Scylla olivacea (Sco-CHH), both wild-type and point-mutated CHH peptides were produced with an amidated C-terminal end. Spectral analyses of circular dichroism, chromatographic retention time, and mass spectrometric analysis of the recombinant peptides indicate that they were close in conformation to native CHH and were produced with the intended substitutions. The recombinant peptides were subsequently used for an in vivo hyperglycemic assay. Two mutants (R13A and I69A rSco-CHH) completely lacked hyperglycemic activity, with temporal profiles similar to that of vehicle control. Temporal profiles of hyperglycemic responses elicited by 4 mutants (I2A, F3A, D12A, and D60A Sco-CHH) were different from that elicited by wild-type Sco-CHH; I2A was unique in that it exhibited significantly higher hyperglycemic activity, whereas the remaining 3 mutants showed lower activity. Four mutants (D4A, Q51A, E54A, and V72A rSco-CHH) elicited hyperglycemic responses with temporal profiles similar to those evoked by wild-type Sco-CHH. In contrast, the glycine-extended version of V72A rSco-CHH (V72A rSco-CHH-Gly) completely lost hyperglycemic activity. By comparing our study with previous ones of ion-transport peptide (ITP) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) using deleted or point-mutated mutants, detail discussion is made regarding functionally important residues that are shared by both CHH and ITP (members of Group I of the CHH family), and those that discriminate CHH from ITP, and Group-I from Group-II peptides. Conclusions summarized in the present study provide insights into understanding of how functional diversification occurred within a peptide family of multifunctional members. PMID:26261986

  3. Using diverse U.S. beef cattle genomes to identify missense mutations in EPAS1, a gene associated with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Michael P.; Smith, Timothy P.L.; Carnahan, Jacky K.; Basnayake, Veronica; Qiu, Jiansheng; Simpson, Barry; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of whole genome sequence (WGS) data has made it possible to discover protein variants in silico. However, existing bovine WGS databases do not show data in a form conducive to protein variant analysis, and tend to under represent the breadth of genetic diversity in global beef cattle. Thus, our first aim was to use 96 beef sires, sharing minimal pedigree relationships, to create a searchable and publicly viewable set of mapped genomes relevant for 19 popular breeds of U.S. cattle. Our second aim was to identify protein variants encoded by the bovine endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1 gene ( EPAS1), a gene associated with pulmonary hypertension in Angus cattle. The identity and quality of genomic sequences were verified by comparing WGS genotypes to those derived from other methods. The average read depth, genotype scoring rate, and genotype accuracy exceeded 14, 99%, and 99%, respectively. The 96 genomes were used to discover four amino acid variants encoded by EPAS1 (E270Q, P362L, A671G, and L701F) and confirm two variants previously associated with disease (A606T and G610S). The six EPAS1 missense mutations were verified with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry assays, and their frequencies were estimated in a separate collection of 1154 U.S. cattle representing 46 breeds. A rooted phylogenetic tree of eight polypeptide sequences provided a framework for evaluating the likely order of mutations and potential impact of EPAS1 alleles on the adaptive response to chronic hypoxia in U.S. cattle. This public, whole genome resource facilitates in silico identification of protein variants in diverse types of U.S. beef cattle, and provides a means of translating WGS data into a practical biological and evolutionary context for generating and testing hypotheses. PMID:27746904

  4. Metabolic Engineering of an ATP-Neutral Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas Pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum: Growth Restoration by an Adaptive Point Mutation in NADH Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Komati Reddy, Gajendar; Lindner, Steffen N.

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum uses the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway of glycolysis and gains 2 mol of ATP per mol of glucose by substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP). To engineer glycolysis without net ATP formation by SLP, endogenous phosphorylating NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was replaced by nonphosphorylating NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapN) from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which irreversibly converts glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) to 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG) without generating ATP. As shown recently (S. Takeno, R. Murata, R. Kobayashi, S. Mitsuhashi, and M. Ikeda, Appl Environ Microbiol 76:7154–7160, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01464-10), this ATP-neutral, NADPH-generating glycolytic pathway did not allow for the growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum with glucose as the sole carbon source unless hitherto unknown suppressor mutations occurred; however, these mutations were not disclosed. In the present study, a suppressor mutation was identified, and it was shown that heterologous expression of udhA encoding soluble transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli partly restored growth, suggesting that growth was inhibited by NADPH accumulation. Moreover, genome sequence analysis of second-site suppressor mutants that were able to grow faster with glucose revealed a single point mutation in the gene of non-proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-II) leading to the amino acid change D213G, which was shared by these suppressor mutants. Since related NDH-II enzymes accepting NADPH as the substrate possess asparagine or glutamine residues at this position, D213G, D213N, and D213Q variants of C. glutamicum NDH-II were constructed and were shown to oxidize NADPH in addition to NADH. Taking these findings together, ATP-neutral glycolysis by the replacement of endogenous NAD-dependent GAPDH with NADP-dependent GapN became possible via oxidation of NADPH formed in this pathway by mutant NADPH

  5. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zaffino, R L; Mir, M; Samitier, J

    2014-03-14

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50 nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications.

  6. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, R. L.; Mir, M.; Samitier, J.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications.

  7. Effect of single-point mutations on the stability and immunogenicity of a recombinant ricin A chain subunit vaccine antigen.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Justin C; O'Hara, Joanne M; Hu, Lei; Gao, Fei P; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Volkin, David B; Brey, Robert N; Fang, Jianwen; Karanicolas, John; Mantis, Nicholas J; Middaugh, C Russell

    2013-04-01

    There is great interest in the design and development of highly thermostable and immunogenic protein subunit vaccines for biodefense. In this study, we used two orthogonal and complementary computational protein design approaches to generate a series of single-point mutants of RiVax, an attenuated recombinant ricin A chain (RTA) protein subunit vaccine antigen. As assessed by differential scanning calorimetry, the conformational stabilities of the designed mutants ranged from 4°C less stable to 4.5°C more stable than RiVax, depending on solution pH. Two more thermostable (V18P, C171L) and two less thermostable (T13V, S89T) mutants that displayed native-like secondary and tertiary structures (as determined by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectral analysis, respectively) were tested for their capacity to elicit RTA-specific antibodies and toxin-neutralizing activity. Following a prime-boost regimen, we found qualitative differences with respect to specific antibody titers and toxin neutralizing antibody levels induced by the different mutants. Upon a second boost with the more thermostable mutant C171L, a statistically significant increase in RTA-specific antibody titers was observed when compared with RiVax-immunized mice. Notably, the results indicate that single residue changes can be made to the RiVax antigen that increase its thermal stability without adversely impacting the efficacy of the vaccine.

  8. Screening of nineteen unrelated families with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone for known point mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta gene and the detection of a new mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, K; Balzano, S; Sakurai, A; DeGroot, L J; Refetoff, S

    1991-01-01

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH) is a syndrome characterized by impaired tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Two distinct point mutations in the hormone binding domain of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta have recently been identified in two unrelated families with GRTH. One, Mf, involves a replacement of the normal glycine-345 for arginine in exon 7 and another, Mh, replaces the normal proline-453 for histidine in exon 8. To probe for the presence of the Mf and Mh defect in 19 unrelated families with GRTH, we applied separate polymerase chain reactions using allele-specific oligonucleotide primers containing the normal and each of the two mutant nucleotides at the 3'-position. A total of 24 affected subjects and 13 normal family members were studied. The mode of inheritance was dominant in 13 families, was unknown in 5 families, and was clearly recessive in 1 family in which only the consanguineous subjects were affected. Primers containing the substitutions specific for Mf and Mh amplified exons 7 and 8, respectively, only in affected members of each of the two index families. Primers containing the normal sequences amplified exons 7 and 8 of the TR beta gene in all subjects except affected members of one family. In this family with recessively inherited GRTH, neither exon could be amplified using any combinations of primers and DNA blot revealed absence of all coding exons. These results indicate a major deletion of the TR beta gene, including both DNA and hormone binding domains. Since heterozygous members of this family are not affected, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient for normal function of the TR beta. These data also support the hypothesis that in the dominant mode of GRTH inheritance the presence of an abnormal TR beta interferes with the function of the normal TR beta. Distinct mutations are probably responsible for GRTH in unrelated families. Images PMID:1991834

  9. Comparing Weighted and Unweighted Grade Point Averages in Predicting College Success of Diverse and Low-Income College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warne, Russell T.; Nagaishi, Chanel; Slade, Michael K.; Hermesmeyer, Paul; Peck, Elizabeth Kimberli

    2014-01-01

    While research has shown the statistical significance of high school grade point averages (HSGPAs) in predicting future academic outcomes, the systems with which HSGPAs are calculated vary drastically across schools. Some schools employ unweighted grades that carry the same point value regardless of the course in which they are earned; other…

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of P. vivax in Iran: High Diversity and Complex Sub-Structure Using Neutral Markers, but No Evidence of Y976F Mutation at pvmdr1

    PubMed Central

    Hamedi, Yaghoob; Sharifi-Sarasiabi, Khojasteh; Dehghan, Farzaneh; Safari, Reza; To, Sheren; Handayuni, Irene; Trimarsanto, Hidayat; Price, Ric N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria remains endemic at low levels in the south-eastern provinces of Iran bordering Afghanistan and Pakistan, with the majority of cases attributable to P. vivax. The national guidelines recommend chloroquine (CQ) as blood-stage treatment for uncomplicated P. vivax, but the large influx of imported cases enhances the risk of introducing CQ resistance (CQR). Methodology and Principal Findings The genetic diversity at pvmdr1, a putative modulator of CQR, and across nine putatively neutral short tandem repeat (STR) markers were assessed in P. vivax clinical isolates collected between April 2007 and January 2013 in Hormozgan Province, south-eastern Iran. One hundred blood samples were collected from patients with microscopy-confirmed P. vivax enrolled at one of five district clinics. In total 73 (73%) were autochthonous cases, 23 (23%) imported cases from Afghanistan or Pakistan, and 4 (4%) with unknown origin. 97% (97/100) isolates carried the F1076L mutation, but none carried the Y976F mutation. STR genotyping was successful in 71 (71%) isolates, including 57(57%) autochthonous and 11 (11%) imported cases. Analysis of population structure revealed 2 major sub-populations, K1 and K2, with further sub-structure within K2. The K1 sub-population had markedly lower diversity than K2 (HE = 0.06 vs HE = 0.82) suggesting that the sub-populations were sustained by distinct reservoirs with differing transmission dynamics, possibly reflecting local versus imported/introduced populations. No notable separation was observed between the local and imported cases although the sample size was limited. Conclusions The contrasting low versus high diversity in the two sub-populations (K1 and K2) infers that a combination of local transmission and cross-border malaria from higher transmission regions shape the genetic make-up of the P. vivax population in south-eastern Iran. There was no molecular evidence of CQR amongst the local or imported cases, but ongoing clinical

  11. Novel progranulin mutation: screening for PGRN mutations in a Portuguese series of FTD/CBS cases.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Rita Joao; Santana, Isabel; Bras, Jose Miguel; Revesz, Tamas; Rebelo, Olinda; Ribeiro, Maria Helena; Santiago, Beatriz; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2008-07-15

    Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene were recently described as the cause of ubiquitin positive frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in many families. Different frequencies of these genetic changes have been reported in diverse populations leading us to determine if these mutations were a major cause of FTD in the Portuguese population. The entire coding sequence plus exon 0 of PGRN were sequenced in a consecutive series of 46 FTD/CBS Portuguese patients. Two mutations were found: a novel pathogenic insertion (p.Gln300GlnfsX61) and a previously described point variant (p.T182M) of unclear pathogenicity. Pathogenic mutations in the PGRN gene were found in one of the 36 probands studied (3% of the probands in our series) who had a corticobasal syndrome presentation, indicating that in the Portuguese population, mutations in this gene are not a major cause of FTD.

  12. Endogenous spar tin, mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia, has a complex subcellular localization suggesting diverse roles in neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Robay, Dimitri; Patel, Heema; Simpson, Michael A.; Brown, Nigel A.; Crosby, Andrew H. . E-mail: acrosby@sgul.ac.uk

    2006-09-10

    Mutation of spartin (SPG20) underlies a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia, a disorder principally defined by the degeneration of upper motor neurons. Using a polyclonal antibody against spartin to gain insight into the function of the endogenous molecule, we show that the endogenous molecule is present in two main isoforms of 85 kDa and 100 kDa, and 75 kDa and 85 kDa in human and murine, respectively, with restricted subcellular localization. Immunohistochemical studies on human and mouse embryo sections and in vitro cell studies indicate that spartin is likely to possess both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. The nuclear expression of spartin closely mirrors that of the snRNP (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein) marker {alpha}-Sm, a component of the spliceosome. Spartin is also enriched at the centrosome within mitotic structures. Notably we show that spartin protein undergoes dynamic positional changes in differentiating human SH-SY5Y cells. In undifferentiated non-neuronal cells, spartin displays a nuclear and diffuse cytosolic profile, whereas spartin transiently accumulates in the trans-Golgi network and subsequently decorates discrete puncta along neurites in terminally differentiated neuroblastic cells. Investigation of these spartin-positive vesicles reveals that a large proportion colocalizes with the synaptic vesicle marker synaptotagmin. Spartin is also enriched in synaptic-like structures and in synaptic vesicle-enriched fraction.

  13. Proteolipoprotein gene analysis in 82 patients with sporadic Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease: duplications, the major cause of the disease, originate more frequently in male germ cells, but point mutations do not. The Clinical European Network on Brain Dysmyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Mimault, C; Giraud, G; Courtois, V; Cailloux, F; Boire, J Y; Dastugue, B; Boespflug-Tanguy, O

    1999-08-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease (PMD) is an X-linked developmental defect of myelination affecting the central nervous system and segregating with the proteolipoprotein (PLP) locus. Investigating 82 strictly selected sporadic cases of PMD, we found PLP mutations in 77%; complete PLP-gene duplications were the most frequent abnormality (62%), whereas point mutations in coding or splice-site regions of the gene were involved less frequently (38%). We analyzed the maternal status of 56 cases to determine the origin of both types of PLP mutation, since this is relevant to genetic counseling. In the 22 point mutations, 68% of mothers were heterozygous for the mutation, a value identical to the two-thirds of carrier mothers that would be expected if there were an equal mutation rate in male and female germ cells. In sharp contrast, among the 34 duplicated cases, 91% of mothers were carriers, a value significantly (chi2=9. 20, P<.01) in favor of a male bias, with an estimation of the male/female mutation frequency (k) of 9.3. Moreover, we observed the occurrence of de novo mutations between parental and grandparental generations in 17 three-generation families, which allowed a direct estimation of the k value (k=11). Again, a significant male mutation imbalance was observed only for the duplications. The mechanism responsible for this strong male bias in the duplications may involve an unequal sister chromatid exchange, since two deletion events, responsible for mild clinical manifestations, have been reported in PLP-related diseases.

