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Sample records for diverse yeast genes

  1. [Diversity and genetic stability of yeast flocculation caused by variation of tandem repeats in yeast flocculin genes].

    PubMed

    Yue, Feng; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping; Zhang, Borun

    2013-07-01

    Yeast flocculation is described as a reversible, asexual and calcium dependent process, in which cells adhere to form flocs by interaction of specific cell surface proteins named flocculins on yeast cells with mannose residues present on the cell wall of adjacent yeast cells. Yeast flocculation provides a very economical and convenient pathway for separation of yeast cells from the fermentation broth or removal of heavy metal ions from effluent. A large number of tandem repeats have been found in genes encoding flocculins, which not only have great regulatory effect on the structure and function of flocculins, generating the diversity of flocculation characteristics, but lead to genetic instability in flocculation as well for driving slippage and recombination reactions within and between FLO genes. Here, the research progress in effect of variation of tandem repeats in FLO genes on flocculation characteristics and genetic stability were reviewed to direct and promote the controllable application of flocculation in industrial fermentation process and environmental remediation.

  2. YAGM: a web tool for mining associated genes in yeast based on diverse biological associations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Investigating association between genes can be used in understanding the relations of genes in biological processes. STRING and GeneMANIA are two well-known web tools which can provide a list of associated genes of a query gene based on diverse biological associations such as co-expression, co-localization, co-citation and so on. However, the transcriptional regulation association and mutant phenotype association have not been used in these two web tools. Since the comprehensive transcription factor (TF)-gene binding data, TF-gene regulation data and mutant phenotype data are available in yeast, we developed a web tool called YAGM (Yeast Associated Genes Miner) which constructed the transcriptional regulation association, mutant phenotype association and five commonly used biological associations to mine a list of associated genes of a query yeast gene. Description In YAGM, we collected seven kinds of datasets including TF-gene binding (TFB) data, TF-gene regulation (TFR) data, mutant phenotype (MP) data, functional annotation (FA) data, physical interaction (PI) data, genetic interaction (GI) data, and literature evidence (LE) data. Then by using the hypergeometric test to calculate the association scores of all gene pairs in yeast, we constructed seven biological associations including two transcriptional regulation associations (TFB association and TFR association), MP association, FA association, PI association, GI association, and LE association. Moreover, the expression profile association from SPELL database was also included in YAGM. When using YAGM, users can input a query gene and choose any possible subsets of the eight biological associations, then a list of associated genes of the query gene will be returned based on the chosen biological associations. Conclusions In this study, we presented the YAGM which provides eight biological associations for mining associated genes of a query gene in yeast. Among the eight biological associations

  3. Diverse fission yeast genes required for responding to oxidative and metal stress: Comparative analysis of glutathione-related and other defense gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Pluskal, Tomáš; Sajiki, Kenichi; Becker, Joanne; Takeda, Kojiro; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Living organisms have evolved multiple sophisticated mechanisms to deal with reactive oxygen species. We constructed a collection of twelve single-gene deletion strains of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe designed for the study of oxidative and heavy metal stress responses. This collection contains deletions of biosynthetic enzymes of glutathione (Δgcs1 and Δgsa1), phytochelatin (Δpcs2), ubiquinone (Δabc1) and ergothioneine (Δegt1), as well as catalase (Δctt1), thioredoxins (Δtrx1 and Δtrx2), Cu/Zn- and Mn- superoxide dismutases (SODs; Δsod1 and Δsod2), sulfiredoxin (Δsrx1) and sulfide-quinone oxidoreductase (Δhmt2). First, we employed metabolomic analysis to examine the mutants of the glutathione biosynthetic pathway. We found that ophthalmic acid was produced by the same enzymes as glutathione in S. pombe. The identical genetic background of the strains allowed us to assess the severity of the individual gene knockouts by treating the deletion strains with oxidative agents. Among other results, we found that glutathione deletion strains were not particularly sensitive to peroxide or superoxide, but highly sensitive to cadmium stress. Our results show the astonishing diversity in cellular adaptation mechanisms to various types of oxidative and metal stress and provide a useful tool for further research into stress responses. PMID:27005325

  4. Yeast and yeast-like diversity in the southernmost glacier of Europe (Calderone Glacier, Apennines, Italy).

    PubMed

    Branda, Eva; Turchetti, Benedetta; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Pecci, Massimo; Smiraglia, Claudio; Buzzini, Pietro

    2010-06-01

    The present study reports the characterization of psychrophilic yeast and yeast-like diversity in cold habitats (superficial and deep sediments, ice cores and meltwaters) of the Calderone Glacier (Italy), which is the southernmost glacier in Europe. After incubation at 4 and 20 degrees C, sediments contained about 10(2)-10(3) CFU of yeasts g(-1). The number of viable yeast cells in ice and meltwaters was several orders of magnitude lower. The concomitant presence of viable bacteria and filamentous fungi has also been observed. In all, 257 yeast strains were isolated and identified by 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 and internal transcribed spacers (1 and 2) sequencing as belonging to 28 ascomycetous and basidiomycetous species of 11 genera (Candida, Cystofilobasidium, Cryptococcus, Dioszegia, Erythrobasidium, Guehomyces, Mastigobasidium, Mrakia, Mrakiella, Rhodotorula and Sporobolomyces). Among them, the species Cryptococcus gastricus accounted for almost 40% of the total isolates. In addition, 12 strains were identified as belonging to the yeast-like species Aureobasidium pullulans and Exophiala dermatitidis, whereas 15 strains, presumably belonging to new species, yet to be described, were also isolated. Results herein reported indicate that the Calderone Glacier, although currently considered a vanishing ice body due to the ongoing global-warming phenomenon, still harbors viable psychrophilic yeast populations. Differences of yeast and yeast-like diversity between the glacier under study and other worldwide cold habitats are also discussed.

  5. Diversity and adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces wine yeast: a review.

    PubMed

    Marsit, Souhir; Dequin, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species, the main workhorses of wine fermentation, have been exposed to stressful conditions for millennia, potentially resulting in adaptive differentiation. As a result, wine yeasts have recently attracted considerable interest for studying the evolutionary effects of domestication. The widespread use of whole-genome sequencing during the last decade has provided new insights into the biodiversity, population structure, phylogeography and evolutionary history of wine yeasts. Comparisons between S. cerevisiae isolates from various origins have indicated that a variety of mechanisms, including heterozygosity, nucleotide and structural variations, introgressions, horizontal gene transfer and hybridization, contribute to the genetic and phenotypic diversity of S. cerevisiae. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the diversity and evolutionary history of wine yeasts, focusing on the domestication fingerprints identified in these strains.

  6. Diversity and adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces wine yeast: a review

    PubMed Central

    Marsit, Souhir; Dequin, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species, the main workhorses of wine fermentation, have been exposed to stressful conditions for millennia, potentially resulting in adaptive differentiation. As a result, wine yeasts have recently attracted considerable interest for studying the evolutionary effects of domestication. The widespread use of whole-genome sequencing during the last decade has provided new insights into the biodiversity, population structure, phylogeography and evolutionary history of wine yeasts. Comparisons between S. cerevisiae isolates from various origins have indicated that a variety of mechanisms, including heterozygosity, nucleotide and structural variations, introgressions, horizontal gene transfer and hybridization, contribute to the genetic and phenotypic diversity of S. cerevisiae. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the diversity and evolutionary history of wine yeasts, focusing on the domestication fingerprints identified in these strains. PMID:26205244

  7. Duplicate genes increase gene expression diversity within and between species.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenglong; Rifkin, Scott A; White, Kevin P; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2004-06-01

    Using microarray gene expression data from several Drosophila species and strains, we show that duplicated genes, compared with single-copy genes, significantly increase gene expression diversity during development. We show further that duplicate genes tend to cause expression divergences between Drosophila species (or strains) to evolve faster than do single-copy genes. This conclusion is also supported by data from different yeast strains.

  8. Yeasts Diversity in Fermented Foods and Beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Fleet, Graham H.

    People across the world have learnt to culture and use the essential microorganisms for production of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. A fermented food is produced either spontaneously or by adding mixed/pure starter culture(s). Yeasts are among the essential functional microorganisms encountered in many fermented foods, and are commercially used in production of baker's yeast, breads, wine, beer, cheese, etc. In Asia, moulds are predominant followed by amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts in the fermentation processes, whereas in Africa, Europe, Australia and America, fermented products are prepared exclusively using bacteria or bacteria-yeasts mixed cultures. This chapter would focus on the varieties of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages produced by yeasts, their microbiology and role in food fermentation, widely used commercial starters (pilot production, molecular aspects), production technology of some common commercial fermented foods and alcoholic beverages, toxicity and food safety using yeasts cultures and socio-economy

  9. Gene Deletion by Synthesis in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsil; Kim, Dong-Uk; Hoe, Kwang-Lae

    2017-01-01

    Targeted gene deletion is a useful tool for understanding the function of a gene and its protein product. We have developed an efficient and robust gene deletion approach in yeast that employs oligonucleotide-based gene synthesis. This approach requires a deletion cassette composed of three modules: a central 1397-bp KanMX4 selection marker module and two 366-bp gene-specific flanking modules. The invariable KanMX4 module can be used in combination with different pairs of flanking modules targeting different genes. The two flanking modules consist of both sequences unique to each cassette (chromosomal homologous regions and barcodes) and those common to all deletion constructs (artificial linkers and restriction enzyme sites). Oligonucleotides for each module and junction regions are designed using the BatchBlock2Oligo program and are synthesized on a 96-well basis. The oligonucleotides are ligated into a single deletion cassette by ligase chain reaction, which is then amplified through two rounds of nested PCR to obtain sufficient quantities for yeast transformation. After removal of the artificial linkers, the deletion cassettes are transformed into wild-type diploid fission yeast SP286 cells. Verification of correct clone and gene deletion is achieved by performing check PCR and tetrad analysis. This method with proven effectiveness, as evidenced by a high success rate of gene deletion, can be potentially applicable to create systematic gene deletion libraries in a variety of yeast species. PMID:27671940

  10. Improving industrial yeast strains: exploiting natural and artificial diversity.

    PubMed

    Steensels, Jan; Snoek, Tim; Meersman, Esther; Picca Nicolino, Martina; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-09-01

    Yeasts have been used for thousands of years to make fermented foods and beverages, such as beer, wine, sake, and bread. However, the choice for a particular yeast strain or species for a specific industrial application is often based on historical, rather than scientific grounds. Moreover, new biotechnological yeast applications, such as the production of second-generation biofuels, confront yeast with environments and challenges that differ from those encountered in traditional food fermentations. Together, this implies that there are interesting opportunities to isolate or generate yeast variants that perform better than the currently used strains. Here, we discuss the different strategies of strain selection and improvement available for both conventional and nonconventional yeasts. Exploiting the existing natural diversity and using techniques such as mutagenesis, protoplast fusion, breeding, genome shuffling and directed evolution to generate artificial diversity, or the use of genetic modification strategies to alter traits in a more targeted way, have led to the selection of superior industrial yeasts. Furthermore, recent technological advances allowed the development of high-throughput techniques, such as 'global transcription machinery engineering' (gTME), to induce genetic variation, providing a new source of yeast genetic diversity.

  11. Improving industrial yeast strains: exploiting natural and artificial diversity.

    PubMed

    Steensels, Jan; Snoek, Tim; Meersman, Esther; Picca Nicolino, Martina; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-09-01

    Yeasts have been used for thousands of years to make fermented foods and beverages, such as beer, wine, sake, and bread. However, the choice for a particular yeast strain or species for a specific industrial application is often based on historical, rather than scientific grounds. Moreover, new biotechnological yeast applications, such as the production of second-generation biofuels, confront yeast with environments and challenges that differ from those encountered in traditional food fermentations. Together, this implies that there are interesting opportunities to isolate or generate yeast variants that perform better than the currently used strains. Here, we discuss the different strategies of strain selection and improvement available for both conventional and nonconventional yeasts. Exploiting the existing natural diversity and using techniques such as mutagenesis, protoplast fusion, breeding, genome shuffling and directed evolution to generate artificial diversity, or the use of genetic modification strategies to alter traits in a more targeted way, have led to the selection of superior industrial yeasts. Furthermore, recent technological advances allowed the development of high-throughput techniques, such as 'global transcription machinery engineering' (gTME), to induce genetic variation, providing a new source of yeast genetic diversity. PMID:24724938

  12. Improving industrial yeast strains: exploiting natural and artificial diversity

    PubMed Central

    Steensels, Jan; Snoek, Tim; Meersman, Esther; Nicolino, Martina Picca; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts have been used for thousands of years to make fermented foods and beverages, such as beer, wine, sake, and bread. However, the choice for a particular yeast strain or species for a specific industrial application is often based on historical, rather than scientific grounds. Moreover, new biotechnological yeast applications, such as the production of second-generation biofuels, confront yeast with environments and challenges that differ from those encountered in traditional food fermentations. Together, this implies that there are interesting opportunities to isolate or generate yeast variants that perform better than the currently used strains. Here, we discuss the different strategies of strain selection and improvement available for both conventional and nonconventional yeasts. Exploiting the existing natural diversity and using techniques such as mutagenesis, protoplast fusion, breeding, genome shuffling and directed evolution to generate artificial diversity, or the use of genetic modification strategies to alter traits in a more targeted way, have led to the selection of superior industrial yeasts. Furthermore, recent technological advances allowed the development of high-throughput techniques, such as ‘global transcription machinery engineering’ (gTME), to induce genetic variation, providing a new source of yeast genetic diversity. PMID:24724938

  13. Yeast diversity and native vigor for flavor phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Carrau, Francisco; Gaggero, Carina; Aguilar, Pablo S

    2015-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the yeast used widely for beer, bread, cider, and wine production, is the most resourceful eukaryotic model used for genetic engineering. A typical concern about using engineered yeasts for food production might be negative consumer perception of genetically modified organisms. However, we believe the true pitfall of using genetically modified yeasts is their limited capacity to either refine or improve the sensory properties of fermented foods under real production conditions. Alternatively, yeast diversity screening to improve the aroma and flavors could offer groundbreaking opportunities in food biotechnology. We propose a 'Yeast Flavor Diversity Screening' strategy which integrates knowledge from sensory analysis and natural whole-genome evolution with information about flavor metabolic networks and their regulation. PMID:25630239

  14. Evolutionary Advantage Conferred by an Eukaryote-to-Eukaryote Gene Transfer Event in Wine Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Marsit, Souhir; Mena, Adriana; Bigey, Frédéric; Sauvage, François-Xavier; Couloux, Arnaud; Guy, Julie; Legras, Jean-Luc; Barrio, Eladio; Dequin, Sylvie; Galeote, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Although an increasing number of horizontal gene transfers have been reported in eukaryotes, experimental evidence for their adaptive value is lacking. Here, we report the recent transfer of a 158-kb genomic region between Torulaspora microellipsoides and Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts or closely related strains. This genomic region has undergone several rearrangements in S. cerevisiae strains, including gene loss and gene conversion between two tandemly duplicated FOT genes encoding oligopeptide transporters. We show that FOT genes confer a strong competitive advantage during grape must fermentation by increasing the number and diversity of oligopeptides that yeast can utilize as a source of nitrogen, thereby improving biomass formation, fermentation efficiency, and cell viability. Thus, the acquisition of FOT genes has favored yeast adaptation to the nitrogen-limited wine fermentation environment. This finding indicates that anthropic environments offer substantial ecological opportunity for evolutionary diversification through gene exchange between distant yeast species. PMID:25750179

  15. Studying Functions of All Yeast Genes Simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Eason, Robert G.; Poumand, Nader; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Anthony Kevin; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2006-01-01

    A method of studying the functions of all the genes of a given species of microorganism simultaneously has been developed in experiments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker's or brewer's yeast). It is already known that many yeast genes perform functions similar to those of corresponding human genes; therefore, by facilitating understanding of yeast genes, the method may ultimately also contribute to the knowledge needed to treat some diseases in humans. Because of the complexity of the method and the highly specialized nature of the underlying knowledge, it is possible to give only a brief and sketchy summary here. The method involves the use of unique synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences that are denoted as DNA bar codes because of their utility as molecular labels. The method also involves the disruption of gene functions through deletion of genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly powerful experimental system in that multiple deletion strains easily can be pooled for parallel growth assays. Individual deletion strains recently have been created for 5,918 open reading frames, representing nearly all of the estimated 6,000 genetic loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tagging of each deletion strain with one or two unique 20-nucleotide sequences enables identification of genes affected by specific growth conditions, without prior knowledge of gene functions. Hybridization of bar-code DNA to oligonucleotide arrays can be used to measure the growth rate of each strain over several cell-division generations. The growth rate thus measured serves as an index of the fitness of the strain.

  16. The assessment of epiphytic yeast diversity in sugarcane phyllosphere in Thailand by culture-independent method.

    PubMed

    Nasanit, Rujikan; Tangwong-O-Thai, Apirat; Tantirungkij, Manee; Limtong, Savitree

    2015-12-01

    The diversity of epiphytic yeasts from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum Linn.) phyllospheres in Thailand was investigated by culture-independent method based on the analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene sequences. Forty-five samples of sugarcane leaf were collected randomly from ten provinces in Thailand. A total of 1342 clones were obtained from 45 clone libraries. 426 clones (31.7 %) were closely related to yeast strains in the GenBank database, and they were clustered into 31 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with a similarity threshold of 99 %. All OTU sequences were classified in phylum Basidiomycota which were closely related to 11 yeast species in seven genera including Cryptococcus flavus, Hannaella coprosmaensis, Rhodotorula taiwanensis, Jaminaea angkoreiensis, Malassezia restricta, Pseudozyma antarctica, Pseudozyma aphidis, Pseudozyma hubeiensis, Pseudozyma prolifica, Pseudozyma shanxiensis, and Sporobolomyces vermiculatus. The most predominant yeasts detected belonged to Ustilaginales with 89.4 % relative frequency and the prevalent yeast genus was Pseudozyma. However, the majority were unable to be identified as known yeast species and these sequences may represent the sequences of new yeast taxa. In addition, The OTU that closely related to P. prolifica was commonly detected in sugarcane phyllosphere.

  17. The assessment of epiphytic yeast diversity in sugarcane phyllosphere in Thailand by culture-independent method.

    PubMed

    Nasanit, Rujikan; Tangwong-O-Thai, Apirat; Tantirungkij, Manee; Limtong, Savitree

    2015-12-01

    The diversity of epiphytic yeasts from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum Linn.) phyllospheres in Thailand was investigated by culture-independent method based on the analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene sequences. Forty-five samples of sugarcane leaf were collected randomly from ten provinces in Thailand. A total of 1342 clones were obtained from 45 clone libraries. 426 clones (31.7 %) were closely related to yeast strains in the GenBank database, and they were clustered into 31 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with a similarity threshold of 99 %. All OTU sequences were classified in phylum Basidiomycota which were closely related to 11 yeast species in seven genera including Cryptococcus flavus, Hannaella coprosmaensis, Rhodotorula taiwanensis, Jaminaea angkoreiensis, Malassezia restricta, Pseudozyma antarctica, Pseudozyma aphidis, Pseudozyma hubeiensis, Pseudozyma prolifica, Pseudozyma shanxiensis, and Sporobolomyces vermiculatus. The most predominant yeasts detected belonged to Ustilaginales with 89.4 % relative frequency and the prevalent yeast genus was Pseudozyma. However, the majority were unable to be identified as known yeast species and these sequences may represent the sequences of new yeast taxa. In addition, The OTU that closely related to P. prolifica was commonly detected in sugarcane phyllosphere. PMID:26615738

  18. Yeast diversity on grapes in two German wine growing regions.

    PubMed

    Brysch-Herzberg, Michael; Seidel, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The yeast diversity on wine grapes in Germany, one of the most northern wine growing regions of the world, was investigated by means of a culture dependent approach. All yeast isolates were identified by sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA and the ITS region. Besides Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima, which are well known to be abundant on grapes, Metschnikowia viticola, Rhodosporidium babjevae, and Curvibasidium pallidicorallinum, as well as two potentially new species related to Sporidiobolus pararoseus and Filobasidium floriforme, turned out to be typical members of the grape yeast community. We found M. viticola in about half of the grape samples in high abundance. Our data strongly suggest that M. viticola is one of the most important fermenting yeast species on grapes in the temperate climate of Germany. The frequent occurrence of Cu. pallidicorallinum and strains related to F. floriforme is a new finding. The current investigation provides information on the distribution of recently described yeast species, some of which are known from a very few strains up to now. Interestingly yeasts known for their role in the wine making process, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus ssp. uvarum, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, were not found in the grape samples.

  19. Comparative genomics of wild type yeast strains unveils important genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Carreto, Laura; Eiriz, Maria F; Gomes, Ana C; Pereira, Patrícia M; Schuller, Dorit; Santos, Manuel AS

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome variability generates phenotypic heterogeneity and is of relevance for adaptation to environmental change, but the extent of such variability in natural populations is still poorly understood. For example, selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are variable at the ploidy level, have gene amplifications, changes in chromosome copy number, and gross chromosomal rearrangements. This suggests that genome plasticity provides important genetic diversity upon which natural selection mechanisms can operate. Results In this study, we have used wild-type S. cerevisiae (yeast) strains to investigate genome variation in natural and artificial environments. We have used comparative genome hybridization on array (aCGH) to characterize the genome variability of 16 yeast strains, of laboratory and commercial origin, isolated from vineyards and wine cellars, and from opportunistic human infections. Interestingly, sub-telomeric instability was associated with the clinical phenotype, while Ty element insertion regions determined genomic differences of natural wine fermentation strains. Copy number depletion of ASP3 and YRF1 genes was found in all wild-type strains. Other gene families involved in transmembrane transport, sugar and alcohol metabolism or drug resistance had copy number changes, which also distinguished wine from clinical isolates. Conclusion We have isolated and genotyped more than 1000 yeast strains from natural environments and carried out an aCGH analysis of 16 strains representative of distinct genotype clusters. Important genomic variability was identified between these strains, in particular in sub-telomeric regions and in Ty-element insertion sites, suggesting that this type of genome variability is the main source of genetic diversity in natural populations of yeast. The data highlights the usefulness of yeast as a model system to unravel intraspecific natural genome diversity and to elucidate how natural selection shapes the yeast genome

  20. Safeguarding CRISPR-Cas9 gene drives in yeast

    PubMed Central

    DiCarlo, James E.; Chavez, Alejandro; Dietz, Sven L.; Esvelt, Kevin M.; Church, George M.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-guided gene drives capable of spreading genomic alterations made in laboratory organisms through wild populations in an inheritable way could be used to control populations of organisms that cause environmental and public health problems. However, the possibility of unintended genome editing through the escape of strains from laboratories, coupled with the prospect of unanticipated ecological change, demands caution. We report the efficacy of CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive systems in wild and laboratory strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, we address concerns surrounding accidental genome editing by developing and validating methods of molecular confinement that minimize the risk of unwanted genome editing. We also present a drive system capable of overwriting the changes introduced by an earlier gene drive. These molecular safeguards should enable the development of safe CRISPR gene drives for diverse organisms. PMID:26571100

  1. Differential gene retention as an evolutionary mechanism to generate biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Morel, Guillaume; Sterck, Lieven; Swennen, Dominique; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Onesime, Djamila; Levasseur, Anthony; Jacques, Noémie; Mallet, Sandrine; Couloux, Arnaux; Labadie, Karine; Amselem, Joëlle; Beckerich, Jean-Marie; Henrissat, Bernard; Van de Peer, Yves; Wincker, Patrick; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Gabaldón, Toni; Tinsley, Colin R; Casaregola, Serge

    2015-06-25

    The evolutionary history of the characters underlying the adaptation of microorganisms to food and biotechnological uses is poorly understood. We undertook comparative genomics to investigate evolutionary relationships of the dairy yeast Geotrichum candidum within Saccharomycotina. Surprisingly, a remarkable proportion of genes showed discordant phylogenies, clustering with the filamentous fungus subphylum (Pezizomycotina), rather than the yeast subphylum (Saccharomycotina), of the Ascomycota. These genes appear not to be the result of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT), but to have been specifically retained by G. candidum after the filamentous fungi-yeasts split concomitant with the yeasts' genome contraction. We refer to these genes as SRAGs (Specifically Retained Ancestral Genes), having been lost by all or nearly all other yeasts, and thus contributing to the phenotypic specificity of lineages. SRAG functions include lipases consistent with a role in cheese making and novel endoglucanases associated with degradation of plant material. Similar gene retention was observed in three other distantly related yeasts representative of this ecologically diverse subphylum. The phenomenon thus appears to be widespread in the Saccharomycotina and argues that, alongside neo-functionalization following gene duplication and HGT, specific gene retention must be recognized as an important mechanism for generation of biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts.

  2. Diversity of soil yeasts isolated from South Victoria Land, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, L.; Redman, R.; Craig, S.; Scorzetti, G.; Iszard, M.; Rodriguez, R.

    2008-01-01

    Unicellular fungi, commonly referred to as yeasts, were found to be components of the culturable soil fungal population in Taylor Valley, Mt. Discovery, Wright Valley, and two mountain peaks of South Victoria Land, Antarctica. Samples were taken from sites spanning a diversity of soil habitats that were not directly associated with vertebrate activity. A large proportion of yeasts isolated in this study were basidiomycetous species (89%), of which 43% may represent undescribed species, demonstrating that culturable yeasts remain incompletely described in these polar desert soils. Cryptococcus species represented the most often isolated genus (33%) followed by Leucosporidium (22%). Principle component analysis and multiple linear regression using stepwise selection was used to model the relation between abiotic variables (principle component 1 and principle component 2 scores) and yeast biodiversity (the number of species present at a given site). These analyses identified soil pH and electrical conductivity as significant predictors of yeast biodiversity. Species-specific PCR primers were designed to rapidly discriminate among the Dioszegia and Leucosporidium species collected in this study. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  3. The environmental and intrinsic yeast diversity of Cuban cocoa bean heap fermentations.

    PubMed

    Fernández Maura, Yurelkys; Balzarini, Tom; Clapé Borges, Pablo; Evrard, Pierre; De Vuyst, Luc; Daniel, H-M

    2016-09-16

    The environmental yeast diversity of spontaneous cocoa bean fermentations in east Cuba was investigated. Seven fermentations, 25 equipment- and handling-related samples, and 115 environmental samples, such as flowers, leaf and cocoa pod surfaces, as well as drosophilid insects, were analysed. The basic fermentation parameters temperature and pH were recorded during five fermentations for at least six days. A total of 435 yeast isolates were identified by a combination of PCR-fingerprinting of genomic DNA with the M13 primer and sequence analysis of DNA from representative isolates, using the internal transcribed spacer region, the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rRNA gene, and an actin gene-encoding fragment, as required. Among 65 yeast species detected, Pichia manshurica and Hanseniaspora opuntiae were the most frequently isolated species, obtained from five and four fermentations, followed in frequency by Pichia kudriavzevii from two fermentations. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was isolated only occasionally. Cocoa fermentation yeast species were also present on processing equipment. The repeated isolation of a preliminarily as Yamadazyma sp. classified species, a group of strains similar to Saccharomycopsis crataegensis from fermentations and equipment, and the isolation of fifteen other potentially novel yeast species in low numbers provides material for further studies. Environmental samples showed higher yeast diversity compared to the fermentations, included the most frequent fermentation species, whereas the most frequently isolated environmental species were Candida carpophila, Candida conglobata, and Candida quercitrusa. Potential selective advantages of the most frequently isolated species were only partly explained by the physiological traits tested. For instance, tolerance to higher ethanol concentrations was more frequent in strains of Pichia spp. and S. cerevisiae compared to Hanseniaspora spp.; the ability to also assimilate ethanol might have

  4. The sensitive [SWI (+)] prion: new perspectives on yeast prion diversity.

    PubMed

    Hines, Justin K; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based genetic elements which rely on molecular chaperone proteins for stable transmission to cell progeny. Within the past few years, five new prions have been validated and 18 additional putative prions identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The exploration of the physical and biological properties of these "nouveau prions" has begun to reveal the extent of prion diversity in yeast. We recently reported that one such prion, [SWI(+)], differs from the best studied, archetypal prion [PSI(+)] in several significant ways. ( 1) Notably, [SWI(+)] is highly sensitive to alterations in Hsp70 system chaperone activity and is lost upon growth at elevated temperatures. In that report we briefly noted a correlation amongst prions regarding amino acid composition, seed number and sensitivity to the activity of the Hsp70 chaperone system. Here we extend that analysis and put forth the idea that [SWI(+)] may be representative of a class of asparagine-rich yeast prions which also includes [URE3], [MOT3(+)] and [ISP(+)], distinct from the glutamine-rich prions such as [PSI(+)] and [RNQ(+)]. While much work remains, it is apparent that our understanding of the extent of the diversity of prion characteristics is in its infancy.

  5. In vivo continuous evolution of genes and pathways in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Nathan; Abatemarco, Joseph; Sun, Jie; Wagner, James M.; Schmitz, Alexander; Alper, Hal S.

    2016-01-01

    Directed evolution remains a powerful, highly generalizable approach for improving the performance of biological systems. However, implementations in eukaryotes rely either on in vitro diversity generation or limited mutational capacities. Here we synthetically optimize the retrotransposon Ty1 to enable in vivo generation of mutant libraries up to 1.6 × 107 l−1 per round, which is the highest of any in vivo mutational generation approach in yeast. We demonstrate this approach by using in vivo-generated libraries to evolve single enzymes, global transcriptional regulators and multi-gene pathways. When coupled to growth selection, this approach enables in vivo continuous evolution (ICE) of genes and pathways. Through a head-to-head comparison, we find that ICE libraries yield higher-performing variants faster than error-prone PCR-derived libraries. Finally, we demonstrate transferability of ICE to divergent yeasts, including Kluyveromyces lactis and alternative S. cerevisiae strains. Collectively, this work establishes a generic platform for rapid eukaryotic-directed evolution across an array of target cargo. PMID:27748457

  6. Yeast diversity of Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentations.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Heide-Marie; Vrancken, Gino; Takrama, Jemmy F; Camu, Nicholas; De Vos, Paul; De Vuyst, Luc

    2009-08-01

    The fermentation of the Theobroma cacao beans, involving yeasts, lactic acid bacteria, and acetic acid bacteria, has a major influence on the quality of the resulting cocoa. An assessment of the microbial community of cocoa bean heap fermentations in Ghana resulted in 91 yeast isolates. These were grouped by PCR-fingerprinting with the primer M13. Representative isolates were identified using the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rRNA gene, internal transcribed spacer sequences and partial actin gene sequences leading to the detection of 15 species. Properties of importance for cocoa bean fermentation, namely sucrose, glucose, and citrate assimilation capacity, pH-, ethanol-, and heat-tolerance, were examined for selected isolates. Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis), Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Hanseniaspora opuntiae formed the major components of the yeast community. Hanseniaspora opuntiae was identified conclusively for the first time from cocoa fermentations. Among the less frequently encountered species, Candida carpophila, Candida orthopsilosis, Kodamaea ohmeri, Meyerozyma (Pichia) caribbica, Pichia manshurica, Saccharomycodes ludwigii, and Yamadazyma (Pichia) mexicana were not yet documented from this substrate. Hanseniaspora opuntiae was preferably growing during the earlier phase of fermentation, reflecting its tolerance to low pH and its citrate-negative phenotype, while no specific temporal distribution was recognized for P. kudriavzevii and S. cerevisiae.

  7. Yeast diversity of Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentations.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Heide-Marie; Vrancken, Gino; Takrama, Jemmy F; Camu, Nicholas; De Vos, Paul; De Vuyst, Luc

    2009-08-01

    The fermentation of the Theobroma cacao beans, involving yeasts, lactic acid bacteria, and acetic acid bacteria, has a major influence on the quality of the resulting cocoa. An assessment of the microbial community of cocoa bean heap fermentations in Ghana resulted in 91 yeast isolates. These were grouped by PCR-fingerprinting with the primer M13. Representative isolates were identified using the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rRNA gene, internal transcribed spacer sequences and partial actin gene sequences leading to the detection of 15 species. Properties of importance for cocoa bean fermentation, namely sucrose, glucose, and citrate assimilation capacity, pH-, ethanol-, and heat-tolerance, were examined for selected isolates. Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis), Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Hanseniaspora opuntiae formed the major components of the yeast community. Hanseniaspora opuntiae was identified conclusively for the first time from cocoa fermentations. Among the less frequently encountered species, Candida carpophila, Candida orthopsilosis, Kodamaea ohmeri, Meyerozyma (Pichia) caribbica, Pichia manshurica, Saccharomycodes ludwigii, and Yamadazyma (Pichia) mexicana were not yet documented from this substrate. Hanseniaspora opuntiae was preferably growing during the earlier phase of fermentation, reflecting its tolerance to low pH and its citrate-negative phenotype, while no specific temporal distribution was recognized for P. kudriavzevii and S. cerevisiae. PMID:19473277

  8. The yeast ubiquitin genes: a family of natural gene fusions.

    PubMed

    Ozkaynak, E; Finley, D; Solomon, M J; Varshavsky, A

    1987-05-01

    Ubiquitin is a 76-residue protein highly conserved among eukaryotes. Conjugation of ubiquitin to intracellular proteins mediates their selective degradation in vivo. We describe a family of four ubiquitin-coding loci in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. UB11, UB12 and UB13 encode hybrid proteins in which ubiquitin is fused to unrelated ('tail') amino acid sequences. The ubiquitin coding elements of UB11 and UB12 are interrupted at identical positions by non-homologous introns. UB11 and UB12 encode identical 52-residue tails, whereas UB13 encodes a different 76-residue tail. The tail amino acid sequences are highly conserved between yeast and mammals. Each tail contains a putative metal-binding, nucleic acid-binding domain of the form Cys-X2-4-Cys-X2-15-Cys-X2-4-Cys, suggesting that these proteins may function by binding to DNA. The fourth gene, UB14, encodes a polyubiquitin precursor protein containing five ubiquitin repeats in a head-to-tail, spacerless arrangement. All four ubiquitin genes are expressed in exponentially growing cells, while in stationary-phase cells the expression of UB11 and UB12 is repressed. The UB14 gene, which is strongly inducible by starvation, high temperatures and other stresses, contains in its upstream region strong homologies to the consensus 'heat shock box' nucleotide sequence. Elsewhere we show that the essential function of the UB14 gene is to provide ubiquitin to cells under stress. PMID:3038523

  9. Posttranscriptional Control of Gene Expression in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John E. G.

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have greatly advanced our understanding of the posttranscriptional steps of eukaryotic gene expression. Given the wide range of experimental tools applicable to S. cerevisiae and the recent determination of its complete genomic sequence, many of the key challenges of the posttranscriptional control field can be tackled particularly effectively by using this organism. This article reviews the current knowledge of the cellular components and mechanisms related to translation and mRNA decay, with the emphasis on the molecular basis for rate control and gene regulation. Recent progress in characterizing translation factors and their protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions has been rapid. Against the background of a growing body of structural information, the review discusses the thermodynamic and kinetic principles that govern the translation process. As in prokaryotic systems, translational initiation is a key point of control. Modulation of the activities of translational initiation factors imposes global regulation in the cell, while structural features of particular 5′ untranslated regions, such as upstream open reading frames and effector binding sites, allow for gene-specific regulation. Recent data have revealed many new details of the molecular mechanisms involved while providing insight into the functional overlaps and molecular networking that are apparently a key feature of evolving cellular systems. An overall picture of the mechanisms governing mRNA decay has only very recently begun to develop. The latest work has revealed new information about the mRNA decay pathways, the components of the mRNA degradation machinery, and the way in which these might relate to the translation apparatus. Overall, major challenges still to be addressed include the task of relating principles of posttranscriptional control to cellular compartmentalization and polysome structure and the role of molecular channelling

  10. Application of temperature gradient gel electrophoresis to the study of yeast diversity in the estuary of the Tagus river, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Gadanho, Mário; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2004-12-01

    Temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) was employed for the assessment of yeast diversity in the estuary of the Tagus river (Portugal). The molecular detection of yeasts was carried out directly from water samples and, in parallel, a cultivation approach by means of an enrichment step was employed. A nested PCR was employed to obtain a fungal amplicon containing the D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. For identification the TGGE bands were extracted, re-amplified, and sequenced. Fourteen fungal taxa were detected and all except one were yeasts. Most yeast sequences corresponded to members of the Ascomycota and only three belonged to the Basidiomycota. Five yeasts (four ascomycetes and one basidiomycete) could not be identified to the species level due to the uniqueness of their sequences. The number of species detected after enrichment was higher than the number of taxa found using the direct detection method. This suggests that some yeast populations are present in densities that are below the detection threshold of the method. With respect to the analysis of the yeast community structure, our results indicate that the dominant populations belong to Debaryomyces hansenii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Cryptococcus longus, and to an uncultured basidiomycetous yeast phylogenetically close to Cr. longus. The combined analysis of direct detection and cultivation approaches indicates a similar community structure at the two sampled sites since nine species were present at both localities. PMID:15556087

  11. Selection of Error-Less Synthetic Genes in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Hoshida, Hisashi; Yarimizu, Tohru; Akada, Rinji

    2017-01-01

    Conventional gene synthesis is usually accompanied by sequence errors, which are often deletions derived from chemically synthesized oligonucleotides. Such deletions lead to frame shifts and mostly result in premature translational terminations. Therefore, in-frame fusion of a marker gene to the downstream of a synthetic gene is an effective strategy to select for frame-shift-free synthetic genes. Functional expression of fused marker genes indicates that synthetic genes are translated without premature termination, i.e., error-less synthetic genes. A recently developed nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated DNA cloning method in the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus is suitable for the selection of frame-shift-free synthetic genes. Transformation and NHEJ-mediated in-frame joining of a synthetic gene with a selection marker gene enables colony formation of only the yeast cells containing synthetic genes without premature termination. This method increased selection frequency of error-less synthetic genes by 3- to 12-fold. PMID:27671945

  12. Assessing genetic diversity among Brettanomyces yeasts by DNA fingerprinting and whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Crauwels, Sam; Zhu, Bo; Steensels, Jan; Busschaert, Pieter; De Samblanx, Gorik; Marchal, Kathleen; Willems, Kris A; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Lievens, Bart

    2014-07-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts, with the species Brettanomyces (Dekkera) bruxellensis being the most important one, are generally reported to be spoilage yeasts in the beer and wine industry due to the production of phenolic off flavors. However, B. bruxellensis is also known to be a beneficial contributor in certain fermentation processes, such as the production of certain specialty beers. Nevertheless, despite its economic importance, Brettanomyces yeasts remain poorly understood at the genetic and genomic levels. In this study, the genetic relationship between more than 50 Brettanomyces strains from all presently known species and from several sources was studied using a combination of DNA fingerprinting techniques. This revealed an intriguing correlation between the B. bruxellensis fingerprints and the respective isolation source. To further explore this relationship, we sequenced a (beneficial) beer isolate of B. bruxellensis (VIB X9085; ST05.12/22) and compared its genome sequence with the genome sequences of two wine spoilage strains (AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499). ST05.12/22 was found to be substantially different from both wine strains, especially at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, there were major differences in the genome structures between the strains investigated, including the presence of large duplications and deletions. Gene content analysis revealed the presence of 20 genes which were present in both wine strains but absent in the beer strain, including many genes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and vice versa, no genes that were missing in both AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499 were found in ST05.12/22. Together, this study provides tools to discriminate Brettanomyces strains and provides a first glimpse at the genetic diversity and genome plasticity of B. bruxellensis.

  13. Assessing Genetic Diversity among Brettanomyces Yeasts by DNA Fingerprinting and Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Crauwels, Sam; Zhu, Bo; Steensels, Jan; Busschaert, Pieter; De Samblanx, Gorik; Marchal, Kathleen; Willems, Kris A.

    2014-01-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts, with the species Brettanomyces (Dekkera) bruxellensis being the most important one, are generally reported to be spoilage yeasts in the beer and wine industry due to the production of phenolic off flavors. However, B. bruxellensis is also known to be a beneficial contributor in certain fermentation processes, such as the production of certain specialty beers. Nevertheless, despite its economic importance, Brettanomyces yeasts remain poorly understood at the genetic and genomic levels. In this study, the genetic relationship between more than 50 Brettanomyces strains from all presently known species and from several sources was studied using a combination of DNA fingerprinting techniques. This revealed an intriguing correlation between the B. bruxellensis fingerprints and the respective isolation source. To further explore this relationship, we sequenced a (beneficial) beer isolate of B. bruxellensis (VIB X9085; ST05.12/22) and compared its genome sequence with the genome sequences of two wine spoilage strains (AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499). ST05.12/22 was found to be substantially different from both wine strains, especially at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, there were major differences in the genome structures between the strains investigated, including the presence of large duplications and deletions. Gene content analysis revealed the presence of 20 genes which were present in both wine strains but absent in the beer strain, including many genes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and vice versa, no genes that were missing in both AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499 were found in ST05.12/22. Together, this study provides tools to discriminate Brettanomyces strains and provides a first glimpse at the genetic diversity and genome plasticity of B. bruxellensis. PMID:24814796

  14. A Gondwanan imprint on global diversity and domestication of wine and cider yeast Saccharomyces uvarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla; Teixeira, Sara; Libkind, Diego; Bontrager, Martin; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Albertin, Warren; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David James; Marullo, Philippe; Todd Hittinger, Chris; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2014-06-01

    In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cryotolerant yeast species S. uvarum is also used for wine and cider fermentation but nothing is known about its natural history. Here we use a population genomics approach to investigate its global phylogeography and domestication fingerprints using a collection of isolates obtained from fermented beverages and from natural environments on five continents. South American isolates contain more genetic diversity than that found in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, coalescence analyses suggest that a Patagonian sub-population gave rise to the Holarctic population through a recent bottleneck. Holarctic strains display multiple introgressions from other Saccharomyces species, those from S. eubayanus being prevalent in European strains associated with human-driven fermentations. These introgressions are absent in the large majority of wild strains and gene ontology analyses indicate that several gene categories relevant for wine fermentation are overrepresented. Such findings constitute a first indication of domestication in S. uvarum.

  15. A Gondwanan Imprint on Global Diversity and Domestication of Wine and Cider Yeast Saccharomyces uvarum

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla; Teixeira, Sara; Libkind, Diego; Bontrager, Martin; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Albertin, Warren; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David; Marullo, Philippe; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cryotolerant yeast species S. uvarum is also used for wine and cider fermentation but nothing is known about its natural history. Here we use a population genomics approach to investigate its global phylogeography and domestication fingerprints using a collection of isolates obtained from fermented beverages and from natural environments on five continents. South American isolates contain more genetic diversity than that found in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, coalescence analyses suggest that a Patagonian sub-population gave rise to the Holarctic population through a recent bottleneck. Holarctic strains display multiple introgressions from other Saccharomyces species, those from S. eubayanus being prevalent in European strains associated with human-driven fermentations. These introgressions are absent in the large majority of wild strains and gene ontology analyses indicate that several gene categories relevant for wine fermentation are overrepresented. Such findings constitute a first indication of domestication in S. uvarum. PMID:24887054

  16. A Gondwanan imprint on global diversity and domestication of wine and cider yeast Saccharomyces uvarum.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla; Teixeira, Sara; Libkind, Diego; Bontrager, Martin; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Albertin, Warren; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David James; Marullo, Philippe; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2014-01-01

    In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cryotolerant yeast species S. uvarum is also used for wine and cider fermentation but nothing is known about its natural history. Here we use a population genomics approach to investigate its global phylogeography and domestication fingerprints using a collection of isolates obtained from fermented beverages and from natural environments on five continents. South American isolates contain more genetic diversity than that found in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, coalescence analyses suggest that a Patagonian sub-population gave rise to the Holarctic population through a recent bottleneck. Holarctic strains display multiple introgressions from other Saccharomyces species, those from S. eubayanus being prevalent in European strains associated with human-driven fermentations. These introgressions are absent in the large majority of wild strains and gene ontology analyses indicate that several gene categories relevant for wine fermentation are overrepresented. Such findings constitute a first indication of domestication in S. uvarum.

  17. A Complete Set of Nascent Transcription Rates for Yeast Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pelechano, Vicent; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2010-01-01

    The amount of mRNA in a cell is the result of two opposite reactions: transcription and mRNA degradation. These reactions are governed by kinetics laws, and the most regulated step for many genes is the transcription rate. The transcription rate, which is assumed to be exercised mainly at the RNA polymerase recruitment level, can be calculated using the RNA polymerase densities determined either by run-on or immunoprecipitation using specific antibodies. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the ideal model organism to generate a complete set of nascent transcription rates that will prove useful for many gene regulation studies. By combining genomic data from both the GRO (Genomic Run-on) and the RNA pol ChIP-on-chip methods we generated a new, more accurate nascent transcription rate dataset. By comparing this dataset with the indirect ones obtained from the mRNA stabilities and mRNA amount datasets, we are able to obtain biological information about posttranscriptional regulation processes and a genomic snapshot of the location of the active transcriptional machinery. We have obtained nascent transcription rates for 4,670 yeast genes. The median RNA polymerase II density in the genes is 0.078 molecules/kb, which corresponds to an average of 0.096 molecules/gene. Most genes have transcription rates of between 2 and 30 mRNAs/hour and less than 1% of yeast genes have >1 RNA polymerase molecule/gene. Histone and ribosomal protein genes are the highest transcribed groups of genes and other than these exceptions the transcription of genes is an infrequent phenomenon in a yeast cell. PMID:21103382

  18. Assessment of epiphytic yeast diversity in rice (Oryza sativa) phyllosphere in Thailand by a culture-independent approach.

    PubMed

    Nasanit, Rujikan; Krataithong, Kultara; Tantirungkij, Manee; Limtong, Savitree

    2015-06-01

    The epiphytic yeast diversity in rice phyllosphere in Thailand was investigated by a culture-independent technique based on the RFLP pattern and the sequence of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit rRNA gene. Forty-four samples of rice leaf were collected randomly from six provinces. The DNA was extracted from leaf washing samples and the D1/D2 domain was amplified using PCR technique. The PCR products were cloned and then screened by colony PCR. Of total 1121 clones, 451 clones (40.2 %) revealed the D1/D2 domain sequences closely related to sequences of yeasts in GenBank, and they were clustered into 45 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 99 % homology. Of total yeast related clones, 329 clones (72.9 %) were identified as nine known yeast species, which consisted of 314 clones (8 OTUs) in the phylum Basidiomycota including Bullera japonica, Pseudozyma antarctica, Pseudozyma aphidis, Sporobolomyces blumeae, Sporobolomyces carnicolor and Sporobolomyces oryzicola and 15 clones (6 OTUs) in the phylum Ascomycota including Metschnikowia koreensis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Wickerhamomyces anomalus. The D1/D2 sequences (122 clones) that could not be identified as known yeast species were closest to 3 and 14 species in Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, respectively, some of which may be new yeast species. The most predominant species detected was P. antarctica (42.6 %) followed by B. japonica (25.9 %) with 63.6 and 22.7 % frequency of occurrence, respectively. The results of OTU richness of each sampling location revealed that climate condition and sampling location could affect epiphytic yeast diversity in rice phyllosphere. PMID:25842038

  19. Advances in Gene Expression in Non-Conventional Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, Sanet; Labuschagne, Michel; Albertyn, Jacobus

    Yeast has been a favoured lower eukaryotic system for the expression and production of recombinant proteins for both basic research and practical applications, and the demand for foreign-gene expression systems is increasing rapidly. Despite the vast amount of information on the molecular biology and physiology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has consequently been the first choice as host system for recombinant protein production in the past, several limitations have been identified in this expression system. These limitations have recently been relieved by the development of expression systems in other yeast species known as ‘ non-conventional yeasts’ or ‘non-Saccharomyces ’ yeasts. With the increasing interest in the biotechnological applications of these yeasts in applied and fundamental studies and processes, the term ‘ non-conventional ’ yeast may well soon become redundant. As there is no universal expression system for heterologous protein production, it is necessary to recognize the merits and demerits of each system in order to make a right choice. This chapter will evaluate the competitive environment of non-conventional expression platforms represented by some of the best-known alternative yeasts systems including Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia pastoris and more recently, Arxula adeninivorans.

  20. Yeast diversity associated to sediments and water from two Colombian artificial lakes

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Bedoya, L.M.; Ramírez-Castrillón, M.; Osorio-Cadavid, E.

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, knowledge of the yeast and yeast-like fungi community is limited because most studies have focused on species with clinical importance. Sediments and water represent important habitats for the study of yeast diversity, especially for yeast species with industrial, biotechnological, and bioremediation potential. The main purpose of this study was to identify and compare the diversity of yeast species associated with sediment and water samples from two artificial lakes in Universidad del Valle (Cali-Colombia). Yeast samplings were performed from fifteen sediment samples and ten water samples. Grouping of similar isolates was initially based on colony and cell morphology, which was then complemented by micro/mini satellite primed PCR banding pattern analysis by using GTG5 as single primer. A representative isolate for each group established was chosen for D1/D2 domain sequencing and identification. In general, the following yeast species were identified: Candida albicans, Candida diversa, Candida glabrata, Candida pseudolambica, Cryptococcus podzolicus, Cryptococcus rajasthanensis, Cryptococcus laurentii, Williopsis saturnus, Hanseniaspora thailandica, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Torulaspora pretoriensis, Tricosporon jirovecii, Trichosporon laibachii and Yarrowia lypolitica. Two possible new species were also found, belonging to the Issatchenkia sp. and Bullera sp. genera. In conclusion, the lakes at the Universidad del Valle campus have significant differences in yeast diversity and species composition between them. PMID:24948924

  1. Yeast diversity associated to sediments and water from two Colombian artificial lakes.

    PubMed

    Silva-Bedoya, L M; Ramírez-Castrillón, M; Osorio-Cadavid, E

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, knowledge of the yeast and yeast-like fungi community is limited because most studies have focused on species with clinical importance. Sediments and water represent important habitats for the study of yeast diversity, especially for yeast species with industrial, biotechnological, and bioremediation potential. The main purpose of this study was to identify and compare the diversity of yeast species associated with sediment and water samples from two artificial lakes in Universidad del Valle (Cali-Colombia). Yeast samplings were performed from fifteen sediment samples and ten water samples. Grouping of similar isolates was initially based on colony and cell morphology, which was then complemented by micro/mini satellite primed PCR banding pattern analysis by using GTG5 as single primer. A representative isolate for each group established was chosen for D1/D2 domain sequencing and identification. In general, the following yeast species were identified: Candida albicans, Candida diversa, Candida glabrata, Candida pseudolambica, Cryptococcus podzolicus, Cryptococcus rajasthanensis, Cryptococcus laurentii, Williopsis saturnus, Hanseniaspora thailandica, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Torulaspora pretoriensis, Tricosporon jirovecii, Trichosporon laibachii and Yarrowia lypolitica. Two possible new species were also found, belonging to the Issatchenkia sp. and Bullera sp. genera. In conclusion, the lakes at the Universidad del Valle campus have significant differences in yeast diversity and species composition between them.

  2. The influence of Aster x salignus Willd. Invasion on the diversity of soil yeast communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushakova, A. M.; Kachalkin, A. V.; Chernov, I. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The annual dynamics of yeast communities were studied in the soddy-podzolic soil under the thickets of Aster x salignus Willd., one of the widespread invasive plant species in central Russia. Yeast groups in the soils under continuous aster thickets were found to differ greatly from the yeast communities in the soils under the adjacent indigenous meadow vegetation. In both biotopes the same species ( Candida vartiovaarae, Candida sake, and Cryptococcus terreus) are dominants. However, in the soils under indigenous grasses, eurybiontic yeasts Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, which almost never occur in the soil under aster, are widespread. In the soil under aster, the shares of other typical epiphytic and pedobiontic yeast fungi (ascomycetic species Wickerhamomyces aniomalus, Barnettozyma californica and basidiomycetic species Cystofilobasidium macerans, Guehomyces pullulans) significantly increase. Thus, the invasion of Aster x salignus has a clear effect on soil yeast complexes reducing their taxonomic and ecological diversity.

  3. Histone modification pattern evolution after yeast gene duplication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene duplication and subsequent functional divergence especially expression divergence have been widely considered as main sources for evolutionary innovations. Many studies evidenced that genetic regulatory network evolved rapidly shortly after gene duplication, thus leading to accelerated expression divergence and diversification. However, little is known whether epigenetic factors have mediated the evolution of expression regulation since gene duplication. In this study, we conducted detailed analyses on yeast histone modification (HM), the major epigenetics type in this organism, as well as other available functional genomics data to address this issue. Results Duplicate genes, on average, share more common HM-code patterns than random singleton pairs in their promoters and open reading frames (ORF). Though HM-code divergence between duplicates in both promoter and ORF regions increase with their sequence divergence, the HM-code in ORF region evolves slower than that in promoter region, probably owing to the functional constraints imposed on protein sequences. After excluding the confounding effect of sequence divergence (or evolutionary time), we found the evidence supporting the notion that in yeast, the HM-code may co-evolve with cis- and trans-regulatory factors. Moreover, we observed that deletion of some yeast HM-related enzymes increases the expression divergence between duplicate genes, yet the effect is lower than the case of transcription factor (TF) deletion or environmental stresses. Conclusions Our analyses demonstrate that after gene duplication, yeast histone modification profile between duplicates diverged with evolutionary time, similar to genetic regulatory elements. Moreover, we found the evidence of the co-evolution between genetic and epigenetic elements since gene duplication, together contributing to the expression divergence between duplicate genes. PMID:22776110

  4. Occurrence and diversity of marine yeasts in Antarctica environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Hua, Mingxia; Song, Chunli; Chi, Zhenming

    2012-03-01

    A total of 28 yeast strains were obtained from the sea sediment of Antarctica. According to the results of routine identification and molecular characterization, the strains belonged to species of Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii, Rhodotorula slooffiae, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Sporidiobolus salmonicolor, Aureobasidium pullulans, Mrakia frigida and Guehomyces pullulans, respectively. The Antarctica yeasts have wide potential applications in biotechnology, for some of them can produce β-galactosidase and killer toxins.

  5. Yeast metabolic chassis designs for diverse biotechnological products

    PubMed Central

    Jouhten, Paula; Boruta, Tomasz; Andrejev, Sergej; Pereira, Filipa; Rocha, Isabel; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of industrially important molecules for which microbial production routes have been experimentally demonstrated is rapidly increasing. The development of economically viable producer cells is, however, lagging behind, as it requires substantial engineering of the host metabolism. A chassis strain suitable for production of a range of molecules is therefore highly sought after but remains elusive. Here, we propose a genome-scale metabolic modeling approach to design chassis strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae – a widely used microbial cell factory. For a group of 29 products covering a broad range of biochemistry and applications, we identified modular metabolic engineering strategies for re-routing carbon flux towards the desired product. We find distinct product families with shared targets forming the basis for the corresponding chassis cells. The design strategies include overexpression targets that group products by similarity in precursor and cofactor requirements, as well as gene deletion strategies for growth-product coupling that lead to non-intuitive product groups. Our results reveal the extent and the nature of flux re-routing necessary for producing a diverse range of products in a widely used cell factory and provide blueprints for constructing pre-optimized chassis strains. PMID:27430744

  6. Mechanism of Gene Amplification via Yeast Autonomously Replicating Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification. PMID:25685838

  7. YGA: identifying distinct biological features between yeast gene sets.

    PubMed

    Chang, Darby Tien-Hao; Li, Wen-Si; Bai, Yi-Han; Wu, Wei-Sheng

    2013-04-10

    The advance of high-throughput experimental technologies generates many gene sets with different biological meanings, where many important insights can only be extracted by identifying the biological (regulatory/functional) features that are distinct between different gene sets (e.g. essential vs. non-essential genes, TATA box-containing vs. TATA box-less genes, induced vs. repressed genes under certain biological conditions). Although many servers have been developed to identify enriched features in a gene set, most of them were designed to analyze one gene set at a time but cannot compare two gene sets. Moreover, the features used in existing servers were mainly focused on functional annotations (GO terms), pathways, transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and/or protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In yeast, various important regulatory features, including promoter bendability, nucleosome occupancy, 5'-UTR length, and TF-gene regulation evidence, are available but have not been used in any enrichment analysis servers. This motivates us to develop the Yeast Genes Analyzer (YGA), a web server that simultaneously analyzes various biological (regulatory/functional) features of two gene sets and performs statistical tests to identify the distinct features between them. Many well-studied gene sets such as essential, stress-response, TATA box-containing and cell cycle genes were pre-compiled in YGA for users, if they have only one gene set, to compare with. In comparison with the existing enrichment analysis servers, YGA tests more comprehensive regulatory features (e.g. promoter bendability, nucleosome occupancy, 5'-UTR length, experimental evidence of TF-gene binding and TF-gene regulation) and functional features (e.g. PPI, GO terms, pathways and functional groups of genes, including essential/non-essential genes, stress-induced/-repressed genes, TATA box-containing/-less genes, occupied/depleted proximal-nucleosome genes and cell cycle genes). Furthermore, YGA

  8. Membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plants reveal diverse yeast and protist communities of potential significance in biofouling.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Belda, Ignacio; Gamella, Luis; Santos, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast community was studied in a municipal full-scale membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plant (MBR-WWTP). The unexpectedly high diversity of yeasts indicated that the activated sludge formed a suitable environment for them to proliferate, with cellular concentrations of 2.2 ± 0.8 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1). Sixteen species of seven genera were present in the biological reactor, with Ascomycetes being the most prevalent group (93%). Most isolates were able to grow in a synthetic wastewater medium, adhere to polyethylene surfaces, and develop biofilms of variable complexity. The relationship between yeast populations and the protists in the MBR-WWTP was also studied, revealing that some protist species preyed on and ingested yeasts. These results suggest that yeast populations may play a role in the food web of a WWTP and, to some extent, contribute to membrane biofouling in MBR systems. PMID:25588128

  9. Membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plants reveal diverse yeast and protist communities of potential significance in biofouling.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Belda, Ignacio; Gamella, Luis; Santos, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast community was studied in a municipal full-scale membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plant (MBR-WWTP). The unexpectedly high diversity of yeasts indicated that the activated sludge formed a suitable environment for them to proliferate, with cellular concentrations of 2.2 ± 0.8 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1). Sixteen species of seven genera were present in the biological reactor, with Ascomycetes being the most prevalent group (93%). Most isolates were able to grow in a synthetic wastewater medium, adhere to polyethylene surfaces, and develop biofilms of variable complexity. The relationship between yeast populations and the protists in the MBR-WWTP was also studied, revealing that some protist species preyed on and ingested yeasts. These results suggest that yeast populations may play a role in the food web of a WWTP and, to some extent, contribute to membrane biofouling in MBR systems.

  10. Local climatic conditions constrain soil yeast diversity patterns in Mediterranean forests, woodlands and scrub biome.

    PubMed

    Yurkov, Andrey M; Röhl, Oliver; Pontes, Ana; Carvalho, Cláudia; Maldonado, Cristina; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-02-01

    Soil yeasts represent a poorly known fraction of the soil microbiome due to limited ecological surveys. Here, we provide the first comprehensive inventory of cultivable soil yeasts in a Mediterranean ecosystem, which is the leading biodiversity hotspot for vascular plants and vertebrates in Europe. We isolated and identified soil yeasts from forested sites of Serra da Arrábida Natural Park (Portugal), representing the Mediterranean forests, woodlands and scrub biome. Both cultivation experiments and the subsequent species richness estimations suggest the highest species richness values reported to date, resulting in a total of 57 and 80 yeast taxa, respectively. These values far exceed those reported for other forest soils in Europe. Furthermore, we assessed the response of yeast diversity to microclimatic environmental factors in biotopes composed of the same plant species but showing a gradual change from humid broadleaf forests to dry maquis. We observed that forest properties constrained by precipitation level had strong impact on yeast diversity and on community structure and lower precipitation resulted in an increased number of rare species and decreased evenness values. In conclusion, the structure of soil yeast communities mirrors the environmental factors that affect aboveground phytocenoses, aboveground biomass and plant projective cover.

  11. The diversity of yeasts associated with grapes and musts of the Strekov winegrowing region, Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Nemcová, Kornélia; Breierová, Emília; Vadkertiová, Renáta; Molnárová, Jana

    2015-03-01

    Many different yeast species have been isolated from grapes and musts worldwide. The diversity and frequency of yeasts depend on a number of factors such as the grape variety, the physical damage of the grapes, the weather conditions and the chemical composition of must. A total of 366 isolates were associated with the three grape cultivars: Blue Frankish, Green Veltliner and Sauvignon blanc over four consecutive years. Yeast cultures were isolated from the grapes and from the fermenting musts after the first and seventh days. The ascomycetous yeasts of the genera Aureobasidium, Candida, Hanseniaspora, Metschnikowia, Pichia, Saccharomyces and Saccharomycopsis together with basidiomycetous yeasts of the genera Cryptococcus, Dioszegia, Filobasidium, Rhodotorula and Sporidiobolus were associated with the three grape varieties. Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia kluyveri, Pichia kudriavzevii and Sporidiobolus pararoseus were found on the berries in significant amounts. P. kluyveri and P. kudriavzevii were more associated with the damaged grapes, whereas Sp. pararoseus with intact ones. H. uvarum and M. pulcherrima were present on both types of grapes almost equally. The yeast composition and quantitative representation of yeast species varied over the grape varieties and the years examined. Although the basidiomycetous species formed a significant proportion of the yeast population in some individual grape variety/year combinations, the ascomycetous species were dominant. PMID:25253264

  12. Yeast Communities of Diverse Drosophila Species: Comparison of Two Symbiont Groups in the Same Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Jonathan A.; Kopp, Artyom

    2012-01-01

    The combination of ecological diversity with genetic and experimental tractability makes Drosophila a powerful model for the study of animal-associated microbial communities. Despite the known importance of yeasts in Drosophila physiology, behavior, and fitness, most recent work has focused on Drosophila-bacterial interactions. In order to get a more complete understanding of the Drosophila microbiome, we characterized the yeast communities associated with different Drosophila species collected around the world. We focused on the phylum Ascomycota because it constitutes the vast majority of the Drosophila-associated yeasts. Our sampling strategy allowed us to compare the distribution and structure of the yeast and bacterial communities in the same host populations. We show that yeast communities are dominated by a small number of abundant taxa, that the same yeast lineages are associated with different host species and populations, and that host diet has a greater effect than host species on yeast community composition. These patterns closely parallel those observed in Drosophila bacterial communities. However, we do not detect a significant correlation between the yeast and bacterial communities of the same host populations. Comparative analysis of different symbiont groups provides a more comprehensive picture of host-microbe interactions. Future work on the role of symbiont communities in animal physiology, ecological adaptation, and evolution would benefit from a similarly holistic approach. PMID:22885750

  13. Super-paramagnetic clustering of yeast gene expression profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getz, G.; Levine, E.; Domany, E.; Zhang, M. Q.

    2000-04-01

    High-density DNA arrays, used to monitor gene expression at a genomic scale, have produced vast amounts of information which require the development of efficient computational methods to analyze them. The important first step is to extract the fundamental patterns of gene expression inherent in the data. This paper describes the application of a novel clustering algorithm, super-paramagnetic clustering (SPC) to analysis of gene expression profiles that were generated recently during a study of the yeast cell cycle. SPC was used to organize genes into biologically relevant clusters that are suggestive for their co-regulation. Some of the advantages of SPC are its robustness against noise and initialization, a clear signature of cluster formation and splitting, and an unsupervised self-organized determination of the number of clusters at each resolution. Our analysis revealed interesting correlated behavior of several groups of genes which has not been previously identified.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA size diversity in the Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts.

    PubMed

    McArthur, C R; Clark-Walker, G D

    1983-03-01

    Restriction endonuclease digestion of mitocondrial DNAs from the nine Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts have revealed that three separate pairs of species, namely D. bruxellensis/B. lambicus; B. abstinens/B. custersii and B. anomalus/B. clausenii have identical genomes. This observation suggests that such analysis of mtDNA could be an important procedure for yeast taxonomy. Sizes of mtDNAs showed a graded range from the 28 kbp molecule in B. custersianus to the 100 kbp molecule in B. custersii. Furthermore, although the mtDNAs from D. intermedia (72 kbp) and D. bruxellensis (82 kbp) differ in size by 10 kbp the restriction enzyme fragmentation patterns are generally similar. The differences are reminiscent of mtDNA polymorphisms found in strains of Saccharomyces cervisiae which result from insertions or deletions, chiefly within genic sequences. By analogy, the two Dekkera species may, on further analysis, be revealed as variants of a single species. PMID:24173115

  15. Diversity and regulation of plant Ca2+ pumps: insights from expression in yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sze, H.; Liang, F.; Hwang, I.; Curran, A. C.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The spatial and temporal regulation of calcium concentration in plant cells depends on the coordinate activities of channels and active transporters located on different organelles and membranes. Several Ca2+ pumps have been identified and characterized by functional expression of plant genes in a yeast mutant (K616). This expression system has opened the way to a genetic and biochemical characterization of the regulatory and catalytic features of diverse Ca2+ pumps. Plant Ca(2+)-ATPases fall into two major types: AtECA1 represents one of four or more members of the type IIA (ER-type) Ca(2+)-ATPases in Arabidopsis, and AtACA2 is one of seven or more members of the type IIB (PM-type) Ca(2+)-ATPases that are regulated by a novel amino terminal domain. Type IIB pumps are widely distributed on membranes, including the PM (plasma membrane), vacuole, and ER (endoplasmic reticulum). The regulatory domain serves multiple functions, including autoinhibition, calmodulin binding, and sites for modification by phosphorylation. This domain, however, is considerably diverse among several type IIB ATPases, suggesting that the pumps are differentially regulated. Understanding of Ca2+ transporters at the molecular level is providing insights into their roles in signaling networks and in regulating fundamental processes of cell biology.