  14. Proteolipoprotein gene analysis in 82 patients with sporadic Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease: duplications, the major cause of the disease, originate more frequently in male germ cells, but point mutations do not. The Clinical European Network on Brain Dysmyelinating Disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mimault, C; Giraud, G; Courtois, V; Cailloux, F; Boire, J Y; Dastugue, B; Boespflug-Tanguy, O

    1999-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease (PMD) is an X-linked developmental defect of myelination affecting the central nervous system and segregating with the proteolipoprotein (PLP) locus. Investigating 82 strictly selected sporadic cases of PMD, we found PLP mutations in 77%; complete PLP-gene duplications were the most frequent abnormality (62%), whereas point mutations in coding or splice-site regions of the gene were involved less frequently (38%). We analyzed the maternal status of 56 cases to determine the origin of both types of PLP mutation, since this is relevant to genetic counseling. In the 22 point mutations, 68% of mothers were heterozygous for the mutation, a value identical to the two-thirds of carrier mothers that would be expected if there were an equal mutation rate in male and female germ cells. In sharp contrast, among the 34 duplicated cases, 91% of mothers were carriers, a value significantly (chi2=9. 20, P<.01) in favor of a male bias, with an estimation of the male/female mutation frequency (k) of 9.3. Moreover, we observed the occurrence of de novo mutations between parental and grandparental generations in 17 three-generation families, which allowed a direct estimation of the k value (k=11). Again, a significant male mutation imbalance was observed only for the duplications. The mechanism responsible for this strong male bias in the duplications may involve an unequal sister chromatid exchange, since two deletion events, responsible for mild clinical manifestations, have been reported in PLP-related diseases. PMID:10417279

  15. Investigating the effects of point mutations on the affinity between the cyanobacterial lectin microvirin and high mannose-type glycans present on the HIV envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Conceição de Souza, Rafael; de Medeiros Muniz, Gabriela; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; de Melo Lima, Adonis; da Silva, Alessandra Pereira; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez Júnior, João Lídio

    2016-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to exert an enormous impact on global human health. This led experts to emphasize the importance of new measures for preventing HIV infections, including the development of vaccines and novel drugs. In this context, a promising approach involves the use of lectins that can bind the surface envelope glycoprotein gp120 of HIV with high affinity, preventing viral entry. The cyanobacterial lectin microvirin (MVN) has been proposed as a candidate for development as a topical microbicide because of its ability to bind to high mannose-type glycans, potently inhibiting HIV-1 entry. Thus, the aim of this computational study was to investigate the effects of four point mutations (D53Q, D53E, D53K, and D53W) on the structure and affinity of MVN with di-mannose (MAN). Molecular dynamics simulations followed by binding free energy calculations using MM-GBSA were employed. The calculated binding free energy of ligand-receptor complexation of MVN with MAN was -26.02 kcal mol(-1). We identified in the wild-type protein that residues I45, T59, and Q81 have a major contribution to the binding free energy of di-mannose. Among the investigated mutants, the most promising one was the D53W mutation, with a theoretical binding free energy value of -29.16 kcal mol(-1). We suggest that this increased stability is due to the introduction of extra rigidity on the hinge region connecting two key structural elements of the MVN binding site.

  16. MAMA-PCR assay for the detection of point mutations associated with high-level erythromycin resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Mateo, Estibaliz; Churruca, Estibaliz; Martinez, Irati; Girbau, Cecilia; Fernández-Astorga, Aurora

    2005-10-01

    Twenty Campylobacter jejuni and 16 Campylobacter coli strains isolated from humans and food/animals, including 17 isolates resistant to erythromycin, were analyzed. A combined mismatch amplification mutation assay-PCR technique was developed to detect the mutations A 2074 C and A 2075 G in the 23S rRNA gene associated with erythromycin resistance. All high-level erythromycin-resistant strains examined by DNA sequencing carried the transition mutation A 2075 G, whereas no isolate carried the A 2074 C mutation. No mutations were found among the susceptible and low-level erythromycin-resistant strains.

  17. Analytical Evaluation of Bit Error Rate Performance of a Free-Space Optical Communication System with Receive Diversity Impaired by Pointing Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazrul Islam, A. K. M.; Majumder, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    Analysis is carried out to evaluate the conditional bit error rate conditioned on a given value of pointing error for a Free Space Optical (FSO) link with multiple receivers using Equal Gain Combining (EGC). The probability density function (pdf) of output signal to noise ratio (SNR) is also derived in presence of pointing error with EGC. The average BER of a SISO and SIMO FSO links are analytically evaluated by averaging the conditional BER over the pdf of the output SNR. The BER performance results are evaluated for several values of pointing jitter parameters and number of IM/DD receivers. The results show that, the FSO system suffers significant power penalty due to pointing error and can be reduced by increasing in the number of receivers at a given value of pointing error. The improvement of receiver sensitivity over SISO is about 4 dB and 9 dB when the number of photodetector is 2 and 4 at a BER of 10-10. It is also noticed that, system with receive diversity can tolerate higher value of pointing error at a given BER and transmit power.

  18. Further elucidation of the genomic structure of PAX3, and identification of two different point mutations within the PAX3 homeobox that cause Waardenburg syndrome type I in two families

    SciTech Connect

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.B.; Wilcox, E.R.

    1995-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigmentary disturbances. Previous work has linked the disease to PAX3 on chromosome 2, and several mutations within the highly conserved paired-box and octapeptide motifs, but not the homeobox, have been reported. In this report, we have used the published cDNA sequence to further define the genomic structure of PAX3, using inverse PCR. We have identified exon/intron boundaries between exons 5 and 6 and between exons 6 and 7. Further, we have identified the first two mutations within the homeobox in two different families with type 1 Waardenburg syndrome. The first is a point mutation (G{yields}T) at the first base of exon 6, which substitutes phenylalanine for valine. In another family, we have identified a point mutation (C{yields}G) within the homeobox, in exon 6, which substitutes a glycine for arginine at a highly conserved site. The homeodomain is important in binding of DNA and in effecting transcriptional control. These mutations likely result in structural change within the homeodomain that either change the DNA-binding specificity of the homeodomain or reduce the affinity of the PAX3 protein for DNA. These homeodomain mutations should aid in elucidating the role of the homeodomain in the function of the PAX3 protein. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. HIV-1 Diversity and Drug Resistance Mutations among People Seeking HIV Diagnosis in Voluntary Counseling and Testing Sites in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-de-Castro, Carlos A.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Bastos, Francisco I.; Pilotto, José H.; Fernandes, Nilo; Morgado, Mariza G.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable viral diversity remains a big challenge to the development of HIV vaccines and optimal therapy worldwide. In the latest years, as a consequence of the large expansion of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) availability worldwide, an increase in transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) has been observed, varying according the region. This study assessed HIV-1 diversity and TDRM profile over time among newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from individuals seeking HIV diagnosis in four voluntary counseling and testing (VCTs) sites located in the Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Area, in 2005–2007. Recent (RS) and long-term (LTS) HIV-1 seroconverters were distinguished using BED-CEIA. Pol viral sequences were obtained for 102 LTS identified in 2005 and 144 RS from 2005–2007. HIV-1 subtype and pol recombinant genomes were determined using Rega HIV-1 Subtyping Tool and by phylogenetic inferences and bootscanning analyses. Surveillance of HIV-1 TDRM to protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors were performed according to the Calibrated Population Resistance (CPR) Tool 6.0. Overall, subtype B remains the most prevalent in Rio de Janeiro in both LTS and RS HIV-1 infected individuals. An increased proportion of recombinant samples was detected over time, especially in RS heterosexual men, due to the emergence of CRF02_AG and URF samples bearing a subtype K fragment. The prevalence of HIV-1 samples carrying TDRM was high and similar between LTS and RS (15.7% vs 14.6%) or age (<25yo 17.9% vs >25yo 16.6%) along the study period. The high resistance levels detected in both populations are of concern, especially considering the dynamics of HIV-1 diversity over time. Our results suggest that the incorporation of resistance testing prior to HAART initiation should be highly considered, as well as permanent surveillance, aiming to carefully monitoring HIV-1 diversity, with focus on CRF

  20. A novel m.7539C>T point mutation in the mt-tRNA(Asp) gene associated with multisystemic mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Diana; Schubert, Kathrin; Joshi, Pushpa R; Baty, Karen; Blakely, Emma L; Zierz, Stephan; Taylor, Robert W; Deschauer, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial transfer RNA (mt-tRNA) mutations are the commonest sub-type of mitochondrial (mtDNA) mutations associated with human disease. We report a patient with multisytemic disease characterised by myopathy, spinal ataxia, sensorineural hearing loss, cataract and cognitive impairment in whom a novel m.7539C>T mt-tRNA(Asp) transition was identified. Muscle biopsy revealed extensive histopathological findings including cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient fibres. Pyrosequencing confirmed mtDNA heteroplasmy for the mutation whilst single muscle fibre segregation studies revealed statistically significant higher mutation loads in COX-deficient fibres than in COX-positive fibres. Absence from control databases, hierarchical mt-tRNA mutation segregation within tissues, and occurrence at conserved sequence positions, further confirm this novel mt-tRNA mutation to be pathogenic. To date only three mt-tRNA(Asp) gene mutations have been described with clear evidence of pathogenicity. The novel m.7539C>T mt-tRNA(Asp) gene mutation extends the spectrum of pathogenic mutations in this gene, further supporting the notion that mt-tRNA(Asp) gene mutations are associated with multisystemic disease presentations.

  1. Diverse lectin-binding specificity of four ZP3 glycoprotein isoforms with a discrete isoelectric point in chicken egg coat.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hiroki; Fukushima, Hideaki; Momoda, Masaki; Ima, Yurie; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Ujita, Minoru

    2012-08-03

    The vertebrate egg coat corresponding to mammalian zona pellucida is a filamentous matrix composed of highly and heterogeneously glycosylated proteins designated ZP glycoproteins including ZP1 to 4, ZPD and ZPAX, and play important roles in species-specific egg-sperm interactions. Recent advance in structural biology of chicken ZP3 provided new insights into molecular mechanisms of the egg-coat function involving its carbohydrate moieties. In this study, chicken ZP3 was separated into four major and distinct isoforms with different pI in 2D-PAGE. To investigate the meanings of the ZP3 heterogeneity in egg-sperm interactions, we preliminary analyzed glycan diversity on the molecules by using lectin-staining assays. The four major ZP3 isoforms 4-7 (from acidic to basic) were recognized equally with PNA (Galβ1-3GalNAc), but the isoforms 5-7 were recognized dominantly with WGA ((β-GlcNAc)n, clustered Sia), PHA-E (bi- and triantennary N-glycan containing Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-2Manα1-6) and RCA I (terminal Galβ1-4GlcNAc), respectively. Despite such sugar chain diversity among the ZP3 isoforms, a partner in the egg coat, ZP1, showed specific binding to each isoform equally. Localization of ZP1 and ZP3 in the egg-coat matrix were also analyzed.

  2. African diversity from the HLA point of view: influence of genetic drift, geography, linguistics, and natural selection.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2001-09-01

    This study investigates the influence of different evolutionary factors on the patterns of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genetic diversity within sub-Saharan Africa, and between Africa, Europe, and East Asia. This is done by comparing the significance of several statistics computed on equivalent population data sets tested for two HLA class II loci, DRB1 and DPB1, which strongly differ from each other by the shape of their allelic distributions. Similar results are found for the two loci concerning highly significant correlations between geographic and genetic distances at the world scale, high levels of genetic diversity within sub-Saharan Africa and East Asia, and low within Europe, and low genetic differentiations among the three broad continental areas, with no special divergence of Africa. On the other hand, DPB1 behaves as a neutral polymorphism, although a significant excess of heterozygotes is often observed for DRB1. Whereas the pattern observed for DPB1 is explained by geographic differentiations and genetic drift in isolated populations, balancing selection is likely to have prevented genetic differentiations among populations at the DRB1 locus. However, this selective effect did not disrupt the high correlation found between DRB1 and geography at the world scale, nor between DRB1 and linguistic differentiations at the African level.

  3. Single point mutations in the helicase domain of the NS3 protein enhance dengue virus replicative capacity in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and circumvent the type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Silveira, G F; Strottmann, D M; de Borba, L; Mansur, D S; Zanchin, N I T; Bordignon, J; dos Santos, C N Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease worldwide. The outcome of the infection is determined by the interplay of viral and host factors. In the present study, we evaluated the cellular response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mdDCs) infected with recombinant dengue virus type 1 (DV1) strains carrying a single point mutation in the NS3hel protein (L435S or L480S). Both mutated viruses infect and replicate more efficiently and produce more viral progeny in infected mdDCs compared with the parental, non-mutated virus (vBACDV1). Additionally, global gene expression analysis using cDNA microarrays revealed that the mutated DVs induce the up-regulation of the interferon (IFN) signalling and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) canonical pathways in mdDCs. Pronounced production of type I IFN were detected specifically in mdDCs infected with DV1-NS3hel-mutated virus compared with mdDCs infected with the parental virus. In addition, we showed that the type I IFN produced by mdDCs is able to reduce DV1 infection rates, suggesting that cytokine function is effective but not sufficient to mediate viral clearance of DV1-NS3hel-mutated strains. Our results demonstrate that single point mutations in subdomain 2 have important implications for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of DV1-NS3hel. Although a direct functional connection between the increased ATPase activity and viral replication still requires further studies, these mutations speed up viral RNA replication and are sufficient to enhance viral replicative capacity in human primary cell infection and circumvent type I IFN activity. This information may have particular relevance for attenuated vaccine protocols designed for DV.

  4. Increased incidence of cycloguanil resistance in malaria cases entering France from Africa, determined as point mutations in the parasites' dihydrofolate-reductase genes.

    PubMed

    Durand, R; di Piazza, J P; Longuet, C; Sécardin, Y; Clain, J; le Bras, J

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of cycloguanil resistance in 501 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from individuals entering France from Africa was estimated by a method based on PCR-restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms. None of the subjects had taken antifol prophylaxis. Annual incidence of the resistance, detected as a point mutation at codon 108 in the parasite's dihydrofolate-reductase gene, increased from 19.8% in 1995 to 43.6% in 1997 (P < 0.001). The proportion of isolates found to be susceptible (i.e. wild-type) among travellers returning from the African countries known as Group 2 in France (i.e. Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Tchad and Togo) was reasonably high (62.9%) and much higher than in the other subjects returning from other identifiable countries in Africa (35.3%). The antimalarial prophylaxis recommended in France to those travelling to Group-2 countries, chloroquine-proguanil, therefore still seems reasonable, although cycloguanil resistance may seriously undermine the efficacy of this drug combination in the future.

  5. Zinc Finger Domain of the PRDM9 Gene on Chromosome 1 Exhibits High Diversity in Ruminants but Its Paralog PRDM7 Contains Multiple Disruptive Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ahlawat, Sonika; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Rekha; Arora, Reena; De, Sachinandan

    2016-01-01

    PRDM9 is the sole hybrid sterility gene identified so far in vertebrates. PRDM9 gene encodes a protein with an immensely variable zinc-finger (ZF) domain that determines the site of meiotic recombination hotspots genome-wide. In this study, the terminal ZF domain of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 1 and its paralog on chromosome 22 were characterized in 225 samples from five ruminant species (cattle, yak, mithun, sheep and goat). We found extraordinary variation in the number of PRDM9 zinc fingers (6 to 12). We sequenced PRDM9 ZF encoding region from 15 individuals (carrying the same ZF number in both copies) and found 43 different ZF domain sequences. Ruminant zinc fingers of PRDM9 were found to be diversifying under positive selection and concerted evolution, specifically at positions involved in defining their DNA-binding specificity, consistent with the reports from other vertebrates such as mice, humans, equids and chimpanzees. ZF-encoding regions of the PRDM7, a paralog of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 22 and on unknown chromosomes in other studied species were found to contain 84 base repeat units as in PRDM9, but there were multiple disruptive mutations after the first repeat unit. The diversity of the ZFs suggests that PRDM9 may activate recombination hotspots that are largely unique to each ruminant species. PMID:27203728

  6. Zinc Finger Domain of the PRDM9 Gene on Chromosome 1 Exhibits High Diversity in Ruminants but Its Paralog PRDM7 Contains Multiple Disruptive Mutations.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, Sonika; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Rekha; Arora, Reena; De, Sachinandan

    2016-01-01

    PRDM9 is the sole hybrid sterility gene identified so far in vertebrates. PRDM9 gene encodes a protein with an immensely variable zinc-finger (ZF) domain that determines the site of meiotic recombination hotspots genome-wide. In this study, the terminal ZF domain of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 1 and its paralog on chromosome 22 were characterized in 225 samples from five ruminant species (cattle, yak, mithun, sheep and goat). We found extraordinary variation in the number of PRDM9 zinc fingers (6 to 12). We sequenced PRDM9 ZF encoding region from 15 individuals (carrying the same ZF number in both copies) and found 43 different ZF domain sequences. Ruminant zinc fingers of PRDM9 were found to be diversifying under positive selection and concerted evolution, specifically at positions involved in defining their DNA-binding specificity, consistent with the reports from other vertebrates such as mice, humans, equids and chimpanzees. ZF-encoding regions of the PRDM7, a paralog of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 22 and on unknown chromosomes in other studied species were found to contain 84 base repeat units as in PRDM9, but there were multiple disruptive mutations after the first repeat unit. The diversity of the ZFs suggests that PRDM9 may activate recombination hotspots that are largely unique to each ruminant species.