  16. A Survey of Essential Gene Function in the Yeast Cell Division Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lisa; Castillo, Lourdes Peña; Mnaimneh, Sanie

    2006-01-01

    Mutations impacting specific stages of cell growth and division have provided a foundation for dissecting mechanisms that underlie cell cycle progression. We have undertaken an objective examination of the yeast cell cycle through flow cytometric analysis of DNA content in TetO7 promoter mutant strains representing 75% of all essential yeast genes. More than 65% of the strains displayed specific alterations in DNA content, suggesting that reduced function of an essential gene in most cases impairs progression through a specific stage of the cell cycle. Because of the large number of essential genes required for protein biosynthesis, G1 accumulation was the most common phenotype observed in our analysis. In contrast, relatively few mutants displayed S-phase delay, and most of these were defective in genes required for DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism. G2 accumulation appeared to arise from a variety of defects. In addition to providing a global view of the diversity of essential cellular processes that influence cell cycle progression, these data also provided predictions regarding the functions of individual genes: we identified four new genes involved in protein trafficking (NUS1, PHS1, PGA2, PGA3), and we found that CSE1 and SMC4 are important for DNA replication. PMID:16943325

  17. Cycloheximide resistance in yeast: the gene and its protein.

    PubMed Central

    Käufer, N F; Fried, H M; Schwindinger, W F; Jasin, M; Warner, J R

    1983-01-01

    Mutations in the yeast gene CYH2 can lead to resistance to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of eukaryotic protein synthesis. The gene product of CYH2 is ribosomal protein L29, a component of the 60S ribosomal subunit. We have cloned the wild-type and resistance alleles of CYH2 and determined their nucleotide sequence. Transcription of CYH2 appears to initiate and terminate at multiple sites, as judged by S1 nuclease analysis. The gene is transcribed into an RNA molecule of about 1082 nucleotides, containing an intervening sequence of 510 nucleotides. The splice junction of the intron resides within a codon near the 5' end of the gene. In confirmation of peptide analysis by Stocklein et al. (1) we find that resistance to cycloheximide is due to a transversion mutation resulting in the replacement of a glutamine by glutamic acid in position 37 of L29. Images PMID:6304624

  18. Influence of abiotic variables on culturable yeast diversity in two distinct Alpine glaciers.

    PubMed

    Turchetti, Benedetta; Goretti, Marta; Branda, Eva; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; D'Agata, Carlo; Smiraglia, Claudio; Onofri, Andrea; Buzzini, Pietro

    2013-11-01

    The influence of some abiotic variables (pH, dry weight, organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous) on culturable yeast diversity in two distinct, but adjacent Alpine glaciers (Glacier du Géant, France, and Miage Glacier, Italy) was investigated. In all, 682 yeast strains were isolated and identified by D1/D2 and ITS sequencing as belonging to species of the genera Aureobasidium, Candida, Bulleromyces, Cryptococcus, Cystofilobasidium, Dioszegia, Guehomyces, Holtermanniella, Leucosporidiella, Mrakia, Mrakiella, Rhodotorula, Sporidiobolus, Sporobolomyces and Udenyomyces. Overall, the most represented genera were Cryptococcus (55% of isolates), Rhodotorula (17%) and Mrakia (10%). About 10% of strains, presumably belonging to new species (yet to be described), were preliminarily identified at the genus level. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous are apparently mostly related to culturable yeast abundance and diversity. In this context, the hypothesis that the frequency of isolation of certain species may be correlated with some organic nutrients (with special emphasis for phosphorous) is discussed.

  19. Black yeast diversity on creosoted railway sleepers changes with ambient climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gümral, Ramazan; Tümgör, Ayşegül; Saraçlı, Mehmet Ali; Yıldıran, Şinasi Taner; Ilkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2014-11-01

    The environmental isolation of opportunistic pathogenic black yeasts, which are responsible for a wide spectrum of human infections, is essential to understanding the ecology of clinical fungi. Extreme outdoor environments polluted with aromatic hydrocarbons support the growth of black yeasts in unlikely places, such as railway sleepers. However, there are limited data concerning the diversity of these fungi growing on polluted railway sleepers. In this investigation, we examined 845 railway sleeper samples, obtained from 11 Turkish cities representing altitudes from 25 to 1,893 m, and inoculated the samples onto mycological media for the isolation of black yeasts. Ninety-four samples (11.1 %) yielded positive results for black yeast, with creosoted oak sleepers having a significantly higher number of isolates than concrete sleepers (p < 0.05). Identification based on the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer region revealed the highest prevalence of Exophiala phaeomuriformis, followed by Exophiala dermatitidis, Exophiala heteromorpha, Exophiala xenobiotica, and Exophiala crusticola. This study revealed that railway sleepers harboring black yeasts were predominantly (>75 %) populated with thermophilic species. We observed that altitude might have a significant effect on species diversity. Briefly, E. phaeomuriformis exhibited growth over a wide altitude range, from 30 to 1,893 m. In contrast, E. dermatitidis had a remarkable aversion to low altitudes and exhibited maximum growth at 1,285 m. In conclusion, we speculate that one can predict what species will be found on railway sleepers and their probability and that species diversity primarily depends on sleeper type and altitude height. We believe that this study can contribute new insights into the ecology of black yeasts on railway sleepers and the railway factors that influence their diversity. PMID:25027275

  20. Black yeast diversity on creosoted railway sleepers changes with ambient climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gümral, Ramazan; Tümgör, Ayşegül; Saraçlı, Mehmet Ali; Yıldıran, Şinasi Taner; Ilkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2014-11-01

    The environmental isolation of opportunistic pathogenic black yeasts, which are responsible for a wide spectrum of human infections, is essential to understanding the ecology of clinical fungi. Extreme outdoor environments polluted with aromatic hydrocarbons support the growth of black yeasts in unlikely places, such as railway sleepers. However, there are limited data concerning the diversity of these fungi growing on polluted railway sleepers. In this investigation, we examined 845 railway sleeper samples, obtained from 11 Turkish cities representing altitudes from 25 to 1,893 m, and inoculated the samples onto mycological media for the isolation of black yeasts. Ninety-four samples (11.1 %) yielded positive results for black yeast, with creosoted oak sleepers having a significantly higher number of isolates than concrete sleepers (p < 0.05). Identification based on the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer region revealed the highest prevalence of Exophiala phaeomuriformis, followed by Exophiala dermatitidis, Exophiala heteromorpha, Exophiala xenobiotica, and Exophiala crusticola. This study revealed that railway sleepers harboring black yeasts were predominantly (>75 %) populated with thermophilic species. We observed that altitude might have a significant effect on species diversity. Briefly, E. phaeomuriformis exhibited growth over a wide altitude range, from 30 to 1,893 m. In contrast, E. dermatitidis had a remarkable aversion to low altitudes and exhibited maximum growth at 1,285 m. In conclusion, we speculate that one can predict what species will be found on railway sleepers and their probability and that species diversity primarily depends on sleeper type and altitude height. We believe that this study can contribute new insights into the ecology of black yeasts on railway sleepers and the railway factors that influence their diversity.

  1. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of autochthonous cider yeasts in a cellar from Asturias.

    PubMed

    Pando Bedriñana, R; Querol Simón, A; Suárez Valles, B

    2010-06-01

    This paper analyses yeast diversity and dynamics during the production of Asturian cider. Yeasts were isolated from apple juice and at different stages of fermentation in a cellar in Villaviciosa during two Asturian cider-apple harvests. The species identified by ITS-RFLP corresponded to Hanseniaspora valbyensis, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii, Candida parapsilosis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus/Saccharomyces pastorianus/Saccharomyces kudriavzevii/Saccharomyces mikatae. The species C. parapsilosis is reported here for the first time in cider. The analysis of Saccharomyces mtDNA patterns showed great diversity, sequential substitution and the presence of a small number of yeast patterns (up to 8), present in both harvests. Killer (patterns nos. 22' and 47), sensitive (patterns nos. 12, 15, 33 and 61) and neutral phenotypes were found among the S. cerevisiae isolates. The detection of beta-glucosidase activity, with arbutin as the sole carbon source, allowed two S. cerevisiae strains (patterns nos. 3' and 19') to be differentiated by means of this enzymatic activity. Yeast strains producing the killer toxin or with beta-glucosidase activity are reported for the first time in autochthonous cider yeasts.

  2. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of autochthonous cider yeasts in a cellar from Asturias.

    PubMed

    Pando Bedriñana, R; Querol Simón, A; Suárez Valles, B

    2010-06-01

    This paper analyses yeast diversity and dynamics during the production of Asturian cider. Yeasts were isolated from apple juice and at different stages of fermentation in a cellar in Villaviciosa during two Asturian cider-apple harvests. The species identified by ITS-RFLP corresponded to Hanseniaspora valbyensis, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii, Candida parapsilosis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus/Saccharomyces pastorianus/Saccharomyces kudriavzevii/Saccharomyces mikatae. The species C. parapsilosis is reported here for the first time in cider. The analysis of Saccharomyces mtDNA patterns showed great diversity, sequential substitution and the presence of a small number of yeast patterns (up to 8), present in both harvests. Killer (patterns nos. 22' and 47), sensitive (patterns nos. 12, 15, 33 and 61) and neutral phenotypes were found among the S. cerevisiae isolates. The detection of beta-glucosidase activity, with arbutin as the sole carbon source, allowed two S. cerevisiae strains (patterns nos. 3' and 19') to be differentiated by means of this enzymatic activity. Yeast strains producing the killer toxin or with beta-glucosidase activity are reported for the first time in autochthonous cider yeasts. PMID:20417399

  3. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype. PMID:26898953

  4. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G.; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F.; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A.

    2016-01-01

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype. PMID:26898953

  5. Genetic diversity in yeast assessed with whole-genome oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed Central

    Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Castillo-Davis, Cristian I; Oshiro, Guy; Liang, David; Richards, Daniel R; Zhou, Yingyao; Hartl, Daniel L

    2003-01-01

    The availability of a complete genome sequence allows the detailed study of intraspecies variability. Here we use high-density oligonucleotide arrays to discover 11,115 single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) existing in one or more of 14 different yeast strains. We use these SFPs to define regions of genetic identity between common laboratory strains of yeast. We assess the genome-wide distribution of genetic variation on the basis of this yeast population. We find that genome variability is biased toward the ends of chromosomes and is more likely to be found in genes with roles in fermentation or in transport. This subtelomeric bias may arise through recombination between nonhomologous sequences because full-gene deletions are more common in these regions than in more central regions of the chromosome. PMID:12586698

  6. AnGeLi: A Tool for the Analysis of Gene Lists from Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Danny A; Schubert, Falk; Dey, Shoumit; Okoniewski, Michal; Smith, Graeme C; Khadayate, Sanjay; Pancaldi, Vera; Wood, Valerie; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide assays and screens typically result in large lists of genes or proteins. Enrichments of functional or other biological properties within such lists can provide valuable insights and testable hypotheses. To systematically detect these enrichments can be challenging and time-consuming, because relevant data to compare against query gene lists are spread over many different sources. We have developed AnGeLi (Analysis of Gene Lists), an intuitive, integrated web-tool for comprehensive and customized interrogation of gene lists from the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. AnGeLi searches for significant enrichments among multiple qualitative and quantitative information sources, including gene and phenotype ontologies, genetic and protein interactions, numerous features of genes, transcripts, translation, and proteins such as copy numbers, chromosomal positions, genetic diversity, RNA polymerase II and ribosome occupancy, localization, conservation, half-lives, domains, and molecular weight among others, as well as diverse sets of genes that are co-regulated or lead to the same phenotypes when mutated. AnGeLi uses robust statistics which can be tailored to specific needs. It also provides the option to upload user-defined gene sets to compare against the query list. Through an integrated data submission form, AnGeLi encourages the community to contribute additional curated gene lists to further increase the usefulness of this resource and to get the most from the ever increasing large-scale experiments. AnGeLi offers a rigorous yet flexible statistical analysis platform for rich insights into functional enrichments and biological context for query gene lists, thus providing a powerful exploratory tool through which S. pombe researchers can uncover fresh perspectives and unexpected connections from genomic data. AnGeLi is freely available at: www.bahlerlab.info/AnGeLi. PMID:26635866

  7. AnGeLi: A Tool for the Analysis of Gene Lists from Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Danny A; Schubert, Falk; Dey, Shoumit; Okoniewski, Michal; Smith, Graeme C; Khadayate, Sanjay; Pancaldi, Vera; Wood, Valerie; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide assays and screens typically result in large lists of genes or proteins. Enrichments of functional or other biological properties within such lists can provide valuable insights and testable hypotheses. To systematically detect these enrichments can be challenging and time-consuming, because relevant data to compare against query gene lists are spread over many different sources. We have developed AnGeLi (Analysis of Gene Lists), an intuitive, integrated web-tool for comprehensive and customized interrogation of gene lists from the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. AnGeLi searches for significant enrichments among multiple qualitative and quantitative information sources, including gene and phenotype ontologies, genetic and protein interactions, numerous features of genes, transcripts, translation, and proteins such as copy numbers, chromosomal positions, genetic diversity, RNA polymerase II and ribosome occupancy, localization, conservation, half-lives, domains, and molecular weight among others, as well as diverse sets of genes that are co-regulated or lead to the same phenotypes when mutated. AnGeLi uses robust statistics which can be tailored to specific needs. It also provides the option to upload user-defined gene sets to compare against the query list. Through an integrated data submission form, AnGeLi encourages the community to contribute additional curated gene lists to further increase the usefulness of this resource and to get the most from the ever increasing large-scale experiments. AnGeLi offers a rigorous yet flexible statistical analysis platform for rich insights into functional enrichments and biological context for query gene lists, thus providing a powerful exploratory tool through which S. pombe researchers can uncover fresh perspectives and unexpected connections from genomic data. AnGeLi is freely available at: www.bahlerlab.info/AnGeLi.

  8. Primers for fourteen protein-coding genes and the deep phylogeny of the true yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Koufopanou, Vassiliki; Swire, Jonathan; Lomas, Susan; Burt, Austin

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomycetales or ‘true yeasts’ consist of more than 800 described species, including many of scientific, medical and commercial importance. Considerable progress has been made in determining the phylogenetic relationships of these species, largely based on rDNA sequences, but many nodes for early-diverging lineages cannot be resolved with rDNA alone. rDNA is also not ideal for delineating recently diverged species. From published full-genome sequence data, we have identified 14 regions of protein-coding genes that can be PCR-amplified in a large proportion of a diverse collection of 25 yeast species using degenerate primers. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences thus obtained reveals a well-resolved phylogeny of the Saccharomycetales with many branches having high bootstrap support. Analysis of published sequences from the Saccharomyces paradoxus species complex shows that these protein-coding gene fragments are also informative about genealogical relationships amongst closely related strains. Our set of protein-coding gene fragments is therefore suitable for analysing both ancient and recent evolutionary relationships amongst yeasts. PMID:23786589

  9. A Genetic Screen for Fission Yeast Gene Deletion Mutants Exhibiting Hypersensitivity to Latrunculin A

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Farzad; Michalski, Dorothy; Karagiannis, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast cells treated with low doses of the actin depolymerizing drug, latrunculin A (LatA), delay entry into mitosis via a mechanism that is dependent on both the Clp1p and Rad24p proteins. During this delay, cells remain in a cytokinesis-competent state that is characterized by continuous repair and/or reestablishment of the actomyosin ring. In this manner, cells ensure the faithful completion of the preceding cytokinesis in response to perturbation of the cell division machinery. To uncover other genes with a role in this response, or simply genes with roles in adapting to LatA-induced stress, we carried out a genome-wide screen and identified a group of 38 gene deletion mutants that are hyper-sensitive to the drug. As expected, we found genes affecting cytokinesis and/or the actin cytoskeleton within this set (ain1, acp2, imp2). We also identified genes with roles in histone modification (tra1, ngg1), intracellular transport (apl5, aps3), and glucose-mediated signaling (git3, git5, git11, pka1, cgs2). Importantly, while the identified gene deletion mutants are prone to cytokinesis failure in the presence of LatA, they are nevertheless fully capable of cell division in the absence of the drug. These results indicate that fission yeast cells make use of a diverse set of regulatory modules to counter abnormal cytoskeletal perturbations, and furthermore, that these modules act redundantly to ensure cell survival and proliferation. PMID:27466272

  10. A yeast functional screen predicts new candidate ALS disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Couthouis, Julien; Hart, Michael P.; Shorter, James; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Erion, Renske; Oristano, Rachel; Liu, Annie X.; Ramos, Daniel; Jethava, Niti; Hosangadi, Divya; Epstein, James; Chiang, Ashley; Diaz, Zamia; Nakaya, Tadashi; Ibrahim, Fadia; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Solski, Jennifer A.; Williams, Kelly L.; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Ingre, Caroline; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Clay-Falcone, Dana; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Greene, Robert; Kalb, Robert G.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ludolph, Albert; Robberecht, Wim; Andersen, Peter M.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Blair, Ian P.; King, Oliver D.; Bonini, Nancy M.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Rademakers, Rosa; Mourelatos, Zissimos; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating and universally fatal neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in two related RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, that harbor prion-like domains, cause some forms of ALS. There are at least 213 human proteins harboring RNA recognition motifs, including FUS and TDP-43, raising the possibility that additional RNA-binding proteins might contribute to ALS pathogenesis. We performed a systematic survey of these proteins to find additional candidates similar to TDP-43 and FUS, followed by bioinformatics to predict prion-like domains in a subset of them. We sequenced one of these genes, TAF15, in patients with ALS and identified missense variants, which were absent in a large number of healthy controls. These disease-associated variants of TAF15 caused formation of cytoplasmic foci when expressed in primary cultures of spinal cord neurons. Very similar to TDP-43 and FUS, TAF15 aggregated in vitro and conferred neurodegeneration in Drosophila, with the ALS-linked variants having a more severe effect than wild type. Immunohistochemistry of postmortem spinal cord tissue revealed mislocalization of TAF15 in motor neurons of patients with ALS. We propose that aggregation-prone RNA-binding proteins might contribute very broadly to ALS pathogenesis and the genes identified in our yeast functional screen, coupled with prion-like domain prediction analysis, now provide a powerful resource to facilitate ALS disease gene discovery. PMID:22065782

  11. Interpathway regulation of the TRP4 gene of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Braus, G; Mösch, H U; Vogel, K; Hinnen, A; Hütter, R

    1989-01-01

    Two regulatory proteins, PHO2 and the general control regulator GCN4, bind in vitro to the promoter of the tryptophan biosynthetic TRP4 gene; the TRP4 gene product catalyses the phosphoribosylation of anthranilate. PHO2 binds specifically to the TRP4 promoter, but does not bind to any other TRP promoter. PHO2 and GCN4 proteins bind in a mutually exclusive manner to the same sequence, UAS1, one of two GCN4 binding sites in the TRP4 promoter. UAS1 is the major site for GCN4-dependent TRP4 activation. The second GCN4 binding site, UAS2, interacts with GCN4 alone. PHO2 binding interferes with the general control response of TRP4 under low phosphate conditions and simultaneous amino acid starvation and thus the PHO2 regulatory protein connects phosphate metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis in yeast. The GCN4 protein mediates the response of the transcriptional apparatus to the environmental signal 'amino acid limitation', while PHO2 seems to be the phosphate sensor that adjusts the response to the availability of phosphate precursors. Images PMID:2656261

  12. Application of the FLP/FRT system for conditional gene deletion in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang-Nim; Masison, Daniel; Eisenberg, Evan; Greene, Lois E

    2011-09-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model organism to study the function of proteins. One of the many advantages of yeast is the many genetic tools available to manipulate gene expression, but there are still limitations. To complement the many methods used to control gene expression in yeast, we have established a conditional gene deletion system by using the FLP/FRT system on yeast vectors to conditionally delete specific yeast genes. Expression of Flp recombinase, which is under the control of the GAL1 promoter, was induced by galactose, which in turn excised FRT sites flanked genes. The efficacy of this system was examined using the FRT site-flanked genes HSP104, URA3 and GFP. The pre-excision frequency of this system, which might be caused by the basal activity of the GAL1 promoter or by spontaneous recombination between FRT sites, was detected ca. 2% under the non-selecting condition. After inducing expression of Flp recombinase, the deletion efficiency achieved ca. 96% of cells in a population within 9 h. After conditional deletion of the specific gene, protein degradation and cell division then diluted out protein that was expressed from this gene prior to its excision. Most importantly, the specific protein to be deleted could be expressed under its own promoter, so that endogenous levels of protein expression were maintained prior to excision by the Flp recombinase. Therefore, this system provides a useful tool for the conditional deletion of genes in yeast.

  13. A yeast transcription system for the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Keulen, H; Thomas, D Y

    1982-01-01

    A cell-free extract of yeast nuclei that can specifically transcribe cloned yeast 5S rRNA genes has been developed. Optima for transcription of 5S rDNA were determined and conditions of extract preparation leading to reproducible activities and specificities established. The major in vitro product has the same size and oligonucleotide composition as in vivo 5S rRNA. The in vitro transcription extract does not transcribe yeast tRNA genes. The extract does increase the transcription of tRNA genes packaged in chromatin. Images PMID:7145700

  14. Matrix factorization-based data fusion for gene function prediction in baker's yeast and slime mold.

    PubMed

    Zitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective methods for the characterization of gene functions that are able to combine diverse data sources in a sound and easily-extendible way is an important goal in computational biology. We have previously developed a general matrix factorization-based data fusion approach for gene function prediction. In this manuscript, we show that this data fusion approach can be applied to gene function prediction and that it can fuse various heterogeneous data sources, such as gene expression profiles, known protein annotations, interaction and literature data. The fusion is achieved by simultaneous matrix tri-factorization that shares matrix factors between sources. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by evaluating its performance on predicting ontological annotations in slime mold D. discoideum and on recognizing proteins of baker's yeast S. cerevisiae that participate in the ribosome or are located in the cell membrane. Our approach achieves predictive performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art kernel-based data fusion, but requires fewer data preprocessing steps.

  15. Matrix factorization-based data fusion for gene function prediction in baker's yeast and slime mold.

    PubMed

    Zitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective methods for the characterization of gene functions that are able to combine diverse data sources in a sound and easily-extendible way is an important goal in computational biology. We have previously developed a general matrix factorization-based data fusion approach for gene function prediction. In this manuscript, we show that this data fusion approach can be applied to gene function prediction and that it can fuse various heterogeneous data sources, such as gene expression profiles, known protein annotations, interaction and literature data. The fusion is achieved by simultaneous matrix tri-factorization that shares matrix factors between sources. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by evaluating its performance on predicting ontological annotations in slime mold D. discoideum and on recognizing proteins of baker's yeast S. cerevisiae that participate in the ribosome or are located in the cell membrane. Our approach achieves predictive performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art kernel-based data fusion, but requires fewer data preprocessing steps. PMID:24297565

  16. Genomic diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts associated with alcoholic fermentation of bacanora produced by artisanal methods.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Ainza, M L; Zamora-Quiñonez, K A; Moreno-Ibarra, G M; Acedo-Félix, E

    2015-03-01

    Bacanora is a spirituous beverage elaborated with Agave angustifolia Haw in an artisanal process. Natural fermentation is mostly performed with native yeasts and bacteria. In this study, 228 strains of yeast like Saccharomyces were isolated from the natural alcoholic fermentation on the production of bacanora. Restriction analysis of the amplified region ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 of the ribosomal DNA genes (RFLPr) were used to confirm the genus, and 182 strains were identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These strains displayed high genomic variability in their chromosomes profiles by karyotyping. Electrophoretic profiles of the strains evaluated showed a large number of chromosomes the size of which ranged between 225 and 2200 kpb approximately.

  17. Genomic diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts associated with alcoholic fermentation of bacanora produced by artisanal methods.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Ainza, M L; Zamora-Quiñonez, K A; Moreno-Ibarra, G M; Acedo-Félix, E

    2015-03-01

    Bacanora is a spirituous beverage elaborated with Agave angustifolia Haw in an artisanal process. Natural fermentation is mostly performed with native yeasts and bacteria. In this study, 228 strains of yeast like Saccharomyces were isolated from the natural alcoholic fermentation on the production of bacanora. Restriction analysis of the amplified region ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 of the ribosomal DNA genes (RFLPr) were used to confirm the genus, and 182 strains were identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These strains displayed high genomic variability in their chromosomes profiles by karyotyping. Electrophoretic profiles of the strains evaluated showed a large number of chromosomes the size of which ranged between 225 and 2200 kpb approximately. PMID:25561061

  18. Hsp40 function in yeast prion propagation: Amyloid diversity necessitates chaperone functional complexity.

    PubMed

    Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2015-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based elements, most of which are formed of amyloid aggregates that rely on the action of molecular chaperones for transmission to progeny. Prions can form distinct amyloid structures, known as 'strains' in mammalian systems, that dictate both pathological progression and cross-species infection barriers. In yeast these same amyloid structural polymorphisms, called 'variants', dictate the intensity of prion-associated phenotypes and stability in mitosis. We recently reported that [PSI(+)] prion variants differ in the fundamental domain requirements for one chaperone, the Hsp40/J-protein Sis1, which are mutually exclusive between 2 different yeast prions, demonstrating a functional plurality for Sis1. Here we extend that analysis to incorporate additional data that collectively support the hypothesis that Sis1 has multiple functional roles that can be accomplished by distinct sets of domains. These functions are differentially required by distinct prions and prion variants. We also present new data regarding Hsp104-mediated prion elimination and show that some Sis1 functions, but not all, are conserved in the human homolog Hdj1/DNAJB1. Importantly, of the 10 amyloid-based prions indentified to date in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chaperone requirements of only 4 are known, leaving a great diversity of amyloid structures, and likely modes of amyloid-chaperone interaction, largely unexplored.

  19. The two yeast histone H2A genes encode similar protein subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Choe, J; Kolodrubetz, D; Grunstein, M

    1982-01-01

    The sequences of the two histones H2A genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined. These genes encode two histone H2A subtypes which are 131 amino acids in length but differ at 2 amino acid positions: an Ala leads to Thr and a Thr leads to Ala change at positions 124 and 125. Thus, the two histone H2A subtypes have identical amino acid compositions. The coding regions of the two H2A genes are homologous at 369 of 393 bases (94%), with all but 2 of the 24 changes being silent. There is only 30% homology in the 5' flanking sequences of the two H2A genes. Like other eukaryotic histone genes, the yeast H2A genes are not interrupted by intervening sequences. When the yeast H2A histones are compared to those from other eukaryotes, there is at least 80% homology in amino acid sequence. PMID:7041122

  20. TORC1 signaling inhibition by rapamycin and caffeine affect lifespan, global gene expression, and cell proliferation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Rallis, Charalampos; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg

    2013-08-01

    Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is implicated in growth control and aging from yeast to humans. Fission yeast is emerging as a popular model organism to study TOR signaling, although rapamycin has been thought to not affect cell growth in this organism. Here, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin and caffeine, singly and combined, on multiple cellular processes in fission yeast. The two drugs led to diverse and specific phenotypes that depended on TORC1 inhibition, including prolonged chronological lifespan, inhibition of global translation, inhibition of cell growth and division, and reprograming of global gene expression mimicking nitrogen starvation. Rapamycin and caffeine differentially affected these various TORC1-dependent processes. Combined drug treatment augmented most phenotypes and effectively blocked cell growth. Rapamycin showed a much more subtle effect on global translation than did caffeine, while both drugs were effective in prolonging chronological lifespan. Rapamycin and caffeine did not affect the lifespan via the pH of the growth media. Rapamycin prolonged the lifespan of nongrowing cells only when applied during the growth phase but not when applied after cells had stopped proliferation. The doses of rapamycin and caffeine strongly correlated with growth inhibition and with lifespan extension. This comprehensive analysis will inform future studies into TORC1 function and cellular aging in fission yeast and beyond. PMID:23551936

  1. Modeling Yeast Organelle Membranes and How Lipid Diversity Influences Bilayer Properties.

    PubMed

    Monje-Galvan, Viviana; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2015-11-17

    Membrane lipids are important for the health and proper function of cell membranes. We have improved computational membrane models for specific organelles in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the effect of lipid diversity on membrane structure and dynamics. Previous molecular dynamics simulations were performed by Jo et al. [(2009) Biophys J. 97, 50-58] on yeast membrane models having six lipid types with compositions averaged between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM). We incorporated ergosterol, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol lipids in our models to better describe the unique composition of the PM, ER, and trans-Golgi network (TGN) bilayers of yeast. Our results describe membrane structure based on order parameters (SCD), electron density profiles (EDPs), and lipid packing. The average surface area per lipid decreased from 63.8 ± 0.4 Å(2) in the ER to 47.1 ± 0.3 Å(2) in the PM, while the compressibility modulus (KA) varied in the opposite direction. The high SCD values for the PM lipids indicated a more ordered bilayer core, while the corresponding lipids in the ER and TGN models had lower parameters by a factor of at least 0.7. The hydrophobic core thickness (2DC) as estimated from EDPs is the thickest for PM, which is in agreement with estimates of hydrophobic regions of transmembrane proteins from the Orientation of Proteins in Membranes database. Our results show the importance of lipid diversity and composition on a bilayer's structural and mechanical properties, which in turn influences interactions with the proteins and membrane-bound molecules.

  2. The yeast Starmerella bacillaris (synonym Candida zemplinina) shows high genetic diversity in winemaking environments.

    PubMed

    Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; Juquin, Elodie; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Renault, Philippe; Laizet, Yec'han; Salin, Franck; Alexandre, Hervé; Capozzi, Vittorio; Cocolin, Luca; Colonna-Ceccaldi, Benoit; Englezos, Vasileios; Girard, Patrick; Gonzalez, Beatriz; Lucas, Patrick; Mas, Albert; Nisiotou, Aspasia; Sipiczki, Matthias; Spano, Giuseppe; Tassou, Chrysoula; Bely, Marina; Albertin, Warren

    2015-08-01

    The yeast Candida zemplinina (Starmerella bacillaris) is frequently isolated from grape and wine environments. Its enological use in mixed fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively investigated these last few years, and several interesting features including low ethanol production, fructophily, glycerol and other metabolites production, have been described. In addition, molecular tools allowing the characterization of yeast populations have been developed, both at the inter- and intraspecific levels. However, most of these fingerprinting methods are not compatible with population genetics or ecological studies. In this work, we developed 10 microsatellite markers for the C. zemplinina species that were used for the genotyping of 163 strains from nature or various enological regions (28 vineyards/wineries from seven countries). We show that the genetic diversity of C. zemplinina is shaped by geographical localization. Populations isolated from winemaking environments are quite diverse at the genetic level: neither clonal-like behaviour nor specific genetic signature were associated with the different vineyards/wineries. Altogether, these results suggest that C. zemplinina is not under selective pressure in winemaking environments. PMID:26071435

  3. Diversity and antifungal susceptibility of yeasts isolated by multiple-tube fermentation from three freshwater lakes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Luciana R; Medeiros, Adriana O; Duarte, Mariana C; Barbosa, Anne C; Rosa, Carlos A

    2010-06-01

    The diversity and antifungal resistance of yeasts able to grow at 37 degrees C and the occurrence of bacterial indicators of water quality were studied in three lakes in Southeastern Brazil. The densities of yeasts, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were determined by the multiple-tube fermentation technique, and counts of heterotrophic bacteria were determined using the pour plate method. The yeasts were identified using physiological and molecular techniques and their resistance to amphotericin B, itraconazole and fluconazole was tested. Yeast occurrence was significantly correlated only with the density of fecal coliforms. Candida krusei, C. guilliermondii and C. tropicalis, the most frequently isolated yeast species, are associated with fecal contamination of water by warm-blooded animals. Yeast isolates were most resistant to amphotericin B (21.7%), followed by itraconazole (20%) and then fluconazole (2.8%). In addition to tests for the fecal coliform group, the density of yeasts grown at 37 degrees C could be used as a complementary microbial indicator that aquatic environments contain organic matter of human origin. The incidence of yeast species resistant to three antifungal drugs shows that these microorganisms could pose a health risk to the people who use these lakes for recreation. PMID:20154391

  4. Repair of UV damaged DNA, genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1991-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, as well as studying the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins. In addition to its single-stranded DNA-dependent A TPase and DNA helicase activities, we have found that RAD3 protein also possesses DNA-RNA helicase activity, and that like RAD3, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe RAD3 homolog, rhp3{sup +}, is an essential gene. We have overexpressed the human RAD3 homolog, ERCC2, in yeast to facilitate its purification. The RAD10 protein was purified to homogeneity and shown to bind DNA. ERCC3y, the yeast homolog of the human ERCC-3/XP-B gene, has been sequenced and shown to be essential for viability. The Drosophila and human homologs of RAD6, required for postreplication repair and UV induced mutagenesis, were shown to complement the rad6 {Delta} mutation of yeast. Since defective DNA repair and enhanced neoplasia characterize several human genetic diseases, and repair proteins are highly conserved between yeast and man, a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms of DNA repir in yeast should provide a better understanding of the causes of carcinogenesis.

  5. Yeast PPR proteins, watchdogs of mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Christopher J; Golik, Pawel; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    PPR proteins are a family of ubiquitous RNA-binding factors, found in all the Eukaryotic lineages, and are particularly numerous in higher plants. According to recent bioinformatic analyses, yeast genomes encode from 10 (in S. pombe) to 15 (in S. cerevisiae) PPR proteins. All of these proteins are mitochondrial and very often interact with the mitochondrial membrane. Apart from the general factors, RNA polymerase and RNase P, most yeast PPR proteins are involved in the stability and/or translation of mitochondrially encoded RNAs. At present, some information concerning the target RNA(s) of most of these proteins is available, the next challenge will be to refine our understanding of the function of the proteins and to resolve the yeast PPR-RNA-binding code, which might differ significantly from the plant PPR code.

  6. Loss of the Yeast SR Protein Npl3 Alters Gene Expression Due to Transcription Readthrough.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Rebecca K; Tuck, Alex C; Zhu, Chenchen; Dunn-Davies, Hywel R; Kudla, Grzegorz; Clauder-Munster, Sandra; Granneman, Sander; Steinmetz, Lars M; Guthrie, Christine; Tollervey, David

    2015-12-01

    Yeast Npl3 is a highly abundant, nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, RNA-binding protein, related to metazoan SR proteins. Reported functions of Npl3 include transcription elongation, splicing and RNA 3' end processing. We used UV crosslinking and analysis of cDNA (CRAC) to map precise RNA binding sites, and strand-specific tiling arrays to look at the effects of loss of Npl3 on all transcripts across the genome. We found that Npl3 binds diverse RNA species, both coding and non-coding, at sites indicative of roles in both early pre-mRNA processing and 3' end formation. Tiling arrays and RNAPII mapping data revealed 3' extended RNAPII-transcribed RNAs in the absence of Npl3, suggesting that defects in pre-mRNA packaging events result in termination readthrough. Transcription readthrough was widespread and frequently resulted in down-regulation of neighboring genes. We conclude that the absence of Npl3 results in widespread 3' extension of transcripts with pervasive effects on gene expression. PMID:26694144

  7. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  8. Molecular cloning of a gene encoding an ARS binding factor from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, E E; Stefanec, M J; Biswas, S B

    1990-01-01

    We report the isolation of the gene for origin binding factor 1 (OBF1) from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by screening a yeast genomic DNA library in lambda gt11 with an ARS-specific oligonucleotide probe. One recombinant encoded a fusion protein of approximately 180 kDa that bound ARS-specific oligonucleotide probes in vitro. The restriction map of this gene was determined after isolation of the complete gene by screening a yeast genomic DNA library in YEp24. Characterization of the gene for OBF1 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Northern and Southern blot analyses demonstrated that (i) the gene is located in chromosome IV, (ii) the gene is a single-copy gene, (iii) the mRNA is approximately 3.8 kilobases, which could code for an approximately 130-kDa polypeptide, consistent with the reported size of OBF1. An antibody, affinity-purified using the lysogen-encoded fusion protein, specifically detected an approximately 130-kDa polypeptide in yeast extract. The isolation of the gene for OBF1 should allow further analysis of the mechanism of action of this protein in vitro and in vivo. Images PMID:1697686

  9. Genome-wide survey of yeast mutations leading to activation of the yeast cell integrity MAPK pathway: Novel insights into diverse MAPK outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The yeast cell wall integrity mitogen-activated protein kinase (CWI-MAPK) pathway is the main regulator of adaptation responses to cell wall stress in yeast. Here, we adopt a genomic approach to shed light on two aspects that are only partially understood, namely, the characterization of the gene functional catalog associated with CWI pathway activation and the extent to which MAPK activation correlates with transcriptional outcomes. Results A systematic yeast mutant deletion library was screened for constitutive transcriptional activation of the CWI-related reporter gene MLP1. Monitoring phospho-Slt2/Mpk1 levels in the identified mutants revealed sixty-four deletants with high levels of phosphorylation of this MAPK, including mainly genes related to cell wall construction and morphogenesis, signaling, and those with unknown function. Phenotypic analysis of the last group of mutants suggests their involvement in cell wall homeostasis. A good correlation between levels of Slt2 phosphorylation and the magnitude of the transcriptional response was found in most cases. However, the expression of CWI pathway-related genes was enhanced in some mutants in the absence of significant Slt2 phosphorylation, despite the fact that functional MAPK signaling through the pathway was required. CWI pathway activation was associated to increased deposition of chitin in the cell wall - a known survival compensatory mechanism - in about 30% of the mutants identified. Conclusion We provide new insights into yeast genes related to the CWI pathway and into how the state of activation of the Slt2 MAPK leads to different outcomes, discovering the versatility of this kind of signaling pathways. These findings potentially have broad implications for understanding the functioning of other eukaryotic MAPKs. PMID:21810245

  10. Gateway Vectors for Efficient Artificial Gene Assembly In Vitro and Expression in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Giuraniuc, Claudiu V.; MacPherson, Murray; Saka, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Construction of synthetic genetic networks requires the assembly of DNA fragments encoding functional biological parts in a defined order. Yet this may become a time-consuming procedure. To address this technical bottleneck, we have created a series of Gateway shuttle vectors and an integration vector, which facilitate the assembly of artificial genes and their expression in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our method enables the rapid construction of an artificial gene from a promoter and an open reading frame (ORF) cassette by one-step recombination reaction in vitro. Furthermore, the plasmid thus created can readily be introduced into yeast cells to test the assembled gene’s functionality. As flexible regulatory components of a synthetic genetic network, we also created new versions of the tetracycline-regulated transactivators tTA and rtTA by fusing them to the auxin-inducible degron (AID). Using our gene assembly approach, we made yeast expression vectors of these engineered transactivators, AIDtTA and AIDrtTA and then tested their functions in yeast. We showed that these factors can be regulated by doxycycline and degraded rapidly after addition of auxin to the medium. Taken together, the method for combinatorial gene assembly described here is versatile and would be a valuable tool for yeast synthetic biology. PMID:23675537

  11. A few shared up-regulated genes may influence conidia to yeast transformation in dimorphic fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Theo N

    2016-08-01

    The small number of fungi that commonly cause disease in normal people share the capacity to grow as mycelia in the soil at 25°C and as yeast (or spherules) in mammals at 37°C. This remarkable conversion has long been a topic of interest in medical mycology. The conidia to yeast conversion has been studied by transcription profiling in several fungal species, including Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Coccidioides spp., Blastomyces dermatitidis, and Talaromyces marneffei One limitation of transcriptional profiling is determining which genes are involved in the process of conversion to yeast as opposed to a result of conversion to yeast. If there are genes that are up-regulated in the yeast phase of more than one dimorphic, pathogenic fungus they might be required for conversion to yeast (or spherules). To address this issue, 24 up-regulated genes common to Coccidioides spp spherules and H. capsulatum yeasts were identified. Four homologs of these genes were also found in P. brasiliensis, B. dermatitidis or T. marneffei genes that were up-regulated in yeast. 4-hydroxyphenylpurvate dioxygenase, a gene involved in tyrosine metabolism and melanin synthesis that has been shown to be required for yeast conversion, is conserved and up-regulated in yeast in all five species. Another up-regulated gene that is conserved in all five species is a MFS sugar porter. These results suggest that a minority of up-regulated yeast (or spherule) genes are conserved across species and raises the possibility that conserved up-regulated genes may be of special interest for differentiation of mycelium into yeast.

  12. A few shared up-regulated genes may influence conidia to yeast transformation in dimorphic fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Theo N

    2016-08-01

    The small number of fungi that commonly cause disease in normal people share the capacity to grow as mycelia in the soil at 25°C and as yeast (or spherules) in mammals at 37°C. This remarkable conversion has long been a topic of interest in medical mycology. The conidia to yeast conversion has been studied by transcription profiling in several fungal species, including Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Coccidioides spp., Blastomyces dermatitidis, and Talaromyces marneffei One limitation of transcriptional profiling is determining which genes are involved in the process of conversion to yeast as opposed to a result of conversion to yeast. If there are genes that are up-regulated in the yeast phase of more than one dimorphic, pathogenic fungus they might be required for conversion to yeast (or spherules). To address this issue, 24 up-regulated genes common to Coccidioides spp spherules and H. capsulatum yeasts were identified. Four homologs of these genes were also found in P. brasiliensis, B. dermatitidis or T. marneffei genes that were up-regulated in yeast. 4-hydroxyphenylpurvate dioxygenase, a gene involved in tyrosine metabolism and melanin synthesis that has been shown to be required for yeast conversion, is conserved and up-regulated in yeast in all five species. Another up-regulated gene that is conserved in all five species is a MFS sugar porter. These results suggest that a minority of up-regulated yeast (or spherule) genes are conserved across species and raises the possibility that conserved up-regulated genes may be of special interest for differentiation of mycelium into yeast. PMID:27118798

  13. Distribution of the trehalase activation response and the regulatory trehalase gene among yeast species.

    PubMed

    Soto, T; Fernández, J; Cansado, J; Vicente, J; Gacto, M

    1997-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts the activity of regulatory trehalases increases in response to the addition of glucose and to thermal changes in the extracellular medium. We have performed an screening on the extent of this response among different representative yeast species and the results show that this ability is displayed only by a few members of the Saccharomycetaceae family. However, all yeasts examined contain a gene related to that coding for regulatory trehalase in S. cerevisiae. This finding reveals that the operational distinction between regulatory and nonregulatory trehalase in yeasts is not a property of the enzyme by itself but relays on the expression of accompanying mechanisms able to modulate trehalase activity.

  14. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:27299603

  15. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement.

  16. Combining Spinach-tagged RNA and gene localization to image gene expression in live yeast

    PubMed Central

    Guet, David; Burns, Laura T.; Maji, Suman; Boulanger, Jérôme; Hersen, Pascal; Wente, Susan R.; Salamero, Jean; Dargemont, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Although many factors required for the formation of export-competent mRNPs have been described, an integrative view of the spatiotemporal coordinated cascade leading mRNPs from their site of transcription to their site of nuclear exit, at a single cell level, is still partially missing due to technological limitations. Here we report that the RNA Spinach aptamer is a powerful tool for mRNA imaging in live S. cerevisiae with high spatial-temporal resolution and no perturbation of the mRNA biogenesis properties. Dedicated image processing workflows are developed to allow detection of very low abundance of transcripts, accurate quantitative dynamic studies, as well as to provide a localization precision close to 100 nm at consistent time scales. Combining these approaches has provided a state-of-the-art analysis of the osmotic shock response in live yeast by localizing induced transcription factors, target gene loci and corresponding transcripts. PMID:26582123

  17. Yeast diversity associated with invasive Dendroctonus valens killing Pinus tabuliformis in China using culturing and molecular methods.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qiao-Zhe; Lu, Min; Sun, Jiang-Hua

    2014-08-01

    Bark beetle-associated yeasts are much less studied than filamentous fungi, yet they are also considered to play important roles in beetle nutrition, detoxification, and chemical communication. The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens, an invasive bark beetle introduced from North America, became one of the most destructive pests in China, having killed more than 10 million Pinus tabuliformis as well as other pine species. No investigation of yeasts associated with this bark beetle in its invaded ranges has been conducted so far. The aim of this study was to assess the diversity of yeast communities in different microhabitats and during different developmental stages of Den. valens in China using culturing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approaches and to compare the yeast flora between China and the USA. The yeast identity was confirmed by sequencing the D1/D2 domain of LSU ribosomal DNA (rDNA). In total, 21 species (13 ascomycetes and eight basidiomycetes) were detected by culturing method, and 12 species (11 ascomycetes and one basidiomycetes) were detected by molecular methods from China. The most frequent five species in China were Candida piceae (Ogataea clade), Cyberlindnera americana, Candida oregonensis (Metschnikowia clade), Candida nitratophila (Ogataea clade) and an undescribed Saccharomycopsis sp., detected by both methods. Seven species were exclusively detected by DGGE. Ca. oregonensis (Metschnikowia clade) was the most frequently detected species by DGGE method. Eight species (all were ascomycetes) from the USA were isolated; seven of those were also found in China. We found significant differences in yeast total abundance as well as community composition between different developmental stages and significant differences between the surface and the gut. The frass yeast community was more similar to that of Den. valens surface or larvae than to the community of the gut or adults. Possible functions of the yeast associates are

  18. An IF-FISH Approach for Covisualization of Gene Loci and Nuclear Architecture in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, K-D; Iwasaki, O; Noma, K

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic studies have revealed that chromosomal structures are formed by a hierarchy of organizing processes ranging from gene associations, including interactions among enhancers and promoters, to topologically associating domain formations. Gene associations identified by these studies can be characterized by microscopic analyses. Fission yeast is a model organism, in which gene associations have been broadly mapped across the genome, although many of those associations have not been further examined by cell biological approaches. To address the technically challenging process of the visualization of associating gene loci in the fission yeast nuclei, we provide, in detail, an IF-FISH procedure that allows for covisualizing both gene loci and nuclear structural markers such as the nuclear membrane and nucleolus. PMID:27423862

  19. An IF-FISH Approach for Covisualization of Gene Loci and Nuclear Architecture in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, K-D; Iwasaki, O; Noma, K

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic studies have revealed that chromosomal structures are formed by a hierarchy of organizing processes ranging from gene associations, including interactions among enhancers and promoters, to topologically associating domain formations. Gene associations identified by these studies can be characterized by microscopic analyses. Fission yeast is a model organism, in which gene associations have been broadly mapped across the genome, although many of those associations have not been further examined by cell biological approaches. To address the technically challenging process of the visualization of associating gene loci in the fission yeast nuclei, we provide, in detail, an IF-FISH procedure that allows for covisualizing both gene loci and nuclear structural markers such as the nuclear membrane and nucleolus.

  20. Self-excising integrative yeast plasmid vectors containing an intronated recombinase gene.

    PubMed

    Agaphonov, Michael; Alexandrov, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Site-specific recombinases are widely used for selectable marker recycling in molecular-genetic manipulations with eukaryotic cells. This usually involves the use of two genetic constructs, one of which possesses a selectable marker flanked by the recombinase recognition sequences, while the other one bears the recombinase gene. Combining the recombinase gene with its recognition sequences in one plasmid is usually avoided, as it may lead to undesirable recombination due to promoter leakage, while the plasmid is maintained in Escherichia coli cells. Here, we describe yeast vectors possessing Cre recombinase genes under control of regulatable yeast promoters and loxP sequences for the in vivo vector backbone excision. The plasmid stability in E. coli is ensured by the presence of an intron in the recombinase gene. Applicability of these vectors was validated by disruptions of the Hansenula polymorpha PMC1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae HSP104 and PRB1 genes.

  1. Yeasts from native Brazilian Cerrado plants: Occurrence, diversity and use in the biocontrol of citrus green mould.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Eugenio Miranda; do Vale, Helson Mario Martins; Moreira, Geisianny Augusta Monteiro

    2015-11-01

    Yeasts are some of the most important postharvest biocontrol agents. Postharvest oranges frequently deteriorate due to green mould (Penicillium digitatum), which causes significant losses. The aims of this study were to determine the composition and diversity of yeasts on plants of the Brazilian Cerrado and to explore their potential for inhibiting citrus green mould. Leaves and fruit of Byrsonima crassifolia and Eugenia dysenterica were collected from Cerrado conservation areas, and thirty-five yeasts were isolated and identified by sequencing the D1-D2 domain of the rDNA large subunit (26S). The isolates represented the Aureobasidium, Meyerozyma, Candida, and Pichia genera. Three isolates identified as Aureobasidium pullulans exhibited potential for the control of P. digitatum in both in vitro and in vivo tests; these isolates reduced the incidence of disease and increased the storage time of fruit. Aureobasidium. pullulans has immense potential for the biological control of filamentous fungi.

  2. Yeasts from native Brazilian Cerrado plants: Occurrence, diversity and use in the biocontrol of citrus green mould.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Eugenio Miranda; do Vale, Helson Mario Martins; Moreira, Geisianny Augusta Monteiro

    2015-11-01

    Yeasts are some of the most important postharvest biocontrol agents. Postharvest oranges frequently deteriorate due to green mould (Penicillium digitatum), which causes significant losses. The aims of this study were to determine the composition and diversity of yeasts on plants of the Brazilian Cerrado and to explore their potential for inhibiting citrus green mould. Leaves and fruit of Byrsonima crassifolia and Eugenia dysenterica were collected from Cerrado conservation areas, and thirty-five yeasts were isolated and identified by sequencing the D1-D2 domain of the rDNA large subunit (26S). The isolates represented the Aureobasidium, Meyerozyma, Candida, and Pichia genera. Three isolates identified as Aureobasidium pullulans exhibited potential for the control of P. digitatum in both in vitro and in vivo tests; these isolates reduced the incidence of disease and increased the storage time of fruit. Aureobasidium. pullulans has immense potential for the biological control of filamentous fungi. PMID:26466874

  3. Using a Euclid distance discriminant method to find protein coding genes in the yeast genome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Ting; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Ren

    2002-02-01

    The Euclid distance discriminant method is used to find protein coding genes in the yeast genome, based on the single nucleotide frequencies at three codon positions in the ORFs. The method is extremely simple and may be extended to find genes in prokaryotic genomes or eukaryotic genomes with less introns. Six-fold cross-validation tests have demonstrated that the accuracy of the algorithm is better than 93%. Based on this, it is found that the total number of protein coding genes in the yeast genome is less than or equal to 5579 only, about 3.8-7.0% less than 5800-6000, which is currently widely accepted. The base compositions at three codon positions are analyzed in details using a graphic method. The result shows that the preference codons adopted by yeast genes are of the RGW type, where R, G and W indicate the bases of purine, non-G and A/T, whereas the 'codons' in the intergenic sequences are of the form NNN, where N denotes any base. This fact constitutes the basis of the algorithm to distinguish between coding and non-coding ORFs in the yeast genome. The names of putative non-coding ORFs are listed here in detail.

  4. Multicopy integration and expression of heterologous genes in the oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Yoshifumi; Yamazaki, Harutake; Shida, Yosuke; Ogasawara, Wataru; Takagi, Masamichi; Takaku, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi, is an excellent lipid producer with great industrial potential. However, methods for molecular breeding have not been established for L. starkeyi. We describe the development of a system for targeted rDNA integration of multiple copies of a gene into L. starkeyi genome by spheroplast-polyethylene glycol transformation.

  5. The Yeast HAL1 Gene Improves Salt Tolerance of Transgenic Tomato1

    PubMed Central

    Gisbert, Carmina; Rus, Ana M.; Bolarín, M. Carmen; López-Coronado, J. Miguel; Arrillaga, Isabel; Montesinos, Consuelo; Caro, Manuel; Serrano, Ramon; Moreno, Vicente

    2000-01-01

    Overexpression of the HAL1 gene in yeast has a positive effect on salt tolerance by maintaining a high internal K+ concentration and decreasing intracellular Na+ during salt stress. In the present work, the yeast gene HAL1 was introduced into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. A sample of primary transformants was self-pollinated, and progeny from both transformed and non-transformed plants (controls) were evaluated for salt tolerance in vitro and in vivo. Results from different tests indicated a higher level of salt tolerance in the progeny of two different transgenic plants bearing four copies or one copy of the HAL1 gene. In addition, measurement of the intracellular K+ to Na+ ratios showed that transgenic lines were able to retain more K+ than the control under salt stress. Although plants and yeast cannot be compared in an absolute sense, these results indicate that the mechanism controlling the positive effect of the HAL1 gene on salt tolerance may be similar in transgenic plants and yeast. PMID:10806256

  6. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis reveals YRF1 gene copy number variation that modulates genetic stability in distillery yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Skoneczna, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Industrial yeasts, economically important microorganisms, are widely used in diverse biotechnological processes including brewing, winemaking and distilling. In contrast to a well-established genome of brewer's and wine yeast strains, the comprehensive evaluation of genomic features of distillery strains is lacking. In the present study, twenty two distillery yeast strains were subjected to electrophoretic karyotyping and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). The strains analyzed were assigned to the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex and grouped into four species categories: S. bayanus, S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii. The genomic diversity was mainly revealed within subtelomeric regions and the losses and/or gains of fragments of chromosomes I, III, VI and IX were the most frequently observed. Statistically significant differences in the gene copy number were documented in six functional gene categories: 1) telomere maintenance via recombination, DNA helicase activity or DNA binding, 2) maltose metabolism process, glucose transmembrane transporter activity; 3) asparagine catabolism, cellular response to nitrogen starvation, localized in cell wall-bounded periplasmic space, 4) siderophore transport, 5) response to copper ion, cadmium ion binding and 6) L-iditol 2- dehydrogenase activity. The losses of YRF1 genes (Y' element ATP-dependent helicase) were accompanied by decreased level of Y' sequences and an increase in DNA double and single strand breaks, and oxidative DNA damage in the S. paradoxus group compared to the S. bayanus group. We postulate that naturally occurring diversity in the YRF1 gene copy number may promote genetic stability in the S. bayanus group of distillery yeast strains. PMID:26384347

  7. [Cloning of structural genes involved in riboflavin synthesis of the yeast Candida famata].

    PubMed

    Dmytruk, K V; Abbas, C A; Voronovsky, A Y; Kshanovska, B V; Sybirna, K A; Sybirny, A A

    2004-01-01

    The riboflavin overproducing mutants of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata isolated by conventional selection methods are used for the industrial production of vitamin B2. Recently, a transformation system was developed for C. famata using the leu2 mutant as a recipient strain and Saccharomyces cerevislae LEU2 gene as a selective marker. In this paper the cloning of C. famata genes for riboflavin synthesis on the basis of developed transformation system for this yeast species is described. Riboflavin autotrophic mutants were isolated from a previously selected C. famata leu2 strain. C. famata genomic DNA library was constructed and used for cloning of the corresponding structural genes for riboflavin synthesis by complementation of the growth defects on a medium without leucine and riboflavin. As a result, the DNA fragments harboring genes RIB1, RIB2, RIB5, RIB6 and RIB7 encoding GTP cyclohydrolase, reductase, dimethylribityllumazine synthase, dihydroxybutanone phosphate synthase and riboflavin synthase, were isolated and subsequently subcloned to the smallest possible fragments. The plasmids with these genes successfully complemented riboflavin auxotrophies of the corresponding mutants of another flavinogenic yeast Pichia guilliermondii. This suggested that C. famata structural genes for riboflavin synthesis and not some of the supressor genes were cloned. PMID:15909421

  8. Genetically Engineered Transvestites Reveal Novel Mating Genes in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huberman, Lori B.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Haploid budding yeast has two mating types, defined by the alleles of the MAT locus, MATa and MATα. Two haploid cells of opposite mating types mate by signaling to each other using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, polarizing and growing toward each other, and eventually fusing to form a single diploid cell. The pheromones and receptors are necessary and sufficient to define a mating type, but other mating-type-specific proteins make mating more efficient. We examined the role of these proteins by genetically engineering “transvestite” cells that swap the pheromone, pheromone receptor, and pheromone processing factors of one mating type for another. These cells mate with each other, but their mating is inefficient. By characterizing their mating defects and examining their transcriptomes, we found Afb1 (a-factor barrier), a novel MATα-specific protein that interferes with a-factor, the pheromone secreted by MATa cells. Strong pheromone secretion is essential for efficient mating, and the weak mating of transvestites can be improved by boosting their pheromone production. Synthetic biology can characterize the factors that control efficiency in biological processes. In yeast, selection for increased mating efficiency is likely to have continually boosted pheromone levels and the ability to discriminate between partners who make more and less pheromone. This discrimination comes at a cost: weak mating in situations where all potential partners make less pheromone. PMID:24121774

  9. Yeast prion architecture explains how proteins can be genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickner, Reed

    2013-03-01

    Prions (infectious proteins) transmit information without an accompanying DNA or RNA. Most yeast prions are self-propagating amyloids that inactivate a normally functional protein. A single protein can become any of several prion variants, with different manifestations due to different amyloid structures. We showed that the yeast prion amyloids of Ure2p, Sup35p and Rnq1p are folded in-register parallel beta sheets using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling experiments, mass-per-filament-length measurements, and filament diameter measurements. The extent of beta sheet structure, measured by chemical shifts in solid-state NMR and acquired protease-resistance on amyloid formation, combined with the measured filament diameters, imply that the beta sheets must be folded along the long axis of the filament. We speculate that prion variants of a single protein sequence differ in the location of these folds. Favorable interactions between identical side chains must hold these structures in-register. The same interactions must guide an unstructured monomer joining the end of a filament to assume the same conformation as molecules already in the filament, with the turns at the same locations. In this way, a protein can template its own conformation, in analogy to the ability of a DNA molecule to template its sequence by specific base-pairing. Bldg. 8, Room 225, NIH, 8 Center Drive MSC 0830, Bethesda, MD 20892-0830, wickner@helix.nih.gov, 301-496-3452

  10. Patterns of Gene Conversion in Duplicated Yeast Histones Suggest Strong Selection on a Coadapted Macromolecular Complex

    PubMed Central

    Scienski, Kathy; Fay, Justin C.; Conant, Gavin C.

    2015-01-01

    We find evidence for interlocus gene conversion in five duplicated histone genes from six yeast species. The sequences of these duplicated genes, surviving from the ancient genome duplication, show phylogenetic patterns inconsistent with the well-resolved orthology relationships inferred from a likelihood model of gene loss after the genome duplication. Instead, these paralogous genes are more closely related to each other than any is to its nearest ortholog. In addition to simulations supporting gene conversion, we also present evidence for elevated rates of radical amino acid substitutions along the branches implicated in the conversion events. As these patterns are similar to those seen in ribosomal proteins that have undergone gene conversion, we speculate that in cases where duplicated genes code for proteins that are a part of tightly interacting complexes, selection may favor the fixation of gene conversion events in order to maintain high protein identities between duplicated copies. PMID:26560339

  11. Extraordinary diversity of chemosensory receptor gene repertoires among vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Shi, P; Zhang, J

    2009-01-01

    Chemosensation (smell and taste) is important to the survival and reproduction of vertebrates and is mediated by specific bindings of odorants, pheromones, and tastants by chemoreceptors that are encoded by several large gene families. This review summarizes recent comparative genomic and evolutionary studies of vertebrate chemoreceptor genes. It focuses on the remarkable diversity of chemoreceptor gene repertoires in terms of gene number and gene sequence across vertebrates and the evolutionary mechanisms that are responsible for generating this diversity. We argue that the great among-species variation of chemoreceptor gene repertoires is a result of adaptations of individual species to their environments and diets. PMID:19145414

  12. Multiple Yeast Genes, Including Paf1 Complex Genes, Affect Telomere Length via Telomerase RNA Abundance▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mozdy, Amy D.; Podell, Elaine R.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Twofold reductions in telomerase RNA levels cause telomere shortening in both humans and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To test whether multiple genes that affect telomere length act by modulating telomerase RNA abundance, we used real-time reverse transcription-PCR to screen S. cerevisiae deletion strains reported to maintain shorter or longer telomeres to determine the levels of their telomerase RNA (TLC1) abundance. Of 290 strains screened, 5 had increased TLC1 levels; 4 of these maintained longer telomeres. Twenty strains had decreased TLC1 levels; 18 of these are known to maintain shorter telomeres. Four strains with decreased TLC1 RNA levels contained deletions of subunits of Paf1C (polymerase II-associated factor complex). While Paf1C had been implicated in the transcription of both polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNAs, Paf1C had not been associated previously with the noncoding telomerase RNA. In Paf1C mutant strains, TLC1 overexpression partially rescues telomere length and cell growth defects, suggesting that telomerase RNA is a critical direct or indirect Paf1C target. Other factors newly identified as affecting TLC1 RNA levels include cyclin-dependent kinase, the mediator complex, protein phosphatase 2A, and ribosomal proteins L13B and S16A. This report establishes that a subset of telomere length genes act by modulating telomerase RNA abundance. PMID:18411302

  13. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B.; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J. Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P.; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Hieter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1. Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  14. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Hieter, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1 Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  15. Phylogeny of tremellomycetous yeasts and related dimorphic and filamentous basidiomycetes reconstructed from multiple gene sequence analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X.-Z.; Wang, Q.-M.; Theelen, B.; Groenewald, M.; Bai, F.-Y.; Boekhout, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Tremellomycetes (Basidiomycota) contains a large number of unicellular and dimorphic fungi with stable free-living unicellular states in their life cycles. These fungi have been conventionally classified as basidiomycetous yeasts based on physiological and biochemical characteristics. Many currently recognised genera of these yeasts are mainly defined based on phenotypical characters and are highly polyphyletic. Here we reconstructed the phylogeny of the majority of described anamorphic and teleomorphic tremellomycetous yeasts using Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and neighbour-joining analyses based on the sequences of seven genes, including three rRNA genes, namely the small subunit of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA), D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rDNA, and the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS 1 and 2) of rDNA including 5.8S rDNA; and four protein-coding genes, namely the two subunits of the RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2), the translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1) and the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b (CYTB). With the consideration of morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characters and the congruence of phylogenies inferred from analyses using different algorithms based on different data sets consisting of the combined seven genes, the three rRNA genes, and the individual protein-coding genes, five major lineages corresponding to the orders Cystofilobasidiales, Filobasidiales, Holtermanniales, Tremellales, and Trichosporonales were resolved. A total of 45 strongly supported monophyletic clades with multiple species and 23 single species clades were recognised. This phylogenetic framework will be the basis for the proposal of an updated taxonomic system of tremellomycetous yeasts that will be compatible with the current taxonomic system of filamentous basidiomycetes accommodating the ‘one fungus, one name’ principle. PMID:26955196

  16. Function of a plant stress-induced gene, HVA22. Synthetic enhancement screen with its yeast homolog reveals its role in vesicular traffic.

    PubMed

    Brands, Alex; Ho, Tuan-hua David

    2002-11-01

    Expression of the barley (Hordeum vulgare) HVA22 gene is induced by environmental stresses, such as dehydration, salinity, and extreme temperatures, and by a plant stress hormone, abscisic acid. Genes sharing high level of sequence similarities with HVA22 exist in diverse eukaryotic organisms, including animals, plants, and fungi, but not in any prokaryotic organisms. The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) HVA22 homolog, Yop1p, has been shown to interact with the GTPase-interacting protein, Yip1p. Deletion of YOP1 led to only a modest reduction of the stationary phase titer at 37C. A synthetic enhancement mutant screen was performed in the yop1 deletion background to identify genes interacting with YOP1. The open reading frame YOR165W (renamed SEY1 for synthetic enhancement of YOP1) was identified as a YOP1-dependent complementation gene. The yeast SEY1 is a homolog of the Arabidopsis RHD3 gene whose mutations cause the accumulation of transport vesicles near the tips of defective root hairs. The yeast double mutant of yop1 and sey1 is defective in vesicular traffic as evidenced by the accumulation of transport vesicles and the decrease in invertase secretion. Based on these observations, we suggest that Yop1p/HVA22 regulates vesicular traffic in stressed cells either to facilitate membrane turnover, or to decrease unnecessary secretion.

  17. Delta sequences in the 5' non-coding region of yeast tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Gafner, Jürg; Robertis, Eddy M.De; Philippsen, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Two so far undetected tRNA genes were found close to delta (δ) sequences at the sup4 locus on chromosome X in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The two genes were identified from their abundant transcription products in frog oocytes. Hybridisation experiments allowed the mapping of the transcripts in cloned DNA and DNA sequence analysis revealed the presence of one AGGtRNAArg and one GACtRNAAsp gene. tRNAAsp genes with sequences similar or identical to GACtRNAAsp exist in 14-16 copies per haploid yeast genome, whereas only one copy was detected for AGGtRNAArg. In vivo labelling of total yeast tRNA with 32P followed by hybridisation revealed that the unique AGGtRNAArg gene is transcribed in S. cerevisiae. δ sequences are present 120 bp upstream from the first coding nucleotide in the case of AGGtRNAArg, 80 bp in the case of GACtRNAAsp and 405 bp in the case of the known UACtRNATyr (sup4) gene. δ sequences, as part of Ty elements or alone, were also found by other investigators at similar distances upstream of the mRNA start in mutant alleles of protein-coding yeast genes. Although protein-coding genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II and tRNA genes by RNA polymerase III, the 5' non-coding region of both types of genes could conceivably have a peculiar DNA or chromatin structure used as preferred landing sites by transposable elements. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:16453444

  18. Fission Yeast CSL Transcription Factors: Mapping Their Target Genes and Biological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Oravcová, Martina; Tvarůžková, Jarmila; Zach, Róbert; Folk, Petr; Půta, František; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Background Cbf11 and Cbf12, the fission yeast CSL transcription factors, have been implicated in the regulation of cell-cycle progression, but no specific roles have been described and their target genes have been only partially mapped. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a combination of transcriptome profiling under various conditions and genome-wide analysis of CSL-DNA interactions, we identify genes regulated directly and indirectly by CSL proteins in fission yeast. We show that the expression of stress-response genes and genes that are expressed periodically during the cell cycle is deregulated upon genetic manipulation of cbf11 and/or cbf12. Accordingly, the coordination of mitosis and cytokinesis is perturbed in cells with genetically manipulated CSL protein levels, together with other specific defects in cell-cycle progression. Cbf11 activity is nutrient-dependent and Δcbf11-associated defects are mitigated by inactivation of the protein kinase A (Pka1) and stress-activated MAP kinase (Sty1p38) pathways. Furthermore, Cbf11 directly regulates a set of lipid metabolism genes and Δcbf11 cells feature a stark decrease in the number of storage lipid droplets. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide a framework for a more detailed understanding of the role of CSL proteins in the regulation of cell-cycle progression in fission yeast. PMID:26366556

  19. The genes and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of thiamin and thiamin diphosphate in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Ewa; Kozik, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is an essential molecule for all living organisms. Its major biologically active derivative is thiamin diphosphate, which serves as a cofactor for several enzymes involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Important new functions for thiamin and its phosphate esters have recently been suggested, e.g. in gene expression regulation by influencing mRNA structure, in DNA repair after UV illumination, and in the protection of some organelles against reactive oxygen species. Unlike higher animals, which rely on nutritional thiamin intake, yeasts can synthesize thiamin de novo. The biosynthesis pathways include the separate synthesis of two precursors, 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine diphosphate and 5-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole phosphate, which are then condensed into thiamin monophosphate. Additionally, yeasts evolved salvage mechanisms to utilize thiamin and its dephosphorylated late precursors, 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine and 5-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole, from the environment. The current state of knowledge on the discrete steps of thiamin biosynthesis in yeasts is far from satisfactory; many intermediates are postulated only by analogy to the much better understood biosynthesis process in bacteria. On the other hand, the genetic mechanisms regulating thiamin biosynthesis in yeasts are currently under extensive exploration. Only recently, the structures of some of the yeast enzymes involved in thiamin biosynthesis, such as thiamin diphosphokinase and thiazole synthase, were determined at the atomic resolution, and mechanistic proposals for the catalysis of particular biosynthetic steps started to emerge.