  7. Structure-activity relationships of diverse oxazolidinones for linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains possessing the cfr methyltransferase gene or ribosomal mutations.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jeffrey B; Finn, John; Hilgers, Mark; Morales, Gracia; Rahawi, Shahad; G C, Kedar; Picazo, Juan José; Im, Weonbin; Shaw, Karen Joy; Stein, Jeffrey L

    2010-12-01

    Staphylococcal resistance to linezolid (LZD) is mediated through ribosomal mutations (23S rRNA or ribosomal proteins L3 and L4) or through methylation of 23S rRNA by the horizontally transferred Cfr methyltransferase. To investigate the structural basis for oxazolidinone activity against LZD-resistant (LZD(r)) strains, we compared structurally diverse, clinically relevant oxazolidinones, including LZD, radezolid (RX-1741), TR-700 (torezolid), and a set of TR-700 analogs (including novel CD-rings and various A-ring C-5 substituents), against a panel of laboratory-derived and clinical LZD(r) Staphylococcus aureus strains possessing a variety of resistance mechanisms. Potency against all strains was correlated with optimization of C- and D-rings, which interact with more highly conserved regions of the peptidyl transferase center binding site. Activity against cfr strains was retained with either hydroxymethyl or 1,2,3-triazole C-5 groups but was reduced by 2- to 8-fold in compounds with acetamide substituents. LZD, which possesses a C-5 acetamide group and lacks a D-ring substituent, demonstrated the lowest potency against all strains tested, particularly against cfr strains. These data reveal key features contributing to oxazolidinone activity and highlight structural tradeoffs between potency against susceptible strains and potency against strains with various resistance mechanisms.

  8. A Single P-loop Glutamate Point Mutation to either Lysine or Arginine Switches the Cation–Anion Selectivity of the CNGA2 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wei; Moorhouse, Andrew J.; Chandra, Meenak; Pierce, Kerrie D.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Barry, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels play a critical role in olfactory and visual transduction. Site-directed mutagenesis and inside-out patch-clamp recordings were used to investigate ion permeation and selectivity in two mutant homomeric rat olfactory CNGA2 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. A single point mutation of the negatively charged pore loop (P-loop) glutamate (E342) to either a positively charged lysine or arginine resulted in functional channels, which consistently responded to cGMP, although the currents were generally extremely small. The concentration–response curve of the lysine mutant channel was very similar to that of wild-type (WT) channels, suggesting no major structural alteration to the mutant channels. Reversal potential measurements, during cytoplasmic NaCl dilutions, showed that the lysine and the arginine mutations switched the selectivity of the channel from cations (PCl/PNa = 0.07 [WT]) to anions (PCl/PNa = 14 [Lys] or 10 [Arg]). Relative anion permeability sequences for the two mutant channels, measured with bi-ionic substitutions, were NO3− > I− > Br− > Cl− > F− > acetate−, the same as those obtained for anion-selective GABA and glycine channels. The mutant channels also seem to have an extremely small single-channel conductance, measured using noise analysis of about 1–2 pS, compared to a WT value of about 29 pS. The results showed that it is predominantly the charge of the E342 residue in the P-loop, rather than the pore helix dipoles, which controls the cation–anion selectivity of this channel. However, the outward rectification displayed by both mutant channels in symmetrical NaCl solutions suggests that the negative ends of the pore helix dipoles may play a role in reducing the outward movement of Cl− ions through these anion-selective channels. These results have potential implications for the determinants of anion–cation selectivity in the large family of P-loop–containing channels. PMID:16533895

  9. Activating point mutations in the common beta subunit of the human GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-5 receptors suggest the involvement of beta subunit dimerization and cell type-specific molecules in signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, B J; D'Andrea, R; Gonda, T J

    1995-01-01

    We have combined retroviral expression cloning with random mutagenesis to identify two activating point mutations in the common signal-transducing subunit (h beta c) of the receptors for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 by virtue of their ability to confer factor independence on the haemopoietic cell line, FDC-P1. One mutation (V449E) is located within the transmembrane domain and, by analogy with a similar mutation in the neu oncogene, may act by inducing dimerization of h beta c. The other mutation (I374N) lies in the extracellular, membrane-proximal portion of h beta c. Neither of these mutants, nor a previously described mutant of h beta c (FI delta, which has a small duplication in the extracellular region), was capable of inducing factor independence in CTLL-2 cells, while only V449E could induce factor independence in BAF-B03 cells. These results imply that the extracellular and transmembrane mutations act by different mechanisms. Furthermore, they imply that the mutants, and hence also wild-type h beta c, interact with cell type-specific signalling molecules. Models are presented which illustrate how these mutations may act and predict some of the characteristics of the putative receptor-associated signalling molecules. Images PMID:7556069

  10. Immigrants' mortality patterns in the short- and long-term point toward origin-related diversities: the Israeli experience.

    PubMed

    Gabbay, Uri; Leshukovits, Yuri; Sadetzki, Siegal

    2014-02-01

    Immigrant mortality studies reveal conflicting results that were attributed to diversity in immigrant definition, different classifications, and lack of appropriate comparisons. This work studied mortality patterns of the immigrations absorbed in Israel. Short-term mortality was evaluated by comparing the Standardized Mortality Rate (SMR) of the first year after immigration to the SMR of the second to fifth years. Long-term mortality was evaluated by comparing recent immigrant cohorts to cohorts of immigrants who have been residents 5 and 10 years. Stratification was made by source country classification and gender. Data were derived from the Israel National Population Registry and were analyzed anonymously. Immigrants from developed and developing countries had the highest SMR in the first year, which considerably decreased in both short and long term. Immigrants from mid-developed countries had stable SMR in the short term followed by only a modest decrease in the long term. Ethiopian immigrants exhibited exceptionally low SMR in the first year, following which it increased but remained relatively low. Mortality patterns of different immigrant groups differ even under similar definitions, conditions, and period. Only immigrants of developed and developing countries presented the expected pattern of excessive short-term mortality, which consistently decreased with time. Unique mortality patterns were discovered among two groups: Immigrants from mid-developed countries presented stable mortality attributable to isolation and delayed adaptation, and Ethiopian low mortality attributable to pre-migration natural selection.

  11. Archaeal amoA gene diversity points to distinct biogeography of ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Sintes, Eva; Bergauer, Kristin; De Corte, Daniele; Yokokawa, Taichi; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2013-05-01

    Mesophilic ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) are abundant in a diverse range of marine environments, including the deep ocean, as revealed by the quantification of the archaeal amoA gene encoding the alpha-subunit of the ammonia monooxygenase. Using two different amoA primer sets, two distinct ecotypes of marine Crenarchaeota Group I (MCGI) were detected in the waters of the tropical Atlantic and the coastal Arctic. The HAC-AOA ecotype (high ammonia concentration AOA) was ≈ 8000 times and 15 times more abundant in the coastal Arctic and the top 300 m layer of the open equatorial Atlantic, respectively, than the LAC-AOA (low ammonia concentration AOA) ecotype. In contrast, the LAC-AOA ecotype dominated the lower meso- and bathypelagic waters of the tropical Atlantic (≈ 50 times more abundant than the HAC-AOA) where ammonia concentrations are well below the detection limit using conventional spectrophotometric or fluorometric methods. Cluster analysis of the sequences from the clone libraries obtained by the two amoA primer sets revealed two phylogenetically distinct clusters. Taken together, our results suggest the presence of two ecotypes of archaeal ammonia oxidizers corresponding to the medium (1.24 µM on average in the coastal Arctic) and low ammonia concentration (< 0.01 µM) in the shallow and the deep waters respectively.

  12. The performance of a point of care test for detection of anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin and rheumatoid factor in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rojanasantikul, Preeda; Pattrapornpisut, Prapa; Anuruckparadorn, Kulvara; Katchamart, Wanruchada

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of a point-of-care test (POCT) for detection of anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) and rheumatoid factor (RF) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with 2 years of disease duration or less. Additionally, we evaluated the agreement of these tests when using EDTA whole blood and capillary blood. Patients with RA and other rheumatic disorders were consecutively recruited from the rheumatology outpatient clinic. The POCT for detection of anti-MCV and RF using capillary blood and EDTA whole blood was performed in 78 patients with early RA, 55 patients with other rheumatic disorders, and 55 healthy blood donors. The sensitivity and specificity of anti-MCV POCT in patients with early RA were 64 and 97 %, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of RF POCT were 51 and 95 %, respectively. The positive likelihood ratio of the POCT for anti-MCV was higher than those for RF (23.5 vs 9.4). The negative likelihood was 0.37 for anti-MCV and 0.52 for RF. There were three cases with false positive for anti-MCV including a patient with psoriatic arthritis and the other two with systemic sclerosis. The agreement between capillary blood and EDTA whole blood testing for anti-MCV and RF was low to moderate with Cohen's kappa of 0.58 and 0.49, respectively. This POCT for detection of anti-MCV and RF yielded high specificity and may be a valuable tool for the diagnosis of early RA. Using this POCT with EDTA whole blood instead of capillary blood is not recommended.

  13. Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin – Application to murine amelogenin containing the equivalent P70→T point mutation observed in human amelogenesis imperfecta

    DOE PAGES

    Buchko, Garry W.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-13

    Amelogenin is the predominant extracellular protein responsible for converting carbonated hydroxyapatite into dental enamel, the hardest and most heavily mineralized tissue in vertebrates. Despite much effort, the precise mechanism by which amelogenin regulates enamel formation is not fully understood. To assist efforts aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanism of enamel formation, more facile protocols to purify recombinantly expressed amelogenin, ideally without any tag to assist affinity purification, are advantageous. Here we describe an improved method to purify milligram quantities of amelogenin that exploits its high solubility in 2% glacial acetic acid under conditions of low ionic strength. The method involvesmore » heating the frozen cell pellet for two 15 min periods at ~70 ºC with two minutes of sonication in between, dialysis twice in 2% acetic acid (1:250 v/v), and reverse phase chromatography. A further improvement in yield is obtained by resuspending the frozen cell pellet in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride in the first step. The acetic acid heating method is illustrated with a murine amelogenin containing the corresponding P70→T point mutation observed in an human amelogenin associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (P71T), while the guanidine hydrochloride heating method is illustrated with wild type murine amelogenin (M180). The self-assembly properties of P71T were probed by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies as a function of protein (0.1 to 1.8 mM) and NaCl (0 to 367 mM) concentration. In conclusion, relative to similar studies with wild type murine amelogenin, P71T self-associates at lower protein or salt concentrations with the interactions initiated near the N-terminus.« less

  14. Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin – Application to murine amelogenin containing the equivalent P70→T point mutation observed in human amelogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-13

    Amelogenin is the predominant extracellular protein responsible for converting carbonated hydroxyapatite into dental enamel, the hardest and most heavily mineralized tissue in vertebrates. Despite much effort, the precise mechanism by which amelogenin regulates enamel formation is not fully understood. To assist efforts aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanism of enamel formation, more facile protocols to purify recombinantly expressed amelogenin, ideally without any tag to assist affinity purification, are advantageous. Here we describe an improved method to purify milligram quantities of amelogenin that exploits its high solubility in 2% glacial acetic acid under conditions of low ionic strength. The method involves heating the frozen cell pellet for two 15 min periods at ~70 ºC with two minutes of sonication in between, dialysis twice in 2% acetic acid (1:250 v/v), and reverse phase chromatography. A further improvement in yield is obtained by resuspending the frozen cell pellet in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride in the first step. The acetic acid heating method is illustrated with a murine amelogenin containing the corresponding P70→T point mutation observed in an human amelogenin associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (P71T), while the guanidine hydrochloride heating method is illustrated with wild type murine amelogenin (M180). The self-assembly properties of P71T were probed by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies as a function of protein (0.1 to 1.8 mM) and NaCl (0 to 367 mM) concentration. In conclusion, relative to similar studies with wild type murine amelogenin, P71T self-associates at lower protein or salt concentrations with the interactions initiated near the N-terminus.

  15. Single Point Mutations in the Small Cytoplasmic Loop of ACA8, a Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana, Generate Partially Deregulated Pumps*

    PubMed Central

    Fusca, Tiziana; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Meneghelli, Silvia; Marrano, Claudia Adriana; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2009-01-01

    ACA8 is a type 2B Ca2+-ATPase having a regulatory N terminus whose auto-inhibitory action can be suppressed by binding of calmodulin (CaM) or of acidic phospholipids. ACA8 N terminus is able to interact with a region of the small cytoplasmic loop connecting transmembrane domains 2 and 3. To determine the role of this interaction in auto-inhibition we analyzed single point mutants produced by mutagenesis of ACA8 Glu252 to Asn345 sequence. Mutation to Ala of any of six tested acidic residues (Glu252, Asp273, Asp291, Asp303, Glu302, or Asp332) renders an enzyme that is less dependent on CaM for activity. These results highlight the relevance in ACA8 auto-inhibition of a negative charge of the surface area of the small cytoplasmic loop. The most deregulated of these mutants is D291A ACA8, which is less activated by controlled proteolysis or by acidic phospholipids; the D291A mutant has an apparent affinity for CaM higher than wild-type ACA8. Moreover, its phenotype is stronger than that of D291N ACA8, suggesting a more direct involvement of this residue in the mechanism of auto-inhibition. Among the other produced mutants (I284A, N286A, P289A, P322A, V344A, and N345A), only P322A ACA8 is less dependent on CaM for activity than the wild type. The results reported in this study provide the first evidence that the small cytoplasmic loop of a type 2B Ca2+-ATPase plays a role in the attainment of the auto-inhibited state. PMID:19740735

  16. Single point mutations in the small cytoplasmic loop of ACA8, a plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana, generate partially deregulated pumps.

    PubMed

    Fusca, Tiziana; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Meneghelli, Silvia; Marrano, Claudia Adriana; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2009-11-06

    ACA8 is a type 2B Ca(2+)-ATPase having a regulatory N terminus whose auto-inhibitory action can be suppressed by binding of calmodulin (CaM) or of acidic phospholipids. ACA8 N terminus is able to interact with a region of the small cytoplasmic loop connecting transmembrane domains 2 and 3. To determine the role of this interaction in auto-inhibition we analyzed single point mutants produced by mutagenesis of ACA8 Glu(252) to Asn(345) sequence. Mutation to Ala of any of six tested acidic residues (Glu(252), Asp(273), Asp(291), Asp(303), Glu(302), or Asp(332)) renders an enzyme that is less dependent on CaM for activity. These results highlight the relevance in ACA8 auto-inhibition of a negative charge of the surface area of the small cytoplasmic loop. The most deregulated of these mutants is D291A ACA8, which is less activated by controlled proteolysis or by acidic phospholipids; the D291A mutant has an apparent affinity for CaM higher than wild-type ACA8. Moreover, its phenotype is stronger than that of D291N ACA8, suggesting a more direct involvement of this residue in the mechanism of auto-inhibition. Among the other produced mutants (I284A, N286A, P289A, P322A, V344A, and N345A), only P322A ACA8 is less dependent on CaM for activity than the wild type. The results reported in this study provide the first evidence that the small cytoplasmic loop of a type 2B Ca(2+)-ATPase plays a role in the attainment of the auto-inhibited state.

  17. Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin - Application to murine amelogenin containing the equivalent P70→T point mutation observed in human amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Shaw, Wendy J

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenin is the predominant extracellular protein responsible for converting carbonated hydroxyapatite into dental enamel, the hardest and most heavily mineralized tissue in vertebrates. Despite much effort, the precise mechanism by which amelogenin regulates enamel formation is not fully understood. To assist efforts aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanism of enamel formation, more facile protocols to purify recombinantly expressed amelogenin, ideally without any tag to assist affinity purification, are advantageous. Here we describe an improved method to purify milligram quantities of amelogenin that exploits its high solubility in 2% glacial acetic acid under conditions of low ionic strength. The method involves heating the frozen cell pellet for two 15min periods at ∼70°C with 2min of sonication in between, dialysis twice in 2% acetic acid (1:250 v/v), and reverse phase chromatography. A further improvement in yield is obtained by resuspending the frozen cell pellet in 6M guanidine hydrochloride in the first step. The acetic acid heating method is illustrated with a murine amelogenin containing the corresponding P70→T point mutation observed in an human amelogenin associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (P71T), while the guanidine hydrochloride heating method is illustrated with wild type murine amelogenin (M180). The self-assembly properties of P71T were probed by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies as a function of protein (0.1-1.8mM) and NaCl (0-367mM) concentration. Relative to similar studies with wild type murine amelogenin, P71T self-associates at lower protein or salt concentrations with the interactions initiated near the N-terminus.

  18. A transgenic mouse model demonstrates a dominant negative effect of a point mutation in the RPS19 gene associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Emily E; Dacosta, Lydie; Mohandas, Narla; Elliott, Gene; Bodine, David M

    2010-10-14

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited erythroblastopenia associated with mutations in at least 8 different ribosomal protein genes. Mutations in the gene encoding ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) have been identified in approximately 25% of DBA families. Most of these mutations disrupt either the translation or stability of the RPS19 protein and are predicted to cause DBA by haploinsufficiency. However, approximately 30% of RPS19 mutations are missense mutations that do not alter the stability of the RPS19 protein and are hypothesized to act by a dominant negative mechanism. To formally test this hypothesis, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing an RPS19 mutation in which an arginine residue is replaced with a tryptophan residue at codon 62 (RPS19R62W). Constitutive expression of RPS19R62W in developing mice was lethal. Conditional expression of RPS19R62W resulted in growth retardation, a mild anemia with reduced numbers of erythroid progenitors, and significant inhibition of terminal erythroid maturation, similar to DBA. RNA profiling demonstrated more than 700 dysregulated genes belonging to the same pathways that are disrupted in RNA profiles of DBA patient cells. We conclude that RPS19R62W is a dominant negative DBA mutation.

  19. VNTR diversity in Yersinia pestis isolates from an animal challenge study reveals the potential for in vitro mutations during laboratory cultivation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogler, Amy J.; Nottingham, Roxanne; Busch, Joseph D.; Sahl, Jason W.; Shuey, Megan M.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Schupp, James M.; Smith, Susan; Rocke, Tonie E.; Klein, Paul; Wagner, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Underlying mutation rates and other evolutionary forces shape the population structure of bacteria in nature. Although easily overlooked, similar forces are at work in the laboratory and may influence observed mutations. Here, we investigated tissue samples and Yersinia pestis isolates from a rodent laboratory challenge with strain CO92 using whole genome sequencing and multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA). We identified six VNTR mutations that were found to have occurred in vitro during laboratory cultivation rather than in vivo during the rodent challenge. In contrast, no single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations were observed, either in vivo or in vitro. These results were consistent with previously published mutation rates and the calculated number of Y. pestis generations that occurred during the in vitro versus the in vivo portions of the experiment. When genotyping disease outbreaks, the potential for in vitro mutations should be considered, particularly when highly variable genetic markers such as VNTRs are used.

  20. Single point mutations in various domains of a plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increase H(+)-pumping and permit yeast growth at low pH.

    PubMed Central

    Morsomme, P; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, A; De Meester, S; Thinès, D; Goffeau, A; Boutry, M

    1996-01-01

    In plants, the proton pump-ATPase (H(+)-ATPase) of the plasma membrane is encoded by a multigene family. The PMA2 (plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase) isoform from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia was previously shown to be capable of functionally replacing the yeast H(+)-ATPase, provided that the external pH was kept above pH 5.5. In this study, we used a positive selection to isolate 19 single point mutations of PMA2 which permit the growth of yeast cells at pH 4.0. Thirteen mutations were restricted to the C-terminus region, but another six mutations were found in four other regions of the enzyme. Kinetic studies determined on nine mutated PMA2 compared with the wild-type PMA2 revealed an activated enzyme characterized by an alkaline shift of the optimum pH and a slightly higher specific ATPase activity. However, the most striking difference was a 2- to 3-fold increase of H(+)-pumping in both reconstituted vesicles and intact cells. These results indicate that point mutations in various domains of the plant H(+)-ATPase improve the coupling between H(+)-pumping and ATP hydrolysis, resulting in better growth at low pH. Moreover, the yeast cells expressing the mutated PMA2 showed a marked reduction in the frequency of internal membrane proliferation seen with the strain expressing the wild-type PMA2, indicating a relationship between H(+)-ATPase activity and perturbations of the secretory pathway. Images PMID:8896445

  1. Site-specific gene correction of a point mutation in human iPS cells derived from an adult patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jizhong; Mali, Prashant; Huang, Xiaosong; Dowey, Sarah N; Cheng, Linzhao

    2011-10-27

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) bearing monogenic mutations have great potential for modeling disease phenotypes, screening candidate drugs, and cell replacement therapy provided the underlying disease-causing mutation can be corrected. Here, we report a homologous recombination-based approach to precisely correct the sickle cell disease (SCD) mutation in patient-derived iPSCs with 2 mutated β-globin alleles (β(s)/β(s)). Using a gene-targeting plasmid containing a loxP-flanked drug-resistant gene cassette to assist selection of rare targeted clones and zinc finger nucleases engineered to specifically stimulate homologous recombination at the β(s) locus, we achieved precise conversion of 1 mutated β(s) to the wild-type β(A) in SCD iPSCs. However, the resulting co-integration of the selection gene cassette into the first intron suppressed the corrected allele transcription. After Cre recombinase-mediated excision of this loxP-flanked selection gene cassette, we obtained "secondary" gene-corrected β(s)/β(A) heterozygous iPSCs that express at 25% to 40% level of the wild-type transcript when differentiated into erythrocytes. These data demonstrate that single nucleotide substitution in the human genome is feasible using human iPSCs. This study also provides a new strategy for gene therapy of monogenic diseases using patient-specific iPSCs, even if the underlying disease-causing mutation is not expressed in iPSCs.

  2. A solution NMR investigation into the impaired self-assembly properties of two murine amelogenins containing the point mutations T21→I or P41→T

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Lin, Genyao; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-08-26

    Amelogenesis imperfecta describes a group of inherited disorders that results in defective tooth enamel. Two disorders associated with human amelogenesis imperfecta are the point mutations T21?I or P40?T in amelogenin, the dominant protein present during the early stages of enamel biomineralization. The biophysical properties of wildtype murine amelogenin (M180) and two proteins containing the equivalent mutations in murine amelogenin, T21?I (M180-I) and P41?T (M180-T), were probed by NMR spectroscopy. At low protein concentration (0.1 mM), M180, M180-I, and M180-T are predomi- nately monomeric at pH 3.0 in 2% acetic acid and neither mutation produces a major structural change. Chemical shift perturbation studies as a function of protein (0.1–1.8 mM) or NaCl (0–400 mM) concentra- tions show that the mutations affect the self-association properties by causing self-assembly at lower protein or salt concentrations, relative to wildtype amelogenin, with the largest effect observed for M180-I. Under both conditions, the premature self-assembly is initiated near the N-terminus, providing further evidence for the importance of this region in the self-assembly process. The self-association of M180-I and M180-T at lower protein concentrations and lower ionic strengths than wildtype M180 may account for the clinical phenotypes of these mutations, defective enamel formation.

  3. The F130S point mutation in the Arabidopsis high-affinity K+ transporter AtHAK5 increases K+ over Na+ and Cs+ selectivity and confers Na+ and Cs+ tolerance to yeast under heterologous expression

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Fernando; Caballero, Fernando; Ródenas, Reyes; Rivero, Rosa M.; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Potassium (K+) is an essential macronutrient required for plant growth, development and high yield production of crops. Members of group I of the KT/HAK/KUP family of transporters, such as HAK5, are key components for K+ acquisition by plant roots at low external K+ concentrations. Certain abiotic stress conditions such as salinity or Cs+-polluted soils may jeopardize plant K+ nutrition because HAK5-mediated K+ transport is inhibited by Na+ and Cs+. Here, by screening in yeast a randomly-mutated collection of AtHAK5 transporters, a new mutation in AtHAK5 sequence is identified that greatly increases Na+ tolerance. The single point mutation F130S, affecting an amino acid residue conserved in HAK5 transporters from several species, confers high salt tolerance, as well as Cs+ tolerance. This mutation increases more than 100-fold the affinity of AtHAK5 for K+ and reduces the Ki values for Na+ and Cs+, suggesting that the F130 residue may contribute to the structure of the pore region involved in K+ binding. In addition, this mutation increases the Vmax for K+. All this changes occur without increasing the amount of the AtHAK5 protein in yeast and support the idea that this residue is contributing to shape the selectivity filter of the AtHAK5 transporter. PMID:25228905

  4. Copper(II) complexes of alloferon 1 with point mutations (H1A) and (H9A) stability structure and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2014-09-01

    Mono- and polynuclear copper(II) complexes of the alloferon 1 with point mutations (H1A) A(1)GVSGH(6)GQH(9)GVH(12)G (Allo1A) and (H9A) H(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G (Allo9A) have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR spectroscopic and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. To obtain a complete complex speciation different metal-to-ligand molar ratios ranging from 1:1 to 4:1 for Allo1A and to 3:1 for Allo9A were studied. The presence of the His residue in first position of the peptide chain changes the coordination abilities of the Allo9A peptide in comparison to that of the Allo1A. Imidazole-N3 atom of N-terminal His residue of the Allo9A peptide forms stable 6-membered chelate with the terminal amino group. Furthermore, the presence of two additional histidine residues in the Allo9A peptide (H(6),H(12)) leads to the formation of the CuL complex with 4N {NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6),NIm-H(12)} binding site in wide pH range (5-8). For the Cu(II)-Allo1A system, the results demonstrated that at physiological pH7.4 the predominant complex the CuH-1L consists of the 3N {NH2,N(-),CO,NIm} coordination mode. The inductions of phenoloxidase activity and apoptosis in vivo in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 were studied. The Allo1A, Allo1K peptides and their copper(II) complexes displayed the lowest hemocytotoxic activity while the most active was the Cu(II)-Allo9A complex formed at pH7.4. The results may suggest that the N-terminal-His(1) and His(6) residues may be more important for their proapoptotic properties in insects than those at positions 9 and 12 in the peptide chain.

  5. Copper(II) complexes of neuropeptide gamma with point mutations (S8,16A) products of metal-catalyzed oxidation.

    PubMed

    Błaszak, Marta; Jankowska, Elżbieta; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    To obtain the information about the influence of the serine residues (S8,S16) on the acid-base properties of the neuropeptide gamma, the peptide with point mutations (S8,16A) and its N-acetyl derivative were synthesized. Any additional deprotonations were not observed. It means that the presence of serine residues is necessary in the amino acid sequence of the neuropeptide gamma to have its acid-base properties. The stability constants, stoichiometry and solution structures of copper(II) complexes of the neuropeptide gamma mutants D(1)AGH(4)GQIA(8)H(9)KRH(12)KTDA(16)FVGLM(21)-NH2 (S8,16A) 2ANPG and its N-acetyl derivative Ac-2ANPG were determined in aqueous solution. The equilibrium and structural properties of copper(II) complexes have been characterized by pH-metric, spectroscopic (UV-visible, CD, EPR) and mass spectrometric (MS) methods. At physiological pH7.4 the 2ANPG forms the CuH2L and CuHL complexes in equilibrium with 3N {NH2,βCOO(-)-D(1),2NIm} and 4N {NH2,N(-),2NIm} binding sites, respectively. The exchange Ser on Ala residues does not alter the coordination mode of the peptide. To elucidate the products of the copper(II)-catalyzed oxidation of 2ANPG and Ac-2ANPG the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method (LC-MS) and the Cu(II)/H2O2 as a model oxidizing system were employed. For solutions containing a 1:4 peptide-hydrogen peroxide molar ratio oxidation of the methionine residue to methionine sulphoxide was observed. For the 1:1:4 Cu(II)-2ANPG-H2O2 system oxidation of two His residues and cleavage of the G(3)H(4) peptide bond was observed, while for the 1:1:4 Cu(II)-Ac-2ANPG-H2O2 system oxidation of three histidine residues to 2-oxohistidines was also observed.

  6. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  7. A point mutation in the extracellular domain of KIT promotes tumorigenesis of mast cells via ligand-independent auto-dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Amagai, Yosuke; Matsuda, Akira; Jung, Kyungsook; Oida, Kumiko; Jang, Hyosun; Ishizaka, Saori; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the juxtamembrane and tyrosine kinase domains of the KIT receptor have been implicated in several cancers and are known to promote tumorigenesis. However, the pathophysiological manifestations of mutations in the extracellular domain remain unknown. In this study, we examined the impact of a mutation in the extracellular domain of KIT on mast cell tumorigenesis. A KIT mutant with an Asn508Ile variation (N508I) in the extracellular domain derived from a canine mast cell tumor was introduced into IC-2 cells. The IC-2N508I cells proliferated in a cytokine-independent manner and showed KIT auto-phosphorylation. Subcutaneous injection of IC-2N508I cells into the dorsal area of immunodeficient BALB/c-nu/nu mice resulted in the formation of solid tumors, but tumor progression was abrogated by treatment with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (STI571). In addition, the N508I mutant KIT protein dimerized in the absence of the natural ligand, stem cell factor. Structure modeling indicates that the increased hydrophobicity of the mutant led to the stabilization of KIT dimers. These results suggest that this extracellular domain mutation confers a ligand-independent tumorigenic phenotype to mast cells by KIT auto-dimerization that is STI571-sensitive. This is the first report demonstrating the tumorigenic potential of a mutation in the extracellular domain of KIT. PMID:25965812

  8. Relationship between a point mutation S97C in CK1δ protein and its affect on ATP-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ambuj; Rajendran, Vidya; Sethumadhavan, Rao; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    CK1δ (Casein kinase I isoform delta) is a member of CK1 kinase family protein that mediates neurite outgrowth and the function as brain-specific microtubule-associated protein. ATP binding kinase domain of CK1δ is essential for regulating several key cell cycle signal transduction pathways. Mutation in CK1δ protein is reported to cause cancers and affects normal brain development. S97C mutation in kinase domain of CK1δ protein has been involved to induce breast cancer and ductal carcinoma. We performed molecular docking studies to examine the effect of this mutation on its ATP-binding affinity. Further, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations to understand the structural consequences of S97C mutation over the kinase domain of CK1δ protein. Docking results indicated the loss of ATP-binding affinity of mutant structure, which were further rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations, where a notable loss in 3-D conformation of CK1δ kinase domain was observed in mutant as compared to native. Our results explained the underlying molecular mechanism behind the observed cancer associated phenotype caused by S97C mutation in CK1δ protein.