  20. Evidence for widespread adaptive evolution of gene expression in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Hunter B; Moses, Alan M; Schadt, Eric E

    2010-02-16

    Changes in gene expression have been proposed to underlie many, or even most, adaptive differences between species. Despite the increasing acceptance of this view, only a handful of cases of adaptive gene expression evolution have been demonstrated. To address this discrepancy, we introduce a simple test for lineage-specific selection on gene expression. Applying the test to genome-wide gene expression data from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we find that hundreds of gene expression levels have been subject to lineage-specific selection. Comparing these findings with independent population genetic evidence of selective sweeps suggests that this lineage-specific selection has resulted in recent sweeps at over a hundred genes, most of which led to increased transcript levels. Examination of the implicated genes revealed a specific biochemical pathway--ergosterol biosynthesis--where the expression of multiple genes has been subject to selection for reduced levels. In sum, these results suggest that adaptive evolution of gene expression is common in yeast, that regulatory adaptation can occur at the level of entire pathways, and that similar genome-wide scans may be possible in other species, including humans.

  1. Changes in expression of oxidative stress related genes in grapefruit peel in response to yeast Metschnikowia fructicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain insight into the mode of action of the yeast biocontrol agent, Metschnikowia fructicola, the transcription profiles of genes involved in oxidative stress were studied in grapefruit (Citrus paradis, 'Star Ruby') surface wounds following the application of the yeast antagonist. Three transcri...

  2. Diversity and Fermentation Products of Xylose-Utilizing Yeasts Isolated from Buffalo Feces in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Lorliam, Wanlapa; Akaracharanya, Ancharida; Suzuki, Motofumi; Ohkuma, Moriya; Tanasupawat, Somboon

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-eight xylose-utilizing yeast strains were isolated by enrichment culture from 11 samples of feces from the rectum of Murrah buffalo and Swamp buffalo in Thailand. On the basis of their morphological and biochemical characteristics, including sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large-subunit ribosomal RNA gene (LSU rDNA), they were identified as Candida tropicalis (designated as Group I, 11 isolates), Candida parasilosis (Group II, 2 isolates), Candida mengyuniae (Group III, 2 isolates), Sporopachydermia lactativora (Group IV, 2 isolates), Geotrichum sp. (Group V, 5 isolates) and Trichosporon asahii (Group VI, 6 isolates). All isolates utilized xylose as the sole carbon source but 27 isolates could ferment xylose to ethanol (0.006–0.602 g L−1) and 21 isolates could ferment xylose to xylitol (0.19–22.84 g L−1). Candida tropicalis isolates produced the highest yield of xylitol (74.80%). Their ability to convert xylose to xylitol and ethanol ranged from 15.06 g L−1 to 22.84 g L−1 xylitol and 0.110 g L−1 to 0.602 g L−1 ethanol, respectively. PMID:24005843

  3. Gene Expression Analysis of Cold and Freeze Stress in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Vargas, Sonia; Estruch, Francisco; Randez-Gil, Francisca

    2002-01-01

    We used mRNA differential display to assess yeast gene expression under cold or freeze shock stress conditions. We found both up- and down-regulation of genes, although repression was more common. We identified and sequenced several cold-induced genes exhibiting the largest differences. We confirmed, by Northern blotting, the specificity of the response for TPI1, which encodes triose-phosphate isomerase; ERG10, the gene for acetoacetyl coenzyme A thiolase; and IMH1, which encodes a protein implicated in protein transport. These genes also were induced under other stress conditions, suggesting that this cold response is mediated by a general stress mechanism. We determined the physiological significance of the cold-induced expression change of these genes in two baker's yeast strains with different sensitivities to freeze stress. The mRNA level of TPI1 and ERG10 genes was higher in freeze-stressed than in control samples of the tolerant strain. In contrast, both genes were repressed in frozen cells of the sensitive strain. Next, we examined the effects of ERG10 overexpression on cold and freeze-thaw tolerance. Growth of wild-type cells at 10°C was not affected by high ERG10 expression. However, YEpERG10 transformant cells exhibited increased freezing tolerance. Consistent with this, cells of an erg10 mutant strain showed a clear phenotype of cold and freeze sensitivity. These results give support to the idea that a cause-and-effect relationship between differentially expressed genes and cryoresistance exists in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and open up the possibility of design strategies to improve the freeze tolerance of baker's yeast. PMID:12039763

  4. Horizontal gene transfer promoted evolution of the ability to propagate under anaerobic conditions in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Gojković, Z; Knecht, W; Zameitat, E; Warneboldt, J; Coutelis, J-B; Pynyaha, Y; Neuveglise, C; Møller, K; Löffler, M; Piskur, J

    2004-05-01

    The ability to propagate under anaerobic conditions is an essential and unique trait of brewer's or baker's yeast ( Saccharomyces cervisiae). To understand the evolution of facultative anaerobiosis we studied the dependence of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, more precisely the fourth enzymic activity catalysed by dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase), on the enzymes of the respiratory chain in several yeast species. While the majority of yeasts possess a mitochondrial DHODase, Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a cytoplasmatic enzyme, whose activity is independent of the presence of oxygen. From the phylogenetic point of view, this enzyme is closely related to a bacterial DHODase from Lactococcus lactis. Here we show that S. kluyveri, which separated from the S. cerevisiae lineage more than 100 million years ago, represents an evolutionary intermediate, having both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial DHODases. We show that these two S. kluyveri enzymes, and their coding genes, differ in their dependence on the presence of oxygen. Only the cytoplasmic DHODase promotes growth in the absence of oxygen. Apparently a Saccharomyces yeast progenitor which had a eukaryotic-like mitochondrial DHODase acquired a bacterial gene for DHODase, which subsequently allowed cell growth gradually to become independent of oxygen. PMID:15014982

  5. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan.

  6. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowska, Agata; Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen; Kylsten, Per; Swoboda, Peter; Ekwall, Karl

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  7. Unconventional genomic architecture in the budding yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae masks the nested antisense gene NAG1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Dobry, Craig J; Krysan, Damian J; Kumar, Anuj

    2008-08-01

    The genomic architecture of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is typical of other eukaryotes in that genes are spatially organized into discrete and nonoverlapping units. Inherent in this organizational model is the assumption that protein-coding sequences do not overlap completely. Here, we present evidence to the contrary, defining a previously overlooked yeast gene, NAG1 (for nested antisense gene) nested entirely within the coding sequence of the YGR031W open reading frame in an antisense orientation on the opposite strand. NAG1 encodes a 19-kDa protein, detected by Western blotting of hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Nag1p with anti-HA antibodies and by beta-galactosidase analysis of a NAG1-lacZ fusion. NAG1 is evolutionarily conserved as a unit with YGR031W in bacteria and fungi. Unlike the YGR031WP protein product, however, which localizes to the mitochondria, Nag1p localizes to the cell periphery, exhibiting properties consistent with those of a plasma membrane protein. Phenotypic analysis of a site-directed mutant (nag1-1) disruptive for NAG1 but silent with respect to YGR031W, defines a role for NAG1 in yeast cell wall biogenesis; microarray profiling of nag1-1 indicates decreased expression of genes contributing to cell wall organization, and the nag1-1 mutant is hypersensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent calcofluor white. Furthermore, production of Nag1p is dependent upon the presence of the cell wall integrity pathway mitogen-activated protein kinase Slt2p and its downstream transcription factor Rlm1p. Thus, NAG1 is important for two reasons. First, it contributes to yeast cell wall biogenesis. Second, its genomic context is novel, raising the possibility that other nested protein-coding genes may exist in eukaryotic genomes.

  8. Life-history strategies and carbon metabolism gene dosage in the Nakaseomyces yeasts.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Judith; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Bourgais, Aurélie; Fairhead, Cécile; Sicard, Delphine

    2016-03-01

    The Nakaseomyces clade consists of a group of six hemiascomyceteous yeasts (Candida glabrata, Nakaseomyces delphensis, C. nivarensis, C. bracarensis, C. castelli, N. bacillisporus), phylogenetically close to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, their representative being the well-known pathogenic yeast C. glabrata. Four species had been previously examined for their carbon assimilation properties and found to have similar properties to S. cerevisiae (repression of respiration in high glucose-i.e. Crabtree positivity-and being a facultative anaerobe). We examined here the complete set of the six species for their carbon metabolic gene content. We also measured different metabolic and life-history traits (glucose consumption rate, population growth rate, carrying capacity, cell size, cell and biomass yield). We observed deviations from the glycolytic gene redundancy observed in S. cerevisiae presumed to be an important property for the Crabtree positivity, especially for the two species C. castelli and N. bacillisporus which frequently have only one gene copy, but different life strategies. Therefore, we show that the decrease in carbon metabolic gene copy cannot be simply associated with a reduction of glucose consumption rate and can be counterbalanced by other beneficial genetic variations.

  9. Improvement of fermentation ability under baking-associated stress conditions by altering the POG1 gene expression in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Oshiro, Satoshi; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    During the bread-making process, yeast cells are exposed to many types of baking-associated stress. There is thus a demand within the baking industry for yeast strains with high fermentation abilities under these stress conditions. The POG1 gene, encoding a putative transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation, is a multicopy suppressor of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 mutant. The pog1 mutant is sensitive to various stresses. Our results suggested that the POG1 gene is involved in stress tolerance in yeast cells. In this study, we showed that overexpression of the POG1 gene in baker's yeast conferred increased fermentation ability in high-sucrose-containing dough, which is used for sweet dough baking. Furthermore, deletion of the POG1 gene drastically increased the fermentation ability in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress, which would be a useful characteristic for frozen dough baking. Thus, the engineering of yeast strains to control the POG1 gene expression level would be a novel method for molecular breeding of baker's yeast.

  10. Improvement of fermentation ability under baking-associated stress conditions by altering the POG1 gene expression in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Oshiro, Satoshi; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    During the bread-making process, yeast cells are exposed to many types of baking-associated stress. There is thus a demand within the baking industry for yeast strains with high fermentation abilities under these stress conditions. The POG1 gene, encoding a putative transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation, is a multicopy suppressor of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 mutant. The pog1 mutant is sensitive to various stresses. Our results suggested that the POG1 gene is involved in stress tolerance in yeast cells. In this study, we showed that overexpression of the POG1 gene in baker's yeast conferred increased fermentation ability in high-sucrose-containing dough, which is used for sweet dough baking. Furthermore, deletion of the POG1 gene drastically increased the fermentation ability in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress, which would be a useful characteristic for frozen dough baking. Thus, the engineering of yeast strains to control the POG1 gene expression level would be a novel method for molecular breeding of baker's yeast. PMID:23800735

  11. Microbial Terroir in Chilean Valleys: Diversity of Non-conventional Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Carla; Laurie, V. Felipe; Mas, Albert; Romero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the presence of non-conventional yeast associated with vineyards located between latitudes 30°S and 36°S was examined, including the valleys of Limarí, Casablanca, Maipo, Colchagua, Maule, and Itata. The microbial fingerprinting in each valley was examined based on the specific quantification of yeast of enological interest. Grape–berries were sampled to evaluate the presence and load of non-conventional yeast with enological potential, such as Metschnikowia, Hanseniaspora, Torulaspora, Debaryomyces, Meyerozyma, and Rhodotorula. These yeasts were present in all vineyards studied but with varying loads depending on the valley sampled. No identical fingerprints were observed; however, similarities and differences could be observed among the microbial profiles of each valley. A co-variation in the loads of Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora with latitude was observed, showing high loads in the Casablanca and Itata valleys, which was coincident with the higher relative humidity or rainfall of those areas. Non-conventional yeasts were also isolated and identified after sequencing molecular markers. Potentially good aromatic properties were also screened among the isolates, resulting in the selection of mostly Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora isolates. Finally, our results suggest that microbial terroir might be affected by climatic conditions such as relative humidity and rainfall, especially impacting the load of non-conventional yeast. In this study, the microbial fingerprint for yeast in Chilean vineyards is reported for the first time revealing an opportunity to study the contribution of this assembly of microorganisms to the final product. PMID:27242693

  12. Microbial Terroir in Chilean Valleys: Diversity of Non-conventional Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jara, Carla; Laurie, V Felipe; Mas, Albert; Romero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the presence of non-conventional yeast associated with vineyards located between latitudes 30°S and 36°S was examined, including the valleys of Limarí, Casablanca, Maipo, Colchagua, Maule, and Itata. The microbial fingerprinting in each valley was examined based on the specific quantification of yeast of enological interest. Grape-berries were sampled to evaluate the presence and load of non-conventional yeast with enological potential, such as Metschnikowia, Hanseniaspora, Torulaspora, Debaryomyces, Meyerozyma, and Rhodotorula. These yeasts were present in all vineyards studied but with varying loads depending on the valley sampled. No identical fingerprints were observed; however, similarities and differences could be observed among the microbial profiles of each valley. A co-variation in the loads of Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora with latitude was observed, showing high loads in the Casablanca and Itata valleys, which was coincident with the higher relative humidity or rainfall of those areas. Non-conventional yeasts were also isolated and identified after sequencing molecular markers. Potentially good aromatic properties were also screened among the isolates, resulting in the selection of mostly Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora isolates. Finally, our results suggest that microbial terroir might be affected by climatic conditions such as relative humidity and rainfall, especially impacting the load of non-conventional yeast. In this study, the microbial fingerprint for yeast in Chilean vineyards is reported for the first time revealing an opportunity to study the contribution of this assembly of microorganisms to the final product. PMID:27242693

  13. Microbial Terroir in Chilean Valleys: Diversity of Non-conventional Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jara, Carla; Laurie, V Felipe; Mas, Albert; Romero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the presence of non-conventional yeast associated with vineyards located between latitudes 30°S and 36°S was examined, including the valleys of Limarí, Casablanca, Maipo, Colchagua, Maule, and Itata. The microbial fingerprinting in each valley was examined based on the specific quantification of yeast of enological interest. Grape-berries were sampled to evaluate the presence and load of non-conventional yeast with enological potential, such as Metschnikowia, Hanseniaspora, Torulaspora, Debaryomyces, Meyerozyma, and Rhodotorula. These yeasts were present in all vineyards studied but with varying loads depending on the valley sampled. No identical fingerprints were observed; however, similarities and differences could be observed among the microbial profiles of each valley. A co-variation in the loads of Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora with latitude was observed, showing high loads in the Casablanca and Itata valleys, which was coincident with the higher relative humidity or rainfall of those areas. Non-conventional yeasts were also isolated and identified after sequencing molecular markers. Potentially good aromatic properties were also screened among the isolates, resulting in the selection of mostly Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora isolates. Finally, our results suggest that microbial terroir might be affected by climatic conditions such as relative humidity and rainfall, especially impacting the load of non-conventional yeast. In this study, the microbial fingerprint for yeast in Chilean vineyards is reported for the first time revealing an opportunity to study the contribution of this assembly of microorganisms to the final product.

  14. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes.

  15. Yeast functional screen to identify genes conferring salt stress tolerance in Salicornia europaea

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Yoshiki; Sawabe, Shogo; Kainuma, Kenta; Katsuhara, Maki; Shibasaka, Mineo; Suzuki, Masanori; Yamamoto, Kosuke; Oguri, Suguru; Sakamoto, Hikaru

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is a critical environmental factor that adversely affects crop productivity. Halophytes have evolved various mechanisms to adapt to saline environments. Salicornia europaea L. is one of the most salt-tolerant plant species. It does not have special salt-secreting structures like a salt gland or salt bladder, and is therefore a good model for studying the common mechanisms underlying plant salt tolerance. To identify candidate genes encoding key proteins in the mediation of salt tolerance in S. europaea, we performed a functional screen of a cDNA library in yeast. The library was screened for genes that allowed the yeast to grow in the presence of 1.3 M NaCl. We obtained three full-length S. europaea genes that confer salt tolerance. The genes are predicted to encode (1) a novel protein highly homologous to thaumatin-like proteins, (2) a novel coiled-coil protein of unknown function, and (3) a novel short peptide of 32 residues. Exogenous application of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 32 residues improved salt tolerance of Arabidopsis. The approach described in this report provides a rapid assay system for large-scale screening of S. europaea genes involved in salt stress tolerance and supports the identification of genes responsible for such mechanisms. These genes may be useful candidates for improving crop salt tolerance by genetic transformation. PMID:26579166

  16. Yeast KRE genes provide evidence for a pathway of cell wall beta-glucan assembly

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae KRE1 gene encodes a Ser/Thr-rich protein, that is directed into the yeast secretory pathway, where it is highly modified, probably through addition of O-linked mannose residues. Gene disruption of the KRE1 locus leads to a 40% reduced level of cell wall (1----6)-beta-glucan. Structural analysis of the (1----6)-beta-glucan fraction, isolated from a strain with a krel disruption mutation, showed that it had an altered structure with a smaller average polymer size. Mutations in two other loci, KRE5 and KRE6 also lead to a defect in cell wall (1----6)-beta-glucan production and appear to be epistatic to KRE1. These findings outline a possible pathway of assembly of yeast cell wall (1----6)-beta-glucan. PMID:2186051

  17. Diversity of culturable yeasts in phylloplane of sugarcane in Thailand and their capability to produce indole-3-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Kaewwichian, Rungluk; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Kawasaki, Hiroko

    2014-06-01

    Yeasts were isolated by the enrichment technique from the phylloplane of 94 samples of sugarcane leaf collected from seven provinces in Thailand. All sugarcane leaf samples contained yeasts and 158 yeast strains were obtained. On the basis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit rRNA gene sequence analysis, 144 strains were identified to 24 known species in 14 genera belonging to the Ascomycota viz. Candida akabanensis, Candida dendronema, Candida mesorugosa, Candida michaelii, Candida nivariensis, Candida rugosa, Candida orthopsilosis, Candida quercitrusa, Candida tropicalis, Candida xylopsoci, Cyberlindnera fabianii, Cyberlindnera rhodanensis, Debaryomyces nepalensis, Hannaella aff. coprosmaensis, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lachancea thermotolerans, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Metschnikowia koreensis, Meyerozyma caribbica, Millerozyma koratensis, Pichia kudriavzevii, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Wickerhamomyces edaphicus, and 12 species in six genera of the Basidiomycota viz . Cryptococcus flavescens, Cryptococcus laurentii, Cryptococcus rajasthanensis, Kwoniella heveanensis, Rhodosporidium fluviale, Rhodosporidium paludigenum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Rhodotorula sesimbrana, Rhodotorula taiwanensis, Sporidiobolus ruineniae, Sporobolomyces carnicolor and Sporobolomyces nylandii. Seven strains were identical or similar to four undescribed species. Another seven strains represented four novels species in the genus Metschnikowia, Nakazawaea, Wickerhamomyces and Yamadazyma. The results revealed 69 % of the isolated strains were ascomycete yeasts and 31 % were basidiomycete yeast. The most prevalent species was M. caribbica with a 23 % frequency of occurrence followed by Rh. taiwanensis (11 %) and C. tropicalis (10 %). All strains were assessed for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) producing capability showing that 69 strains had the capability of producing IAA when cultivated in yeast extract peptone dextrose broth supplemented with 1

  18. Diversity of culturable yeasts in phylloplane of sugarcane in Thailand and their capability to produce indole-3-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Kaewwichian, Rungluk; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Kawasaki, Hiroko

    2014-06-01

    Yeasts were isolated by the enrichment technique from the phylloplane of 94 samples of sugarcane leaf collected from seven provinces in Thailand. All sugarcane leaf samples contained yeasts and 158 yeast strains were obtained. On the basis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit rRNA gene sequence analysis, 144 strains were identified to 24 known species in 14 genera belonging to the Ascomycota viz. Candida akabanensis, Candida dendronema, Candida mesorugosa, Candida michaelii, Candida nivariensis, Candida rugosa, Candida orthopsilosis, Candida quercitrusa, Candida tropicalis, Candida xylopsoci, Cyberlindnera fabianii, Cyberlindnera rhodanensis, Debaryomyces nepalensis, Hannaella aff. coprosmaensis, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lachancea thermotolerans, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Metschnikowia koreensis, Meyerozyma caribbica, Millerozyma koratensis, Pichia kudriavzevii, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Wickerhamomyces edaphicus, and 12 species in six genera of the Basidiomycota viz . Cryptococcus flavescens, Cryptococcus laurentii, Cryptococcus rajasthanensis, Kwoniella heveanensis, Rhodosporidium fluviale, Rhodosporidium paludigenum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Rhodotorula sesimbrana, Rhodotorula taiwanensis, Sporidiobolus ruineniae, Sporobolomyces carnicolor and Sporobolomyces nylandii. Seven strains were identical or similar to four undescribed species. Another seven strains represented four novels species in the genus Metschnikowia, Nakazawaea, Wickerhamomyces and Yamadazyma. The results revealed 69 % of the isolated strains were ascomycete yeasts and 31 % were basidiomycete yeast. The most prevalent species was M. caribbica with a 23 % frequency of occurrence followed by Rh. taiwanensis (11 %) and C. tropicalis (10 %). All strains were assessed for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) producing capability showing that 69 strains had the capability of producing IAA when cultivated in yeast extract peptone dextrose broth supplemented with 1

  19. MATRIX FACTORIZATION-BASED DATA FUSION FOR GENE FUNCTION PREDICTION IN BAKER’S YEAST AND SLIME MOLD

    PubMed Central

    ŽITNIK, MARINKA; ZUPAN, BLAŽ

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective methods for the characterization of gene functions that are able to combine diverse data sources in a sound and easily-extendible way is an important goal in computational biology. We have previously developed a general matrix factorization-based data fusion approach for gene function prediction. In this manuscript, we show that this data fusion approach can be applied to gene function prediction and that it can fuse various heterogeneous data sources, such as gene expression profiles, known protein annotations, interaction and literature data. The fusion is achieved by simultaneous matrix tri-factorization that shares matrix factors between sources. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by evaluating its performance on predicting ontological annotations in slime mold D. discoideum and on recognizing proteins of baker’s yeast S. cerevisiae that participate in the ribosome or are located in the cell membrane. Our approach achieves predictive performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art kernel-based data fusion, but requires fewer data preprocessing steps. PMID:24297565

  20. A Neurospora crassa ribosomal protein gene, homologous to yeast CRY1, contains sequences potentially coordinating its transcription with rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, B M; Harrison, K

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced a Neurospora crassa ribosomal protein gene (designated crp-2) strongly homologous to the rp59 gene (CRY1) of yeast and the S14 ribosomal protein gene of mammals. The inferred sequence of the crp-2 protein is more homologous (83%) to the mammalian S14 sequence than to the yeast rp59 sequence (69%). The gene has three intervening sequences (IVSs) two of which are offset 7 bp from the position of IVSs in the mammalian genes. None correspond to the position of the IVS in the yeast gene. Crp-2 was mapped by RFLP analysis to the right arm of linkage group III. The 5' region of the gene contains three copies of a sequence, the Ribo box, previously shown to be required for transcription of both 5S and 40S rRNA genes. We speculate that the Ribo box may coordinate ribosomal protein and rRNA gene transcription. Images PMID:1977135

  1. Retroviruses and yeast retrotransposons use overlapping sets of host genes

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Becky; Aye, Michael; Baldi, Pierre; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Cheng, Henry; Dou, Yimeng; Liou, Willy; Sandmeyer, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    A collection of 4457 Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants deleted for nonessential genes was screened for mutants with increased or decreased mobilization of the gypsylike retroelement Ty3. Of these, 64 exhibited increased and 66 decreased Ty3 transposition compared with the parental strain. Genes identified in this screen were grouped according to function by using GOnet software developed as part of this study. Gene clusters were related to chromatin and transcript elongation, translation and cytoplasmic RNA processing, vesicular trafficking, nuclear transport, and DNA maintenance. Sixty-six of the mutants were tested for Ty3 proteins and cDNA. Ty3 cDNA and transposition were increased in mutants affected in nuclear pore biogenesis and in a subset of mutants lacking proteins that interact physically or genetically with a replication clamp loader. Our results suggest that nuclear entry is linked mechanistically to Ty3 cDNA synthesis but that host replication factors antagonize Ty3 replication. Some of the factors we identified have been previously shown to affect Ty1 transposition and others to affect retroviral budding. Host factors, such as these, shared by distantly related Ty retroelements and retroviruses are novel candidates for antiviral targets. PMID:15837808

  2. Functional characterization of new mutations in Wilson disease gene (ATP7B) using the yeast model.

    PubMed

    Papur, Ozlenen Simsek; Terzioglu, Orhan; Koc, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    The Wilson disease gene, a copper transporting ATPase (Atp7b), is responsible for the sequestration of Cu into secretory vesicles, and this function is exhibited by the orthologous Ccc2p in the yeast. In this study, we aimed to characterize clinically relevant new mutations of human ATP7B (p.T788I, p.V1036I and p.R1038G-fsX83) in yeast lacking the CCC2 gene. Expression of human wild type ATP7B gene in ccc2Δ mutant yeast restored the growth deficiency and copper transport activity; however, expression of the mutant forms did not restore the copper transport functions and only partially supported the cell growth. Our data support that p.T788I, p.V1036I and p.R1038G-fsX83 mutations cause functional deficiency in ATP7B functions and suggest that these residues are important for normal ATP7B function.

  3. Four Inducible Promoters for Controlled Gene Expression in the Oleaginous Yeast Rhodotorula toruloides

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Alexander M. B.; Love, John; Aves, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Rhodotorula (Rhodosporidium) toruloides is an oleaginous yeast with great biotechnological potential, capable of accumulating lipid up to 70% of its dry biomass, and of carotenoid biosynthesis. However, few molecular genetic tools are available for manipulation of this basidiomycete yeast and its high genomic GC content can make routine cloning difficult. We have developed plasmid vectors for transformation of R. toruloides which include elements for Saccharomyces cerevisiae in-yeast assembly; this method is robust to the assembly of GC-rich DNA and of large plasmids. Using such vectors we screened for controllable promoters, and identified inducible promoters from the genes NAR1, ICL1, CTR3, and MET16. These four promoters have independent induction/repression conditions and exhibit different levels and rates of induction in R. toruloides, making them appropriate for controllable transgene expression in different experimental situations. Nested deletions were used to identify regulatory regions in the four promoters, and to delimit the minimal inducible promoters, which are as small as 200 bp for the NAR1 promoter. The NAR1 promoter shows very tight regulation under repressed conditions as determined both by an EGFP reporter gene and by conditional rescue of a leu2 mutant. These new tools facilitate molecular genetic manipulation and controllable gene expression in R. toruloides.

  4. Identification of a functional homolog of the yeast copper homeostasis gene ATX1 from Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Himelblau, E.; Amasino, R.M.; Mira, H.; Penarrubia, L.; Lin, S.J.; Culotta, V.C.

    1998-08-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a homolog of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) gene Anti-oxidant 1 (ATX1) has been identified from Arabidopsis. This gene, referred to as Copper CHaperone (CCH), encodes a protein that is 36% identical to the amino acid sequence of ATX1 and has a 48-amino acid extension at the C-terminal end, which is absent from ATX1 homologs identified in animals. ATX1-deficient yeast (atx1) displayed a loss of high-affinity iron uptake. Expression of CCH in the atx1 strain restored high-affinity iron uptake, demonstrating that CCH is a functional homolog of ATX1. When overexpressed in yeast lacking the superoxide dismutase gene SOD1, both ATX1 and CCH protected the cell from the reactive oxygen toxicity that results from superoxide dismutase deficiency. CCH was unable to rescue the sod1 phenotype in the absence of copper, indicating that CCH function is copper dependent. In Arabidopsis CCH mRNA is present in the root, leaf, and in fluorescence and is up-regulated 7-fold in leaves undergoing senescence. In plants treated with 800 nL/L ozone for 30 min, CCH mRNA levels increased by 30%. In excised leaves and whole plants treated with high levels of exogenous CuSO{sub 4}, CCH mRNA levels decreased, indicating that CCH is regulated differently than characterized metallothionein proteins in Arabidopsis.

  5. Tomato Fruits Show Wide Phenomic Diversity but Fruit Developmental Genes Show Low Genomic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vijee; Gupta, Soni; Thomas, Sherinmol; Mickey, Hanjabam; Charakana, Chaitanya; Chauhan, Vineeta Singh; Sharma, Kapil; Kumar, Rakesh; Tyagi, Kamal; Sarma, Supriya; Gupta, Suresh Kumar; Kilambi, Himabindu Vasuki; Nongmaithem, Sapana; Kumari, Alka; Gupta, Prateek; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Domestication of tomato has resulted in large diversity in fruit phenotypes. An intensive phenotyping of 127 tomato accessions from 20 countries revealed extensive morphological diversity in fruit traits. The diversity in fruit traits clustered the accessions into nine classes and identified certain promising lines having desirable traits pertaining to total soluble salts (TSS), carotenoids, ripening index, weight and shape. Factor analysis of the morphometric data from Tomato Analyzer showed that the fruit shape is a complex trait shared by several factors. The 100% variance between round and flat fruit shapes was explained by one discriminant function having a canonical correlation of 0.874 by stepwise discriminant analysis. A set of 10 genes (ACS2, COP1, CYC-B, RIN, MSH2, NAC-NOR, PHOT1, PHYA, PHYB and PSY1) involved in various plant developmental processes were screened for SNP polymorphism by EcoTILLING. The genetic diversity in these genes revealed a total of 36 non-synonymous and 18 synonymous changes leading to the identification of 28 haplotypes. The average frequency of polymorphism across the genes was 0.038/Kb. Significant negative Tajima’D statistic in two of the genes, ACS2 and PHOT1 indicated the presence of rare alleles in low frequency. Our study indicates that while there is low polymorphic diversity in the genes regulating plant development, the population shows wider phenotype diversity. Nonetheless, morphological and genetic diversity of the present collection can be further exploited as potential resources in future. PMID:27077652

  6. Tomato Fruits Show Wide Phenomic Diversity but Fruit Developmental Genes Show Low Genomic Diversity.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vijee; Gupta, Soni; Thomas, Sherinmol; Mickey, Hanjabam; Charakana, Chaitanya; Chauhan, Vineeta Singh; Sharma, Kapil; Kumar, Rakesh; Tyagi, Kamal; Sarma, Supriya; Gupta, Suresh Kumar; Kilambi, Himabindu Vasuki; Nongmaithem, Sapana; Kumari, Alka; Gupta, Prateek; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Domestication of tomato has resulted in large diversity in fruit phenotypes. An intensive phenotyping of 127 tomato accessions from 20 countries revealed extensive morphological diversity in fruit traits. The diversity in fruit traits clustered the accessions into nine classes and identified certain promising lines having desirable traits pertaining to total soluble salts (TSS), carotenoids, ripening index, weight and shape. Factor analysis of the morphometric data from Tomato Analyzer showed that the fruit shape is a complex trait shared by several factors. The 100% variance between round and flat fruit shapes was explained by one discriminant function having a canonical correlation of 0.874 by stepwise discriminant analysis. A set of 10 genes (ACS2, COP1, CYC-B, RIN, MSH2, NAC-NOR, PHOT1, PHYA, PHYB and PSY1) involved in various plant developmental processes were screened for SNP polymorphism by EcoTILLING. The genetic diversity in these genes revealed a total of 36 non-synonymous and 18 synonymous changes leading to the identification of 28 haplotypes. The average frequency of polymorphism across the genes was 0.038/Kb. Significant negative Tajima'D statistic in two of the genes, ACS2 and PHOT1 indicated the presence of rare alleles in low frequency. Our study indicates that while there is low polymorphic diversity in the genes regulating plant development, the population shows wider phenotype diversity. Nonetheless, morphological and genetic diversity of the present collection can be further exploited as potential resources in future.

  7. Tolerance to toxic metals by a gene family of phytochelatin synthases from plants and yeast.

    PubMed

    Clemens, S; Kim, E J; Neumann, D; Schroeder, J I

    1999-06-15

    Phytochelatins play major roles in metal detoxification in plants and fungi. However, genes encoding phytochelatin synthases have not yet been identified. By screening for plant genes mediating metal tolerance we identified a wheat cDNA, TaPCS1, whose expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a dramatic increase in cadmium tolerance. TaPCS1 encodes a protein of approximately 55 kDa with no similarity to proteins of known function. We identified homologs of this new gene family from Arabidopsis thaliana, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and interestingly also Caenorhabditis elegans. The Arabidopsis and S.pombe genes were also demonstrated to confer substantial increases in metal tolerance in yeast. PCS-expressing cells accumulate more Cd2+ than controls. PCS expression mediates Cd2+ tolerance even in yeast mutants that are either deficient in vacuolar acidification or impaired in vacuolar biogenesis. PCS-induced metal resistance is lost upon exposure to an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis, a process necessary for phytochelatin formation. Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells disrupted in the PCS gene exhibit hypersensitivity to Cd2+ and Cu2+ and are unable to synthesize phytochelatins upon Cd2+ exposure as determined by HPLC analysis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing PCS produce phytochelatins. Moreover, the recombinant purified S.pombe PCS protein displays phytochelatin synthase activity. These data demonstrate that PCS genes encode phytochelatin synthases and mediate metal detoxification in eukaryotes.

  8. Tolerance to toxic metals by a gene family of phytochelatin synthases from plants and yeast.

    PubMed

    Clemens, S; Kim, E J; Neumann, D; Schroeder, J I

    1999-06-15

    Phytochelatins play major roles in metal detoxification in plants and fungi. However, genes encoding phytochelatin synthases have not yet been identified. By screening for plant genes mediating metal tolerance we identified a wheat cDNA, TaPCS1, whose expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a dramatic increase in cadmium tolerance. TaPCS1 encodes a protein of approximately 55 kDa with no similarity to proteins of known function. We identified homologs of this new gene family from Arabidopsis thaliana, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and interestingly also Caenorhabditis elegans. The Arabidopsis and S.pombe genes were also demonstrated to confer substantial increases in metal tolerance in yeast. PCS-expressing cells accumulate more Cd2+ than controls. PCS expression mediates Cd2+ tolerance even in yeast mutants that are either deficient in vacuolar acidification or impaired in vacuolar biogenesis. PCS-induced metal resistance is lost upon exposure to an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis, a process necessary for phytochelatin formation. Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells disrupted in the PCS gene exhibit hypersensitivity to Cd2+ and Cu2+ and are unable to synthesize phytochelatins upon Cd2+ exposure as determined by HPLC analysis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing PCS produce phytochelatins. Moreover, the recombinant purified S.pombe PCS protein displays phytochelatin synthase activity. These data demonstrate that PCS genes encode phytochelatin synthases and mediate metal detoxification in eukaryotes. PMID:10369673

  9. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Smialowska, Agata; Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen; Kylsten, Per; Swoboda, Peter; Ekwall, Karl

    2014-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of potato leaves expressing the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase 1 gene of yeast.

    PubMed

    Kondrák, Mihály; Marincs, Ferenc; Kalapos, Balázs; Juhász, Zsófia; Bánfalvi, Zsófia

    2011-01-01

    Transgenic lines of the potato cultivar White Lady expressing the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS1) gene of yeast exhibit improved drought tolerance, but grow slower and have a lower carbon fixation rate and stomatal density than the wild-type. To understand the molecular basis of this phenomenon, we have compared the transcriptomes of wild-type and TPS1-transgenic plants using the POCI microarray containing 42,034 potato unigene probes. We show that 74 and 25 genes were up-, and down-regulated, respectively, in the mature source leaves of TPS1-transgenic plants when compared with the wild-type. The differentially regulated genes were assigned into 16 functional groups. All of the seven genes, which were assigned into carbon fixation and metabolism group, were up-regulated, while about 42% of the assigned genes are involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Expression of genes encoding a 14-3-3 regulatory protein, and four transcription factors were down-regulated in the TPS1-transgenic leaves. To verify the microarray results, we used RNA gel blot analysis to examine the expression of eight genes and found that the RNA gel blot and microarray data correlated in each case. Using the putative Arabidopsis orthologs of the assigned potato sequences we have identified putative transcription binding sites in the promoter region of the differentially regulated genes, and putative protein-protein interactions involving some of the up- and down-regulated genes. We have also demonstrated that starch content is lower, while malate, inositol and maltose contents are higher in the TPS1-transgenic than in the wild-type leaves. Our results suggest that a complex regulatory network, involving transcription factors and other regulatory proteins, underpins the phenotypic alterations we have observed previously in potato when expressing the TPS1 gene of yeast.

  11. Development of a transformation system for gene knock-out in the flavinogenic yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Pynyaha, Yuriy V; Boretsky, Volodymyr Y; Kutsyaba, Vasyl I; Protchenko, Olga V; Philpott, Caroline C; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2007-07-01

    Pichia guilliermondii is a representative of a yeast species, all of which over-synthesize riboflavin in response to iron deprivation. Molecular genetic studies in this yeast species have been hampered by a lack of strain-specific tools for gene manipulation. Stable P. guilliermondii ura3 mutants were selected on the basis of 5'-fluoroorotic acid resistance. Plasmid carrying Saccharomyces cerevisiae URA3 gene transformed the mutant strains to prototrophy with a low efficiency. Substitution of a single leucine codon CUG by another leucine codon CUC in the URA3 gene increased the efficiency of transformation 100 fold. Deletion cassettes for the RIB1 and RIB7 genes, coding for GTP cyclohydrolase and riboflavin synthase, respectively, were constructed using the modified URA3 gene and subsequently introduced into a P. guilliermondii ura3 strain. Site-specific integrants were identified by selection for the Rib(-) Ura(+) phenotype and confirmed by PCR analysis. Transformation of the P. guilliermondii ura3 strain was performed using electroporation, spheroplasting or lithium acetate treatment. Only the lithium acetate transformation procedure provided selection of uracil prototrophic, riboflavin deficient recombinant strains. Depending on the type of cassette, efficiency of site-specific integration was 0.1% and 3-12% in the case of the RIB1 and RIB7 genes, respectively. We suggest that the presence of the ARS element adjacent to the 3' end of the RIB1 gene significantly reduced the frequency of homologous recombination. Efficient gene deletion in P. guilliermondii can be achieved using the modified URA3 gene of S. cerevisiae flanked by 0.8-0.9 kb sequences homologous to the target gene. PMID:17467833

  12. [Construction of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata strains with high riboflavin kinase activity using gene engineering].

    PubMed

    Ishchuk, O P; Iatsyshyn, V Iu; Dmytruk, K V; Voronovs'kyĭ, A Ia; Fedorovych, D V; Sybirnyĭ, A A

    2006-01-01

    The recombinant strains of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata, which contain the DNA fragment consisting of the FMN1 gene (encoding the riboflavin kinase, enzyme that converts riboflavin to flavinmononucleotide) driven by the strong promoters (the regulated RIB1 or constitutive TEF1 promoter) were isolated. Riboflavin kinase activity in the isolated transformants was tested. The 6-8-fold increase of the riboflavin kinase activity was shown in the recombinant strains containing the integrated Debaryomyces hansenii FMN1 gene under the strong constitutive TEF1 promoter. The recombinant strains can be used for the following construction of flavinmononucleotide overproducers. PMID:17290783

  13. Identifying Gene Regulatory Networks in Arabidopsis by In Silico Prediction, Yeast-1-Hybrid, and Inducible Gene Profiling Assays.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Erin E; Benfey, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    A system-wide understanding of gene regulation will provide deep insights into plant development and physiology. In this chapter we describe a threefold approach to identify the gene regulatory networks in Arabidopsis thaliana that function in a specific tissue or biological process. Since no single method is sufficient to establish comprehensive and high-confidence gene regulatory networks, we focus on the integration of three approaches. First, we describe an in silico prediction method of transcription factor-DNA binding, then an in vivo assay of transcription factor-DNA binding by yeast-1-hybrid and lastly the identification of co-expression clusters by transcription factor induction in planta. Each of these methods provides a unique tool to advance our understanding of gene regulation, and together provide a robust model for the generation of gene regulatory networks.

  14. Construction of a brewer's yeast having alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase gene from Acetobacter aceti ssp. xylinum integrated in the genome.

    PubMed

    Yamano, S; Kondo, K; Tanaka, J; Inoue, T

    1994-02-14

    alpha-Acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC) gene from Acetobacter aceti ssp. xylinum has several possible initiation codons in the N-terminus. To determine the initiation codon of the ALDC giving the highest expression levels, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) promoter was linked just upstream of each possible initiation codon. The ALDC whose translation starts 130 bp downstream from the first ATG codon had the highest activity in yeast cells. When expression levels of the ALDC gene were compared using three strong yeast promoters of glycolytic genes, alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADC1), phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and GPD, the GPD promoter was the strongest. The ALDC gene was integrated in a ribosomal RNA gene of a brewer's yeast by co-transformation with an expression plasmid of G418-resistance gene. The laboratory-scale growth test confirmed that the total diacetyl concentration was reduced in wort.

  15. Isolation of the alkane inducible cytochrome P450 (P450alk) gene from the yeast Candida tropicalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a λgt11 library. Isolation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. Transcripts of this gene were i...

  16. Diversity of Gene Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Cui, Li; Kuo, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding tumor diversity has been a long-lasting and challenging question for researchers in the field of cancer heterogeneity or tumor evolution. Studies have reported that compared to normal cells, there is a higher genetic diversity in tumor cells, while higher genetic diversity is associated with higher progression risks of tumor. We thus hypothesized that tumor diversity also holds true at the gene expression level. To test this hypothesis, we used t-test to compare the means of Simpson’s diversity index for gene expression (SDIG) between tumor and non-tumor samples. We found that the mean SDIG in tumor tissues is significantly higher than that in the non-tumor or normal tissues (P < 0.05) for most datasets. We also combined microarrays and next-generation sequencing data for validation. This cross-platform and cross-experimental validation greatly increased the reliability of our results. PMID:26779818

  17. Gene expression and biochemical analysis of cheese-ripening yeasts: focus on catabolism of L-methionine, lactate, and lactose.

    PubMed

    Cholet, Orianne; Hénaut, Alain; Casaregola, Serge; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2007-04-01

    DNA microarrays of 86 genes from the yeasts Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica were developed to determine which genes were expressed in a medium mimicking a cheese-ripening environment. These genes were selected for potential involvement in lactose/lactate catabolism and the biosynthesis of sulfur-flavored compounds. Hybridization conditions to follow specifically the expression of homologous genes belonging to different species were set up. The microarray was first validated on pure cultures of each yeast; no interspecies cross-hybridization was observed. Expression patterns of targeted genes were studied in pure cultures of each yeast, as well as in coculture, and compared to biochemical data. As expected, a high expression of the LAC genes of K. marxianus was observed. This is a yeast that efficiently degrades lactose. Several lactate dehydrogenase-encoding genes were also expressed essentially in D. hansenii and K. marxianus, which are two efficient deacidifying yeasts in cheese ripening. A set of genes possibly involved in l-methionine catabolism was also used on the array. Y. lipolytica, which efficiently assimilates l-methionine, also exhibited a high expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologs BAT2 and ARO8, which are involved in the l-methionine degradation pathway. Our data provide the first evidence that the use of a multispecies microarray could be a powerful tool to investigate targeted metabolism and possible metabolic interactions between species within microbial cocultures. PMID:17308183

  18. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-07-14

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes.

  19. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L.; Chiang, Jennifer H.; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. PMID:26175450

  20. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-09-01

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. PMID:26175450

  1. Functional complementation of sir2Δ yeast mutation by the human orthologous gene SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Gaglio, Davide; D'Alfonso, Anna; Camilloni, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuins, class III histone deacetylases, are proteins homologous to the yeast protein Sir2p. Mammalian Sirt1 has been shown to be involved in energy metabolism, brain functions, inflammation and aging through its deacetylase activity, acting on both histone and non-histone substrates. In order to verify whether Sirt1 can replace Sir2p in the yeast cells, we expressed the full-length human Sirt1 protein in S.cerevisiae sir2Δ mutant strain. The structure of chromatin is basically maintained from yeast to human. Thus, yeast chromatin is a favourable environment to evaluate, inhibit or activate an ectopic histone deacetylase activity in an in vivo substrate. Mutant sir2Δ shows a series of different phenotypes, all dependent on the deacetylase activity of Sir2p. We analyzed the three silent loci where normally Sir2p acts: ribosomal DNA, telomeres and the mating type loci. Moreover, we verified extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA circles production and histone hyperacetylation levels, typical marks of sir2Δ strains. By strong SIRT1 overexpression in sir2Δ cells, we found that specific molecular phenotypes of the mutant revert almost to a wild-type condition. In particular, transcriptional silencing at rDNA was restored, extrachromosomal rDNA circles formation was repressed and histone acetylation at H3K9 and H4K16 decreased. The complementation at the other studied loci: HM loci, telomere and sub-telomere does not occur. Overall, our observations indicate that: i) SIRT1 gene is able to complement different molecular phenotypes of the sir2Δ mutant at rDNA ii) the in vivo screening of Sirt1 activity is possible in yeast.

  2. Rapid identification of potential drought tolerance genes from Solanum tuberosum by using a yeast functional screening method.

    PubMed

    Kappachery, Sajeesh; Yu, Jae Woong; Baniekal-Hiremath, Gangadhar; Park, Se Won

    2013-01-01

    Identification of major stress tolerance genes of a crop plant is important for the rapid development of its stress-tolerant cultivar. Here, we used a yeast functional screen method to identify potential drought-tolerance genes from a potato plant. A cDNA expression library was constructed from hyperosmotic stressed potato plants. The yeast transformants expressing different cDNAs were selected for their ability to survive in hyperosmotic stress conditions. The relative tolerances of the selected yeast transformants to multiple abiotic stresses were also studied. Specific potato cDNAs expressed in the tolerant yeast transformants were identified. Sixty-nine genes were found capable of enhancing hyperosmotic stress tolerance of yeast. Based on the relative tolerance data generated, 12 genes were selected, which could be most effective in imparting higher drought tolerance to potato with better survival in salt and high-temperature stresses. Orthologues of few genes identified here are previously known to increase osmotic stress tolerance of yeast and plants; however, specific studies are needed to confirm their role in the osmotic stress tolerance of potato. PMID:24296077

  3. Yeast spindle pole body duplication gene MPS1 encodes an essential dual specificity protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lauzé, E; Stoelcker, B; Luca, F C; Weiss, E; Schutz, A R; Winey, M

    1995-01-01

    The MPS1 gene has been previously identified by a mutant allele that shows defects in spindle pole body (SPB) duplication and cell cycle control. The SPB is the centrosome-equivalent organelle in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and it nucleates all the microtubules in the cell. We report the isolation of the MPS1 gene, which encodes an essential protein kinase homolog. The MPS1 open reading frame has been fused to those that encode the LexA protein or the GST protein and both of these constructs function in yeast. The fusion proteins have been affinity-purified from yeast extracts and the GST chimeric protein has been found to be a phosphoprotein. Both proteins have been used to demonstrate intrinsic in vitro protein kinase activity of Mps1p against exogenous substrates and itself (autophosphorylation). A mutation predicted to abolish kinase function not only eliminates in vitro protein kinase activity, but also behaves like a null mutation in vivo, suggesting that kinase activity contributes to the essential function of the protein. Phosphoamino acid analysis of substrates phosphorylated by Mps1p indicates that this kinase can phosphorylate serine, threonine and tyrosine residues, identifying Mps1p as a dual specificity protein kinase. Images PMID:7737118

  4. Disruption of phospholipase B gene, PLB1, increases the survival of baker's yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Imai, K; Oishi, H; Tamai, Y

    1996-12-15

    An uracil auxotrophic mutant of baker's yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii, which is resistant to 5-fluoro-orotic acid, was complemented by transformation with YEp24 which harbors 2 microns origin and URA3 derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phospholipase B in T. delbrueckii cells is active in both acidic and alkaline conditions. However, activity of phospholipase B gene (PLB1) in cells of disruption mutant (plb1:: URA3) was lost in both conditions, which indicates that all phospholipase B activity is encoded by a single gene (or a single polypeptide) in these yeast cells. Over-expression of PLB1 with YEp plasmid vector in T. delbrueckii cells showed approximately 2.5-fold increase in phospholipase B activity, comparing with that in wild-type cells. Cells of plb1 delta mutant showed increased survival when cells of plb1 delta mutant and wild-type strain were incubated in water at 30 degrees C. Cells of PLB1-over-expressed strain died rapidly even during the cultivation period, indicating that phospholipase B activity may be a determinant for the survival of this yeast.

  5. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression: Applications in Malaria Parasite, Yeast, Plant, and Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tuteja, Renu

    2004-01-01

    The serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) method is based on the isolation of unique sequence tags from individual transcripts and concatenation of tags serially into long DNA molecules. SAGE is an innovative technique that offers the potential of cataloging both the identity and relative frequencies of mRNA transcripts in a given RNA preparation. It can quantify low-abundance transcripts and reliably detect relatively small differences in transcript abundance between cell populations. SAGE data can be used to complement studies in cases where other gene expression methods may be more convenient or efficient. SAGE can be used in a wide variety of applications to identify disease-related genes, to analyze the effect of drugs on tissues, and to provide insights into the disease pathways. The most important application of SAGE is the identification of differentially expressed genes. In this review, we describe various applications of this powerful technology in malarial parasite, yeast, plant, and animal systems. PMID:15240921

  6. Metabolic analyses elucidate non-trivial gene targets for amplifying dihydroartemisinic acid production in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ashish; Conway, Matthew F.; Johnnie, Joseph; Qureshi, Tabish M.; Lige, Bao; Derrick, Anne M.; Agbo, Eddy C.; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables metabolic engineering of industrial microbes to synthesize value-added molecules. In this, a major challenge is the efficient redirection of carbon to the desired metabolic pathways. Pinpointing strategies toward this goal requires an in-depth investigation of the metabolic landscape of the organism, particularly primary metabolism, to identify precursor and cofactor availability for the target compound. The potent antimalarial therapeutic artemisinin and its precursors are promising candidate molecules for production in microbial hosts. Recent advances have demonstrated the production of artemisinin precursors in engineered yeast strains as an alternative to extraction from plants. We report the application of in silico and in vivo metabolic pathway analyses to identify metabolic engineering targets to improve the yield of the direct artemisinin precursor dihydroartemisinic acid (DHA) in yeast. First, in silico extreme pathway (ExPa) analysis identified NADPH-malic enzyme and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as mechanisms to meet NADPH demand for DHA synthesis. Next, we compared key DHA-synthesizing ExPas to the metabolic flux distributions obtained from in vivo 13C metabolic flux analysis of a DHA-synthesizing strain. This comparison revealed that knocking out ethanol synthesis and overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP (gene YNL241C) or the NADPH-malic enzyme ME2 (YKL029C) are vital steps toward overproducing DHA. Finally, we employed in silico flux balance analysis and minimization of metabolic adjustment on a yeast genome-scale model to identify gene knockouts for improving DHA yields. The best strategy involved knockout of an oxaloacetate transporter (YKL120W) and an aspartate aminotransferase (YKL106W), and was predicted to improve DHA yields by 70-fold. Collectively, our work elucidates multiple non-trivial metabolic engineering strategies for improving DHA yield in yeast. PMID:23898325

  7. Metabolic analyses elucidate non-trivial gene targets for amplifying dihydroartemisinic acid production in yeast.

    PubMed

    Misra, Ashish; Conway, Matthew F; Johnnie, Joseph; Qureshi, Tabish M; Lige, Bao; Derrick, Anne M; Agbo, Eddy C; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables metabolic engineering of industrial microbes to synthesize value-added molecules. In this, a major challenge is the efficient redirection of carbon to the desired metabolic pathways. Pinpointing strategies toward this goal requires an in-depth investigation of the metabolic landscape of the organism, particularly primary metabolism, to identify precursor and cofactor availability for the target compound. The potent antimalarial therapeutic artemisinin and its precursors are promising candidate molecules for production in microbial hosts. Recent advances have demonstrated the production of artemisinin precursors in engineered yeast strains as an alternative to extraction from plants. We report the application of in silico and in vivo metabolic pathway analyses to identify metabolic engineering targets to improve the yield of the direct artemisinin precursor dihydroartemisinic acid (DHA) in yeast. First, in silico extreme pathway (ExPa) analysis identified NADPH-malic enzyme and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as mechanisms to meet NADPH demand for DHA synthesis. Next, we compared key DHA-synthesizing ExPas to the metabolic flux distributions obtained from in vivo (13)C metabolic flux analysis of a DHA-synthesizing strain. This comparison revealed that knocking out ethanol synthesis and overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP (gene YNL241C) or the NADPH-malic enzyme ME2 (YKL029C) are vital steps toward overproducing DHA. Finally, we employed in silico flux balance analysis and minimization of metabolic adjustment on a yeast genome-scale model to identify gene knockouts for improving DHA yields. The best strategy involved knockout of an oxaloacetate transporter (YKL120W) and an aspartate aminotransferase (YKL106W), and was predicted to improve DHA yields by 70-fold. Collectively, our work elucidates multiple non-trivial metabolic engineering strategies for improving DHA yield in yeast.

  8. Plug-and-Play Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Biosynthetic Gene Discovery in Engineered Yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S; Dastmalchi, M; Li, J; Chang, L; Chen, X; Hagel, J M; Facchini, P J

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid (BIA) metabolism has been the focus of a considerable research effort over the past half-century, primarily because of the pharmaceutical importance of several compounds produced by opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Advancements in genomics technologies have substantially accelerated the rate of gene discovery over the past decade, such that most biosynthetic enzymes involved in the formation of the major alkaloids of opium poppy have now been isolated and partially characterized. Not unexpectedly, the availability of all perceived biosynthetic genes has facilitated the reconstitution of several BIA pathways in microbial hosts, including yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Product yields are currently insufficient to consider the commercial production of high-value BIAs, such as morphine. However, the rudimentary success demonstrated by the uncomplicated and routine assembly of a multitude of characterized BIA biosynthetic genes provides a valuable gene discovery tool for the rapid functional identification of the plethora of gene candidates available through increasingly accessible genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic databases. BIA biosynthetic gene discovery represents a substantial research opportunity largely owing to the wealth of existing enzyme data mostly obtained from a single plant species. Functionally novel enzymes and variants with potential metabolic engineering applications can be considered the primary targets. Selection of candidates from sequence repositories is facilitated by the monophyletic relationship among biosynthetic genes belonging to a wide range of enzyme families, such as the numerous cytochromes P450 and AdoMet-dependent O- and N-methyltransferases that operate in BIA metabolism. We describe methods for the rapid functional screening of uncharacterized gene candidates encoding potential BIA biosynthetic enzymes using yeast strains engineered to perform selected metabolic conversions. As an initial

  9. Species diversity and polymorphism in the Exophiala spinifera clade containing opportunistic black yeast-like fungi.

    PubMed

    de Hoog, G S; Vicente, V; Caligiorne, R B; Kantarcioglu, S; Tintelnot, K; Gerrits van den Ende, A H G; Haase, G

    2003-10-01

    A monophyletic group of black yeast-like fungi containing opportunistic pathogens around Exophiala spinifera is analyzed using sequences of the small-subunit (SSU) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domains of ribosomal DNA. The group contains yeast-like and annellidic species (anamorph genus Exophiala) in addition to sympodial taxa (anamorph genera Ramichloridium and Rhinocladiella). The new species Exophiala oligosperma, Ramichloridium basitonum, and Rhinocladiella similis are introduced and compared with their morphologically similar counterparts at larger phylogenetic distances outside the E. spinifera clade. Exophiala jeanselmei is redefined. New combinations are proposed in EXOPHIALA: Exophiala exophialae for Phaeococcomyces exophialae and Exophiala heteromorpha for E. jeanselmei var. heteromorpha. PMID:14532218

  10. Species Diversity and Polymorphism in the Exophiala spinifera Clade Containing Opportunistic Black Yeast-Like Fungi

    PubMed Central

    de Hoog, G. S.; Vicente, V.; Caligiorne, R. B.; Kantarcioglu, S.; Tintelnot, K.; Gerrits van den Ende, A. H. G.; Haase, G.

    2003-01-01

    A monophyletic group of black yeast-like fungi containing opportunistic pathogens around Exophiala spinifera is analyzed using sequences of the small-subunit (SSU) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domains of ribosomal DNA. The group contains yeast-like and annellidic species (anamorph genus Exophiala) in addition to sympodial taxa (anamorph genera Ramichloridium and Rhinocladiella). The new species Exophiala oligosperma, Ramichloridium basitonum, and Rhinocladiella similis are introduced and compared with their morphologically similar counterparts at larger phylogenetic distances outside the E. spinifera clade. Exophiala jeanselmei is redefined. New combinations are proposed in Exophiala: Exophiala exophialae for Phaeococcomyces exophialae and Exophiala heteromorpha for E. jeanselmei var. heteromorpha. PMID:14532218

  11. Satellite DNA from the brine shrimp Artemia affects the expression of a flanking gene in yeast.

    PubMed

    Maiorano, D; Cece, R; Badaracco, G

    1997-04-11

    We have previously revealed that in the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana an AluI DNA family of repeats, 113 bp in length, is the major component of the constitutive heterochromatin and that this repetitive DNA shows a stable curvature that confers a solenoidal geometry on the double helix in vitro. It was suggested that this particular structure may play a relevant role in determining the condensation of the heterochromatin. In this report we have cloned hexamers of highly-repetitive sequence (AluI-satellite DNA) in proximity to a yeast lacZ reporter gene on a plasmid. We find that the expression of the reporter gene is affected by the presence of this DNA in a dose- and orientation-dependent manner in the yeast, S. cerevisiae. We show that this effect is not dependent on under-replication or re-arrangements of the repetitive DNA in the cell but is due to decreased expression of the reporter gene. Our results indicate that the AluI-satellite DNA of Artemia per se is able to influence gene expression. PMID:9161405

  12. Satellite DNA from the brine shrimp Artemia affects the expression of a flanking gene in yeast.

    PubMed

    Maiorano, D; Cece, R; Badaracco, G

    1997-04-11

    We have previously revealed that in the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana an AluI DNA family of repeats, 113 bp in length, is the major component of the constitutive heterochromatin and that this repetitive DNA shows a stable curvature that confers a solenoidal geometry on the double helix in vitro. It was suggested that this particular structure may play a relevant role in determining the condensation of the heterochromatin. In this report we have cloned hexamers of highly-repetitive sequence (AluI-satellite DNA) in proximity to a yeast lacZ reporter gene on a plasmid. We find that the expression of the reporter gene is affected by the presence of this DNA in a dose- and orientation-dependent manner in the yeast, S. cerevisiae. We show that this effect is not dependent on under-replication or re-arrangements of the repetitive DNA in the cell but is due to decreased expression of the reporter gene. Our results indicate that the AluI-satellite DNA of Artemia per se is able to influence gene expression.

  13. Genetic engineering of a sake yeast producing no urea by successive disruption of arginase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, K; Oda, K; Gomi, K; Takahashi, K

    1991-01-01

    Urea is reported to be a main precursor of ethyl carbamate (ECA), which is suspected to be a carcinogen, in wine and sake. In order to minimize production of urea, arginase-deficient mutants (delta car1/delta car1) were constructed from a diploid sake yeast, Kyokai no. 9, by successive disruption of the two copies of the CAR1 gene. First, the yeast strain was transformed with plasmid pCAT2 (delta car1 SMR1), and strains heterozygous for CAR1 gene were isolated on sulfometuron methyl plates. Successively, the other CAR1 gene was disrupted by transformation with plasmid pCAT1 (delta car1 G418r) and the resulting car1 mutants were isolated on a G418 plate. Arginase assay of the total cell lysate of the mutants showed that 70% of transformants isolated on G418 plates had no detectable enzyme activity, possibly as a result of the disruption of the two copies of the CAR1 gene. Further genomic Southern analysis confirmed this result. We could brew sake containing no urea with the delta car1/delta car1 homozygous mutant. It is of additional interest that no ECA was detected in the resulting sake, even after storage for 5 months at 30 degrees C. This molecular biological study suggests that ECA in sake originates mainly from urea that is produced by the arginase. Images PMID:2036017

  14. Life History Responses and Gene Expression Profiles of the Nematode Pristionchus pacificus Cultured on Cryptococcus Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Gaurav V.; Baskaran, Praveen; Röseler, Waltraud; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Nematodes, the earth’s most abundant metazoa are found in all ecosystems. In order to survive in diverse environments, they have evolved distinct feeding strategies and they can use different food sources. While some nematodes are specialists, including parasites of plants and animals, others such as Pristionchus pacificus are omnivorous feeders, which can live on a diet of bacteria, protozoans, fungi or yeast. In the wild, P. pacificus is often found in a necromenic association with beetles and is known to be able to feed on a variety of microbes as well as on nematode prey. However, in laboratory studies Escherichia coli OP50 has been used as standard food source, similar to investigations in Caenorhabditis elegans and it is unclear to what extent this biases the obtained results and how relevant findings are in real nature. To gain first insight into the variation in traits induced by a non-bacterial food source, we study Pristionchus-fungi interactions under laboratory conditions. After screening different yeast strains, we were able to maintain P. pacificus for at least 50–60 generations on Cryptococcus albidus and Cryptococcus curvatus. We describe life history traits of P. pacificus on both yeast strains, including developmental timing, survival and brood size. Despite a slight developmental delay and problems to digest yeast cells, which are both reflected at a transcriptomic level, all analyses support the potential of Cryptococcus strains as food source for P. pacificus. In summary, our work establishes two Cryptococcus strains as alternative food source for P. pacificus and shows change in various developmental, physiological and morphological traits, including the transcriptomic profiles. PMID:27741297

  15. Yeasts in an industrial malting ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Laitila, A; Wilhelmson, A; Kotaviita, E; Olkku, J; Home, S; Juvonen, R

    2006-11-01

    The malting ecosystem consists of two components: the germinating cereal grains and the complex microbial community. Yeasts and yeast-like fungi are an important part of this ecosystem, but the composition and the effects of this microbial group have been largely unknown. In this study we surveyed the development of yeasts and yeast-like fungi in four industrial scale malting processes. A total of 136 malting process samples were collected and examined for the presence of yeasts growing at 15, 25 and 37 degrees C. More than 700 colonies were isolated and characterized. The isolates were discriminated by PCR-fingerprinting with microsatellite primer (M13). Yeasts representing different fingerprint types were identified by sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. Furthermore, identified yeasts were screened for the production of alpha-amylase, beta-glucanase, cellulase and xylanase. A numerous and diverse yeast community consisting of both ascomycetous (25) and basidiomycetous (18) species was detected in the various stages of the malting process. The most frequently isolated ascomycetous yeasts belonged to the genera Candida, Clavispora, Galactomyces, Hanseniaspora, Issatchenkia, Pichia, Saccharomyces and Williopsis and the basidiomycetous yeasts to Bulleromyces, Filobasidium, Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Sporobolomyces and Trichosporon. In addition, two ascomycetous yeast-like fungi (black yeasts) belonging to the genera Aureobasidium and Exophiala were commonly detected. Yeasts and yeast-like fungi produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes with a potentially positive contribution to the malt enzyme spectrum. Knowledge of the microbial diversity provides a basis for microflora management and understanding of the role of microbes in the cereal germination process. PMID:16758169

  16. Positionally biased gene loss after whole genome duplication: Evidence from human, yeast, and plant

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Takashi; McLysaght, Aoife

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has made a significant contribution to many eukaryotic genomes including yeast, plants, and vertebrates. Following WGD, some ohnologs (WGD paralogs) remain in the genome arranged in blocks of conserved gene order and content (paralogons). However, the most common outcome is loss of one of the ohnolog pair. It is unclear what factors, if any, govern gene loss from paralogons. Recent studies have reported physical clustering (genetic linkage) of functionally linked (interacting) genes in the human genome and propose a biological significance for the clustering of interacting genes such as coexpression or preservation of epistatic interactions. Here we conduct a novel test of a hypothesis that functionally linked genes in the same paralogon are preferentially retained in cis after WGD. We compare the number of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) between linked singletons within a paralogon (defined as cis-PPIs) with that of PPIs between singletons across paralogon pairs (defined as trans-PPIs). We find that paralogons in which the number of cis-PPIs is greater than that of trans-PPIs are significantly enriched in human and yeast. The trend is similar in plants, but it is difficult to assess statistical significance due to multiple, overlapping WGD events. Interestingly, human singletons participating in cis-PPIs tend to be classified into “response to stimulus.” We uncover strong evidence of biased gene loss after WGD, which further supports the hypothesis of biologically significant gene clusters in eukaryotic genomes. These observations give us new insight for understanding the evolution of genome structure and of protein interaction networks. PMID:22835904

  17. Evaluation of microbial quality and yeast diversity in fresh-cut apple.

    PubMed

    Graça, Ana; Santo, David; Esteves, Eduardo; Nunes, Carla; Abadias, Maribel; Quintas, Célia

    2015-10-01

    The present work's aim was to study the microbial quality of minimally processed apples commercialized in Portugal. Sixty eight samples of fresh-cut apple were analyzed before their best-before date in 2011 and 2012 for aerobic mesophilic and psychrotrophic microorganisms, total coliforms, lactic-acid bacteria (LAB), coagulase-positive staphylococci and fungi. The parameters of food safety studied were Cronobacter sakazakii, Salmonella spp. and Listeria sp. Samples were analyzed according to standard methodologies and using Chromocult Agar for coliforms and Escherichia coli. The yeasts were identified by restriction analysis of the ITS-5.8S rDNA-region and 26S rDNA partial sequencing. The mesophilic and psychrotrophic microorganisms ranged from 3.3 to 8.9 and from 4.9 to 8.4 log CFU/g, respectively. Coliforms were detected in all the samples and staphylococci in 5.8% of them. LAB numbers varied from 2.8 to 8.7 and fungi (yeast and molds) from 3.6 to 7.1 log CFU/g. The most common yeasts were Candida sake and Pichia fermentans followed by Hanseniaspora spp., Candida spp., Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Cryptococcus spp. and the psychrotrophic Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum. Foodborne bacteria and opportunistic pathogenic yeasts were not detected in the apples studied. The results obtained respected the European Commission regulation regarding criteria of food hygiene and safety. PMID:26187843

  18. Evaluation of microbial quality and yeast diversity in fresh-cut apple.

    PubMed

    Graça, Ana; Santo, David; Esteves, Eduardo; Nunes, Carla; Abadias, Maribel; Quintas, Célia

    2015-10-01

    The present work's aim was to study the microbial quality of minimally processed apples commercialized in Portugal. Sixty eight samples of fresh-cut apple were analyzed before their best-before date in 2011 and 2012 for aerobic mesophilic and psychrotrophic microorganisms, total coliforms, lactic-acid bacteria (LAB), coagulase-positive staphylococci and fungi. The parameters of food safety studied were Cronobacter sakazakii, Salmonella spp. and Listeria sp. Samples were analyzed according to standard methodologies and using Chromocult Agar for coliforms and Escherichia coli. The yeasts were identified by restriction analysis of the ITS-5.8S rDNA-region and 26S rDNA partial sequencing. The mesophilic and psychrotrophic microorganisms ranged from 3.3 to 8.9 and from 4.9 to 8.4 log CFU/g, respectively. Coliforms were detected in all the samples and staphylococci in 5.8% of them. LAB numbers varied from 2.8 to 8.7 and fungi (yeast and molds) from 3.6 to 7.1 log CFU/g. The most common yeasts were Candida sake and Pichia fermentans followed by Hanseniaspora spp., Candida spp., Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Cryptococcus spp. and the psychrotrophic Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum. Foodborne bacteria and opportunistic pathogenic yeasts were not detected in the apples studied. The results obtained respected the European Commission regulation regarding criteria of food hygiene and safety.