  9. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease in a family of Portuguese origin caused by a point mutation in exon 5 of the proteolipid protein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, V.M.; Boyadjiev, S.; Dlouhy, S.R.

    1995-02-13

    Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of an affected male with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) showed a slight change in mobility of amplified exon 5 of the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene. The exon was sequenced and a G{r_arrow}A transition at codon 216 was found. This mutation eliminates a BstNI restriction site and creates a MaeI restriction site. In 1989, Gencic et al. reported a mutation that destroyed the same BstNI site, but resulted in a substitution at codon 15. The mutation we report here is also present in the patient`s mother and her male fetus as determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis of amniocytes. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy.

  11. Novel Candidate Genes and a Wide Spectrum of Structural and Point Mutations Responsible for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies Revealed by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    de Castro-Miró, Marta; Tonda, Raul; Escudero-Ferruz, Paula; Andrés, Rosa; Mayor-Lorenzo, Andrés; Castro, Joaquín; Ciccioli, Marcela; Hidalgo, Daniel A.; Rodríguez-Ezcurra, Juan José; Farrando, Jorge; Pérez-Santonja, Juan J.; Cormand, Bru; Marfany, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Background NGS-based genetic diagnosis has completely revolutionized the human genetics field. In this study, we have aimed to identify new genes and mutations by Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) responsible for inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD). Methods A cohort of 33 pedigrees affected with a variety of retinal disorders was analysed by WES. Initial prioritization analysis included around 300 IRD-associated genes. In non-diagnosed families a search for pathogenic mutations in novel genes was undertaken. Results Genetic diagnosis was attained in 18 families. Moreover, a plausible candidate is proposed for 10 more cases. Two thirds of the mutations were novel, including 4 chromosomal rearrangements, which expand the IRD allelic heterogeneity and highlight the contribution of private mutations. Our results prompted clinical re-evaluation of some patients resulting in assignment to a syndromic instead of non-syndromic IRD. Notably, WES unveiled four new candidates for non-syndromic IRD: SEMA6B, CEP78, CEP250, SCLT1, the two latter previously associated to syndromic disorders. We provide functional data supporting that missense mutations in CEP250 alter cilia formation. Conclusion The diagnostic efficiency of WES, and strictly following the ACMG/AMP criteria is 55% in reported causative genes or functionally supported new candidates, plus 30% families in which likely pathogenic or VGUS/VUS variants were identified in plausible candidates. Our results highlight the clinical utility of WES for molecular diagnosis of IRD, provide a wider spectrum of mutations and concomitant genetic variants, and challenge our view on syndromic vs non-syndromic, and causative vs modifier genes. PMID:28005958

  12. The Trojan Female Technique for pest control: a candidate mitochondrial mutation confers low male fertility across diverse nuclear backgrounds in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Damian K; Tompkins, Daniel M; Gemmell, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Pest species represent a major ongoing threat to global biodiversity. Effective management approaches are required that regulate pest numbers, while minimizing collateral damage to nontarget species. The Trojan Female Technique (TFT) was recently proposed as a prospective approach to biological pest control. The TFT draws on the evolutionary hypothesis that maternally inherited mitochondrial genomes are prone to the accumulation of male, but not female, harming mutations. These mutations could be harnessed to provide trans-generational fertility-based control of pest species. A candidate TFT mutation was recently described in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which confers male-only sterility in the specific isogenic nuclear background in which it is maintained. However, applicability of the TFT relies on mitochondrial mutations whose male-sterilizing effects are general across nuclear genomic contexts. We test this assumption, expressing the candidate TFT-mutation bearing haplotype alongside a range of nuclear backgrounds and comparing its fertility in males, relative to that of control haplotypes. We document consistently lower fertility for males harbouring the TFT mutation, in both competitive and noncompetitive mating contexts, across all nuclear backgrounds screened. This indicates that TFT mutations conferring reduced male fertility can segregate within populations and could be harnessed to facilitate this novel form of pest control. PMID:26495040

  13. The Trojan Female Technique for pest control: a candidate mitochondrial mutation confers low male fertility across diverse nuclear backgrounds in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Damian K; Tompkins, Daniel M; Gemmell, Neil J

    2015-10-01

    Pest species represent a major ongoing threat to global biodiversity. Effective management approaches are required that regulate pest numbers, while minimizing collateral damage to nontarget species. The Trojan Female Technique (TFT) was recently proposed as a prospective approach to biological pest control. The TFT draws on the evolutionary hypothesis that maternally inherited mitochondrial genomes are prone to the accumulation of male, but not female, harming mutations. These mutations could be harnessed to provide trans-generational fertility-based control of pest species. A candidate TFT mutation was recently described in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which confers male-only sterility in the specific isogenic nuclear background in which it is maintained. However, applicability of the TFT relies on mitochondrial mutations whose male-sterilizing effects are general across nuclear genomic contexts. We test this assumption, expressing the candidate TFT-mutation bearing haplotype alongside a range of nuclear backgrounds and comparing its fertility in males, relative to that of control haplotypes. We document consistently lower fertility for males harbouring the TFT mutation, in both competitive and noncompetitive mating contexts, across all nuclear backgrounds screened. This indicates that TFT mutations conferring reduced male fertility can segregate within populations and could be harnessed to facilitate this novel form of pest control.

  14. A Point Mutation in Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (Socs2) Increases the Susceptibility to Inflammation of the Mammary Gland while Associated with Higher Body Weight and Size and Higher Milk Production in a Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Rachel; Senin, Pavel; Sarry, Julien; Allain, Charlotte; Tasca, Christian; Ligat, Laeticia; Portes, David; Woloszyn, Florent; Bouchez, Olivier; Tabouret, Guillaume; Lebastard, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease mainly caused by bacteria invading the mammary gland. Genetic control of susceptibility to mastitis has been widely evidenced in dairy ruminants, but the genetic basis and underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. We describe the discovery, fine mapping and functional characterization of a genetic variant associated with elevated milk leukocytes count, or SCC, as a proxy for mastitis. After implementing genome-wide association studies, we identified a major QTL associated with SCC on ovine chromosome 3. Fine mapping of the region, using full sequencing with 12X coverage in three animals, provided one strong candidate SNP that mapped to the coding sequence of a highly conserved gene, suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (Socs2). The frequency of the SNP associated with increased SCC was 21.7% and the Socs2 genotype explained 12% of the variance of the trait. The point mutation induces the p.R96C substitution in the SH2 functional domain of SOCS2 i.e. the binding site of the protein to various ligands, as well-established for the growth hormone receptor GHR. Using surface plasmon resonance we showed that the p.R96C point mutation completely abrogates SOCS2 binding affinity for the phosphopeptide of GHR. Additionally, the size, weight and milk production in p.R96C homozygote sheep, were significantly increased by 24%, 18%, and 4.4%, respectively, when compared to wild type sheep, supporting the view that the point mutation causes a loss of SOCS2 functional activity. Altogether these results provide strong evidence for a causal mutation controlling SCC in sheep and highlight the major role of SOCS2 as a tradeoff between the host’s inflammatory response to mammary infections, and body growth and milk production, which are all mediated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. PMID:26658352

  15. A Point Mutation in Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (Socs2) Increases the Susceptibility to Inflammation of the Mammary Gland while Associated with Higher Body Weight and Size and Higher Milk Production in a Sheep Model.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Rachel; Senin, Pavel; Sarry, Julien; Allain, Charlotte; Tasca, Christian; Ligat, Laeticia; Portes, David; Woloszyn, Florent; Bouchez, Olivier; Tabouret, Guillaume; Lebastard, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile; Foucras, Gilles; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola

    2015-12-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease mainly caused by bacteria invading the mammary gland. Genetic control of susceptibility to mastitis has been widely evidenced in dairy ruminants, but the genetic basis and underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. We describe the discovery, fine mapping and functional characterization of a genetic variant associated with elevated milk leukocytes count, or SCC, as a proxy for mastitis. After implementing genome-wide association studies, we identified a major QTL associated with SCC on ovine chromosome 3. Fine mapping of the region, using full sequencing with 12X coverage in three animals, provided one strong candidate SNP that mapped to the coding sequence of a highly conserved gene, suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (Socs2). The frequency of the SNP associated with increased SCC was 21.7% and the Socs2 genotype explained 12% of the variance of the trait. The point mutation induces the p.R96C substitution in the SH2 functional domain of SOCS2 i.e. the binding site of the protein to various ligands, as well-established for the growth hormone receptor GHR. Using surface plasmon resonance we showed that the p.R96C point mutation completely abrogates SOCS2 binding affinity for the phosphopeptide of GHR. Additionally, the size, weight and milk production in p.R96C homozygote sheep, were significantly increased by 24%, 18%, and 4.4%, respectively, when compared to wild type sheep, supporting the view that the point mutation causes a loss of SOCS2 functional activity. Altogether these results provide strong evidence for a causal mutation controlling SCC in sheep and highlight the major role of SOCS2 as a tradeoff between the host's inflammatory response to mammary infections, and body growth and milk production, which are all mediated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathway.

  16. Consequences of point mutations in melanoma-associated antigen 4 (MAGE-A4) protein: Insights from structural and biophysical studies

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Yoshio; Sieverling, Lina; Hanif , Farina; Anton, Jensy; Dickinson, Eleanor R.; Bui, Tam T. T.; Andreeva, Antonina; Barran, Perdita E.; Cota, Ernesto; Nikolova, Penka V.

    2016-01-01

    The Melanoma-Associated Antigen A4 (MAGE-A4) protein is a target for cancer therapy. The function of this protein is not well understood. We report the first comprehensive study on key cancer-associated MAGE-A4 mutations and provide analysis on the consequences of these mutations on the structure, folding and stability of the protein. Based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Circular Dichroism, these mutations had no significant effects on the structure and the folding of the protein. Some mutations affected the thermal stability of the protein remarkably. Native mass spectrometry of wild-type MAGE-A4 showed a broad charge state distribution suggestive of a structurally dynamic protein. Significant intensity was found in relatively low charge states, indicative of a predominantly globular form and some population in more extended states. The latter is supported by Ion Mobility measurements. The MAGE-A4 mutants exhibited similar features. These novel molecular insights shed further light on better understanding of these proteins, which are implicated in a wide range of human cancers. PMID:27121989

  17. A novel point mutation (G-1 to T) in a 5' splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Y.; Nishio, H.; Kitoh, Y.; Takeshima, Y.; Narita, N.; Wada, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Nakamura, H.; Matsuo, M.

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. We now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5' splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5' splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G-1-to-T mutation at the 5' splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8279470

  18. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi )

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  19. High-level ciprofloxacin resistance from point mutations in gyrA and parC confined to global hospital-adapted clonal lineage CC17 of Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Leavis, Helen L; Willems, Rob J L; Top, Janetta; Bonten, Marc J M

    2006-03-01

    To substantiate a common genetic background of ciprofloxacin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, 32 ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cip(r)) and 31 ciprofloxacin-susceptible (Cip(s)) isolates from outbreaks, clinical infections, surveillances, and animals from 10 different countries were genotyped by multilocus sequence typing. Additionally, susceptibilities to ampicillin and vancomycin and the presence of esp were determined and the quinolone resistance-determining regions of parC, gyrA, parB, and gyrE were sequenced. High-level Cip(r) (MIC > or = 64 microg/ml) due to point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region was unique to a distinct hospital-adapted genetic complex in E. faecium, previously designated CC17. Low-level Cip(r) (MIC = 4 microg/ml) in non-CC17 strains is not attributable to point mutations in any subunit of the topoisomerase genes, and the mechanism of resistance remains unclear. Acquisition of mutations in parC and gyrA, leading to high-level Cip(r), is, in addition to ampicillin resistance and the presence of a putative pathogenicity island, another cumulative step in hospital adaptation of CC17.

  20. No evidence for association of autism with rare heterozygous point mutations in Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2), or in Other Contactin-Associated Proteins or Contactins.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, John D; Gupta, Abha R; Sanders, Stephan J; Walker, Michael F; Keaney, John; Fernandez, Thomas V; Murtha, Michael T; Anyanwu, Samuel; Ober, Gordon T; Raubeson, Melanie J; DiLullo, Nicholas M; Villa, Natalie; Waqar, Zainabdul; Sullivan, Catherine; Gonzalez, Luis; Willsey, A Jeremy; Choe, So-Yeon; Neale, Benjamin M; Daly, Mark J; State, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Contactins and Contactin-Associated Proteins, and Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2) in particular, have been widely cited as autism risk genes based on findings from homozygosity mapping, molecular cytogenetics, copy number variation analyses, and both common and rare single nucleotide association studies. However, data specifically with regard to the contribution of heterozygous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) have been inconsistent. In an effort to clarify the role of rare point mutations in CNTNAP2 and related gene families, we have conducted targeted next-generation sequencing and evaluated existing sequence data in cohorts totaling 2704 cases and 2747 controls. We find no evidence for statistically significant association of rare heterozygous mutations in any of the CNTN or CNTNAP genes, including CNTNAP2, placing marked limits on the scale of their plausible contribution to risk.

  1. Amplification-free In Situ KRAS Point Mutation Detection at 60 copies/mL in Urine in a Background of 1000-fold Wild Type

    PubMed Central

    KirimLi, Ceyhun E.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have examined in situ detection of single-nucleotide KRAS mutation in urine using a (Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.65(PbTiO3)0.35 (PMN-PT) piezoelectric plate sensor (PEPS) coated with a 17-nucleotide (nt) locked nucleic acid (LNA) probe DNA complementary to the KRAS mutation. To enhance in situ mutant (MT) DNA detection specificity against the wild type (WT), the detection was carried out in a flow with a flow rate of 4 mL/min and at 63°C with the PEPS vertically situated at the center of the flow in which both the temperature and the flow impingement force discriminated the wild type. Under such conditions, PEPS was shown to specifically detect KRAS MT in situ with 60 copies/mL analytical sensitivity in a background of clinically-relevant 1000-fold more WT in 30 min without DNA isolation, amplification, or labeling. For validation, the detection was followed with detection in a mixture of blue MT fluorescent reporter microspheres (FRMs) (MT FRMs) that bound to only the captured MT and orange WT FRMs that bound to only the captured WT. Microscopic examinations showed that the captured blue MT FRMs still outnumbered the orange WT FRMs by a factor of 4 to 1 even though WT was 1000-fold of MT in urine. Finally, multiplexed specific mutation detection was demonstrated using a 6-PEPS array each with a probe DNA targeting one of the 6 codon-12 KRAS mutations. PMID:26783561

  2. Male infertility-linked point mutation disrupts the Ca2+ oscillation-inducing and PIP2 hydrolysis activity of sperm PLCζ

    PubMed Central

    Nomikos, Michail; Elgmati, Khalil; Theodoridou, Maria; Calver, Brian L.; Cumbes, Bevan; Nounesis, Georg; Swann, Karl; Lai, F. Anthony

    2011-01-01

    A male infertility-linked human PLCζ (phospholipase Cζ) mutation introduced into mouse PLCζ completely abolishes both in vitro PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate) hydrolysis activity and the ability to trigger in vivo Ca2+ oscillations in mouse eggs. Wild-type PLCζ initiated a normal pattern of Ca2+ oscillations in eggs in the presence of 10-fold higher mutant PLCζ, suggesting that infertility is not mediated by a dominant-negative mechanism. PMID:21204786

  3. Isolation of a point mutation associated with altered expression of the CmeABC efflux pump in a multidrug-resistant Campylobacter jejuni population of poultry origin.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Boto, David; Acebo, Paloma; García-Peña, Francisco Javier; Abad, Juan Carlos; Echeita, María Aurora; Amblar, Mónica

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antibiotic resistance phenotype of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from a poultry flock of broiler production in Spain. Isolates were characterised by RFLP-PCR of the flaA gene and multilocus sequence typing. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of quinolones, aminoglycosides, β-lactams, tetracyclines, phenicols, macrolides and lincosamides were determined by Etest. Determinants of resistance and the regulatory region of the cmeABC operon were investigated in all isolates by PCR detection and sequencing. Expression of the CmeABC efflux pump was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR and accumulation assay. Based on their molecular markers, two different populations of C. jejuni were identified: one resistant to quinolones, β-lactams and tetracyclines, considered multidrug-resistant (MDR); and another resistant only to tetracyclines. Both populations possessed the tetO gene, previously associated with tetracycline resistance. The blaOXA-61 gene was also present in both populations, although only the MDR population showed β-lactamase activity. In addition, MDR isolates possessed the Thr86Ile mutation in the gyrA gene responsible for quinolone resistance. Moreover, sequencing of the regulatory region of the cmeABC operon revealed the presence of the C-32→T mutation in the MDR isolates, which was accompanied by an increase in cmeA mRNA levels compared with the non-mutant population. In conclusion, this is the first report of the mutation C-32→T in the cmeABC operon in C. jejuni isolates of veterinary origin. This mutation is associated with overexpression of the CmeABC efflux pump in a MDR population and is possibly related to enhanced tolerance to antimicrobials that favours the development of resistance.