  19. GAPDH gene diversity in spirochetes: a paradigm for genetic promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Figge, R M; Cerff, R

    2001-12-01

    In this study we have determined gap sequences from nine different spirochetes. Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences in the context of all other available eubacterial and a selection of eukaryotic Gap sequences demonstrated that the eubacterial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene diversity encompasses at least five highly distinct gene families. Within these gene families, spirochetes show an extreme degree of sequence divergence that is probably the result of several lateral gene transfer events between spirochetes and other eubacterial phyla, and early gene duplications in the eubacterial ancestor. A Gap1 sequence from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum has recently been shown to be closely related to GapC sequences from Euglenozoa. Here we demonstrate that several other spirochetal species are part of this cluster, supporting the conclusion that an interkingdom gene transfer from spirochetes to Euglenozoa must have occurred. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the GAPDH genes present in the protists Parabasalia may also be of spirochetal descent.

  20. Cell cycle Start is coupled to entry into the yeast metabolic cycle across diverse strains and growth rates.

    PubMed

    Burnetti, Anthony J; Aydin, Mert; Buchler, Nicolas E

    2016-01-01

    Cells have evolved oscillators with different frequencies to coordinate periodic processes. Here we studied the interaction of two oscillators, the cell division cycle (CDC) and the yeast metabolic cycle (YMC), in budding yeast. Previous work suggested that the CDC and YMC interact to separate high oxygen consumption (HOC) from DNA replication to prevent genetic damage. To test this hypothesis, we grew diverse strains in chemostat and measured DNA replication and oxygen consumption with high temporal resolution at different growth rates. Our data showed that HOC is not strictly separated from DNA replication; rather, cell cycle Start is coupled with the initiation of HOC and catabolism of storage carbohydrates. The logic of this YMC-CDC coupling may be to ensure that DNA replication and cell division occur only when sufficient cellular energy reserves have accumulated. Our results also uncovered a quantitative relationship between CDC period and YMC period across different strains. More generally, our approach shows how studies in genetically diverse strains efficiently identify robust phenotypes and steer the experimentalist away from strain-specific idiosyncrasies. PMID:26538026

  1. Cell cycle Start is coupled to entry into the yeast metabolic cycle across diverse strains and growth rates

    PubMed Central

    Burnetti, Anthony J.; Aydin, Mert; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2016-01-01

    Cells have evolved oscillators with different frequencies to coordinate periodic processes. Here we studied the interaction of two oscillators, the cell division cycle (CDC) and the yeast metabolic cycle (YMC), in budding yeast. Previous work suggested that the CDC and YMC interact to separate high oxygen consumption (HOC) from DNA replication to prevent genetic damage. To test this hypothesis, we grew diverse strains in chemostat and measured DNA replication and oxygen consumption with high temporal resolution at different growth rates. Our data showed that HOC is not strictly separated from DNA replication; rather, cell cycle Start is coupled with the initiation of HOC and catabolism of storage carbohydrates. The logic of this YMC–CDC coupling may be to ensure that DNA replication and cell division occur only when sufficient cellular energy reserves have accumulated. Our results also uncovered a quantitative relationship between CDC period and YMC period across different strains. More generally, our approach shows how studies in genetically diverse strains efficiently identify robust phenotypes and steer the experimentalist away from strain-specific idiosyncrasies. PMID:26538026

  2. [Constructing recombinant plasmid pSH-CUP and knockout of acid trehalase gene in baker's yeast].

    PubMed

    He, Dongqin; Xiao, Dongguang; Lv, Ye

    2008-02-01

    The ATH1 gene encoded acid trehalase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The gene disruption cassette combined the heterologous dominant kan(r) resistance marker with a Cre/loxP-mediated marker removal procedure. The gene disruption cassette was produced by PCR using the same long oligonucleotides comprising 50 nucleotides that annealed to sites upstream or downstream of the genomic target sequence to be deleted. After transformation of the linear disruption cassettes with a Cre/loxP-mediated marker into the cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY-6, selected transformants were checked by PCR for correct the integration of the cassette and concurrent deletion of the chromosomal target sequence. The copper-resistance gene (CUP1-MT1) was cloned into pSH47, which yielded pSH-CUP. The recombinant plasmid pSH-CUP was transformed into the cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY-6(delta ATH1, G418(r)), and transformants were selected for copper resistance. Upon expression of the Cre recombinase results in removal of the kan(r) gene, leaving behind a single loxP site at the chromosomal locus. Construction of the recombinant plasmid pSH-CUP avoided inserting non-yeast gene and made the loxP - kanMX - loxP gene disruption cassette more conventional for eukaryotic organism gene disruption.

  3. Functional gene diversity of oolitic sands from Great Bahama Bank.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M R; Van Norstrand, J D; Eberli, G P; Piggot, A M; Zhou, J; Klaus, J S

    2014-05-01

    Despite the importance of oolitic depositional systems as indicators of climate and reservoirs of inorganic C, little is known about the microbial functional diversity, structure, composition, and potential metabolic processes leading to precipitation of carbonates. To fill this gap, we assess the metabolic gene carriage and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) development in microbial communities associated with oolitic carbonate sediments from the Bahamas Archipelago. Oolitic sediments ranging from high-energy 'active' to lower energy 'non-active' and 'microbially stabilized' environments were examined as they represent contrasting depositional settings, mostly influenced by tidal flows and wave-generated currents. Functional gene analysis, which employed a microarray-based gene technology, detected a total of 12,432 of 95,847 distinct gene probes, including a large number of metabolic processes previously linked to mineral precipitation. Among these, gene-encoding enzymes for denitrification, sulfate reduction, ammonification, and oxygenic/anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant. In addition, a broad diversity of genes was related to organic carbon degradation, and N2 fixation implying these communities has metabolic plasticity that enables survival under oligotrophic conditions. Differences in functional genes were detected among the environments, with higher diversity associated with non-active and microbially stabilized environments in comparison with the active environment. EPS showed a gradient increase from active to microbially stabilized communities, and when combined with functional gene analysis, which revealed genes encoding EPS-degrading enzymes (chitinases, glucoamylase, amylases), supports a putative role of EPS-mediated microbial calcium carbonate precipitation. We propose that carbonate precipitation in marine oolitic biofilms is spatially and temporally controlled by a complex consortium of microbes with diverse physiologies, including

  4. Tagging Morphogenetic Genes by Insertional Mutagenesis in the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Mathias; Quijano, Raymundo Rosas; Bezzate, Samira; Bordon-Pallier, Florence; Gaillardin, Claude

    2001-01-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is distantly related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can be genetically modified, and can grow in both haploid and diploid states in either yeast, pseudomycelial, or mycelial forms, depending on environmental conditions. Previous results have indicated that the STE and RIM pathways, which mediate cellular switching in other dimorphic yeasts, are not required for Y. lipolytica morphogenesis. To identify the pathways involved in morphogenesis, we mutagenized a wild-type strain of Y. lipolytica with a Tn3 derivative. We isolated eight tagged mutants, entirely defective in hyphal formation, from a total of 40,000 mutants and identified seven genes homologous to S. cerevisiae CDC25, RAS2, BUD6, KEX2, GPI7, SNF5, and PPH21. We analyzed their abilities to invade agar and to form pseudomycelium or hyphae under inducing conditions and their sensitivity to temperature and to Calcofluor white. Chitin staining was used to detect defects in their cell walls. Our results indicate that a functional Ras-cyclic AMP pathway is required for the formation of hyphae in Y. lipolytica and that perturbations in the processing of extracellular, possibly parietal, proteins result in morphogenetic defects. PMID:11325938

  5. One-step integration of multiple genes into the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuliang; Han, Linna; Zhu, Li; Ge, Mei; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Daijie

    2014-12-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica is an unconventional yeast, and is generally recognized as safe (GRAS). It provides a versatile fermentation platform that is used commercially to produce many added-value products. Here we report a multiple fragment assembly method that allows one-step integration of an entire β-carotene biosynthesis pathway (~11 kb, consisting of four genes) via in vivo homologous recombination into the rDNA locus of the Y. lipolytica chromosome. The highest efficiency was 21%, and the highest production of β-carotene was 2.2 ± 0.3 mg per g dry cell weight. The total procedure was completed in less than one week, as compared to a previously reported sequential gene integration method that required n weeks for n genes. This time-saving method will facilitate synthetic biology, metabolic engineering and functional genomics studies of Y. lipolytica. PMID:25216641

  6. The Yeast Gene, MDM20, Is Necessary for Mitochondrial Inheritance and Organization of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Greg J.; King, Edward J.; Shaw, Janet M.

    1997-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the growing bud inherits a portion of the mitochondrial network from the mother cell soon after it emerges. Although this polarized transport of mitochondria is thought to require functions of the cytoskeleton, there are conflicting reports concerning the nature of the cytoskeletal element involved. Here we report the isolation of a yeast mutant, mdm20, in which both mitochondrial inheritance and actin cables (bundles of actin filaments) are disrupted. The MDM20 gene encodes a 93-kD polypeptide with no homology to other characterized proteins. Extra copies of TPM1, a gene encoding the actin filament–binding protein tropomyosin, suppress mitochondrial inheritance defects and partially restore actin cables in mdm20Δ cells. Synthetic lethality is also observed between mdm20 and tpm1 mutant strains. Overexpression of a second yeast tropomyosin, Tpm2p, rescues mutant phenotypes in the mdm20 strain to a lesser extent. Together, these results provide compelling evidence that mitochondrial inheritance in yeast is an actin-mediated process. MDM20 and TPM1 also exhibit the same pattern of genetic interactions; mutations in MDM20 are synthetically lethal with mutations in BEM2 and MYO2 but not SAC6. Although MDM20 and TPM1 are both required for the formation and/or stabilization of actin cables, mutations in these genes disrupt mitochondrial inheritance and nuclear segregation to different extents. Thus, Mdm20p and Tpm1p may act in vivo to establish molecular and functional heterogeneity of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9105043

  7. [Construction and Identification of the Bait Vector Containing Duck Circovirus Cap Gene for the Yeast Two-hybrid System].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Zhang, Zhilong; Lu, Yanyan; Zhang, Lei; Li, Pengfei; Jia, Renyong

    2015-05-01

    To construct a bait expression vector containing the duck circovirus Cap gene for use in the yeast two-hybrid system, the whole cap codon-optimized gene was inserted into pGBKT7 vector and confirmed by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion, and sequence analysis. After transformation into a Y2HGold yeast strain, the expression of Cap protein was analyzed by Western blotting. Toxicity and self-activation of the bait protein were detected using different dropout minimal base. PCR reaction, restriction enzyme digestion, and sequencing analyses indicated that the duck circovirus Cap gene was correctly inserted into pG- BKT7. Western blotting showed that the whole Cap protein was expressed. The recombinant bait protein had no toxicity and self-activation. Therefore, the bait vector with the Cap gene was constructed successfully, providing a foundation for future screening for interacting proteins in the yeast two-hybrid system.

  8. Reconstructing the chemical diversity of labdane-type diterpene biosynthesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ignea, Codruta; Ioannou, Efstathia; Georgantea, Panagiota; Loupassaki, Sofia; Trikka, Fotini A; Kanellis, Angelos K; Makris, Antonios M; Roussis, Vassilios; Kampranis, Sotirios C

    2015-03-01

    Terpenes are a large class of natural products, many of which are used in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, or biofuels. However, terpene's industrial application is frequently hindered by limited availability of natural sources or low yields of chemical synthesis. In this report, we developed a modular platform based on standardized and exchangeable parts to reproduce and potentially expand the diversity of terpene structures in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By combining different module-specific parts, we exploited the substrate promiscuity of class I diterpene synthases to produce an array of labdane-type scaffolds. These were subsequently modified by a scaffold decoration module consisting of a mutant library of a promiscuous cytochrome P450 to afford a range of hydroxylated diterpenes. Further P450 protein engineering yielded dedicated and efficient catalysts for specific products. Terpenes produced include precursors of pharmacologically important compounds, molecules that are difficult to obtain from natural sources, or new natural products. The approach described here provides a platform on which additional gene mining, combinatorial biosynthesis, and protein engineering efforts can be integrated to sustainably explore the terpene chemical space.

  9. MOB1, an Essential Yeast Gene Required for Completion of Mitosis and Maintenance of Ploidy

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Francis C.; Winey, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Mob1p is an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein, identified from a two-hybrid screen, that binds Mps1p, a protein kinase essential for spindle pole body duplication and mitotic checkpoint regulation. Mob1p contains no known structural motifs; however MOB1 is a member of a conserved gene family and shares sequence similarity with a nonessential yeast gene, MOB2. Mob1p is a phosphoprotein in vivo and a substrate for the Mps1p kinase in vitro. Conditional alleles of MOB1 cause a late nuclear division arrest at restrictive temperature. MOB1 exhibits genetic interaction with three other yeast genes required for the completion of mitosis, LTE1, CDC5, and CDC15 (the latter two encode essential protein kinases). Most haploid mutant mob1 strains also display a complete increase in ploidy at permissive temperature. The mechanism for the increase in ploidy may occur through MPS1 function. One mob1 strain, which maintains stable haploidy at both permissive and restrictive temperature, diploidizes at permissive temperature when combined with the mps1–1 mutation. Strains containing mob2Δ also display a complete increase in ploidy when combined with the mps1-1 mutation. Perhaps in addition to, or as part of, its essential function in late mitosis, MOB1 is required for a cell cycle reset function necessary for the initiation of the spindle pole body duplication. PMID:9436989

  10. Changes in oil content of transgenic soybeans expressing the yeast SLC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Rao, Suryadevara S; Hildebrand, David

    2009-10-01

    The wild type (Wt) and mutant form of yeast (sphingolipid compensation) genes, SLC1 and SLC1-1, have been shown to have lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT) activities (Nageic et al. in J Biol Chem 269:22156-22163, 1993). Expression of these LPAT genes was reported to increase oil content in transgenic Arabidopsis and Brassica napus. It is of interest to determine if the TAG content increase would also be seen in soybeans. Therefore, the wild type SLC1 was expressed in soybean somatic embryos under the control of seed specific phaseolin promoter. Some transgenic somatic embryos and in both T2 and T3 transgenic seeds showed higher oil contents. Compared to controls, the average increase in triglyceride values went up by 1.5% in transgenic somatic embryos. A maximum of 3.2% increase in seed oil content was observed in a T3 line. Expression of the yeast Wt LPAT gene did not alter the fatty acid composition of the seed oil.

  11. In silico design and in vivo implementation of yeast gene Boolean gates.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, Mario A

    2014-01-01

    In our previous computational work, we showed that gene digital circuits can be automatically designed in an electronic fashion. This demands, first, a conversion of the truth table into Boolean formulas with the Karnaugh map method and, then, the translation of the Boolean formulas into circuit schemes organized into layers of Boolean gates and Pools of signal carriers. In our framework, gene digital circuits that take up to three different input signals (chemicals) arise from the composition of three kinds of basic Boolean gates, namely YES, NOT, and AND. Here we present a library of YES, NOT, and AND gates realized via plasmidic DNA integration into the yeast genome. Boolean behavior is reproduced via the transcriptional control of a synthetic bipartite promoter that contains sequences of the yeast VPH1 and minimal CYC1 promoters together with operator binding sites for bacterial (i.e. orthogonal) repressor proteins. Moreover, model-driven considerations permitted us to pinpoint a strategy for re-designing gates when a better digital performance is required. Our library of well-characterized Boolean gates is the basis for the assembly of more complex gene digital circuits. As a proof of concepts, we engineered two 2-input OR gates, designed by our software, by combining YES and NOT gates present in our library.

  12. Identification of genes responsible for improved cryoresistance in fermenting yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Tanghe, A; Teunissen, A; Van Dijck, P; Thevelein, J M

    2000-04-10

    Using repetitive freezing and thawing, different mutant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with increased freeze resistance have been isolated. To get a better insight in the mechanisms responsible for this elevated resistance and to give us the opportunity to modify other strains so that they become more suitable for use in frozen dough preparations, we applied the microarray technology in order to identify genes that are differentially expressed in a freeze-resistant mutant when compared to a freeze-sensitive industrial yeast strain. PMID:10791754

  13. Metabolic Genes within Cyanophage Genomes: Implications for Diversity and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gao, E-Bin; Huang, Youhua; Ning, Degang

    2016-01-01

    Cyanophages, a group of viruses specifically infecting cyanobacteria, are genetically diverse and extensively abundant in water environments. As a result of selective pressure, cyanophages often acquire a range of metabolic genes from host genomes. The host-derived genes make a significant contribution to the ecological success of cyanophages. In this review, we summarize the host-derived metabolic genes, as well as their origin and roles in cyanophage evolution and important host metabolic pathways, such as the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, nutrient acquisition and nucleotide biosynthesis. We also discuss the suitability of the host-derived metabolic genes as potential diagnostic markers for the detection of genetic diversity of cyanophages in natural environments. PMID:27690109

  14. [Expression of the Drosophila melanogaster limk1 gene 3'-UTRs mRNA in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, A M; Zakharov, G A; Zhuravlev, A V; Padkina, M V; Savvateeva-Popova, E V; Sambuk, E V

    2014-06-01

    The stability of mRNA and its translation efficacy in higher eukaryotes are influenced by the interaction of 3'-untranscribed regions (3'-UTRs) with microRNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae lack microRNAs, it is possible to evaluate the contribution of only 3'-UTRs' and RNA-binding proteins' interaction in post-transcriptional regulation. For this, the post-transcriptional regulation of Drosophila limk1 gene encoding for the key enzyme of actin remodeling was studied in yeast. Analysis of limkl mRNA 3'-UTRs revealed the potential sites of yeast transcriptional termination. Computer remodeling demonstrated the possibility of secondary structure formation in limkl mRNA 3'-UTRs. For an evaluation of the functional activity of Drosophila 3'-UTRs in yeast, the reporter gene PHO5 encoding for yeast acid phosphatase (AP) fused to different variants of Drosophila limk1 mRNA 3'-UTRs (513, 1075, 1554 bp) was used. Assessments of AP activity and RT-PCR demonstrated that Drosophila limkl gene 3'-UTRs were functionally active and recognized in yeast. Therefore, yeast might be used as an appropriate model system for studies of 3'-UTR's role in post-transcriptional regulation.

  15. Diversity and Physiological Characterization of D-Xylose-Fermenting Yeasts Isolated from the Brazilian Amazonian Forest

    PubMed Central

    Cadete, Raquel M.; Melo, Monaliza A.; Dussán, Kelly J.; Rodrigues, Rita C. L. B.; Silva, Silvio S.; Zilli, Jerri E.; Vital, Marcos J. S.; Gomes, Fátima C. O.; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Background This study is the first to investigate the Brazilian Amazonian Forest to identify new D-xylose-fermenting yeasts that might potentially be used in the production of ethanol from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysates. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 224 yeast strains were isolated from rotting wood samples collected in two Amazonian forest reserve sites. These samples were cultured in yeast nitrogen base (YNB)-D-xylose or YNB-xylan media. Candida tropicalis, Asterotremella humicola, Candida boidinii and Debaryomyces hansenii were the most frequently isolated yeasts. Among D-xylose-fermenting yeasts, six strains of Spathaspora passalidarum, two of Scheffersomyces stipitis, and representatives of five new species were identified. The new species included Candida amazonensis of the Scheffersomyces clade and Spathaspora sp. 1, Spathaspora sp. 2, Spathaspora sp. 3, and Candida sp. 1 of the Spathaspora clade. In fermentation assays using D-xylose (50 g/L) culture medium, S. passalidarum strains showed the highest ethanol yields (0.31 g/g to 0.37 g/g) and productivities (0.62 g/L·h to 0.75 g/L·h). Candida amazonensis exhibited a virtually complete D-xylose consumption and the highest xylitol yields (0.55 g/g to 0.59 g/g), with concentrations up to 25.2 g/L. The new Spathaspora species produced ethanol and/or xylitol in different concentrations as the main fermentation products. In sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic fermentation assays, S. stipitis UFMG-XMD-15.2 generated the highest ethanol yield (0.34 g/g) and productivity (0.2 g/L·h), while the new species Spathaspora sp. 1 UFMG-XMD-16.2 and Spathaspora sp. 2 UFMG-XMD-23.2 were very good xylitol producers. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates the promise of using new D-xylose-fermenting yeast strains from the Brazilian Amazonian Forest for ethanol or xylitol production from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysates. PMID:22912807

  16. Genomes, diversity and resistance gene analogues in Musa species.

    PubMed

    Azhar, M; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2008-01-01

    Resistance genes (R genes) in plants are abundant and may represent more than 1% of all the genes. Their diversity is critical to the recognition and response to attack from diverse pathogens. Like many other crops, banana and plantain face attacks from potentially devastating fungal and bacterial diseases, increased by a combination of worldwide spread of pathogens, exploitation of a small number of varieties, new pathogen mutations, and the lack of effective, benign and cheap chemical control. The challenge for plant breeders is to identify and exploit genetic resistances to diseases, which is particularly difficult in banana and plantain where the valuable cultivars are sterile, parthenocarpic and mostly triploid so conventional genetic analysis and breeding is impossible. In this paper, we review the nature of R genes and the key motifs, particularly in the Nucleotide Binding Sites (NBS), Leucine Rich Repeat (LRR) gene class. We present data about identity, nature and evolutionary diversity of the NBS domains of Musa R genes in diploid wild species with the Musa acuminata (A), M. balbisiana (B), M. schizocarpa (S), M. textilis (T), M. velutina and M. ornata genomes, and from various cultivated hybrid and triploid accessions, using PCR primers to isolate the domains from genomic DNA. Of 135 new sequences, 75% of the sequenced clones had uninterrupted open reading frames (ORFs), and phylogenetic UPGMA tree construction showed four clusters, one from Musa ornata, one largely from the B and T genomes, one from A and M. velutina, and the largest with A, B, T and S genomes. Only genes of the coiled-coil (non-TIR) class were found, typical of the grasses and presumably monocotyledons. The analysis of R genes in cultivated banana and plantain, and their wild relatives, has implications for identification and selection of resistance genes within the genus which may be useful for plant selection and breeding and also for defining relationships and genome evolution

  17. Genomes, diversity and resistance gene analogues in Musa species.

    PubMed

    Azhar, M; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2008-01-01

    Resistance genes (R genes) in plants are abundant and may represent more than 1% of all the genes. Their diversity is critical to the recognition and response to attack from diverse pathogens. Like many other crops, banana and plantain face attacks from potentially devastating fungal and bacterial diseases, increased by a combination of worldwide spread of pathogens, exploitation of a small number of varieties, new pathogen mutations, and the lack of effective, benign and cheap chemical control. The challenge for plant breeders is to identify and exploit genetic resistances to diseases, which is particularly difficult in banana and plantain where the valuable cultivars are sterile, parthenocarpic and mostly triploid so conventional genetic analysis and breeding is impossible. In this paper, we review the nature of R genes and the key motifs, particularly in the Nucleotide Binding Sites (NBS), Leucine Rich Repeat (LRR) gene class. We present data about identity, nature and evolutionary diversity of the NBS domains of Musa R genes in diploid wild species with the Musa acuminata (A), M. balbisiana (B), M. schizocarpa (S), M. textilis (T), M. velutina and M. ornata genomes, and from various cultivated hybrid and triploid accessions, using PCR primers to isolate the domains from genomic DNA. Of 135 new sequences, 75% of the sequenced clones had uninterrupted open reading frames (ORFs), and phylogenetic UPGMA tree construction showed four clusters, one from Musa ornata, one largely from the B and T genomes, one from A and M. velutina, and the largest with A, B, T and S genomes. Only genes of the coiled-coil (non-TIR) class were found, typical of the grasses and presumably monocotyledons. The analysis of R genes in cultivated banana and plantain, and their wild relatives, has implications for identification and selection of resistance genes within the genus which may be useful for plant selection and breeding and also for defining relationships and genome evolution

  18. Preferential repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of a gene in yeast chromosomes and plasmids is dependent on transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Sweder, K S; Hanawalt, P C

    1992-01-01

    While preferential repair of the transcribed strands within active genes has been demonstrated in organisms as diverse as humans and Escherichia coli, it has not previously been shown to occur in chromosomal genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of the expressed RPB2 gene in the chromosome of a repair-proficient strain is much more rapid than that in the nontranscribed strand. Furthermore, a copy of the RPB2 gene borne on a centromeric ARS1 plasmid showed the same strand bias in repair. To investigate the relation of this strand bias to transcription, we studied repair in a yeast strain with the temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. When exponentially growing rpb1-1 cells are shifted to the nonpermissive temperature, they rapidly cease mRNA synthesis. At the permissive temperature, both rpb1-1 and the wild-type, parental cells exhibited rapid, proficient repair in the transcribed strand of chromosomal and plasmid-borne copies of the RPB2 gene. At the nonpermissive temperature, the rate of repair in the transcribed strand in rpb1-1 cells was reduced to that in the nontranscribed strand. These findings establish the dependence of strand bias in repair on transcription by RNA polymerase II in the chromosomes and in plasmids, and they validate the use of plasmids for analysis of the relation of repair to transcription in yeast. Images PMID:1438266

  19. Diversity of viral photosystem-I psaA genes

    PubMed Central

    Hevroni, Gur; Enav, Hagay; Rohwer, Forest; Béjà, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Marine photosynthesis is one of the major contributors to the global carbon cycle and the world's oxygen supply. This process is largely driven by cyanobacteria, namely Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. Genes encoding photosystem-II (PSII) reaction center proteins are found in many cyanophage genomes, and are expressed during the infection of their hosts. On the basis of metagenomics, cyanophage photosystem-I (PSI) gene cassettes were recently discovered with two gene arrangements psaJF→C→A→B→K→E→D and psaD→C→A→B. It was suggested that the horizontal transfer of PSII and PSI genes is increasing phage fitness. To better understand their diversity, we designed degenerate primers to cover a wide diversity of organisms, and using PCR we targeted the psaC→A arrangement, which is unique to cyanophages cassettes. We examined viral concentrates from four islands in the Pacific Ocean and found samples containing the psaC→A arrangement. Analyses of the amplified viral psaA gene revealed six subgroups varying in their level of similarity and %G+C content, suggesting that the diversity of cyanophage PSI genes is greater than originally thought. PMID:25535938

  20. Diversity of Arabidopsis Genes Encoding Precursors for Phytosulfokine, a Peptide Growth Factor1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heping; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Nakamura, Kenzo; Sakagami, Youji

    2001-01-01

    Phytosulfokine-α (PSK-α), a unique plant peptide growth factor, was originally isolated from conditioned medium of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) mesophyll cell cultures. PSK-α has several biological activities including promoting plant cell proliferation. Four genes that encode precursors of PSK-α have been identified from Arabidopsis. Analysis of cDNAs for two of these, AtPSK2 and AtPSK3, shows that both of these genes consist of two exons and one intron. The predicted precursors have N-terminal signal peptides and only a single PSK-α sequence located close to their carboxyl termini. Both precursors contain dibasic processing sites flanking PSK, analogous to animal and yeast prohormones. Although the PSK domain including the sequence of PSK-α and three amino acids preceding it are perfectly conserved, the precursors bear very limited similarity among Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa), suggesting a new level of diversity among polypeptides that are processed into the same signaling molecule in plants, a scenario not found in animals and yeast. Unnatural [serine-4]PSK-β was found to be secreted by transgenic Arabidopsis cells expressing a mutant of either AtPSK2 or AtPSK3 cDNAs, suggesting that both AtPSK2 and AtPSK3 encode PSK-α precursors. AtPSK2 and AtPSK3 were expressed demonstrably not only in cultured cells but also in intact plants, suggesting that PSK-α may be essential for plant cell proliferation in vivo as well as in vitro. Overexpression of either precursor gene allowed the transgenic calli to grow twice as large as the controls. However, the transgenic cells expressing either antisense cDNA did not dramatically decrease mitogenic activity, suggesting that these two genes may act redundantly. PMID:11706167

  1. Diversity of yeast and mold species from a variety of cheese types.

    PubMed

    Banjara, Nabaraj; Suhr, Mallory J; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2015-06-01

    To generate a comprehensive profile of viable fungi (yeasts and molds) on cheese as it is purchased by consumers, 44 types of cheese were obtained from a local grocery store from 1 to 4 times each (depending on availability) and sampled. Pure cultures were obtained and identified by DNA sequence of the ITS region, as well as growth characteristics and colony morphology. The yeast Debaryomyces hansenii was the most abundant fungus, present in 79 % of all cheeses and 63 % of all samples. Penicillium roqueforti was the most common mold, isolated from a variety of cheeses in addition to the blue cheeses. Eighteen other fungal species were isolated, ten from only one sample each. Most fungi isolated have been documented from dairy products; a few raise potential food safety concerns (i.e. Aspergillus flavus, isolated from a single sample and capable of producing aflatoxins; and Candida parapsilosis, an emerging human pathogen isolated from three cheeses). With the exception of D. hansenii (present in most cheese) and P. roqueforti (a necessary component of blue cheese), no strong correlation was observed between cheese type, manufacturer, or sampling time with the yeast or mold species composition.

  2. Winemaking and bioprocesses strongly shaped the genetic diversity of the ubiquitous yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii.

    PubMed

    Albertin, Warren; Chasseriaud, Laura; Comte, Guillaume; Panfili, Aurélie; Delcamp, Adline; Salin, Franck; Marullo, Philippe; Bely, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii is associated with several human activities including oenology, bakery, distillery, dairy industry, etc. In addition to its biotechnological applications, T. delbrueckii is frequently isolated in natural environments (plant, soil, insect). T. delbrueckii is thus a remarkable ubiquitous yeast species with both wild and anthropic habitats, and appears to be a perfect yeast model to search for evidence of human domestication. For that purpose, we developed eight microsatellite markers that were used for the genotyping of 110 strains from various substrates and geographical origins. Microsatellite analysis showed four genetic clusters: two groups contained most nature strains from Old World and Americas respectively, and two clusters were associated with winemaking and other bioprocesses. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) confirmed that human activities significantly shaped the genetic variability of T. delbrueckii species. Natural isolates are differentiated on the basis of geographical localisation, as expected for wild population. The domestication of T. delbrueckii probably dates back to the Roman Empire for winemaking (∼ 1900 years ago), and to the Neolithic era for bioprocesses (∼ 4000 years ago). Microsatellite analysis also provided valuable data regarding the life-cycle of the species, suggesting a mostly diploid homothallic life. In addition to population genetics and ecological studies, the microsatellite tool will be particularly useful for further biotechnological development of T. delbrueckii strains for winemaking and other bioprocesses.

  3. Winemaking and Bioprocesses Strongly Shaped the Genetic Diversity of the Ubiquitous Yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii

    PubMed Central

    Comte, Guillaume; Panfili, Aurélie; Delcamp, Adline; Salin, Franck; Marullo, Philippe; Bely, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii is associated with several human activities including oenology, bakery, distillery, dairy industry, etc. In addition to its biotechnological applications, T. delbrueckii is frequently isolated in natural environments (plant, soil, insect). T. delbrueckii is thus a remarkable ubiquitous yeast species with both wild and anthropic habitats, and appears to be a perfect yeast model to search for evidence of human domestication. For that purpose, we developed eight microsatellite markers that were used for the genotyping of 110 strains from various substrates and geographical origins. Microsatellite analysis showed four genetic clusters: two groups contained most nature strains from Old World and Americas respectively, and two clusters were associated with winemaking and other bioprocesses. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) confirmed that human activities significantly shaped the genetic variability of T. delbrueckii species. Natural isolates are differentiated on the basis of geographical localisation, as expected for wild population. The domestication of T. delbrueckii probably dates back to the Roman Empire for winemaking (∼1900 years ago), and to the Neolithic era for bioprocesses (∼4000 years ago). Microsatellite analysis also provided valuable data regarding the life-cycle of the species, suggesting a mostly diploid homothallic life. In addition to population genetics and ecological studies, the microsatellite tool will be particularly useful for further biotechnological development of T. delbrueckii strains for winemaking and other bioprocesses. PMID:24718638

  4. Profiling DNA damage-induced phosphorylation in budding yeast reveals diverse signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E H; Naylor, Maria L; Dephoure, Noah; Ballif, Bryan A; Goel, Gautam; Xu, Qikai; Ng, Aylwin; Chou, Danny M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gygi, Steven P; Elledge, Stephen J

    2016-06-28

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is regulated by a protein kinase signaling cascade that orchestrates DNA repair and other processes. Identifying the substrate effectors of these kinases is critical for understanding the underlying physiology and mechanism of the response. We have used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile DDR-dependent phosphorylation in budding yeast and genetically explored the dependency of these phosphorylation events on the DDR kinases MEC1, RAD53, CHK1, and DUN1. Based on these screens, a database containing many novel DDR-regulated phosphorylation events has been established. Phosphorylation of many of these proteins has been validated by quantitative peptide phospho-immunoprecipitation and examined for functional relevance to the DDR through large-scale analysis of sensitivity to DNA damage in yeast deletion strains. We reveal a link between DDR signaling and the metabolic pathways of inositol phosphate and phosphatidyl inositol synthesis, which are required for resistance to DNA damage. We also uncover links between the DDR and TOR signaling as well as translation regulation. Taken together, these data shed new light on the organization of DDR signaling in budding yeast. PMID:27298372

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic diversity of yeasts isolated from water-buffalo Mozzarella cheese.

    PubMed

    Suzzi, G; Lombardi, A; Lanorte, M T; Caruso, M; Andrighetto, C; Gardini, F

    2000-01-01

    Water-buffalo Mozzarella (WBM) cheese is one of the several 'pasta filata' or stretched curd cheeses that originated in southern Italy, traditionally manufactured from raw milk employing natural whey starter cultures. Lactose- and galactose-fermenting yeasts isolated from WBM were studied to evaluate their role in the ripening of this cheese. The kinetic parameters of the growth of the yeasts as well as their principal metabolic end-products showed a great variability depending on the species. Moreover, the genetic polymorphism of the yeasts was studied for their differentiation at species level by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprinting and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis. While the differentiation based on metabolic traits was not able to discriminate Kluyveromyces marxianus, Candida kefyr and C. sphaerica, the PCR analysis with primers M13 and RF2 resulted in a reliable and rapid method for differentiating at species level Saccharomyces cerevisiae, K. marxianus, K. lactis and their anamorphic species. Furthermore, mtDNA analysis proved to be more discriminating at strain level.

  6. C/N Ratio Drives Soil Actinobacterial Cellobiohydrolase Gene Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T.; Poonpatana, Pabhon; Farrell, Mark; Bissett, Andrew; Macdonald, Lynne M.; Toscas, Peter; Richardson, Alan E.; Thrall, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose accounts for approximately half of photosynthesis-fixed carbon; however, the ecology of its degradation in soil is still relatively poorly understood. The role of actinobacteria in cellulose degradation has not been extensively investigated despite their abundance in soil and known cellulose degradation capability. Here, the diversity and abundance of the actinobacterial glycoside hydrolase family 48 (cellobiohydrolase) gene in soils from three paired pasture-woodland sites were determined by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and clone libraries with gene-specific primers. For comparison, the diversity and abundance of general bacteria and fungi were also assessed. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of 80 clones revealed significant new diversity of actinobacterial GH48 genes, and analysis of translated protein sequences showed that these enzymes are likely to represent functional cellobiohydrolases. The soil C/N ratio was the primary environmental driver of GH48 community compositions across sites and land uses, demonstrating the importance of substrate quality in their ecology. Furthermore, mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry-predicted humic organic carbon was distinctly more important to GH48 diversity than to total bacterial and fungal diversity. This suggests a link between the actinobacterial GH48 community and soil organic carbon dynamics and highlights the potential importance of actinobacteria in the terrestrial carbon cycle. PMID:25710367

  7. C/N ratio drives soil actinobacterial cellobiohydrolase gene diversity.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Alexandre B; Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T; Poonpatana, Pabhon; Farrell, Mark; Bissett, Andrew; Macdonald, Lynne M; Toscas, Peter; Richardson, Alan E; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    Cellulose accounts for approximately half of photosynthesis-fixed carbon; however, the ecology of its degradation in soil is still relatively poorly understood. The role of actinobacteria in cellulose degradation has not been extensively investigated despite their abundance in soil and known cellulose degradation capability. Here, the diversity and abundance of the actinobacterial glycoside hydrolase family 48 (cellobiohydrolase) gene in soils from three paired pasture-woodland sites were determined by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and clone libraries with gene-specific primers. For comparison, the diversity and abundance of general bacteria and fungi were also assessed. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of 80 clones revealed significant new diversity of actinobacterial GH48 genes, and analysis of translated protein sequences showed that these enzymes are likely to represent functional cellobiohydrolases. The soil C/N ratio was the primary environmental driver of GH48 community compositions across sites and land uses, demonstrating the importance of substrate quality in their ecology. Furthermore, mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry-predicted humic organic carbon was distinctly more important to GH48 diversity than to total bacterial and fungal diversity. This suggests a link between the actinobacterial GH48 community and soil organic carbon dynamics and highlights the potential importance of actinobacteria in the terrestrial carbon cycle. PMID:25710367

  8. Extraordinary diversity of visual opsin genes in dragonflies

    PubMed Central

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Shunsuke; Arikawa, Kentaro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-01-01

    Dragonflies are colorful and large-eyed animals strongly dependent on color vision. Here we report an extraordinary large number of opsin genes in dragonflies and their characteristic spatiotemporal expression patterns. Exhaustive transcriptomic and genomic surveys of three dragonflies of the family Libellulidae consistently identified 20 opsin genes, consisting of 4 nonvisual opsin genes and 16 visual opsin genes of 1 UV, 5 short-wavelength (SW), and 10 long-wavelength (LW) type. Comprehensive transcriptomic survey of the other dragonflies representing an additional 10 families also identified as many as 15–33 opsin genes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic multiplications and losses of the opsin genes in the course of evolution. In contrast to many SW and LW genes expressed in adults, only one SW gene and several LW genes were expressed in larvae, reflecting less visual dependence and LW-skewed light conditions for their lifestyle under water. In this context, notably, the sand-burrowing or pit-dwelling species tended to lack SW gene expression in larvae. In adult visual organs: (i) many SW genes and a few LW genes were expressed in the dorsal region of compound eyes, presumably for processing SW-skewed light from the sky; (ii) a few SW genes and many LW genes were expressed in the ventral region of compound eyes, probably for perceiving terrestrial objects; and (iii) expression of a specific LW gene was associated with ocelli. Our findings suggest that the stage- and region-specific expressions of the diverse opsin genes underlie the behavior, ecology, and adaptation of dragonflies. PMID:25713365

  9. Extraordinary diversity of visual opsin genes in dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Shunsuke; Arikawa, Kentaro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-03-17

    Dragonflies are colorful and large-eyed animals strongly dependent on color vision. Here we report an extraordinary large number of opsin genes in dragonflies and their characteristic spatiotemporal expression patterns. Exhaustive transcriptomic and genomic surveys of three dragonflies of the family Libellulidae consistently identified 20 opsin genes, consisting of 4 nonvisual opsin genes and 16 visual opsin genes of 1 UV, 5 short-wavelength (SW), and 10 long-wavelength (LW) type. Comprehensive transcriptomic survey of the other dragonflies representing an additional 10 families also identified as many as 15-33 opsin genes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic multiplications and losses of the opsin genes in the course of evolution. In contrast to many SW and LW genes expressed in adults, only one SW gene and several LW genes were expressed in larvae, reflecting less visual dependence and LW-skewed light conditions for their lifestyle under water. In this context, notably, the sand-burrowing or pit-dwelling species tended to lack SW gene expression in larvae. In adult visual organs: (i) many SW genes and a few LW genes were expressed in the dorsal region of compound eyes, presumably for processing SW-skewed light from the sky; (ii) a few SW genes and many LW genes were expressed in the ventral region of compound eyes, probably for perceiving terrestrial objects; and (iii) expression of a specific LW gene was associated with ocelli. Our findings suggest that the stage- and region-specific expressions of the diverse opsin genes underlie the behavior, ecology, and adaptation of dragonflies. PMID:25713365

  10. Extraordinary diversity of visual opsin genes in dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Shunsuke; Arikawa, Kentaro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-03-17

    Dragonflies are colorful and large-eyed animals strongly dependent on color vision. Here we report an extraordinary large number of opsin genes in dragonflies and their characteristic spatiotemporal expression patterns. Exhaustive transcriptomic and genomic surveys of three dragonflies of the family Libellulidae consistently identified 20 opsin genes, consisting of 4 nonvisual opsin genes and 16 visual opsin genes of 1 UV, 5 short-wavelength (SW), and 10 long-wavelength (LW) type. Comprehensive transcriptomic survey of the other dragonflies representing an additional 10 families also identified as many as 15-33 opsin genes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic multiplications and losses of the opsin genes in the course of evolution. In contrast to many SW and LW genes expressed in adults, only one SW gene and several LW genes were expressed in larvae, reflecting less visual dependence and LW-skewed light conditions for their lifestyle under water. In this context, notably, the sand-burrowing or pit-dwelling species tended to lack SW gene expression in larvae. In adult visual organs: (i) many SW genes and a few LW genes were expressed in the dorsal region of compound eyes, presumably for processing SW-skewed light from the sky; (ii) a few SW genes and many LW genes were expressed in the ventral region of compound eyes, probably for perceiving terrestrial objects; and (iii) expression of a specific LW gene was associated with ocelli. Our findings suggest that the stage- and region-specific expressions of the diverse opsin genes underlie the behavior, ecology, and adaptation of dragonflies.

  11. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:26150486

  12. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  13. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this “dead” cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:26150486

  14. Synthetic riboswitches that induce gene expression in diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Topp, Shana; Reynoso, Colleen M K; Seeliger, Jessica C; Goldlust, Ian S; Desai, Shawn K; Murat, Dorothée; Shen, Aimee; Puri, Aaron W; Komeili, Arash; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Scott, June R; Gallivan, Justin P

    2010-12-01

    We developed a series of ligand-inducible riboswitches that control gene expression in diverse species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including human pathogens that have few or no previously reported inducible expression systems. We anticipate that these riboswitches will be useful tools for genetic studies in a wide range of bacteria. PMID:20935124

  15. Evaluation of Gene Modification Strategies for the Development of Low-Alcohol-Wine Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Kutyna, D. R.; Solomon, M. R.; Black, C. A.; Borneman, A.; Henschke, P. A.; Pretorius, I. S.; Chambers, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has evolved a highly efficient strategy for energy generation which maximizes ATP energy production from sugar. This adaptation enables efficient energy generation under anaerobic conditions and limits competition from other microorganisms by producing toxic metabolites, such as ethanol and CO2. Yeast fermentative and flavor capacity forms the biotechnological basis of a wide range of alcohol-containing beverages. Largely as a result of consumer demand for improved flavor, the alcohol content of some beverages like wine has increased. However, a global trend has recently emerged toward lowering the ethanol content of alcoholic beverages. One option for decreasing ethanol concentration is to use yeast strains able to divert some carbon away from ethanol production. In the case of wine, we have generated and evaluated a large number of gene modifications that were predicted, or known, to impact ethanol formation. Using the same yeast genetic background, 41 modifications were assessed. Enhancing glycerol production by increasing expression of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, GPD1, was the most efficient strategy to lower ethanol concentration. However, additional modifications were needed to avoid negatively affecting wine quality. Two strains carrying several stable, chromosomally integrated modifications showed significantly lower ethanol production in fermenting grape juice. Strain AWRI2531 was able to decrease ethanol concentrations from 15.6% (vol/vol) to 13.2% (vol/vol), whereas AWRI2532 lowered ethanol content from 15.6% (vol/vol) to 12% (vol/vol) in both Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon juices. Both strains, however, produced high concentrations of acetaldehyde and acetoin, which negatively affect wine flavor. Further modifications of these strains allowed reduction of these metabolites. PMID:22729542

  16. Genes involved in sister chromatid separation and segregation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Biggins, S; Bhalla, N; Chang, A; Smith, D L; Murray, A W

    2001-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires the precise coordination of events during the cell cycle. Replicated sister chromatids are held together while they are properly attached to and aligned by the mitotic spindle at metaphase. At anaphase, the links between sisters must be promptly dissolved to allow the mitotic spindle to rapidly separate them to opposite poles. To isolate genes involved in chromosome behavior during mitosis, we microscopically screened a temperature-sensitive collection of budding yeast mutants that contain a GFP-marked chromosome. Nine LOC (loss of cohesion) complementation groups that do not segregate sister chromatids at anaphase were identified. We cloned the corresponding genes and performed secondary tests to determine their function in chromosome behavior. We determined that three LOC genes, PDS1, ESP1, and YCS4, are required for sister chromatid separation and three other LOC genes, CSE4, IPL1, and SMT3, are required for chromosome segregation. We isolated alleles of two genes involved in splicing, PRP16 and PRP19, which impair alpha-tubulin synthesis thus preventing spindle assembly, as well as an allele of CDC7 that is defective in DNA replication. We also report an initial characterization of phenotypes associated with the SMT3/SUMO gene and the isolation of WSS1, a high-copy smt3 suppressor. PMID:11606525

  17. Global effects on gene expression in fission yeast by silencing and RNA interference machineries.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Klavs R; Burns, Gavin; Mata, Juan; Volpe, Thomas A; Martienssen, Robert A; Bähler, Jürg; Thon, Geneviève

    2005-01-01

    Histone modifications influence gene expression in complex ways. The RNA interference (RNAi) machinery can repress transcription by recruiting histone-modifying enzymes to chromatin, although it is not clear whether this is a general mechanism for gene silencing or whether it requires repeated sequences such as long terminal repeats (LTRs). We analyzed the global effects of the Clr3 and Clr6 histone deacetylases, the Clr4 methyltransferase, the zinc finger protein Clr1, and the RNAi proteins Dicer, RdRP, and Argonaute on the transcriptome of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The clr mutants derepressed similar subsets of genes, many of which also became transcriptionally activated in cells that were exposed to environmental stresses such as nitrogen starvation. Many genes that were repressed by the Clr proteins clustered in extended regions close to the telomeres. Surprisingly few genes were repressed by both the silencing and RNAi machineries, with transcripts from centromeric repeats and Tf2 retrotransposons being notable exceptions. We found no correlation between repression by RNAi and proximity to LTRs, and the wtf family of repeated sequences seems to be repressed by histone deacetylation independent of RNAi. Our data indicate that the RNAi and Clr proteins show only a limited functional overlap and that the Clr proteins play more global roles in gene silencing. PMID:15632061

  18. Improving freeze-tolerance of baker's yeast through seamless gene deletion of NTH1 and PUT1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian; Chen, Didi; Wang, Guanglu; Zhang, Cuiying; Du, Liping; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-06-01

    Baker's yeast strains with freeze-tolerance are highly desirable to maintain high leavening ability after freezing. Enhanced intracellular concentration of trehalose and proline in yeast is linked with freeze-tolerance. In this study, we constructed baker's yeast with enhanced freeze-tolerance by simultaneous deletion of the neutral trehalase-encoded gene NTH1 and the proline oxidase-encoded gene PUT1. We first used the two-step integration-based seamless gene deletion method to separately delete NTH1 and PUT1 in haploid yeast. Subsequently, through two rounds of hybridization and sporulation-based allelic exchange and colony PCR-mediated tetrad analysis, we obtained strains with restored URA3 and deletion of NTH1 and/or PUT1. The resulting strain showed higher cell survival and dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to the wild-type strain due to enhanced accumulation of trehalose and/or proline. Moreover, mutant with simultaneous deletion of NTH1 and PUT1 exhibits the highest relative dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to mutants with single-gene deletion perhaps due to elevated levels of both trehalose and proline. These results verified that it is applicable to construct frozen dough baker's yeast using the method proposed in this paper.

  19. Improving freeze-tolerance of baker's yeast through seamless gene deletion of NTH1 and PUT1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian; Chen, Didi; Wang, Guanglu; Zhang, Cuiying; Du, Liping; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-06-01

    Baker's yeast strains with freeze-tolerance are highly desirable to maintain high leavening ability after freezing. Enhanced intracellular concentration of trehalose and proline in yeast is linked with freeze-tolerance. In this study, we constructed baker's yeast with enhanced freeze-tolerance by simultaneous deletion of the neutral trehalase-encoded gene NTH1 and the proline oxidase-encoded gene PUT1. We first used the two-step integration-based seamless gene deletion method to separately delete NTH1 and PUT1 in haploid yeast. Subsequently, through two rounds of hybridization and sporulation-based allelic exchange and colony PCR-mediated tetrad analysis, we obtained strains with restored URA3 and deletion of NTH1 and/or PUT1. The resulting strain showed higher cell survival and dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to the wild-type strain due to enhanced accumulation of trehalose and/or proline. Moreover, mutant with simultaneous deletion of NTH1 and PUT1 exhibits the highest relative dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to mutants with single-gene deletion perhaps due to elevated levels of both trehalose and proline. These results verified that it is applicable to construct frozen dough baker's yeast using the method proposed in this paper. PMID:26965428

  20. Differential regulation of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier genes modulates respiratory capacity and stress tolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Timón-Gómez, Alba; Proft, Markus; Pascual-Ahuir, Amparo

    2013-01-01

    Mpc proteins are highly conserved from yeast to humans and are necessary for the uptake of pyruvate at the inner mitochondrial membrane, which is used for leucine and valine biosynthesis and as a fuel for respiration. Our analysis of the yeast MPC gene family suggests that amino acid biosynthesis, respiration rate and oxidative stress tolerance are regulated by changes in the Mpc protein composition of the mitochondria. Mpc2 and Mpc3 are highly similar but functionally different: Mpc2 is most abundant under fermentative non stress conditions and important for amino acid biosynthesis, while Mpc3 is the most abundant family member upon salt stress or when high respiration rates are required. Accordingly, expression of the MPC3 gene is highly activated upon NaCl stress or during the transition from fermentation to respiration, both types of regulation depend on the Hog1 MAP kinase. Overexpression experiments show that gain of Mpc2 function leads to a severe respiration defect and ROS accumulation, while Mpc3 stimulates respiration and enhances tolerance to oxidative stress. Our results identify the regulated mitochondrial pyruvate uptake as an important determinant of respiration rate and stress resistance.

  1. Yeast genes required for conversion of grape precursors to varietal thiols in wine.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Margarita; Gardner, Richard C

    2015-08-01

    Three varietal thiols are important for the tropical fruit aromas of Sauvignon blanc: 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one (4MMP), 3-mercaptohexanol (3MH) and its acetylated derivative 3-mercaptohexyl acetate (3MHA). These thiols are produced by yeast during fermentation from precursors in grape juice. Here we identify genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are required for the transport and cleavage of two thiol precursors: cysteine-4MMP and glutathione-3MH. A full-length copy of IRC7 is absolutely required for the cleavage of both precursors in the tested strains; the deleted form of the enzyme found in most yeast strains is incapable of converting these compounds into detectable thiols. By using strains that overexpress full-length IRC7, we further show that the glutathione transporter OPT1 and the transpeptidase CIS2 are also required for conversion of glut-3MH to its varietal thiol. No transporter for cys-4MMP was identified: a strain deleted for all nine known cysteine transport genes was still capable of converting cys-4MMP to its varietal thiol, and was also able to take up cysteine at high concentrations. Based on these results, we conclude that cysteine and glutathione precursors make a relatively minor contribution to 3MH production from most grape juices.

  2. Species Accumulation Curves and Incidence-Based Species Richness Estimators to Appraise the Diversity of Cultivable Yeasts from Beech Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Andrey M.; Kemler, Martin; Begerow, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    Background Yeast-like fungi inhabit soils throughout all climatic zones in a great abundance. While recent estimations predicted a plethora of prokaryotic taxa in one gram of soil, similar data are lacking for fungi, especially yeasts. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the diversity of soil yeasts in different forests of central Germany using cultivation-based techniques with subsequent identification based on rDNA sequence data. Based on experiments using various pre-cultivation sample treatment and different cultivation media we obtained the highest number of yeasts by analysing mixed soil samples with a single nutrient-rich medium. Additionally, several species richness estimators were applied to incidence-based data of 165 samples. All of them predicted a similar range of yeast diversity, namely 14 to 16 species. Randomized species richness curves reached saturation in all applied estimators, thus indicating that the majority of species is detected after approximately 30 to 50 samples analysed. Conclusions/Significance In this study we demonstrate that robust species identification as well as mathematical approaches are essential to reliably estimate the sampling effort needed to describe soil yeast communities. This approach has great potential for optimisation of cultivation techniques and allows high throughput analysis in the future. PMID:21858201

  3. Gene CATCHR--gene cloning and tagging for Caenorhabditis elegans using yeast homologous recombination: a novel approach for the analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Holly E; Renihan, Stephanie; Spence, Andrew M; Cooperstock, Ramona L

    2005-01-01

    Expression patterns of gene products provide important insights into gene function. Reporter constructs are frequently used to analyze gene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans, but the sequence context of a given gene is inevitably altered in such constructs. As a result, these transgenes may lack regulatory elements required for proper gene expression. We developed Gene Catchr, a novel method of generating reporter constructs that exploits yeast homologous recombination (YHR) to subclone and tag worm genes while preserving their local sequence context. YHR facilitates the cloning of large genomic regions, allowing the isolation of regulatory sequences in promoters, introns, untranslated regions and flanking DNA. The endogenous regulatory context of a given gene is thus preserved, producing expression patterns that are as accurate as possible. Gene Catchr is flexible: any tag can be inserted at any position without introducing extra sequence. Each step is simple and can be adapted to process multiple genes in parallel. We show that expression patterns derived from Gene Catchr transgenes are consistent with previous reports and also describe novel expression data. Mutant rescue assays demonstrate that Gene Catchr-generated transgenes are functional. Our results validate the use of Gene Catchr as a valuable tool to study spatiotemporal gene expression. PMID:16254074

  4. Detection of maltose fermentation genes in the baking yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y; Tonomura, K

    1996-10-01

    The presence of any one of the five unlinked MAL loci (MAL1, MAL2, MAL3, MAL4 and MAL6) confers the ability to ferment maltose on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each locus is composed of three genes encoding maltose permease, alpha-glucosidase and MAL activator. Chromosomal DNA of seven representative baking strains has been separated by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and probed with three genes in MAL6 locus. The DNA bands to which all of the three MAL-derived probes simultaneously hybridized were chromosome VII carrying MAL1 in all of the strains tested, chromosome XI carrying MAL4 in six strains, chromosome III carrying MAL2 in three strains and chromosomes II and VIII carrying MAL3 and MAL6, respectively, in the one strain. The number of MAL loci in baking strains was comparable to those of brewing strains.

  5. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase.

  6. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase. PMID:24815694

  7. TAP1, a yeast gene that activates the expression of a tRNA gene with a defective internal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Di Segni, G; McConaughy, B L; Shapiro, R A; Aldrich, T L; Hall, B D

    1993-01-01

    We developed a genetic selection system based on nonsense suppression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify mutations in proteins involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase III. A SUP4 tRNA(Tyr) internal promoter mutation (A53T61) that was unable to suppress ochre mutations in vivo and was incapable of binding TFIIIC in vitro was used as the target for selection of trans-acting compensatory mutations. We identified two such mutations in the same gene, which we named TAP1 (for transcription activation protein). The level of the SUP4A53T61 transcript was threefold higher in the tap1-1 mutant than in the wild type. The tap1-1 mutant strain was also temperature sensitive for growth. The thermosensitive character cosegregated with the restorer of suppression activity, as shown by meiotic linkage analysis and coreversion of the two traits. At 1 to 2 h after a shift to the restrictive temperature, RNA synthesis was strongly inhibited in the tap1-1 mutant, preceding any effect upon protein synthesis or growth. A marked decrease in tRNA and 5S rRNA synthesis was seen, and shortly after that, rRNA synthesis was inhibited. By complementation of the ts- growth defect, we cloned the wild-type TAP1 gene. It is essential for yeast growth. We show in the accompanying report (T. L. Aldrich, G. Di Segni, B. L. McConaughy, N. J. Keen, S. Whelen, and B. D. Hall, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:3434-3444, 1993) that TAP1 is identical to RAT1, a yeast gene implicated in poly(A)+ RNA export and that the TAP1/RAT1 gene product has extensive sequence similarity to the protein encoded by another yeast gene (variously named DST2, KEM1, RAR5, SEP1, or XRN1) having exonuclease and DNA strand transfer activity (reviewed by Kearsey and Kipling [Trends Cell Biol. 1:110-112, 1991]). Images PMID:8497259

  8. Isolation of genes expressed preferentially during sporulation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, M J; Buten-Magee, B; Straight, D J; Kennedy, A L; Partridge, R M; Magee, P T

    1983-01-01

    A library of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA in the vector lambda Charon 28 was probed for sequences complementary to cDNA made from poly(A)+ RNA isolated from the well-sporulating yeast strain AP1 a/alpha. The RNA was isolated from cells that had been incubated 7, 9, 11, and 13 hr in sporulation medium. DNA complementary to poly(A)+ RNA from alpha/alpha(nonsporulating) AP1 was used as a control, and 46 bacteriophage that gave a stronger response with a/alpha cDNA than with alpha/alpha cDNA were obtained in a screening of three yeast genomes worth of DNA. Two of the bacteriophage appeared to contain a/alpha-specific genes, in that they hybridized to cDNA from vegetative a/alpha RNA. The rest appeared to correspond to a/alpha genes expressed preferentially during sporulation. Restriction endonuclease analysis of four of the cloned sequences revealed a single major region of transcription in each; these regions ranged in size from 2.5 to 4.0 kilobases. RNA blot analysis showed that, in three of the four cases, transcripts of two different sizes were homologous to the cloned sequence. In all four cases, the homologous transcripts appeared at about 7 hr and were decreasing in amount by 13 hr. These results provide evidence for transcriptional control of genes expressed during sporulation and for at least one group of genes that is turned on at about the time of meiosis I in sporulation. Images PMID:6304689

  9. [Basidiomycetous laccase gene diversity in two subtropical forest soils].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-bi; Su, Yi-rong; He, Xun-yang; Hu, Le-ning; Liang, Yue-ming; Feng, Shu-zhen; Ge, Yun-hui; Xiao, Wei

    2011-10-01

    As one of the key enzymes involved in lignin decomposition of forest litter, laccase plays an important role in the carbon cycling in forest ecosystem. By using TA cloning and sequencing, a comparative study was conducted on the basidiomycetous laccase gene diversity in the O horizon (litter layer) and A horizon (surface soil layer, 0-20 cm) in two subtropical forests (a primeval evergreen deciduous broadleaved mixed forest and an artificial masson pine forest). For the same soil horizons, the basidiomycetous laccase gene diversity and richness were higher in the primeval forest than in the masson pine forest; for the same forest ecosystems, the basidiomycetous laccase gene diversity and richness in the primeval forest were slightly higher in O horizon than in A horizon, but those in the masson pine forest were apparently lower in O horizon than in A horizon. The two forest soils had the same dominant laccase gene-containing basidiomycetous populations, and most of the populations had high similarity of amino acid sequence to Mycena sp. or Pleurotus sp. belonging to Agaricales. Comparing with the A horizon in primeval forest and the O horizon in masson pine forest, the O horizon in primeval forest and the A horizon in masson pine forest had a relatively uniform distribution of basidiomycetous populations. The nucleotide sequence similarity of basidiomycetous laccase gene between the O and A horizons in the masson pine forest was higher than that in the primeval forest. This study showed that vegetation and soil horizon had significant effects on the basidiomycetous laccase gene diversity and community structure, and the discrepancies in the substrate availability for basidiomycetes and in the soil pH induced by the vegetation and soil horizon could be the driving forces.

  10. Fission yeast Mus81.Eme1 Holliday junction resolvase is required for meiotic crossing over but not for gene conversion.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gerald R; Boddy, Michael N; Shanahan, Paul; Russell, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Most models of homologous recombination invoke cleavage of Holliday junctions to explain crossing over. The Mus81.Eme1 endonuclease from fission yeast and humans cleaves Holliday junctions and other branched DNA structures, leaving its physiological substrate uncertain. We report here that Schizosaccharomyces pombe mus81 mutants have normal or elevated frequencies of gene conversion but 20- to 100-fold reduced frequencies of crossing over. Thus, gene conversion and crossing over can be genetically separated, and Mus81 is required for crossing over, supporting the hypothesis that the fission yeast Mus81.Eme1 protein complex resolves Holliday junctions in meiotic cells. PMID:14704204

  11. Yeast diversity in a traditional French cheese "Tomme d'orchies" reveals infrequent and frequent species with associated benefits.

    PubMed

    Ceugniez, Alexandre; Drider, Djamel; Jacques, Philippe; Coucheney, Françoise

    2015-12-01

    This study is aimed at unrevealing the yeast diversity of handmade cheese, Tomme d'orchies, produced and marketed in the north of France. A total of 185 yeast colonies were isolated from the surface and core of this cheese. From these, 80 morphologically different colonies were selected and subjected to rep-PCR analysis. The isolates were clustered into six distinct groups based on their DNA fingerprints. From each group, at least 30% of isolates were selected and identified to species level by biochemical characteristics (ID32C Api system) and sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 26S rDNA regions. The isolates belonged to Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus, frequently isolated, and less frequently isolated Saturnispora mendoncae and Clavispora lusitaniae. Two isolates designated as Kluyveromyces lactis (isolate S-3-05) and Kluyveromyces marxianus (isolate S-2-05) were non-hemolytic, sensitive to antifungal compounds and able to inhibit the growth of pathogens including Candida albicans, Listeria monocytogenes and some bacilli.

  12. Effects of a ferrate-containing preparation on diverse metabolic processes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kotyk, A; Lapathitis, G; Suttajit, M

    2000-01-01

    A plant-sap-derived preparation containing bi- and tervalent ferrate anions was tested on growth, respiration on glucose, and membrane transport of 6-deoxy-D-glucose (6-dGlc) and 2-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) in several yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Rhodotorula gracilis, and Dipodascus magnusii. Growth was enhanced by as much as 65%, respiration was not affected significantly except for a decrease in R. gracilis, transport of 6-dGlc was not affected while that of Aib was increased by up to 45% in R. gracilis and up to 27% in L. elongisporus.

  13. High-resolution genome-wide scan of genes, gene-networks and cellular systems impacting the yeast ionome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To balance the demand for uptake of essential elements with their potential toxicity living cells have complex regulatory mechanisms. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen to identify genes that impact the elemental composition (‘ionome’) of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using inductively coupled plasma – mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) we quantify Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, S and Zn in 11890 mutant strains, including 4940 haploid and 1127 diploid deletion strains, and 5798 over expression strains. Results We identified 1065 strains with an altered ionome, including 584 haploid and 35 diploid deletion strains, and 446 over expression strains. Disruption of protein metabolism or trafficking has the highest likelihood of causing large ionomic changes, with gene dosage also being important. Gene over expression produced more extreme ionomic changes, but over expression and loss of function phenotypes are generally not related. Ionomic clustering revealed the existence of only a small number of possible ionomic profiles suggesting fitness tradeoffs that constrain the ionome. Clustering also identified important roles for the mitochondria, vacuole and ESCRT pathway in regulation of the ionome. Network analysis identified hub genes such as PMR1 in Mn homeostasis, novel members of ionomic networks such as SMF3 in vacuolar retrieval of Mn, and cross-talk between the mitochondria and the vacuole. All yeast ionomic data can be searched and downloaded at http://www.ionomicshub.org. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate the power of high-throughput ICP-MS analysis to functionally dissect the ionome on a genome-wide scale. The information this reveals has the potential to benefit both human health and agriculture. PMID:23151179

  14. Existence and expression of photoreactivation repair genes in various yeast species.

    PubMed

    Yasui, A; Eker, A P; Koken, M

    1989-01-01

    Photoreactivation repair (Phr) activities in cell extracts of 13 different yeast species were measured by the Haemophilus influenzae transformation assay. Five species including Schizosaccharomyces pombe showed no or low enzymatic activity. In contrast to the other species, chromosomal DNAs of these 5 species did not show detectable hybridization using a DNA fragment of the photolyase PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cervisiae as a probe even at a low stringency condition. When the PHR1 gene was attached to the 5'-flanking sequence of the iso-1-cytochrome c (CYC-1) gene of S. cerevisiae and introduced into S. pombe cells, the transformants acquired a high Phr activity, indicating that the PHR1 gene alone can provide a Phr-negative species with this repair activity and the light-absorbing cofactor(s) must be present in S. pombe. Our results also demonstrated that the 5'-flanking sequence of the S. cerevisiae CYC-1 gene works in S. pombe as a regulatory element. PMID:2911265

  15. Eukaryote-to-eukaryote gene transfer events revealed by the genome sequence of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118

    PubMed Central

    Novo, Maite; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Galeote, Virginie; Gavory, Frédérick; Mallet, Sandrine; Cambon, Brigitte; Legras, Jean-Luc; Wincker, Patrick; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for millennia in winemaking, but little is known about the selective forces acting on the wine yeast genome. We sequenced the complete genome of the diploid commercial wine yeast EC1118, resulting in an assembly of 31 scaffolds covering 97% of the S288c reference genome. The wine yeast differed strikingly from the other S. cerevisiae isolates in possessing 3 unique large regions, 2 of which were subtelomeric, the other being inserted within an EC1118 chromosome. These regions encompass 34 genes involved in key wine fermentation functions. Phylogeny and synteny analyses showed that 1 of these regions originated from a species closely related to the Saccharomyces genus, whereas the 2 other regions were of non-Saccharomyces origin. We identified Zygosaccharomyces bailii, a major contaminant of wine fermentations, as the donor species for 1 of these 2 regions. Although natural hybridization between Saccharomyces strains has been described, this report provides evidence that gene transfer may occur between Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces species. We show that the regions identified are frequent and differentially distributed among S. cerevisiae clades, being found almost exclusively in wine strains, suggesting acquisition through recent transfer events. Overall, these data show that the wine yeast genome is subject to constant remodeling through the contribution of exogenous genes. Our results suggest that these processes are favored by ecologic proximity and are involved in the molecular adaptation of wine yeasts to conditions of high sugar, low nitrogen, and high ethanol concentrations. PMID:19805302

  16. Common gene expression strategies revealed by genome-wide analysis in yeast

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, José; González-Candelas, Fernando; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression is a two-step synthesis process that ends with the necessary amount of each protein required to perform its function. Since the protein is the final product, the main focus of gene regulation should be centered on it. However, because mRNA is an intermediate step and the amounts of both mRNA and protein are controlled by their synthesis and degradation rates, the desired amount of protein can be achieved following different strategies. Results In this paper we present the first comprehensive analysis of the relationships among the six variables that characterize gene expression in a living organism: transcription and translation rates, mRNA and protein amounts, and mRNA and protein stabilities. We have used previously published data from exponentially growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We show that there is a general tendency to harmonize the levels of mRNA and protein by coordinating their synthesis rates and that functionally related genes tend to have similar values for the six variables. Conclusion We propose that yeast cells use common expression strategies for genes acting in the same physiological pathways. This trend is more evident for genes coding for large and stable protein complexes, such as ribosomes or the proteasome. Hence, each functional group can be defined by a 'six variable profile' that illustrates the common strategy followed by the genes included in it. Genes encoding subunits of protein complexes show a tendency to have relatively unstable mRNAs and a less balanced profile for mRNA than for protein, suggesting a stronger regulation at the transcriptional level. PMID:17945030

  17. Highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated TAR cloning of genes and chromosomal loci from complex genomes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nicholas C O; Larionov, Vladimir; Kouprina, Natalay

    2015-04-30

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) protocol allowing the selective isolation of full-length genes complete with their distal enhancer regions and entire genomic loci with sizes up to 250 kb from complex genomes in yeast S. cerevisiae has been developed more than a decade ago. However, its wide spread usage has been impeded by a low efficiency (0.5-2%) of chromosomal region capture during yeast transformants which in turn requires a time-consuming screen of hundreds of colonies. Here, we demonstrate that pre-treatment of genomic DNA with CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases to generate double-strand breaks near the targeted genomic region results in a dramatic increase in the fraction of gene-positive colonies (up to 32%). As only a dozen or less yeast transformants need to be screened to obtain a clone with the desired chromosomal region, extensive experience with yeast is no longer required. A TAR-CRISPR protocol may help to create a bank of human genes, each represented by a genomic copy containing its native regulatory elements, that would lead to a significant advance in functional, structural and comparative genomics, in diagnostics, gene replacement, generation of animal models for human diseases and has a potential for gene therapy.

  18. Human DNA methyltransferase gene-transformed yeasts display an inducible flocculation inhibited by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Takamune, Makiko; Furusawa, Hiroko; Honma, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) play an important role in establishing and maintaining the proper regulation of epigenetic information. However, it remains unclear whether mammalian DNMTs can be functionally expressed in yeasts, which probably lack endogenous DNMTs. We cotransformed the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the human DNMT1 gene, which encodes a methylation maintenance enzyme, and the DNMT3A/3B genes, which encode de novo methylation enzymes, in an expression vector also containing the GAL1 promoter, which is induced by galactose, and examined the effects of the DNMT inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5AZ) on cell growth. Transformed yeast strains grown in galactose- and glucose-containing media showed growth inhibition, and their growth rate was unaffected by 5AZ. Conversely, 5AZ, but not 2'-deoxycytidine, dose-dependently interfered with the flocculation exhibited by DNMT-gene transformants grown in glucose-containing medium. Further investigation of the properties of this flocculation indicated that it may be dependent on the expression of a Flocculin-encoding gene, FLO1. Taken together, these findings suggest that DNMT-gene transformed yeast strains functionally express these enzymes and represent a useful tool for in vivo screening for DNMT inhibitors.

  19. Overexpression of stress-related genes enhances cell viability and velum formation in Sherry wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Rincón, Ana María; Benítez, Tahía; Codón, Antonio C

    2013-08-01

    Flor formation and flor endurance have been related to ability by Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts to resist hostile conditions such as oxidative stress and the presence of acetaldehyde and ethanol. Ethanol and acetaldehyde toxicity give rise to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of cell viability. Superoxide dismutases Sod1p and Sod2p and other proteins such as Hsp12p are involved in oxidative stress tolerance. In this study, genes SOD1, SOD2, and HSP12 were overexpressed in flor yeast strains FJF206, FJF414 and B16. In the SOD1 and SOD2 transformant strains superoxide dismutases encoded by genes SOD1 and SOD2 increased their specific activity considerably as a direct result of overexpression of genes SOD1 and SOD2, indirectly, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase activities increased too. The HSP12 transformant strains showed higher levels of glutathione peroxidase and reductase activities. These transformant strains showed an increase in intracellular glutathione content, a reduction in peroxidized lipid concentration, and higher resistance to oxidative stress conditions. As a result, flor formation by these strains took place more rapidly than by their parental strains, velum being thicker and with higher percentages of viable cells. In addition, a slight decrease in ethanol and glycerol concentrations, and an increase in acetaldehyde were detected in wines matured under velum formed by transformant strains, as compared to their parental strains. In the industry, velum formed by transformant strains with increased viability may result in acceleration of both metabolism and wine aging, thus reducing time needed for wine maturation. PMID:23553032

  20. FEN2: a gene implicated in the catabolite repression-mediated regulation of ergosterol biosynthesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Marcireau, C; Joets, J; Pousset, D; Guilloton, M; Karst, F

    1996-05-01

    We have isolated and characterized a pleiotropic recessive mutation. fen2-1, that causes resistance to fenpropimorph and a low level of ergosterol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ergosterol synthesis in the mutant strain was 5.5-fold slower than in the wild type; however, in vitro assays of the enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis could not account for this low rate in the mutant. The mutant phenotype was expressed only in media exerting both carbon and nitrogen catabolite repression. To our knowledge, this is the first locus in yeast that reveals a concerted regulation between different pathways (carbon and nitrogen catabolite repression and/or general control of amino acid biosynthesis and ergosterol biosynthesis). The yeast gene FEN2 has been isolated and contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 512 codons. This ORF was found to be identical to YCR28C of chromosome III. A possible function of the FEN2 gene product in yeast is discussed.

  1. Physical mapping of the human t-cell receptor beta gene complex, using yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hashim, Y.; So, A.K.; Kearney, L.

    1995-04-01

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to construct a physical map of the germline human T-cell {beta} chain gene complex (TCRB). Variable region genes (BV) for the 25 known subfamilies were used as probes to screen the ICRF AM4x YAC library. Of the five positive YACs identified, one YAC designated B3, 820 kilobase pairs (kbp) in size, scored positive for all 25 TCRBV subfamilies plus the constant region genes (BC) when analyzed by pulse field gel electrophoresis. Restriction enzyme mapping of B3 located TCRBV and TCRBC gene regions to 4 Sfi I fragments of 280, 110, 90, and 125 kbp and was in accordance with published data. In addition, comparison of hybridization results of Sfi I-restricted B3 and genomic DNA from the parental cell line GM1416B revealed identical banding patterns. The data thus showed YAC B3 encoded a complete and unrearranged TCRB gene locus of some 600-620 kbp. The map was further resolved by locating restriction sites for Sal I and Bss HII on B3, giving more precise localization of the individual TCRBV gene families. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of B3 to spreads of human metaphase chromosomes localized B3 to 7q35. However, two additional signals were obtained; one attributable to the TCRBV orphon cluster on 9p21, the second to the long arm of chromosome 2. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of a chromosome 2 somatic cell hybrid, using primers for all 25 TCRBV gene families, revealed that the signal was not attributable to a second orphon cluster. It is suggested that B3 is a chimeric YAC with an intact TCRB locus flanked by chromosome 2 sequences. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1. Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1. Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them. PMID:27190003

  3. Barcode Sequencing Screen Identifies SUB1 as a Regulator of Yeast Pheromone Inducible Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sliva, Anna; Kuang, Zheng; Meluh, Pamela B.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2016-01-01

    The yeast pheromone response pathway serves as a valuable model of eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and transcription of their downstream targets. Here, we describe application of a screening method combining two technologies: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and barcode analysis by sequencing (Bar-Seq). Using this screening method, and pFUS1-GFP as a reporter for MAPK pathway activation, we readily identified mutants in known mating pathway components. In this study, we also include a comprehensive analysis of the FUS1 induction properties of known mating pathway mutants by flow cytometry, featuring single cell analysis of each mutant population. We also characterized a new source of false positives resulting from the design of this screen. Additionally, we identified a deletion mutant, sub1Δ, with increased basal expression of pFUS1-GFP. Here, in the first ChIP-Seq of Sub1, our data shows that Sub1 binds to the promoters of about half the genes in the genome (tripling the 991 loci previously reported), including the promoters of several pheromone-inducible genes, some of which show an increase upon pheromone induction. Here, we also present the first RNA-Seq of a sub1Δ mutant; the majority of genes have no change in RNA, but, of the small subset that do, most show decreased expression, consistent with biochemical studies implicating Sub1 as a positive transcriptional regulator. The RNA-Seq data also show that certain pheromone-inducible genes are induced less in the sub1Δ mutant relative to the wild type, supporting a role for Sub1 in regulation of mating pathway genes. The sub1Δ mutant has increased basal levels of a small subset of other genes besides FUS1, including IMD2 and FIG1, a gene encoding an integral membrane protein necessary for efficient mating. PMID:26837954

  4. Lack of genetic diversity across diverse immune genes in an endangered mammal, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Morris, Katrina M; Wright, Belinda; Grueber, Catherine E; Hogg, Carolyn; Belov, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is threatened with extinction due to the spread of devil facial tumour disease. Polymorphisms in immune genes can provide adaptive potential to resist diseases. Previous studies in diversity at immune loci in wild species have almost exclusively focused on genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, these genes only account for a fraction of immune gene diversity. Devils lack diversity at functionally important immunity loci, including MHC and Toll-like receptor genes. Whether there are polymorphisms at devil immune genes outside these two families is unknown. Here, we identify polymorphisms in a wide range of key immune genes, and develop assays to type single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a subset of these genes. A total of 167 immune genes were examined, including cytokines, chemokines and natural killer cell receptors. Using genome-level data from ten devils, SNPs within coding regions, introns and 10 kb flanking genes of interest were identified. We found low polymorphism across 167 immune genes examined bioinformatically using whole-genome data. From this data, we developed long amplicon assays to target nine genes. These amplicons were sequenced in 29-220 devils and found to contain 78 SNPs, including eight SNPS within exons. Despite the extreme paucity of genetic diversity within these genes, signatures of balancing selection were exhibited by one chemokine gene, suggesting that remaining diversity may hold adaptive potential. The low functional diversity may leave devils highly vulnerable to infectious disease, and therefore, monitoring and preserving remaining diversity will be critical for the long-term management of this species. Examining genetic variation in diverse immune genes should be a priority for threatened wildlife species. This study can act as a model for broad-scale immunogenetic diversity analysis in threatened species. PMID:26119928

  5. Unisexual and Heterosexual Meiotic Reproduction Generate Aneuploidy and Phenotypic Diversity De Novo in the Yeast Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Floyd-Averette, Anna; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Dietrich, Fred S.; Heitman, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Aneuploidy is known to be deleterious and underlies several common human diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders such as trisomy 21 in Down's syndrome. In contrast, aneuploidy can also be advantageous and in fungi confers antifungal drug resistance and enables rapid adaptive evolution. We report here that sexual reproduction generates phenotypic and genotypic diversity in the human pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, which is globally distributed and commonly infects individuals with compromised immunity, such as HIV/AIDS patients, causing life-threatening meningoencephalitis. C. neoformans has a defined a-α opposite sexual cycle; however, >99% of isolates are of the α mating type. Interestingly, α cells can undergo α-α unisexual reproduction, even involving genotypically identical cells. A central question is: Why would cells mate with themselves given that sex is costly and typically serves to admix preexisting genetic diversity from genetically divergent parents? In this study, we demonstrate that α-α unisexual reproduction frequently generates phenotypic diversity, and the majority of these variant progeny are aneuploid. Aneuploidy is responsible for the observed phenotypic changes, as chromosome loss restoring euploidy results in a wild-type phenotype. Other genetic changes, including diploidization, chromosome length polymorphisms, SNPs, and indels, were also generated. Phenotypic/genotypic changes were not observed following asexual mitotic reproduction. Aneuploidy was also detected in progeny from a-α opposite-sex congenic mating; thus, both homothallic and heterothallic sexual reproduction can generate phenotypic diversity de novo. Our study suggests that the ability to undergo unisexual reproduction may be an evolutionary strategy for eukaryotic microbial pathogens, enabling de novo genotypic and phenotypic plasticity and facilitating rapid adaptation to novel environments. PMID:24058295

  6. Genetic diversity in the feline leukemia virus gag gene.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Maki; Watanabe, Shinya; Odahara, Yuka; Nakagawa, So; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) belongs to the Gammaretrovirus genus and is horizontally transmitted among cats. FeLV is known to undergo recombination with endogenous retroviruses already present in the host during FeLV-subgroup A infection. Such recombinant FeLVs, designated FeLV-subgroup B or FeLV-subgroup D, can be generated by transduced endogenous retroviral env sequences encoding the viral envelope. These recombinant viruses have biologically distinct properties and may mediate different disease outcomes. The generation of such recombinant viruses resulted in structural diversity of the FeLV particle and genetic diversity of the virus itself. FeLV env diversity through mutation and recombination has been studied, while gag diversity and its possible effects are less well understood. In this study, we investigated recombination events in the gag genes of FeLVs isolated from naturally infected cats and reference isolates. Recombination and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the gag genes often contain endogenous FeLV sequences and were occasionally replaced by entire endogenous FeLV gag genes. Phylogenetic reconstructions of FeLV gag sequences allowed for classification into three distinct clusters, similar to those previously established for the env gene. Analysis of the recombination junctions in FeLV gag indicated that these variants have similar recombination patterns within the same genotypes, indicating that the recombinant viruses were horizontally transmitted among cats. It remains to be investigated whether the recombinant sequences affect the molecular mechanism of FeLV transmission. These findings extend our understanding of gammaretrovirus evolutionary patterns in the field.

  7. Population Structure and Comparative Genome Hybridization of European Flor Yeast Reveal a Unique Group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains with Few Gene Duplications in Their Genome

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Erny, Claude; Charpentier, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation. PMID:25272156

  8. Disruption of the CAR1 gene encoding arginase enhances freeze tolerance of the commercial baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shima, Jun; Sakata-Tsuda, Yuko; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakajima, Ryouichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Takano, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    The effect of intracellular charged amino acids on freeze tolerance in dough was determined by constructing homozygous diploid arginase-deficient mutants of commercial baker's yeast. An arginase mutant accumulated higher levels of arginine and/or glutamate and showed increased leavening ability during the frozen-dough baking process, suggesting that disruption of the CAR1 gene enhances freeze tolerance.

  9. Disruption of the CAR1 gene encoding arginase enhances freeze tolerance of the commercial baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shima, Jun; Sakata-Tsuda, Yuko; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakajima, Ryouichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Takano, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    The effect of intracellular charged amino acids on freeze tolerance in dough was determined by constructing homozygous diploid arginase-deficient mutants of commercial baker's yeast. An arginase mutant accumulated higher levels of arginine and/or glutamate and showed increased leavening ability during the frozen-dough baking process, suggesting that disruption of the CAR1 gene enhances freeze tolerance. PMID:12514069

  10. Integrative phenomics reveals insight into the structure of phenotypic diversity in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Skelly, Daniel A.; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Riffle, Michael; Connelly, Caitlin F.; Kerr, Emily O.; Johansson, Marnie; Jaschob, Daniel; Graczyk, Beth; Shulman, Nicholas J.; Wakefield, Jon; Cooper, Sara J.; Fields, Stanley; Noble, William S.; Muller, Eric G.D.; Davis, Trisha N.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Akey, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the quantitative characteristics and structure of phenotypic diversity, we measured over 14,000 transcript, protein, metabolite, and morphological traits in 22 genetically diverse strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. More than 50% of all measured traits varied significantly across strains [false discovery rate (FDR) = 5%]. The structure of phenotypic correlations is complex, with 85% of all traits significantly correlated with at least one other phenotype (median = 6, maximum = 328). We show how high-dimensional molecular phenomics data sets can be leveraged to accurately predict phenotypic variation between strains, often with greater precision than afforded by DNA sequence information alone. These results provide new insights into the spectrum and structure of phenotypic diversity and the characteristics influencing the ability to accurately predict phenotypes. PMID:23720455

  11. Isolation of the Inositol Phosphoceramide Synthase Gene (AUR1) from Stress-Tolerant Yeast Pichia kudriavzevii.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Boung-Hyuk; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2015-11-01

    This study is the first report of the entire nucleotide sequence of an inositol phosphoceramide synthase gene from the stress-tolerant yeast Pichia kudriavzevii (PkAUR1). Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame that spans 1,443 bp and encodes a 480-amino-acid-residue protein with the highest sequence similarity (41.7%) to Aur1 from Spathaspora passalidarum. A phenotypic assay with transformed S. cerevisiae and P. kudriavzevii indicated that two amino acid residues, Phe166 and Gly249, play crucial roles in the resistance to aureobasidin A, which is consistent with previous reports for other fungal Aur1s. The GenBank Accession No. for PkAUR1 is KP729614. PMID:26323269

  12. Cloning of the transketolase gene from erythritol-producing yeast Candida magnoliae.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Boung-Hyuk; Park, Eun-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-10-01

    The entire nucleotide sequence of the TKL1 gene encoding transketolase (TKL) in an erythritolproducing yeast of Candida magnoliae was determined by degenerate polymerase chain reaction and genome walking. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of C. magnoliae TKL1 (CmTKL1) that spans 2,088 bp and encodes 696 amino acids, sharing 61.7% amino acid identity to Kluyveromyces lactis TKL. Functional analysis showed that CmTKL1 complemented a Saccharomyces cerevisiae tkl1 tkl2 double mutant for growth in the absence of aromatic amino acids and restored transketolase activity in this mutant. An enzyme activity assay and RT-PCR revealed that the expression of CmTKL1 is induced by fructose, H2O2, and KCl. The GenBank accession number for C. magnoliae TKL1 is KF751756.

  13. Diverse alkane hydroxylase genes in microorganisms and environments

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Fang, Hui; Liang, Jie-Liang; Lu, She-Lian; Lai, Guo-Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    AlkB and CYP153 are important alkane hydroxylases responsible for aerobic alkane degradation in bioremediation of oil-polluted environments and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Since their distribution in nature is not clear, we made the investigation among thus-far sequenced 3,979 microbial genomes and 137 metagenomes from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. Hundreds of diverse alkB and CYP153 genes including many novel ones were found in bacterial genomes, whereas none were found in archaeal genomes. Moreover, these genes were detected with different distributional patterns in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine metagenomes. Hints for horizontal gene transfer, gene duplication, and gene fusion were found, which together are likely responsible for diversifying the alkB and CYP153 genes adapt to the ubiquitous distribution of different alkanes in nature. In addition, different distributions of these genes between bacterial genomes and metagenomes suggested the potentially important roles of unknown or less common alkane degraders in nature. PMID:24829093

  14. Characterization of a component of the yeast secretion machinery: identification of the SEC18 gene product.

    PubMed

    Eakle, K A; Bernstein, M; Emr, S D

    1988-10-01

    SEC18 gene function is required for secretory protein transport between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi complex. We cloned the SEC18 gene by complementation of the sec18-1 mutation. Gene disruption has shown that SEC18 is essential for yeast cell growth. Sequence analysis of the gene revealed a 2,271-base-pair open reading frame which could code for a protein of 83.9 kilodaltons. The predicted protein sequence showed no significant similarity to other known protein sequences. In vitro transcription and translation of SEC18 led to the synthesis of two proteins of approximately 84 and 82 kilodaltons. Antisera raised against a Sec18-beta-galactosidase fusion protein also detected two proteins (collectively referred to as Sec18p) in extracts of 35S-labeled yeast cells identical in size to those seen by in vitro translation. Mapping of the 5' end of the SEC18 mRNA revealed only one major start site for transcription, which indicates that the multiple forms of Sec18p do not arise from mRNAs with different 5' ends. Results of pulse-chase experiments indicated that the two forms of Sec18p are not the result of posttranslational processing. We suggest that translation initiating at different in-frame AUG start codons is likely to account for the presence of two forms of Sec18p. Hydrophobicity analysis indicated that the proteins were hydrophilic in nature and lacked any region that would be predicted to serve as a signal sequence or transmembrane anchor. Although potential sites for N-linked glycosylation were present in the Sec18p sequence, the sizes of the in vivo SEC18 gene products were unaffected by the drug tunicamycin, indicating that Sec18p does not enter the secretory pathway. These results suggest that Sec18p resides in the cell cytoplasm. While preliminary cell fractionation studies showed that Sec18p is not associated with the ER or Golgi complex, association with a 100,000 x g pellet fraction was observed. This suggests that Sec18p may bind

  15. Characterization of putative human homologues of the yeast chromosome transmission fidelity gene, CHL1.

    PubMed

    Amann, J; Kidd, V J; Lahti, J M

    1997-02-01

    Helicases are components of numerous protein complexes, including those regulating transcription, translation, DNA replication and repair, splicing, and mitotic chromosome transmission. Helicases unwind double-stranded DNA and RNA homo- and hetero-duplexes. The yeast CHL1 helicase has been linked to maintenance of the high fidelity of chromosome transmission during mitosis. Mutations in this gene result in a 200-fold increase in the rate of aberrant chromosome segregation with a concomitant delay in the cell cycle at G2-M, suggesting that CHL1 is required for the maintenance of proper chromosome transmission. Two highly related human cDNA clones encoding proteins which are homologous to the yeast CHL1 gene product have been isolated. Here we show that these two distinct human CHL1-related mRNAs and proteins (hCHLR1 and hCHLR2) are expressed only in proliferating human cell lines. Quiescent normal human fibroblasts stimulated to re-enter the cell cycle by addition of serum begin to express the CHL1-related proteins as the cells enter S phase, concomitant with the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Furthermore, expression of the CHL1-related mRNAs is lost when human K562 cells cease to proliferate and terminally differentiate in response to phorbol ester treatments. Human hCHLR expression is not extinguished during hemin-induced differentiation of the same cell line, which produces erythrocyte-like cells that continue to proliferate. These experiments are consistent with the requirement of this putative helicase during either S or G2-M phase but not G1. In vitro transcribed and translated hCHLR1 protein binds to both single- and double-stranded DNA, supporting the possibility that these proteins are DNA helicases. Finally, affinity-purified hCHLR1 antisera was used to demonstrate the localization of the hCHLR proteins to the nucleolus by indirect immunofluorescence as well as by cell fractionation.

  16. Yeast community survey in the Tagus estuary.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, João M G C F

    2005-07-01

    The yeast community in the waters of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, was followed for over a year in order to assess its dynamics. Yeast occurrence and incidence were measured and this information was related to relevant environmental data. Yeast occurrence did not seem to depend upon tides, but river discharge had a dramatic impact both on the density and diversity of the community. The occurrence of some yeasts was partially correlated with faecal pollution indicators. Yeast isolates were characterized by microsatellite primed PCR (MSP-PCR) fingerprinting and rRNA gene sequencing. The principal species found were Candida catenulata, C. intermedia, C. parapsilosis, Clavispora lusitaniae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia guilliermondii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Rhodosporidium diobovatum. The incidence of these species was evaluated against the environmental context of the samples and the current knowledge about the substrates from which they are usually isolated. PMID:16329949

  17. Genetic distance and gene diversity among linguistically different tribes of Mexican Indians.

    PubMed

    Roychoudhury, A K

    1975-05-01

    Using gene frequency data for 14 genetic loci, genetic distances between 13 tribes of Mexican Indians belonging to 12 language groups were determined and a dendrogram was constructed. The genetic distance between tribes is correlated more with geographic proximity than with language affinity. The gene diversity (heterozygosity) of the total population was decomposed into the three components, i.e., the gene diversity between three main linguistic groups, the gene diversity between tribes within the main linguistic groups and the gene diversity within tribes. About 95% of the total gene diversity exists within tribes, the intergroup and intertribe components being only about 5%.

  18. Different Mechanisms Confer Gradual Control and Memory at Nutrient- and Stress-Regulated Genes in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rienzo, Alessandro; Poveda-Huertes, Daniel; Aydin, Selcan; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to environmental stimuli by fine-tuned regulation of gene expression. Here we investigated the dose-dependent modulation of gene expression at high temporal resolution in response to nutrient and stress signals in yeast. The GAL1 activity in cell populations is modulated in a well-defined range of galactose concentrations, correlating with a dynamic change of histone remodeling and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) association. This behavior is the result of a heterogeneous induction delay caused by decreasing inducer concentrations across the population. Chromatin remodeling appears to be the basis for the dynamic GAL1 expression, because mutants with impaired histone dynamics show severely truncated dose-response profiles. In contrast, the GRE2 promoter operates like a rapid off/on switch in response to increasing osmotic stress, with almost constant expression rates and exclusively temporal regulation of histone remodeling and RNAPII occupancy. The Gal3 inducer and the Hog1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase seem to determine the different dose-response strategies at the two promoters. Accordingly, GAL1 becomes highly sensitive and dose independent if previously stimulated because of residual Gal3 levels, whereas GRE2 expression diminishes upon repeated stimulation due to acquired stress resistance. Our analysis reveals important differences in the way dynamic signals create dose-sensitive gene expression outputs. PMID:26283730

  19. Genome-Wide Functional Profiling Reveals Genes Required for Tolerance to Benzene Metabolites in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    North, Matthew; Tandon, Vickram J.; Thomas, Reuben; Loguinov, Alex; Gerlovina, Inna; Hubbard, Alan E.; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.; Vulpe, Chris D.

    2011-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and is widely used in industry. Exposure to benzene causes a number of serious health problems, including blood disorders and leukemia. Benzene undergoes complex metabolism in humans, making mechanistic determination of benzene toxicity difficult. We used a functional genomics approach to identify the genes that modulate the cellular toxicity of three of the phenolic metabolites of benzene, hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CAT) and 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT), in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Benzene metabolites generate oxidative and cytoskeletal stress, and tolerance requires correct regulation of iron homeostasis and the vacuolar ATPase. We have identified a conserved bZIP transcription factor, Yap3p, as important for a HQ-specific response pathway, as well as two genes that encode putative NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductases, PST2 and YCP4. Many of the yeast genes identified have human orthologs that may modulate human benzene toxicity in a similar manner and could play a role in benzene exposure-related disease. PMID:21912624

  20. Intrinsic biocontainment: multiplex genome safeguards combine transcriptional and recombinational control of essential yeast genes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yizhi; Agmon, Neta; Choi, Woo Jin; Ubide, Alba; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Caravelli, Katrina; Hao, Haiping; Bader, Joel S; Boeke, Jef D

    2015-02-10

    Biocontainment may be required in a wide variety of situations such as work with pathogens, field release applications of engineered organisms, and protection of intellectual properties. Here, we describe the control of growth of the brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using both transcriptional and recombinational "safeguard" control of essential gene function. Practical biocontainment strategies dependent on the presence of small molecules require them to be active at very low concentrations, rendering them inexpensive and difficult to detect. Histone genes were controlled by an inducible promoter and controlled by 30 nM estradiol. The stability of the engineered genes was separately regulated by the expression of a site-specific recombinase. The combined frequency of generating viable derivatives when both systems were active was below detection (<10(-10)), consistent with their orthogonal nature and the individual escape frequencies of <10(-6). Evaluation of escaper mutants suggests strategies for reducing their emergence. Transcript profiling and growth test suggest high fitness of safeguarded strains, an important characteristic for wide acceptance. PMID:25624482

  1. Construction of a yeast artifical chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Kleyn, P.W.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.; Pan, J.; Ross, B.M.; Grunn, A.; Palmer, D.A.; Warburton, D.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.G. ); Lien, L.L.; Kunkel, L.M. )

    1993-07-15

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Intrinsic biocontainment: Multiplex genome safeguards combine transcriptional and recombinational control of essential yeast genes

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yizhi; Agmon, Neta; Choi, Woo Jin; Ubide, Alba; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Caravelli, Katrina; Hao, Haiping; Bader, Joel S.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2015-01-01

    Biocontainment may be required in a wide variety of situations such as work with pathogens, field release applications of engineered organisms, and protection of intellectual properties. Here, we describe the control of growth of the brewer’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using both transcriptional and recombinational “safeguard” control of essential gene function. Practical biocontainment strategies dependent on the presence of small molecules require them to be active at very low concentrations, rendering them inexpensive and difficult to detect. Histone genes were controlled by an inducible promoter and controlled by 30 nM estradiol. The stability of the engineered genes was separately regulated by the expression of a site-specific recombinase. The combined frequency of generating viable derivatives when both systems were active was below detection (<10−10), consistent with their orthogonal nature and the individual escape frequencies of <10−6. Evaluation of escaper mutants suggests strategies for reducing their emergence. Transcript profiling and growth test suggest high fitness of safeguarded strains, an important characteristic for wide acceptance. PMID:25624482

  3. A single desaturase gene from red yeast Sporidiobolus pararoseus is responsible for both four- and five-step dehydrogenation of phytoene.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunji; Zhang, Ning; Song, Jia; Wei, Na; Li, Bingxue; Zou, Hongtao; Han, Xiaori

    2016-09-15

    Carotenoids are one of the most common classes of natural pigments widely occurring within organisms. These structurally diverse pigments are of great importance in different processes such as nutrition, vision, cellular growth and development. While found in various yeast strains, one of the best-studied carotenoid producer is the pigmented species Sporidiobolus pararoseus. However, the precise nature of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids in this species remains unclear. Here, we cloned a cDNA copy of the phytoene desaturase gene crtI from Sporidiobolus pararoseus CGMCC 2.5280. The crtI full-length genomic DNA and cDNA are 2330bp and 1683bp, respectively. This gene encodes a 560-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 62.28 kDa and a pI of 7.27. Functional identification of the gene was performed using heterologous complementation detection in Escherichia coli. Our experimental findings indicate that the enzymatic conversion of phytoene to lycopene (fourth step product) and 3,4-didehydrolycopene (fifth step product) is catalyzed by this phytoene desaturase of S. pararoseus through consecutive dehydrogenation. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the crtI gene of S. pararoseus represents an alternative gene source for the reconstruction of carotenogenic pathways vital for the production of engineered carotenoids. PMID:27346167

  4. High diversity of polyketide synthase genes and the melanin biosynthesis gene cluster in Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Tam, Emily W T; Chong, Ken T K; Cai, James J; Tung, Edward T K; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2010-09-01

    Despite the unique phenotypic properties and clinical importance of Penicillium marneffei, the polyketide synthase genes in its genome have never been characterized. Twenty-three putative polyketide synthase genes and two putative polyketide synthase nonribosomal peptide-synthase hybrid genes were identified in the P. marneffei genome, a diversity much higher than found in other pathogenic thermal dimorphic fungi, such as Histoplasma capsulatum (one polyketide synthase gene) and Coccidioides immitis (10 polyketide synthase genes). These genes were evenly distributed on the phylogenetic tree with polyketide synthase genes of Aspergillus and other fungi, indicating that the high diversity was not a result of lineage-specific gene expansion through recent gene duplication. The melanin-biosynthesis gene cluster had gene order and orientations identical to those in the Talaromyces stipitatus (a teleomorph of Penicillium emmonsii) genome. Phylogenetically, all six genes of the melanin-biosynthesis gene cluster in P. marneffei were also most closely related to those in T. stipitatus, with high bootstrap supports. The polyketide synthase gene of the melanin-biosynthesis gene cluster (alb1) in P. marneffei was knocked down, which was accompanied by loss of melanin pigment production and reduced ornamentation in conidia. The survival of mice challenged with the alb1 knockdown mutant was significantly better than those challenged with wild-type P. marneffei (P < 0.005). The sterilizing doses of hydrogen peroxide, leading to a 50% reduction in survival of conidia, were 11 min for wild-type P. marneffei and 6 min for the alb1 knockdown mutant of P. marneffei, implying that the melanin-biosynthesis gene cluster contributed to virulence through decreased susceptibility to killing by hydrogen peroxide. PMID:20718860

  5. Cell organisation, sulphur metabolism and ion transport-related genes are differentially expressed in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis mycelium and yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rosângela V; Paes, Hugo C; Nicola, André M; de Carvalho, Maria José A; Fachin, Ana Lúcia; Cardoso, Renato S; Silva, Simoneide S; Fernandes, Larissa; Silva, Silvana P; Donadi, Eduardo A; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T; Passos, Geraldo AS; Soares, Célia MA; Brígido, Marcelo M; Felipe, Maria Sueli S

    2006-01-01

    Background Mycelium-to-yeast transition in the human host is essential for pathogenicity by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and both cell types are therefore critical to the establishment of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. The infected population is of about 10 million individuals, 2% of whom will eventually develop the disease. Previously, transcriptome analysis of mycelium and yeast cells resulted in the assembly of 6,022 sequence groups. Gene expression analysis, using both in silico EST subtraction and cDNA microarray, revealed genes that were differential to yeast or mycelium, and we discussed those involved in sugar metabolism. To advance our understanding of molecular mechanisms of dimorphic transition, we performed an extended analysis of gene expression profiles using the methods mentioned above. Results In this work, continuous data mining revealed 66 new differentially expressed sequences that were MIPS(Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences)-categorised according to the cellular process in which they are presumably involved. Two well represented classes were chosen for further analysis: (i) control of cell organisation – cell wall, membrane and cytoskeleton, whose representatives were hex (encoding for a hexagonal peroxisome protein), bgl (encoding for a 1,3-β-glucosidase) in mycelium cells; and ags (an α-1,3-glucan synthase), cda (a chitin deacetylase) and vrp (a verprolin) in yeast cells; (ii) ion metabolism and transport – two genes putatively implicated in ion transport were confirmed to be highly expressed in mycelium cells – isc and ktp, respectively an iron-sulphur cluster-like protein and a cation transporter; and a putative P-type cation pump (pct) in yeast. Also, several enzymes from the cysteine de novo biosynthesis pathway were shown to be up regulated in the yeast form, including ATP sulphurylase, APS kinase and also PAPS reductase. Conclusion Taken together, these data

  6. [Cloning and expression of bacteriophage FMV lysocyme gene in cells of yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, D G; Cheperigin, S E; Chestkov, A V; Krylov, V N; Tsygankov, Iu D

    2010-03-01

    Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene for soluble lysozyme of bacteriophage FMV from Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria were conducted in yeast cells. Comparable efficiency of two lysozyme expression variants (as intracellular or secreted proteins) was estimated in cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. Under laboratory conditions, yeast S. cerevisiae proved to be more effective producer of phage lysozyme than P. pastoris, the yield of the enzyme in the secreted form being significantly higher than that produced in the intracellular form. PMID:20391778

  7. Fishing for lectins from diverse sequence libraries by yeast surface display - an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ryckaert, Stefan; Callewaert, Nico; Jacobs, Pieter P; Dewaele, Sylviane; Dewerte, Isabelle; Contreras, Roland

    2008-02-01

    The establishment of a robust technology platform for the expression cloning of carbohydrate-binding proteins remains a key challenge in glycomics. Here we explore the utility of using yeast surface display (YSD) technology in the interaction-based lectin cloning from complete cDNA libraries. This should pave the way for more detailed studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions. To evaluate the performance of this system, lectins representing three different subfamilies (galectins, siglecs, and C-type lectins) were successfully displayed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris as a-agglutinin and/or alpha-agglutinin fusions. The predicted carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected for three out of five lectins tested (galectin-1, galectin-3, and siaoadhesin). For galectin-4 and E-selectin, no specific carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected. We also demonstrate that proteins with carbohydrate affinity can be specifically isolated from complex metazoan cDNA libraries through multiple rounds of FACS sorting, employing multivalent, fluorescent-labeled polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates.

  8. Fishing for lectins from diverse sequence libraries by yeast surface display - an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ryckaert, Stefan; Callewaert, Nico; Jacobs, Pieter P; Dewaele, Sylviane; Dewerte, Isabelle; Contreras, Roland

    2008-02-01

    The establishment of a robust technology platform for the expression cloning of carbohydrate-binding proteins remains a key challenge in glycomics. Here we explore the utility of using yeast surface display (YSD) technology in the interaction-based lectin cloning from complete cDNA libraries. This should pave the way for more detailed studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions. To evaluate the performance of this system, lectins representing three different subfamilies (galectins, siglecs, and C-type lectins) were successfully displayed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris as a-agglutinin and/or alpha-agglutinin fusions. The predicted carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected for three out of five lectins tested (galectin-1, galectin-3, and siaoadhesin). For galectin-4 and E-selectin, no specific carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected. We also demonstrate that proteins with carbohydrate affinity can be specifically isolated from complex metazoan cDNA libraries through multiple rounds of FACS sorting, employing multivalent, fluorescent-labeled polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates. PMID:18086821

  9. In-silico identification and characterization of organic and inorganic chemical stress responding genes in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed

    Barozai, Muhammad Younas Khan; Bashir, Farrukh; Muzaffar, Shafia; Afzal, Saba; Behlil, Farida; Khan, Muzaffar

    2014-10-15

    To study the life processes of all eukaryotes, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is a significant model organism. It is also one of the best models to study the responses of genes at transcriptional level. In a living organism, gene expression is changed by chemical stresses. The genes that give response to chemical stresses will provide good source for the strategies in engineering and formulating mechanisms which are chemical stress resistant in the eukaryotic organisms. The data available through microarray under the chemical stresses like lithium chloride, lactic acid, weak organic acids and tomatidine were studied by using computational tools. Out of 9335 yeast genes, 388 chemical stress responding genes were identified and characterized under different chemical stresses. Some of these are: Enolases 1 and 2, heat shock protein-82, Yeast Elongation Factor 3, Beta Glucanase Protein, Histone H2A1 and Histone H2A2 Proteins, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, ras GTPase activating protein, Establishes Silent Chromatin protein, Mei5 Protein, Nondisjunction Protein and Specific Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase. Characterization of these genes was also made on the basis of their molecular functions, biological processes and cellular components.

  10. Identification of the gene PaEMT1 for biosynthesis of mannosylerythritol lipids in the basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma antarctica.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Ito, Emi; Kitamoto, Hiroko K; Takegawa, Kaoru; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2010-11-01

    The yeast Pseudozyma antarctica produces a large amount of glycolipid biosurfactants known as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), which show not only excellent surface-active properties but also versatile biochemical actions. To investigate the biosynthesis of MELs in the yeast, we recently reported expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis and estimated genes expressing under MEL production conditions. Among the genes, a contiguous sequence of 938 bp, PA_004, showed high sequence identity to the gene emt1, encoding an erythritol/mannose transferase of Ustilago maydis, which is essential for MEL biosynthesis. The predicted translation product of the extended PA_004 containing the two introns and a stop codon was aligned with Emt1 of U. maydis. The predicted amino acid sequence shared high identity (72%) with Emt1 of U. maydis, although the amino-terminal was incomplete. To identify the gene as PaEMT1 encoding an erythritol/mannose transferase of P. antarctica, the gene-disrupted strain was developed by the method for targeted gene disruption, using hygromycin B resistance as the selection marker. The obtained ΔPaEMT1 strain failed to produce MELs, while its growth was the same as that of the parental strain. The additional mannosylerythritol into culture allowed ΔPaEMT1 strain to form MELs regardless of the carbon source supplied, indicating a defect of the erythritol/mannose transferase activity. Furthermore, we found that MEL formation is associated with the morphology and low-temperature tolerance of the yeast. PMID:20564650

  11. Methods of plate pexophagy monitoring and positive selection for ATG gene cloning in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Stasyk, Oleh V; Nazarko, Taras Y; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2008-01-01

    Methods for colony assay of peroxisomal oxidases in yeasts provide a convenient and fast approach for monitoring peroxisome status. They have been used in several laboratories for the isolation of yeast mutants deficient in selective autophagic peroxisome degradation (pexophagy), catabolite repression of peroxisomal enzymes or mutants deficient in oxidases themselves. In this chapter, protocols for monitoring peroxisomal alcohol oxidase and amine oxidase directly in yeast colonies and examples of their application for mutant isolation are described. These methods were successfully utilized in several methylotrophic yeasts and the alkane-utilizing yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

  12. Identification of yeast genes that confer resistance to chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) using chemogenomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chitosan oligosaccharide (COS), a deacetylated derivative of chitin, is an abundant, and renewable natural polymer. COS has higher antimicrobial properties than chitosan and is presumed to act by disrupting/permeabilizing the cell membranes of bacteria, yeast and fungi. COS is relatively non-toxic to mammals. By identifying the molecular and genetic targets of COS, we hope to gain a better understanding of the antifungal mode of action of COS. Results Three different chemogenomic fitness assays, haploinsufficiency (HIP), homozygous deletion (HOP), and multicopy suppression (MSP) profiling were combined with a transcriptomic analysis to gain insight in to the mode of action and mechanisms of resistance to chitosan oligosaccharides. The fitness assays identified 39 yeast deletion strains sensitive to COS and 21 suppressors of COS sensitivity. The genes identified are involved in processes such as RNA biology (transcription, translation and regulatory mechanisms), membrane functions (e.g. signalling, transport and targeting), membrane structural components, cell division, and proteasome processes. The transcriptomes of control wild type and 5 suppressor strains overexpressing ARL1, BCK2, ERG24, MSG5, or RBA50, were analyzed in the presence and absence of COS. Some of the up-regulated transcripts in the suppressor overexpressing strains exposed to COS included genes involved in transcription, cell cycle, stress response and the Ras signal transduction pathway. Down-regulated transcripts included those encoding protein folding components and respiratory chain proteins. The COS-induced transcriptional response is distinct from previously described environmental stress responses (i.e. thermal, salt, osmotic and oxidative stress) and pre-treatment with these well characterized environmental stressors provided little or any resistance to COS. Conclusions Overexpression of the ARL1 gene, a member of the Ras superfamily that regulates membrane trafficking, provides

  13. The Diversity and Evolution of Wolbachia Ankyrin Repeat Domain Genes

    PubMed Central

    Siozios, Stefanos; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Klasson, Lisa; Andersson, Siv G. E.; Braig, Henk R.; Bourtzis, Kostas

    2013-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes are common in the eukaryotic and viral domains of life, but they are rare in bacteria, the exception being a few obligate or facultative intracellular Proteobacteria species. Despite having a reduced genome, the arthropod strains of the alphaproteobacterium Wolbachia contain an unusually high number of ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes ranging from 23 in wMel to 60 in wPip strain. This group of genes has attracted considerable attention for their astonishing large number as well as for the fact that ankyrin proteins are known to participate in protein-protein interactions, suggesting that they play a critical role in the molecular mechanism that determines host-Wolbachia symbiotic interactions. We present a comparative evolutionary analysis of the wMel-related ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes present in different Drosophila-Wolbachia associations. Our results show that the ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes change in size by expansion and contraction mediated by short directly repeated sequences. We provide examples of intra-genic recombination events and show that these genes are likely to be horizontally transferred between strains with the aid of bacteriophages. These results confirm previous findings that the Wolbachia genomes are evolutionary mosaics and illustrate the potential that these bacteria have to generate diversity in proteins potentially involved in the symbiotic interactions. PMID:23390535

  14. GLK gene pairs regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

    PubMed

    Fitter, David W; Martin, David J; Copley, Martin J; Scotland, Robert W; Langdale, Jane A

    2002-09-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is a complex process that requires close co-ordination between two genomes. Many of the proteins that accumulate in the chloroplast are encoded by the nuclear genome, and the developmental transition from proplastid to chloroplast is regulated by nuclear genes. Here we show that a pair of Golden 2-like (GLK) genes regulates chloroplast development in Arabidopsis. The GLK proteins are members of the GARP superfamily of transcription factors, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that the maize, rice and Arabidopsis GLK gene pairs comprise a distinct group within the GARP superfamily. Further phylogenetic analysis suggests that the gene pairs arose through separate duplication events in the monocot and dicot lineages. As in rice, AtGLK1 and AtGLK2 are expressed in partially overlapping domains in photosynthetic tissue. Insertion mutants demonstrate that this expression pattern reflects a degree of functional redundancy as single mutants display normal phenotypes in most photosynthetic tissues. However, double mutants are pale green in all photosynthetic tissues and chloroplasts exhibit a reduction in granal thylakoids. Products of several genes involved in light harvesting also accumulate at reduced levels in double mutant chloroplasts. GLK genes therefore regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

  15. Pancreatic beta cells express a diverse set of homeobox genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, A; Ling, T Y; Odagiri, H; Rutter, W J; German, M S

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes, which are found in all eukaryotic organisms, encode transcriptional regulators involved in cell-type differentiation and development. Several homeobox genes encoding homeodomain proteins that bind and activate the insulin gene promoter have been described. In an attempt to identify additional beta-cell homeodomain proteins, we designed primers based on the sequences of beta-cell homeobox genes cdx3 and lmx1 and the Drosophila homeodomain protein Antennapedia and used these primers to amplify inserts by PCR from an insulinoma cDNA library. The resulting amplification products include sequences encoding 10 distinct homeodomain proteins; 3 of these proteins have not been described previously. In addition, an insert was obtained encoding a splice variant of engrailed-2, a homeodomain protein previously identified in the central nervous system. Northern analysis revealed a distinct pattern of expression for each homeobox gene. Interestingly, the PCR-derived clones do not represent a complete sampling of the beta-cell library because no inserts encoding cdx3 or lmx1 protein were obtained. Beta cells probably express additional homeobox genes. The abundance and diversity of homeodomain proteins found in beta cells illustrate the remarkable complexity and redundancy of the machinery controlling beta-cell development and differentiation. Images PMID:7991607

  16. The Tree versus the Forest: The Fungal Tree of Life and the Topological Diversity within the Yeast Phylome

    PubMed Central

    Marcet-Houben, Marina; Gabaldón, Toni

    2009-01-01

    A recurrent topic in phylogenomics is the combination of various sequence alignments to reconstruct a tree that describes the evolutionary relationships within a group of species. However, such approach has been criticized for not being able to properly represent the topological diversity found among gene trees. To evaluate the representativeness of species trees based on concatenated alignments, we reconstruct several fungal species trees and compare them with the complete collection of phylogenies of genes encoded in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. We found that, despite high levels of among-gene topological variation, the species trees do represent widely supported phylogenetic relationships. Most topological discrepancies between gene and species trees are concentrated in certain conflicting nodes. We propose to map such information on the species tree so that it accounts for the levels of congruence across the genome. We identified the lack of sufficient accuracy of current alignment and phylogenetic methods as an important source for the topological diversity encountered among gene trees. Finally, we discuss the implications of the high levels of topological variation for phylogeny-based orthology prediction strategies. PMID:19190756

  17. Determination of yeast diversity in ogi, mawè, gowé and tchoukoutou by using culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    PubMed

    Greppi, Anna; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Padonou, Wilfrid; Hounhouigan, Joseph; Jespersen, Lene; Jakobsen, Mogens; Cocolin, Luca

    2013-07-15

    The maize based ogi and mawè and the sorghum based gowé and tchoukoutou are traditional, spontaneously fermented products widely consumed by the population of Benin (West Africa). Yeast occurrence in the products, as sold on local markets at different locations, was studied using a combination of culture-dependent and independent methods. Number of yeasts is varied from 3.75 log10 colony forming units (cfu)/g for ogi to 5.60 log10 cfu/g for tchoukoutou. Isolated yeasts (236) were identified based on different migration profiles on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 26S rRNA gene sequencing. Candida krusei was the yeast most frequently isolated with strongest predominance in the maize based products. Other predominant yeast present at equal or lower incidence were Clavispora lusitaniae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in ogi and mawè, Cl. lusitaniae, Candida tropicalis and Kluyveromyces marxianus in gowè and Cl. lusitaniae, S. cerevisiae and Candida rugosa in tchoukoutou. Grouping of C. krusei isolates (164) by rep-PCR analysis indicated that several biotypes were involved in fermentation of the four products. The DGGE analysis on the DNA directly extracted from the food matrices demonstrated the presence of Dekkera bruxellensis and Debaryomyces hansenii, not detected by the culture-based approach. This is the first study combining culture-dependent and independent methods to reveal predominant yeast species and biotypes in traditional foods from Benin.

  18. Identification and functional analysis of hPRP17, the human homologue of the PRP17/CDC40 yeast gene involved in splicing and cell cycle control.

    PubMed Central

    Ben Yehuda, S; Dix, I; Russell, C S; Levy, S; Beggs, J D; Kupiec, M

    1998-01-01

    The PRP17 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein that participates in the second step of the splicing reaction. It was found recently that the yeast PRP17 gene is identical to the cell division cycle CDC40 gene. The PRP17/CDC40 gene codes for a protein with several copies of the WD repeat, a motif found in a large family of proteins that play important roles in signal transduction, cell cycle progression, splicing, transcription, and development. In this report, we describe the identification of human, nematode, and fission yeast homologues of the PRP17/CDC40 gene of S. cerevisiae. The newly identified proteins share homology with the budding yeast protein throughout their entire sequence, with the similarity being greatest in the C-terminal two thirds that includes the conserved WD repeats. We show that a yeast-human chimera, carrying the C-terminal two thirds of the hPRP17 protein, is able to complement the cell cycle and splicing defects of a yeast prp17 mutant. Moreover, the yeast and yeast-human chimeric proteins co-precipitate the intron-exon 2 lariat intermediate and the intron lariat product, providing evidence that these proteins are spliceosome-associated. These results show the functional conservation of the Prp17 proteins in evolution and suggest that the second step of splicing takes place by a similar mechanism throughout eukaryotes. PMID:9769104

  19. The role of the Parkinson's disease gene PARK9 in essential cellular pathways and the manganese homeostasis network in yeast.

    PubMed

    Chesi, Alessandra; Kilaru, Austin; Fang, Xiaodong; Cooper, Antony A; Gitler, Aaron D

    2012-01-01

    YPK9 (Yeast PARK9; also known as YOR291W) is a non-essential yeast gene predicted by sequence to encode a transmembrane P-type transport ATPase. However, its substrate specificity is unknown. Mutations in the human homolog of YPK9, ATP13A2/PARK9, have been linked to genetic forms of early onset parkinsonism. We previously described a strong genetic interaction between Ypk9 and another Parkinson's disease (PD) protein α-synuclein in multiple model systems, and a role for Ypk9 in manganese detoxification in yeast. In humans, environmental exposure to toxic levels of manganese causes a syndrome similar to PD and is thus an environmental risk factor for the disease. How manganese contributes to neurodegeneration is poorly understood. Here we describe multiple genome-wide screens in yeast aimed at defining the cellular function of Ypk9 and the mechanisms by which it protects cells from manganese toxicity. In physiological conditions, we found that Ypk9 genetically interacts with essential genes involved in cellular trafficking and the cell cycle. Deletion of Ypk9 sensitizes yeast cells to exposure to excess manganese. Using a library of non-essential gene deletions, we screened for additional genes involved in tolerance to excess manganese exposure, discovering several novel pathways involved in manganese homeostasis. We defined the dependence of the deletion strain phenotypes in the presence of manganese on Ypk9, and found that Ypk9 deletion modifies the manganese tolerance of only a subset of strains. These results confirm a role for Ypk9 in manganese homeostasis and illuminates cellular pathways and biological processes in which Ypk9 likely functions. PMID:22457822

  20. Secondary products formation as a tool for discriminating non-Saccharomyces wine strains. Strain diversity in non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Romano, P; Suzzi, G; Domizio, P; Fatichenti, F

    1997-03-01

    A total of 78 strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated: 30 strains of Kloeckera apiculata, 20 of Candida stellata, 8 of Candida valida and 20 of Zygosaccharomyces fermentati. The diversity of yeast species and strains was monitored by determining the formation of secondary products of fermentation, such as acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate and higher alcohols. Within each species, the strains were distinguishable in phenotypes through the production of different amounts of by-products. In particular, a great variability was found in C. stellata, where six different phenotypes were identified by means of the production of acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, isobutanol and isoamyl alcohol. At different stages of the spontaneous fermentation different phenotypes of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts were represented, characterized by consistent differences in some by-products involved in the wine bouquet, such as acetaldehyde. PMID:9111917

  1. Conserved Gene Expression Programs in Developing Roots from Diverse Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-08-01

    The molecular basis for the origin and diversification of morphological adaptations is a central issue in evolutionary developmental biology. Here, we defined temporal transcript accumulation in developing roots from seven vascular plants, permitting a genome-wide comparative analysis of the molecular programs used by a single organ across diverse species. The resulting gene expression maps uncover significant similarity in the genes employed in roots and their developmental expression profiles. The detailed analysis of a subset of 133 genes known to be associated with root development in Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that most of these are used in all plant species. Strikingly, this was also true for root development in a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii), which forms morphologically different roots and is thought to have evolved roots independently. Thus, despite vast differences in size and anatomy of roots from diverse plants, the basic molecular mechanisms employed during root formation appear to be conserved. This suggests that roots evolved in the two major vascular plant lineages either by parallel recruitment of largely the same developmental program or by elaboration of an existing root program in the common ancestor of vascular plants.

  2. Over-expressing a yeast ornithine decarboxylase gene in transgenic roots of Nicotiana rustica can lead to enhanced nicotine accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hamill, J D; Robins, R J; Parr, A J; Evans, D M; Furze, J M; Rhodes, M J

    1990-07-01

    Transformed root cultures of Nicotiana rustica have been generated in which the gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae coding for ornithine decarboxylase has been integrated. The gene, driven by the powerful CaMV35S promoter with an upstream duplicated enhancer sequence, shows constitutive expression throughout the growth cycle of some lines, as demonstrated by the analysis of mRNA and enzyme activity. The presence of the yeast gene and enhanced ornithine decarboxylase activity is associated with an enhanced capacity of cultures to accumulate both putrescine and the putrescine-derived alkaloid, nicotine. Even, however, with the very powerful promoter used in this work the magnitude of the changes seen is typically only in the order of 2-fold, suggesting that regulatory factors exist which limit the potential increase in metabolic flux caused by these manipulations. Nevertheless, it is demonstrated that flux through a pathway to a plant secondary product can be elevated by means of genetic manipulation. PMID:2103440

  3. [The cloning and expression of the gene for beta-galactosidase from Candida pseudotropicalis yeasts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells].

    PubMed

    Tretiak, K A; Zakal'skiĭ, A E; Gudz', S P

    1998-01-01

    The gene of beta-galactosidase of lactose-assimilating yeast Candida pseudotropicalis was cloned in pG2 and pBG2-3 hybrid shuttle vectors and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains under the control of own promoter. The plasmids were able to replicate autonomously with relative stability in transformants of baker's yeasts. The availability of glucose or lactose in the medium influenced the recombinant plasmid stability and the expression of the cloned gene. A number of experiments have shown that the LAC+ phenotype in pG2-transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae was due to the expression of the Candida pseudotropicalis lactose permease gene that is probably located in SaIG1/XhoI DNA fragment about 4.3 kb long. Southern hybridization experiments showed that LAC(+)-transformants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contained both autonomously-replicative, and integrative pG2 plasmid.

  4. A systematic exploration of high-temperature stress-responsive genes in potato using large-scale yeast functional screening.

    PubMed

    Gangadhar, Baniekal Hiremath; Yu, Jae Woong; Sajeesh, Kappachery; Park, Se Won

    2014-04-01

    Potato (S. tuberosum) is a highly heat-sensitive crop; a slight rise from optimal temperature can lead to drastic decline in tuber yield. Despite several advancements made in breeding for thermo-tolerant potato, molecular mechanisms governing thermo-tolerance is poorly understood. The first step towards understanding the thermo-tolerance mechanism is to identify the key genes involved in it. Here we used a yeast-based functional screening method to identify, characterize and classify potato genes with potentials to impart heat tolerance. We constructed two cDNA expression libraries from heat-stressed potato plants (35 °C) after 2 and 48 h of treatment. 95 potential candidate genes were identified based on enhanced ability of yeast cells over-expressing heterologous potato cDNA sequences to tolerate heat stress. Cross-resistance analysis of these heat-tolerant yeast clones to other abiotic stresses indicated that 20 genes were responsive to drought, 14 to salt and 11 to heat/drought/salt stresses. Comparison of 95 genes with reported whole potato transcriptome data showed that majority of them have varying expression patterns under heat, drought and salt stresses. The expression pattern was validated by analyzing the expression of 22 randomly selected genes under various stresses using qPCR. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of these 95 genes indicated that most of them are involved in various cellular metabolism, signal transduction, response to stress and protein folding, suggesting possible role of these genes in heat tolerance of potato. Genes identified from this study can be potential candidates for engineering heat tolerance as well as broad-spectrum abiotic stress tolerance of potato. PMID:24357347

  5. Biochemical investigation of a human pathogenic mutation in the nuclear ATP5E gene using yeast as a model

    PubMed Central

    Sardin, Elodie; Donadello, Stéphanie; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Tetaud, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    F1F0-ATP synthase is a key enzyme of the mitochondrial energetic metabolism responsible for the production of most cellular ATP in humans. Mayr et al. (2010) recently described a patient with a homozygote (Y12C) mutation in the nuclear gene ATP5E encoding the ε-subunit of ATP synthase. To better define how it affects ATP synthase, we have modeled this mutation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A yeast equivalent of this mutation (Y11C) had no significant effect on the growth of yeast on non-fermentable carbon sources (glycerol/ethanol or lactate), conditions under which the activity of the mitochondrial energy transducing system is absolutely essential. In addition, similar to what was observed in patient, this mutation in yeast has a minimal effect on the ATPase/synthase activities. On the contrary, this mutation which has been shown to have a strong impact on the assembly of the ATP synthase complex in humans, shows no significant impact on the assembly/stability of this complex in yeast, suggesting that biogenesis of this complex differs significantly. PMID:25954304

  6. Introduction of yeast artificial chromosomes containing mutant human amyloid precursor protein genes into transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Call, L.M.; Lamb, B.T.; Boese, K.F.

    1994-09-01

    Several hypothetical mechanisms have been proposed for the generation and deposition of the amyloid beta (A{beta}) peptide in Alzheimer`s disease (AD). These include overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene, as suggested by Down Syndrome (DS, trisomy 21), and mutation of APP, as suggested by mutations associated with the presence of disease/amyloid deposition in some cases of familial AD (FAD). Although numerous in vitro studies have lead to certain insights into the molecular basis for amyloid deposition, the mechanisms(s) of amyloidogenesis in vivo remains poorly defined. To examine the effect of FAD mutations on amyloidogenesis in an animal model, we have focused on producing APP YAC transgenic mice containing the human APP gene with FAD mutations. These APP YAC transgenics are being produced by introduction of a 650 kb APP YAC through lipid-mediated transfection of ES cells. This strategy has two principal advantages: the APP genomic sequences contain transcriptional regulatory elements required for proper spatial and temporal expression and contain appropriate splice donor and acceptor sites needed to generate the entire spectrum of alternatively spliced APP transcripts. As a first step, we cloned the genomic regions surrounding APP exons 16 and 17 from an APP YAC sublibrary. Both the Swedish and the 717 mutations were then introduced into exons 16 and 17, respectively, by PCR mutagenesis, and subsequently transferred into the 650 kb APP YAC by a two step gene replacement in yeast. The mutant YACs have been introduced into ES cells, and we have determined that these cells are expressing human mutant APP mRNA and protein. These cells are being used to generate transgenic mice. This paradigm should provide the appropriate test of whether a mutant APP gene is capable of producing AD-like pathology in a mouse model.

  7. Identification and transcription control of fission yeast genes repressed by an ammonium starvation growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, C; Perret, E; Dumont, X; Picard, A; Caput, D; Lenaers, G

    2000-01-15

    In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ammonium starvation induces a growth arrest, a cell cycle exit in G(1) and a further switch to meiosis. This process is regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the Wis1-dependent MAP kinase cascade, and downstream transcription factors. In order to understand how cells adapt their genetic programme to the switch from mitotic cycling to starvation, a differential transcript analysis comparing mRNA from exponentially growing and ammonium-starved cells was performed. Genes repressed by this stimulus mainly concern cell growth, i.e. protein synthesis and global metabolism. Comparison of the expression of two of them, the ribosomal proteins Rps6 and TCTP, in many different growing conditions, evidenced a strong correlation, suggesting that their transcriptions are coordinately regulated. Nevertheless, by repeating the ammonium starvation on strains constitutively activated for the PKA pathway (Deltacgs1), or unable to activate the Wis1-dependent MAP kinase pathway (Deltawis1), or with both characteristics (Deltacgs1+Deltawis1), the transcriptional inhibition was found to be governed either by the PKA pathway, or by the Wis1 pathway, or by both. These results suggest that during the switch from exponential growth to ammonium starvation, cell homeostasis is maintained by downregulating the transcription of the most expressed genes by a PKA and a Wis1-dependent process. Accession Nos for the S30 and L14 ribosomal protein cDNA sequences are AJ2731 and AJ2732, respectively.

  8. AUT1, a gene essential for autophagocytosis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Schlumpberger, M; Schaeffeler, E; Straub, M; Bredschneider, M; Wolf, D H; Thumm, M

    1997-01-01

    Autophagocytosis is a starvation-induced process responsible for transport of cytoplasmic proteins to the vacuole. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, autophagy is characterized by the phenotypic appearance of autophagic vesicles inside the vacuole of strains deficient in proteinase yscB. The AUT1 gene, essential for autophagy, was isolated by complementation of the sporulation deficiency of a diploid aut1-1 mutant strain by a yeast genomic library and characterized. AUT1 is located on the right arm of chromosome XIV, 10 kb from the centromere, and encodes a protein of 310 amino acids, with an estimated molecular weight of 36 kDa. Cells carrying a chromosomal deletion of AUT1 are defective in the starvation-induced bulk flow transport of cytoplasmic proteins to the vacuole. aut1 null mutant strains are completely viable but show decreased survival rates during starvation. Homozygous delta aut1 diploid cells fail to sporulate. The selective cytoplasm-to-vacuole transport of aminopeptidase I is blocked in logarithmically growing and in starved delta autl cells. Deletion of the AUT1 gene had no obvious influence on secretion, fluid phase endocytosis, or vacuolar protein sorting. This supports the idea of autophagocytosis as being a novel route transporting proteins from the cytoplasm to the vacuole. PMID:9023185

  9. Minisatellite variants generated in yeast meiosis involve DNA removal during gene conversion.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, A J; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    2000-01-01

    Two yeast minisatellite alleles were cloned and inserted into a genetically defined interval in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of flanking markers in combination with sequencing allowed the determination of the meiotic events that produced minisatellites with altered lengths. Tetrad analysis revealed that gene conversions, deletions, or complex combinations of both were involved in producing minisatellite variants. Similar changes were obtained following selection for nearby gene conversions or crossovers among random spores. The largest class of events involving the minisatellite was a 3:1 segregation of parental-size alleles, a class that would have been missed in all previous studies of minisatellites. Comparison of the sequences of the parental and novel alleles revealed that DNA must have been removed from the recipient array while a newly synthesized copy of donor array sequences was inserted. The length of inserted sequences did not appear to be constrained by the length of DNA that was removed. In cases where one or both sides of the insertion could be determined, the insertion endpoints were consistent with the suggestion that the event was mediated by alignment of homologous stretches of donor/recipient DNA. PMID:10978271

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a malic enzyme gene from the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Zhang, Sufang; Tan, Haidong; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2010-06-01

    The malic enzyme-encoding cDNA (GQ372891) from the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi AS 2.1560 was isolated, which has an 1719-bp open reading frame flanked by a 290-bp 5' untranslated sequence and a 92-bp 3' untranslated sequence. The proposed gene, LsME1, encoded a protein with 572 amino acid residues. The protein presented 58% sequence identity with the malic enzymes from Yarrowia lipolytica CLIB122 and Aspergillus fumigatus Af293. The LsME1 gene was cloned into the vector pMAL-p4x to express a fusion protein (MBP-LsME1) in Escherichia coli TB1. The fusion protein was purified and then cleaved by Factor Xa to give the recombinant LsME1. This purified enzyme took either NAD(+) or NADP(+) as the coenzyme but preferred NAD(+). The K (m) values for malic acid, NAD(+) and NADP(+) were 0.85 +/- 0.05 mM, 0.34 +/- 0.08 mM, and 7.4 +/- 0.32 mM, respectively, at pH 7.3.