  4. Field-collected permethrin-resistant Aedes aegypti from central Thailand contain point mutations in the domain IIS6 of the sodium channel gene (KDR).

    PubMed

    Srisawat, Raweewan; Komalamisra, Narumon; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Paeporn, Pungasem; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Rongsriyam, Yupha; Eshita, Yuki

    2012-11-01

    One of the mechanisms responsible for pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes is mutations in domain IIS6 of voltage-gated sodium channel gene (kdr). Aedes aegypti larvae were collected from the central provinces of Thailand (Bangkok, Prachin Buri and Ratchaburi) and colonized until they became adults. Partial fragment of kdr of permethrin-resistant mosquitoes were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Among the four nucleotide mutations detected, two mutations resulted in two amino acid substitutions, S(TCC) 989 P(CCC) and V(GTA)1016 G(GGA). Among 94 permethrin-resistant mosquitoes, the SS genotype (SS/VV) was found to predominate (n = 74), followed by SR (SP/VG) (n = 15) and RR (PP/ GG) genotypes (n = 5), with the resistant allele frequency ranging from 0.03 to 0.17. As pyrethroid insecticides are currently being advocated for use in Thailand, investigations of pyrethroid resistance in other regions of the country are needed to prevent potential cross-resistance among different types of insecticides.

  5. A Point Mutation in the FRNK Motif of the Potyvirus Helper Component-Protease Gene Alters Symptom Expression in Cucurbits and Elicits Protection Against the Severe Homologous Virus.

    PubMed

    Gal-On, A

    2000-05-01

    Sequence comparison had previously shown three amino acid changes in conserved motifs in the 455-amino acid sequence of the helper component-protease (HC-Pro) between a severe field strain of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV-NAT) and a mild field strain of ZYMV (ZYMV-WK). In this study, exchange of fragments and site-directed mutagenesis within the HC-Pro gene in an infectious clone of ZYMV enabled the effects of the mutations on symptom expression to be mapped. The substitution of Ile for Arg at position 180 in the conserved motif Phe-Arg-Asn-Lys (FRNK) of potyviruses was found to affect symptom expression. Infection of cucurbits with the engineered ZYMV (ZYMV-AG) that contained this mutation caused a dramatic symptom change from severe to mild in squash and to a symptom-free appearance in cucumber, melon, and watermelon. The Ile to Arg mutation was found to be stable, and no revertant virus was found after several passages through plants after long incubation periods. The AG strain was detected 4 days postinoculation and accumulated in cucurbits to a level and with kinetics similar to that of the wild-type ZYMV-AT strain. Cucurbit plants infected with the AG strain were protected against infection by the severe strain.

  6. Evaluation of point mutation detection in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with isoniazid resistance using real-time PCR and TaqMan probe assay.

    PubMed

    Riahi, F; Derakhshan, M; Mosavat, A; Soleimanpour, S; Rezaee, S A

    2015-03-01

    Rapid methods for diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) drug resistance and choosing appropriate antibiotic treatment are pivotal. Thirty isoniazid (INH)-resistant and 30 INH-susceptible Mtb isolates were evaluated using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method followed by multiplex real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) for detection of mutation in 315 codon of katG gene and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for detection of mutation in -15 (C>T) in the regulatory zone of mabA-inhA were carried out using the TaqMan method. Primers and probe were used for IS6110 region of Mtb as an internal amplification control. The sensitivity and specificity of the RT-PCR TaqMan probe for detection of Mtb complex were 100 %. Detection of INH-resistant Mtb using the ARMS method for KatG had 69 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity. The sensitivity and specificity of SNP in mabA-inhA fragment for detection of INH-resistant Mtb were 53 and 100 %, respectively. Furthermore, considering both regions, the sensitivity of RT-PCR has increased to 75 %. This study revealed that the qPCR-TaqMan method can be used as a standard tool for diagnosis of Mtb. Moreover, ARMS and SNP RT-PCR TaqMan methods can be used as rapid screening methods for detection of INH-resistant Mtb.

  7. True hermaphroditism in a 46, XY individual, caused by a postzygotic somatic point mutation in the male gonadal sex-determining locus (SRY): Molecular genetics and histological findings in a sporadic case

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Kammerer, S.; Cleve, H.; Loehrs, U.; Schwarz, H.P.; Kuhnle, U. )

    1993-03-01

    Recently, the gene for the determination of maleness has been identified in the sex-determining region on the short arm of the Y chromosome (SRY) between the Y-chromosomal pseudoautosomal boundary (PABY) and the ZFY gene locus. Experiments with transgenic mice confirmed that SRY is a part of the testis-determining factor (TDF). The authors describe a sporadic case of a patient with intersexual genitalia and the histological finding of ovotestes in the gonad, which resembles the mixed type of gonadal tissue without primordial follicle structures. The karyotype of the patient was 46,XY. By PCR amplification, they tested for the presence of SRY by using DNA obtained from histological gonadal slices. The SRY products of both DNA preparations were further analyzed by direct sequencing. All three parts of the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome could be amplified from leukocytic DNA. The patient's and the father's SRY sequences were identical with the published sequence. In the SRY PCR product of gonadal DNA, the wild-type and two point mutations were present in the patient's sequence, simulating a heterozygous state of a Y-chromosomal gene: one of the mutations was silent, while the other encoded for a nonconservative amino acid substitution from leucine to histidine. Subcloning procedures showed that the two point mutations always occurred together. The origin of the patient's intersexuality is a postzygotic mutation of the SRY occurring in part of the gonadal tissue. This event caused the loss of the testis-determining function in affected cells. 37 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Novel point mutations and mutational complexes in the enhancer II, core promoter and precore regions of hepatitis B virus genotype D1 associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anis; Al Balwi, Mohammed A; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hajeer, Ali; Sanai, Faisal M; Al Abdulkarim, Ibrahim; Al Ayyar, Latifah; Badri, Motasim; Saudi, Dib; Tamimi, Waleed; Mizokami, Masashi; Al Knawy, Bandar

    2013-12-15

    In this study, a cohort of 182 patients [55 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 127 non-HCC] infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Saudi Arabia was investigated to study the relationship between sequence variation in the enhancer II (EnhII), basal core promoter (BCP) and precore regions of HBV genotype D (HBV/D) and the risk of HCC. HBV genotypes were determined by sequencing analysis and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Variations in the EnhII, BCP and precore regions were compared between 107 non-HCC and 45 HCC patients infected with HBV/D, followed by age-matched analysis of 40 cases versus equal number of controls. Age and male gender were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.03, respectively). Serological markers such as aspartate aminotransferase, albumin and anti-HBe were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 for all), whereas HBeAg positivity was associated with non-HCC (p = 0.0001). The most prevalent HBV genotype was HBV/D (94%), followed by HBV/E (4%), HBV/A (1.6%) and HBV/C (0.5%). For HBV/D1, genomic mutations associated with HCC were T1673/G1679, G1727, C1741, C1761, A1757/T1764/G1766, T1773, T1773/G1775 and C1909. Age- and gender-adjusted stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that mutations G1727 [odds ratio (OR) = 18.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.8-118.4; p = 0.002], A1757/T1764/G1766 (OR = 4.7; 95% CI = 1.3-17.2; p = 0.01) and T1773 (OR = 14.06; 95% CI = 2.3-84.8; p = 0.004) are independent predictors of HCC development. These results implicate novel individual and combination patterns of mutations in the X/precore region of HBV/D1 as predictors of HCC. Risk stratification based on these mutation complexes would be useful in determining high-risk patients and improving diagnostic and treatment strategies for HBV/D1.

  9. A Novel Heterozygous Mutation in the STAT1 SH2 Domain Causes Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis, Atypically Diverse Infections, Autoimmunity, and Impaired Cytokine Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Meesilpavikkai, Kornvalee; Dik, Willem A.; Schrijver, Benjamin; Nagtzaam, Nicole M. A.; van Rijswijk, Angelique; Driessen, Gertjan J.; van der Spek, Peter J.; van Hagen, P. Martin; Dalm, Virgil A. S. H.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by persistent or recurrent skin and mucosal surface infections with Candida species. Different gene mutations leading to CMC have been identified. These include various heterozygous gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) that are not only associated with infections but also with autoimmune manifestations. Recently, two STAT1 GOF mutations involving the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain have been reported, while so far, over 50 mutations have been described mainly in the coiled coil and the DNA-binding domains. Here, we present two members of a Dutch family with a novel STAT1 mutation located in the SH2 domain. T lymphocytes of these patients revealed STAT1 hyperphosphorylation and higher expression of STAT1 target genes. The clinical picture of CMC in our patients could be explained by diminished production of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-22, cytokines important in the protection against fungal infections. PMID:28348565

  10. A novel mutation in NF1 is associated with diverse intra-familial phenotypic variation and astrocytoma in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Santasree; Dai, Yi; Liang, Shengran; Chen, Huishuang; Wang, Yanyan; Tang, Lihui; Wu, Jing; Huang, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a dysregulated neurocutaneous disorder, characterized by neurofibromas and café-au-lait spots. NF1 is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene, encoding neurofibromin. Here, we present a clinical molecular study of a three-generation Chinese family with NF1. The proband was a male patient who showed café-au-lait spots and multiple subcutaneous neurofibromas over the whole body, but his siblings only had regional lesions. The man's daughter presented with severe headache and vomiting. Neurological examination revealed an intracranial space occupying lesion. Surgery was undertaken and the histopathological examination showed a grade I-II astrocytoma. Next-Generation sequencing (Illumina HiSeq2500 Analyzers; Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA) and Sanger sequencing (ABI PRISM 3730 automated sequencer; Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) identified the c.227delA mutation in the NF1 gene in the man. The mutation is co-segregated with the disease phenotypes among the affected members of this family and was absent in 100 healthy controls. This novel mutation results in a frameshift (p.Asn78IlefsX7) as well as truncation of neurofibromin by formation of a premature stop codon. Our results not only extended the mutational and phenotypic spectra of the gene and the disease, but also highlight the importance of the other genetic or environmental factors in the development and severity of the disease.

  11. A Point Mutation in the Ubiquitin Ligase RNF170 That Causes Autosomal Dominant Sensory Ataxia Destabilizes the Protein and Impairs Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Forrest A.; Lu, Justine P.; Sliter, Danielle A.; Dupré, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A.; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J. H.

    2015-01-01

    RNF170 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane ubiquitin ligase that contributes to the ubiquitination of activated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and also, when point mutated (arginine to cysteine at position 199), causes autosomal dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), a disease characterized by neurodegeneration in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. Here we demonstrate that this point mutation inhibits RNF170 expression and signaling via IP3 receptors. Inhibited expression of mutant RNF170 was seen in cells expressing exogenous RNF170 constructs and in ADSA lymphoblasts, and appears to result from enhanced RNF170 autoubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The basis for these effects was probed via additional point mutations, revealing that ionic interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane domains of RNF170 are required for protein stability. In ADSA lymphoblasts, platelet-activating factor-induced Ca2+ mobilization was significantly impaired, whereas neither Ca2+ store content, IP3 receptor levels, nor IP3 production were altered, indicative of a functional defect at the IP3 receptor locus, which may be the cause of neurodegeneration. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic deletion of RNF170 showed that RNF170 mediates the addition of all of the ubiquitin conjugates known to become attached to activated IP3 receptors (monoubiquitin and Lys48- and Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains), and that wild-type and mutant RNF170 have apparently identical ubiquitin ligase activities toward IP3 receptors. Thus, the Ca2+ mobilization defect seen in ADSA lymphoblasts is apparently not due to aberrant IP3 receptor ubiquitination. Rather, the defect likely reflects abnormal ubiquitination of other substrates, or adaptation to the chronic reduction in RNF170 levels. PMID:25882839

  12. A Point Mutation in the Ubiquitin Ligase RNF170 That Causes Autosomal Dominant Sensory Ataxia Destabilizes the Protein and Impairs Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Forrest A; Lu, Justine P; Sliter, Danielle A; Dupré, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J H

    2015-05-29

    RNF170 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane ubiquitin ligase that contributes to the ubiquitination of activated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and also, when point mutated (arginine to cysteine at position 199), causes autosomal dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), a disease characterized by neurodegeneration in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. Here we demonstrate that this point mutation inhibits RNF170 expression and signaling via IP3 receptors. Inhibited expression of mutant RNF170 was seen in cells expressing exogenous RNF170 constructs and in ADSA lymphoblasts, and appears to result from enhanced RNF170 autoubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The basis for these effects was probed via additional point mutations, revealing that ionic interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane domains of RNF170 are required for protein stability. In ADSA lymphoblasts, platelet-activating factor-induced Ca(2+) mobilization was significantly impaired, whereas neither Ca(2+) store content, IP3 receptor levels, nor IP3 production were altered, indicative of a functional defect at the IP3 receptor locus, which may be the cause of neurodegeneration. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic deletion of RNF170 showed that RNF170 mediates the addition of all of the ubiquitin conjugates known to become attached to activated IP3 receptors (monoubiquitin and Lys(48)- and Lys(63)-linked ubiquitin chains), and that wild-type and mutant RNF170 have apparently identical ubiquitin ligase activities toward IP3 receptors. Thus, the Ca(2+) mobilization defect seen in ADSA lymphoblasts is apparently not due to aberrant IP3 receptor ubiquitination. Rather, the defect likely reflects abnormal ubiquitination of other substrates, or adaptation to the chronic reduction in RNF170 levels.

  13. Concurrent titration and determination of antibiotic resistance in ureaplasma species with identification of novel point mutations in genes associated with resistance.

    PubMed

    Beeton, Michael L; Chalker, Victoria J; Maxwell, Nicola C; Kotecha, Sailesh; Spiller, O Brad

    2009-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance determination of Ureaplasma spp. (Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum) usually requires predetermination of bacterial titer, followed by antibiotic interrogation using a set bacterial input. This 96-well method allows simultaneous quantification of bacteria in the presence and absence of antibiotics. A method for determining precise MICs and a method for screening against multiple antibiotics using breakpoint thresholds are detailed. Of the 61 Ureaplasma-positive clinical isolates screened, one (1.6%) was resistant to erythromycin (MIC, >64 mg/liter) and clarithromycin (MIC, 4 mg/liter), one to ciprofloxacin (1.6%), and one to tetracycline/doxycycline (1.6%). Five isolates were also consistently found to have an elevated MIC of 8 mg/liter for erythromycin, but this may not represent true antibiotic resistance, as no mutations were found in the 23S rRNA operons or ribosome-associated L4 and L22 proteins for these strains. However, two amino acids (R66Q67) were deleted from the L4 protein of the erythromycin-/clarithromycin-resistant strain. The tetM genetic element was detected in the tetracycline-resistant clinical isolate as well as in the positive control Vancouver strain serotype 9. The tetM gene was also found in a fully tetracycline-susceptible Ureaplasma clinical isolate, and no mutations were found in the coding region that would explain its failure to mediate tetracycline resistance. An amino acid substitution (D82N) was found in the ParC subunit of the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolate, adjacent to the S83L mutation reported by other investigators in many ciprofloxacin-resistant Ureaplasma isolates. It is now possible to detect antibiotic resistance in Ureaplasma within 48 h of positive culture without prior knowledge of bacterial load, identifying them for further molecular analysis.