  11. Comparative genomics of Geobacter chemotaxis genes reveals diverse signaling function

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hoa T; Krushkal, Julia; Antommattei, Frances M; Lovley, Derek R; Weis, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    Background Geobacter species are δ-Proteobacteria and are often the predominant species in a variety of sedimentary environments where Fe(III) reduction is important. Their ability to remediate contaminated environments and produce electricity makes them attractive for further study. Cell motility, biofilm formation, and type IV pili all appear important for the growth of Geobacter in changing environments and for electricity production. Recent studies in other bacteria have demonstrated that signaling pathways homologous to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli chemotaxis can regulate type IV pili-dependent motility, the synthesis of flagella and type IV pili, the production of extracellular matrix material, and biofilm formation. The classification of these pathways by comparative genomics improves the ability to understand how Geobacter thrives in natural environments and better their use in microbial fuel cells. Results The genomes of G. sulfurreducens, G. metallireducens, and G. uraniireducens contain multiple (~70) homologs of chemotaxis genes arranged in several major clusters (six, seven, and seven, respectively). Unlike the single gene cluster of E. coli, the Geobacter clusters are not all located near the flagellar genes. The probable functions of some Geobacter clusters are assignable by homology to known pathways; others appear to be unique to the Geobacter sp. and contain genes of unknown function. We identified large numbers of methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) homologs that have diverse sensing domain architectures and generate a potential for sensing a great variety of environmental signals. We discuss mechanisms for class-specific segregation of the MCPs in the cell membrane, which serve to maintain pathway specificity and diminish crosstalk. Finally, the regulation of gene expression in Geobacter differs from E. coli. The sequences of predicted promoter elements suggest that the alternative sigma factors σ28 and σ54 play a role

  12. Diversity, evolution, and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in soda lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkart, Holly C.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.

    2007-09-01

    Soap Lake is a hypersaline, alkaline lake in Central Washington State (USA). For the past five years the lake has been the site of an NSF Microbial Observatory project devoted to identifying critical geochemical and microbial characteristics of the monimolimnion sediment and water column, and has demonstrated rich multispecies communities occupy all areas of the lake. Soap Lake and similar soda lakes are subject to repeated transient periods of extreme evaporation characterized by significant repetitive alterations in salinity, pH, and total water volume, yet maintain high genetic and metabolic diversity. It has been argued that this repetitive cycle for salinity, alkalinity, and sulfur concentration has been a major driver for prokaryote evolution and diversity. The rapidity of wet-dry cycling places special demands on genome evolution, requirements that are beyond the relatively conservative eukaryotic evolutionary strategy of serial alteration of existing gene sequences in a relatively stable genome. Although HGT is most likely responsible for adding a significant amount of noise to the genetic record, analysis of HGT activity can also provide us with a much-needed probe for exploration of prokaryotic genome evolution and the origin of diversity. Packaging of genetic information within the protective protein capsid of a bacteriophage would seem preferable to exposing naked DNA to the highly alkaline conditions in the lake. In this study, we present preliminary data demonstrating the presence of a diverse group of phage integrases in Soap Lake. Integrase is the viral enzyme responsible for the insertion of phage DNA into the bacterial host's chromosome. The presence of the integrase sequence in bacterial chromosomes is evidence of lysogeny, and the diversity of integrase sequences reported here suggests a wide variety of temperate phage exist in this system, and are especially active in transition zones.

  13. Direct evaluation of the effect of gene dosage on secretion of protein from yeast Pichia pastoris by expressing EGFP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hailong; Qin, Yufeng; Huang, Yuankai; Chen, Yaosheng; Cong, Peiqing; He, Zuyong

    2014-02-28

    Increasing the gene copy number has been commonly used to enhance the protein expression level in the yeast Pichia pastoris. However, this method has been shown to be effective up to a certain gene copy number, and a further increase of gene dosage can result in a decrease of expression level. Evidences indicate the gene dosage effect is product-dependent, which needs to be determined when expressing a new protein. Here, we describe a direct detection of the gene dosage effect on protein secretion through expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene under the direction of the α-factor preprosequence in a panel of yeast clones carrying increasing copies of the EGFP gene (from one to six copies). Directly examined under fluorescence microscopy, we found relatively lower levels of EGFP were secreted into the culture medium at one copy and two copies, substantial improvement of secretion appeared at three copies, plateau happened at four and five copies, and an apparent decrease of secretion happened at six copies. The secretion of EGFP being limiting at four and five copies was due to abundant intracellular accumulation of proteins, observed from the fluorescence image of yeast and confirmed by western blotting, which significantly activated the unfolded protein response indicated by the up-regulation of the BiP (the KAR2 gene product) and the protein disulfide isomerase. This study implies that tagging a reporter like GFP to a specific protein would facilitate a direct and rapid determination of the optimal gene copy number for high-yield expression. PMID:24225373

  14. Reconstruction of ancestral chromosome architecture and gene repertoire reveals principles of genome evolution in a model yeast genus.

    PubMed

    Vakirlis, Nikolaos; Sarilar, Véronique; Drillon, Guénola; Fleiss, Aubin; Agier, Nicolas; Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Blanpain, Lou; Carbone, Alessandra; Devillers, Hugo; Dubois, Kenny; Gillet-Markowska, Alexandre; Graziani, Stéphane; Huu-Vang, Nguyen; Poirel, Marion; Reisser, Cyrielle; Schott, Jonathan; Schacherer, Joseph; Lafontaine, Ingrid; Llorente, Bertrand; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Fischer, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructing genome history is complex but necessary to reveal quantitative principles governing genome evolution. Such reconstruction requires recapitulating into a single evolutionary framework the evolution of genome architecture and gene repertoire. Here, we reconstructed the genome history of the genus Lachancea that appeared to cover a continuous evolutionary range from closely related to more diverged yeast species. Our approach integrated the generation of a high-quality genome data set; the development of AnChro, a new algorithm for reconstructing ancestral genome architecture; and a comprehensive analysis of gene repertoire evolution. We found that the ancestral genome of the genus Lachancea contained eight chromosomes and about 5173 protein-coding genes. Moreover, we characterized 24 horizontal gene transfers and 159 putative gene creation events that punctuated species diversification. We retraced all chromosomal rearrangements, including gene losses, gene duplications, chromosomal inversions and translocations at single gene resolution. Gene duplications outnumbered losses and balanced rearrangements with 1503, 929, and 423 events, respectively. Gene content variations between extant species are mainly driven by differential gene losses, while gene duplications remained globally constant in all lineages. Remarkably, we discovered that balanced chromosomal rearrangements could be responsible for up to 14% of all gene losses by disrupting genes at their breakpoints. Finally, we found that nonsynonymous substitutions reached fixation at a coordinated pace with chromosomal inversions, translocations, and duplications, but not deletions. Overall, we provide a granular view of genome evolution within an entire eukaryotic genus, linking gene content, chromosome rearrangements, and protein divergence into a single evolutionary framework.

  15. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil.

    PubMed

    Ragot, Sabine A; Kertesz, Michael A; Bünemann, Else K

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples.

  16. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Michael A.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples. PMID:26253682

  17. Strains isogenic to S288C used in the yeast genome sequencing programme carry a functional KSS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Morillon, A; Springer, M; Lesage, P

    2001-07-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the KSS1 gene encodes the MAP kinase of the invasive/filamentous growth pathway. In addition to its role in this signal transduction pathway, Kssl can replace the Fus3 MAP kinase in the pheromone-response pathway, in the absence of FUS3. Previous work indicated that derivatives of the S288C strain carry a mutant kss1 allele. Here, we report evidence that S288C derivatives used in the Yeast Genome Sequencing Programme carry a functional KSS1 gene and can thus be used to study the regulation of gene expression by KSS1. PMID:11525401

  18. Functional characterization of transcriptional regulatory elements in the upstream region of the yeast GLK1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, P; Flores, L; de la Cera, T; Moreno, F

    1999-01-01

    The glucokinase gene GLK1 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is transcriptionally regulated in response to the carbon source of the growth medium. Northern-blot analysis shows that the GLK1 gene is expressed at a basal level in the presence of glucose, de-repressed more than 6-fold under conditions of sugar limitation and more than 25-fold under conditions of ethanol induction. lacZ fusions of the GLK1 gene promoter were constructed and a deletion analysis was performed in order to identify the cis-acting regulatory elements of the promoter that controls GLK1 gene expression. First, the expression seemed to be mediated mainly by one GCR1 and three stress-responsive element (STRE) activating elements. Secondly, an ethanol repression autoregulation (ERA)/twelve-fold TA repeat (TAB) repressor element was identified within the promoter region of the GLK1 gene. A specific and differential protein binding to the STRE was observed with extracts from de-repressed and repressed cells. No differential binding to the GCR1 or ERA/TAB elements was observed with extracts from de-repressed and repressed cells, but, in both cases, the binding was competed for by an excess of the unlabelled GLK1(GCR1) and GLK1(ERA) sequence. The transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4, which bind to the GLK1 upstream region through the STRE, contribute to inductive activation. The transcription factor Gcr1, which binds through the GCR1 element, contributes to constitutive activation. In order to achieve the severe glucose repression of GLK1, constitutive repressor factors acting through the ERA/TAB element must counteract constitutive activation generated by Gcr1 binding to the GCR1 element. Full expression of the GLK1 gene is produced by inductive activation of three STRE when Msn2 and Msn4 proteins are translocated to the nucleus by covalent modification. The combinatorial effect of the entire region leads to the regulated transcription of GLK1, i.e., silent in media with glucose and other

  19. Immune gene expression profile of Penaeus monodon in response to marine yeast glucan application and white spot syndrome virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wilsy; Lowman, Douglas; Antony, Swapna P; Puthumana, Jayesh; Bright Singh, I S; Philip, Rosamma

    2015-04-01

    Immunostimulant potential of eight marine yeast glucans (YG) from Candida parapsilosis R20, Hortaea werneckii R23, Candida spencermartinsiae R28, Candida haemulonii R63, Candida oceani R89, Debaryomyces fabryi R100, Debaryomyces nepalensis R305 and Meyerozyma guilliermondii R340 were tested against WSSV challenge in Penaeus monodon post larvae (PL). Structural characterization of these marine yeast glucans by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicated structures containing (1-6)-branched (1-3)-β-D-glucan. PL were fed 0.2% glucan incorporated diet once in seven days for a period of 45 days and the animals were challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The immunostimulatory activity of yeast glucans were assessed pre- and post-challenge WSSV by analysing the expression profile of six antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes viz., anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF), crustin-1, crustin-2, crustin-3, penaeidin-3 and penaeidin-5 and 13 immune genes viz., alpha-2-macroglobulin (α-2-M), astakine, caspase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase, haemocyanin, peroxinectin, pmCathepsinC, prophenol oxidase (proPO), Rab-7, superoxide dismutase and transglutaminase. Expression of seven WSSV genes viz., DNA polymerase, endonuclease, protein kinase, immediate early gene, latency related gene, thymidine kinase and VP28 were also analysed to detect the presence and intensity of viral infection in the experimental animals post-challenge. The study revealed that yeast glucans (YG) do possess immunostimulatory activity against WSSV and also supported higher survival (40-70 %) post-challenge WSSV. Among the various glucans tested, YG23 showed maximum survival (70.27%), followed by YG20 (66.66%), YG28 (60.97%), YG89 (58.53%), YG100 (54.05%), YG63 (48.64%), YG305 (45.7%) and YG340 (43.24%). PMID:25555812

  20. Yeast has homologs (CNA1 and CNA2 gene products) of mammalian calcineurin, a calmodulin-regulated phosphoprotein phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, M S; Kunisawa, R; Kaim, D; Thorner, J

    1991-01-01

    Calcineurin, or phosphoprotein phosphatase type 2B (PP2B), is a calmodulin-regulated phosphoprotein phosphatase. We isolated a gene encoding a yeast PP2B homolog (CNA1) by screening a yeast genomic DNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11, first with 125I-labeled yeast calmodulin and then with a human cDNA encoding the catalytic (or A) subunit of calcineurin. The predicted CNA1 gene product is 54% identical to its mammalian counterpart. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with oligonucleotide primers based on sequences conserved between CNA1 and mammalian PP2B genes, we isolated a second gene, CNA2. CNA2 is identical to PP2Bw, a partial cDNA clone previously described by others as originating from rabbit brain tissue. Our findings demonstrate that a unicellular eukaryote contains phosphoprotein phosphatases of the 2B class. Haploid cells containing a single cna1 or cna2 null mutation, or both mutations, were viable. MATa cna1 cna2 double mutants were more sensitive than wild-type cells or either single mutant to growth arrest induced by the mating pheromone alpha factor and failed to resume growth during continuous exposure to alpha factor. Thus, calcineurin action antagonizes the mating-pheromone response pathway. Images PMID:1651503

  1. Expansions and contractions in 36-bp minisatellites by gene conversion in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Pâques, F; Richard, G F; Haber, J E

    2001-01-01

    The instability of simple tandem repeats, such as human minisatellite loci, has been suggested to arise by gene conversions. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a double-strand break (DSB) was created by the HO endonuclease so that DNA polymerases associated with gap repair must traverse an artificial minisatellite of perfect 36-bp repeats or a yeast Y' minisatellite containing diverged 36-bp repeats. Gene conversions are frequently accompanied by changes in repeat number when the template contains perfect repeats. When the ends of the DSB have nonhomologous tails of 47 and 70 nucleotides that must be removed before repair DNA synthesis can begin, 16% of gene conversions had rearrangements, most of which were contractions, almost always in the recipient locus. When efficient removal of nonhomologous tails was prevented in rad1 and msh2 strains, repair was reduced 10-fold, but among survivors there was a 10-fold reduction in contractions. Half the remaining events were expansions. A similar decrease in the contraction rate was observed when the template was modified so that DSB ends were homologous to the template; and here, too, half of the remaining rearrangements were expansions. In this case, efficient repair does not require RAD1 and MSH2, consistent with our previous observations. In addition, without nonhomologous DSB ends, msh2 and rad1 mutations did not affect the frequency or the distribution of rearrangements. We conclude that the presence of nonhomologous ends alters the mechanism of DSB repair, likely through early recruitment of repair proteins including Msh2p and Rad1p, resulting in more frequent contractions of repeated sequences. PMID:11333226

  2. Gene regulation networks generate diverse pigmentation patterns in plants.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nick W; Davies, Kevin M; Schwinn, Kathy E

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of pigmentation patterns observed in plants occurs due to the spatial distribution and accumulation of colored compounds, which may also be associated with structural changes to the tissue. Anthocyanins are flavonoids that provide red/purple/blue coloration to plants, often forming complex patterns such as spots, stripes, and vein-associated pigmentation, particularly in flowers. These patterns are determined by the activity of MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes, which activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, resulting in anthocyanin pigment accumulation. Recently, we established that the MBW complex controlling anthocyanin synthesis acts within a gene regulation network that is conserved within at least the Eudicots. This network involves hierarchy, reinforcement, and feedback mechanisms that allow for stringent and responsive regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. The gene network and mobile nature of the WDR and R3-MYB proteins provide exciting new opportunities to explore the basis of pigmentation patterning, and to investigate the evolutionary history of the MBW components in land plants.

  3. The gene encoding gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase II in the fission yeast is regulated by oxidative and metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Eun-Hee; Ahn, Kisup; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2005-09-30

    gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, EC 2.3.2.2.) catalyzes the transfer of the gamma-glutamyl moiety from gamma-glutamylcontaining compounds, notably glutathione (GSH), to acceptor amino acids and peptides. A second gene (GGTII) encoding GGT was previously isolated and characterized from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In the present work, the GGTII-lacZ fusion gene was constructed and used to study the transcriptional regulation of the S. pombe GGTII gene. The synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the GGTII-lacZ fusion gene was significantly enhanced by NO-generating SNP and hydrogen peroxide in the wildtype yeast cells. The GGTII mRNA level was increased in the wild-type S. pombe cells treated with SNP. However, the induction by SNP was abolished in the Pap1-negative S. pombe cells, implying that the induction by SNP of GGTII is mediated by Pap1. Fermentable carbon sources, such as glucose (at low concentrations), lactose and sucrose, as a sole carbon source, enhanced the synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the GGTII-lacZ fusion gene in wildtype KP1 cells but not in Pap1-negative cells. Glycerol, a non-fermentable carbon source, was also able to induce the synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the fusion gene, but other non-fermentable carbon sources such as acetate and ethanol were not. Transcriptional induction of the GGTII gene by fermentable carbon sources was also confirmed by increased GGTII mRNA levels in the yeast cells grown with them. Nitrogen starvation was also able to induce the synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the GGTII-lacZ fusiongene in a Pap1-dependent manner. On the basis of the results, it is concluded that the S. pombe GGTII gene is regulated by oxidative and metabolic stress.

  4. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces ...

  5. Gene Islands Integrated into tRNAGly Genes Confer Genome Diversity on a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clone

    PubMed Central

    Larbig, Karen D.; Christmann, Andreas; Johann, André; Klockgether, Jens; Hartsch, Thomas; Merkl, Rainer; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Fritz, Hans-Joachim; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2002-01-01

    Intraclonal genome diversity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied in one of the most diverse mosaic regions of the P. aeruginosa chromosome. The ca. 110-kb large hypervariable region located near the lipH gene in two members of the predominant P. aeruginosa clone C, strain C and strain SG17M, was sequenced. In both strains the region consists of an individual strain-specific gene island of 111 (strain C) or 106 (SG17M) open reading frames (ORFs) and of a 7-kb stretch of clone C-specific sequence of 9 ORFs. The gene islands are integrated into conserved tRNAGly genes and have a bipartite structure. The first part adjacent to the tRNA gene consists of strain-specific ORFs encoding metabolic functions and transporters, the majority of which have homologs of known function in other eubacteria, such as hemophores, cytochrome c biosynthesis, or mercury resistance. The second part is made up mostly of ORFs of yet-unknown function. Forty-seven of these ORFs are mutual homologs with a pairwise amino acid sequence identity of 35 to 88% and are arranged in the same order in the two gene islands. We hypothesize that this novel type of gene island derives from mobile elements which, upon integration, endow the recipient with strain-specific metabolic properties, thus possibly conferring on it a selective advantage in its specific habitat. PMID:12426355

  6. Isolation and DNA-binding characteristics of a protein involved in transcription activation of two divergently transcribed, essential yeast genes.

    PubMed Central

    Halfter, H; Müller, U; Winnacker, E L; Gallwitz, D

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a protein, BAF1, which has two oppositely oriented, partially overlapping binding sites within a symmetrical sequence located midway between and upstream of the divergently transcribed YPT1 and TUB2 genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 120 kd BAF1 protein was purified to near homogeneity and used to delineate the two binding sites and to identify apparent protein contact sites by the missing contact technique, methylation interference and by site-directed mutagenesis. The BAF1-recognition sequence contains a conserved TCN7ACG element recently identified at autonomously replicating sequences (ARS) and in the 5' and 3' flanking region of other yeast genes. The symmetrical sequence of the YPT1/TUB2 intergene region seems not to be involved in DNA replication but activates transcription in an orientation-independent fashion. Images PMID:2684633

  7. Identification of target genes regulated by homeotic proteins in Drosophila melanogaster through genetic selection of Ultrabithorax protein-binding sites in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Mastick, G.S.; McKay, R.; Oligino, T.

    1995-01-01

    A method based on the transcriptional activation of a selectable reporter in yeast cells was used to identify genes regulated by the Utrabithorax homeoproteins in Drosophila melanogaster. Fifty-three DNA fragments that can mediate activation by UBX isoform Ia in this test were recovered after screening 15% of the Drosophila genome. Half of these fragments represent single-copy sequences in the genome. Six single-copy fragments were investigated in detail, and each was found to reside near a transcription unit whose expression in the embryo is segmentally modulated as expected for targets of homeotic genes. Four of these putative target genes are expressed in patterns that suggest roles in the development of regional specializations within mesoderm derivatives; in three cases these expression patterns depend on Ultrabithorax function. Extrapolation from this pilot study indicates that 85-170 candidate target genes can be identified by screening the entire Drosophila genome with UBX isoform Ia. With appropriate modifications, this approach should be applicable to other transcriptional regulators in diverse organisms. 69 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Ubiquity and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes in diverse marine environments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be

  9. Ubiquity and Diversity of Heterotrophic Bacterial nasA Genes in Diverse Marine Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be

  10. Ubiquity and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes in diverse marine environments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be

  11. Diversity and Evolutionary History of Iron Metabolism Genes in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Groussman, Ryan D; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Ferroproteins arose early in Earth's history, prior to the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and the subsequent reduction of bioavailable iron. Today, iron availability limits primary productivity in about 30% of the world's oceans. Diatoms, responsible for nearly half of oceanic primary production, have evolved molecular strategies for coping with variable iron concentrations. Our understanding of the evolutionary breadth of these strategies has been restricted by the limited number of species for which molecular sequence data is available. To uncover the diversity of strategies marine diatoms employ to meet cellular iron demands, we analyzed 367 newly released marine microbial eukaryotic transcriptomes, which include 47 diatom species. We focused on genes encoding proteins previously identified as having a role in iron management: iron uptake (high-affinity ferric reductase, multi-copper oxidase, and Fe(III) permease); iron storage (ferritin); iron-induced protein substitutions (flavodoxin/ferredoxin, and plastocyanin/cytochrome c6) and defense against reactive oxygen species (superoxide dismutases). Homologs encoding the high-affinity iron uptake system components were detected across the four diatom Classes suggesting an ancient origin for this pathway. Ferritin transcripts were also detected in all Classes, revealing a more widespread utilization of ferritin throughout diatoms than previously recognized. Flavodoxin and plastocyanin transcripts indicate possible alternative redox metal strategies. Predicted localization signals for ferredoxin identify multiple examples of gene transfer from the plastid to the nuclear genome. Transcripts encoding four superoxide dismutase metalloforms were detected, including a putative nickel-coordinating isozyme. Taken together, our results suggest that the majority of iron metabolism genes in diatoms appear to be vertically inherited with functional diversity achieved via possible neofunctionalization of paralogs. This

  12. Diversity and Evolutionary History of Iron Metabolism Genes in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Groussman, Ryan D.; Parker, Micaela S.; Armbrust, E. Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Ferroproteins arose early in Earth’s history, prior to the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and the subsequent reduction of bioavailable iron. Today, iron availability limits primary productivity in about 30% of the world’s oceans. Diatoms, responsible for nearly half of oceanic primary production, have evolved molecular strategies for coping with variable iron concentrations. Our understanding of the evolutionary breadth of these strategies has been restricted by the limited number of species for which molecular sequence data is available. To uncover the diversity of strategies marine diatoms employ to meet cellular iron demands, we analyzed 367 newly released marine microbial eukaryotic transcriptomes, which include 47 diatom species. We focused on genes encoding proteins previously identified as having a role in iron management: iron uptake (high-affinity ferric reductase, multi-copper oxidase, and Fe(III) permease); iron storage (ferritin); iron-induced protein substitutions (flavodoxin/ferredoxin, and plastocyanin/cytochrome c6) and defense against reactive oxygen species (superoxide dismutases). Homologs encoding the high-affinity iron uptake system components were detected across the four diatom Classes suggesting an ancient origin for this pathway. Ferritin transcripts were also detected in all Classes, revealing a more widespread utilization of ferritin throughout diatoms than previously recognized. Flavodoxin and plastocyanin transcripts indicate possible alternative redox metal strategies. Predicted localization signals for ferredoxin identify multiple examples of gene transfer from the plastid to the nuclear genome. Transcripts encoding four superoxide dismutase metalloforms were detected, including a putative nickel-coordinating isozyme. Taken together, our results suggest that the majority of iron metabolism genes in diatoms appear to be vertically inherited with functional diversity achieved via possible neofunctionalization of paralogs. This

  13. A linear discrete dynamic system model for temporal gene interaction and regulatory network influence in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor HMF for ethanologenic yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A linear discrete dynamic system model is constructed to represent the temporal interactions among significantly expressed genes in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study identifies the most significant linear...

  14. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  15. Transcriptional control of ADH genes in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.Y.; Jeffries, T.W. |

    1999-06-01

    The authors studied the expression of the genes encoding group 1 alcohol dehydrogenases (PsADH1 and PsADH2) in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. The cells expressed PsADH1 approximately 10 times higher under oxygen-limited conditions than under fully aerobic conditions when cultivated on xylose. Transcripts of PsADH2 were not detectable under either aeration condition. The authors used a PsADH1::lacZ fusion to monitor PsADH1 expression and found that expression increased as oxygen decreased. The level of PsADH1 transcript was expressed about 10-fold in cells grown in the presence of heme under oxygen-limited conditions. Concomitantly with the induction of PsADH1, PsCYC1 expression was regressed. These results indicate that oxygen availability regulates PsADH1 expression and that regulation may be mediated by heme. The regulation of PsADH2 expression was also examined in other genetic backgrounds. Disruption of PsADH1 dramatically increased PsADH2 expression on nonfermentable carbon sources under fully aerobic conditions, indicating that the expression of PsADH2 is subject to feedback regulation under these conditions.

  16. A mutation of the yeast gene encoding PCNA destabilizes both microsatellite and minisatellite DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Kokoska, R J; Stefanovic, L; Buermeyer, A B; Liskay, R M; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The POL30 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein required for processive DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase delta and epsilon. We examined the effects of the pol30-52 mutation on the stability of microsatellite (1- to 8-bp repeat units) and minisatellite (20-bp repeat units) DNA sequences. It had previously been shown that this mutation destabilizes dinucleotide repeats 150-fold and that this effect is primarily due to defects in DNA mismatch repair. From our analysis of the effects of pol30-52 on classes of repetitive DNA with longer repeat unit lengths, we conclude that this mutation may also elevate the rate of DNA polymerase slippage. The effect of pol30-52 on tracts of repetitive DNA with large repeat unit lengths was similar, but not identical, to that observed previously for pol3-t, a temperature-sensitive mutation affecting DNA polymerase delta. Strains with both pol30-52 and pol3-t mutations grew extremely slowly and had minisatellite mutation rates considerably greater than those observed in either single mutant strain. PMID:9927447

  17. The meiotic recombination checkpoint is regulated by checkpoint rad+ genes in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Midori; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Tougan, Takahiro; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    During the course of meiotic prophase, intrinsic double-strand breaks (DSBs) must be repaired before the cell can engage in meiotic nuclear division. Here we investigate the mechanism that controls the meiotic progression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that have accumulated excess meiotic DSBs. A meiotic recombination-defective mutant, meu13Δ, shows a delay in meiotic progression. This delay is dependent on rec12+, namely on DSB formation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that meiotic DSB repair in meu13Δ was retarded. We also found that the delay in entering nuclear division was dependent on the checkpoint rad+, cds1+ and mek1+ (the meiotic paralog of Cds1/Chk2). This implies that these genes are involved in a checkpoint that provides time to repair DSBs. Consistently, the induction of an excess of extrinsic DSBs by ionizing radiation delayed meiotic progression in a rad17+-dependent manner. dmc1Δ also shows meiotic delay, however, this delay is independent of rec12+ and checkpoint rad+. We propose that checkpoint monitoring of the status of meiotic DSB repair exists in fission yeast and that defects other than DSB accumulation can cause delays in meiotic progression. PMID:12032093

  18. The meiotic recombination checkpoint is regulated by checkpoint rad+ genes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Midori; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Tougan, Takahiro; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2002-06-01

    During the course of meiotic prophase, intrinsic double-strand breaks (DSBs) must be repaired before the cell can engage in meiotic nuclear division. Here we investigate the mechanism that controls the meiotic progression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that have accumulated excess meiotic DSBs. A meiotic recombination-defective mutant, meu13Delta, shows a delay in meiotic progression. This delay is dependent on rec12+, namely on DSB formation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that meiotic DSB repair in meu13Delta was retarded. We also found that the delay in entering nuclear division was dependent on the checkpoint rad+, cds1+ and mek1+ (the meiotic paralog of Cds1/Chk2). This implies that these genes are involved in a checkpoint that provides time to repair DSBs. Consistently, the induction of an excess of extrinsic DSBs by ionizing radiation delayed meiotic progression in a rad17(+)-dependent manner. dmc1Delta also shows meiotic delay, however, this delay is independent of rec12+ and checkpoint rad+. We propose that checkpoint monitoring of the status of meiotic DSB repair exists in fission yeast and that defects other than DSB accumulation can cause delays in meiotic progression. PMID:12032093

  19. Alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3 activates glucose alcoholic fermentation in genetically engineered Dekkera bruxellensis yeast.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Siurkus, Juozas; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Joerck-Ramberg, Dorte; Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Nerve; Blevins, James E; Sibirny, Andriy A; Piškur, Jure; Ishchuk, Olena P

    2016-04-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a non-conventional Crabtree-positive yeast with a good ethanol production capability. Compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its tolerance to acidic pH and its utilization of alternative carbon sources make it a promising organism for producing biofuel. In this study, we developed an auxotrophic transformation system and an expression vector, which enabled the manipulation of D. bruxellensis, thereby improving its fermentative performance. Its gene ADH3, coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, was cloned and overexpressed under the control of the strong and constitutive promoter TEF1. Our recombinant D. bruxellensis strain displayed 1.4 and 1.7 times faster specific glucose consumption rate during aerobic and anaerobic glucose fermentations, respectively; it yielded 1.2 times and 1.5 times more ethanol than did the parental strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The overexpression of ADH3 in D. bruxellensis also reduced the inhibition of fermentation by anaerobiosis, the "Custer effect". Thus, the fermentative capacity of D. bruxellensis could be further improved by metabolic engineering. PMID:26743658

  20. Transcriptional Control of ADH Genes in the Xylose-Fermenting Yeast Pichia stipitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae-Yong; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the expression of the genes encoding group I alcohol dehydrogenases (PsADH1 and PsADH2) in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. The cells expressed PsADH1 approximately 10 times higher under oxygen-limited conditions than under fully aerobic conditions when cultivated on xylose. Transcripts of PsADH2 were not detectable under either aeration condition. We used a PsADH1::lacZ fusion to monitor PsADH1 expression and found that expression increased as oxygen decreased. The level of PsADH1 transcript was repressed about 10-fold in cells grown in the presence of heme under oxygen-limited conditions. Concomitantly with the induction of PsADH1, PsCYC1 expression was repressed. These results indicate that oxygen availability regulates PsADH1 expression and that regulation may be mediated by heme. The regulation of PsADH2 expression was also examined in other genetic backgrounds. Disruption of PsADH1 dramatically increased PsADH2 expression on nonfermentable carbon sources under fully aerobic conditions, indicating that the expression of PsADH2 is subject to feedback regulation under these conditions. PMID:10347014

  1. The yeast PNC1 longevity gene is up-regulated by mRNA mistranslation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Raquel M; Duarte, Iven C N; Paredes, João A; Lima-Costa, Tatiana; Perrot, Michel; Boucherie, Hélian; Goodfellow, Brian J; Gomes, Ana C; Mateus, Denisa D; Moura, Gabriela R; Santos, Manuel A S

    2009-01-01

    Translation fidelity is critical for protein synthesis and to ensure correct cell functioning. Mutations in the protein synthesis machinery or environmental factors that increase synthesis of mistranslated proteins result in cell death and degeneration and are associated with neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and with an increasing number of mitochondrial disorders. Remarkably, mRNA mistranslation plays critical roles in the evolution of the genetic code, can be beneficial under stress conditions in yeast and in Escherichia coli and is an important source of peptides for MHC class I complex in dendritic cells. Despite this, its biology has been overlooked over the years due to technical difficulties in its detection and quantification. In order to shed new light on the biological relevance of mistranslation we have generated codon misreading in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using drugs and tRNA engineering methodologies. Surprisingly, such mistranslation up-regulated the longevity gene PNC1. Similar results were also obtained in cells grown in the presence of amino acid analogues that promote protein misfolding. The overall data showed that PNC1 is a biomarker of mRNA mistranslation and protein misfolding and that PNC1-GFP fusions can be used to monitor these two important biological phenomena in vivo in an easy manner, thus opening new avenues to understand their biological relevance.

  2. Diverse nucleotide compositions and sequence fluctuation in Rubisco protein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Bienaime, R.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    The Rubisco protein-enzyme is arguably the most abundance protein on Earth. The biology dogma of transcription and translation necessitates the study of the Rubisco genes and Rubisco-like genes in various species. Stronger correlation of fractal dimension of the atomic number fluctuation along a DNA sequence with Shannon entropy has been observed in the studied Rubisco-like gene sequences, suggesting a more diverse evolutionary pressure and constraints in the Rubisco sequences. The strategy of using metal for structural stabilization appears to be an ancient mechanism, with data from the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in Capsaspora owczarzaki and Monosiga brevicollis. Using the chi-square distance probability, our analysis supports the conjecture that the more ancient Rubisco-like sequence in Microcystis aeruginosa would have experienced very different evolutionary pressure and bio-chemical constraint as compared to Bordetella bronchiseptica, the two microbes occupying either end of the correlation graph. Our exploratory study would indicate that high fractal dimension Rubisco sequence would support high carbon dioxide rate via the Michaelis- Menten coefficient; with implication for the control of the whooping cough pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica, a microbe containing a high fractal dimension Rubisco-like sequence (2.07). Using the internal comparison of chi-square distance probability for 16S rRNA (~ E-22) versus radiation repair Rec-A gene (~ E-05) in high GC content Deinococcus radiodurans, our analysis supports the conjecture that high GC content microbes containing Rubisco-like sequence are likely to include an extra-terrestrial origin, relative to Deinococcus radiodurans. Similar photosynthesis process that could utilize host star radiation would not compete with radiation resistant process from the biology dogma perspective in environments such as Mars and exoplanets.

  3. The fungal aroma gene ATF1 promotes dispersal of yeast cells through insect vectors.

    PubMed

    Christiaens, Joaquin F; Franco, Luis M; Cools, Tanne L; De Meester, Luc; Michiels, Jan; Wenseleers, Tom; Hassan, Bassem A; Yaksi, Emre; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-10-23

    Yeast cells produce various volatile metabolites that are key contributors to the pleasing fruity and flowery aroma of fermented beverages. Several of these fruity metabolites, including isoamyl acetate and ethyl acetate, are produced by a dedicated enzyme, the alcohol acetyl transferase Atf1. However, despite much research, the physiological role of acetate ester formation in yeast remains unknown. Using a combination of molecular biology, neurobiology, and behavioral tests, we demonstrate that deletion of ATF1 alters the olfactory response in the antennal lobe of fruit flies that feed on yeast cells. The flies are much less attracted to the mutant yeast cells, and this in turn results in reduced dispersal of the mutant yeast cells by the flies. Together, our results uncover the molecular details of an intriguing aroma-based communication and mutualism between microbes and their insect vectors. Similar mechanisms may exist in other microbes, including microbes on flowering plants and pathogens. PMID:25310977

  4. Diversity of yeasts associated with the sea surface microlayer and underlying water along the northern coast of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Feng; Lee, Ching-Fu; Lin, Kao-Yung; Liu, Shiu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Yeast communities inhabiting the sea surface microlayer (SSML) on the northern coast of Taiwan were examined using a cultivation method and compared with those inhabiting the underlying water (UW) at a 50-cm depth. Culturable yeasts were recovered from the SSML and UW samples collected in the morning during 4 field campaigns, and 420 strains were isolated. The 420 isolates were grouped into 43 species using a polyphasic molecular approach, including sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS region. From the SSML samples, 12 genera and 39 species, including 7 new species of Cryptococcus sp. (1), Candida spp. (4), and Rhodotorula spp. (2), were isolated. From the UW samples, 10 genera and 21 species, including one new species of Rhodotorula sp. (1), were isolated. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was the most abundant species present in the yeast community in SSML (37.6%) and UW (21.6%) samples. Basidiomycetous yeasts (63.6%) and pigmented yeasts (64.5%) comprised the major yeast population. The yeast community in the SSML had a higher species number and abundance than the UW. Moreover, although the majority of yeast community species were from the SSML, individual species distribution in the SSML was unequal.

  5. Pediatric fecal microbiota harbor diverse and novel antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Moore, Aimée M; Patel, Sanket; Forsberg, Kevin J; Wang, Bin; Bentley, Gayle; Razia, Yasmin; Qin, Xuan; Tarr, Phillip I; Dantas, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance threatens human health. Gut microbes are an epidemiologically important reservoir of resistance genes (resistome), yet prior studies indicate that the true diversity of gut-associated resistomes has been underestimated. To deeply characterize the pediatric gut-associated resistome, we created metagenomic recombinant libraries in an Escherichia coli host using fecal DNA from 22 healthy infants and children (most without recent antibiotic exposure), and performed functional selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from eight drug classes. Resistance-conferring DNA fragments were sequenced (Illumina HiSeq 2000), and reads assembled and annotated with the PARFuMS computational pipeline. Resistance to 14 of the 18 antibiotics was found in stools of infants and children. Recovered genes included chloramphenicol acetyltransferases, drug-resistant dihydrofolate reductases, rRNA methyltransferases, transcriptional regulators, multidrug efflux pumps, and every major class of beta-lactamase, aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme, and tetracycline resistance protein. Many resistance-conferring sequences were mobilizable; some had low identity to any known organism, emphasizing cryptic organisms as potentially important resistance reservoirs. We functionally confirmed three novel resistance genes, including a 16S rRNA methylase conferring aminoglycoside resistance, and two tetracycline-resistance proteins nearly identical to a bifidobacterial MFS transporter (B. longum s. longum JDM301). We provide the first report to our knowledge of resistance to folate-synthesis inhibitors conferred by a predicted Nudix hydrolase (part of the folate synthesis pathway). This functional metagenomic survey of gut-associated resistomes, the largest of its kind to date, demonstrates that fecal resistomes of healthy children are far more diverse than previously suspected, that clinically relevant resistance genes are present even without recent selective antibiotic

  6. Unique marine derived cyanobacterial biosynthetic genes for chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Kleigrewe, Karin; Gerwick, Lena; Sherman, David H; Gerwick, William H

    2016-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are a prolific source of structurally unique and biologically active natural products that derive from intriguing biochemical pathways. Advancements in genome sequencing have accelerated the identification of unique modular biosynthetic gene clusters in cyanobacteria and reveal a wealth of unusual enzymatic reactions involved in their construction. This article examines several interesting mechanistic transformations involved in cyanobacterial secondary metabolite biosynthesis with a particular focus on marine derived modular polyketide synthases (PKS), nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and combinations thereof to form hybrid natural products. Further, we focus on the cyanobacterial genus Moorea and the co-evolution of its enzyme cassettes that create metabolic diversity. Progress in the development of heterologous expression systems for cyanobacterial gene clusters along with chemoenzymatic synthesis makes it possible to create new analogs. Additionally, phylum-wide genome sequencing projects have enhanced the discovery rate of new natural products and their distinctive enzymatic reactions. Summarizing, cyanobacterial biosynthetic gene clusters encode for a large toolbox of novel enzymes that catalyze unique chemical reactions, some of which may be useful in synthetic biology.

  7. Molecular characterization of hap complex components responsible for methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Oda, Saori; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Nitta, Nobuhisa; Sasano, Yu; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    We identified genes encoding components of the Hap complex, CbHAP2, CbHAP3, and CbHAP5, as transcription factors regulating methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii. We found that the Cbhap2Δ, Cbhap3Δ, and Cbhap5Δ gene-disrupted strains showed severe growth defects on methanol but not on glucose and nonfermentable carbon sources such as ethanol and glycerol. In these disruptants, the transcriptional activities of methanol-inducible promoters were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain, indicating that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p play indispensable roles in methanol-inducible gene expression. Further molecular and biochemical analyses demonstrated that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p localized to the nucleus and bound to the promoter regions of methanol-inducible genes regardless of the carbon source, and heterotrimer formation was suggested to be necessary for binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, distinct from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hap complex functioned in methanol-specific induction rather than glucose derepression in C. boidinii. Our results shed light on a novel function of the Hap complex in methanol-inducible gene expression in methylotrophic yeasts.

  8. Genes Required for Survival in Microgravity Revealed by Genome-Wide Yeast Deletion Collections Cultured during Spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Nislow, Corey; Lee, Anna Y.; Allen, Patricia L.; Giaever, Guri; Smith, Andrew; Gebbia, Marinella; Stodieck, Louis S.; Hammond, Jeffrey S.; Birdsall, Holly H.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight is a unique environment with profound effects on biological systems including tissue redistribution and musculoskeletal stresses. However, the more subtle biological effects of spaceflight on cells and organisms are difficult to measure in a systematic, unbiased manner. Here we test the utility of the molecularly barcoded yeast deletion collection to provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of microgravity on a model organism. We developed robust hardware to screen, in parallel, the complete collection of ~4800 homozygous and ~5900 heterozygous (including ~1100 single-copy deletions of essential genes) yeast deletion strains, each carrying unique DNA that acts as strain identifiers. We compared strain fitness for the homozygous and heterozygous yeast deletion collections grown in spaceflight and ground, as well as plus and minus hyperosmolar sodium chloride, providing a second additive stressor. The genome-wide sensitivity profiles obtained from these treatments were then queried for their similarity to a compendium of drugs whose effects on the yeast collection have been previously reported. We found that the effects of spaceflight have high concordance with the effects of DNA-damaging agents and changes in redox state, suggesting mechanisms by which spaceflight may negatively affect cell fitness. PMID:25667933

  9. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Elbing, Karin; Andrade-Garda, José Manuel; Sjögreen, Björn; Forootan, Amin; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. Results We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Conclusion Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains. PMID:18412983

  10. Genome-scale gene function prediction using multiple sources of high-throughput data in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Trupti; Chen, Yu; Becker, Jeffrey M; Alexandrov, Nickolai; Xu, Dong

    2004-01-01

    Characterizing gene function is one of the major challenging tasks in the post-genomic era. To address this challenge, we have developed GeneFAS (Gene Function Annotation System), a new integrated probabilistic method for cellular function prediction by combining information from protein-protein interactions, protein complexes, microarray gene expression profiles, and annotations of known proteins through an integrative statistical model. Our approach is based on a novel assessment for the relationship between (1) the interaction/correlation of two proteins' high-throughput data and (2) their functional relationship in terms of their Gene Ontology (GO) hierarchy. We have developed a Web server for the predictions. We have applied our method to yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and predicted functions for 1548 out of 2472 unannotated proteins.

  11. Diversity of the Lactic Acid Bacterium and Yeast Microbiota in the Switch from Firm- to Liquid-Sourdough Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; Pontonio, Erica; Buchin, Solange; De Angelis, Maria; Lattanzi, Anna; Valerio, Francesca; Calasso, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Four traditional type I sourdoughs were comparatively propagated (28 days) under firm (dough yield, 160) and liquid (dough yield, 280) conditions to mimic the alternative technology options frequently used for making baked goods. After 28 days of propagation, liquid sourdoughs had the lowest pH and total titratable acidity (TTA), the lowest concentrations of lactic and acetic acids and free amino acids, and the most stable density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria. The cell density of yeasts was the highest in liquid sourdoughs. Liquid sourdoughs showed simplified microbial diversity and harbored a low number of strains, which were persistent. Lactobacillus plantarum dominated firm sourdoughs over time. Leuconostoc lactis and Lactobacillus brevis dominated only some firm sourdoughs, and Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis persisted for some time only in some firm sourdoughs. Leuconostoc citreum persisted in all firm and liquid sourdoughs, and it was the only species detected in liquid sourdoughs at all times; it was flanked by Leuconostoc mesenteroides in some sourdoughs. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida humilis, Saccharomyces servazzii, Saccharomyces bayanus-Kazachstania sp., and Torulaspora delbrueckii were variously identified in firm and liquid sourdoughs. A total of 197 volatile components were identified through purge and trap–/solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PT–/SPME–GC-MS). Aldehydes, several alcohols, and some esters were at the highest levels in liquid sourdoughs. Firm sourdoughs mainly contained ethyl acetate, acetic acid, some sulfur compounds, and terpenes. The use of liquid fermentation would change the main microbial and biochemical features of traditional baked goods, which have been manufactured under firm conditions for a long time. PMID:24632249

  12. Nucleotide sequence of a Dictyostelium discoideum gene encoding a protein homologous to the yeast ribosomal protein S31.

    PubMed

    Hoja, U; Hofmann, J; Marschalek, R; Dingermann, T

    1993-01-15

    A cDNA clone has been isolated whose coding potential is significantly homologous to the yeast ribosomal protein S31. The single copy genomic gene contains a 271 bp intron immediately downstream from the ATG translation initiation codon and is flanked by cannonical exon/intron junctions. The intron carries a CAATCAAT motif which has been described as inducer element for discoidin I gamma expression and which has also been found within the intron of the rp29 gene form D. discoideum. The deduced protein contains 110 amino acids and is slightly basic. PMID:7916591

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS: IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW P450 FAMILY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The P450alk gene, which is inducible by the assimilation of alkane in Candida tropicalis, was sequenced and characterized. Structural features described in promoter and terminator regions of Saccharomyces yeast genes are present in the P450alk gene and some particular structures ...

  14. Genomic Evolution of the Ascomycete Yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert; Haridas, Sajeet; Salamov, Asaf; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Goker, Markus; Hittinger, Chris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lopes, Mariana; Meir-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Rokas, Antonis; Rosa, Carlos; Scheuner, Carmen; Soares, Marco; Stielow, Benjamin; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Wolfe, Ken; Blackwell, Meredith; Kurtzman, Cletus; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas

    2015-03-16

    Yeasts are important for industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable metabolic and phylogenetic diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. Phylogenetic analysis of these and previously published yeast genomes helped resolve the placement of species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora, Hyphopichia burtonii, and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Moreover, we find that alternative nuclear codon usage, where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine, are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes, and a tendency towards more introns in early-diverging species. Analysis of enzyme phylogeny gives insights into the evolution of metabolic capabilities such as methanol utilization and assimilation of alternative carbon sources.

  15. Querying Co-regulated Genes on Diverse Gene Expression Datasets Via Biclustering.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Mehmet; Küçüktunç, Onur; Eren, Kemal; Bozdağ, Doruk; Kaya, Kamer; Çatalyürek, Ümit V

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development and increasing popularity of gene expression microarrays have resulted in a number of studies on the discovery of co-regulated genes. One important way of discovering such co-regulations is the query-based search since gene co-expressions may indicate a shared role in a biological process. Although there exist promising query-driven search methods adapting clustering, they fail to capture many genes that function in the same biological pathway because microarray datasets are fraught with spurious samples or samples of diverse origin, or the pathways might be regulated under only a subset of samples. On the other hand, a class of clustering algorithms known as biclustering algorithms which simultaneously cluster both the items and their features are useful while analyzing gene expression data, or any data in which items are related in only a subset of their samples. This means that genes need not be related in all samples to be clustered together. Because many genes only interact under specific circumstances, biclustering may recover the relationships that traditional clustering algorithms can easily miss. In this chapter, we briefly summarize the literature using biclustering for querying co-regulated genes. Then we present a novel biclustering approach and evaluate its performance by a thorough experimental analysis.

  16. Gene Expression and Biochemical Analysis of Cheese-Ripening Yeasts: Focus on Catabolism of l-Methionine, Lactate, and Lactose▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cholet, Orianne; Hénaut, Alain; Casaregola, Serge; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarrays of 86 genes from the yeasts Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica were developed to determine which genes were expressed in a medium mimicking a cheese-ripening environment. These genes were selected for potential involvement in lactose/lactate catabolism and the biosynthesis of sulfur-flavored compounds. Hybridization conditions to follow specifically the expression of homologous genes belonging to different species were set up. The microarray was first validated on pure cultures of each yeast; no interspecies cross-hybridization was observed. Expression patterns of targeted genes were studied in pure cultures of each yeast, as well as in coculture, and compared to biochemical data. As expected, a high expression of the LAC genes of K. marxianus was observed. This is a yeast that efficiently degrades lactose. Several lactate dehydrogenase-encoding genes were also expressed essentially in D. hansenii and K. marxianus, which are two efficient deacidifying yeasts in cheese ripening. A set of genes possibly involved in l-methionine catabolism was also used on the array. Y. lipolytica, which efficiently assimilates l-methionine, also exhibited a high expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologs BAT2 and ARO8, which are involved in the l-methionine degradation pathway. Our data provide the first evidence that the use of a multispecies microarray could be a powerful tool to investigate targeted metabolism and possible metabolic interactions between species within microbial cocultures. PMID:17308183

  17. Metabolic gene clusters encoding the enzymes of two branches of the 3-oxoadipate pathway in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gérecová, Gabriela; Neboháčová, Martina; Zeman, Igor; Pryszcz, Leszek P; Tomáška, Ľubomír; Gabaldón, Toni; Nosek, Jozef

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans utilizes hydroxyderivatives of benzene via the catechol and hydroxyhydroquinone branches of the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The genetic basis and evolutionary origin of this catabolic pathway in yeasts are unknown. In this study, we identified C. albicans genes encoding the enzymes involved in the degradation of hydroxybenzenes. We found that the genes coding for core components of the 3-oxoadipate pathway are arranged into two metabolic gene clusters. Our results demonstrate that C. albicans cells cultivated in media containing hydroxybenzene substrates highly induce the transcription of these genes as well as the corresponding enzymatic activities. We also found that C. albicans cells assimilating hydroxybenzenes cope with the oxidative stress by upregulation of cellular antioxidant systems such as alternative oxidase and catalase. Moreover, we investigated the evolution of the enzymes encoded by these clusters and found that most of them share a particularly sparse phylogenetic distribution among Saccharomycotina, which is likely to have been caused by extensive gene loss. We exploited this fact to find co-evolving proteins that are suitable candidates for the missing enzymes of the pathway. PMID:25743787

  18. Identification and characterization of a novel yeast gene: the YGP1 gene product is a highly glycosylated secreted protein that is synthesized in response to nutrient limitation.

    PubMed Central

    Destruelle, M; Holzer, H; Klionsky, D J

    1994-01-01

    Nutrient starvation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to a number of physiological changes that accompany entry into stationary phase. The expression of genes whose products play a role in stress adaptation is regulated in a manner that allows the cell to sense and respond to changing environmental conditions. We have identified a novel yeast gene, YGP1, that displays homology to the sporulation-specific SPS100 gene. The expression of YGP1 is regulated by nutrient availability. The gene is expressed at a basal level during "respiro-fermentative" (logarithmic) growth. When the glucose concentration in the medium falls below 1%, the YGP1 gene is derepressed and the gene product, gp37, is synthesized at levels up to 50-fold above the basal level. The glucose-sensing mechanism is independent of the SNF1 pathway and does not operate when cells are directly shifted to a low glucose concentration. The expression of YGP1 also responds to the depletion of nitrogen and phosphate, indicating a general response to nutrient deprivation. These results suggest that the YGP1 gene product may be involved in cellular adaptations prior to stationary phase and may be a useful marker protein for monitoring early events associated with the stress response. Images PMID:8139573

  19. The yeast ARD1 gene product is required for repression of cryptic mating-type information at the HML locus.

    PubMed Central

    Whiteway, M; Freedman, R; Van Arsdell, S; Szostak, J W; Thorner, J

    1987-01-01

    Mutations in the ARD1 gene prevent yeast cells from displaying G1-specific growth arrest in response to nitrogen deprivation and cause MATa haploids (but not MAT alpha haploids) to be mating defective. Analysis of cell type-specific gene expression by examination of RNA transcripts and measurement of beta-galactosidase activity from yeast gene-lacZ fusions demonstrated that the mating defect of MATa ard1 mutants was due to an inability to express genes required by MATa cells for the mating process. The lack of mating-specific gene expression in MATa cells was found to be due solely to derepression of the normally silent alpha information at the HML locus. The cryptic a information at the HMR locus was only very slightly derepressed in ard1 mutants, to a level insufficient to affect the mating efficiency of MAT alpha cells. The preferential elevation of expression from HML over HMR was also observed in ard1 mutants which contained the alternate arrangement of a information at HML and alpha information at HMR. Hence, the effect of the ard1 mutation was position specific (rather than information specific). Although the phenotype of ard1 mutants resembled that of cells with mutations in the SIR1 gene, both genetic and biochemical findings indicated that ARD1 control of HML expression was independent of the regulation imposed by SIR1 and the other SIR genes. These results suggest that the ARD1 gene encodes a protein product that acts, directly or indirectly, at the HML locus to repress its expression and, by analogy, may control expression of other genes involved in monitoring nutritional conditions. Images PMID:3316986

  20. Ethanol fermentation driven by elevated expression of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3 in sake yeast.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Nogami, Satoru; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Kanno, Yoichiro; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2011-12-01

    Cellular and subcellular morphology reflects the physiological state of a cell. To determine the physiological nature of sake yeast with superior fermentation properties, we quantitatively analyzed the morphology of sake yeast cells by using the CalMorph system. All the sake strains examined here exhibited common morphological traits that are typically observed in the well-characterized whiskey (whi) mutants that show accelerated G(1)/S transition. In agreement with this finding, the sake strain showed less efficient G(0)/G(1) arrest and elevated expression of the G(1) cyclin gene CLN3 throughout the fermentation period. Furthermore, deletion of CLN3 remarkably impaired the fermentation rate in both sake and laboratory strains. Disruption of the SWI6 gene, a transcriptional coactivator responsible for Cln3p-mediated G(1)/S transition, also resulted in a decreased fermentation rate, whereas whi mutants exhibited significant improvement in the fermentation rate, demonstrating positive roles of Cln3p and its downstream signalling pathway in facilitating ethanol fermentation. The combined results indicate that enhanced induction of CLN3 contributes to the high fermentation rate of sake yeast, which are natural whi mutants.

  1. Systematic screen for mutants resistant to TORC1 inhibition in fission yeast reveals genes involved in cellular ageing and growth

    PubMed Central

    Rallis, Charalampos; López-Maury, Luis; Georgescu, Teodora; Pancaldi, Vera; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    Summary Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1), which controls growth in response to nutrients, promotes ageing in multiple organisms. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe emerges as a valuable genetic model system to study TORC1 function and cellular ageing. Here we exploited the combinatorial action of rapamycin and caffeine, which inhibit fission yeast growth in a TORC1-dependent manner. We screened a deletion library, comprising ∼84% of all non-essential fission yeast genes, for drug-resistant mutants. This screen identified 33 genes encoding functions such as transcription, kinases, mitochondrial respiration, biosynthesis, intra-cellular trafficking, and stress response. Among the corresponding mutants, 5 showed shortened and 21 showed increased maximal chronological lifespans; 15 of the latter mutants showed no further lifespan increase with rapamycin and might thus represent key targets downstream of TORC1. We pursued the long-lived sck2 mutant with additional functional analyses, revealing that the Sck2p kinase functions within the TORC1 network and is required for normal cell growth, global protein translation, and ribosomal S6 protein phosphorylation in a nutrient-dependent manner. Notably, slow cell growth was associated with all long-lived mutants while oxidative-stress resistance was not. PMID:24463365

  2. Prequels to Synthetic Biology: From Candidate Gene Identification and Validation to Enzyme Subcellular Localization in Plant and Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Foureau, E; Carqueijeiro, I; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Melin, C; Lafontaine, F; Besseau, S; Lanoue, A; Papon, N; Oudin, A; Glévarec, G; Clastre, M; St-Pierre, B; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, N; Courdavault, V

    2016-01-01

    Natural compounds extracted from microorganisms or plants constitute an inexhaustible source of valuable molecules whose supply can be potentially challenged by limitations in biological sourcing. The recent progress in synthetic biology combined to the increasing access to extensive transcriptomics and genomics data now provide new alternatives to produce these molecules by transferring their whole biosynthetic pathway in heterologous production platforms such as yeasts or bacteria. While the generation of high titer producing strains remains per se an arduous field of investigation, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathways as well as characterization of their complex subcellular organization are essential prequels to the efficient development of such bioengineering approaches. Using examples from plants and yeasts as a framework, we describe potent methods to rationalize the study of partially characterized pathways, including the basics of computational applications to identify candidate genes in transcriptomics data and the validation of their function by an improved procedure of virus-induced gene silencing mediated by direct DNA transfer to get around possible resistance to Agrobacterium-delivery of viral vectors. To identify potential alterations of biosynthetic fluxes resulting from enzyme mislocalizations in reconstituted pathways, we also detail protocols aiming at characterizing subcellular localizations of protein in plant cells by expression of fluorescent protein fusions through biolistic-mediated transient transformation, and localization of transferred enzymes in yeast using similar fluorescence procedures. Albeit initially developed for the Madagascar periwinkle, these methods may be applied to other plant species or organisms in order to establish synthetic biology platform. PMID:27480687

  3. Interaction networks of prion, prionogenic and prion-like proteins in budding yeast, and their role in gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Harbi, Djamel; Harrison, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Prions are transmissible, propagating alternative states of proteins. Prions in budding yeast propagate heritable phenotypes and can function in large-scale gene regulation, or in some cases occur as diseases of yeast. Other 'prionogenic' proteins are likely prions that have been determined experimentally to form amyloid in vivo, and to have prion-like domains that are able to propagate heritable states. Furthermore, there are over 300 additional 'prion-like' yeast proteins that have similar amino-acid composition to prions (primarily a bias for asparagines and glutamines). Here, we examine the protein functional and interaction networks that involve prion, prionogenic and prion-like proteins. Set against a marked overall preference for N/Q-rich prion-like proteins not to interact with each other, we observe a significant tendency of prion/prionogenic proteins to interact with other, N/Q-rich prion-like proteins. This tendency is mostly due to a small number of networks involving the proteins NUP100p, LSM4p and PUB1p. In general, different data analyses of functional and interaction networks converge to indicate a strong linkage of prionogenic and prion-like proteins, to stress-granule assembly and related biological processes. These results further elucidate how prions may impact gene regulation, and reveal a broader horizon for the functional relevance of N/Q-rich prion-like domains.

  4. Ethanol fermentation driven by elevated expression of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3 in sake yeast.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Nogami, Satoru; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Kanno, Yoichiro; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2011-12-01

    Cellular and subcellular morphology reflects the physiological state of a cell. To determine the physiological nature of sake yeast with superior fermentation properties, we quantitatively analyzed the morphology of sake yeast cells by using the CalMorph system. All the sake strains examined here exhibited common morphological traits that are typically observed in the well-characterized whiskey (whi) mutants that show accelerated G(1)/S transition. In agreement with this finding, the sake strain showed less efficient G(0)/G(1) arrest and elevated expression of the G(1) cyclin gene CLN3 throughout the fermentation period. Furthermore, deletion of CLN3 remarkably impaired the fermentation rate in both sake and laboratory strains. Disruption of the SWI6 gene, a transcriptional coactivator responsible for Cln3p-mediated G(1)/S transition, also resulted in a decreased fermentation rate, whereas whi mutants exhibited significant improvement in the fermentation rate, demonstrating positive roles of Cln3p and its downstream signalling pathway in facilitating ethanol fermentation. The combined results indicate that enhanced induction of CLN3 contributes to the high fermentation rate of sake yeast, which are natural whi mutants. PMID:21906996

  5. Evolution of chemical diversity by coordinated gene swaps in type II polyketide gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Hillenmeyer, Maureen E.; Vandova, Gergana A.; Berlew, Erin E.; Charkoudian, Louise K.

    2015-01-01

    Natural product biosynthetic pathways generate molecules of enormous structural complexity and exquisitely tuned biological activities. Studies of natural products have led to the discovery of many pharmaceutical agents, particularly antibiotics. Attempts to harness the catalytic prowess of biosynthetic enzyme systems, for both compound discovery and engineering, have been limited by a poor understanding of the evolution of the underlying gene clusters. We developed an approach to study the evolution of biosynthetic genes on a cluster-wide scale, integrating pairwise gene coevolution information with large-scale phylogenetic analysis. We used this method to infer the evolution of type II polyketide gene clusters, tracing the path of evolution from the single ancestor to those gene clusters surviving today. We identified 10 key gene types in these clusters, most of which were swapped in from existing cellular processes and subsequently specialized. The ancestral type II polyketide gene cluster likely comprised a core set of five genes, a roster that expanded and contracted throughout evolution. A key C24 ancestor diversified into major classes of longer and shorter chain length systems, from which a C20 ancestor gave rise to the majority of characterized type II polyketide antibiotics. Our findings reveal that (i) type II polyketide structure is predictable from its gene roster, (ii) only certain gene combinations are compatible, and (iii) gene swaps were likely a key to evolution of chemical diversity. The lessons learned about how natural selection drives polyketide chemical innovation can be applied to the rational design and guided discovery of chemicals with desired structures and properties. PMID:26499248

  6. Expression of a Phanerochaete chrysosporium manganese peroxidase gene in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lina; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    2003-01-01

    A gene encoding manganese peroxidase (mnp1) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was cloned downstream of a constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Three different expression vectors were constructed: pZBMNP contains the native P. chrysosporium fungal secretion signal, palphaAMNP contains an alpha-factor secretion signal derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and pZBIMNP has no secretion signal and was used for intracellular expression. Both the native fungal secretion signal sequence and alpha-factor secretion signal sequence directed the secretion of active recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) from P. pastoris transformants. The majority of the rMnP produced by P. pastoris exhibited a molecular mass (55-100 kDa) considerably larger than that of the wild-type manganese peroxidase (wtMnP, 46 kDa). Deletion of the native fungal secretion signal yielded a molecular mass of 39 kDa for intracellular rMnP in P. pastoris. Treatment of the secreted rMnP with endoglycosidase H (Endo H) resulted in a considerable decrease in the mass of rMnP, indicating N-linked hyperglycosylation. Partially purified rMnP showed kinetic characteristics similar to those of wtMnP. Both enzymes also had similar pH stability profiles. Addition of exogenous Mn(II), Ca(II), and Fe(III) conferred additional thermal stability to both enzymes. However, rMnP was slightly less thermostable than wtMnP, which demonstrated an extended half-life at 55 degrees C. PMID:14524699

  7. Mutations in the YRB1 gene encoding yeast ran-binding-protein-1 that impair nucleocytoplasmic transport and suppress yeast mating defects.

    PubMed Central

    Künzler, M; Trueheart, J; Sette, C; Hurt, E; Thorner, J

    2001-01-01

    We identified two temperature-sensitive (ts) mutations in the essential gene, YRB1, which encodes the yeast homolog of Ran-binding-protein-1 (RanBP1), a known coregulator of the Ran GTPase cycle. Both mutations result in single amino acid substitutions of evolutionarily conserved residues (A91D and R127K, respectively) in the Ran-binding domain of Yrb1. The altered proteins have reduced affinity for Ran (Gsp1) in vivo. After shift to restrictive temperature, both mutants display impaired nuclear protein import and one also reduces poly(A)+ RNA export, suggesting a primary defect in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Consistent with this conclusion, both yrb1ts mutations display deleterious genetic interactions with mutations in many other genes involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport, including SRP1 (alpha-importin) and several beta-importin family members. These yrb1ts alleles were isolated by their ability to suppress two different types of mating-defective mutants (respectively, fus1Delta and ste5ts), indicating that reduction in nucleocytoplasmic transport enhances mating proficiency. Indeed, in both yrb1ts mutants, Ste5 (scaffold protein for the pheromone response MAPK cascade) is mislocalized to the cytosol, even in the absence of pheromone. Also, both yrb1ts mutations suppress the mating defect of a null mutation in MSN5, which encodes the receptor for pheromone-stimulated nuclear export of Ste5. Our results suggest that reimport of Ste5 into the nucleus is important in downregulating mating response. PMID:11238397

  8. The diversity and antifungal susceptibility of the yeasts isolated from coconut water and reconstituted fruit juices in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Natália O P; Piló, Fernanda B; Freitas, Larissa F D; Gomes, Fátima C O; Johann, Susana; Nardi, Regina M D; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterise the yeasts present in the reconstituted fruit juices and coconut water extracted with "coconut machines", both collected from commercial outlets in a Brazilian city, and to investigate the antifungal resistance of isolates from these beverages that were able to grow at 37°C. The yeast population counts in the coconut water samples ranged from 1.7 to >6.5logcfu/ml, and in the reconstituted fruit juices, the counts ranged from 1.5 to >5.5logcfu/ml. Aureobasidium pullulans, Candida boidinii, Candidaintermedia, Candidaoleophila, Candidaparapsilosis, Candidasantamariae, Candidatropicalis, Clavispora lusitaniae, Kloeckera apis, Lachancea fermentati, Pichia fermentans and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were the most frequent species isolated from these beverages. At least 18 yeast species isolated from these beverages have been reported as opportunistic pathogens. Eight yeast isolates were resistant to fluconazole, seven were resistant to itraconazole, and 26 to amphotericin B. Some yeast species were resistant to more than one of the antifungal drugs tested. Two isolates of C. tropicalis from the reconstituted fruit juices exhibited resistance to all three drugs. The presence of yeast strains that are resistant to commonly used antifungal drugs suggests a potential risk, at least to immunocompromised individuals who consume these beverages.

  9. A yeast phenomic model for the gene interaction network modulating CFTR-ΔF508 protein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The overall influence of gene interaction in human disease is unknown. In cystic fibrosis (CF) a single allele of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR-ΔF508) accounts for most of the disease. In cell models, CFTR-ΔF508 exhibits defective protein biogenesis and degradation rather than proper trafficking to the plasma membrane where CFTR normally functions. Numerous genes function in the biogenesis of CFTR and influence the fate of CFTR-ΔF508. However it is not known whether genetic variation in such genes contributes to disease severity in patients. Nor is there an easy way to study how numerous gene interactions involving CFTR-ΔF would manifest phenotypically. Methods To gain insight into the function and evolutionary conservation of a gene interaction network that regulates biogenesis of a misfolded ABC transporter, we employed yeast genetics to develop a 'phenomic' model, in which the CFTR-ΔF508-equivalent residue of a yeast homolog is mutated (Yor1-ΔF670), and where the genome is scanned quantitatively for interaction. We first confirmed that Yor1-ΔF undergoes protein misfolding and has reduced half-life, analogous to CFTR-ΔF. Gene interaction was then assessed quantitatively by growth curves for approximately 5,000 double mutants, based on alteration in the dose response to growth inhibition by oligomycin, a toxin extruded from the cell at the plasma membrane by Yor1. Results From a comparative genomic perspective, yeast gene interactions influencing Yor1-ΔF biogenesis were representative of human homologs previously found to modulate processing of CFTR-ΔF in mammalian cells. Additional evolutionarily conserved pathways were implicated by the study, and a ΔF-specific pro-biogenesis function of the recently discovered ER membrane complex (EMC) was evident from the yeast screen. This novel function was validated biochemically by siRNA of an EMC ortholog in a human cell line expressing CFTR-ΔF508. The precision and

  10. Measurement variation determines the gene network topology reconstructed from experimental data: a case study of the yeast cyclin network.

    PubMed

    To, Cuong Chieu; Vohradsky, Jiri

    2010-09-01

    Inference of the topology of gene regulatory networks from experimental data is one of the primary challenges of systems biology. In an example of a genetic network of cyclins in the yeast cell cycle, we analyzed static genome-wide location data together with microarray kinetic measurements using a recurrent neural network-based model of gene expression and a newly developed, unbiased algorithm based on evolutionary programming principles. The modeling and simulation of gene expression dynamics identified cyclin genetic networks that were active during the cell cycle. We document that because there is inherent experimental variation, it is not possible to identify a single genetic network, only a set of equivalent networks with the same probability of occurrence. Analysis of these networks showed that each target gene was controlled by only a few regulators and that the control was robust. These results led to the reformulation of the cyclin genetic network in the yeast cell cycle as previously published. The analysis shows that with the methodologies that are currently available, it is not possible to predict only one genetic network; rather, we must work with the hypothesis of multiple, equivalent networks. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip experiments are not sufficient to predict the functional networks that are active during an investigated process. Such predictions must be considered as only potential, and their actual realization during particular cellular processes must be identified by incorporating both kinetic and other types of data.

  11. Contributions of transcription and mRNA decay to gene expression dynamics of fission yeast in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Marguerat, Samuel; Lawler, Katherine; Brazma, Alvis; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels of control to shape gene regulation is only partially understood. Here we show that a combination of two simple and non-invasive genomic techniques, coupled with kinetic mathematical modeling, affords insight into the intricate dynamics of RNA regulation in response to oxidative stress in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study reveals a dominant role of transcriptional regulation in response to stress, but also points to the first minutes after stress induction as a critical time when the coordinated control of mRNA turnover can support the control of transcription for rapid gene regulation. In addition, we uncover specialized gene expression strategies associated with distinct functional gene groups, such as simultaneous transcriptional repression and mRNA destabilization for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, delayed mRNA destabilization with varying contribution of transcription for ribosome biogenesis genes, dominant roles of mRNA stabilization for genes functioning in protein degradation, and adjustment of both transcription and mRNA turnover during the adaptation to stress. We also show that genes regulated independently of the bZIP transcription factor Atf1p are predominantly controlled by mRNA turnover, and identify putative cis-regulatory sequences that are associated with different gene expression strategies during the stress response. This study highlights the intricate and multi-faceted interplay between transcription and RNA turnover during the dynamic regulatory response to stress. PMID:25007214

  12. Regions in the promoter of the yeast FBP1 gene implicated in catabolite repression may bind the product of the regulatory gene MIG1.

    PubMed

    Mercado, J J; Vincent, O; Gancedo, J M

    1991-10-01

    We have identified in the promoter of the yeast FBP1 gene two sites able to bind nuclear proteins. These sites have a nucleotide sequence strongly similar to that of sites which bind the regulatory protein MIG1 in the promoters of GAL4 and SUC2. Deletions performed in the FBP1 promoter showed that one of the sites contributes to catabolite repression of this gene. In this same promoter, another region was identified with a strong effect on the catabolite repression of FBP1. In this region a sequence similar to the consensus for the binding site of the MIG1 protein was also present.

  13. Bck2 Acts through the MADS Box Protein Mcm1 to Activate Cell-Cycle-Regulated Genes in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bastajian, Nazareth; Friesen, Helena; Andrews, Brenda J.

    2013-01-01

    The Bck2 protein is a potent genetic regulator of cell-cycle-dependent gene expression in budding yeast. To date, most experiments have focused on assessing a potential role for Bck2 in activation of the G1/S-specific transcription factors SBF (Swi4, Swi6) and MBF (Mbp1, Swi6), yet the mechanism of gene activation by Bck2 has remained obscure. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using a truncated version of Bck2 and discovered six novel Bck2-binding partners including Mcm1, an essential protein that binds to and activates M/G1 promoters through Early Cell cycle Box (ECB) elements as well as to G2/M promoters. At M/G1 promoters Mcm1 is inhibited by association with two repressors, Yox1 or Yhp1, and gene activation ensues once repression is relieved by an unknown activating signal. Here, we show that Bck2 interacts physically with Mcm1 to activate genes during G1 phase. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments to show that Bck2 localizes to the promoters of M/G1-specific genes, in a manner dependent on functional ECB elements, as well as to the promoters of G1/S and G2/M genes. The Bck2-Mcm1 interaction requires valine 69 on Mcm1, a residue known to be required for interaction with Yox1. Overexpression of BCK2 decreases Yox1 localization to the early G1-specific CLN3 promoter and rescues the lethality caused by overexpression of YOX1. Our data suggest that Yox1 and Bck2 may compete for access to the Mcm1-ECB scaffold to ensure appropriate activation of the initial suite of genes required for cell cycle commitment. PMID:23675312

  14. Gene engineering in yeast for biodegradation: Immunological cross-reactivity among cytochrome p-450 system proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and candida tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Loper, J.C.; Chen, C.; Dey, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms whose cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase systems may be amenable to genetic engineering for the hydroxylation and detoxication of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. The molecular genetic properties of strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and an n-alkane utilizing yeast, Candida tropicalis ATCC750 are examined. Standard methods were used to purify cytochrome P-450 and NADPH-cytochrome c (P-450) reductase proteins from cells cultured by semi-anaerobic glucose fermentation (S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis) and by growth on tetradecane (C. tropicalis). Polyvalent antisera prepared in rabbits to some of these proteins were used in tests of immunological relatedness among the purified proteins using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nitrocellulose filter immunoblots. The results provide evidence for gene relationships which should prove useful in gene isolation and subsequent engineering of P-450 enzyme systems in yeast.

  15. Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE)

    PubMed Central

    DiCarlo, JE; Conley, AJ; Penttilä, M; Jäntti, J; Wang, HH; Church, GM

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency oligonucleotide-directed recombination engineering (recombineering) has enabled rapid modification of several prokaryotic genomes to date. Here, we present a method for oligonucleotide-mediated recombineering in the model eukaryote and industrial production host S. cerevisiae, which we call Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE). Through a combination of overexpression and knockouts of relevant genes and optimization of transformation and oligonucleotide designs, we achieve high gene modification frequencies at levels that only require screening of dozens of cells. We demonstrate the robustness of our approach in three divergent yeast strains, including those involved in industrial production of bio-based chemicals. Furthermore, YOGE can be iteratively executed via cycling to generate genomic libraries up to 105 individuals at each round for diversity generation. YOGE cycling alone, or in combination with phenotypic selections or endonuclease-based negative genotypic selections, can be used to easily generate modified alleles in yeast populations with high frequencies. PMID:24160921

  16. Single Cell Visualization of Yeast Gene Expression Shows Correlation of Epigenetic Switching between Multiple Heterochromatic Regions through Multiple Generations

    PubMed Central

    Mano, Yasunobu; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Nakayama, Jun-ichi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Oki, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    Differences in gene expression between individual cells can be mediated by epigenetic regulation; thus, methods that enable detailed analyses of single cells are crucial to understanding this phenomenon. In this study, genomic silencing regions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are subject to epigenetic regulation, including the HMR, HML, and telomere regions, were investigated using a newly developed single cell analysis method. This method uses fluorescently labeled proteins to track changes in gene expression over multiple generations of a single cell. Epigenetic control of gene expression differed depending on the specific silencing region at which the reporter gene was inserted. Correlations between gene expression at the HMR-left and HMR-right regions, as well as the HMR-right and HML-right regions, were observed in the single-cell level; however, no such correlations involving the telomere region were observed. Deletion of the histone acetyltransferase GCN5 gene from a yeast strain carrying a fluorescent reporter gene at the HMR-left region reduced the frequency of changes in gene expression over a generation. The results presented here suggest that epigenetic control within an individual cell is reversible and can be achieved via regulation of histone acetyltransferase activity. PMID:23843746

  17. Enhanced freeze tolerance of baker's yeast by overexpressed trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene (TPS1) and deleted trehalase genes in frozen dough.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haigang; Dong, Jian; Wang, Guanglu; Xu, Haiyan; Zhang, Cuiying; Xiao, Dongguang

    2014-08-01

    Several recombinant strains with overexpressed trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene (TPS1) and/or deleted trehalase genes were obtained to elucidate the relationships between TPS1, trehalase genes, content of intracellular trehalose and freeze tolerance of baker's yeast, as well as improve the fermentation properties of lean dough after freezing. In this study, strain TL301(TPS1) overexpressing TPS1 showed 62.92 % higher trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (Tps1) activity and enhanced the content of intracellular trehalose than the parental strain. Deleting ATH1 exerted a significant effect on trehalase activities and the degradation amount of intracellular trehalose during the first 30 min of prefermentation. This finding indicates that acid trehalase (Ath1) plays a role in intracellular trehalose degradation. NTH2 encodes a functional neutral trehalase (Nth2) that was significantly involved in intracellular trehalose degradation in the absence of the NTH1 and/or ATH1 gene. The survival ratio, freeze-tolerance ratio and relative fermentation ability of strain TL301(TPS1) were approximately twice as high as those of the parental strain (BY6-9α). The increase in freeze tolerance of strain TL301(TPS1) was accompanied by relatively low trehalase activity, high Tps1 activity and high residual content of intracellular trehalose. Our results suggest that overexpressing TPS1 and deleting trehalase genes are sufficient to improve the freeze tolerance of baker's yeast in frozen dough. The present study provides guidance for the commercial baking industry as well as the research on the intracellular trehalose mobilization and freeze tolerance of baker's yeast. PMID:24951963

  18. Cloning and expression of the gene encoding alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase from Acetobacter aceti ssp. xylinum in brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Yamano, S; Tanaka, J; Inoue, T

    1994-02-14

    Acetobacter aceti ssp. xylinum genomic library was constructed using cosmid pJB8 in Escherichia coli. The gene encoding alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC) was isolated from the library by direct measurement of ALDC activity. The ALDC gene was expressed by its own promoter in E. coli. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and an open reading frame which may encode a protein composed of 304 amino acids with a molecular weight of 33,747 was found. A brewer's yeast was transformed with the YEp-type plasmid containing the ALDC gene placed under the control of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter. The laboratory-scale growth test confirmed that the total diacetyl concentration was considerably reduced by the transformant. The analysis of the wort indicates that the Acetobacter ALDC reduces the concentration of diacetyl more effectively than that of 2,3-pentanedione.

  19. Potential Direct Regulators of the Drosophila yellow Gene Identified by Yeast One-Hybrid and RNAi Screens

    PubMed Central

    Kalay, Gizem; Lusk, Richard; Dome, Mackenzie; Hens, Korneel; Deplancke, Bart; Wittkopp, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression controls development, and changes in this regulation often contribute to phenotypic evolution. Drosophila pigmentation is a model system for studying evolutionary changes in gene regulation, with differences in expression of pigmentation genes such as yellow that correlate with divergent pigment patterns among species shown to be caused by changes in cis- and trans-regulation. Currently, much more is known about the cis-regulatory component of divergent yellow expression than the trans-regulatory component, in part because very few trans-acting regulators of yellow expression have been identified. This study aims to improve our understanding of the trans-acting control of yellow expression by combining yeast-one-hybrid and RNAi screens for transcription factors binding to yellow cis-regulatory sequences and affecting abdominal pigmentation in adults, respectively. Of the 670 transcription factors included in the yeast-one-hybrid screen, 45 showed evidence of binding to one or more sequence fragments tested from the 5′ intergenic and intronic yellow sequences from D. melanogaster, D. pseudoobscura, and D. willistoni, suggesting that they might be direct regulators of yellow expression. Of the 670 transcription factors included in the yeast-one-hybrid screen, plus another TF previously shown to be genetically upstream of yellow, 125 were also tested using RNAi, and 32 showed altered abdominal pigmentation. Nine transcription factors were identified in both screens, including four nuclear receptors related to ecdysone signaling (Hr78, Hr38, Hr46, and Eip78C). This finding suggests that yellow expression might be directly controlled by nuclear receptors influenced by ecdysone during early pupal development when adult pigmentation is forming. PMID:27527791

  20. Superfamily Assignments for the Yeast Proteome through Integration of Structure Prediction with the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Malmström, Lars; Riffle, Michael; Strauss, Charlie E. M; Chivian, Dylan; Davis, Trisha N; Bonneau, Richard; Baker, David

    2007-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best-studied model organisms, yet the three-dimensional structure and molecular function of many yeast proteins remain unknown. Yeast proteins were parsed into 14,934 domains, and those lacking sequence similarity to proteins of known structure were folded using the Rosetta de novo structure prediction method on the World Community Grid. This structural data was integrated with process, component, and function annotations from the Saccharomyces Genome Database to assign yeast protein domains to SCOP superfamilies using a simple Bayesian approach. We have predicted the structure of 3,338 putative domains and assigned SCOP superfamily annotations to 581 of them. We have also assigned structural annotations to 7,094 predicted domains based on fold recognition and homology modeling methods. The domain predictions and structural information are available in an online database at http://rd.plos.org/10.1371_journal.pbio.0050076_01. PMID:17373854

  1. Superfamily assignments for the yeast proteome through integration of structure prediction with the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Lars; Riffle, Michael; Strauss, Charlie E M; Chivian, Dylan; Davis, Trisha N; Bonneau, Richard; Baker, David

    2007-04-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best-studied model organisms, yet the three-dimensional structure and molecular function of many yeast proteins remain unknown. Yeast proteins were parsed into 14,934 domains, and those lacking sequence similarity to proteins of known structure were folded using the Rosetta de novo structure prediction method on the World Community Grid. This structural data was integrated with process, component, and function annotations from the Saccharomyces Genome Database to assign yeast protein domains to SCOP superfamilies using a simple Bayesian approach. We have predicted the structure of 3,338 putative domains and assigned SCOP superfamily annotations to 581 of them. We have also assigned structural annotations to 7,094 predicted domains based on fold recognition and homology modeling methods. The domain predictions and structural information are available in an online database at http://rd.plos.org/10.1371_journal.pbio.0050076_01.

  2. Heterologous expression of glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene [DhGPD1] from the osmotolerant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Patricia E

    2005-08-01

    The role for the gene encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (DhGPD1) from the osmotolerant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii, in glycerol production and halotolerance, was studied through its heterologous expression in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deficient in glycerol synthesis (gpd1Delta). The expression of the DhGPD1 gene in the gpd1Delta background restored glycerol production and halotolerance to wild type levels, corroborating its role in the salt-induced production of glycerol. Although the gene was functional in S. cerevisiae, its heterologous expression was not efficient, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism may not be shared by these two yeasts.

  3. The rpoN gene product of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is required for expression of diverse genes, including the flagellin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Totten, P A; Lara, J C; Lory, S

    1990-01-01

    The product of the rpoN gene is an alternative sigma factor of RNA polymerase which is required for transcription of a number of genes in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, including those that specify enzymes of nitrogen assimilation, amino acid uptake, and degradation of a variety of organic molecules. We have previously shown that transcription of the pilin gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa also requires RpoN (K. S. Ishimoto and S. Lory, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:1954-1957, 1989) and have undertaken a more extensive survey of genes under RpoN control. Strains of P. aeruginosa that carry an insertionally inactivated rpoN gene were constructed and shown to be nonmotile because of the inability of these mutants to synthesize flagellin. The mutation in rpoN had no effect on expression of extracellular polypeptides, outer membrane proteins, and the alginate capsule. However, the rpoN mutants were glutamine auxotrophs and were defective in glutamine synthetase, indicating defects in nitrogen assimilation. In addition, the P. aeruginosa rpoN mutants were defective in urease activity. These findings indicate that the sigma factor encoded by the rpoN gene is used by P. aeruginosa for transcription of a diverse set of genes that specify biosynthetic enzymes, degradative enzymes, and surface components. These rpoN-controlled genes include pili and flagella which are required for full virulence of the organism. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:2152909

  4. Acetate ester production by Chinese yellow rice wine yeast overexpressing the alcohol acetyltransferase-encoding gene ATF2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Zhang, C; Qi, Y; Dai, L; Ma, H; Guo, X; Xiao, D

    2014-01-01

    Acetate ester, which are produced by fermenting yeast cells in an enzyme-catalyzed intracellular reaction, are responsible for the fruity character of fermented alcoholic beverages such as Chinese yellow rice wine. Alcohol acetyltransferase (AATase) is currently believed to be the key enzyme responsible for the production of acetate ester. In order to determine the precise role of the ATF2 gene in acetate ester production, an ATF2 gene encoding a type of AATase was overexpressed and the ability of the mutant to form acetate esters (including ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, and isobutyl acetate) was investigated. The results showed that after 5 days of fermentation, the concentrations of ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, and isobutyl acetate in yellow rice wines fermented with EY2 (pUC-PIA2K) increased to 137.79 mg/L (an approximate 4.9-fold increase relative to the parent cell RY1), 26.68 mg/L, and 7.60 mg/L, respectively. This study confirms that the ATF2 gene plays an important role in the production of acetate ester production during Chinese yellow rice wine fermentation, thereby offering prospects for the development of yellow rice wine yeast starter strains with optimized ester-producing capabilities. PMID:25501183

  5. Using Gene Essentiality and Synthetic Lethality Information to Correct Yeast and CHO Cell Genome-Scale Models.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ratul; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-01-01

    Essentiality (ES) and Synthetic Lethality (SL) information identify combination of genes whose deletion inhibits cell growth. This information is important for both identifying drug targets for tumor and pathogenic bacteria suppression and for flagging and avoiding gene deletions that are non-viable in biotechnology. In this study, we performed a comprehensive ES and SL analysis of two important eukaryotic models (S. cerevisiae and CHO cells) using a bilevel optimization approach introduced earlier. Information gleaned from this study is used to propose specific model changes to remedy inconsistent with data model predictions. Even for the highly curated Yeast 7.11 model we identified 50 changes (metabolic and GPR) leading to the correct prediction of an additional 28% of essential genes and 36% of synthetic lethals along with a 53% reduction in the erroneous identification of essential genes. Due to the paucity of mutant growth phenotype data only 12 changes were made for the CHO 1.2 model leading to an additional correctly predicted 11 essential and eight non-essential genes. Overall, we find that CHO 1.2 was 76% less accurate than the Yeast 7.11 metabolic model in predicting essential genes. Based on this analysis, 14 (single and double deletion) maximally informative experiments are suggested to improve the CHO cell model by using information from a mouse metabolic model. This analysis demonstrates the importance of single and multiple knockout phenotypes in assessing and improving model reconstructions. The advent of techniques such as CRISPR opens the door for the global assessment of eukaryotic models. PMID:26426067

  6. Gene conversion in yeast as a function of linear energy transfer (LET) for low-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Unrau, P.; Morrison, D.P.; Johnson, J.R.

    1992-05-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for low-LET radiation is known to depend on such factors as LET and dose rate. Microdosimetric calculations indicate that the biological target size could also be an important parameter, and calculations predict that the RBE for effects produced by hits in target sizes below about 100 nm should be unity for all low LET radiation. We have measured that RBE for gene conversion in yeast (a small target) for five different low LET photon sources, and the results were consistent with an RBE of unity, which agrees with microdosimetric predictions. 4 refs.

  7. Improved ethyl caproate production of Chinese liquor yeast by overexpressing fatty acid synthesis genes with OPI1 deletion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yefu; Luo, Weiwei; Gong, Rui; Xue, Xingxiang; Guan, Xiangyu; Song, Lulu; Guo, Xuewu; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-09-01

    During yeast fermentation, ethyl esters play a key role in the development of the flavor profiles of Chinese liquor. Ethyl caproate, an ethyl ester eliciting apple-like flavor, is the characteristic flavor of strong aromatic liquor, which is the best selling liquor in China. In the traditional fermentation process, ethyl caproate is mainly produced at the later fermentation stage by aroma-producing yeast, bacteria, and mold in a mud pit instead of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at the expense of grains and fermentation time. To improve the production of ethyl caproate by Chinese liquor yeast (S. cerevisiae) with less food consumption and shorter fermentation time, we constructed three recombinant strains, namely, α5-ACC1ΔOPI1, α5-FAS1ΔOPI1, and α5-FAS2ΔOPI1 by overexpressing acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1), fatty acid synthase 1 (FAS1), and fatty acid synthase 2 (FAS2) with OPI1 (an inositol/choline-mediated negative regulatory gene) deletion, respectively. In the liquid fermentation of corn hydrolysate, the contents of ethyl caproate produced by α5-ACC1ΔOPI1, α5-FAS1ΔOPI1, and α5-FAS2ΔOPI1 increased by 0.40-, 1.75-, and 0.31-fold, correspondingly, compared with the initial strain α5. The contents of other fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) (C8:0, C10:0, C12:0) also increased. In comparison, the content of FAEEs produced by α5-FAS1ΔOPI1 significantly improved. Meanwhile, the contents of acetyl-CoA and ethyl acetate were enhanced by α5-FAS1ΔOPI1. Overall, this study offers a promising platform for the development of pure yeast culture fermentation of Chinese strong aromatic liquor without the use of a mud pit. PMID:27344573

  8. Yeast Extract and Silver Nitrate Induce the Expression of Phenylpropanoid Biosynthetic Genes and Induce the Accumulation of Rosmarinic Acid in Agastache rugosa Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo Tae; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yeo, Sun Kyung; Jeon, Jin; Park, Jong Seok; Lee, Sook Young; Park, Sang Un

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of yeast extract and silver nitrate on the enhancement of phenylpropanoid pathway genes and accumulation of rosmarinic acid in Agastache rugosa cell cultures. The treatment of cell cultures with yeast extract (500 mg/L) and silver nitrate (30 mg/L) for varying times enhanced the expression of genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway and the production of rosmarinic acid. The results indicated that the expression of RAS and HPPR was proportional to the amount of yeast extract and silver nitrate. The transcript levels of HPPR under yeast extract treatment were 1.84-, 1.97-, and 2.86-fold higher than the control treatments after 3, 6, and 12 h, respectively, whereas PAL expression under silver nitrate treatment was 52.31-fold higher than in the non-treated controls after 24 h of elicitation. The concentration of rosmarinic acid was directly proportional to the concentration of the applied elicitors. Yeast extract supplementation documented the highest amount of rosmarinic acid at 4.98 mg/g, whereas silver nitrate addition resulted in a comparatively lower amount of rosmarinic acid at 0.65 mg/g. In conclusion, addition of yeast extract to the cell cultures enhanced the accumulation of rosmarinic acid, which was evidenced by the expression levels of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway genes in A. rugosa.

  9. Improvement of stress tolerance and leavening ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions by overexpression of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Feng, Bing; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-03-16

    During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast cells are exposed to multiple baking-associated stresses, such as elevated high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. There is a high demand for baker's yeast strains that could withstand these stresses with high leavening ability. The SNR84 gene encodes H/ACA snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), which is known to be involved in pseudouridylation of the large subunit rRNA. However, the function of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast coping with baking-associated stresses remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of SNR84 overexpression on baker's yeast which was exposed to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. These results suggest that overexpression of the SNR84 gene conferred tolerance of baker's yeast cells to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses and enhanced their leavening ability in high-sucrose and freeze-thaw dough. These findings could provide a valuable insight for breeding of novel stress-resistant baker's yeast strains that are useful for baking.

  10. Improvement of stress tolerance and leavening ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions by overexpression of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Feng, Bing; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-03-16

    During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast cells are exposed to multiple baking-associated stresses, such as elevated high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. There is a high demand for baker's yeast strains that could withstand these stresses with high leavening ability. The SNR84 gene encodes H/ACA snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), which is known to be involved in pseudouridylation of the large subunit rRNA. However, the function of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast coping with baking-associated stresses remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of SNR84 overexpression on baker's yeast which was exposed to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. These results suggest that overexpression of the SNR84 gene conferred tolerance of baker's yeast cells to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses and enhanced their leavening ability in high-sucrose and freeze-thaw dough. These findings could provide a valuable insight for breeding of novel stress-resistant baker's yeast strains that are useful for baking. PMID:25555226

  11. Diversity and linkage of genes in the self-incompatibility gene family in Arabidopsis lyrata.

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Deborah; Mable, Barbara K; Schierup, Mikkel H; Bartolomé, Carolina; Awadalla, Philip

    2003-01-01

    We report studies of seven members of the S-domain gene family in Arabidopsis lyrata, a member of the Brassicaceae that has a sporophytic self-incompatibility (SI) system. Orthologs for five loci are identifiable in the self-compatible relative A. thaliana. Like the Brassica stigmatic incompatibility protein locus (SRK), some of these genes have kinase domains. We show that several of these genes are unlinked to the putative A. lyrata SRK, Aly13. These genes have much lower nonsynonymous and synonymous polymorphism than Aly13 in the S-domains within natural populations, and differentiation between populations is higher, consistent with balancing selection at the Aly13 locus. One gene (Aly8) is linked to Aly13 and has high diversity. No departures from neutrality were detected for any of the loci. Comparing different loci within A. lyrata, sites corresponding to hypervariable regions in the Brassica S-loci (SLG and SRK) and in comparable regions of Aly13 have greater replacement site divergence than the rest of the S-domain. This suggests that the high polymorphism in these regions of incompatibility loci is due to balancing selection acting on sites within or near these regions, combined with low selective constraints. PMID:12930757

  12. Response to acetaldehyde stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a strain-dependent regulation of several ALD genes and is mediated by the general stress response pathway.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Agustín; del Olmo Ml, Marcel lí

    2003-06-01

    One of the stress conditions that yeast may encounter is the presence of acetaldehyde. In a previous study we identified that, in response to this stress, several HSP genes are induced that are also involved in the response to other forms of stress. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) play an important role in yeast acetaldehyde metabolism (e.g. when cells are growing in ethanol). In this work we analyse the expression of the genes encoding these enzymes (ALD) and also the corresponding enzymatic activities under several growth conditions. We investigate three kinds of yeast strains: laboratory strains, strains involved in the alcoholic fermentation stage of wine production and flor yeasts (responsible for the biological ageing of sherry wines). The latter are very important to consider because they grow in media containing high ethanol concentrations, and produce important amounts of acetaldehyde. Under several growth conditions, further addition of acetaldehyde or ethanol in flor yeasts induced the expression of some ALD genes and led to an increase in ALDH activity. This result is consistent with their need to obtain energy from ethanol during biological ageing processes. Our data also suggest that post-transcriptional and/or post-translational mechanisms are involved in regulating the activity of these enzymes. Finally, analyses indicate that the Msn2/4p and Hsf1p transcription factors are necessary for HSP26, ALD2/3 and ALD4 gene expression under acetaldehyde stress, while PKA represses the expression of these genes.

  13. A new genetic method for isolating functionally interacting genes: high plo1(+)-dependent mutants and their suppressors define genes in mitotic and septation pathways in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, C F; May, K M; Hagan, I M; Glover, D M; Ohkura, H

    2000-01-01

    We describe a general genetic method to identify genes encoding proteins that functionally interact with and/or are good candidates for downstream targets of a particular gene product. The screen identifies mutants whose growth depends on high levels of expression of that gene. We apply this to the plo1(+) gene that encodes a fission yeast homologue of the polo-like kinases. plo1(+) regulates both spindle formation and septation. We have isolated 17 high plo1(+)-dependent (pld) mutants that show defects in mitosis or septation. Three mutants show a mitotic arrest phenotype. Among the 14 pld mutants with septation defects, 12 mapped to known loci: cdc7, cdc15, cdc11 spg1, and sid2. One of the pld mutants, cdc7-PD1, was selected for suppressor analysis. As multicopy suppressors, we isolated four known genes involved in septation in fission yeast: spg1(+), sce3(+), cdc8(+), and rho1(+), and two previously uncharacterized genes, mpd1(+) and mpd2(+). mpd1(+) exhibits high homology to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase, while mpd2(+) resembles Saccharomyces cerevisiae SMY2; both proteins are involved in the regulation of actin-mediated processes. As chromosomal suppressors of cdc7-PD1, we isolated mutations of cdc16 that resulted in multiseptation without nuclear division. cdc16(+), dma1(+), byr3(+), byr4(+) and a truncated form of the cdc7 gene were isolated by complementation of one of these cdc16 mutations. These results demonstrate that screening for high dose-dependent mutants and their suppressors is an effective approach to identify functionally interacting genes. PMID:10924454

  14. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the global occurrence of multi-drug-resistant malarial parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), the anti-malarial drug most effective against malaria is artemisinin, a natural product (sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide) extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua). However, artemisinin is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria patients. Artemisinin can be semi-synthesized from its precursor artemisinic acid, which can be synthesized from simple sugars using microorganisms genetically engineered with genes from A. annua. In order to develop an industrially competent yeast strain, detailed analyses of microbial physiology and development of gene expression strategies are required. Results Three plant genes coding for amorphadiene synthase, amorphadiene oxidase (AMO or CYP71AV1), and cytochrome P450 reductase, which in concert divert carbon flux from farnesyl diphosphate to artemisinic acid, were expressed from a single plasmid. The artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast reached 250 μg mL-1 in shake-flask cultures and 1 g L-1 in bio-reactors with the use of Leu2d selection marker and appropriate medium formulation. When plasmid stability was measured, the yeast strain synthesizing amorphadiene alone maintained the plasmid in 84% of the cells, whereas the yeast strain synthesizing artemisinic acid showed poor plasmid stability. Inactivation of AMO by a point-mutation restored the high plasmid stability, indicating that the low plasmid stability is not caused by production of the AMO protein but by artemisinic acid synthesis or accumulation. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR consistently showed that pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes, belonging to the family of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter, were massively induced in the yeast strain producing artemisinic acid, relative to the yeast strain producing the hydrocarbon amorphadiene alone. Global transcriptional analysis by

  15. A downstream regulatory element located within the coding sequence mediates autoregulated expression of the yeast fatty acid synthase gene FAS2 by the FAS1 gene product.

    PubMed

    Wenz, P; Schwank, S; Hoja, U; Schüller, H J

    2001-11-15

    The fatty acid synthase genes FAS1 and FAS2 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are transcriptionally co-regulated by general transcription factors (such as Reb1, Rap1 and Abf1) and by the phospholipid-specific heterodimeric activator Ino2/Ino4, acting via their corresponding upstream binding sites. Here we provide evidence for a positive autoregulatory influence of FAS1 on FAS2 expression. Even with a constant FAS2 copy number, a 10-fold increase of FAS2 transcript amount was observed in the presence of FAS1 in multi-copy, compared to a fas1 null mutant. Surprisingly, the first 66 nt of the FAS2 coding region turned out as necessary and sufficient for FAS1-dependent gene expression. FAS2-lacZ fusion constructs deleted for this region showed high reporter gene expression even in the absence of FAS1, arguing for a negatively-acting downstream repression site (DRS) responsible for FAS1-dependent expression of FAS2. Our data suggest that the FAS1 gene product, in addition to its catalytic function, is also required for the coordinate biosynthetic control of the yeast FAS complex. An excess of uncomplexed Fas1 may be responsible for the deactivation of an FAS2-specific repressor, acting via the DRS. PMID:11713312

  16. Use of CYP52A2A promoter to increase gene expression in yeast

    DOEpatents

    Craft, David L.; Wilson, C. Ron; Eirich, Dudley; Zhang, Yeyan

    2004-01-06

    A nucleic acid sequence including a CYP promoter operably linked to nucleic acid encoding a heterologous protein is provided to increase transcription of the nucleic acid. Expression vectors and host cells containing the nucleic acid sequence are also provided. The methods and compositions described herein are especially useful in the production of polycarboxylic acids by yeast cells.

  17. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Cytochrome b5 Reductase (CBR) Encoding Genes from the Carotenogenic Yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, María Soledad; Rojas, María Cecilia; Sepúlveda, Dionisia; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor; Alcaíno, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic microsomal cytochrome P450 systems consist of a cytochrome P450 enzyme (P450) and a cytochrome P450 redox partner, which generally is a cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) that supplies electrons from NADPH. However, alternative electron donors may exist such as cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome b5 (CBR and CYB5, respectively) via, which is NADH-dependent and are also anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the carotenogenic yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, three P450-encoding genes have been described: crtS is involved in carotenogenesis and the CYP51 and CYP61 genes are both implicated in ergosterol biosynthesis. This yeast has a single CPR (encoded by the crtR gene), and a crtR- mutant does not produce astaxanthin. Considering that this mutant is viable, the existence of alternative cytochrome P450 electron donors like CBR and CYB5 could operate in this yeast. The aim of this work was to characterize the X. dendrorhous CBR encoding gene and to study its involvement in P450 reactions in ergosterol and carotenoid biosynthesis. Two CBRs genes were identified (CBR.1 and CBR.2), and deletion mutants were constructed. The two mutants and the wild-type strain showed similar sterol production, with ergosterol being the main sterol produced. The crtR- mutant strain produced a lower proportion of ergosterol than did the parental strain. These results indicate that even though one of the two CBR genes could be involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, crtR complements their absence in the cbr- mutant strains, at least for ergosterol production. The higher NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase activity together with the higher transcript levels of CBR.1 and CYB5 in the crtR- mutant as well as the lower NADH-dependent activity in CBS-cbr.1- strongly suggest that CBR.1-CYB5 via participates as an alternative electron donor pathway for P450 enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous. PMID:26466337

  18. Water quality and diversity of yeasts from tropical lakes and rivers from the Rio Doce basin in Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Adriana O.; Missagia, Beatriz S.; Brandão, Luciana R.; Callisto, Marcos; Barbosa, Francisco A. R.; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Yeast communities were assessed in 14 rivers and four lakes from the Doce River basin in Brazil, during the rainy and dry seasons of the years 2000 and 2001. Water samples were collected at the subsurface in all sites. The following physical and chemical parameters were measured: temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, electrical conductivity, total phosphorus, ortho-phosphate, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and total nitrogen and the counts of faecal coliforms and heterotrophic bacteria were carried out to characterize the aquatic environmental sampled. The yeast counts were higher in aquatic environments with the highest counts of coliform and heterotrophic bacteria. These environments receive a high influx of domestic and industrial waste. A total of 317 isolates identified in forty eight yeast species were recorded in the sites sampled and the specie Aureobasidium pullulans were found in eleven out of eighteen sites sampled and some opportunistic pathogens such as the yeast species Candida krusei were isolated only in the polluted rivers with a positive correlation with the biotic and abiotic parameters that indicate sewage contamination. PMID:24031990

  19. Triggering Respirofermentative Metabolism in the Crabtree-Negative Yeast Pichia guilliermondii by Disrupting the CAT8 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Pichia guilliermondii is a Crabtree-negative yeast that does not normally exhibit respirofermentative metabolism under aerobic conditions, and methods to trigger this metabolism may have applications for physiological study and industrial applications. In the present study, CAT8, which encodes a putative global transcriptional activator, was disrupted in P. guilliermondii. This yeast's ethanol titer increased by >20-fold compared to the wild type (WT) during aerobic fermentation using glucose. A comparative transcriptional analysis indicated that the expression of genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and respiratory chain was repressed in the CAT8-disrupted (ΔCAT8) strain, while the fermentative pathway genes were significantly upregulated. The respiratory activities in the ΔCAT8 strain, indicated by the specific oxygen uptake rate and respiratory state value, decreased to one-half and one-third of the WT values, respectively. In addition, the expression of HAP4, a transcriptional respiratory activator, was significantly repressed in the ΔCAT8 strain. Through disruption of HAP4, the ethanol production of P. guilliermondii was also increased, but the yield and titer were lower than that in the ΔCAT8 strain. A further transcriptional comparison between ΔCAT8 and ΔHAP4 strains suggested a more comprehensive reprogramming function of Cat8 in the central metabolic pathways. These results indicated the important role of CAT8 in regulating the glucose metabolism of P. guilliermondii and that the regulation was partially mediated by repressing HAP4. The strategy proposed here might be applicable to improve the aerobic fermentation capacity of other Crabtree-negative yeasts. PMID:24747899

  20. An Arabidopsis gene isolated by a novel method for detecting genetic interaction in yeast encodes the GDP dissociation inhibitor of Ara4 GTPase.

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Matsuda, N; Anai, T; Tsukaya, H; Uchimiya, H; Nakano, A

    1996-11-01

    The Arabidopsis Ara proteins belong to the Rab/Ypt family of small GTPases, which are implicated in intracellular vesicular traffic. To understand their specific roles in the cell, it is imperative to identify molecules that regulate the GTPase cycle. Such molecules have been found and characterized in animals and yeasts but not in plants. Using a yeast system, we developed a novel method of functional screening to detect interactions between foreign genes and identified this Rab regulator in plants. We found that the expression of the ARA4 gene in yeast ypt mutants causes exaggeration of the mutant phenotype. By introducing an Arabidopsis cDNA library into the ypt1 mutant, we isolated a clone whose coexpression overcame the deleterious effect of ARA4. This gene encodes an Arabidopsis homolog of the Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) and was named AtGDI1. The expression of AtGDI1 complemented the yeast sec19-1 (gdi1) mutation. AtGDI1 is expressed almost ubiquitously in Arabidopsis tissues. The method described here indicates the physiological interaction of two plant molecules, Ara4 and GDI, in yeast and should be applicable to other foreign genes.

  1. Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis as host for expression of the bacterial lipase: cloning and adaptation of the new lipase gene from Serratia sp.

    PubMed

    Šiekštelė, Rimantas; Veteikytė, Aušra; Tvaska, Bronius; Matijošytė, Inga

    2015-10-01

    Many microbial lipases have been successfully expressed in yeasts, but not in industrially attractive Kluyveromyces lactis, which among other benefits can be cultivated on a medium supplemented with whey--cheap and easily available industrial waste. A new bacterial lipase from Serratia sp. was isolated and for the first time expressed into the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis by heterologous protein expression system based on a strong promoter of Kluyveromyces marxianus triosephosphate isomerase gene and signal peptide of Kluyveromyces marxianus endopolygalacturonase gene. In addition, the bacterial lipase gene was synthesized de novo by taking into account a codon usage bias optimal for K. lactis and was expressed into the yeast K. lactis also. Both resulting strains were characterized by high output level of the target protein secreted extracellularly. Secreted lipases were characterized for activity and stability. PMID:26254038

  2. Genes with monoallelic expression contribute disproportionately to genetic diversity in humans.

    PubMed

    Savova, Virginia; Chun, Sung; Sohail, Mashaal; McCole, Ruth B; Witwicki, Robert; Gai, Lisa; Lenz, Tobias L; Wu, C-ting; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Gimelbrant, Alexander A

    2016-03-01

    An unexpectedly large number of human autosomal genes are subject to monoallelic expression (MAE). Our analysis of 4,227 such genes uncovers surprisingly high genetic variation across human populations. This increased diversity is unlikely to reflect relaxed purifying selection. Remarkably, MAE genes exhibit an elevated recombination rate and an increased density of hypermutable sequence contexts. However, these factors do not fully account for the increased diversity. We find that the elevated nucleotide diversity of MAE genes is also associated with greater allelic age: variants in these genes tend to be older and are enriched in polymorphisms shared by Neanderthals and chimpanzees. Both synonymous and nonsynonymous alleles of MAE genes have elevated average population frequencies. We also observed strong enrichment of the MAE signature among genes reported to evolve under balancing selection. We propose that an important biological function of widespread MAE might be the generation of cell-to-cell heterogeneity; the increased genetic variation contributes to this heterogeneity. PMID:26808112

  3. Divergent branches of mitochondrial signaling regulate specific genes and the viability of specialized cell types of differentiated yeast colonies

    PubMed Central

    Rešetárová, Stanislava; Kučerová, Helena; Hlaváček, Otakar; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial retrograde signaling mediates communication from altered mitochondria to the nucleus and is involved in many normal and pathophysiological changes, including cell metabolic reprogramming linked to cancer development and progression in mammals. The major mitochondrial retrograde pathway described in yeast includes three activators, Rtg1p, Rtg2p and Rtg3p, and repressors, Mks1p and Bmh1p/Bmh2p. Using differentiated yeast colonies, we show that Mks1p-Rtg pathway regulation is complex and includes three branches that divergently regulate the properties and fate of three specifically localized cell subpopulations via signals from differently altered mitochondria. The newly identified RTG pathway-regulated genes ATO1/ATO2 are expressed in colonial upper (U) cells, the cells with active TORC1 that metabolically resemble tumor cells, while CIT2 is a typical target induced in one subpopulation of starving lower (L) cells. The viability of the second L cell subpopulation is strictly dependent on RTG signaling. Additional co-activators of Rtg1p-Rtg3p specific to particular gene targets of each branch are required to regulate cell differentiation. PMID:26992228

  4. Integrated expression of the α-amylase, dextranase and glutathione gene in an industrial brewer's yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Jing; Wang, Zhao-Yue; He, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2012-01-01

    Genetic engineering is widely used to meliorate biological characteristics of industrial brewing yeast. But how to solve multiple problems at one time has become the bottle neck in the genetic modifications of industrial yeast strains. In a newly constructed strain TYRL21, dextranase gene was expressed in addition of α-amylase to make up α-amylase's shortcoming which can only hydrolyze α-1,4-glycosidic bond. Meanwhile, 18s rDNA repeated sequence was used as the homologous sequence for an effective and stable expression of LSD1 gene. As a result, TYRL21 consumed about twice much starch than the host strain. Moreover TYRL21 speeded up the fermentation which achieved the maximum cell number only within 3 days during EBC tube fermentation. Besides, flavor evaluation comparing TYRL21 and wild type brewing strain Y31 also confirmed TYRL21's better performances regarding its better saccharides utilization (83% less in residual saccharides), less off-flavor compounds (57% less in diacetyl, 39% less in acetaldehyde, 67% less in pentanedione), and improved stability index (increased by 49%) which correlated with sensory evaluation of final beer product. PMID:22806798

  5. Characterization of two genes encoding metal tolerance proteins from Beta vulgaris subspecies maritima that confers manganese tolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Erbasol, Isil; Bozdag, Gonensin Ozan; Koc, Ahmet; Pedas, Pai; Karakaya, Huseyin Caglar

    2013-10-01

    Manganese (Mn(2+)) is an essential micronutrient in plants. However increased Mn(2+) levels are toxic to plant cells. Metal tolerance proteins (MTPs), member of cation diffusion facilitator protein (CDF) family, have important roles in metal homeostatis in different plant species and catalyse efflux of excess metal ions. In this study, we identified and characterized two MTP genes from Beta vulgaris spp. maritima (B. v. ssp. maritima). Overexpression of these two genes provided Mn tolerance in yeast cells. Sequence analyses displayed BmMTP10 and BmMTP11 as members of the Mn-CDF family. Functional analyses of these proteins indicated that they are specific to Mn(2+) with a role in reducing excess cellular Mn(2+) levels when expressed in yeast. GFP-fusion constructs of both proteins localized to the Golgi apparatus as a punctuated pattern. Finally, Q-RT-PCR results showed that BmMTP10 expression was induced threefold in response to the excess Mn(2+) treatment. On the other hand BmMTP11 expression was not affected in response to excess Mn(2+) levels. Thus, our results suggest that the BmMTP10 and BmMTP11 proteins from B. v. ssp. maritima have non-redundant functions in terms of Mn(2+) detoxification with a similar in planta localization and function as the Arabidopsis Mn-CDF homolog AtMTP11 and this conservation shows the evolutionary importance of these vesicular proteins in heavy metal homeostatis among plant species.

  6. Analysis of bacterial xylose isomerase gene diversity using gene-targeted metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nurdiani, Dini; Ito, Michihiro; Maruyama, Toru; Terahara, Takeshi; Mori, Tetsushi; Ugawa, Shin; Takeyama, Haruko

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial xylose isomerases (XI) are promising resources for efficient biofuel production from xylose in lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we investigated xylose isomerase gene (xylA) diversity in three soil metagenomes differing in plant vegetation and geographical location, using an amplicon pyrosequencing approach and two newly-designed primer sets. A total of 158,555 reads from three metagenomic DNA replicates for each soil sample were classified into 1127 phylotypes, detected in triplicate and defined by 90% amino acid identity. The phylotype coverage was estimated to be within the range of 84.0-92.7%. The xylA gene phylotypes obtained were phylogenetically distributed across the two known xylA groups. They shared 49-100% identities with their closest-related XI sequences in GenBank. Phylotypes demonstrating <90% identity with known XIs in the database accounted for 89% of the total xylA phylotypes. The differences among xylA members and compositions within each soil sample were significantly smaller than they were between different soils based on a UniFrac distance analysis, suggesting soil-specific xylA genotypes and taxonomic compositions. The differences among xylA members and their compositions in the soil were strongly correlated with 16S rRNA variation between soil samples, also assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. This is the first report of xylA diversity in environmental samples assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. Our data provide information regarding xylA diversity in nature, and can be a basis for the screening of novel xylA genotypes for practical applications.

  7. Restricted VH gene usage and generation of antibody diversity in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Knight, K L

    1992-01-01

    The presence of VHa allotypic specificities on nearly all rabbit Ig molecules has perplexed immunologists for many years. How could these allotypic specificities be inherited as if controlled by alleles if the germline has hundreds of VHa allotype-encoding genes and if most of these genes are used in VDJ gene rearrangements. I review recent data indicating that the allelic inheritance of the VHa allotypes can be explained by preferential utilization of the D-proximal VH gene VH1 in VDJ gene rearrangements. The preferential usage of one VH gene, however, limits the contribution of combinatorial joining of multiple VH, D and JH gene segments to the generation of antibody diversity. The roles of somatic gene conversion and somatic mutation in generating antibody diversity are discussed. Further, the limited usage of germline VH genes in normal, allotype-suppressed and the mutant Alicia rabbit as well as the molecular basis of latent allotypes and VH/CH recombinants is reviewed.

  8. The structure of the yeast ribosomal RNA genes. I. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rubtsov, P M; Musakhanov, M M; Zakharyev, V M; Krayev, A S; Skryabin, K G; Bayev, A A

    1980-12-11

    The cloned 18 S ribosomal RNA gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been sequenced, using the Maxam-Gilbert procedure. From this data the complete sequence of 1789 nucleotides of the 18 S RNA was deduced. Extensive homology with many eucaryotic as well as E. coli ribosomal small subunit rRNA (S-rRNA) has been observed in the 3'-end region of the rRNA molecule. Comparison of the yeast 18 S rRNA sequences with partial sequence data, available for rRNAs of the other eucaryotes provides strong evidence that a substantial portion of the 18 S RNA sequence has been conserved in evolution.

  9. Polyphosphates and Polyphosphatase Activity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Overexpression of the DDP1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Trilisenko, L V; Andreeva, N A; Eldarov, M A; Dumina, M V; Kulakovskaya, T V

    2015-10-01

    The effects of overexpression of yeast diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolase (DDP1) having endopolyphosphatase activity on inorganic polyphosphate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. The endopolyphosphatase activity in the transformed strain significantly increased compared to the parent strain. This activity was observed with polyphosphates of different chain length, being suppressed by 2 mM tripolyphosphate or ATP. The content of acid-soluble and acid-insoluble polyphosphates under DDP1 overexpression decreased by 9 and 28%, respectively. The average chain length of salt-soluble and alkali-soluble fractions did not change in the overexpressing strain, and that of acid-soluble polyphosphate increased under phosphate excess. At the initial stage of polyphosphate recovery after phosphorus starvation, the chain length of the acid-soluble fraction in transformed cells was lower compared to the recipient strain. This observation suggests the complex nature of DDP1 involvement in the regulation of polyphosphate content and chain length in yeasts.

  10. Cloning of two genes (LAT1,2) encoding specific L: -arabinose transporters of the L: -arabinose fermenting yeast Ambrosiozyma monospora.

    PubMed

    Verho, Ritva; Penttilä, Merja; Richard, Peter

    2011-07-01

    We identified and characterized two genes, LAT1 and LAT2, which encode specific L: -arabinose transporters. The genes were identified in the L: -arabinose fermenting yeast Ambrosiozyma monospora. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae had only very low L: -arabinose transport activity; however, when LAT1 or LAT2 was expressed, L: -arabinose transport was facilitated. When the LAT1 or LAT2 were expressed in an S. cerevisiae mutant where the main hexose transporters were deleted, the L: -arabinose transporters could not restore growth on D: -glucose, D: -fructose, D: -mannose or D: -galactose. This indicates that these sugars are not transported and suggests that the transporters are specific for L: -arabinose.

  11. Endosomal protein sorting and autophagy genes contribute to the regulation of yeast life span.

    PubMed

    Longo, Valter D; Nislow, Corey; Fabrizio, Paola

    2010-11-01

    Accumulating evidence from various organisms points to a role for autophagy in the regulation of life span. By performing a genome-wide screen to identify novel life span determinants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have obtained further insights into the autophagy-related and -unrelated degradation processes that may be important for preventing cellular senescence. The generation of multivesicular bodies and their fusion with the vacuole in the endosomal pathway emerged as novel cell functions involved in yeast chronological survival and longevity extension.

  12. SPN1, a conserved gene identified by suppression of a postrecruitment-defective yeast TATA-binding protein mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbeck, Julie A; Kraemer, Susan M; Stargell, Laurie A

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about TATA-binding protein (TBP) functions after recruitment to the TATA element, although several TBP mutants display postrecruitment defects. Here we describe a genetic screen for suppressors of a postrecruitment-defective TBP allele. Suppression was achieved by a single point mutation in a previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, SPN1 (suppresses postrecruitment functions gene number 1). SPN1 is an essential yeast gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. The suppressing mutation in SPN1 substitutes an asparagine for an invariant lysine at position 192 (spn1(K192N)). The spn1(K192N) strain is able to suppress additional alleles of TBP that possess postrecruitment defects, but not a TBP allele that is postrecruitment competent. In addition, Spn1p does not stably associate with TFIID in vivo. Cells containing the spn1(K192N) allele exhibit a temperature-sensitive phenotype and some defects in activated transcription, whereas constitutive transcription appears relatively robust in the mutant background. Consistent with an important role in postrecruitment functions, transcription from the CYC1 promoter, which has been shown to be regulated by postrecruitment mechanisms, is enhanced in spn1(K192N) cells. Moreover, we find that SPN1 is a member of the SPT gene family, further supporting a functional requirement for the SPN1 gene product in transcriptional processes. PMID:12524336

  13. Yeast H2A.Z, FACT complex and RSC regulate transcription of tRNA gene through differential dynamics of flanking nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Sahasransu; Dewari, Pooran S; Bhardwaj, Anubhav; Bhargava, Purnima

    2011-05-01

    FACT complex is involved in elongation and ensures fidelity in the initiation step of transcription by RNA polymerase (pol) II. Histone variant H2A.Z is found in nucleosomes at the 5'-end of many genes. We report here H2A.Z-chaperone activity of the yeast FACT complex on the short, nucleosome-free, non-coding, pol III-transcribed yeast tRNA genes. On a prototype gene, yeast SUP4, chromatin remodeler RSC and FACT regulate its transcription through novel mechanisms, wherein the two gene-flanking nucleosomes containing H2A.Z, play different roles. Nhp6, which ensures transcription fidelity and helps load yFACT onto the gene flanking nucleosomes, has inhibitory role. RSC maintains a nucleosome abutting the gene terminator downstream, which results in reduced transcription rate in active state while H2A.Z probably helps RSC in keeping the gene nucleosome-free and serves as stress-sensor. All these factors maintain an epigenetic state which allows the gene to return quickly from repressed to active state and tones down the expression from the active SUP4 gene, required probably to maintain the balance in cellular tRNA pool.

  14. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500–2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change. PMID:27524983

  15. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain.

    PubMed

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500-2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change. PMID:27524983

  16. Expression of inulinase gene in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica and single cell oil production from inulin-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Hai; Cui, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Madzak, Catherine

    2010-11-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica ACA-DC 50109 has been reported to be an oleaginous yeast and significant quantities of lipids were accumulated inside the yeast cells. In this study, the INU1 gene encoding exo-inulinase cloned from Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556 was ligated into the expression plasmid pINA1317 and expressed in the cells of the oleaginous yeast. The activity of the inulinase with 6 × His tag secreted by the transformant Z31 obtained was found to be 41.7U mL(-1) after cell growth for 78 h. After optimization of the medium and cultivation conditions for single cell oil production, the transformant could accumulate 46.3% (w/w) oil from inulin in its cells and cell dry weight was 11.6 g L(-1) within 78 h at the flask level. During the 2-L fermentation, the transformant could accumulate 48.3% (w/w) oil from inulin in its cells and cell dry weight was 13.3 g L(-1) within 78 h while the transformant could accumulate 50.6% (w/w) oil from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers in its cells and cell dry weight was 14.6 g L(-1) within 78 h. At the end of fermentation, most of the added sugar was utilized by the transformant cells. Over 91.5% of the fatty acids from the transformant cultivated in the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubercles was C(16:0), C(18:1) and C(18:2), especially C(18:1) (58.5%).

  17. Expression of inulinase gene in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica and single cell oil production from inulin-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Hai; Cui, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Madzak, Catherine

    2010-11-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica ACA-DC 50109 has been reported to be an oleaginous yeast and significant quantities of lipids were accumulated inside the yeast cells. In this study, the INU1 gene encoding exo-inulinase cloned from Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556 was ligated into the expression plasmid pINA1317 and expressed in the cells of the oleaginous yeast. The activity of the inulinase with 6 × His tag secreted by the transformant Z31 obtained was found to be 41.7U mL(-1) after cell growth for 78 h. After optimization of the medium and cultivation conditions for single cell oil production, the transformant could accumulate 46.3% (w/w) oil from inulin in its cells and cell dry weight was 11.6 g L(-1) within 78 h at the flask level. During the 2-L fermentation, the transformant could accumulate 48.3% (w/w) oil from inulin in its cells and cell dry weight was 13.3 g L(-1) within 78 h while the transformant could accumulate 50.6% (w/w) oil from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers in its cells and cell dry weight was 14.6 g L(-1) within 78 h. At the end of fermentation, most of the added sugar was utilized by the transformant cells. Over 91.5% of the fatty acids from the transformant cultivated in the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubercles was C(16:0), C(18:1) and C(18:2), especially C(18:1) (58.5%). PMID:20883812

  18. Diversity and Detection of Nitrate Assimilation Genes in Marine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew E.; Booth, Melissa G.; Frischer, Marc E.; Verity, Peter G.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Zani, Sabino

    2001-01-01

    A PCR approach was used to construct a database of nasA genes (called narB genes in cyanobacteria) and to detect the genetic potential for heterotrophic bacterial nitrate utilization in marine environments. A nasA-specific PCR primer set that could be used to selectively amplify the nasA gene from heterotrophic bacteria was designed. Using seawater DNA extracts obtained from microbial communities in the South Atlantic Bight, the Barents Sea, and the North Pacific Gyre, we PCR amplified and sequenced nasA genes. Our results indicate that several groups of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes are common and widely distributed in oceanic environments. PMID:11679368

  19. The use of a real-time luciferase assay to quantify gene expression dynamics in the living yeast cell.

    PubMed

    Rienzo, Alessandro; Pascual-Ahuir, Amparo; Proft, Markus

    2012-06-01

    A destabilized version of firefly luciferase was used in living yeast cells as a real-time reporter for gene expression. This highly sensitive and non-invasive system can be simultaneously used upon many different experimental conditions in small culture aliquots. This allows the dose-response behaviour of gene expression driven by any yeast promoter to be reported and can be used to quantify important parameters, such as the threshold, sensitivity, response time, maximal activity and synthesis rate for a given stimulus. We applied the luciferase assay to the nutrient-regulated GAL1 promoter and the stress-responsive GRE2 promoter. We find that luciferase expression driven by the GAL1 promoter responds dynamically to growing galactose concentrations, with increasing synthesis rates determined by the light increment in the initial linear phase of activation. In the case of the GRE2 promoter, we demonstrate that the very short-lived version of luciferase used here is an excellent tool to quantitatively describe transient transcriptional activation. The luciferase expression controlled by the GRE2 promoter responds dynamically to a gradual increase of osmotic or oxidative stress stimuli, which is mainly based on the progressive increase of the time the promoter remains active. Finally, we determined the dose-response behaviour of a single transcription factor binding site in a synthetic promoter context, using the stress response element (STRE) as an example. Taken together, the luciferase assay described here is an attractive tool to rapidly and precisely determine and compare kinetic parameters of gene expression.

  20. Identification of the genes affecting the regulation of riboflavin synthesis in the flavinogenic yeast Pichia guilliermondii using insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Pynyaha, Yuriy V; Boretsky, Volodymyr Y; Fedorovych, Dariya V; Fayura, Lyubov R; Protchenko, Olha; Philpott, Caroline C; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2011-05-01

    Pichia guilliermondii is a representative of a group of so-called flavinogenic yeast species that overproduce riboflavin (vitamin B(2)) in response to iron limitation. Using insertion mutagenesis, we isolated P. guilliermondii mutants overproducing riboflavin. Analysis of nucleotide sequence of recombination sites revealed that insertion cassettes integrated into the genome disrupting P. guilliermondii genes similar to the VMA1 gene of Ashbya gossypii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae and FES1 and FRA1 genes of S. cerevisiae. The constructed P. guilliermondiiΔvma1-17 mutant possessed five- to sevenfold elevated riboflavin production and twofold decreased iron cell content as compared with the parental strain. Pichia guilliermondiiΔfra1-45 mutant accumulated 1.8-2.2-fold more iron in the cells and produced five- to sevenfold more riboflavin as compared with the parental strain. Both Δvma1-17 and Δfes1-77 knockout strains could not grow at 37 °C in contrast to the wild-type strain and the Δfra1-45 mutant. Increased riboflavin production by the wild-type strain was observed at 37 °C. Although the Δfes1-77 mutant did not overproduce riboflavin, it showed partial complementation when crossed with previously isolated P. guilliermondii riboflavin-overproducing mutant rib80-22. Complementation analysis revealed that Δvma1-17 and Δfra1-45 mutants are distinct from previously reported riboflavin-producing mutants hit1-1, rib80-22 and rib81-31 of this yeast. PMID:21261808

  1. Identification of the genes affecting the regulation of riboflavin synthesis in the flavinogenic yeast Pichia guilliermondii using insertion mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boretsky, Yuriy R.; Pynyaha, Yuriy V.; Boretsky, Volodymyr Y.; Fedorovych, Dariya V.; Fayura, Lyubov R.; Protchenko, Olha; Philpott, Caroline C.; Sibirny, Andriy A.

    2012-01-01

    Pichia guilliermondii is a representative of a group of so-called flavinogenic yeast species that overproduce riboflavin (vitamin B2) in response to iron limitation. Using insertion mutagenesis, we isolated P. guilliermondii mutants overproducing riboflavin. Analysis of nucleotide sequence of recombination sites revealed that insertion cassettes integrated into the genome disrupting P. guilliermondii genes similar to the VMA1 gene of Ashbya gossypii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae and FES1 and FRA1 genes of S. cerevisiae. The constructed P. guilliermondii Δvma1–17 mutant possessed five- to sevenfold elevated riboflavin production and twofold decreased iron cell content as compared with the parental strain. Pichia guilliermondii Δfra1–45 mutant accumulated 1.8–2.2-fold more iron in the cells and produced five- to sevenfold more riboflavin as compared with the parental strain. Both Δvma1–17 and Δfes1–77 knockout strains could not grow at 37 °C in contrast to the wild-type strain and the Δfra1–45 mutant. Increased riboflavin production by the wild-type strain was observed at 37 °C. Although the Δfes1–77 mutant did not overproduce riboflavin, it showed partial complementation when crossed with previously isolated P. guilliermondii riboflavin-overproducing mutant rib80–22. Complementation analysis revealed that Δvma1–17 and Δfra1–45 mutants are distinct from previously reported riboflavin-producing mutants hit1-1, rib80-22 and rib81-31 of this yeast. PMID:21261808

  2. The yeast prion [SWI+] abolishes multicellular growth by triggering conformational changes of multiple regulators required for flocculin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Summary While transcription factors are prevalent among yeast prion proteins, the role of prion-mediated transcriptional regulation remains elusive. We show here that the yeast prion [SWI+] abolishes flocculin (FLO) gene expression and results in a complete loss of multicellularity. Further investigation demonstrates that besides Swi1, multiple other proteins essential for FLO expression, including Mss11, Sap30, and Msn1 also undergo conformational changes, and become inactivated in [SWI+] cells. Moreover, the asparagine-rich region of Mss11 can exist as prion-like aggregates specifically in [SWI+] cells, which are SDS-resistant, heritable, and curable, but become metastable after separation from [SWI+]. Our findings thus reveal a prion-mediated mechanism through which multiple regulators in a biological pathway can be inactivated. In combination with the partial loss-of-function phenotypes of [SWI+] cells on non-glucose sugar utilization, our data therefore demonstrate that a prion can influence differently on distinct traits through multi-level regulations, providing insights into the biological roles of prions. PMID:26711350

  3. The yeast PHO5 promoter: from single locus to systems biology of a paradigm for gene regulation through chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Korber, Philipp; Barbaric, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics crucially contributes to gene regulation. Studies of the yeast PHO5 promoter were key to establish this nowadays accepted view and continuously provide mechanistic insight in chromatin remodeling and promoter regulation, both on single locus as well as on systems level. The PHO5 promoter is a context independent chromatin switch module where in the repressed state positioned nucleosomes occlude transcription factor sites such that nucleosome remodeling is a prerequisite for and not consequence of induced gene transcription. This massive chromatin transition from positioned nucleosomes to an extensive hypersensitive site, together with respective transitions at the co-regulated PHO8 and PHO84 promoters, became a prime model for dissecting how remodelers, histone modifiers and chaperones co-operate in nucleosome remodeling upon gene induction. This revealed a surprisingly complex cofactor network at the PHO5 promoter, including five remodeler ATPases (SWI/SNF, RSC, INO80, Isw1, Chd1), and demonstrated for the first time histone eviction in trans as remodeling mode in vivo. Recently, the PHO5 promoter and the whole PHO regulon were harnessed for quantitative analyses and computational modeling of remodeling, transcription factor binding and promoter input-output relations such that this rewarding single-locus model becomes a paradigm also for theoretical and systems approaches to gene regulatory networks. PMID:25190457

  4. Multiple heterologies increase mitotic double-strand break-induced allelic gene conversion tract lengths in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, J A; Sweetser, D B; Clikeman, J A; Khalsa, G J; Wheeler, S L

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous and double-strand break (DSB)-induced allelic recombination in yeast was investigated in crosses between ura3 heteroalleles inactivated by an HO site and a +1 frameshift mutation, with flanking markers defining a 3.4-kbp interval. In some crosses, nine additional phenotypically silent RFLP mutations were present at approximately 100-bp intervals. Increasing heterology from 0.2 to 1% in this interval reduced spontaneous, but not DSB-induced, recombination. For DSB-induced events, 75% were continuous tract gene conversions without a crossover in this interval; discontinuous tracts and conversions associated with a crossover each comprised approximately 7% of events, and 10% also converted markers in unbroken alleles. Loss of heterozygosity was seen for all markers centromere distal to the HO site in 50% of products; such loss could reflect gene conversion, break-induced replication, chromosome loss, or G2 crossovers. Using telomere-marked strains we determined that nearly all allelic DSB repair occurs by gene conversion. We further show that most allelic conversion results from mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA. Interestingly, markers shared between the sparsely and densely marked interval converted at higher rates in the densely marked interval. Thus, the extra markers increased gene conversion tract lengths, which may reflect mismatch repair-induced recombination, or a shift from restoration- to conversion-type repair. PMID:10511547

  5. The gene ICS3 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in copper homeostasis dependent on extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Alesso, C A; Discola, K F; Monteiro, G

    2015-09-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes are involved in the uptake, transport, storage and detoxification of copper. Large scale studies have noted that deletion of the gene ICS3 increases sensitivity to copper, Sortin 2 and acid exposure. Here, we report a study on the Δics3 strain, in which ICS3 is related to copper homeostasis, affecting the intracellular accumulation of this metal. This strain is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and copper exposure, but not to other tested transition metals. At pH 6.0, the Δics3 strain accumulates a larger amount of intracellular copper than the wild-type strain, explaining the sensitivity to oxidants in this condition. Unexpectedly, sensitivity to copper exposure only occurs in acidic conditions. This can be explained by the fact that the exposure of Δics3 cells to high copper concentrations at pH 4.0 results in over-accumulation of copper and iron. Moreover, the expression of ICS3 increases in acidic pH, and this is correlated with CCC2 gene expression, since both genes are regulated by Rim101 from the pH regulon. CCC2 is also upregulated in Δics3 in acidic pH. Together, these data indicate that ICS3 is involved in copper homeostasis and is dependent on extracellular pH.