  14. Characterization of a Novel BCHE “Silent” Allele: Point Mutation (p.Val204Asp) Causes Loss of Activity and Prolonged Apnea with Suxamethonium

    PubMed Central

    Delacour, Herve; Lushchekina, Sofya; Mabboux, Isabelle; Bousquet, Aurore; Ceppa, Franck; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana; Masson, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase deficiency is characterized by prolonged apnea after the use of muscle relaxants (suxamethonium or mivacurium) in patients who have mutations in the BCHE gene. Here, we report a case of prolonged neuromuscular block after administration of suxamethonium leading to the discovery of a novel BCHE variant (c.695T>A, p.Val204Asp). Inhibition studies, kinetic analysis and molecular dynamics were undertaken to understand how this mutation disrupts the catalytic triad and determines a “silent” phenotype. Low activity of patient plasma butyrylcholinesterase with butyrylthiocholine (BTC) and benzoylcholine, and values of dibucaine and fluoride numbers fit with heterozygous atypical silent genotype. Electrophoretic analysis of plasma BChE of the proband and his mother showed that patient has a reduced amount of tetrameric enzyme in plasma and that minor fast-moving BChE components: monomer, dimer, and monomer-albumin conjugate are missing. Kinetic analysis showed that the p.Val204Asp/p.Asp70Gly-p.Ala539Thr BChE displays a pure Michaelian behavior with BTC as the substrate. Both catalytic parameters Km = 265 µM for BTC, two times higher than that of the atypical enzyme, and a low Vmax are consistent with the absence of activity against suxamethonium. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations showed that the overall effect of the mutation p.Val204Asp is disruption of hydrogen bonding between Gln223 and Glu441, leading Ser198 and His438 to move away from each other with subsequent disruption of the catalytic triad functionality regardless of the type of substrate. MD also showed that the enzyme volume is increased, suggesting a pre-denaturation state. This fits with the reduced concentration of p.Ala204Asp/p.Asp70Gly-p.Ala539Thr tetrameric enzyme in the plasma and non-detectable fast moving-bands on electrophoresis gels. PMID:25054547

  15. SAAFEC: Predicting the Effect of Single Point Mutations on Protein Folding Free Energy Using a Knowledge-Modified MM/PBSA Approach

    PubMed Central

    Getov, Ivan; Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Folding free energy is an important biophysical characteristic of proteins that reflects the overall stability of the 3D structure of macromolecules. Changes in the amino acid sequence, naturally occurring or made in vitro, may affect the stability of the corresponding protein and thus could be associated with disease. Several approaches that predict the changes of the folding free energy caused by mutations have been proposed, but there is no method that is clearly superior to the others. The optimal goal is not only to accurately predict the folding free energy changes, but also to characterize the structural changes induced by mutations and the physical nature of the predicted folding free energy changes. Here we report a new method to predict the Single Amino Acid Folding free Energy Changes (SAAFEC) based on a knowledge-modified Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann (MM/PBSA) approach. The method is comprised of two main components: a MM/PBSA component and a set of knowledge based terms delivered from a statistical study of the biophysical characteristics of proteins. The predictor utilizes a multiple linear regression model with weighted coefficients of various terms optimized against a set of experimental data. The aforementioned approach yields a correlation coefficient of 0.65 when benchmarked against 983 cases from 42 proteins in the ProTherm database. Availability: the webserver can be accessed via http://compbio.clemson.edu/SAAFEC/. PMID:27070572

  16. A point mutation in the groove of HLA-DO allows egress from the endoplasmic reticulum independent of HLA-DM.

    PubMed

    Deshaies, Francis; Brunet, Alexandre; Diallo, Djibril A; Denzin, Lisa K; Samaan, Angela; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2005-05-03

    B lymphocytes express the nonclassical class II molecule HLA-DO, which modulates the peptide loading activity of HLA-DM in the endocytic pathway. Binding to HLA-DM is required for HLA-DO to egress from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To gain insights into the mode of action of DO and on the role of DM in ER release, we sought to identify DM-binding residues on DO. Our results show that DOalpha encompasses the binding site for HLA-DM. More specifically, mutation of residue DOalpha41 on an exposed lateral loop of the alpha1 domain affects the binding to DM, ER egress, and activity of DO. Using a series of chimeric DR/DO molecules, we confirmed the role of the alpha chain and established that a second DM-binding region is located C-terminal to the DOalpha80 residue, most probably in the alpha2 domain. Interestingly, after mutation of a buried proline (alpha11) on the floor of the putative peptide-binding groove, HLA-DO remained functional but became independent of HLA-DM for ER egress and intracellular trafficking. Collectively, these results suggest that the binding of HLA-DM to DOalpha allows the complex to egress from the ER by stabilizing intramolecular contacts between the N-terminal antiparallel beta-strands of the DOalphabeta heterodimer.

  17. Translocation t(3;12)(q26;q21) in JAK2V617F Point Mutation Negative Chronic Idiopathic Myelofibrosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mešanović, S.; Šahović, H.; Perić, M.

    2014-01-01

    The myeloproliferative diseases (MPDs) or myelo-proliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a group of diseases of the bone marrow in which excess cells are produced. Chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis (CIMF) is a stem cell defect characterized by splenomegaly with multiorgan extramedullary hematopoiesis, immature peripheral blood granulocytes and erythrocytes and progressive bone marrow fibrosis. The most common chromosomal abnormalities seen in CIMF patients include numerical changes of chromosomes 7, 8 and 9, and structural changes of 1q, 5q, 13q and 20q. At least 75.0% of patients with bone marrow abnormalities have one or more of these chromosomal anomalies. Detection of the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) mutation may be a potential major breakthrough for understanding the pathobiology of MPNs, and is an essential part of the diagnostic algorithm. In this study, we describe a JAK2V617F mutation negative CIMF patient who has the chromosomal translocation t(3;12)(q26;q21) in her karyotype. PMID:25741217

  18. Evolved osmotolerant Escherichia coli mutants frequently exhibit defective N-acetylglucosamine catabolism and point mutations in cell shape-regulating protein MreB.

    PubMed

    Winkler, James D; Garcia, Carlos; Olson, Michelle; Callaway, Emily; Kao, Katy C

    2014-06-01

    Biocatalyst robustness toward stresses imposed during fermentation is important for efficient bio-based production. Osmotic stress, imposed by high osmolyte concentrations or dense populations, can significantly impact growth and productivity. In order to better understand the osmotic stress tolerance phenotype, we evolved sexual (capable of in situ DNA exchange) and asexual Escherichia coli strains under sodium chloride (NaCl) stress. All isolates had significantly improved growth under selection and could grow in up to 0.80 M (47 g/liter) NaCl, a concentration that completely inhibits the growth of the unevolved parental strains. Whole genome resequencing revealed frequent mutations in genes controlling N-acetylglucosamine catabolism (nagC, nagA), cell shape (mrdA, mreB), osmoprotectant uptake (proV), and motility (fimA). Possible epistatic interactions between nagC, nagA, fimA, and proV deletions were also detected when reconstructed as defined mutations. Biofilm formation under osmotic stress was found to be decreased in most mutant isolates, coupled with perturbations in indole secretion. Transcriptional analysis also revealed significant changes in ompACGL porin expression and increased transcription of sulfonate uptake systems in the evolved mutants. These findings expand our current knowledge of the osmotic stress phenotype and will be useful for the rational engineering of osmotic tolerance into industrial strains in the future.

  19. Molecular recognition in a diverse set of protein-ligand interactions studied with molecular dynamics simulations and end-point free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Liwei; Hurley, Thomas D; Meroueh, Samy O

    2013-10-28

    End-point free energy calculations using MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA provide a detailed understanding of molecular recognition in protein-ligand interactions. The binding free energy can be used to rank-order protein-ligand structures in virtual screening for compound or target identification. Here, we carry out free energy calculations for a diverse set of 11 proteins bound to 14 small molecules using extensive explicit-solvent MD simulations. The structure of these complexes was previously solved by crystallography and their binding studied with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data enabling direct comparison to the MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA calculations. Four MM-GBSA and three MM-PBSA calculations reproduced the ITC free energy within 1 kcal·mol(-1) highlighting the challenges in reproducing the absolute free energy from end-point free energy calculations. MM-GBSA exhibited better rank-ordering with a Spearman ρ of 0.68 compared to 0.40 for MM-PBSA with dielectric constant (ε = 1). An increase in ε resulted in significantly better rank-ordering for MM-PBSA (ρ = 0.91 for ε = 10), but larger ε significantly reduced the contributions of electrostatics, suggesting that the improvement is due to the nonpolar and entropy components, rather than a better representation of the electrostatics. The SVRKB scoring function applied to MD snapshots resulted in excellent rank-ordering (ρ = 0.81). Calculations of the configurational entropy using normal-mode analysis led to free energies that correlated significantly better to the ITC free energy than the MD-based quasi-harmonic approach, but the computed entropies showed no correlation with the ITC entropy. When the adaptation energy is taken into consideration by running separate simulations for complex, apo, and ligand (MM-PBSAADAPT), there is less agreement with the ITC data for the individual free energies, but remarkably good rank-ordering is observed (ρ = 0.89). Interestingly, filtering MD snapshots by prescoring

  20. High rate of somatic point mutation in vitro in and near the variable-region segment of an immunoglobulin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, J; Jäck, H M; Ellis, N; Wabl, M

    1986-01-01

    The "silent" allele at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus in the pre-B-lymphocyte line 18-81 contains a correctly assembled gene. However, an amber termination codon within the variable-region gene segment prematurely terminates translation into complete heavy chain. Revertants that do produce heavy chain are generated at a high rate, which is termed hypermutation. By DNA sequencing of subclones, we have confirmed that whenever mu chain is produced by the usually silent allele, a true reversion is found in the DNA. Mutations are not confined to the position of the amber termination codon but are also found at other sites in and near the variable-region gene segment. Images PMID:3092221

  1. Novel point mutation in the splice donor site of exon-intron junction 6 of the androgen receptor gene in a patient with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sammarco, I; Grimaldi, P; Rossi, P; Cappa, M; Moretti, C; Frajese, G; Geremia, R

    2000-09-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations have been shown to cause androgen insensitivity syndrome with altered sexual differentiation in XY individuals, ranging from a partial insensitivity with male phenotype and azoospermia to a complete insensitivity with female phenotype and the absence of pubic and axillary sexual hair after puberty. In this study we present an 11-yr-old XY girl, with clinical manifestations peculiar for impaired androgen biological action, including female phenotype, blind-ending vagina, small degree of posterior labial fusion, and absence of uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. At the time of the diagnosis the patient had a FSH/LH ratio according to the puberal stage, undetectable 17beta-estradiol, and high levels of testosterone (80.1 ng/mL). After bilateral gonadectomy, performed at the age of 11 yr, histological examination showed small embryonic seminiferous tubules containing prevalently Sertoli cells and occasional spermatogonia together with abundant fibrous tissue. Molecular study of the patient showed a guanine to thymine transversion in position +5 of the donor splice site in the junction between exon 6 and intron 6 of the AR gene. The result of RT-PCR amplification of the AR messenger ribonucleic acid from cultured genital skin fibroblasts of the patient suggests that splicing is defective, and intron 6 is retained in most of the receptor messenger ribonucleic acid molecules. We show by immunoblotting that most of the expressed protein lacks part of the C-terminal hormone-binding domain, and a small amount of normal receptor is observed. This is probably responsible for the reduced binding capacity in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient. The molecular basis of the alteration in this case is a novel, uncommon mutation, leading to a phenotype indicative of a partial androgen insensitivity syndrome, Quigley's grade 5.

  2. A point mutation in the EGF-4 domain of β(3) integrin is responsible for the formation of the Sec(a) platelet alloantigen and affects receptor function.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Ulrich J; Bakchoul, Tamam; Eva, Olga; Giptner, Astrid; Bein, Gregor; Aster, Richard H; Gitter, Maria; Peterson, Julie; Santoso, Sentot

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is caused by fetomaternal platelet incompatibility with maternal antibodies crossing the placenta and destroying fetal platelets. Antibodies against human platelet antigen-1a (HPA-1a) and HPA-5b are responsible for the majority of NAIT cases. We observed a suspected NAIT in a newborn with a platelet count of 25 G/l and petechial haemorrhages. Serological analysis of maternal serum revealed an immunisation against αIIbβ3 on paternal platelets only, indicating the presence of an antibody against a new rare alloantigen (Sec(a)) residing on αIIbβ3. The location of Sec(a) on αIIbβ3 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Nucleotide sequence analysis of paternal β3 revealed a single nucleotide exchange (G(1818)T) in exon 11 of the β3 gene (ITGB3), changing Lys(580) (wild-type) to Asn(580) (Sec(a)). Two additional members of the family Sec were typed Sec(a) positive, but none of 300 blood donors. Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing Asn(580), but not Lys(580) αIIbβ3, bound anti-Sec(a), which was corroborated by immunoprecipitation. Adhesion of transfected cells onto immobilised fibrinogen showed reduced binding of the Asn(580) variant compared to wild-type αIIbβ3. Analysis of transfected cells with anti-LIBS and PAC-1 antibody showed reduced binding when compared to the wild-type. No such effects were observed with Sec(a) positive platelets, which, however, are heterozygous for the Lys(580)Asn mutation. In this study, we describe a NAIT case caused by maternal alloimmunisation against a new antigen on αIIbβ3. Analysis with mutant transfected cells showed that the Lys(580)Asn mutation responsible for the formation of the Sec(a) antigenic determinant affects αIIbβ3 receptor function.

  3. The point mutation UCH-L1 C152A protects primary neurons against cyclopentenone prostaglandin-induced cytotoxicity: implications for post-ischemic neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Li, W; Rose, M E; Hickey, R W; Chen, J; Uechi, G T; Balasubramani, M; Day, B W; Patel, K V; Graham, S H

    2015-11-05

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (CyPGs), such as 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2), are reactive prostaglandin metabolites exerting a variety of biological effects. CyPGs are produced in ischemic brain and disrupt the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Ubiquitin-C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a brain-specific deubiquitinating enzyme that has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Using tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analyses, we found that the C152 site of UCH-L1 is adducted by CyPGs. Mutation of C152 to alanine (C152A) inhibited CyPG modification and conserved recombinant UCH-L1 protein hydrolase activity after 15dPGJ2 treatment. A knock-in (KI) mouse expressing the UCH-L1 C152A mutation was constructed with the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technique. Brain expression and distribution of UCH-L1 in the KI mouse was similar to that of wild type (WT) as determined by western blotting. Primary cortical neurons derived from KI mice were resistant to 15dPGJ2 cytotoxicity compared with neurons from WT mice as detected by the WST-1 cell viability assay and caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. This protective effect was accompanied with significantly less ubiquitinated protein accumulation and aggregation as well as less UCH-L1 aggregation in C152A KI primary neurons after 15dPGJ2 treatment. Additionally, 15dPGJ2-induced axonal injury was also significantly attenuated in KI neurons as compared with WT. Taken together, these studies indicate that UCH-L1 function is important in hypoxic neuronal death, and the C152 site of UCH-L1 has a significant role in neuronal survival after hypoxic/ischemic injury.