  6. [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like gene is involved in the regulation of sensitivity to oxygen in yeast and nematode.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Michihiko; Adachi, Noritaka; Shikatani, Kazuki; Ayusawa, Dai

    2009-04-01

    Oxygen is essential for the life of aerobic organisms, but reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from oxygen can be a threat for it. Many genes are involved in generation of ROS, but not much attention has been focused on the reactions from which ROS are generated. We therefore screened for mutants that showed an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and isolated a novel mutant, oxy-4(qa5001). This mutant showed an increased sensitivity to a high concentration of oxygen, and decreased longevity at 20 degrees C but not at 26 degrees C. The genetic analysis has revealed that oxy-4 had a causative mutation in an [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like gene (Y54H5A.4). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a deletion of NAR1, a possible homologue of oxy-4, also caused a similar increased sensitivity to oxygen. [FeFe]-hydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze both the formation and the splitting of molecular hydrogen, and function in anaerobic respiration in anaerobes. In contrast, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like genes identified in aerobic eukaryotes do not generate hydrogen, and its functional roles are less understood. Our results suggested that [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like genes were involved in the regulation of sensitivity to oxygen in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans. PMID:19335616

  7. The gene ICS3 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in copper homeostasis dependent on extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Alesso, C A; Discola, K F; Monteiro, G

    2015-09-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes are involved in the uptake, transport, storage and detoxification of copper. Large scale studies have noted that deletion of the gene ICS3 increases sensitivity to copper, Sortin 2 and acid exposure. Here, we report a study on the Δics3 strain, in which ICS3 is related to copper homeostasis, affecting the intracellular accumulation of this metal. This strain is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and copper exposure, but not to other tested transition metals. At pH 6.0, the Δics3 strain accumulates a larger amount of intracellular copper than the wild-type strain, explaining the sensitivity to oxidants in this condition. Unexpectedly, sensitivity to copper exposure only occurs in acidic conditions. This can be explained by the fact that the exposure of Δics3 cells to high copper concentrations at pH 4.0 results in over-accumulation of copper and iron. Moreover, the expression of ICS3 increases in acidic pH, and this is correlated with CCC2 gene expression, since both genes are regulated by Rim101 from the pH regulon. CCC2 is also upregulated in Δics3 in acidic pH. Together, these data indicate that ICS3 is involved in copper homeostasis and is dependent on extracellular pH. PMID:26127016

  8. A New Type of Fusion Analysis Applicable to Many Organisms: Protein Fusions to the URA3 Gene of Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Alani, Eric; Kleckner, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    We have made constructs that join the promoter sequences and a portion of the coding region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS4 and GAL1 genes and the E. coli lacZ gene to the sixth codon of the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene (encodes orotidine-5'-phosphate (OMP) decarboxylase) to form three in frame protein fusions. In each case the fusion protein has OMP decarboxylase activity as assayed by complementation tests and this activity is properly regulated. A convenient cassette consisting of the URA3 segment plus some immediately proximal amino acids of HIS4C is available for making URA3 fusions to other proteins of interest. URA3 fusions offer several advantages over other systems for gene fusion analysis: the URA3 specified protein is small and cytosolic; genetic selections exist to identify mutants with either increased or decreased URA3 function in both yeast (S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium); and a sensitive OMP decarboxylase enzyme assay is available. Also, OMP decarboxylase activity is present in mammals, Drosophila and plants, so URA3 fusions may eventually be applicable in these other organisms as well. PMID:3311876

  9. A gene encoding a yeast equivalent of mammalian NADPH-adrenodoxin oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Lacour, T; Dumas, B

    1996-10-01

    Adrenodoxin oxidoreductase (ADR) and adrenodoxin (ADX) are the two proteins involved in electron transport to mammalian mitochondrial P-450s capable of steroid modifications. The cloning and sequencing of a S. cervisiae ADR homologue (YADR) is presented here. The YADR protein sequence shares 36 and 37% of identical amino acids with human and bovine ADR respectively. The physiological role of this ADR homologue in yeast is unknown. We intend to study the interaction of this YADR with bovine ADX in vitro and in vivo. PMID:8890749

  10. Human helicase gene SKI2W in the HLA class III region exhibits striking structural similarities to the yeast antiviral gene SKI2 and to the human gene KIAA0052: emergence of a new gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Dangel, A W; Shen, L; Mendoza, A R; Wu, L C; Yu, C Y

    1995-01-01

    Helicases are essential enzymes for life because DNA replication, DNA repair, recombination, transcription, RNA splicing and translation all involve more than one helicase to unwind DNA or RNA. We have discovered, cloned and partially characterized a novel human helicase gene, SKI2W. The human SKI2W is located between the RD and RP1 genes in the class III region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6, a genomic region associated with many malignant, genetic and autoimmune diseases. Derived amino acid sequence of human SKI2W showed an open reading frame for 1246 residues. It contains consensus sequences for structural motifs of an RNA helicase with a DEVH box. It has a leucine zipper motif that may be important for protein dimerization, and an RGD motif close to the N-terminus that might serve as a ligand for integrin or cell adhesion molecules. SKI2W shares a striking and extensive similarity to the yeast Ski2p that is involved in the inhibition of translation of poly(A) negative [poly(A)-] RNA, and plays an important role in antiviral activities. Human SKI2W fusion protein expressed in insect cells using a baculovirus vector has ATPase activity. The human SKI2W protein and the yeast Ski2p share extensive sequence similarities to another putative human protein KIAA0052, suggesting the presence of a new gene family that may be involved in translational regulation of cellular and viral RNA. Images PMID:7610041

  11. Production of Candida antaractica Lipase B Gene Open Reading Frame using Automated PCR Gene Assembly Protocol on Robotic Workcell & Expression in Ethanologenic Yeast for use as Resin-Bound Biocatalyst in Biodiesel Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A synthetic Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) gene open reading frame (ORF) for expression in yeast was produced using an automated PCR assembly and DNA purification protocol on an integrated robotic workcell. The lycotoxin-1 (Lyt-1) C3 variant gene ORF was added in-frame with the CALB ORF to pote...

  12. The diversity and extracellular enzymatic activities of yeasts isolated from water tanks of Vriesea minarum, an endangered bromeliad species in Brazil, and the description of Occultifur brasiliensis f.a., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Fátima C O; Safar, Silvana V B; Marques, Andrea R; Medeiros, Adriana O; Santos, Ana Raquel O; Carvalho, Cláudia; Lachance, Marc-André; Sampaio, José Paulo; Rosa, Carlos A

    2015-02-01

    The diversity of yeast species collected from the bromeliad tanks of Vriesea minarum, an endangered bromeliad species, and their ability to produce extracellular enzymes were studied. Water samples were collected from 30 tanks of bromeliads living in a rupestrian field site located at Serrada Piedade, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, during both the dry and rainy seasons. Thirty-six species were isolated, representing 22 basidiomycetous and 14 ascomycetous species. Occultifur sp., Cryptococcus podzolicus and Cryptococcus sp. 1 were the prevalent basidiomycetous species. The yeast-like fungus from the order Myriangiales, Candida silvae and Aureobasidium pullulans were the most frequent ascomycetous species. The diversity of the yeast communities obtained between seasons was not significantly different, but the yeast composition per bromeliad was different between seasons. These results suggest that there is significant spatial heterogeneity in the composition of populations of the yeast communities within bromeliad tanks, independent of the season. Among the 352 yeast isolates tested, 282 showed at least one enzymatic activity. Protease activity was the most widely expressed extracellular enzymatic activity, followed by xylanase, amylase, pectinase and cellulase activities. These enzymes may increase the carbon and nitrogen availability for the microbial food web in the bromeliad tank of V. minarum. Sequence analyses revealed the existence of 10 new species, indicating that bromeliad tanks are important sources of new yeasts. The novel species Occultifur brasiliensis, f.a., sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate the most frequently isolated yeast associated with V. minarum. The type strain of O. brasiliensis, f.a., sp. nov. is UFMG-CM-Y375(T) (= CBS 12687(T)). The Mycobank number is MB 809816.

  13. The diversity and extracellular enzymatic activities of yeasts isolated from water tanks of Vriesea minarum, an endangered bromeliad species in Brazil, and the description of Occultifur brasiliensis f.a., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Fátima C O; Safar, Silvana V B; Marques, Andrea R; Medeiros, Adriana O; Santos, Ana Raquel O; Carvalho, Cláudia; Lachance, Marc-André; Sampaio, José Paulo; Rosa, Carlos A

    2015-02-01

    The diversity of yeast species collected from the bromeliad tanks of Vriesea minarum, an endangered bromeliad species, and their ability to produce extracellular enzymes were studied. Water samples were collected from 30 tanks of bromeliads living in a rupestrian field site located at Serrada Piedade, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, during both the dry and rainy seasons. Thirty-six species were isolated, representing 22 basidiomycetous and 14 ascomycetous species. Occultifur sp., Cryptococcus podzolicus and Cryptococcus sp. 1 were the prevalent basidiomycetous species. The yeast-like fungus from the order Myriangiales, Candida silvae and Aureobasidium pullulans were the most frequent ascomycetous species. The diversity of the yeast communities obtained between seasons was not significantly different, but the yeast composition per bromeliad was different between seasons. These results suggest that there is significant spatial heterogeneity in the composition of populations of the yeast communities within bromeliad tanks, independent of the season. Among the 352 yeast isolates tested, 282 showed at least one enzymatic activity. Protease activity was the most widely expressed extracellular enzymatic activity, followed by xylanase, amylase, pectinase and cellulase activities. These enzymes may increase the carbon and nitrogen availability for the microbial food web in the bromeliad tank of V. minarum. Sequence analyses revealed the existence of 10 new species, indicating that bromeliad tanks are important sources of new yeasts. The novel species Occultifur brasiliensis, f.a., sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate the most frequently isolated yeast associated with V. minarum. The type strain of O. brasiliensis, f.a., sp. nov. is UFMG-CM-Y375(T) (= CBS 12687(T)). The Mycobank number is MB 809816. PMID:25515414

  14. Clonal diversity of recurrently mutated genes in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, MJ; Shen, D; Shao, J; Ding, L; White, BS; Kandoth, C; Miller, CA; Niu, B; McLellan, MD; Dees, ND; Fulton, R; Elliot, K; Heath, S; Grillot, M; Westervelt, P; Link, DC; DiPersio, JF; Mardis, E; Ley, TJ; Wilson, RK; Graubert, TA

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that most cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are clonally heterogeneous, with a founding clone and multiple subclones. It is not known whether specific gene mutations typically occur in founding clones or subclones. We screened a panel of 94 candidate genes in a cohort of 157 patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). This included 150 cases with samples obtained at MDS diagnosis and 15 cases with samples obtained at sAML transformation (8 were also analyzed at the MDS stage). We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to define the clonal architecture in eight sAML genomes and identified the range of variant allele frequencies (VAFs) for founding clone mutations. At least one mutation or cytogenetic abnormality was detected in 83% of the 150 MDS patients and 17 genes were significantly mutated (false discovery rate ≤0.05). Individual genes and patient samples displayed a wide range of VAFs for recurrently mutated genes, indicating that no single gene is exclusively mutated in the founding clone. The VAFs of recurrently mutated genes did not fully recapitulate the clonal architecture defined by WGS, suggesting that comprehensive sequencing may be required to accurately assess the clonal status of recurrently mutated genes in MDS. PMID:23443460

  15. Purification and Properties of an Esterase from the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Identification of the Encoding Gene

    PubMed Central

    Degrassi, Giuliano; Uotila, Lasse; Klima, Raffaella; Venturi, Vittorio

    1999-01-01

    We purified an intracellular esterase that can function as an S-formylglutathione hydrolase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Its molecular mass was 40 kDa, as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric point was 5.0 by isoelectric focusing. The enzyme activity was optimal at 50°C and pH 7.0. The corresponding gene, YJLO68C, was identified by its N-terminal amino acid sequence and is not essential for cell viability. Null mutants have reduced esterase activities and grow slowly in the presence of formaldehyde. This enzyme may be involved in the detoxification of formaldehyde, which can be metabolized to S-formylglutathione by S. cerevisiae. PMID:10427036

  16. Influence of Artisan Bakery- or Laboratory-Propagated Sourdoughs on the Diversity of Lactic Acid Bacterium and Yeast Microbiotas

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Fabio; Lattanzi, Anna; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Seven mature type I sourdoughs were comparatively back-slopped (80 days) at artisan bakery and laboratory levels under constant technology parameters. The cell density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria and related biochemical features were not affected by the environment of propagation. On the contrary, the number of yeasts markedly decreased from artisan bakery to laboratory propagation. During late laboratory propagation, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that the DNA band corresponding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae was no longer detectable in several sourdoughs. Twelve species of lactic acid bacteria were variously identified through a culture-dependent approach. All sourdoughs harbored a certain number of species and strains, which were dominant throughout time and, in several cases, varied depending on the environment of propagation. As shown by statistical permutation analysis, the lactic acid bacterium populations differed among sourdoughs propagated at artisan bakery and laboratory levels. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, and Weissella cibaria dominated in only some sourdoughs back-slopped at artisan bakeries, and Leuconostoc citreum seemed to be more persistent under laboratory conditions. Strains of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis were indifferently found in some sourdoughs. Together with the other stable species and strains, other lactic acid bacteria temporarily contaminated the sourdoughs and largely differed between artisan bakery and laboratory levels. The environment of propagation has an undoubted influence on the composition of sourdough yeast and lactic acid bacterium microbiotas. PMID:22635989

  17. An evolutionary approach uncovers a diverse response of tRNA 2-thiolation to elevated temperatures in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Alings, Fiona; Sarin, L. Peter; Fufezan, Christian; Drexler, Hannes C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modifications of transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules are evolutionarily well conserved and critical for translation and tRNA structure. Little is known how these nucleoside modifications respond to physiological stress. Using mass spectrometry and complementary methods, we defined tRNA modification levels in six yeast species in response to elevated temperatures. We show that 2-thiolation of uridine at position 34 (s2U34) is impaired at temperatures exceeding 30°C in the commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains S288C and W303, and in Saccharomyces bayanus. Upon stress relief, thiolation levels recover and we find no evidence that modified tRNA or s2U34 nucleosides are actively removed. Our results suggest that loss of 2-thiolation follows accumulation of newly synthesized tRNA that lack s2U34 modification due to temperature sensitivity of the URM1 pathway in S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Furthermore, our analysis of the tRNA modification pattern in selected yeast species revealed two alternative phenotypes. Most strains moderately increase their tRNA modification levels in response to heat, possibly constituting a common adaptation to high temperatures. However, an overall reduction of nucleoside modifications was observed exclusively in S288C. This surprising finding emphasizes the importance of studies that utilize the power of evolutionary biology, and highlights the need for future systematic studies on tRNA modifications in additional model organisms. PMID:25505025

  18. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric; Suominen, Pirkko

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  19. Characterization and Prediction of Haploinsufficiency Using Systems-Level Gene Properties in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Matthew; Lovell, Simon; Delneri, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Variation in gene copy number can significantly affect organism fitness. When one allele is missing in a diploid, the phenotype can be compromised because of haploinsufficiency. In this work, we identified associations between Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene properties and genome-scale haploinsufficiency phenotypes from previous work. We compared the haploinsufficiency profiles against 23 gene properties and found that genes with higher level of connectivity (degree) in a protein–protein interaction network, higher genetic interaction degree, greater gene sequence conservation, and higher protein expression were significantly more likely to be haploinsufficient. Additionally, haploinsufficiency showed negative relationships with cell cycle regulation and promoter sequence conservation. PMID:24048642

  20. Meiotic chromosome dynamics dependent upon the rec8(+), rec10(+) and rec11(+) genes of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Krawchuk, M D; DeVeaux, L C; Wahls, W P

    1999-09-01

    During meiosis homologous chromosomes replicate once, pair, experience recombination, and undergo two rounds of segregation to produce haploid meiotic products. The rec8(+), rec10(+), and rec11(+) genes of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe exhibit similar specificities for meiotic recombination and rec8(+) is required for sister chromatid cohesion and homolog pairing. We applied cytological and genetic approaches to identify potential genetic interactions and to gauge the fidelity of meiotic chromosome segregation in the mutants. The rec8(+) gene was epistatic to rec10(+) and to rec11(+), but there was no clear epistatic relationship between rec10(+) and rec11(+). Reciprocal (crossover) recombination in the central regions of all three chromosomes was compromised in the rec mutants, but recombination near the telomeres was nearly normal. Each of the mutants also exhibited a high rate of aberrant segregation for all three chromosomes. The rec8 mutations affected mainly meiosis I segregation. Remarkably, the rec10 and rec11 mutations, which compromised recombination during meiosis I, affected mainly meiosis II segregation. We propose that these genes encode regulators or components of a "meiotic chromatid cohesion" pathway involved in establishing, maintaining, and appropriately releasing meiotic interactions between chromosomes. A model of synergistic interactions between sister chromatid cohesion and crossover position suggests how crossovers and cohesion help ensure the proper segregation of chromosomes in each of the meiotic divisions. PMID:10471700

  1. Meiotic chromosome dynamics dependent upon the rec8(+), rec10(+) and rec11(+) genes of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Krawchuk, M D; DeVeaux, L C; Wahls, W P

    1999-01-01

    During meiosis homologous chromosomes replicate once, pair, experience recombination, and undergo two rounds of segregation to produce haploid meiotic products. The rec8(+), rec10(+), and rec11(+) genes of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe exhibit similar specificities for meiotic recombination and rec8(+) is required for sister chromatid cohesion and homolog pairing. We applied cytological and genetic approaches to identify potential genetic interactions and to gauge the fidelity of meiotic chromosome segregation in the mutants. The rec8(+) gene was epistatic to rec10(+) and to rec11(+), but there was no clear epistatic relationship between rec10(+) and rec11(+). Reciprocal (crossover) recombination in the central regions of all three chromosomes was compromised in the rec mutants, but recombination near the telomeres was nearly normal. Each of the mutants also exhibited a high rate of aberrant segregation for all three chromosomes. The rec8 mutations affected mainly meiosis I segregation. Remarkably, the rec10 and rec11 mutations, which compromised recombination during meiosis I, affected mainly meiosis II segregation. We propose that these genes encode regulators or components of a "meiotic chromatid cohesion" pathway involved in establishing, maintaining, and appropriately releasing meiotic interactions between chromosomes. A model of synergistic interactions between sister chromatid cohesion and crossover position suggests how crossovers and cohesion help ensure the proper segregation of chromosomes in each of the meiotic divisions. PMID:10471700

  2. What Population Reveals about Individual Cell Identity: Single-Cell Parameter Estimation of Models of Gene Expression in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Versari, Cristian; Cinquemani, Eugenio; Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo; Hersen, Pascal; Batt, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Significant cell-to-cell heterogeneity is ubiquitously observed in isogenic cell populations. Consequently, parameters of models of intracellular processes, usually fitted to population-averaged data, should rather be fitted to individual cells to obtain a population of models of similar but non-identical individuals. Here, we propose a quantitative modeling framework that attributes specific parameter values to single cells for a standard model of gene expression. We combine high quality single-cell measurements of the response of yeast cells to repeated hyperosmotic shocks and state-of-the-art statistical inference approaches for mixed-effects models to infer multidimensional parameter distributions describing the population, and then derive specific parameters for individual cells. The analysis of single-cell parameters shows that single-cell identity (e.g. gene expression dynamics, cell size, growth rate, mother-daughter relationships) is, at least partially, captured by the parameter values of gene expression models (e.g. rates of transcription, translation and degradation). Our approach shows how to use the rich information contained into longitudinal single-cell data to infer parameters that can faithfully represent single-cell identity. PMID:26859137

  3. Design and characterization of a dual-mode promoter with activation and repression capability for tuning gene expression in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Mostafizur; McMillen, David R

    2014-08-01

    Modularity in controlling gene expression artificially is becoming an essential aspect of synthetic biology. Artificial transcriptional control of gene expression is one of the most well-developed methods for the design of novel synthetic regulatory networks. Such networks are intended to help understand natural cellular phenomena and to enable new biotechnological applications. Promoter sequence manipulation with cis-regulatory elements is a key approach to control gene expression transcriptionally. Here, we have designed a promoter that can be both activated and repressed, as a contribution to the library of synthetic biological 'parts'. Starting with the minimal cytochrome C (minCYC) promoter in yeast, we incorporated five steroid hormone responsive elements (SHREs) and one lac operator site, respectively, upstream and downstream of the TATA box. This allows activation through the testosterone-responsive androgen receptor, and repression through the LacI repressor. Exposure to varying concentrations of testosterone (to vary activation) and IPTG (to vary repression) demonstrated the ability to tune the promoter's output curve over a wide range. By integrating activating and repressing signals, the promoter permits a useful form of signal integration, and we are optimistic that it will serve as a component in future regulatory networks, including feedback controllers. PMID:25056312

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Candida tsukubaensis alpha-glucosidase gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, B T; Larkin, A; Bolton, M; Cantwell, B A

    1991-07-01

    The molecular cloning of an alpha-glucosidase gene isolated from a Candida tsukubaensis (CBS 6389) genomic library in Saccharomyces cervisiae is reported. The cloned gene is contained within a 6.2 kb Sau3A DNA fragment and directs the synthesis and secretion of an amylolytic enzyme into the extracellular medium of the recombinant host, S. cerevisiae. The cloned enzyme was found to have an unusually broad substrate specificity and is capable of hydrolysing alpha-1,2, alpha-1,3, alpha-1,4 and alpha-1,6 linked, as well as aryl and alkyl, D-glucosides. On the basis of its substrate specificity profile, the cloned enzyme was classified as an alpha-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.20). It has a pH optimum in the range 4.2-4.6, a temperature optimum of 58 degrees C and is readily inactivated at pasteurization temperature (60 degrees C). Southern blot analysis failed to reveal any homology between the cloned gene and genomic DNA isolated from other well characterized amylolytic yeasts. A rapid plate-assay, based on the utilization of a chromogenic substrate X-alpha-D-glucoside to detect the expression of the cloned alpha-glucosidase in S. cerevisiae transformants, was developed. PMID:1934116

  5. Diversity of 5S rRNA genes within individual prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Anna; Li, Hongru; Oberdorf, William E; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Parsons, Tamasha; Yang, Liying; Gerz, Erika A; Lee, Peng; Xiang, Charlie; Nossa, Carlos W; Pei, Zhiheng

    2012-10-01

    We examined intragenomic variation of paralogous 5S rRNA genes to evaluate the concept of ribosomal constraints. In a dataset containing 1161 genomes from 779 unique species, 96 species exhibited > 3% diversity. Twenty-seven species with > 10% diversity contained a total of 421 mismatches between all pairs of the most dissimilar copies of 5S rRNA genes. The large majority (401 of 421) of the diversified positions were conserved at the secondary structure level. The high diversity was associated with partial rRNA operon, split operon, or spacer length-related divergence. In total, these findings indicated that there are tight ribosomal constraints on paralogous 5S rRNA genes in a genome despite of the high degree of diversity at the primary structure level.

  6. Genomic evolution of the ascomycetous yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are important for industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable metabolic and phylogenetic diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphr...

  7. Cloning of the gene encoding the yeast protein BTF1Y, which can substitute for the human TATA box-binding factor.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallini, B; Faus, I; Matthes, H; Chipoulet, J M; Winsor, B; Egly, J M; Chambon, P

    1989-01-01

    An activity (designated BTF1Y) in extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can substitute for the human TATA box-binding factor BTF1 in a reconstituted transcription system containing the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, RNA polymerase B (II), and the basic transcription factors BTF2, BTF3, and STF. We have purified BTF1Y to homogeneity, using as assays reconstitution of in vitro transcription and DNase I footprinting on the TATA element. Both activities copurified with a 27-kDa polypeptide as determined by SDS/PAGE. Gel filtration indicated a molecular mass of 28 +/- 5 kDa under nondenaturing conditions, suggesting that the native BTF1Y protein is a monomer. BTF1Y was enzymatically cleaved, several peptides were sequenced, and appropriate oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to clone the BTF1Y gene from a yeast genomic library. The BTF1Y gene contains a 720-base-pair open reading frame encoding a protein of 27,003 Da. The recombinant protein expressed in HeLa cells exhibited the same chromatographic characteristics and in vitro transcriptional activity as BTF1Y prepared from yeast extracts, confirming the identity of the gene. Gene-disruption experiments indicated that the yeast BTF1Y gene is a single-copy essential gene. Images PMID:2690073

  8. High-Copy Overexpression Screening Reveals PDR5 as the Main Doxorubicin Resistance Gene in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Ayse Banu; Koc, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin is one of the most potent anticancer drugs used in the treatment of various cancer types. The efficacy of doxorubicin is influenced by the drug resistance mechanisms and its cytotoxicity. In this study, we performed a high-copy screening analysis to find genes that play a role in doxorubicin resistance and found several genes (CUE5, AKL1, CAN1, YHR177W and PDR5) that provide resistance. Among these genes, overexpression of PDR5 provided a remarkable resistance, and deletion of it significantly rendered the tolerance level for the drug. Q-PCR analyses suggested that transcriptional regulation of these genes was not dependent on doxorubicin treatment. Additionally, we profiled the global expression pattern of cells in response to doxorubicin treatment and highlighted the genes and pathways that are important in doxorubicin tolerance/toxicity. Our results suggest that many efflux pumps and DNA metabolism genes are upregulated by the drug and required for doxorubicin tolerance. PMID:26690737

  9. Sporadic Gene Loss After Duplication Is Associated with Functional Divergence of Sirtuin Deacetylases Among Candida Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Rupert, Christopher B.; Heltzel, Justin M. H.; Taylor, Derek J.; Rusche, Laura N.

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication promotes the diversification of protein functions in several ways. Ancestral functions can be partitioned between the paralogs, or a new function can arise in one paralog. These processes are generally viewed as unidirectional. However, paralogous proteins often retain related functions and can substitute for one another. Moreover, in the event of gene loss, the remaining paralog might regain ancestral functions that had been shed. To explore this possibility, we focused on the sirtuin deacetylase SIR2 and its homolog HST1 in the CTG clade of yeasts. HST1 has been consistently retained throughout the clade, whereas SIR2 is only present in a subset of species. These NAD+-dependent deacetylases generate condensed chromatin that represses transcription and stabilizes tandemly repeated sequences. By analyzing phylogenetic trees and gene order, we found that a single duplication of the SIR2/HST1 gene occurred, likely prior to the emergence of the CTG clade. This ancient duplication was followed by at least two independent losses of SIR2. Functional characterization of Sir2 and Hst1 in three species revealed that these proteins have not maintained consistent functions since the duplication. In particular, the rDNA locus is deacetylated by Sir2 in Candida albicans, by Hst1 in C. lusitaniae, and by neither paralog in C. parapsilosis. In addition, the subtelomeres in C. albicans are deacetylated by Sir2 rather than by Hst1, which is orthologous to the sirtuin associated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae subtelomeres. These differences in function support the model that sirtuin deacetylases can regain ancestral functions to compensate for gene loss. PMID:27543294

  10. Population structure of the tsetse fly Glossina pallidipes estimated by allozyme, microsatellite and mitochondrial gene diversities

    PubMed Central

    Krafsur, E. S.

    2008-01-01

    Diversities at nuclear and mitochondrial loci were examined in eleven natural populations of Glossina pallidipes from east and southern Africa. Alleles in each class of loci are assumed to be selectively neutral. Allozyme gene diversities (heterozygosities) averaged over eight loci were 0.146 among seven Kenya populations and 0.201 among four southern African populations. Microsatellite diversity averaged over three loci was 0.250 in Kenya and only 0.218 in southern Africa. Mitochondrial diversities averaged 0.504 in Kenya and only 0.156 in southern Africa. Mitochondrial and microsatellite diversities in the populations were strongly correlated with each other, but uncorrelated with allozyme diversities. In contrast to the allozyme diversities, mitochondrial and microsatellite variation indicated a severe and prolonged reduction in population size in southern Africa. Genetic distances among populations increased with the geographical distances between them. Allozyme diversities in southern populations were conserved. Genetic differentiation at allozyme loci among populations was greatly damped when compared with the other markers. The foregoing can be explained if allozyme diversities were maintained by balancing selection. Three main points emerged: genetic data confirm the historical evidence that southern G. pallidipes populations experienced a severe and prolonged bottleneck; allozyme variation was conserved in the bottlenecked populations; and gene flow among populations is surprisingly restricted. PMID:11841501

  11. Patterns of nucleotide diversity at photoperiod related genes in Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst].

    PubMed

    Källman, Thomas; De Mita, Stéphane; Larsson, Hanna; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Heuertz, Myriam; Parducci, Laura; Suyama, Yoshihisa; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Lascoux, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The ability of plants to track seasonal changes is largely dependent on genes assigned to the photoperiod pathway, and variation in those genes is thereby important for adaptation to local day length conditions. Extensive physiological data in several temperate conifer species suggest that populations are adapted to local light conditions, but data on the genes underlying this adaptation are more limited. Here we present nucleotide diversity data from 19 genes putatively involved in photoperiodic response in Norway spruce (Picea abies). Based on similarity to model plants the genes were grouped into three categories according to their presumed position in the photoperiod pathway: photoreceptors, circadian clock genes, and downstream targets. An HKA (Hudson, Kreitman and Aquade) test showed a significant excess of diversity at photoreceptor genes, but no departure from neutrality at circadian genes and downstream targets. Departures from neutrality were also tested with Tajima's D and Fay and Wu's H statistics under three demographic scenarios: the standard neutral model, a population expansion model, and a more complex population split model. Only one gene, the circadian clock gene PaPRR3 with a highly positive Tajima's D value, deviates significantly from all tested demographic scenarios. As the PaPRR3 gene harbours multiple non-synonymous variants it appears as an excellent candidate gene for control of photoperiod response in Norway spruce.

  12. Microbial Functional Gene Diversity with a Shift of Subsurface Redox Conditions during In Situ Uranium Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuting; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; N′Guessan, Lucie A.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Deng, Ye; Long, Philip E.; Resch, C. Tom; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Li, Guanghe; Hazen, Terry C.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the microbial functional diversity changes with subsurface redox conditions during in situ uranium bioremediation, key functional genes were studied with GeoChip, a comprehensive functional gene microarray, in field experiments at a uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) site (Rifle, CO). The results indicated that functional microbial communities altered with a shift in the dominant metabolic process, as documented by hierarchical cluster and ordination analyses of all detected functional genes. The abundance of dsrAB genes (dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes) and methane generation-related mcr genes (methyl coenzyme M reductase coding genes) increased when redox conditions shifted from Fe-reducing to sulfate-reducing conditions. The cytochrome genes detected were primarily from Geobacter sp. and decreased with lower subsurface redox conditions. Statistical analysis of environmental parameters and functional genes indicated that acetate, U(VI), and redox potential (Eh) were the most significant geochemical variables linked to microbial functional gene structures, and changes in microbial functional diversity were strongly related to the dominant terminal electron-accepting process following acetate addition. The study indicates that the microbial functional genes clearly reflect the in situ redox conditions and the dominant microbial processes, which in turn influence uranium bioreduction. Microbial functional genes thus could be very useful for tracking microbial community structure and dynamics during bioremediation. PMID:22327592

  13. Structural diversity repertoire of gene silencing small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chan Il; Kim, Helena Andrade; Dua, Pooja; Kim, Soyoun; Li, Chiang J; Lee, Dong-ki

    2011-06-01

    Since the discovery of double-stranded (ds) RNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) phenomenon in Caenorhabditis elegans, specific gene silencing based upon RNAi mechanism has become a novel biomedical tool that has extended our understanding of cell biology and opened the door to an innovative class of therapeutic agents. To silence genes in mammalian cells, short dsRNA referred to as small interfering RNA (siRNA) is used as an RNAi trigger to avoid nonspecific interferon responses induced by long dsRNAs. An early structure-activity relationship study performed in Drosophila melanogaster embryonic extract suggested the existence of strict siRNA structural design rules to achieve optimal gene silencing. These rules include the presence of a 3' overhang, a fixed duplex length, and structural symmetry, which defined the structure of a classical siRNA. However, several recent studies performed in mammalian cells have hinted that the gene silencing siRNA structure could be much more flexible than that originally proposed. Moreover, many of the nonclassical siRNA structural variants reported improved features over the classical siRNAs, including increased potency, reduced nonspecific responses, and enhanced cellular delivery. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the development of gene silencing siRNA structural variants and discuss these in light of the flexibility of the RNAi machinery in mammalian cells. PMID:21749289

  14. Functional metagenomic analysis reveals rivers are a reservoir for diverse antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Amos, G C A; Zhang, L; Hawkey, P M; Gaze, W H; Wellington, E M

    2014-07-16

    The environment harbours a significant diversity of uncultured bacteria and a potential source of novel and extant resistance genes which may recombine with clinically important bacteria disseminated into environmental reservoirs. There is evidence that pollution can select for resistance due to the aggregation of adaptive genes on mobile elements. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluent disposal to a river by using culture independent methods to study diversity of resistance genes downstream of the WWTP in comparison to upstream. Metagenomic libraries were constructed in Escherichia coli and screened for phenotypic resistance to amikacin, gentamicin, neomycin, ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. Resistance genes were identified by using transposon mutagenesis. A significant increase downstream of the WWTP was observed in the number of phenotypic resistant clones recovered in metagenomic libraries. Common β-lactamases such as blaTEM were recovered as well as a diverse range of acetyltransferases and unusual transporter genes, with evidence for newly emerging resistance mechanisms. The similarities of the predicted proteins to known sequences suggested origins of genes from a very diverse range of bacteria. The study suggests that waste water disposal increases the reservoir of resistance mechanisms in the environment either by addition of resistance genes or by input of agents selective for resistant phenotypes.

  15. Characterization of an AtCCX5 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that involves in high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and Na{sup +} transport in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Min; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} The AtCCX5 protein coding a putative cation calcium exchanger was characterized. {yields} AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. {yields} AtCCX5 protein did not show the same transport properties as the CAXs. {yields} AtCCX5 protein involves in mediating high-affinity K{sup +} uptake in yeast. {yields} AtCCX5 protein also involves in Na{sup +} transport in yeast. -- Abstract: The gene for a putative cation calcium exchanger (CCX) from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtCCX5, was cloned and its function was analyzed in yeast. Green fluorescent protein-tagged AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. The yeast transformants expressing AtCCX5 were created and their growth in the presence of various cations (K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Li{sup +}) were analyzed. AtCCX5 expression was found to affect the response to K{sup +} and Na{sup +} in yeast. The AtCCX5 transformant also showed a little better growth to Zn{sup 2+}. The yeast mutant 9.3 expressing AtCCX5 restored growth of the mutant on medium with low K{sup +} (0.5 mM), and also suppressed its Na{sup +} sensitivity. Ion uptake experiments showed that AtCCX5 mediated relatively high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and was also involved in Na{sup +} transport in yeast. Taken together, these findings suggest that the AtCCX5 is a novel transport protein involves in mediating high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and Na{sup +} transport in yeast.

  16. Regulatory regions in the yeast FBP1 and PCK1 genes.

    PubMed

    Mercado, J J; Gancedo, J M

    1992-10-19

    By deletion analysis of the fusion genes FBP1-lacZ and PCK1-lacZ we have identified a number of strong regulatory regions in the genes FBP1 and PCK1 which encode fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Lack of expression of beta-galactosidase in fusions lacking sequences from the coding regions suggests the existence of downstream activating elements. Both promoters have several UAS and URS regions as well as sites implicated in catabolite repression. We have found in both genes consensus sequences for the binding of the same regulatory proteins, such as yAP1, MIG1 or the complex HAP2/HAP3/HAP4. Neither deletion nor overexpression of the MIG1 gene affected the regulated expression of the FBP1 or PCK1 genes.

  17. Diversity in the Toll-Like Receptor Genes of the African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus)

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Desiré Lee; Vermaak, Elaine; Roelofse, Marli; Kotze, Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    The African penguin, Spheniscus demersus, is listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species due to the drastic reduction in population numbers over the last 20 years. To date, the only studies on immunogenetic variation in penguins have been conducted on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. It was shown in humans that up to half of the genetic variability in immune responses to pathogens are located in non-MHC genes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are now increasingly being studied in a variety of taxa as a broader approach to determine functional genetic diversity. In this study, we confirm low genetic diversity in the innate immune region of African penguins similar to that observed in New Zealand robin that has undergone several severe population bottlenecks. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity across TLRs varied between ex situ and in situ penguins with the number of non-synonymous alterations in ex situ populations (n = 14) being reduced in comparison to in situ populations (n = 16). Maintaining adaptive diversity is of vital importance in the assurance populations as these animals may potentially be used in the future for re-introductions. Therefore, this study provides essential data on immune gene diversity in penguins and will assist in providing an additional monitoring tool for African penguin in the wild, as well as to monitor diversity in ex situ populations and to ensure that diversity found in the in situ populations are captured in the assurance populations. PMID:27760133

  18. Diversity in Expression of Phosphorus (P) Responsive Genes in Cucumis melo L

    PubMed Central

    Fita, Ana; Bowen, Helen C.; Hayden, Rory M.; Nuez, Fernando; Picó, Belén; Hammond, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphorus (P) is a major limiting nutrient for plant growth in many soils. Studies in model species have identified genes involved in plant adaptations to low soil P availability. However, little information is available on the genetic bases of these adaptations in vegetable crops. In this respect, sequence data for melon now makes it possible to identify melon orthologues of candidate P responsive genes, and the expression of these genes can be used to explain the diversity in the root system adaptation to low P availability, recently observed in this species. Methodology and Findings Transcriptional responses to P starvation were studied in nine diverse melon accessions by comparing the expression of eight candidate genes (Cm-PAP10.1, Cm-PAP10.2, Cm-RNS1, Cm-PPCK1, Cm-transferase, Cm-SQD1, Cm-DGD1 and Cm-SPX2) under P replete and P starved conditions. Differences among melon accessions were observed in response to P starvation, including differences in plant morphology, P uptake, P use efficiency (PUE) and gene expression. All studied genes were up regulated under P starvation conditions. Differences in the expression of genes involved in P mobilization and remobilization (Cm-PAP10.1, Cm-PAP10.2 and Cm-RNS1) under P starvation conditions explained part of the differences in P uptake and PUE among melon accessions. The levels of expression of the other studied genes were diverse among melon accessions, but contributed less to the phenotypical response of the accessions. Conclusions This is the first time that these genes have been described in the context of P starvation responses in melon. There exists significant diversity in gene expression levels and P use efficiency among melon accessions as well as significant correlations between gene expression levels and phenotypical measurements. PMID:22536378

  19. Functional Gene Composition, Diversity and Redundancy in Microbial Stream Biofilm Communities

    PubMed Central

    Dopheide, Andrew; Lear, Gavin; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Lewis, Gillian D.

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed the functional gene composition and diversity of microbial biofilm communities in 18 New Zealand streams affected by different types of catchment land use, using a comprehensive functional gene array, GeoChip 3.0. A total of 5,371 nutrient cycling and energy metabolism genes within 65 gene families were detected among all samples (342 to 2,666 genes per stream). Carbon cycling genes were most common, followed by nitrogen cycling genes, with smaller proportions of sulphur, phosphorus cycling and energy metabolism genes. Samples from urban and native forest streams had the most similar functional gene composition, while samples from exotic forest and rural streams exhibited the most variation. There were significant differences between nitrogen and sulphur cycling genes detected in native forest and urban samples compared to exotic forest and rural samples, attributed to contrasting proportions of nitrogen fixation, denitrification, and sulphur reduction genes. Most genes were detected only in one or a few samples, with only a small minority occurring in all samples. Nonetheless, 42 of 65 gene families occurred in every sample and overall proportions of gene families were similar among samples from contrasting streams. This suggests the existence of functional gene redundancy among different stream biofilm communities despite contrasting taxonomic composition. PMID:25849814

  20. The diverse origins of the human gene pool.

    PubMed

    Pääbo, Svante

    2015-06-01

    Analyses of the genomes of Neanderthals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of present-day humans, suggest that our ancestors were part of a web of now-extinct populations linked by limited, but intermittent or sometimes perhaps even persistent, gene flow.

  1. Immunoglobulin genes: generating diversity with AID and UNG.

    PubMed

    Storb, Ursula; Stavnezer, Janet

    2002-10-29

    Somatic hypermutation and switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes require the activity of the activation-induced deaminase, AID. Recent studies of mice deficient for the uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG, which removes U from DNA, suggest that AID catalyses the deamination of dC to dU during antibody diversification.

  2. Global Patterns of Diversity and Selection in Human Tyrosinase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hudjashov, Georgi; Villems, Richard; Kivisild, Toomas

    2013-01-01

    Global variation in skin pigmentation is one of the most striking examples of environmental adaptation in humans. More than two hundred loci have been identified as candidate genes in model organisms and a few tens of these have been found to be significantly associated with human skin pigmentation in genome-wide association studies. However, the evolutionary history of different pigmentation genes is rather complex: some loci have been subjected to strong positive selection, while others evolved under the relaxation of functional constraints in low UV environment. Here we report the results of a global study of the human tyrosinase gene, which is one of the key enzymes in melanin production, to assess the role of its variation in the evolution of skin pigmentation differences among human populations. We observe a higher rate of non-synonymous polymorphisms in the European sample consistent with the relaxation of selective constraints. A similar pattern was previously observed in the MC1R gene and concurs with UV radiation-driven model of skin color evolution by which mutations leading to lower melanin levels and decreased photoprotection are subject to purifying selection at low latitudes while being tolerated or even favored at higher latitudes because they facilitate UV-dependent vitamin D production. Our coalescent date estimates suggest that the non-synonymous variants, which are frequent in Europe and North Africa, are recent and have emerged after the separation of East and West Eurasian populations. PMID:24040225

  3. Identification of auxotrophic mutants of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus by non-homologous end joining-mediated integrative transformation with genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yarimizu, Tohru; Nonklang, Sanom; Nakamura, Junpei; Tokuda, Shuya; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Lorreungsil, Sasithorn; Sutthikhumpha, Surasit; Pukahuta, Charida; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Limtong, Savitree; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-12-01

    The isolation and application of auxotrophic mutants for gene manipulations, such as genetic transformation, mating selection and tetrad analysis, form the basis of yeast genetics. For the development of these genetic methods in the thermotolerant fermentative yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, we isolated a series of auxotrophic mutants with defects in amino acid or nucleic acid metabolism. To identify the mutated genes, linear DNA fragments of nutrient biosynthetic pathway genes were amplified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA and used to directly transform the K. marxianus auxotrophic mutants by random integration into chromosomes through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The appearance of transformant colonies indicated that the specific S. cerevisiae gene complemented the K. marxianus mutant. Using this interspecific complementation approach with linear PCR-amplified DNA, we identified auxotrophic mutations of ADE2, ADE5,7, ADE6, HIS2, HIS3, HIS4, HIS5, HIS6, HIS7, LYS1, LYS2, LYS4, LYS9, LEU1, LEU2, MET2, MET6, MET17, TRP3, TRP4 and TRP5 without the labour-intensive requirement of plasmid construction. Mating, sporulation and tetrad analysis techniques for K. marxianus were also established. With the identified auxotrophic mutant strains and S. cerevisiae genes as selective markers, NHEJ-mediated integrative transformation with PCR-amplified DNA is an attractive system for facilitating genetic analyses in the yeast K. marxianus.

  4. Characterization of the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Ikeda, Terumasa; Mizuki, Fumitaka; Tani, Tokio

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr5{sup +} gene was found to encode nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Seh1p and Mlo3p are multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5 mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p functions in nuclear mRNA export through the mRNA export factor Rae1p. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p interacts genetically with pre-mRNA splicing factors. -- Abstract: To analyze the mechanisms of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, we have isolated eleven mutants, ptr [poly(A){sup +} RNA transport] 1 to 11, which accumulate poly(A){sup +} RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Of those, the ptr5-1 mutant shows dots- or a ring-like accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNA at the nuclear periphery after shifting to the nonpermissive temperature. We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene and found that it encodes a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). The ptr5-1 mutant shows no defects in protein transport, suggesting the specific involvement of Ptr5p/Nup85p in nuclear mRNA export in S. pombe. We identified Seh1p, a nucleoporin interacting with Nup85p, an mRNA-binding protein Mlo3p, and Sac3p, a component of the TREX-2 complex involved in coupling of nuclear mRNA export with transcription, as multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5-1 mutation. In addition, we found that the ptr5-1 mutation is synthetically lethal with a mutation of the mRNA export factor Rae1p, and that the double mutant exaggerates defective nuclear mRNA export, suggesting that Ptr5p/Nup85p is involved in nuclear mRNA export through Rae1p. Interestingly, the ptr5-1 mutation also showed synthetic effects with several prp pre-mRNA splicing mutations, suggesting a functional linkage between the NPCs and the splicing apparatus in the yeast nucleus.

  5. Continuous modeling of metabolic networks with gene regulation in yeast and in vivo determination of rate parameters.

    PubMed

    Moisset, P; Vaisman, D; Cintolesi, A; Urrutia, J; Rapaport, I; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2012-09-01

    A continuous model of a metabolic network including gene regulation to simulate metabolic fluxes during batch cultivation of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed. The metabolic network includes reactions of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycerol and ethanol synthesis and consumption, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and protein synthesis. Carbon sources considered were glucose and then ethanol synthesized during growth on glucose. The metabolic network has 39 fluxes, which represent the action of 50 enzymes and 64 genes and it is coupled with a gene regulation network which defines enzyme synthesis (activities) and incorporates regulation by glucose (enzyme induction and repression), modeled using ordinary differential equations. The model includes enzyme kinetics, equations that follow both mass-action law and transport as well as inducible, repressible, and constitutive enzymes of metabolism. The model was able to simulate a fermentation of S. cerevisiae during the exponential growth phase on glucose and the exponential growth phase on ethanol using only one set of kinetic parameters. All fluxes in the continuous model followed the behavior shown by the metabolic flux analysis (MFA) obtained from experimental results. The differences obtained between the fluxes given by the model and the fluxes determined by the MFA do not exceed 25% in 75% of the cases during exponential growth on glucose, and 20% in 90% of the cases during exponential growth on ethanol. Furthermore, the adjustment of the fermentation profiles of biomass, glucose, and ethanol were 95%, 95%, and 79%, respectively. With these results the simulation was considered successful. A comparison between the simulation of the continuous model and the experimental data of the diauxic yeast fermentation for glucose, biomass, and ethanol, shows an extremely good match using the parameters found. The small discrepancies between the fluxes obtained through MFA and those predicted by the differential

  6. VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Non; Miyoshi, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Nakazono, Toshimitsu; Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized through decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PS), catalysed by PS decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) and 2 (Psd2p) and the cytidine 5'-diphosphate (CDP)-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway. PSD1 null (psd1Δ) and PSD2 null (psd2Δ) mutants are viable in a synthetic minimal medium, but a psd1Δ psd2Δ double mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy, which is incorporated into PE through the CDP-Etn pathway. We have previously shown that psd1Δ is synthetic lethal with deletion of VID22 (vid22Δ) [Kuroda et al. (2011) Mol. Microbiol. 80: , 248-265]. In the present study, we found that vid22Δ mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy under PSD1-depressed conditions. Deletion of VID22 in wild-type and PSD1-depressed cells caused partial defects in PE formation through decarboxylation of PS. The enzyme activity of PS decarboxylase in an extract of vid22Δ cells was ∼70% of that in wild-type cells and similar to that in psd2Δ cells and the PS decarboxylase activity remaining in the PSD1-depressed cells became almost negligible with deletion of VID22. Thus, the vid22Δ mutation was suggested to cause a defect in the Psd2p activity. Furthermore, vid22Δ cells were shown to be defective in expression of the PSD2 gene tagged with 6×HA, the defect being ameliorated by replacement of the native promoter of the PSD2 gene with a CYC1 promoter. In addition, an α-galactosidase reporter assay revealed that the activity of the promoter of the PSD2 gene in vid22Δ cells was ∼5% of that in wild-type cells. These results showed that VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene.

  7. SNC1, a yeast homolog of the synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein/synaptobrevin gene family: genetic interactions with the RAS and CAP genes.

    PubMed Central

    Gerst, J E; Rodgers, L; Riggs, M; Wigler, M

    1992-01-01

    SNC1, a gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes a homolog of vertebrate synaptic vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) or synaptobrevins. SNC1 was isolated by its ability to suppress the loss of CAP function in S. cerevisiae strains possessing an activated allele of RAS2. CAP is a component of the RAS-responsive S. cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex. The N-terminal domain of CAP is required for full cellular responsiveness to activated RAS proteins. The C-terminal domain of CAP is required for normal cellular morphology and responsiveness to nutrient extremes. Multicopy plasmids expressing SNC1 suppress only the loss of the C-terminal functions of CAP and only in the presence of activated RAS2. Images PMID:1316605

  8. Defective Mitochondrial Gene Expression Results in Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Inhibition of Respiration and Reduction of Yeast Life Span†

    PubMed Central

    Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Rodeheffer, Matthew S.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction causes numerous human diseases and is widely believed to be involved in aging. However, mechanisms through which compromised mitochondrial gene expression elicits the reported variety of cellular defects remain unclear. The amino-terminal domain (ATD) of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase is required to couple transcription to translation during expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation subunits. Here we report that several ATD mutants exhibit reduced chronological life span. The most severe of these (harboring the rpo41-R129D mutation) displays imbalanced mitochondrial translation, conditional inactivation of respiration, elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased oxidative stress. Reduction of ROS, via overexpression of superoxide dismutase (SOD1 or SOD2 product), not only greatly extends the life span of this mutant but also increases its ability to respire. Another ATD mutant with similarly reduced respiration (rpo41-D152A/D154A) accumulates only intermediate levels of ROS and has a less severe life span defect that is not rescued by SOD. Altogether, our results provide compelling evidence for the “vicious cycle” of mitochondrial ROS production and lead us to propose that the amount of ROS generated depends on the precise nature of the mitochondrial gene expression defect and initiates a downward spiral of oxidative stress only if a critical threshold is crossed. PMID:16782871

  9. Defective mitochondrial gene expression results in reactive oxygen species-mediated inhibition of respiration and reduction of yeast life span.

    PubMed

    Bonawitz, Nicholas D; Rodeheffer, Matthew S; Shadel, Gerald S

    2006-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction causes numerous human diseases and is widely believed to be involved in aging. However, mechanisms through which compromised mitochondrial gene expression elicits the reported variety of cellular defects remain unclear. The amino-terminal domain (ATD) of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase is required to couple transcription to translation during expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation subunits. Here we report that several ATD mutants exhibit reduced chronological life span. The most severe of these (harboring the rpo41-R129D mutation) displays imbalanced mitochondrial translation, conditional inactivation of respiration, elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased oxidative stress. Reduction of ROS, via overexpression of superoxide dismutase (SOD1 or SOD2 product), not only greatly extends the life span of this mutant but also increases its ability to respire. Another ATD mutant with similarly reduced respiration (rpo41-D152A/D154A) accumulates only intermediate levels of ROS and has a less severe life span defect that is not rescued by SOD. Altogether, our results provide compelling evidence for the "vicious cycle" of mitochondrial ROS production and lead us to propose that the amount of ROS generated depends on the precise nature of the mitochondrial gene expression defect and initiates a downward spiral of oxidative stress only if a critical threshold is crossed.

  10. Identification of a newly isolated erythritol-producing yeast and cloning of its erythrose [corrected] reductase genes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huihui; Han, Ye; Liu, Yuanyuan; Jia, Wei; Zhou, Zhijiang

    2012-11-01

    A new erythritol-producing yeast (strain BH010) was isolated in this study. Analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA sequence, the ITS/5.8S rDNA sequence [corrected] and the 18S rDNA sequence allowed the taxonomic position of strain BH010 to be discussed, [corrected] and it was identified and named Moniliella sp. BH010. Physiological characteristics were described. Scanning electron micrography clearly indicated that the cells were cylindrical to elliptical with an average size of 5 × 10 μm when growing in liquid medium [corrected] and that pseudohyphae and blastoconidia were observed when cultivated in agar plates. The erythrose [corrected] reductase genes were cloned, sequenced, and analyzed. BLAST analysis and multiple sequence alignment demonstrated that erythrose [corrected] reductase genes of Moniliella sp. BH010 shared very high homology with that of Trichosporonoides megachiliensis SNG-42 except for the presence of introns. The deduced amino acid sequences showed high homology to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

  11. Active RNAP pre-initiation sites are highly mutated by cytidine deaminases in yeast, with AID targeting small RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin JM; Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases are single stranded DNA mutators diversifying antibodies and restricting viral infection. Improper access to the genome leads to translocations and mutations in B cells and contributes to the mutation landscape in cancer, such as kataegis. It remains unclear how deaminases access double stranded genomes and whether off-target mutations favor certain loci, although transcription and opportunistic access during DNA repair are thought to play a role. In yeast, AID and the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G preferentially mutate transcriptionally active genes within narrow regions, 110 base pairs in width, fixed at RNA polymerase initiation sites. Unlike APOBEC3G, AID shows enhanced mutational preference for small RNA genes (tRNAs, snoRNAs and snRNAs) suggesting a putative role for RNA in its recruitment. We uncover the high affinity of the deaminases for the single stranded DNA exposed by initiating RNA polymerases (a DNA configuration reproduced at stalled polymerases) without a requirement for specific cofactors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03553.001 PMID:25237741

  12. Yeast tRNA3Leu gene transcribed and spliced in a HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Standring, D N; Venegas, A; Rutter, W J

    1981-01-01

    A cloned yeast tRNA3Leu gene containing a 33-base intervening sequence (IVS) is selectively transcribed by a soluble extract from HeLa cells. The 130-nucleotide tRNA3Leu precursor RNA formed is colinear with the gene and contains approximately 4 leader nucleotides and up to 9 trailer nucleotides. The IVS is accurately and efficiently removed by an endogenous HeLa excision-ligase activity to yield the spliced tRNA, the free IVS, and the half-tRNA intermediates. The splicing reaction occurs without prior 5' and 3' maturation of the precursor but, with this exception, this pattern of synthesis and subsequent maturation of the tRNA3Leu precursor conforms to the scheme for tRNA biosynthesis deduced for the xenopus system. Indeed, the two systems utilize similar or identical tRNA3Leu precursors. Our results stress the extraordinary conservation of tRNA biosynthesis in eukaryotes and demonstrate that a HeLa extract provides a useful system for investigating this process. Images PMID:6796956

  13. N-Terminal Protease Gene Phylogeny Reveals the Potential for Novel Cyanobactin Diversity in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Joana; Leão, Pedro N.; Ramos, Vitor; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobactins are a recently recognized group of ribosomal cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria, which have been studied because of their interesting biological activities. Here, we have used a PCR-based approach to detect the N-terminal protease (A) gene from cyanobactin synthetase gene clusters, in a set of diverse cyanobacteria from our culture collection (Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Genomics and Evolution (LEGE) CC). Homologues of this gene were found in Microcystis and Rivularia strains, and for the first time in Cuspidothrix, Phormidium and Sphaerospermopsis strains. Phylogenetic relationships inferred from available A-gene sequences, including those obtained in this work, revealed two new groups of phylotypes, harboring Phormidium, Sphaerospermopsis and Rivularia LEGE isolates. Thus, this study shows that, using underexplored cyanobacterial strains, it is still possible to expand the known genetic diversity of genes involved in cyanobactin biosynthesis. PMID:24351973

  14. Nucleotide sequence of the transcriptional initiation region of the yeast GAL7 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Nogi, Y; Fukasawa, T

    1983-01-01

    The GAL7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes Gal-1-P uridylyl transferase, the second enzyme of Leloir pathway for the galactose catabolism. We have determined the sequence of 1003 base pairs surrounding and upstream of the transcriptional initiation site of the GAL7 gene. The region sequenced also encompasses the 3' end of GAL10 gene. The 5' end of GAL7 mRNA was determined on the DNA sequence by the S1 nuclease- and exonuclease VII mapping, which is located 21 to 22 base pairs upstream from the translation initiating ATG codon. The primary structure of the GAL7 5' flanking region has many features common to those of multicellular eukaryotic genes. The 3' end of GAL10 mRNA was also determined by the mapping technique with the single-strand specific nucleases to be about 600 base pairs upstream from the 5' end of GAL7 mRNA. Images PMID:6324089

  15. A genome wide study in fission yeast reveals nine PPR proteins that regulate mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Inge; Dujeancourt, Laurent; Gaisne, Mauricette; Herbert, Christopher J; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are particularly numerous in plant mitochondria and chloroplasts, where they are involved in different steps of RNA metabolism, probably due to the repeated 35 amino acid PPR motifs that are thought to mediate interactions with RNA. In non-photosynthetic eukaryotes only a handful of PPR proteins exist, for example the human LRPPRC, which is involved in a mitochondrial disease. We have conducted a systematic study of the PPR proteins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and identified, in addition to the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, eight proteins all of which localized to the mitochondria, and showed some association with the membrane. The absence of all but one of these PPR proteins leads to a respiratory deficiency and modified patterns of steady state mt-mRNAs or newly synthesized mitochondrial proteins. Some cause a general defect, whereas others affect specific mitochondrial RNAs, either coding or non-coding: cox1, cox2, cox3, 15S rRNA, atp9 or atp6, sometimes leading to secondary defects. Interestingly, the two possible homologs of LRPPRC, ppr4 and ppr5, play opposite roles in the expression of the cox1 mt-mRNA, ppr4 being the first mRNA-specific translational activator identified in S. pombe, whereas ppr5 appears to be a general negative regulator of mitochondrial translation.

  16. Yeast prohormone processing enzyme (KEX2 gene product) is a Ca2+-dependent serine protease.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, R S; Brake, A; Thorner, J

    1989-01-01

    The KEX2-encoded endoprotease was overproduced in yeast several hundred-fold and further purified to achieve a 10,000-fold enrichment in specific activity. The enzyme was (i) membrane-bound, but solubilized by detergents; (ii) able to cleave peptide substrates at both Lys-Arg and Arg-Arg sites; (iii) inhibited by EDTA and EGTA (but not o-phenanthroline), but fully reactivated by Ca2+; (iv) unaffected by 5-10 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, N alpha-(ptosyl)lysine chloromethyl ketone, or L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, but inactivated by 1-2 microM Ala-Lys-Arg-chloromethyl ketone; (v) labeled specifically by 125I-labeled Tyr-Ala-Lys-Arg-chloromethyl ketone; and (vi) resistant to trans-epoxysuccinate compounds (which inactivate thiol proteases), but inactivated by diisopropyl fluorophosphate (a diagnostic serine protease inhibitor). Mutant enzyme molecules lacking as many as 200 C-terminal residues still retained Ca2+-dependent protease activity and were labeled by 125I-labeled Tyr-Ala-Lys-Arg-chloromethyl ketone. Images PMID:2646633

  17. Diversity of laccase-coding genes in Fusarium oxysporum genomes.

    PubMed

    Kwiatos, Natalia; Ryngajłło, Małgorzata; Bielecki, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies confirm laccase role in fungal pathogenicity and lignocellulose degradation. In spite of broad genomic research, laccases from plant wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum are still not characterized. The study aimed to identify F. oxysporum genes that may encode laccases sensu stricto and to characterize the proteins in silico in order to facilitate further research on their impact on the mentioned processes. Twelve sequenced F. oxysporum genomes available on Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT (2015) website were analyzed and three genes that may encode laccases sensu stricto were found. Their amino acid sequences possess all features essential for their catalytic activity, moreover, the homology models proved the characteristic 3D laccase structures. The study shades light on F. oxysporum as a new source of multicopper oxidases, enzymes with possible high redox potential and broad perspective in biotechnological applications.

  18. Arab gene geography: From population diversities to personalized medical genomics

    PubMed Central

    Tadmouri, Ghazi O.; Sastry, Konduru S.; Chouchane, Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    Genetic disorders are not equally distributed over the geography of the Arab region. While a number of disorders have a wide geographical presence encompassing 10 or more Arab countries, almost half of these disorders occur in a single Arab country or population. Nearly, one-third of the genetic disorders in Arabs result from congenital malformations and chromosomal abnormalities, which are also responsible for a significant proportion of neonatal and perinatal deaths in Arab populations. Strikingly, about two-thirds of these diseases in Arab patients follow an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. High fertility rates together with increased consanguineous marriages, generally noticed in Arab populations, tend to increase the rates of genetic and congenital abnormalities. Many of the nearly 500 genes studied in Arab people revealed striking spectra of heterogeneity with many novel and rare mutations causing large arrays of clinical outcomes. In this review we provided an overview of Arab gene geography, and various genetic abnormalities in Arab populations, including disorders of blood, metabolic, circulatory and neoplasm, and also discussed their associated molecules or genes responsible for the cause of these disorders. Although studying Arab-specific genetic disorders resulted in a high value knowledge base, approximately 35% of genetic diseases in Arabs do not have a defined molecular etiology. This is a clear indication that comprehensive research is required in this area to understand the molecular pathologies causing diseases in Arab populations. PMID:25780794

  19. Functional Metagenomics Reveals Previously Unrecognized Diversity of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Gulls

    PubMed Central

    Martiny, Adam C.; Martiny, Jennifer B. H.; Weihe, Claudia; Field, Andrew; Ellis, Julie C.

    2011-01-01

    Wildlife may facilitate the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) between human-dominated habitats and the surrounding environment. Here, we use functional metagenomics to survey the diversity and genomic context of AR genes in gulls. Using this approach, we found a variety of AR genes not previously detected in gulls and wildlife, including class A and C β-lactamases as well as six tetracycline resistance gene types. An analysis of the flanking sequences indicates that most of these genes are present in Enterobacteriaceae and various Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to finding known gene types, we detected 31 previously undescribed AR genes. These undescribed genes include one most similar to an uncharacterized gene in Verrucomicrobium and another to a putative DNA repair protein in Lactobacillus. Overall, the study more than doubled the number of clinically relevant AR gene types known to be carried by gulls or by wildlife in general. Together with the propensity of gulls to visit human-dominated habitats, this high diversity of AR gene types suggests that gulls could facilitate the spread of AR. PMID:22347872

  20. Residues required for phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α under diverse stress conditions are divergent between yeast and human

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mithu; Mitchell, Daniel; Merkulov, Sergei; Wu, Jing; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Snider, Martin D.; Krokowski, Dawid; Yee, Vivien C.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    PERK, PKR, HRI and GCN2 are the four mammalian kinases that phosphorylate the α subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) on Ser51. This phosphorylation event is conserved among many species and attenuates protein synthesis in response to diverse stress conditions. In contrast, Saccharmyces cerevisiae expresses only the GCN2 kinase. It was demonstrated previously in S. cerevisiae that single point mutations in eIF2α’s N-terminus severely impaired phosphorylation at Ser51. To assess whether similar recognition patterns are present in mammalian eIF2α, we expressed human eIF2α’s with these mutations in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and assessed their phosphorylation under diverse stress conditions. Some of the mutations prevented the stress-induced phosphorylation of eIF2α by all mammalian kinases, thus defining amino acid residues in eIF2α (Gly 30, Leu 50, and Asp 83) that are required for substrate recognition. We also identified residues that were less critical or not required for recognition by the mammalian kinases (Ala 31, Met 44, Lys 79, and Tyr 81), even though they were essential for recognition of the yeast eIF2α by GCN2. We propose that mammalian eIF2α kinases evolved to maximize their interactions with the evolutionarily conserved Ser51 residue of eIF2α in response to diverse stress conditions, thus adding to the complex signaling pathways that mammalian cells have over simpler organisms. PMID:25541374

  1. Genes, Diversity, and Geologic Process on the Pacific Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, David K.

    2004-05-01

    We examine the genetics of marine diversification along the West Coast of North America in relation to the Late Neogene geology and climate of the region. Trophically important components of the diverse West Coast fauna, including kelp, alcid birds (e.g., auks, puffins), salmon, rockfish, abalone, and Cancer crabs, appear to have radiated during peaks of upwelling primarily in the Late Miocene and in some cases secondarily in the Pleistocene. Phylogeographic barriers associated with Mio-Pliocene estuaries of the mid-California coast, the Pliocene opening of the Gulf of California, tectonic and eustatic evolution of the California Bight, as well as the influence of Pleistocene and Holocene climate change on genetic structure are assessed in a geologic context. Comparisons to East Coast and western freshwater systems, as well as upwelling systems around the globe, provide perspective for the survey.

  2. Effect of environmental stress on regulation of gene expression in the yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Eitan

    2015-07-01

    Several mathematical models have been proposed to predict the activation state of a transcription factor (TF) from the expression levels of its target genes. This inference problem is complicated however due to the fact that different genes may be regulated by different activation schemes (linear, exponential, sigmoidal, etc.). In addition to transcription regulation, the rate of gene expression at any instantaneous point in time is also determined by the independent rates of baseline production and degradation. Consequently, the set of solutions to any model equations describe an infinite number of trajectories in probability space, thus rendering the problem NP-hard. In the current study we used a Gaussian process (GP) approach to address this inverse problem. Experimental gene expression data were modeled by a putative linear activation scheme and discrepancy between theory and experiment was modeled by a GP. Model hyperparameters were calculated using maximum likelihood estimates to generate continuous TF state-space profiles. Identifiability of model parameters was optimized by obtaining TF state-space functions for multiple genes simultaneously. We found that model parameters were sensitive to environmental stress conditions, producing different state-space profiles for different stresses.

  3. Biovar diversity is reflected by variations of genes encoding urease of Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    Ruifu, Y; Minli, Z; Guo, Z; Wang, X

    1997-01-01

    Five oligonucleotide primers derived from the gene encoding urease of Ureaplasma urealyticum were designed to evaluate the relationship between the urease gene and biovar diversity of this organism. Five combinations of these primers were tested by PCR and the result revealed that there were variations in urease genes among different serovars of U. urealyticum. This result, in agreement with other PCRs based on other functionally unrelated (rRNA and MB antigen) genes, may reflect the phylogenetic relationship among organisms taxonomically classified as U. urealyticum.

  4. Structure-Function Analysis of Yeast Tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Luchniak, Anna; Fukuda, Yusuke; Gupta, Mohan L.

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules play essential roles in a wide variety of cellular processes including cell division, motility, and vesicular transport. Microtubule function depends on the polymerization dynamics of tubulin, and specific interactions between tubulin and diverse microtubule-associated proteins. To date, investigation of the structural and functional properties of tubulin and tubulin mutants has been limited by the inability to obtain functional protein from overexpression systems, and by the heterogeneous mixture of tubulin isotypes typically isolated from higher eukaryotes. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has emerged as a leading system for tubulin structure-function analysis. Yeast cells encode a single beta-tubulin gene and can be engineered to express just one, of two, alpha isotypes. Moreover, yeast allows site-directed modification of tubulin genes at the endogenous loci expressed under the native promoter and regulatory elements. These advantageous features provide a homogeneous and controlled environment for analysis of the functional consequences of specific mutations. Here we present techniques to generate site-specific tubulin mutations in diploid and haploid cells, assess the ability of the mutated protein to support cell viability, measure overall microtubule stability, and define changes in the specific parameters of microtubule dynamic instability. We also outline strategies to determine whether mutations disrupt interactions with microtubule-associated proteins. Microtubule-based functions in yeast are well defined, which allows the observed changes in microtubule properties to be related to the role of microtubules in specific cellular processes. PMID:23973083

  5. RAD25 (SSL2), the yeast homolog of the human xeroderma pigmentosum group B DNA repair gene, is essential for viability.

    PubMed

    Park, E; Guzder, S N; Koken, M H; Jaspers-Dekker, I; Weeda, G; Hoeijmakers, J H; Prakash, S; Prakash, L

    1992-12-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients are extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers, due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, and seven complementation groups, A-G, have been identified. Homologs of human excision repair genes ERCC1, XPDC/ERCC2, and XPAC have been identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Since no homolog of human XPBC/ERCC3 existed among the known yeast genes, we cloned the yeast homolog by using XPBC cDNA as a hybridization probe. The yeast homolog, RAD25 (SSL2), encodes a protein of 843 amino acids (M(r) 95,356). The RAD25 (SSL2)- and XPBC-encoded proteins share 55% identical and 72% conserved amino acid residues, and the two proteins resemble one another in containing the conserved DNA helicase sequence motifs. A nonsense mutation at codon 799 that deletes the 45 C-terminal amino acid residues in RAD25 (SSL2) confers UV sensitivity. This mutation shows epistasis with genes in the excision repair group, whereas a synergistic increase in UV sensitivity occurs when it is combined with mutations in genes in other DNA repair pathways, indicating that RAD25 (SSL2) functions in excision repair but not in other repair pathways. We also show that RAD25 (SSL2) is an essential gene. A mutation of the Lys392 residue to arginine in the conserved Walker type A nucleotide-binding motif is lethal, suggesting an essential role of the putative RAD25 (SSL2) ATPase/DNA helicase activity in viabi