  4. The point mutation UCH-L1 C152A protects primary neurons against cyclopentenone prostaglandin-induced cytotoxicity: implications for post-ischemic neuronal injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Li, W; Rose, M E; Hickey, R W; Chen, J; Uechi, G T; Balasubramani, M; Day, B W; Patel, K V; Graham, S H

    2015-01-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (CyPGs), such as 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2), are reactive prostaglandin metabolites exerting a variety of biological effects. CyPGs are produced in ischemic brain and disrupt the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Ubiquitin-C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a brain-specific deubiquitinating enzyme that has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Using tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analyses, we found that the C152 site of UCH-L1 is adducted by CyPGs. Mutation of C152 to alanine (C152A) inhibited CyPG modification and conserved recombinant UCH-L1 protein hydrolase activity after 15dPGJ2 treatment. A knock-in (KI) mouse expressing the UCH-L1 C152A mutation was constructed with the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technique. Brain expression and distribution of UCH-L1 in the KI mouse was similar to that of wild type (WT) as determined by western blotting. Primary cortical neurons derived from KI mice were resistant to 15dPGJ2 cytotoxicity compared with neurons from WT mice as detected by the WST-1 cell viability assay and caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. This protective effect was accompanied with significantly less ubiquitinated protein accumulation and aggregation as well as less UCH-L1 aggregation in C152A KI primary neurons after 15dPGJ2 treatment. Additionally, 15dPGJ2-induced axonal injury was also significantly attenuated in KI neurons as compared with WT. Taken together, these studies indicate that UCH-L1 function is important in hypoxic neuronal death, and the C152 site of UCH-L1 has a significant role in neuronal survival after hypoxic/ischemic injury. PMID:26539913

  5. A Point Mutation in the Pore Region Alters Gating, Ca2+Blockage, and Permeation of Olfactory Cyclic Nucleotide–Gated Channels

    PubMed Central

    Gavazzo, Paola; Picco, Cristiana; Eismann, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Menini, Anna

    2000-01-01

    Upon stimulation by odorants, Ca2+ and Na+ enter the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons through channels directly gated by cAMP. Cyclic nucleotide–gated channels have been found in a variety of cells and extensively investigated in the past few years. Glutamate residues at position 363 of the α subunit of the bovine retinal rod channel have previously been shown to constitute a cation-binding site important for blockage by external divalent cations and to control single-channel properties. It has therefore been assumed, but not proven, that glutamate residues at the corresponding position of the other cyclic nucleotide–gated channels play a similar role. We studied the corresponding glutamate (E340) of the α subunit of the bovine olfactory channel to determine its role in channel gating and in permeation and blockage by Ca2+ and Mg2+. E340 was mutated into either an aspartate, glycine, glutamine, or asparagine residue and properties of mutant channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were measured in excised patches. By single-channel recordings, we demonstrated that the open probabilities in the presence of cGMP or cAMP were decreased by the mutations, with a larger decrease observed on gating by cAMP. Moreover, we observed that the mutant E340N presented two conductance levels. We found that both external Ca2+ and Mg2+ powerfully blocked the current in wild-type and E340D mutants, whereas their blockage efficacy was drastically reduced when the glutamate charge was neutralized. The inward current carried by external Ca2+ relative to Na+ was larger in the E340G mutant compared with wild-type channels. In conclusion, we have confirmed that the residue at position E340 of the bovine olfactory CNG channel is in the pore region, controls permeation and blockage by external Ca2+ and Mg2+, and affects channel gating by cAMP more than by cGMP. PMID:10962010

  6. Amyloid transition of ubiquitin on silver nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquid as a function of stabilizer and single-point mutations.

    PubMed

    Mangini, Vincenzo; Dell'Aglio, Marcella; De Stradis, Angelo; De Giacomo, Alessandro; De Pascale, Olga; Natile, Giovanni; Arnesano, Fabio

    2014-08-18

    The interaction of nanoparticles with proteins has emerged as a key issue in addressing the problem of nanotoxicity. We investigated the interaction of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), produced by laser ablation with human ubiquitin (Ub), a protein essential for degradative processes in cells. The surface plasmon resonance peak of AgNPs indicates that Ub is rapidly adsorbed on the AgNP surface yielding a protein corona; the Ub-coated AgNPs then evolve into clusters held together by an amyloid form of the protein, as revealed by binding of thioflavin T fluorescent dye. Transthyretin, an inhibitor of amyloid-type aggregation, impedes aggregate formation and disrupts preformed AgNP clusters. In the presence of sodium citrate, a common stabilizer that confers an overall negative charge to the NPs, Ub is still adsorbed on the AgNP surface, but no clustering is observed. Ub mutants bearing a single mutation at one edge β strand (i.e. Glu16Val) or in loop (Glu18Val) behave in a radically different manner.

  7. Influenza A H1N1pdm 2009 Virus in Paraguay: Nucleotide Point Mutations in Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Genes are not Associated with Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Espínola, Emilio E; Amarilla, Alberto A; Martínez, Magaly; Aquino, Víctor H; Russomando, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus is associated with upper respiratory tract infections. The fourth influenza pandemic was declared in 2009. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic variability of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus circulating in Paraguay. Nasal swabs were collected from 181 patients with flu symptoms managed at the Hospital of the Medical School in Asunción, Paraguay, between August and October 2009. Virus detection was carried out by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, followed by sequencing of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes, and phylogenetic analysis. H1N1pdm09 was detected in 14.9% (27/181) of the suspected cases. Analysis of 13 samples showed that these viruses the clustered in a single genetic group. Neither the mutation related to exacerbation of disease (D239G in hemagglutinin) nor that related to antiviral resistance (H275Y in neuraminidase), both detected in neighboring countries, were found. This genetic analysis of H1N1pdm09 will help to understand the spread of the disease. PMID:25328558

  8. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser78 to Cys78 resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys78 in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  9. Acute Limonene Toxicity in Escherichia coli Is Caused by Limonene Hydroperoxide and Alleviated by a Point Mutation in Alkyl Hydroperoxidase AhpC

    PubMed Central

    Chubukov, Victor; Mingardon, Florence; Schackwitz, Wendy; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Hu, Qijun; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Limonene, a major component of citrus peel oil, has a number of applications related to microbiology. The antimicrobial properties of limonene make it a popular disinfectant and food preservative, while its potential as a biofuel component has made it the target of renewable production efforts through microbial metabolic engineering. For both applications, an understanding of microbial sensitivity or tolerance to limonene is crucial, but the mechanism of limonene toxicity remains enigmatic. In this study, we characterized a limonene-tolerant strain of Escherichia coli and found a mutation in ahpC, encoding alkyl hydroperoxidase, which alleviated limonene toxicity. We show that the acute toxicity previously attributed to limonene is largely due to the common oxidation product limonene hydroperoxide, which forms spontaneously in aerobic environments. The mutant AhpC protein with an L-to-Q change at position 177 (AhpCL177Q) was able to alleviate this toxicity by reducing the hydroperoxide to a more benign compound. We show that the degree of limonene toxicity is a function of its oxidation level and that nonoxidized limonene has relatively little toxicity to wild-type E. coli cells. Our results have implications for both the renewable production of limonene and the applications of limonene as an antimicrobial. PMID:25934627

  10. Using diverse U.S. beef cattle genomes to identify missense mutations in EPAS1, a gene associated with pulmonary hypertension

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of whole genome sequence (WGS) data has made it possible to discover protein variants in silico. However, existing bovine WGS databases do not show data in a form conducive to protein variant analysis, and tend to under represent the breadth of genetic diversity in U.S. beef cattle...

  11. Using diverse U.S. beef cattle genomes to identify missense mutations in EPAS1, a gene associated with high-altitude pulmonary hypertension

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of whole genome sequence (WGS) data has made it possible to discover protein variants in silico. However, bovine WGS databases comprised of related influential sires from relatively few breeds tend to under represent the breadth of genetic diversity in U.S. beef cattle. Thus, our ...

  12. Synonymous mutations frequently act as driver mutations in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Supek, Fran; Miñana, Belén; Valcárcel, Juan; Gabaldón, Toni; Lehner, Ben

    2014-03-13

    Synonymous mutations change the sequence of a gene without directly altering the sequence of the encoded protein. Here, we present evidence that these "silent" mutations frequently contribute to human cancer. Selection on synonymous mutations in oncogenes is cancer-type specific, and although the functional consequences of cancer-associated synonymous mutations may be diverse, they recurrently alter exonic motifs that regulate splicing and are associated with changes in oncogene splicing in tumors. The p53 tumor suppressor (TP53) also has recurrent synonymous mutations, but, in contrast to those in oncogenes, these are adjacent to splice sites and inactivate them. We estimate that between one in two and one in five silent mutations in oncogenes have been selected, equating to ~6%- 8% of all selected single-nucleotide changes in these genes. In addition, our analyses suggest that dosage-sensitive oncogenes have selected mutations in their 3' UTRs.

  13. Accumulation of point mutations and reassortment of genomic RNA segments are involved in the microevolution of Puumala hantavirus in a bank vole (Myodes glareolus) population.

    PubMed

    Razzauti, Maria; Plyusnina, Angelina; Henttonen, Heikki; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2008-07-01

    The genetic diversity of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) was studied in a local population of its natural host, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). The trapping area (2.5 x 2.5 km) at Konnevesi, Central Finland, included 14 trapping sites, at least 500 m apart; altogether, 147 voles were captured during May and October 2005. Partial sequences of the S, M and L viral genome segments were recovered from 40 animals. Seven, 12 and 17 variants were detected for the S, M and L sequences, respectively; these represent new wild-type PUUV strains that belong to the Finnish genetic lineage. The genetic diversity of PUUV strains from Konnevesi was 0.2-4.9 % for the S segment, 0.2-4.8 % for the M segment and 0.2-9.7 % for the L segment. Most nucleotide substitutions were synonymous and most deduced amino acid substitutions were conservative, probably due to strong stabilizing selection operating at the protein level. Based on both sequence markers and phylogenetic clustering, the S, M and L sequences could be assigned to two groups, 'A' and 'B'. Notably, not all bank voles carried S, M and L sequences belonging to the same group, i.e. S(A)M(A)L(A) or S(B)M(B)L(B). A substantial proportion (8/40, 20 %) of the newly characterized PUUV strains possessed reassortant genomes such as S(B)M(A)L(A), S(A)M(B)L(B) or S(B)M(A)L(B). These results suggest that at least some of the PUUV reassortants are viable and can survive in the presence of their parental strains.

  14. Single point mutations result in the miss-sorting of Glut4 to a novel membrane compartment associated with stress granule proteins.

    PubMed

    Song, XiaoMei; Lichti, Cheryl F; Townsend, R Reid; Mueckler, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Insulin increases cellular glucose uptake and metabolism in the postprandial state by acutely stimulating the translocation of the Glut4 glucose transporter from intracellular membrane compartments to the cell surface in muscle and fat cells. The intracellular targeting of Glut4 is dictated by specific structural motifs within cytoplasmic domains of the transporter. We demonstrate that two leucine residues at the extreme C-terminus of Glut4 are critical components of a motif (IRM, insulin responsive motif) involved in the sorting of the transporter to insulin responsive vesicles in 3T3L1 adipocytes. Light microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy, subcellular fractionation, and sedimentation analysis indicate that mutations in the IRM cause the aberrant targeting of Glut4 to large dispersed membrane vesicles that are not insulin responsive. Proteomic characterization of rapidly and slowly sedimenting membrane vesicles (RSVs and SSVs) that were highly enriched by immunoadsorption for either wild-type Glut4 or an IRM mutant revealed that the major vesicle fraction containing the mutant transporter (IRM-RSVs) possessed a relatively small and highly distinct protein population that was enriched for proteins associated with stress granules. We suggest that the IRM is critical for an early step in the sorting of Glut4 to insulin-responsive subcellular membrane compartments and that IRM mutants are miss-targeted to relatively large, amorphous membrane vesicles that may be involved in a degradation pathway for miss-targeted or miss-folded proteins or represent a transitional membrane compartment that Glut4 traverses en route to insulin responsive storage compartments.

  15. Single Point Mutations Result in the Miss-Sorting of Glut4 to a Novel Membrane Compartment Associated with Stress Granule Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Song, XiaoMei; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Townsend, R. Reid; Mueckler, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Insulin increases cellular glucose uptake and metabolism in the postprandial state by acutely stimulating the translocation of the Glut4 glucose transporter from intracellular membrane compartments to the cell surface in muscle and fat cells. The intracellular targeting of Glut4 is dictated by specific structural motifs within cytoplasmic domains of the transporter. We demonstrate that two leucine residues at the extreme C-terminus of Glut4 are critical components of a motif (IRM, insulin responsive motif) involved in the sorting of the transporter to insulin responsive vesicles in 3T3L1 adipocytes. Light microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy, subcellular fractionation, and sedimentation analysis indicate that mutations in the IRM cause the aberrant targeting of Glut4 to large dispersed membrane vesicles that are not insulin responsive. Proteomic characterization of rapidly and slowly sedimenting membrane vesicles (RSVs and SSVs) that were highly enriched by immunoadsorption for either wild-type Glut4 or an IRM mutant revealed that the major vesicle fraction containing the mutant transporter (IRM-RSVs) possessed a relatively small and highly distinct protein population that was enriched for proteins associated with stress granules. We suggest that the IRM is critical for an early step in the sorting of Glut4 to insulin-responsive subcellular membrane compartments and that IRM mutants are miss-targeted to relatively large, amorphous membrane vesicles that may be involved in a degradation pathway for miss-targeted or miss-folded proteins or represent a transitional membrane compartment that Glut4 traverses en route to insulin responsive storage compartments. PMID:23874650

  16. A point mutation in the [2Fe–2S] cluster binding region of the NAF-1 protein (H114C) dramatically hinders the cluster donor properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tamir, Sagi; Eisenberg-Domovich, Yael; Conlan, Andrea R.; Stofleth, Jason T.; Lipper, Colin H.; Paddock, Mark L.; Mittler, Ron; Jennings, Patricia A.; Livnah, Oded Nechushtai, Rachel

    2014-06-01

    NAF-1 has been shown to be related with human health and disease, is upregulated in epithelial breast cancer and suppression of its expression significantly suppresses tumor growth. It is shown that replacement of the single His ligand with Cys resulted in dramatic changes to the properties of its 2Fe-2S clusters without any global crystal structural changes. NAF-1 is an important [2Fe–2S] NEET protein associated with human health and disease. A mis-splicing mutation in NAF-1 results in Wolfram Syndrome type 2, a lethal childhood disease. Upregulation of NAF-1 is found in epithelial breast cancer cells, and suppression of NAF-1 expression by knockdown significantly suppresses tumor growth. Key to NAF-1 function is the NEET fold with its [2Fe–2S] cluster. In this work, the high-resolution structure of native NAF-1 was determined to 1.65 Å resolution (R factor = 13.5%) together with that of a mutant in which the single His ligand of its [2Fe–2S] cluster, His114, was replaced by Cys. The NAF-1 H114C mutant structure was determined to 1.58 Å resolution (R factor = 16.0%). All structural differences were localized to the cluster binding site. Compared with native NAF-1, the [2Fe–2S] clusters of the H114C mutant were found to (i) be 25-fold more stable, (ii) have a redox potential that is 300 mV more negative and (iii) have their cluster donation/transfer function abolished. Because no global structural differences were found between the mutant and the native (wild-type) NAF-1 proteins, yet significant functional differences exist between them, the NAF-1 H114C mutant is an excellent tool to decipher the underlying biological importance of the [2Fe–2S] cluster of NAF-1 in vivo.

  17. Genome destabilizing mutator alleles drive specific mutational trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J M; Hieter, Philip

    2014-02-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotsp