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  1. Diverticulitis and diverticulosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... fiber foods include: Fruits, such as tangerines, prunes, apples, bananas, peaches, and pears Tender cooked vegetables, such ... Diverticulitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis secondary to diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Tatiana; Martín-Cuesta, Laura; Arnáiz, Javier; de Lucas, Enrique Marco; Pellón, Raúl; García-Bolado, Ana; González, Francisco

    2007-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, rapidly progressive infectious process primarily involving the fascia and the subcutaneous tissue, with thrombosis of the cutaneous microcirculation. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis secondary to diverticulitis in an immunosuppressed patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Trends in the surgical management of diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Wieghard, Nicole; Geltzeiler, Cristina B.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki L.

    2015-01-01

    Sigmoid diverticulitis is an increasingly common Western disease associated with a high morbidity and cost of treatment. Improvement in the understanding of the disease process, along with advances in the diagnosis and medical management has led to recent changes in treatment recommendations. The natural history of diverticulitis is more benign than previously thought, and current trends favor more conservative, less invasive management. Despite current recommendations of more restrictive indications for surgery, practice trends indicate an increase in elective operations being performed for the treatment of diverticulitis. Due to diversity in disease presentation, in many cases, optimal surgical treatment of acute diverticulitis remains unclear with regard to patient selection, timing, and technical approach in both elective and urgent settings. As a result, data is limited to mostly retrospective and non-randomized studies. This review addresses the current treatment recommendations for surgical management of diverticulitis, highlighting technical aspects and patterns of care. PMID:25608492

  4. Bladder diverticulitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Michael; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Bladder diverticulum, an outpouching of the mucosa through the muscular wall of the bladder, is a multifactorial disease process that can be either acquired or congenital. Although small diverticuli are usually asymptomatic, a large diverticulum may result in hematuria, urinary tract infection, acute abdomen due to its rupture, acute urinary retention, or neoplasm formation. We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and was ultimately diagnosed with bladder diverticulitis, a disease not previously described in the literature.

  5. Transverse Colon Diverticulitis with Calcified Fecalith

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Solak, Ilhami; Genç, Berhan; Sahin, Neslin; Yalaz, Seyhan

    2013-01-01

    Left colonic diverticula are common in Western populations, whereas right colonic diverticulosis primarily occurs in Oriental populations. Diverticulitis of the transverse colon is very rare, with very few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of transverse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone in a 69-year-old female. This was a solitary diverticulum. The signs and symptoms of the disease are similar to acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings of a patient with trans-verse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone. PMID:25610254

  6. [Synchronous diverticulitis: a case report.].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Argáiz, R; Rodríguez-Zentner, H A; Tapia, H; González-Contreras, Q H

    2010-01-01

    Diverticular colonic disease is not as common in developing nations as in western and industrialized societies, accounting for approximately 130 000 hospitalizations per year in the United States, being diverticulitis the most frequent complication. Synchronous presentation of this complication is very rare, with only one case reported in literature. We present a patient who presented with diffuse abdominal pain. Colonoscopy was performed identifying a mass in the sigmoid colon and a perforation in the cecum. Patient underwent total abdominal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis and protective loop ileostomy. Histopathologic examination revealed synchronous complicated diverticular disease of the sigmoid and cecum. In this report we disclose this type of atypical presentation of diverticular disease and establish that the approach taken is safe and feasible.

  7. Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is found in more than half of Americans over age 60. However, no one knows exactly what causes the pouches to form. Eating a low-fiber diet mostly made up of processed foods may be a cause. Constipation and hard stools are more likely when you do not ...

  8. Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms improve, you can gradually add solid food to your diet. An over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). This treatment is successful in 70 to 100 percent of people with ...

  9. Emergency Surgery for Acute Complicated Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal treatment of acute complicated diverticulitis is a matter of debate and has undergone significant changes. Currently, the main focus of surgical treatment concepts is on controlling the emergency situation triggered by acute complicated sigmoid diverticulitis through interventional and minimally invasive measures. Methods This article presents the current data and recommendations on differentiated treatment of acute complicated sigmoid diverticulitis, which are also summarized in a decision tree. Results In general, resection of the diverticular sigmoid is needed to treat acute complicated sigmoid diverticulitis, because without resection the recurrence rate is too high at 40%. Since the morbidity and mortality rates associated with emergency resection are extremely high, resulting in the creation of a stoma, efforts are made to control the acute situation through interventional and laparoscopic measures. Therefore, pericolic and pelvic abscesses (Hinchey stages I, II) are eliminated through percutaneous or laparoscopic drainage. Likewise, laparoscopic lavage and drainage are performed for purulent and feculent peritonitis (Hinchey stages III, IV). After elimination of the acute septic situation, interval elective sigmoid resection is conducted. If emergency resection cannot be avoided, it is performed, while taking account of the patient's overall condition, with primary anastomosis and a protective stoma or as discontinuity resection using Hartmann's procedure. Conclusion Thanks to the progress made in interventional and laparoscopic treatment, differentiated concepts are now used to treat acute complicated sigmoid diverticulitis. PMID:26989380

  10. Diverticulitis Diet: Can Certain Foods Trigger an Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/diverticulosis-diverticulitis/Pages/all-content.aspx. Accessed Aug. 26, 2016. Boynton W, et al. New strategies for the management of diverticular disease: ...

  11. Position paper: management of perforated sigmoid diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over the last three decades, emergency surgery for perforated sigmoid diverticulitis has evolved dramatically but remains controversial. Diverticulitis is categorized as uncomplicated (amenable to outpatient treatment) versus complicated (requiring hospitalization). Patients with complicated diverticulitis undergo computerized tomography (CT) scanning and the CT findings are used categorize the severity of disease. Treatment of stage I (phlegmon with or without small abscess) and stage II (phlegmon with large abscess) diverticulitis (which includes bowel rest, intravenous antibiotics and percutaneous drainage (PCD) of the larger abscesses) has not changed much over last two decades. On the other hand, treatment of stage III (purulent peritonitis) and stage IV (feculent peritonitis) diverticulitis has evolved dramatically and remains morbid. In the 1980s a two stage procedure (1st - segmental sigmoid resection with end colostomy and 2nd - colostomy closure after three to six months) was standard of care for most general surgeons. However, it was recognized that half of these patients never had their colostomy reversed and that colostomy closure was a morbid procedure. As a result starting in the 1990s colorectal surgical specialists increasing performed a one stage primary resection anastomosis (PRA) and demonstrated similar outcomes to the two stage procedure. In the mid 2000s, the colorectal surgeons promoted this as standard of care. But unfortunately despite advances in perioperative care and their excellent surgical skills, PRA for stage III/IV diverticulitis continued to have a high mortality (10-15%). The survivors require prolonged hospital stays and often do not fully recover. Recent case series indicate that a substantial portion of the patients who previously were subjected to emergency sigmoid colectomy can be successfully treated with less invasive nonoperative management with salvage PCD and/or laparoscopic lavage and drainage. These patients

  12. [Sigmoid diverticulitis in adolescent. Case report].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Salazar, Carlos; Orozco-Tapia, Luis Manuel; de la Concha Blankenagel, Erika; Gallardo-Ramírez, Mario Alberto; Blas-Franco, Miguel; Cárdenas-Lailson, Luis Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: la enfermedad diverticular colónica en niños y adolescentes es poco frecuente y sólo existen reportes de casos aislados en la bibliografía. La mayoría de los casos reportados se asocian con divertículos verdaderos congénitos y enfermedades genéticas de producción de la colágena. Caso clínico: paciente femenina de 13 años de edad, que ingresó a la División de Cirugía General y Endoscópica con diagnóstico de apendicitis aguda complicada. En la laparotomía se encontró enfermedad diverticular complicada de colon sigmoides. Se le practicó sigmoidectomía y colorrecto-anastomosis. El reporte histopatológico evidenció perforación de pseudodivertículo de colon sigmoides y peritonitis. La paciente fue dada de alta del hospital 72 horas posteriores a la cirugía, sin complicaciones. Conclusión: existen sólo reportes de casos aislados de niños y adolescentes con diverticulitis colónica, y su etiología no ha sido aún debidamente establecida. Esta paciente tuvo diverticulitis de sigmoides, similar a la enfermedad en adultos, sin padecimientos genéticos concomitantes. El caso es una excepción a lo reportado en la bibliografía de las diverticulitis en niños y adolescentes.

  13. Logical hypothesis: Low FODMAP diet to prevent diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Yoshiharu; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    Despite little evidence for the therapeutic benefits of a high-fiber diet for diverticulitis, it is commonly recommended as part of the clinical management. The ongoing uncertainty of the cause(s) of diverticulitis confounds attempts to determine the validity of this therapy. However, the features of a high-fiber diet represent a logical contradiction for colon diverticulitis. Considering that Bernoulli’s principle, by which enlarged diameter of the lumen leads to increased pressure and decreased fluid velocity, might contribute to development of the diverticulum. Thus, theoretically, prevention of high pressure in the colon would be important and adoption of a low FODMAP diet (consisting of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) may help prevent recurrence of diverticulitis. PMID:27867683

  14. Logical hypothesis: Low FODMAP diet to prevent diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yoshiharu; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C

    2016-11-06

    Despite little evidence for the therapeutic benefits of a high-fiber diet for diverticulitis, it is commonly recommended as part of the clinical management. The ongoing uncertainty of the cause(s) of diverticulitis confounds attempts to determine the validity of this therapy. However, the features of a high-fiber diet represent a logical contradiction for colon diverticulitis. Considering that Bernoulli's principle, by which enlarged diameter of the lumen leads to increased pressure and decreased fluid velocity, might contribute to development of the diverticulum. Thus, theoretically, prevention of high pressure in the colon would be important and adoption of a low FODMAP diet (consisting of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) may help prevent recurrence of diverticulitis.

  15. Changing paradigms in the management of diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Horesh, Nir; Wasserberg, Nir; Zbar, Andrew P; Gravetz, Aviad; Berger, Yaniv; Gutman, Mordechai; Rosin, Danny; Zmora, Oded

    2016-09-01

    The management of diverticular disease has evolved in the last few decades from a structured therapeutic approach including operative management in almost all cases to a variety of medical and surgical approaches leading to a more individualized strategy. There is an ongoing debate among surgeons about the surgical management of diverticular disease, questioning not only the surgical procedure of choice, but also about who should be operated and the timing of surgery, both in complicated and uncomplicated diverticular disease. This article reviews the current treatment of diverticulitis, with a focus on the indications and methods of surgery in both the emergency and elective settings. Further investigation with good clinical data is needed for the establishment of clear guidelines.

  16. Safety of Nonoperative Management After Acute Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Amoza Pais, Sonia; Batlle Marin, Xavi; Oronoz Martinez, Begoña; Balen Ribera, Enrique; Yarnoz Irazabal, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The role of surgery in the management of diverticular disease after an episode of acute diverticulitis (AD) managed in a conservative form is evolving. Age, number of episodes of AD, type of episode, and symptoms after the episodes are factors related to the need for elective surgery. The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety of conservative management and the risk factors for emergency surgery after a first episode of AD managed without surgery. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 405 patients diagnosed as having had a first episode of AD. Sixty-nine patients underwent emergency surgery on the first admission, and 69 patients had an elective operation in the follow-up (group A). The remaining 267 patients were managed initially without surgery (group B). Thirteen of these 267 patients needed a further urgent surgical procedure. Factors involved in the decision of elective surgery and the probability of emergency surgery after the first episode of AD managed without surgery were evaluated in relation to demographic factors, risk factors, presence of recurrences, and type of the first episode. Results Patients, mean age was 62.7 years, 71 were aged less than 51, and 151 were males. The mean follow-up for patients with nonoperative management was 91.2 months. An elective operation was performed in 69 patients. Compared to patients in group B, those in group A more frequently had a first episode of complicated acute diverticulitis (CAD) (37.1% vs. 16.4%; P = 0.000) and were more likely to be smokers (46.3% vs. 19.3%; P = 0.000) and to suffer more than one episode of AD (42% vs. 26.9%; P = 0.027). Nonoperative management was chosen for 267 patients, but 13 patients needed an emergency operation later. In the multivariate analysis, we found a significant relation between the presence of CAD in the first episode and the need for emergency surgery. There were no differences in surgical mortality between the patients in the two groups, but patients treated

  17. [Management of liver abscess formed after asymptomatic sigmoid diverticulitis].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Predrag; Zerem, Enver; Zildzić, Muharem

    2007-01-01

    Liver abscess is a rare complication of sigmoid diverticulitis and must be considered within the differential diagnosis. We report a case of a male patient, age 71, admitted to our hospital with chief complaints of a dull pain in upper right abdominal quadrant, fever and weakness of approximately 5 months duration. He had a history of a surgery 18 years ago after an episode of diverticulitis. Physical examination and biochemistry on initial work-up revealed tenderness on palpation in upper right abdomen, leukocytosis and a 39 degrees C fever. Ultrasound examination revealed round structure with low echo properties in the right lobe of the liver. Further CT scan examination confirmed an abscess collection. We performed ultrasound guided percutaneous catheter drainage with intravenous administration of broad spectrum antibiotics, resulting in a successful treatment of a liver abscess. Colonoscopy confirmed sigmoid diverticulitis which was the most likely the source of bacterial invasion through portal venous system.

  18. [Acute Meckel's diverticulitis perforated by a foreign body].

    PubMed

    Pahomeanu, M; Anghelide, A; Mandache, F

    1976-01-01

    The authors present the case of a patient with acute, right iliac fossa abdominal syndrome, simulating acute apendicitis. In the course of the intervention it was noted that the syndrome was determined by an acute Meckel diverticulitis, perforated by a foreign body (fish bone). In view of making the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis, that cannot be assessed before surgery, the importance is stressed of the correlation of the clinical aspects with the apendicular lesions found in the course of the operation, and, when there is no satisfactory concordance, careful checking of the cecum becomes necessary, as well as of the right annexe and of the ileon over at least three feet.

  19. [Diverticulitis and indication for surgery--are there new data?].

    PubMed

    Weimann, A; Hirsch, W D; Schiefke, I

    2013-12-01

    The treatment in acute diverticulitis has undergone a considerable shift from an offensive to a more restrictive and individual indication for surgery. This review of the very recent literature with special regard to long-term observation of conservatively treated patients clearly shows that surgery is not required in any case of a first episode of severe diverticulitis, but should be recommended in high-risk patients under immunosuppression or chronic renal failure. In all other groups of patients the indication for surgery should be weighed on an individual basis after each episode, again aiming for the laparoscopic procedure. A therapeutic algorithm is proposed according to the Hansen-Stock classification.

  20. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  1. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... of All Topics All Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. French (français) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Ukrainian (Українська) ...

  2. National complicated acute diverticulitis (CADS) study: a protocol for a prospective observational scoping study for acute diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Shafaque

    2016-01-01

    Background Diverticular disease is a widely prevalent disease in western society, and acute diverticulitis is a common acute surgical presentation. However, there is a lack of level 1 evidence addressing the multifaceted presentations associated with acute diverticulitis. There is also a lack of robust epidemiological data that could be used to meaningfully inform randomised controlled trials. The National CADS project aims to generate baseline data for a cohort of patients managed for clinically suspected acute diverticulitis and evaluate the impact of variability in the management approach on patient outcomes in the short (3 months) and long (2 years) term. Method A Unit policy questionnaire will be completed by the principal investigator from all participating centres prior to study initiation. All patients aged above 18 years admitted with clinical suspicion of acute diverticulitis will be included from UK hospitals providing acute surgical care. Demographic, clinical, inpatient stay and outpatient follow-up data will be collected for index admissions between July and September 2014, 3 months follow-up and finally a 2-year follow-up. Results The study attracted participation from 108 centres nationally and has so far generated data on 2500 patients admitted between 1 July 2014 and 30 September 2014. Short-term follow-up data have been obtained for this cohort. Conclusions The National CADS study is currently ongoing with the long-term outcomes data anticipated to be submitted in autumn of 2016. PMID:27957337

  3. Colouterine fistula complicating diverticulitis diagnosed at hysteroscopy: case report.

    PubMed

    Mandato, Vincenzo Dario; Abrate, Martino; Sandonà, Francesco; Costagliola, Luigi; Gastaldi, Alfredo; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2012-01-01

    Since Noecker first reported a colouterine fistula secondary to diverticulitis in 1929, about 20 cases have been reported in the literature. Methods for diagnosis have yet to be established. Herein we report the first case of a colouterine fistula at the level of the isthmus diagnosed at hysteroscopy. Diagnostic hysteroscopy enabled rapid diagnosis of the colouterine fistula. Diagnostic hysteroscopy is the first-choice diagnostic tool for investigation of any abnormal vaginal discharge such as blood or stool because it enables direct vision and biopsy of the lesions of the lower genital tract quickly and at low cost.

  4. WSES Guidelines for the management of acute left sided colonic diverticulitis in the emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Ansaloni, Luca; Coccolini, Federico; Griffiths, Ewen A; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Di Saverio, Salomone; Ulrych, Jan; Kluger, Yoram; Ben-Ishay, Ofir; Moore, Frederick A; Ivatury, Rao R; Coimbra, Raul; Peitzman, Andrew B; Leppaniemi, Ari; Fraga, Gustavo P; Maier, Ronald V; Chiara, Osvaldo; Kashuk, Jeffry; Sakakushev, Boris; Weber, Dieter G; Latifi, Rifat; Biffl, Walter; Bala, Miklosh; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Inaba, Kenji; Ordonez, Carlos A; Hecker, Andreas; Augustin, Goran; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Melo, Renato Bessa; Marwah, Sanjay; Zachariah, Sanoop K; Shelat, Vishal G; McFarlane, Michael; Rems, Miran; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Faro, Mario Paulo; Júnior, Gerson Alves Pereira; Negoi, Ionut; Cui, Yunfeng; Sato, Norio; Vereczkei, Andras; Bellanova, Giovanni; Birindelli, Arianna; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Kok, Kenneth Y; Gachabayov, Mahir; Gkiokas, Georgios; Bouliaris, Konstantinos; Çolak, Elif; Isik, Arda; Rios-Cruz, Daniel; Soto, Rodolfo; Moore, Ernest E

    2016-01-01

    Acute left sided colonic diverticulitis is one of the most common clinical conditions encountered by surgeons in acute setting. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference on acute diverticulitis was held during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES in Jerusalem, Israel, on July 7th, 2015. During this consensus conference the guidelines for the management of acute left sided colonic diverticulitis in the emergency setting were presented and discussed. This document represents the executive summary of the final guidelines approved by the consensus conference.

  5. A Case of Colovesical Fistula Induced by Sigmoid Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hwa-Yeon; Sun, Woo-Young; Lee, Taek-Gu

    2011-01-01

    Colonic diverticulosis has continuously increased, noticeably left-sided diseases, in Korea. A colovesical fistula is an uncommon complication of diverticulitis, and its most common cause is diverticular disease. Confirmation of its presence generally depends on clinical findings, such as pneumaturia and fecaluria. The primary aim of a diagnostic workup is not to observe the fistular tract itself but to find the etiology of the disease so that an appropriate therapy can be initiated. We present here the case of a 79-year-old man complaining of pneumaturia and fecaluria. On abdomen and pelvis CT, the patient was diagnosed as having a colovesical fistula due to sigmoid diverticulitis. After division of the adhesion between the sigmoid colon and the bladder, the defect of the bladder wall was repaired by simple closure. The colonic defect was treated with a segmental resection, including the rectosigmoid junction. The patient is doing well at 6 months after the operation and shows no evidence of recurrence of the fistula. PMID:21602969

  6. Acute left-sided colonic diverticulitis: clinical expressions, therapeutic insights, and role of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosetti, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach of patients with suspected acute diverticulitis remains debated. On the one hand, a scoring system with the best predictive value in diagnosing acute diverticulitis has been developed in order to reduce the use of computed tomography (CT) scan, while, on the other hand, patients with a high probability of acute diverticulitis should benefit from CT scan from a clinical viewpoint, ensuring that they will receive the most appropriate treatment. The place and classification of CT scan for acute diverticulitis need to be reassessed. If the management of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis, abscess, and fecal peritonitis is now well codified, urgent surgical or medical treatment of hemodynamically stable patients presenting with intraperitoneal air or fluid without uncontrolled sepsis is still under discussion. Furthermore, the indications for laparoscopic lavage are not yet well established. It is known for years that episode(s) of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis may induce painful recurrent bowel symptoms, known as symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease and irritable bowel syndrome-like diverticular disease. These two clinical expressions of diverticular disease, that may darken quality of life, are treated medically aimed at symptom relief. The possible place of surgery should be discussed. Clinical and CT scan classifications should be separated entities. PMID:27574459

  7. Lemmel Syndrome Secondary to Duodenal Diverticulitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wermers, Joshua D; Beteselassie, Nebiyu

    2017-01-01

    Lemmel syndrome occurs when a duodenal diverticulum causes obstructive jaundice due to a mechanical obstruction of the common bile duct. Additional pathophysiologic processes may also contribute to the development of Lemmel syndrome. These include duodenal diverticula causing dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi as well as compression of the common bile duct by duodenal diverticula. It is uncommon for duodenal diverticulum to become inflamed. We report the case of a 25-year-old female presenting with unintentional weight loss and fatigue. Since her initial labs were concerning for possible infection with hepatobiliary abnormalities, a contrast-enhanced CT was obtained. This study revealed a large periampullary diverticulum with mucosal enhancement and fat stranding consistent with diverticulitis.

  8. Meckel's diverticulitis: a rare entity of Meckel's diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chee S.; Dupley, Leanne; Varia, Haren N.; Golka, Darek; Linn, Thu

    2017-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the small intestine that results from incomplete closure of the vitelline (omphalo-mesenteric) duct. This true diverticulum, ~2 ft from the ileocecal valve commonly found on the anti-mesenteric border of the ileum, is benign and majority asymptomatic. Diagnosis challenges arise when it became inflamed or presented in following ways, for example, haemorrhage (caused by ectopic pepsin—and hydrochloric acid—secreting gastric mucosa), intestinal obstruction (secondary to intussusception or volvulus) or the presence of diverticulum in the hernia sac (Littre's hernia). We report a case of a 59-year-old male who was admitted under the surgical service at Blackpool Victoria Hospital with suspected appendicitis that turned out to be a Meckel's diverticulitis, a rare presentation of an acute abdomen. We discuss the issues involved in his investigation and management as well as perform a literature review comparing different surgical approaches. PMID:28064243

  9. The Impact of Elective Colon Resection on Rates of Emergency Surgery for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Simianu, Vlad V; Strate, Lisa; Billingham, Richard P; Fichera, Alessandro; Steele, Scott R; Thirlby, Richard C; Flum, David R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of elective colectomy on emergency diverticulitis surgery at the population level. Summary Background Data Current recommendations suggest avoiding elective colon resection for uncomplicated diverticulitis because of uncertain effectiveness at reducing recurrence and emergency surgery. The influence of these recommendations on use of elective colectomy or rates of emergency surgery remains undetermined. Methods A retrospective cohort study using a statewide hospital discharge database identified all patients admitted for diverticulitis in Washington State (1987–2012). Sex and age-adjusted rates (standardized to the 2000 state census) of admissions, elective and emergency/urgent surgical and percutaneous interventions for diverticulitis were calculated and temporal changes assessed. Results 84,313 patients (mean age 63.3 years and 58.9% female) were hospitalized for diverticulitis (72.2% emergent/urgent). Elective colectomy increased from 7.9 to 17.2/100,000 people (p<0.001), rising fastest since 2000. Emergency/urgent colectomy increased from 7.1 to 10.2 per 100,000 (p<0.001), non-elective percutaneous interventions increased from 0.1 to 3.7 per 100,000 (p=0.04) and the frequency of emergency/urgent admissions (with or without a resection) increased from 34.0 to 85.0 per 100,000 (p<0.001). In 2012, 47.5% of elective resections were performed laparoscopically compared to 17.5% in 2008 (when the code was introduced). Conclusions The elective colectomy rate for diverticulitis more than doubled, without a decrease in emergency surgery, percutaneous interventions or admissions for diverticulitis. This may reflect changes in thresholds for elective surgery and/or an increase in the frequency or severity of the disease. These trends do not support the practice of elective colectomy to prevent emergency surgery. PMID:26111203

  10. Diverticulitis in immunosuppressed patients: A fatal outcome requiring a new approach?

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Andreas; Kratzer, Theresa; Kafka-Ritsch, Reinhold; Braunwarth, Eva; Denecke, Christian; Weiss, Sascha; Atanasov, Georgi; Sucher, Robert; Biebl, Matthias; Aigner, Felix; Pratschke, Johann; Öllinger, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of diverticulitis in immunosuppressed patients are more challenging than in immunocompetent patients, as maintenance immunosuppressive therapies may mask symptoms or impair the patient’s ability to counteract the local and systemic infective sequelae of diverticulitis. The purpose of this study was to compare the in-hospital mortality and morbidity due to diverticulitis in immunosuppressed and immunocompetent patients and identify risk factors for lethal outcomes. Methods This retrospective study included consecutive in-patients who received treatment for colonic diverticulitis at our institution between April 2008 and April 2014. Patients were divided into immunocompetent and immunosuppressed groups. Primary end points were mortality and morbidity during treatment. Risk factors for death were evaluated. Results Of the 227 patients included, 15 (6.6%) were on immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation, autoimmune disease, or cerebral metastasis. Thirteen of them experienced colonic perforation and showed higher morbidity (p = 0.039). Immunosuppressed patients showed longer stays in hospital (27.6 v. 14.5 d, p = 0.016) and in the intensive care unit (9.8 v. 1.1 d, p < 0.001), a higher rate of emergency operations (66% v. 29.2%, p = 0.004), and higher in-hospital mortality (20% v. 4.7%, p = 0.045). Age, perforated diverticulitis with diffuse peritonitis, emergency operation, C-reactive protein > 20 mg/dL, and immunosuppressive therapy were significant predictors of death. Age (hazard ratio [HR] 2.57, p = 0.008) and emergency operation (HR 3.03, p = 0.003) remained significant after multivariate analysis. Conclusion Morbidity and mortality due to sigmoid diverticulitis is significantly higher in immunosuppressed patients. Early diagnosis and treatment considering elective sigmoid resection for patients with former episodes of diverticulitis who are wait-listed for transplant is crucial to prevent death. PMID:27240131

  11. Role of Damage Control Surgery in the Treatment of Hinchey III and IV Sigmoid Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; Cavaliere, Davide; Farinella, Eriberto; Renzi, Claudio; Cannata, Gaspare; Desiderio, Jacopo; Farinacci, Federico; Barberini, Francesco; Trastulli, Stefano; Parisi, Amilcare; Fingerhut, Abe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Many of the treatment strategies for sigmoid diverticulitis are actually focusing on nonoperative and minimally invasive approaches. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the actual role of damage control surgery (DCS) in the treatment of generalized peritonitis caused by perforated sigmoid diverticulitis. A literature search was performed in PubMed and Google Scholar for articles published from 1960 to July 2013. Comparative and noncomparative studies that included patients who underwent DCS for complicated diverticulitis were considered. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score, duration of open abdomen, intensive care unit length of stay, reoperation, bowel resection performed at first operation, fecal diversion, method, and timing of closure of abdominal wall were the main outcomes of interest. According to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses algorithm for the literature search and review, 10 studies were included in this systematic review. DCS was exclusively performed in diverticulitis patients with septic shock or requiring vasopressors intraoperatively. Two surgical different approaches were highlighted: limited resection of the diseased colonic segment with or without stoma or reconstruction in situ, and laparoscopic washing and drainage without colonic resection. Despite the heterogeneity of patient groups, clinical settings, and interventions included in this review, DCS appears to be a promising strategy for the treatment of Hinchey III and IV diverticulitis, complicated by septic shock. A tailored approach to each patient seems to be appropriate. PMID:25437034

  12. Rethinking elective colectomy for diverticulitis: A strategic approach to population health

    PubMed Central

    Simianu, Vlad V; Flum, David R

    2014-01-01

    Diverticulitis is one of the leading indications for elective colon resection. Surgeons are trained to offer elective operations after a few episodes of diverticulitis in order to prevent future recurrences and potential emergency. However, most emergency surgery happens during the initial presentation. After recovery from an episode, much of the subsequent management of diverticulitis occurs in the outpatient setting, rendering inpatient “episode counting” a poor measure of the severity or burden of disease. Evidence also suggests that the risk of recurrence of diverticulitis is small and similar with or without an operation. Accordingly, contemporary evaluations of the epidemiologic patterns of treatments for diverticulitis have failed to demonstrate that the substantial rise in elective surgery over the last few decades has been successful at preventing emergency surgery at a population level. Multiple professional societies are calling to “individualize” decisions for elective colectomy and there is an international focus on “appropriate” indications for surgery. The rethinking of elective colectomy should come from a patient-centered approach that considers the risks of recurrence, quality of life, patient wishes and experiences about surgical and medical treatment options as well as operative morbidity and risks. PMID:25469029

  13. Management of Complications Following Emergency and Elective Surgery for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Holmer, Christoph; Kreis, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical spectrum of sigmoid diverticulitis (SD) varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications. Sigmoid colectomy with restoration of continuity has been the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent SD, and is often performed as a laparoscopy-assisted procedure. For elective sigmoid colectomy, the postoperative morbidity rate is 15-20% whereas morbidity rates reach up to 30% in patients who undergo emergency surgery for perforated SD. Some of the more common and serious surgical complications after sigmoid colectomy are anastomotic leaks and peritonitis, wound infections, small bowel obstruction, postoperative bleeding, and injuries to the urinary tract structures. Regarding the management of complications, it makes no difference whether the complication is a result of an emergency or an elective procedure. Methods The present work gives an overview of the management of complications in the surgical treatment of SD based on the current literature. Results To achieve successful management, early diagnosis is mandatory in cases of deviation from the normal postoperative course. If diagnostic procedures fail to deliver a correlate for the clinical situation of the patient, re-laparotomy or re-laparoscopy still remain among the most important diagnostic and/or therapeutic principles in visceral surgery when a patient's clinical status deteriorates. Conclusion The ability to recognize and successfully manage complications is a crucial part of the surgical treatment of diverticular disease and should be mastered by any surgeon qualified in this field. PMID:26989382

  14. The place of elective surgery following acute diverticulitis in young patients: when is surgery indicated? An analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Janes, Simon; Meagher, Alan; Faragher, Ian G; Shedda, Susan; Frizelle, Frank A

    2009-05-01

    Diverticulitis in the young is often regarded as a specific entity. Resection after a single attack because of a more "virulent" course of the disease has been accepted as conventional wisdom. The evidence for such a recommendation and the place of elective surgery was reviewed by a search of Medline, PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane library for articles published between January 1965 and March 2008 using the terms diverticular disease and diverticulitis. Publications had to give specific information on at least ten younger patients (age diverticulitis. Previous studies have shown misclassification and selection bias. As a result leading to a bias for more severe cases to be recognized mild cases may not be included. Young patients appear more likely to undergo operations to resolve an uncertain diagnosis. Recent studies have raised doubts about a virulent course with diverticulitis suggesting that recurrence may be associated with disease severity on CT scan, and supporting a conservative approach to diverticular disease. The diagnosis of diverticulitis is often delayed in younger patients because it is not considered, resulting in presenting cases being found at surgery or appearing more severe and more likely to be complicated. There is a lack of evidence to support the hypothesis that elective surgery should follow a single attack of diverticulitis. Any increased risk appears be a chronologic rather than pathologic phenomenon. Most patients will not have further episodes of diverticulitis.

  15. Flare-Up Diverticulitis in the Terminal Ileum in Short Interval after Conservative Therapy: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Kensuke; Okada, Shinichiro; Matsumoto, Risa; Komuro, Hiroyasu; Iida, Maki; Tsujimoto, Shiro; Suganuma, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Diverticulitis in the terminal ileum is uncommon. Past reports suggested that conservative therapy may be feasible to treat terminal ileum diverticulitis without perforation; however, there is no consensus on the therapeutic strategy for small bowel diverticulitis. We present a 37-year-old man who was referred to our hospital for sudden onset of abdominal pain and nausea. He was diagnosed with diverticulitis in the terminal ileum by computed tomography (CT). Tazobactam/piperacillin hydrate (18 g/day) was administered. The antibiotic treatment was maintained for 7 days, and the symptoms disappeared after the treatment. Thirty-eight days after antibiotic therapy, he noticed severe abdominal pain again. He was diagnosed with diverticulitis in terminal ileum which was flare-up of inflammation. He was given antibiotic therapy again. Nine days after antibiotic therapy, laparoscopy assisted right hemicolectomy and resection of 20 cm of terminal ileum were performed. Histopathology report confirmed multiple ileal diverticulitis. He was discharged from our hospital 12 days after the surgery. Colonoscopy was performed two months after the surgery and it revealed no finding suggesting inflammatory bowel disease. Surgical treatment should be taken into account as a potential treatment option to manage the diverticulitis in the terminal ileum even though it is not perforated. PMID:28097035

  16. Validation of a grading system for complicated diverticulitis in the prediction of need for operative or percutaneous intervention

    PubMed Central

    Fung, AKY; Ahmeidat, H; McAteer, D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The current surgical management of acute complicated diverticulitis has seen a major paradigm shift from routine operative intervention to a more conservative approach. This has been made possible by the widespread availability of computed tomography (CT) to enable stratification of the disease severity of acute complicated diverticulitis. The aim of this study was to retrospectively validate a CT grading system for acute complicated diverticulitis in the prediction of the need for operative or percutaneous intervention. Methods Hospital and radiology records were reviewed to identify patients with acute complicated diverticulitis confirmed by CT. A consultant gastrointestinal radiologist, blinded to the clinical outcomes of patients, assigned a score according to the CT grading system. Results Three hundred and sixty-seven patients (34.6%) had CT performed for acute diverticulitis during the study period. Forty-four patients (12.0%) had acute complicated diverticulitis (abscess and/or free intraperitoneal air) confirmed on CT. There were 22 women (50%) and the overall median age was 59 years (range: 19–92 years). According to the CT findings, there was one case with grade 1, eighteen patients with grade 2, four with grade 3 and twenty-one with grade 4 diverticulitis. Three patients with grade 2, three patients with grade 3 and ten patients with grade 4 disease underwent acute radiological or surgical intervention. Conclusions The use of a CT grading system for acute complicated diverticulitis did not predict the need for acute radiological or operative intervention in this small study. Decision making guided by the patient’s clinical condition still retains a primary role in the management of acute complicated diverticulitis. PMID:26263806

  17. Recurrences and Ongoing Complaints of Diverticulitis; Results of a Survey among Gastroenterologists and Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Stam, M.A.W.; Draaisma, W.A.; Consten, E.C.J.; Broeders, I.A.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to investigate the current opinion of gastroenterologists and surgeons on treatment strategies for patients, with recurrences or ongoing complaints of diverticulitis. Background Treatment of recurrences and ongoing complaints remains a point of debate. No randomized trials have been published yet and guidelines are not uniform in their advice. Design A web-based survey was conducted among gastroenterologists and GE-surgeons. Questions were aimed at the treatment options for recurrent diverticulitis and ongoing complaints. Results In total, 123 surveys were filled out. The number of patients with recurrent or ongoing diverticulitis who were seen at the outpatient clinic each year was 7 (0-30) and 5 (0-115) respectively. Surgeons see significantly more patients on an annual basis 20 vs. 15% (p = 0.00). Both surgeons and gastroenterologists preferred to treat patients in a conservative manner using pain medication and lifestyle advise (64.4 vs. 54.0, p = 0.27); however, gastroenterologists would treat patients with mesalazine medication, which is significantly more (28%, p = 0.04) than in the surgical group. Surgeons are inclined more towards surgery (31.5%, p = 0.02). Conclusions Both surgeons and gastroenterologists prefer to treat recurrent diverticulitis and ongoing complaints in a conservative manner. Quality of life, the risk of complications and the viewpoint of the patient are considered important factors in the decision to resect the affected colon. PMID:26889879

  18. Jejunal Diverticulosis Presented with Acute Abdomen and Diverticulitis Complication: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fidan, Nurdan; Mermi, Esra Ummuhan; Acay, Mehtap Beker; Murat, Muammer; Zobaci, Ethem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare, usually asymptomatic disease. Its incidence increases with age. If symptomatic, diverticulosis may cause life-threatening acute complications such as diverticulitis, perforation, intestinal hemorrhage and obstruction. In this report, we aimed to present a 67-year-old male patient with jejunal diverticulitis accompanying with abdominal pain and vomiting. Case Report A 67-year-old male patient complaining of epigastric pain for a week and nausea and fever for a day presented to our emergency department. Ultrasonographic examination in our clinic revealed diverticulum-like images with thickened walls adjacent to the small intestine loops, and increase in the echogenicity of the surrounding mesenteric fat tissue. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography showed multiple diverticula, thickened walls with showing contrast enhancement and adjacent jejunum in the left middle quadrant, increased density of the surrounding mesenteric fat tissue, and mesenteric lymph nodes. The patient was hospitalized by general surgery department with the diagnosis of jejunal diverticulitis. Conservative intravenous fluid administration and antibiotic therapy were initiated. Clinical symptoms regressed and the patient was discharged from hospital after 2 weeks. Conclusions In cases of diverticulitis it should be kept in mind that in patients with advanced age and pain in the left quadrant of the abdomen, diverticular disease causing mortality and morbidity does not always originate from the colon but might also originate from the jejunum. PMID:26715947

  19. Perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia after iliac crest bone graft - a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of perforated diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia constitutes an extremely rare condition. Case presentation We report a case of a 66 year old Caucasian woman presenting with perforated sigmoid diverticulitis localized in a lumbar hernia following iliac crest bone graft performed 18 years ago. Emergency treatment consisted of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. Elective sigmoid resection was scheduled four months later. At the same time a laparoscopic hernia repair with a biologic mesh graft was performed. Conclusion This case shows a very seldom clinical presentation of lumbar hernia. Secondary colonic resection and concurrent hernia repair with a biologic implant have proven useful in treating this rare condition. PMID:25051974

  20. Diverticulitis Outcomes are Equivalent Between Level 1 Trauma Centers and Community Hospitals in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Gale, Stephen C; Arumugam, Dena; Dombrovskiy, Viktor Y

    2015-06-01

    Traditionally, general surgeons provide emergency general surgery (EGS) coverage by assigned call. The acute care surgery (ACS) model is new and remains confined mostly to academic centers. Some argue that in busy trauma centers, on-call trauma surgeons may be unable to also care for EGS patients. In New Jersey, all three Level 1 Trauma Centers (L1TC) have provided ACS services for many years. Analyzing NJ state inpatient data, we sought to determine whether outcomes in one common surgical illness, diverticulitis, have been different between L1TC and nontrauma centers (NTC) over a 10-year period. The NJ Medical Database was queried for patients aged 18 to 90 hospitalized from 2001 to 2010 for acute diverticulitis. Demographics, comorbidities, operative rates, and mortality were compiled and analyzed comparing L1TC to NTC. For additional comparison between L1TC and NTC, 1:1 propensity score matching with replacement was accomplished. χ(2), t test, and Cochran-Armitage trend test were used. From 2001 to 2010, 88794 patients were treated in NJ for diverticulitis. 2621 patients (2.95%) were treated at L1TCs. Operative rates were similar between hospital types. Patients treated at L1TCs were more often younger (63.1 ± 0.3 vs 64.7 ± 0.1; P < 0.001), nonwhite (43.1% vs 23.1%; P < 0.0001), and uninsured (11.0% vs 5.5%; P < 0.0001). After propensity matching, neither operative mortality (9.7% vs 7.9% P = 0.45), nor nonoperative mortality (1.2% vs 1.3% P = 0.60) were different between groups. Mortality and operative rates for patients with acute diverticulitis are equivalent between LT1C and NTC in NJ. Trauma centers in NJ more commonly provide care to minority and uninsured patients.

  1. One of the Rare Causes of Acute Abdomen Leading to Subileus: Jejunal Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Elçin; Yerli, Hasan; Avcı, Tevfik; Yılmaz, Tuğbahan; Gülay, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Jejunal diverticulitis is one of the rare causes of acute abdomen generally seen in the elderly. Jejunal diverticulosis was defined as the herniation of the mucosa and the submucosa from the inside of the muscular layer of the bowel wall on the mesenteric side of the intestine. Case Report: We presented the intraoperative and pathological findings of a 69-year-old male patient who had presented with complaints about abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting and been operated upon due to subileus and peritonitis induced by large-sized jejunal diverticulitis, along with his computed tomography (CT) findings. Conclusion: Jejunal diverticulitis is uncommon and may be a disease which might be difficult to diagnose when it develops on the basis of the large-sized diverticula resembling intestinal ansae. To the best of our knowledge, the computed tomography and intraoperative findings of a case in which partial resection is applied to the jejunum due to subileus have not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:27308082

  2. Laparoscopic Lavage Is Feasible and Safe for the Treatment of Perforated Diverticulitis With Purulent Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Angenete, Eva; Thornell, Anders; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Skullman, Stefan; Bisgaard, Thue; Jess, Per; Läckberg, Zoltan; Matthiessen, Peter; Heath, Jane; Rosenberg, Jacob; Haglind, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate short-term outcomes of a new treatment for perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis in a randomized controlled trial. Background: Perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis (Hinchey III) has traditionally been treated with surgery including colon resection and stoma (Hartmann procedure) with considerable postoperative morbidity and mortality. Laparoscopic lavage has been suggested as a less invasive surgical treatment. Methods: Laparoscopic lavage was compared with colon resection and stoma in a randomized controlled multicenter trial, DILALA (ISRCTN82208287). Initial diagnostic laparoscopy showing Hinchey III was followed by randomization. Clinical data was collected up to 12 weeks postoperatively. Results: Eighty-three patients were randomized, out of whom 39 patients in laparoscopic lavage and 36 patients in the Hartmann procedure groups were available for analysis. Morbidity and mortality after laparoscopic lavage did not differ when compared with the Hartmann procedure. Laparoscopic lavage resulted in shorter operating time, shorter time in the recovery unit, and shorter hospital stay. Conclusions: In this trial, laparoscopic lavage as treatment for patients with perforated diverticulitis Hinchey III was feasible and safe in the short-term. PMID:25489672

  3. Toxic Megacolon and Acute Ischemia of the Colon due to Sigmoid Stenosis Related to Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulos, P.; Almyroudi, M.; Kolonia, V.; Kouris, S.; Troumpoukis, N.; Economou, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of toxic megacolon accompanied by necrosis of the colon due to chronic dilation caused by stenosis of the sigmoid colon as a complication of diverticulitis. The patient presented at the emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain, fever (38.8°C) and tachycardia (120 beats/min). Physical examination revealed distension and tenderness on deep palpation on the left lower quadrant without peritoneal signs. Abdominal computed tomography showed located stenosis in the sigmoid colon and marked dilation of the descending (12 cm diameter) and transverse (7.5 cm diameter) colon. A few hours later, the patient developed severe septic shock with electrolyte abnormalities. He had a history of two prior admissions to our hospital due to crises of acute diverticulitis. Based on Jalan's criteria the diagnosis was compatible with toxic megacolon. The patient's condition deteriorated suddenly and an emergency colectomy was performed. The operative findings revealed a necrotic colon. Histology examination confirmed the diagnosis of ischemia of the colon. To our knowledge this is the first published report in the literature which refers to a rare complication of diverticulitis, namely chronic stenosis which complicated to colonic ischemia and toxic megacolon. PMID:24163654

  4. Anaphylaxis to Polyethylene Glycol (Colyte®) in a Patient with Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are believed to be chemically inert agents, but larger PEG polymers could have immunogenicity. A 39-year-old man was referred to emergency room for loss of consciousness and dyspnea after taking of PEG-3350 (Colyte®). In laboratory findings, the initial serum tryptase level was increased to 91.9 mg/L (normal range: 0.00-11.40 mg/L) without any other laboratory abnormalities. The intradermal test with 10 mg/mL Colyte® showed a 5 × 5 mm wheal, but basophil activation and histamine releasability tests were negative. PEG-3350 is widely used as an osmotic laxative due to its lack of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. However, the loss of mucosal integrity at gastrointestinal membrane such as diverticulitis may be a predisposing factor for anaphylaxis to Colyte®. We report a case of anaphylaxis induced by the ingestion of PEG-3350 in a patient with diverticulitis which might be a risk factor of anaphylaxis. PMID:27550498

  5. Patients with end-stage renal disease were at an increased risk of hospitalization for acute diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Huang, Nicole; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) show a high incidence of bacterial translocation and impaired gastrointestinal motility. The intestinal tract is believed to be the most crucial source of translocated bacteria. To evaluate the risk of colonic diverticulitis in patients with ESRD, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. Patients who met the following 3 criteria were defined as patients with ESRD: patients diagnosed with ESRD who received regular hemodialysis between 2000 and 2005, patients who received hemodialysis for more than 90% of the time during the observation period (2000–2011), and patients with no prior history of hemodialysis between 1997 and 1999. We matched every patient with ESRD with 1 matched control on the basis of propensity scores. The first diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9-CM codes 562.11 and 562.13) within the follow-up period was defined as the primary endpoint. Hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the patients in the control group as the reference. We included 32,547 and 32,547 patients in the ESRD and matched control cohorts, respectively. The 12-year cumulative incidence of acute colonic diverticulitis for patients with ESRD was significantly higher than that for the controls (P < 0.001). After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities, and medication use, the HR of acute colonic diverticulitis in the ESRD cohort was 11.20 times greater than that in the control cohort (95% CI: 8.14–15.42). The results indicated that patients with ESRD are at an increased risk for acute colonic diverticulitis. PMID:27684821

  6. Jejunal Diverticulitis Ascending to the Duodenum as a Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Fresow, Robert; Kamusella, Peter; Talanow, Roland; Andresen, Reimer

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 73 year-old Caucasian male with acute abdominal pain, peritonism and vomiting. Due to the severity of symptoms a CT examination of the abdomen was performed. The scans revealed multiple jejunal diverticula, wall thickening of the duodenum and jejunum, and free peritoneal fluid. No clear signs of mesenteric infarction, free abdominal air or abscess formation were seen. An additional exploratory laparotomy was conducted to confirm the CT findings and rule out the need for resection of small bowel. Since the results were matching, conservative therapy was scheduled and the patient recovered well. Jejunal diverticulitis is a rare cause of acute abdomen, however has to be considered as a differential diagnosis to more common entities. It usually stays localized, while in our case the inflammation ascended to the duodenum. CT is the modality of choice to diagnose and rule out potentially life threatening complications. PMID:25302248

  7. A common cause of irritable bowel syndrome and diverticulitis: chronic distal colon distention from sedentary behavior and excessive dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Steven E

    2013-07-01

    A multidisciplinary analysis restricted to validated reports was applied to the cause and management of irritable bowel syndrome and diverticular formation and subsequent diverticulitis. There is evidence that they are linked - both caused by attenuation of gravitational aid to distal intestinal motility, resulting in damaging chronic intestinal distention. Both irritable bowel syndrome and diverticular formation and subsequent diverticulitis have worsened in recent years owing to excessive dietary fiber intake. Potential solutions include augmenting weight-bearing time, moderating dietary fiber consumption, stimulating distal colon evacuation through chemical means and developing pharmaceuticals to block the reflexive distal colon distention associated with fiber consumption. Amplified intestinal distention commenced when all classes of Renaissance Europeans became the first group in human history to wear shoes, which led to a sedentary lifestyle that moderates gravitational aid to colon motility and evacuation.

  8. Appendiceal diverticulitis in a femoral hernia causing necrotizing fasciitis of the right inguinal region: report of a unique case.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, G K; Bali, C; Theodorou, S J; Zioga, A; Fatouros, M

    2013-02-01

    De Garengeot's hernia--a rare finding occurring mostly in women--is defined by the presence of the vermiform appendix within the sac of a femoral hernia. The incidence of appendicitis is rarer still, with less than a 100 cases reported to date. We present a unique case of an 84-year-old male patient with perforated appendiceal diverticulitis within a De Garengeot's hernia causing abscess and necrotizing infection of the overlying soft tissues.

  9. Rapid eye movement-sleep is reduced in patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis-an observational study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenxi; Alamili, Mahdi; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sleep disturbances are commonly found in patients in the postoperative period. Sleep disturbances may give rise to several complications including cardiopulmonary instability, transient cognitive dysfunction and prolonged convalescence. Many factors including host inflammatory responses are believed to cause postoperative sleep disturbances, as inflammatory responses can alter sleep architecture through cytokine-brain interactions. Our aim was to investigate alteration of sleep architecture during acute infection and its relationships to inflammation and clinical symptoms. Materials & Methods. In this observational study, we included patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis as a model to investigate the isolated effects of inflammatory responses on sleep. Eleven patients completed the study. Patients were admitted and treated with antibiotics for two nights, during which study endpoints were measured by polysomnography recordings, self-reported discomfort scores and blood samples of cytokines. One month later, the patients, who now were in complete remission, were readmitted and the endpoints were re-measured (the baseline values). Results. Total sleep time was reduced 4% and 7% the first (p = 0.006) and second (p = 0.014) nights of diverticulitis, compared to baseline, respectively. The rapid eye movement sleep was reduced 33% the first night (p = 0.016), compared to baseline. Moreover, plasma IL-6 levels were correlated to non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep and fatigue. Conclusion. Total sleep time and rapid eye movement sleep were reduced during nights with active diverticulitis and correlated with markers of inflammation.

  10. Diverticulitis Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... allowed on a clear liquid diet include: Broth Fruit juices without pulp, such as apple juice Ice chips ... skin) Eggs, fish and poultry Refined white bread Fruit and vegetable juice with no pulp Low-fiber cereals Milk, yogurt ...

  11. A Case Report of Acute Diverticulitis in “Pseudodiverticulosis” after Hemorpex System® Procedure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. In the last years many mini-invasive approaches were developed in order to reduce postoperative pain and complication after haemorrhoid surgery: one of these alternatives is represented by Hemorpex System, a relatively young technique that combines transanal dearterialization with mucopexy through a dedicated proctoscope. Case Presentation. A 78-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department for acute urinary retention and elevated temperature. Hemorpex procedure was performed 4 years before. Clinical, endoscopic, and radiological findings demonstrated the presence of multiple diverticula-like structures fulfilled by purulent fluid and a deep alteration of the normal anatomy of the rectum. He was treated following the standard protocol of acute diverticulitis and full recovery from symptoms was achieved. Discussion. Hemorpex System is a young technique, and nowadays-available studies lack long-term follow-up data. Anatomical changes induced by the procedure are consistent and definitive. Our patient luckily demonstrated a prompt response to conservative treatment, but it must be taken into account that, in case of medical treatment failure, surgical approach would be necessary and the actual patient anatomical changes could lead the surgeon to unavoidable threatening maneuvers. PMID:27974987

  12. Risk Factors for Diverticulosis, Diverticulitis, Diverticular Perforation, and Bleeding: A Plea for More Subtle History Taking

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Stephan K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticulosis is a very common condition. Around 20% of diverticula carriers are believed to suffer from diverticular disease during their lifetime. This makes diverticular disease one of the clinically and economically most significant conditions in gastroenterology. The etiopathogenesis of diverticulosis and diverticular disease is not well understood. Epidemiological studies allowed to define risk factors for the development of diverticulosis and the different disease entities associated with it, in particular diverticulitis, perforation, and diverticular bleeding. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed, and the current knowledge about risk factors for diverticulosis and associated conditions reviewed. Results Non-controllable risk factors like age, sex, and genetics, and controllable risk factors like foods, drinks, and physical activity were identified, as well as comorbidities and drugs which increase or decrease the risk of developing diverticula or of suffering from complications. In naming risk factors, it is of utmost importance to differentiate between diverticulosis and the different disease entities. Conclusion Risk factors for diverticulosis and diverticular disease may give a clue towards the possible etiopathogenesis of the conditions. More importantly, knowledge of comorbidities and particularly drugs conferring a risk for development of complicated disease is crucial for patient management. PMID:26989377

  13. Risk factors of admission for acute colonic diverticulitis in a population-based cohort study: The North Trondelag Health Study, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Jamal Talabani, Aras; Lydersen, Stian; Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Endreseth, Birger Henning; Edna, Tom-Harald

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess risk factors of hospital admission for acute colonic diverticulitis. METHODS The study was conducted as part of the second wave of the population-based North Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2), performed in North Trondelag County, Norway, 1995 to 1997. The study consisted of 42570 participants (65.1% from HUNT2) who were followed up from 1998 to 2012. Of these, 22436 (52.7%) were females. The cases were defined as those 358 participants admitted with acute colonic diverticulitis during follow-up. The remaining participants were used as controls. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses was used for each sex separately after multiple imputation to calculate HR. RESULTS Multivariable Cox regression analyses showed that increasing age increased the risk of admission for acute colonic diverticulitis: Comparing with ages < 50 years, females with age 50-70 years had HR = 3.42, P < 0.001 and age > 70 years, HR = 6.19, P < 0.001. In males the corresponding values were HR = 1.85, P = 0.004 and 2.56, P < 0.001. In patients with obesity (body mass index ≥ 30) the HR = 2.06, P < 0.001 in females and HR = 2.58, P < 0.001 in males. In females, present (HR = 2.11, P < 0.001) or previous (HR = 1.65, P = 0.007) cigarette smoking increased the risk of admission. In males, breathlessness (HR = 2.57, P < 0.001) and living in rural areas (HR = 1.74, P = 0.007) increased the risk. Level of education, physical activity, constipation and type of bread eaten showed no association with admission for acute colonic diverticulitis. CONCLUSION The risk of hospital admission for acute colonic diverticulitis increased with increasing age, in obese individuals, in ever cigarette smoking females and in males living in rural areas. PMID:28082819

  14. The AFC Score: Validation of a 4-Item Predicting Score of Postoperative Mortality After Colorectal Resection for Cancer or Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Arnaud; Panis, Yves; Mantion, Georges; Slim, Karem; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Vicaut, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present prospective study was to validate externally a 4-item predictive score of mortality after colorectal surgery (the AFC score) by testing its generalizability on a new population. Summary Background Data: We have recently reported, in a French prospective multicenter study, that age older than 70 years, neurologic comorbidity, underweight (body weight loss >10% in <6 months), and emergency surgery significantly increased postoperative mortality after resection for cancer or diverticulitis. Patients and Methods: From June to September 2004, 1049 consecutive patients (548 men and 499 women) with a mean age of 67 ± 14 years, undergoing open or laparoscopic colorectal resection, were prospectively included. The AFC score was validated in this population. We assessed also the predictive value of other scores, such as the “Glasgow” score and the ASA score. To express and compare the predictive value of the different scores, a receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated. Results: Postoperative mortality rate was 4.6%. Variables already identified as predictors of mortality and used in the AFC score were also found to be associated with a high odds ratio in this study: emergency surgery, body weight loss >10%, neurologic comorbidity, and age older than 70 years in a multivariate logistic model. The validity of the AFC score in this population was found very high based both on the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test (P = 0.37) and on the area under the ROC curve (0.89). We also found that discriminatory capacity was higher than other currently used risk scoring systems such as the Glasgow or ASA score. Conclusion: The present prospective study validated the AFC score as a pertinent predictive score of postoperative mortality after colorectal surgery. Because it is based on only 4 risk factors, the AFC score can be used in daily practice. PMID:17592296

  15. Complications du diverticule de Meckel (DM) chez l'adulte: à propos de 11 cas au CHU-Yalgado Ouédraogo au Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouangré, Edgar; Zida, Maurice; Bazongo, Moussa; Sanou, Adama; Bonkoungou, Gilbert Patindé; Doamba, Rodrigue Namékinsba; Sawadogo, Elie Yamba; Ouédraogo, Sidziguin; Zongo, Nayi; Traore, Si Simon

    2015-01-01

    Le diverticule de Meckel (DM) est la persistance partielle du canal omphalomésentérique. Ses complications sont rares. Le diagnostic est le plus souvent per opératoire. L'objectif a été de décrire les complications du diverticule de Meckel chez l'adulte dans le service de chirurgie générale et digestive du CHU Yalgado Ouédraogo. Il s'est agi d'une étude transversale descriptive sur 10 ans (janvier 2004-décembre 2013) portant sur les dossiers des patients âgés de plus de 15 ans ayant présenté un DM compliqué. Durant la période d’étude, 11 cas ont été colligés. L'incidence annuelle a été de 11 cas. Nous avons noté une prédominance masculine avec un sex-ratio de 4,5. L’âge moyen des patients était de 29,8 ans. Le diagnostic préopératoire a été dans huit cas une occlusion intestinale aiguë, une appendicite aiguë dans deux cas, une péritonite aiguë généralisée dans un cas. Il a été diagnostiqué en peropératoire une occlusion intestinale dans neuf cas; une diverticulite dans un cas et un cas de perforation du DM. Tous les DM avaient été réséqués dont huit résections segmentaires iléales emportant le DM et trois résections cunéiformes. Tous les DM étaient situés à moins d'un mètre de la jonction iléo-caecale. L'histologie réalisée dans deux cas avait conclu à une diverticulite. Les suites opératoires ont été simples dans neuf cas, compliquées dans deux cas dont une éventration et un décès. Les complications du diverticule de Meckel sont rares. Le diagnostic préopératoire est difficile. Le traitement est essentiellement chirurgical. PMID:26958137

  16. Un diverticule géant para urétéral chez l’enfant révélé par une masse pelvienne

    PubMed Central

    Kassogué, Amadou; Diarra, Alkadri; Benzekri, Younes; Doumbia, Aliou; Bouabdallah, Youssef; Traoré, Zacharia; Tizniti, Siham; Mellas, Soufiane; Tazi, Mohammed Fald; Ammari, Jalal Eddine El; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Fassi, Mohammed Jamal El; Farih, My Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Résumé Nous rapportons un cas de diverticule géant para-urétéral chez un enfant de 18 mois, du point de vue des aspects cliniques, diagnostiques et thérapeutiques. Aucune anomalie associée n’a été relevée. Le patient était un enfant de sexe masculin, et la symptomatologie était dominée par la rétention aiguë d’urine et la présence d’une infection urinaire. La chirurgie a consisté en une diverticulectomie laparoscopique avec réimplantation urétéro-vésicale. L’évolution a été favorable avec disparition des signes urinaires. PMID:24940473

  17. Understanding Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... causing serious illness. Causes The leading but unproven theory is that a low-fiber diet causes diverticular ... use a variety of machines and techniques to create pictures of the structures and activities inside your ...

  18. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctors believe the main cause is a low-fiber diet. Most people with diverticulosis don't have symptoms. ... a colonoscopy to screen for cancer. A high-fiber diet and mild pain reliever will often relieve symptoms. ...

  19. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the following examinations: Barium enema: This x-ray test involves putting liquid material into the colon through a tube placed in the rectum. The x-ray image shows the outline of the colon, and can identify if ... Colonoscopy: This test uses a thin, flexible tube with a light ...

  20. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs when small pouches, or sacs, form and push outward through weak spots in the wall of ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney ...

  1. Diverticula, Diverticulosis, Diverticulitis: What's the Difference?

    MedlinePlus

    ... more! Sign up for eNewsletter: Site map | Privacy & Security | Terms of Use | Contact Us This information is in no way intended to replace the guidance of your doctor. We advise seeing a physician whenever a health problem arises requiring an expert’s care. © Copyright 1998-2017 ...

  2. [A rare complication due to diverticulitis].

    PubMed

    Di Bernardo, N; D'Ambrosio, B; Mirenda, F; Cittadino, L; Vena, M

    1992-01-01

    The AA. report about a case of hepatic abscess found in a operated patient for perforation of a sigmoid diverticulum. The AA. made some consideration on the rarity of the hepatic abscess as complication of diverticulum perforation.

  3. Perforated Solitary Diverticulitis of the Ascending Colon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    immobile gallstone at the neck of the gallbladder and peri-cholecystic fluid. We took the patient to the operating room for laparoscopic cholecystectomy...white blood cell count, and focal peritonitis in the right upper quadrant with an ultrasound examination show- ing a large gallstone and peri-cholecystic...ultrasound. Once the gall- bladder was determined not to be the cause of the illness and free purulent fluid found in the peritoneum, we were obli- gated to

  4. Dealing with Diverticulitis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... your system moving again! That, plus good pain management, assured my recovery was excellent. “…so painful, I couldn't walk across the room.” — Sharon Ellison , Facilitator, Educational Resources for Learning Disabled Youth Washington, DC I ...

  5. Solitary caecal diverticulitis as an unusual cause of a right iliac fossa mass: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kurer, Mohamed A

    2007-01-01

    Inflammation of a solitary caecal diverticulum is an uncommon pathological condition. Preoperatively the condition is almost indistinguishable from appendicitis, and is often confused with carcinoma of the caecum during operation. The typical patient with this condition is male, Asian, and in the fourth decade of life. This case is unusual in that the patient was a 26-year-old Caucasian man. PMID:17996114

  6. A case of perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in which gram staining of ascitic fluid was useful for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Junko; Fujita, Shouhei; Kawano, Fumihiro; Tsukamoto, Ryoichi; Honjo, Kunpei; Naito, Shigetoshi; Ishiyama, Shun; Miyano, Shozo; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Fujisawa, Minoru; Kojima, Kuniaki; Ogura, Kanako; Matsumoto, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    An 85-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for steroid therapy for relapsing nephrotic syndrome. During hospitalization, she complained of sudden epigastric pain at night. Although there were signs of peritoneal irritation, CT showed a large amount of ascitic fluid, but no free intraperitoneal gas. Gram staining of ascitic fluid obtained by abdominal paracentesis showed Gram-negative rods, which raised a strong suspicion of gastrointestinal perforation and peritonitis. Therefore, emergency surgery was performed. Exploration of the colon showed multiple sigmoid diverticula, one of which was perforated. The patient underwent an emergency Hartmann's procedure. Imaging studies failed to reveal any evidence of gastrointestinal perforation, presenting a diagnostic challenge. However, a physician performed rapid Gram staining of ascitic fluid at night when laboratory technicians were absent, had a strong suspicion of gastrointestinal perforation, and performed emergency surgery. Gram staining is superior in rapidity, and ascitic fluid Gram staining can aid in diagnosis, suggesting that it should be actively performed. We report this case, with a review of the literature on the significance of rapid diagnosis by Gram staining.

  7. Laparoscopic lavage versus surgical resection for acute diverticulitis with generalised peritonitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cirocchi, R; Di Saverio, S; Weber, D G; Taboła, R; Abraha, I; Randolph, J; Arezzo, A; Binda, G A

    2017-02-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis investigates current evidence on the therapeutic role of laparoscopic lavage in the management of diverticular peritonitis. A systematic review of the literature was performed on PubMed until June 2016, according to preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. All randomised controlled trials comparing laparoscopic lavage with surgical resection, irrespective of anastomosis or stoma formation, were analysed. After assessment of titles and full text, 3 randomised trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Overall the quality of evidence was low because of serious concerns regarding the risk of bias and imprecision. In the laparoscopic lavage group, there was a statistically significant higher rate of postoperative intra-abdominal abscess (RR 2.54, 95% CI 1.34-4.83), a lower rate of postoperative wound infection (RR 0.10, 95% CI 0.02-0.51), and a shorter length of postoperative hospital stay during index admission (WMD = -2.03, 95% CI -2.59 to -1.47). There were no statistically significant differences in terms of postoperative mortality at index admission or within 30 days from intervention in all Hinchey stages and in Hinchey stage III, postoperative mortality at 12 months, surgical reintervention at index admission or within 30-90 days from index intervention, stoma rate at 12 months, or adverse events within 90 days of any Clavien-Dindo grade. The surgical reintervention rate at 12 months from index intervention was significantly lower in the laparoscopic lavage group (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.38-0.86), but these data included emergency reintervention and planned intervention (stoma reversal). This systematic review and meta-analysis did not demonstrate any significant difference between laparoscopic peritoneal lavage and traditional surgical resection in patients with peritonitis from perforated diverticular disease, in terms of postoperative mortality and early reoperation rate. Laparoscopic lavage was associated with a lower rate of stoma formation. However, the finding of a significantly higher rate of postoperative intra-abdominal abscess in patients who underwent laparoscopic lavage compared to those who underwent surgical resection is of concern. Since the aim of surgery in patients with peritonitis is to treat the sepsis, if one technique is associated with more postoperative abscesses, then the technique is ineffective. Even so, laparoscopic lavage does not appear fundamentally inferior to traditional surgical resection and this technique may achieve reasonable outcomes with minimal invasiveness.

  8. Dynamic FDG PET/CT imaging with diuresis demonstrates an enterovesical fistula in a lymphoma patient with repeated colon diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pan-Fu; Ting, Wen-Chien; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Kao, Yu-Lin; Chang, Pai-Jung; Lee, Jong-Kang

    2013-04-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with follicular B-cell lymphoma was referred for a FDG PET/CT scan due to severe left lower abdominal pain to rule out recurrent cancer. These FDG PET/CT images and previous FDG PET/CT images 5 months ago both revealed an air bubble in the urinary bladder on the CT images. He had a recurrent urinary tract infection history for 6 months. A list-mode dynamic data acquisition with diuresis intravenous injection revealed linear FDG activity extending from the upper-left portion of the bladder to a soft tissue mass in the lower-left pelvic region. An enterovesical fistula was confirmed by surgery.

  9. Diverticular Disease of the Colon: News From Imaging.

    PubMed

    Flor, Nicola; Soldi, Simone; Zanchetta, Edoardo; Sbaraini, Sara; Pesapane, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    Different scenarios embrace computed tomography imaging and diverticula, including asymptomatic (diverticulosis) and symptomatic patients (acute diverticulitis, follow-up of acute diverticulitis, chronic diverticulitis). If the role of computed tomography is validated and widely supported by evidence in case of acute diverticulitis, this is not the case of patients in their follow-up for acute diverticulitis or with symptoms related to diverticula, but without acute inflammation. In these settings, computed tomography colonography is gaining consensus as the preferred radiologic test.

  10. Eat fresh vegetables, fruit, and whole grain products | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Diverticulitis "Eat fresh vegetables, fruit, and whole grain products." Past Issues / Winter 2010 ... diverticulitis. I once again eat fresh vegetables and fruit and whole grain products. My two episodes of ...

  11. Colonoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colonoscopy - screening; Colon polyps - colonoscopy; Ulcerative colitis - colonoscopy; Crohn disease - colonoscopy; Diverticulitis - colonoscopy; Diarrhea - colonoscopy; Anemia - colonoscopy; Blood ...

  12. Multimodal Narcotic Limited Perioperative Pain Control With Colorectal Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Colon Cancer; Colon Diverticulosis; Colonic Neoplasms; Colonic Diverticulitis; Pain, Postoperative; Ileus; Ileus Paralytic; Ileus; Mechanical; Constipation Drug Induced; Constipation; Rectum Cancer; Rectum Neoplasm

  13. Diverticulite duodénale: complication inhabituelle pas toujours facile à gérer

    PubMed Central

    Elhjouji, Abderrahman; Jaiteh, Lamine; Bounaim, Ahmed; Aitali, Abdelmounaim; Sair, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Les diverticules duodénaux sont assez fréquents, la majorité reste asymptomatique. Les complications les plus fréquemment rapportées sont les hémorragies et les pancréatites. Contrairement aux diverticules coliques, la survenue de diverticulite est rare. Nous rapportons le cas d'une infection d'un gros diverticule duodénal en mettant le point sur la difficulté de la prise en charge de cette entité pathologique. PMID:26958122

  14. Sigmoidoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal pouches on the lining of the intestines) Hemorrhoids Inflammatory bowel disease Inflammation or infection ( proctitis ) Risks ... abscess Colon cancer Colorectal polyps Crohn disease Diverticulitis Hemorrhoids Intestinal obstruction Proctitis Review Date 8/1/2015 ...

  15. Diverticulosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... O’Keefe KP and Sanson TG. Diverticulitis. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer ...

  16. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many possible causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  17. Lots of Red Meat May Be Tied to Gut Disorder in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods people eat can affect the gut's "microbiome" -- the huge collection of bacteria that dwell in the digestive tract. Some researchers suspect that the microbiome plays a role in diverticulitis, Chan said -- though ...

  18. Large bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... 26. Read More Colon cancer Colostomy Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Large bowel resection Ulcerative colitis Patient Instructions Bland ... Diseases Colonic Polyps Colorectal Cancer Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis Intestinal Obstruction Ulcerative Colitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  19. Total colectomy or proctocolectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016:chap 26. Read More Colon cancer Ileostomy Intestinal obstruction Total abdominal colectomy Total proctocolectomy and ileal - anal ... Diseases Colorectal Cancer Crohn's Disease Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis Intestinal Obstruction Ulcerative Colitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  20. Diverticulosis today: unfashionable and still under-researched

    PubMed Central

    Tursi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Diverticulosis of the colon is a widespread disease, and its prevalence is increasing especially in the developing world. The underlying pathological mechanisms that cause the formation of colonic diverticula remain unclear but are likely to be the result of complex interactions among age, diet, genetic factors, colonic motility, and changes in colonic structure. The large majority of patients remain asymptomatic throughout their life, one fifth of them become symptomatic (developing the so-called ‘diverticular disease’) while only a minority of these will develop acute diverticulitis. The factors predicting the development of symptoms remain to be identified. Again, it is generally recognized that diverticular disease occurrence is probably related to complex interactions among colonic motility, diet, lifestyle, and genetic features. Changes in intestinal microflora due to low-fiber diet and consequent low-grade inflammation are thought to be one of the mechanisms responsible for symptoms occurrence of both diverticular disease and acute diverticulitis. Current therapeutic approaches with rifaximin and mesalazine to treat the symptoms seem to be promising. Antibiotic treatment is currently advised only in acute complicated diverticulitis, and no treatment has currently proven effective in preventing the recurrence of acute diverticulitis. Further studies are required in order to clarify the reasons why diverticulosis occurs and the factors triggering occurrence of symptoms. Moreover, the reasons why rifaximin and mesalazine work in symptomatic diverticular disease but not in acute diverticulitis are yet to be elucidated. PMID:26929783

  1. Point of Care 3D Ultrasound for Various Applications: A Pilot Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Appendicitis; Evidence of Cholecystectomy; Gallstones; Pregnancy, Ectopic; Aortic Aneurysm; Kidney Stones; Intrauterine Pregnancy; Diverticulitis; Abdominal Injuries; Tumors; Pancreatitis; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intraabdominal Infections; Intestinal Diseases; Pregnancy; Vascular Disease; Uterine Fibroids; Ovarian Cysts; Uterine Abnominalies; Bladder Abnominalies; Testicular Abnominalies; Polyps

  2. Prognostic Indicators as Provided by the EPIC ClearView

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-11-18

    Coronary Artery Disease; Congestive Heart Failure; Valvular Heart Disease; Atrial Fibrillation; Hypertension; Pyelonephritis; Acute Renal Failure; Renal Failure; Viral Hepatitis; Alcoholic Hepatitis; Steatohepatitis; Cirrhosis; Asthma; COPD; Bronchitis; Emphysema; Pneumonia; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Colitis; Diverticulitis; Peptic Ulcer Disease; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Cholecystitis; Pancreatitis; Malabsorption Disorders; Celiac Sprue; Diabetes

  3. Acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ricardo; Fernandes, Teresa; Oliveira, Maria I; Castro, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Pylephlebitis is defined as septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein. It is a rare but serious complication of an intraabdominal infection, more commonly diverticulitis and appendicitis. It has an unspecific clinical presentation and the diagnosis is difficult. The authors report a case of a 21-year-old man with acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis. The diagnosis was made with contrast enhanced CT.

  4. Retrograde cystography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 4. Read More Bladder stones Blood clots Diverticulitis Reflux nephropathy Urinary tract infection - adults X-ray Review Date 1/21/2015 Updated by: Scott Miller, MD, urologist in private practice in Atlanta, ...

  5. Diverticular Pylephlebitis and Polymicrobial Septicemia

    PubMed Central

    Punjabi, Chitra

    2017-01-01

    Diverticulitis primarily affects the sigmoid colon and is often complicated by intra-abdominal abscesses and fistulas. Rarely, however, mesenteric venous thrombosis has been known to occur. Optimal management is still unclear. We report the first case of polymicrobial sepsis resulting from diverticular pylephlebitis, managed successfully with bowel rest, antibiotics, and anticoagulation. PMID:28163946

  6. Laparoscopic approach in complicated diverticular disease

    PubMed Central

    Rotholtz, Nicolás A; Canelas, Alejandro G; Bun, Maximiliano E; Laporte, Mariano; Sadava, Emmanuel E; Ferrentino, Natalia; Guckenheimer, Sebastián A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the results of laparoscopic colectomy in complicated diverticular disease. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted at an academic teaching hospital. Data were collected from a database established earlier, which comprise of all patients who underwent laparoscopic colectomy for diverticular disease between 2000 and 2013. The series was divided into two groups that were compared: Patients with complicated disease (abscess, perforation, fistula, or stenosis) (G1) and patients undergoing surgery for recurrent diverticulitis (G2). Recurrent diverticulitis was defined as two or more episodes of diverticulitis regardless of patient age. Data regarding patient demographics, comorbidities, prior abdominal operations, history of acute diverticulitis, classification of acute diverticulitis at index admission and intra and postoperative variables were extracted. Univariate analysis was performed in both groups. RESULTS: Two hundred and sixty patients were included: 28% (72 patients) belonged to G1 and 72% (188 patients) to G2. The mean age was 57 (27-89) years. The average number of episodes of diverticulitis before surgery was 2.1 (r 0-10); 43 patients had no previous inflammatory pathology. There were significant differences between the two groups with respect to conversion rate and hospital stay (G1 18% vs G2 3.2%, P = 0.001; G1: 4.7 d vs G2 3.3 d, P < 0.001). The anastomotic dehiscence rate was 2.3%, with no statistical difference between the groups (G1 2.7% vs G2 2.1%, P = 0.5). There were no differences in demographic data (body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiology and previous abdominal surgery), operative time and intraoperative and postoperative complications between the groups. The mortality rate was 0.38% (1 patient), represented by a death secondary to septic shock in G2. CONCLUSION: The results support that the laparoscopic approach in any kind of complicated diverticular disease can be performed with low morbidity and

  7. Laparoscopic Peritoneal Lavage: A Definitive Treatment for Diverticular Peritonitis or a “Bridge” to Elective Laparoscopic Sigmoidectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Trastulli, Stefano; Vettoretto, Nereo; Milani, Diego; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Adamenko, Olga; Desiderio, Jacopo; Burattini, Maria Federica; Parisi, Amilcare; Arezzo, Alberto; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To this day, the treatment of generalized peritonitis secondary to diverticular perforation is still controversial. Recently, in patients with acute sigmoid diverticulitis, laparoscopic lavage and drainage has gained a wide interest as an alternative to resection. Based on this backdrop, we decided to perform a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of peritoneal lavage in perforated diverticular disease. A bibliographic search was performed in PubMed for case series and comparative studies published between January 1992 and February 2014 describing laparoscopic peritoneal lavage in patients with perforated diverticulitis. A total of 19 articles consisting of 10 cohort studies, 8 case series, and 1 controlled clinical trial met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. In total these studies analyzed data from 871 patients. The mean follow-up time ranged from 1.5 to 96 months when reported. In 11 studies, the success rate of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage, defined as patients alive without surgical treatment for a recurrent episode of diverticulitis, was 24.3%. In patients with Hinchey stage III diverticulitis, the incidence of laparotomy conversion was 1%, whereas in patients with stage IV it was 45%. The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 2.9%. The 30-day postoperative reintervention rate was 4.9%, whereas 2% of patients required a percutaneous drainage. Readmission rate after the first hospitalization for recurrent diverticulitis was 6%. Most patients who were readmitted (69%) required redo surgery. A 2-stage laparoscopic intervention was performed in 18.3% of patients. Laparoscopic peritoneal lavage should be considered an effective and safe option for the treatment of patients with sigmoid diverticulitis with Hinchey stage III peritonitis; it can also be consider as a “bridge” surgical step combined with a delayed and elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in order to avoid a Hartmann procedure

  8. Symptomatic Diverticular Disease in Patients With Severely Reduced Kidney Function: Higher Rates of Complications and Transfusion Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Dirweesh, Ahmed; Amodu, Afolarin; Khan, Muhammad; Zijoo, Ritika; Ambreen, Bushra; Ibrahim, Mohammad; Ijaz, Muhammad; Nawwar, Abdelhameed; Genena, Kareem; Tahir, Muhammad; Kumar, Naresh; Debari, Vincent A.; Wallach, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Background The prevalence of diverticulosis is increasing with 5-10% of patients developing diverticulitis and 5-15% developing symptomatic bleeding. Diverticulitis can result in abscess, perforation, fistula, or obstruction. Bleeding has combined morbidity and mortality rates of 10-20%. The purpose of this study was to compare diverticulitis-related complications and transfusion requirements for diverticular bleeding in patients with normal to moderately reduced kidney function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR) ≥ 30 mL/min/1.73 m2) and patients with severe renal impairment (GFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2), and identify factors associated with these outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed records of all patients with diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding treated at our hospital from January 1, 2011 to July 31, 2016. Patients were evaluated for baseline characteristics, GFR, baseline hemoglobin, medications, comorbidities, length of stay (LOS), presence of perforations or abscesses and the need for transfusion. Results Of the 291 patients included, males were 167 (58%). Perforations and abscesses complicating diverticulitis developed in 31/136 (23%) of patients with GFR ≥ 30 mL/min/1.73 m2, and in 13/26 (50%) of patients with GFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 (odds ratio (OR): 3.4; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.423 - 8.06; P = 0.0073). Mean LOS (days) was 6.3 ± 4 in the GFR ≥ 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 group and 8.5 ± 4.4 in GFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 group (P = 0.0001). Blood transfusion for diverticular bleeding occurred in 11/78 (14%) of patients with GFR ≥ 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and in 22/51 (43%) of patients with GFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 (OR: 4.6; 95% CI: 1.99 - 10.76; P = 0.0004). Among patients who needed transfusion, mean LOS was 8.5 ± 2.5 in GFR ≥ 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 group and 9 ± 5 in those with GFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 (P = 0.04). There were no differences in age, gender or race between the study groups. Conclusion There was a significant increase in complicated

  9. Alimentary tract complications after renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, W C; Harris, N; Stein, S; Brooks, M; Jones, R S; Thompson, W M; Stickel, D L; Seigler, H F

    1979-01-01

    A computer analysis of post renal transplantation gastrointestinal problems was performed to identify important associated clinical factors. Thirty-seven per cent of all transplant recipients developed one or more significant problems. Hemorrhage, nondiverticular intestinal perforation, and esophagitis occurred most frequently in hospitalized patients. Pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and gastroduodenal perforation occurred characteristically in long-term survivors with well functioning allografts. Eleven of 32 HLA identical recipients treated with maintenance corticosteroids during stable kidney function developed gastrointestinal disease while only one of 13 HLA identical recipients not given maintenance steroids developed a problem, which strongly suggests a causal role for steroids in the development of late complications. The association of preexisting peptic ulcer and diverticular disease with hemorrhage and perforation supports previous recommendations that documented peptic ulcer disease or diverticulitis should be corrected surgically prior to transplantation. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:384945

  10. [Colonic diverticular disease: diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2012-02-12

    Colonic diverticular disease is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in the Western world, affecting approximately 50% of the population above the age of 70 years. Symptoms develop only in about one quarter of the affected individuals with complications in one-third of the symptomatic patients. Diagnosis is mostly confirmed by colonoscopy. Abdominal CT is the most sensitive for the diagnosis of complicated severe diverticulitis, while colonoscopy or in severe cases angiography may be performed in bleeding patients. Initial therapy of non-complicated symptomatic diverticulitis includes antibiotics and more recently non-absorbable antibiotics. In complicated cases should be treated with broad spectrum i.v. antibiotics, however surgery may became necessary in a minority of the cases. The proportion of patients needing acute surgical intervention has decreased in the last decades with the advancement of conservative management including medical therapy, endoscopy and imaging techniques and the indication of elective was also changed.

  11. Helicobacter cinaedi bacteremia in four renal transplant patients: clinical features and an important suggestion regarding the route of infection.

    PubMed

    Imafuku, A; Araoka, H; Tanaka, K; Marui, Y; Sawa, N; Ubara, Y; Takaichi, K; Ishii, Y; Tomikawa, S

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi can cause bacteremia mainly in immunocompromised patients. We present the clinical characteristics of H. cinaedi bacteremia in 4 renal transplant patients. Interestingly, all cases showed triggers of bacterial translocation: 2 cases developed after colonic perforation caused by diverticulitis, 1 case developed post cholecystectomy, and the remaining patient had chronic diarrhea. Accordingly, bacterial translocation caused by severe gastrointestinal complication could be a cause of H. cinaedi bacteremia.

  12. ["Barking" micturition noise as sign of acute hip-TEP-late infection].

    PubMed

    Weisenstein, D B; Popescu, I-A

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the case of a patient with an acute late infection of the hip prosthesis. At first, complaints in the hip region were in the foreground. Shortly after the revision operation the patient noticed a barking noise during micturition, as sign of a pneumaturia. The following diagnostics showed a perforated sigmoid diverticulitis with a sigmoid-urinary bladder-fistula.

  13. Can the need for colectomy after computed tomography-guided percutaneous drainage for diverticular abscess be predicted?

    PubMed

    Felder, Seth I; Barmparas, Galinos; Lynn, Juliane; Murrell, Zuri; Margulies, Daniel R; Fleshner, Phillip

    2013-10-01

    The primary aim of this study was to define predictors of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous abscess drainage treatment failure in complicated diverticulitis. A 10-year retrospective analysis of inpatients seen in surgical consultation for diverticular abscess management subsequently referred for CT-guided percutaneous drainage (PD) was conducted. The clinical courses of patients undergoing a technically successful PD were categorized into three groups: 1) no colectomy; 2) elective colectomy; and 3) nonelective colectomy. Forty study patients were identified. Thirteen (33%) of the 40 patients required a nonelective colectomy, 20 patients (50%) underwent elective resection, and seven patients (18%) have been managed nonoperatively with no recurrent diverticulitis for a median of 46.8 months (range, 3.2 to 84.3 months). Forward logistic regression identified the presence of immunosuppression or renal insufficiency (creatinine 1.5 mg/dL or greater) as factors independently associated with failure of PD and need for nonelective colectomy. No clinical, laboratory, or radiologic variables were predictive of long-term nonoperative success. Although PD allows for the resolution of intra-abdominal sepsis for most cases of diverticulitis complicated by an abscess, a substantial proportion progress to nonelective colectomy, emphasizing the need for clinical vigilance in follow-up.

  14. Colonic diverticular disease. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Gargallo Puyuelo, Carla J; Sopeña, Federico; Lanas Arbeloa, Angel

    2015-12-01

    Diverticular disease represents the most common disease affecting the colon in the Western world. Most cases remain asymptomatic, but some others will have symptoms or develop complications. The aims of treatment in symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease are to prevent complications and reduce the frequency and intensity of symptoms. Fibre, probiotics, mesalazine, rifaximin and their combinations seem to be usually an effective therapy. In the uncomplicated diverticulitis, outpatient management is considered the optimal approach in the majority of patients, and oral antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment. Admission to hospital and intravenous antibiotic are recommended only when the patient is unable to intake food orally, affected by severe comorbidity or does not improve. However, inpatient management and intravenous antibiotics are necessary in complicated diverticulitis. The role of surgery is also changing. Most diverticulitis-associated abscesses can be treated with antibiotics and/or percutaneous drainage and emergency surgery is considered only in patients with acute peritonitis. Finally, patient related factors, and not the number of recurrences, play the most important role in selecting recipients of elective surgery to avoid recurrences.

  15. Rifaximin and diverticular disease: Position paper of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology (SIGE).

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Rosario; Barbara, Giovanni; Annibale, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    Management of diverticular disease has significantly improved in the last decade. Antibiotic treatment is used for symptom relief and prevention of complications. In Italy, the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin is one of the most frequently used drugs, and it is perceived as the reference drug to treat symptomatic diverticular disease. Its non-systemic absorption and high faecal concentrations have oriented rifaximin use to the gastrointestinal tract, where rifaximin exerts eubiotic effects representing an additional value to its antibiotic activity. This position paper was commissioned by the Italian Society of Gastroenterology governing board for a panel of experts (RC, GB, BA) to highlight the indications for treatment of diverticular disease. There is a lack of rationale for drug use for the primary prevention of diverticulitis in patients with diverticulosis; thus, rifaximin use should be avoided. The cyclic use of rifaximin, in association with high-fibre intake, is safe and useful for the treatment of symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease, even if the cost-efficacy of long-term treatment remains to be determined. The use of rifaximin in the prevention of diverticulitis recurrence is promising, but the low therapeutic advantage needs to be verified. No evidence is available on the efficacy of rifaximin treatment on acute uncomplicated diverticulitis.

  16. Predictive Value of POSSUM and ACPGBI Scoring in Mortality and Morbidity of Colorectal Resection: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bremers, A. J. A.; Groenewoud, J. M. M.; van Laarhoven, C. J. H. M.; Bleichrodt, R. P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Preoperative risk prediction to assess mortality and morbidity may be helpful to surgical decision making. The aim of this study was to compare mortality and morbidity of colorectal resections performed in a tertiary referral center with mortality and morbidity as predicted with physiological and operative score for enumeration of mortality and morbidity (POSSUM), Portsmouth POSSUM (P-POSSUM), and colorectal POSSUM (CR-POSSUM). The second aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of different POSSUM scores in surgery performed for malignancy, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diverticulitis. POSSUM scoring was also evaluated in colorectal resection in acute vs. elective setting. In procedures performed for malignancy, the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland (ACPGBI) score was assessed in the same way for comparison. Methods POSSUM, P-POSSUM, and CR-POSSUM predictor equations for mortality were applied in a retrospective case–control study to 734 patients who had undergone colorectal resection. The total group was assessed first. Second, the predictive value of outcome after surgery was assessed for malignancy (n = 386), inflammatory bowel diseases (n = 113), diverticulitis (n = 91), and other indications, e.g., trauma, endometriosis, volvulus, or ischemia (n = 144). Third, all subgroups were assessed in relation to the setting in which surgery was performed: acute or elective. In patients with malignancy, the ACPGBI score was calculated as well. In all groups, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed. Results POSSUM, P-POSSUM, and CR-POSSUM have a significant predictive value for outcome after colorectal surgery. Within the total population as well as in all four subgroups, there is no difference in the area under the curve between the POSSUM, P-POSSUM, and CR-POSSUM scores. In the subgroup analysis, smallest areas under the ROC curve are seen in operations performed for malignancy, which

  17. Papillary thyroid cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Sonu, Irene S; Blonski, Wojciech; Lin, Ming Valerie; Lewis, James; Aberra, Faten; Lichtenstein, Gary R

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To formally study age of diagnosis of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and evaluate the prevalence of PTC in IBD patients compared to a control population. METHODS: We were interested in testing the hypothesis that patients with IBD are more likely to be diagnosed with PTC than a control population. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed using the University of Pennsylvania Health System’s electronic database. Outpatients from 1998-2009 were included in the search, and patients in the cohort were selected based on ICD-9 codes. Inclusion criteria included the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) and the concurrent diagnosis of thyroid cancer in comparison to a control population. Using these methods 912 patients with CD and 1774 with UC were compared to 1638 diverticulitis and 19 447 asthma controls. Statistics were performed using corrected chi-square analysis. The primary outcome for this study was the diagnosis of PTC. Approval to conduct this study was obtained by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Pennsylvania. RESULTS: The mean age was 47.5 years (range: 18-102 years) and 66% patients were female. An analysis of variance model was used to compare the age of PTC diagnosis between the CD, UC, asthma and diverticulitis groups, and a statistically significant difference in age at PTC diagnosis was noted across all groups (F = 6.35, df = 3, P = 0.0006). The age of PTC diagnosis in CD patients was statistically significantly lower than UC, asthma, and diverticulitis patients (average PTC diagnosis age for CD 25, UC 49, asthma 45, diverticulitis 63). After covarying for sex and age in 2009, the difference in age at PTC diagnosis remained statistically significant (F = 4.13, df = 3, P = 0.0089). A total of 86 patients were diagnosed with PTC. Nine patients (0.5%) with UC were diagnosed with PTC. Patients with UC were not shown to be more likely to develop PTC [odds

  18. CT detection of intraabdominal disease in patients with lower extremity signs and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Meshkov, S L; Seltzer, S E; Finberg, H J

    1982-06-01

    The initial clinical presentation of intraabdominal disease can be in an extraabdominal location. This phenomenon most commonly occurs in the setting of bowel perforation secondary to diverticulitis, appendicitis, or carcinoma, with resultant spread of infection caudal to the abdomen. Hematomas and pancreatic fluid collections may also dissect out of the abdomen. The spread of these disease processes is likely to occur in a predictable fashion along anatomic tissue planes. Computed tomography (CT) is well suited to demonstrate the extraabdominal site of disease, the pathway of spread from the abdomen, and the occult intraabdominal process. We describe four such cases in which CT was useful and discuss the anatomic pathways involved.

  19. Fournier's gangrene secondary to intra-abdominal processes.

    PubMed

    Gerber, G S; Guss, S P; Pielet, R W

    1994-11-01

    We report 2 cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the perineum, perianal area, and male genitalia (Fournier's gangrene) that arose secondary to intra-abdominal infectious processes (ruptured appendicitis and diverticulitis). Management consisted of immediate debridement of necrotic tissue, exploratory laparotomy, and diverting colostomy. The presence of an acute abdominal process was not immediately evident on initial evaluation of either patient. This demonstrates the critical importance of considering intra-abdominal infection in patients with Fournier's gangrene when the more commonly seen urinary tract, perirectal, and traumatic causes are not readily apparent.

  20. Abdominal pain – learning when not to intervene!

    PubMed Central

    Tachamo, Niranjan; Timilsina, Bidhya; Nazir, Salik; Lohani, Saroj

    2016-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain. It is a benign condition but may mimic other serious causes of acute abdomen such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, and gynecological emergency in severe cases. Knowledge of this condition in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain can save unnecessary hospital admission, antibiotics, and surgery. In this article, we present the case of a 43-year-old female who presented to our hospital with a 2-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain and diarrhea. She was diagnosed with EA with computed tomography of abdomen with contrast and was managed conservatively with good outcome. PMID:27987280

  1. Recurrent epiploic appendagitis mimicking appendicitis and cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Hearne, Christopher B.; Taboada, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain caused by inflammation of an epiploic appendage. It has a nonspecific clinical presentation that may mimic other acute abdominal pathologies on physical exam, such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis. However, EA is usually benign and self-limiting and can be treated conservatively. We present the case of a patient with two episodes of EA, the first mimicking acute appendicitis and the second mimicking acute cholecystitis. Although recurrence of EA is rare, it should be part of the differential diagnosis of acute, localized abdominal pain. A correct diagnosis of EA will prevent unnecessary hospitalization, antibiotic use, and surgical procedures. PMID:28127129

  2. Omental infarction and its mimics: imaging features of acute abdominal conditions presenting with fat stranding greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Tonerini, Michele; Calcagni, Francesca; Lorenzi, Silvia; Scalise, Paola; Grigolini, Alessandro; Bemi, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    The segmental omental infarction is a rare self-limited disorder presenting with aspecific clinical symptoms that may mimic several acute abdominal conditions. Therefore, a correct noninvasive diagnosis is important because treatment approaches range from monitoring to surgery. As omental infarction results in an important fat stranding that is much greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening, it suggests a narrower differential diagnosis: appendicitis, diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, and mesenteric panniculitis. In this pictorial essay, we point out the importance of imaging in identifying this typical sign allowing alternate diagnoses such as segmental omental infarction that can be conservatively managed.

  3. Perforated Meckel’s diverticulum in an adult due to faecolith: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Sunny; Kanapathy Pillai, Shant; DeClercq, Stefaan

    2015-01-01

    Meckel’s diverticulum (MD) is a persistent remnant of the vitelointestinal duct and is present in 2% of population [1]. It is the most common congenital malformation of the gastrointestinal tract. It can present clinically as haemorrhage, diverticulitis, intussusception, chronic ulceration, intestinal obstruction and perforation. Complicated presentation, especially bleeding, tends to be more common in the paediatric group, whereas intestinal obstruction is more common in adults [2]. Patients with a perforation of Meckel’s diverticulum by an enterolith are rare and may present with right iliac fossa pain, which mimics acute appendicitis. PMID:26363105

  4. Predictive value of the Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification on the outcome of diverticular disease of the colon: An international study

    PubMed Central

    Brandimarte, Giovanni; Di Mario, Francesco; Annunziata, Maria L; Bafutto, Mauro; Bianco, Maria A; Colucci, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita; Danese, Silvio; De Bastiani, Rudi; Elisei, Walter; Escalante, Ricardo; Faggiani, Roberto; Ferrini, Luciano; Forti, Giacomo; Latella, Giovanni; Graziani, Maria G; Oliveira, Enio C; Papa, Alfredo; Penna, Antonio; Portincasa, Piero; Søreide, Kjetil; Spadaccini, Antonio; Usai, Paolo; Bonovas, Stefanos; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Picchio, Marcello; Lecca, Piera G; Zampaletta, Costantino; Cassieri, Claudio; Damiani, Alberto; Desserud, Kari F; Fiorella, Serafina; Landi, Rosario; Goni, Elisabetta; Lai, Maria A; Pigò, Flavia; Rotondano, Gianluca; Schiaccianoce, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease. Aims We assessed retrospectively the predictive value of DICA in patients for whom endoscopic data and clinical follow-up were available. Methods For each patient, we recorded: age, severity of DICA, presence of abdominal pain, C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin test (if available) at the time of diagnosis; months of follow-up; therapy taken during the follow-up to maintain remission (if any); occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis; need of surgery. Results We enrolled 1651 patients (793 M, 858 F, mean age 66.6 ± 11.1 years): 939 (56.9%) patients were classified as DICA 1, 501 (30.3%) patients as DICA 2 and 211 (12.8%) patients as DICA 3. The median follow-up was 24 (9–38) months. Acute diverticulitis (AD) occurred/recurred in 263 (15.9%) patients; surgery was necessary in 57 (21.7%) cases. DICA was the only factor significantly associated to the occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis and surgery either at univariate (χ2 = 405.029; p < 0.0001) or multivariate analysis (hazard ratio = 4.319, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.639–5.126; p < 0.0001). Only in DICA 2 patients was therapy effective for prevention of AD occurrence/recurrence with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.598 (0.391–0.914) (p = 0.006, log rank test). Mesalazine-based therapies reduced the risk of AD occurrence/recurrence and needs of surgery with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.2103 (0.122–0.364) and 0.459 (0.258–0.818), respectively. Conclusions DICA classification is a valid parameter to predict the risk of diverticulitis occurrence/recurrence in patients suffering from diverticular disease of the colon. PMID:27536372

  5. An Evaluation of a Computer Based Medical Diagnostic/Information System for Nuclear Submarines,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    PERFDU), Cholecystitis (CHOLE), Small Bowel Obstruction (SBO), Renal Colic (R.COLIC), Non-specific Abdominal Pain (NSAP), and’ Dyspepsia (DYSPP...Small Bowel Obstruction , Cholecystitis, Diverticulitis and Perforated Duodenal Ulcer. This is not surprising since the sample of cases in this study is...Disease Computer Physician Non-Specific Pain 62.0 74.6 Dyspepsia 55.0 30.0 Renal Cholic 25.0 100.0 Small Bowel Obstruction 25.0 75.0 Cholistitis 57.1

  6. Duodenal organ injury severity (OIS) and outcome.

    PubMed

    Kline, G; Lucas, C E; Ledgerwood, A M; Saxe, J M

    1994-07-01

    The effect of organ injury severity on outcome was assessed in 101 patients treated for duodenal trauma. Most patients were men (89%) and victims of penetrating wounds (93%). Grade I is minor hematoma or incomplete perforation; Grade II is major hematoma or small complete perforation; Grade III is large perforation excluding ampulla; Grade IV is large perforation at ampulla; Grade V is duodenopancreatic crunch. The injuries were as follows: Grade I (5 patients), Grade II (31), Grade III (40), Grade IV (12), and Grade V (13). Fourteen patients exsanguinated from associated vessel injury; each had Grade IV or Grade V injury. All 36 patients with Grade I and Grade II injury had primary repair; the single death was due to liver necrosis. Most (31 patients) Grade III injuries and three Grade IV injuries were treated by primary repair alone; the three deaths were unrelated to the duodenal injury. Other major injuries were treated by duodenal exclusion (4 patients), duodenal diverticulization (6), or resection (4); the single death was unrelated to the duodenum. Primary closure is favored for minor injuries and most Grade III injuries. Severe injuries may require exclusion, diverticulization, or resection.

  7. Non-interventional study evaluating efficacy and tolerability of rifaximin for treatment of uncomplicated diverticular disease.

    PubMed

    Stallinger, Sylvia; Eller, Norbert; Högenauer, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Patients with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease represent a spectrum of patients who report recurrent abdominal symptoms, however are lacking substantial colonic inflammation in contrast to patients with acute diverticulitis. This non-interventional study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of rifaximin, a broad-spectrum poorly absorbable antibiotic, in cyclic treatment of these patients. Adult patients with uncomplicated diverticular disease in care of physicians in private practice intended to be treated with rifaximin were included. Patients with acute diverticulitis and symptoms suggestive of more severe intestinal inflammation were excluded. Data of 1,003 patients treated in cycles of 7-10 days per month over a period of 3 months were evaluated. In total, 75 % of patients had more than three episodes of symptoms in the last year before inclusion in the study. However, two-third of patients did not receive any treatment before. Over the 3-month treatment period with rifaximin, all assessed symptoms of diverticular disease, such as abdominal pain, diarrhoea and flatulence, improved significantly. There was an overall good compliance to the scheme of cyclic drug administration of rifaximin. During the study, 24 adverse events in 20 patients were recorded, of which 6 adverse events showed a causal relationship to the use of rifaximin (0.6 %). We conclude that cyclic rifaximin shows good clinical efficacy and tolerability in patients with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease treated in a routine private practice outpatient setting.

  8. Towards an evidence-based management of right iliac fossa pain in the over 50-year-old patient

    PubMed Central

    Gammeri, E; Catton, A; van Duren, BH; Appleton, SG

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Right iliac fossa pain is a common presenting complaint to general surgery. The differential diagnosis is wide, particularly in the elderly. Computed tomography (CT) is often used in the ‘older’ population, as they have a higher prevalence of acute colonic diverticulitis and colonic neoplasia, both of which should be identified prior to surgery. There is, however, no published evidence to support this practice. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients aged over 50 years who presented with right iliac fossa (RIF) pain to a district general hospital. We determined whether tenderness was predominantly right- or left-sided and whether systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was present on admission. The use of imaging modalities, their results and, if performed, operative findings were recorded. Results Of 3160 patients identified, 89 met the inclusion criteria. Diagnoses included appendicitis (27%), neoplasia (15%), non-specific abdominal pain (15%) and acute colonic diverticulitis (10%). CT was performed in 82% of patients, with a sensitivity of 97% based on operative findings. Six patients underwent surgery without a scan, two of whom required a change in the planned procedure due to unexpected findings. Conclusions Unless contraindicated, CT scanning should be mandatory in patients aged over 50 years presenting with signs of peritonism in the RIF or lower abdomen. PMID:27269436

  9. Laparoscopic treatment of complicated colonic diverticular disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Daher, Ronald; Barouki, Elie; Chouillard, Elie

    2016-02-27

    Up to 10% of acute colonic diverticulitis may necessitate a surgical intervention. Although associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, Hartmann's procedure (HP) has been considered for many years to be the gold standard for the treatment of generalized peritonitis. To reduce the burden of surgery in these situations and as driven by the accumulated experience in colorectal and minimally-invasive surgery, laparoscopy has been increasingly adopted in the management of abdominal emergencies. Multiple case series and retrospective comparative studies confirmed that with experienced hands, the laparoscopic approach provided better outcomes than the open surgery. This technique applies to all interventions related to complicated diverticular disease, such as HP, sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis (RPA) and reversal of HP. The laparoscopic approach also provided new therapeutic possibilities with the emergence of the laparoscopic lavage drainage (LLD), particularly interesting in the context of purulent peritonitis of diverticular origin. At this stage, however, most of our knowledge in these fields relies on studies of low-level evidence. More than ever, well-built large randomized controlled trials are necessary to answer present interrogations such as the exact place of LLD or the most appropriate sigmoid resection procedure (laparoscopic HP or RPA), as well as to confirm the advantages of laparoscopy in chronic complications of diverticulitis or HP reversal.

  10. Laparoscopy for Benign Diseases of the Colon.

    PubMed

    Smith, Radhika; Maron, David J

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has revolutionized the delivery of care to the surgical patient undergoing colorectal resection. Since the first laparoscopic-assisted colectomy in 1991, significant advances have been made in minimally invasive colorectal surgery. For many benign conditions, laparoscopic colectomy has been proven to be safe and effective, and in some instances superior when compared with open surgery. Complex laparoscopic resections such as those for diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease have also been shown to have equivalent outcomes when compared with open surgery. Short-term benefits of a minimally invasive approach include less pain, decreased rates of wound infection and postoperative morbidity, faster return of bowel function, and shorter length of stay. Improvements in long-term complications have also been noted with lower incidence of incisional hernias and small bowel obstructions secondary to adhesions. As surgeons become more facile with laparoscopic resection, more complex cases such as those for complicated diverticulitis and reoperative surgery for inflammatory bowel disease can be completed with shorter operative times and decreased cost.

  11. Role of Fiber in Symptomatic Uncomplicated Diverticular Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Carabotti, Marilia; Annibale, Bruno; Severi, Carola; Lahner, Edith

    2017-01-01

    Symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease (SUDD) is a syndrome characterized by recurrent abdominal symptoms in patients with colonic diverticula. There is some evidence that a high-fiber diet or supplemental fibers may reduce symptoms in SUDD patients and a high-fiber diet is commonly suggested for these patients. This systematic review aims to update the evidence on the efficacy of fiber treatment in SUDD, in terms of a reduction in symptoms and the prevention of acute diverticulitis. According to PRISMA, we identified studies on SUDD patients treated with fibers (PubMed and Scopus). The quality of these studies was evaluated by the Jadad scale. The main outcome measures were a reduction of abdominal symptoms and the prevention of acute diverticulitis. Nineteen studies were included, nine with dietary fiber and 10 with supplemental fiber, with a high heterogeneity concerning the quantity and quality of fibers employed. Single studies suggest that fibers, both dietary and supplemental, could be beneficial in SUDD, even if the quality is very low, with just one study yielding an optimal score. The presence of substantial methodological limitations, the heterogeneity of the therapeutic regimens employed, and the lack of ad hoc designed studies, did not permit a summary of the outcome measure. Thus, the benefit of dietary or supplemental fiber in SUDD patients still needs to be established. PMID:28230737

  12. Laparoscopic treatment of complicated colonic diverticular disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Ronald; Barouki, Elie; Chouillard, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of acute colonic diverticulitis may necessitate a surgical intervention. Although associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, Hartmann’s procedure (HP) has been considered for many years to be the gold standard for the treatment of generalized peritonitis. To reduce the burden of surgery in these situations and as driven by the accumulated experience in colorectal and minimally-invasive surgery, laparoscopy has been increasingly adopted in the management of abdominal emergencies. Multiple case series and retrospective comparative studies confirmed that with experienced hands, the laparoscopic approach provided better outcomes than the open surgery. This technique applies to all interventions related to complicated diverticular disease, such as HP, sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis (RPA) and reversal of HP. The laparoscopic approach also provided new therapeutic possibilities with the emergence of the laparoscopic lavage drainage (LLD), particularly interesting in the context of purulent peritonitis of diverticular origin. At this stage, however, most of our knowledge in these fields relies on studies of low-level evidence. More than ever, well-built large randomized controlled trials are necessary to answer present interrogations such as the exact place of LLD or the most appropriate sigmoid resection procedure (laparoscopic HP or RPA), as well as to confirm the advantages of laparoscopy in chronic complications of diverticulitis or HP reversal. PMID:26981187

  13. Disproportionate fat stranding: a helpful CT sign in patients with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose M; Sirlin, Claude B; Pinto, Pedro S; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Stella, Damien L; Casola, Giovanna

    2004-01-01

    Fat stranding adjacent to thickened bowel wall seen at computed tomography (CT) in patients with acute abdominal pain suggests an acute process of the gastrointestinal tract, but the differential diagnosis is wide. The authors observed "disproportionate" fat stranding (ie, stranding more severe than expected for the degree of bowel wall thickening present) and explored how this finding suggests a narrower differential diagnosis, one that is centered in the mesentery: diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, omental infarction, and appendicitis. The characteristic CT findings (in addition to fat stranding) of each of these entities often lead to a final diagnosis. Diverticulitis manifests with mild, smooth bowel wall thickening and no lymphadenopathy. Epiploic appendagitis manifests with central areas of high attenuation and a hyperattenuated rim, in addition to its characteristic location adjacent to the colon. In contrast, omental infarction is always centered in the omentum. The most specific finding of appendicitis is a dilated, fluid-filled appendix. Correct noninvasive diagnosis is important because treatment approaches for these conditions range from monitoring to surgery.

  14. Outcomes of Colostomy Reversal in a Public Safety Net Hospital: The End or Beginning of a New Problem?

    PubMed

    Adam, Nadir; Rahbar, Shahrzad; Skinner, Ruby

    2015-10-01

    Colostomy reversals can be technically challenging and linked to significant morbidity. There is sparse evidence that evaluates outcomes after colostomy reversals performed by acute care surgeons. We performed a review of 61 colostomy reversals from January 2011 to January 2014. Colostomies for acute diverticulitis were predominate, n = 32 (52%). Traumatic colorectal injuries were n = 15, 25 per cent. Colorectal cancer was n = 8, 13 per cent. Sigmoid volvulus accounted for n = 2 cases. Abdominal sepsis from adhesions was n = 3. A rectal foreign body was for n = 1 case. The time to reversal was 360 ± 506 days. Completion of reversals was successful in 90 per cent of cases and protecting stoma use was in n = 12, (22%). Surgical site infections occurred in n = 20, patients (32%). Surgical site infections were prevalent in obese patients, (55%). Anastomotic leaks (ALs) occurred at 12 per cent, and were prevalent in obese, [obese (22%) vs nonobese (8%), P = 0.1]. The majority of AL n = 6, (85%) were in acute diverticulitis and trauma. There were no ALs in cases with protective diversion. No deaths occurred. The elective nature of colostomy reversals does not imply low morbidity. Obesity and major inflammatory processes were associated with major surgical complications. These data suggest that protective stomas should be applied liberally, particularly in high-risk cases.

  15. Enterovesical Fistulae: Aetiology, Imaging, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Golabek, Tomasz; Szymanska, Anna; Szopinski, Tomasz; Bukowczan, Jakub; Furmanek, Mariusz; Powroznik, Jan; Chlosta, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives. Enterovesical fistula (EVF) is a devastating complication of a variety of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Radiological imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis of EVF and is indispensable to gastroenterologists and surgeons for choosing the correct therapeutic option. This paper provides an overview of the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae. The treatment of fistulae is also briefly discussed. Material and Methods. We performed a literature review by searching the Medline database for articles published from its inception until September 2013 based on clinical relevance. Electronic searches were limited to the keywords: “enterovesical fistula,” “colovesical fistula” (CVF), “pelvic fistula”, and “urinary fistula”. Results. EVF is a rare pathology. Diverticulitis is the commonest aetiology. Over two-thirds of affected patients describe pathognomonic features of pneumaturia, fecaluria, and recurrent urinary tract infections. Computed tomography is the modality of choice for the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae as not only does it detect a fistula, but it also provides information about the surrounding anatomical structures. Conclusions. In the vast majority of cases, this condition is diagnosed because of unremitting urinary symptoms after gastroenterologist follow-up procedures for a diverticulitis or bowel inflammatory disease. Computed tomography is the most sensitive test for enterovesical fistula. PMID:24348538

  16. William Arbuthnot Lane (1856-1943): Surgical Innovator and His Theory of Autointoxication.

    PubMed

    Morris, Mackenzie; Price, Thea; Cowan, Scott W; Yeo, Charles J; Phillips, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    William Arbuthnot Lane contributed to the advancement of many fields of orthopedics, otolaryngology, and general surgery. He is credited for his "no-touch technique" and the invention of long-handled instruments, some of which are still in use today, to minimize tissue handling. He is most well known for his hypothesis that slowing of gastric contents could cause a variety of ailments and this became known as Lane's disease. Although his surgical treatment of Lane's disease is now defunct, it advanced the surgical technique in colorectal surgery. It seems likely that some of Lane's "autointoxication" patients would be classified today as patients with colonic inertia, diverticulitis, colonic volvulus, and megacolon or, which are all treated with colectomy. Lane was a pioneer in multiple fields and a true general surgeon. He advanced colorectal surgery immensely and propelled the field of surgery into a new era.

  17. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel: etiologies and CT findings.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Rosenblat, Juliana; Duncan, Dameon R; Friedman, Barak; Katz, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate and discuss the various etiologies of perforation of the mesenteric small bowel and associated findings on abdominal CT. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel is an uncommon cause of an acute abdomen and can be due to various etiologies. In underdeveloped countries, infection is probably the most common cause, while in industrialized nations, perforation may be due to Crohn disease, diverticulitis, foreign body, trauma, tumor, mechanical obstruction, primary ischemic event, or iatrogenic causes. CT is usually the initial imaging examination in patients with an acute abdomen and is sensitive in diagnosing small bowel perforation. CT findings in the setting of small bowel perforation are often subtle, but when present, may help the radiologist determine a specific cause of perforation. The aims of this pictorial essay are to review the various causes of mesenteric small bowel perforation and to discuss and illustrate the CT findings that can help arrive at the diagnosis.

  18. CT evaluation of the acute abdomen: bowel pathology spectrum of disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G L; Johnson, P T; Fishman, E K

    1996-08-01

    CT has become the primary imaging modality for the evaluation of the patient with clinical symptoms of an acute abdomen and a confusing clinical picture. Because these patients may have a range of various pathologies, CT has been used successfully to define the presence of disease and localize it to a specific organ or organ system. In this article, we review the various processes that resulted in acute abdomen focusing on the small bowel and colon. Specific entities discussed include appendicitis, diverticulitis, Crohn disease, and ulcerative colitis. Other less common processes, including pseudomembranous colitis, intussusception, and bowel ischemia are also discussed. The specific role of CT scanning and specific CT signs are discussed and addressed. The value of CT in relationship to other modalities and clinical evaluation is discussed and key statistics provided.

  19. Idiopathic Intractable Diarrhoea Leading to Torsade de Pointes

    PubMed Central

    Mouyis, Kyriacos; Okonko, Darlington; Missouris, Constantinos G.

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old lady was admitted to our hospital with a 3-year history of noninfective diarrhoea and recurrent syncopal events over the last 3 months. Her initial electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed trigeminy and prolonged QTc interval. She had a structurally normal heart with no coronary artery disease. Investigations revealed low potassium at 3.0 mmol/L. Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy suggested a possible diagnosis of diverticulitis. Soon after admission she had an unresponsive episode with spontaneous recovery. Telemetry and Holter analysis confirmed multiple episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (Torsade de Pointes). Following electrolyte supplementation the episodes of polymorphic VT improved. Due to the protracted nature of the diarrhoea, the recurrent syncopal events, and recurrent hypokalaemia documented over recent years, an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) was sanctioned by the multidisciplinary team (MDT). In summary, chronic diarrhoea may result in life threatening polymorphic VT due to hypokalaemia and QTc prolongation. In these patients an ICD may be considered. PMID:27313906

  20. CT in the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Gatewood, O.M.B.; Jones, B.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    Enterovesical fistulae are difficult to demonstrate by conventional radiographic methods. Computed tomography (CT), a sensitive, noninvasive method of documenting the presence of such fistulae, is unique in its ability to outline the extravesical component of the primary disease process. Twenty enterovesical fistulae identified by CT were caused by diverticulitis (nine), carcinoma of the rectosigmoid (two), Crohn disease (three), gynecologic tumors (two), bladder cancer (one), cecal carcinoma (one), prostatic neoplasia (one), and appendiceal abscess (one). The CT findings included intravesical air (90%), passage of orally or rectally administered contrast medium into the bladder (20%), focal bladder-wall thickening (90%), thickening of adjacent bowel wall (85%), and an extraluminal mass that often contained air (75%). CT proved to be an important new method in the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae.

  1. Self-Expanding Metal Stenting in the Management of a Benign Colonic Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ozden, Nuri; Simon, Howard M.; Kobrossi, Semaan; Ubagharaji, Ezinnaya

    2016-01-01

    Colonic postanastomotic strictures occur in 1.5–8% of patients following colorectal surgery. Traditionally, colonic strictures were treated by multiple modalities including endoscopic dilatation. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) have been indicated in the management of benign colonic strictures; however, there are limited available data with regard to their efficacy. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who had perforated sigmoid diverticulitis followed by Hartmann's procedure with eventual reanastomosis 6 months later. He subsequently developed benign colonic stricture, which was treated with a metal stent. SEMS are associated with a low mortality rate and are appropriate in treating acute colonic obstruction as a result of benign stricture in the setting of postanastomosis. PMID:27403114

  2. Perforation in a patient with stercoral colitis and diverticulosis: who did it?

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Murukutla, Srujitha; DiPoce, Jason; Gustafson, Steven; Sarkany, David; Mody, Kokila; Widmann, Warren D.; Gottesman, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Stercoral colitis with perforation of the colon is an uncommon, yet life-threatening cause of the acute abdomen. No one defining symptom exists for stercoral colitis; it may present asymptomatically or with vague symptoms. Diagnostic delay may result in perforation of the colon resulting in complications, even death. Moreover, stercoral perforation of the colon can also present with localized left lower quadrant abdominal pain masquerading as diverticulitis. Diverticular diseases and stercoral colitis share similar pathophysiology; furthermore, they may coexist, further complicating the diagnostic dilemma. The ability to decide the cause of perforation in a patient with both stercoral colitis and diverticulosis has not been discussed. We, therefore, report this case of stercoral perforation in a patient with diverticulosis and include a discussion of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and a review of helpful diagnostic clues for a rapid differentiation to allow for accurate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24596650

  3. Use of rifaximin in gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Shayto, Rani H; Abou Mrad, Rachel; Sharara, Ala I

    2016-08-07

    Rifaximin is a broad spectrum oral antibiotic with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. It is poorly absorbed and thus has a highly favorable safety profile. Rifaximin has been shown to be effective in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea, functional bloating and irritable bowel syndrome, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and in the prevention of recurrent overt hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, there is emerging evidence for a possible beneficial effect of rifaximin in the treatment of uncomplicated diverticular disease and in the prevention of recurrent diverticulitis. The use of rifaximin is associated with a low incidence of development, or persistence of spontaneous bacterial mutants. Moreover, the development of important drug resistance among extra-intestinal flora during rifaximin therapy is unlikely because of minimal systemic absorption and limited cross-resistance of rifaximin with other antimicrobials. This review addresses the current and emerging role of rifaximin in the treatment of gastrointestinal and liver disorders.

  4. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  5. A likely diagnosis of Crohn's disease in a 95-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Kishan R; Patel, Ekta; McCann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) has a bimodal distribution in incidence, with a second peak in the elderly. However, its diagnosis in the elderly is difficult due to a wider range of more common differential diagnoses such as diverticulitis, ischaemic colitis and colorectal cancer. We report a likely case of CD in a 95-year-old woman. She presented with diarrhoea and rectal bleeding and was found to have multiple pleomorphic ulcers with a patchy cobblestone mucosa on sigmoidoscopy. Histopathology demonstrated focal ulceration, altered crypt architecture and adjacent neutrophil polymorph infiltration with no granolomata or features of malignancy. The patient passed away after steroid treatment was started. This case is a reminder that CD can present in the elderly and highlights the challenging diagnosis and high mortality of CD-related hospitalisation in the elderly. When considering management, attention should be given to comorbid disease, age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and patients social circumstances. PMID:23001095

  6. Colonic perforation by a transmural and transvalvular migrated retained sponge: multi-detector computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Sagnelli, Marco; Guadagno, Paolo; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Marra, Teresa; Scotto di Santolo, Maria; Fei, Landino; Salvatore, Marco

    2014-04-21

    Transmural migrated retained sponges usually impact at the level of the ileo-cecal valve leading to a small bowel obstruction. Once passed through the ileo-cecal valve, a retained sponge can be propelled forward by peristaltic activity and eliminated with feces. We report the case of a 52-year-old female with a past surgical history and recurrent episodes of abdominal pain and constipation. On physical examination, a generalized resistance was observed with tenderness in the right flank. Contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography findings were consistent with a perforated right colonic diverticulitis with several out-pouchings at the level of the ascending colon and evidence of free air in the right parieto-colic gutter along with an air-fluid collection within the mesentery. In addition, a ring-shaped hyperdense intraluminal material was also noted. At surgery, the ascending colon appeared irregularly thickened and folded with a focal wall interruption and a peri-visceral abscess at the level of the hepatic flexure, but no diverticula were found. A right hemi-colectomy was performed and on dissection of the surgical specimen a retained laparotomy sponge was found in the bowel lumen.

  7. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in the elderly: an update.

    PubMed

    Pardi, Darrell S; Loftus, Edward V; Camilleri, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is most common in young adults, but it can also present in the elderly. Furthermore, with the aging of the population, the number of elderly patients with IBD is expected to grow. Other conditions, such as diverticulitis and ischaemic colitis, may be more common in the elderly and need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. Management of elderly patients with IBD follows the same principles as in younger patients, with a few exceptions. For patients with mild-to-moderate colitis, a 5-aminosalicylate drug is often used (sulfasalazine, olsalazine, mesalazine, balsalazide). Topical therapy may be sufficient for those with distal colitis, whereas an oral preparation is used for more extensive disease. In those with more severe or refractory symptoms, corticosteroids are used, although the elderly appear to be at increased risk for corticosteroid-associated complications. For patients with corticosteroid-dependent or corticosteroid-refractory disease, immunosuppression with azathioprine or mercaptopurine may help avoid surgery. In patients with Crohn's disease, a similar approach is followed, with the additional consideration that the formulation of drug used must ensure delivery of drug to the site of inflammation. In fistulising Crohn's disease, antibacterials, immunosuppressive drugs, infliximab and surgery are often used in combination. Controlled trials and clinical experience have shown that infliximab is a significant addition to the therapeutic armamentarium for patients with Crohn's disease.

  8. Myenteric plexitis: A frequent feature in patients undergoing surgery for colonic diverticular disease

    PubMed Central

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Sidoni, Angelo; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Dore, Maria P; Binda, Gian A; Bandelloni, Roberto; Salemme, Marianna; Del Sordo, Rachele; Cadei, Moris; Manca, Alessandra; Bernardini, Nunzia; Maurer, Christoph A; Cathomas, Gieri

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticular disease of the colon is frequent in clinical practice, and a large number of patients each year undergo surgical procedures worldwide for their symptoms. Thus, there is a need for better knowledge of the basic pathophysiologic mechanisms of this disease entity. Objectives Because patients with colonic diverticular disease have been shown to display abnormalities of the enteric nervous system, we assessed the frequency of myenteric plexitis (i.e. the infiltration of myenteric ganglions by inflammatory cells) in patients undergoing surgery for this condition. Methods We analyzed archival resection samples from the proximal resection margins of 165 patients undergoing left hemicolectomy (60 emergency and 105 elective surgeries) for colonic diverticulitis, by histology and immunochemistry. Results Overall, plexitis was present in almost 40% of patients. It was subdivided into an eosinophilic (48%) and a lymphocytic (52%) subtype. Plexitis was more frequent in younger patients; and it was more frequent in those undergoing emergency surgery (50%), compared to elective (28%) surgery (p = 0.007). All the severe cases of plexitis displayed the lymphocytic subtype. Conclusions In conclusion, myenteric plexitis is frequent in patients with colonic diverticular disease needing surgery, and it might be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26668745

  9. Analysis of indication for laparoscopic right colectomy and conversion risks.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Paolo; Bertocchi, Elisa; Madoni, Cristiana; Viani, Lorenzo; Dell'Abate, Paolo; Sianesi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery developed continuously over the past years becoming the gold standard for some surgical interventions. Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is well established as a safe and feasible procedure to treat benign and malignant pathologies. In this paper we studied in deep the role of laparoscopic right colectomy analysing the indications to this surgical procedure and the factors related to the conversion from laparoscopy to open surgery. We described the different surgical techniques of laparoscopic right colectomy comparing extra to intracorporeal anastomosis and we pointed out the different ways to access to the abdomen (multiport VS single incision). The indications for laparoscopic right colectomy are benign (inflammatory bowel disease and rare right colonic diverticulitis) and malignant diseases (right colon cancer and appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasm): we described the good outcomes of laparoscopic right colectomy in all these illnesses. Laparoscopic conversion rates in right colectomy are reported as 12-16%; we described the different type of risk factors related to open conversion: patient-related, disease-related and surgeon-related factors, procedural factors and intraoperative complications. We conclude that laparoscopic right colectomy is considered superior to open surgery in the shortterm outcomes without difference in long-term outcomes.

  10. Gossypiboma presenting as coloduodenal fistula--report of a rare case with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ramesh, Ananthakrishnan; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Sengutuvan; Ram, Duvuru; Ali, Sheik Manwar; Subramaniam, Raghavan Velayutham Sugi

    2014-01-01

    The term gossypiboma is used to describe a mass of cotton matrix left behind in a body cavity intraoperatively. The most common site reported is the abdominal cavity. It can present with abscess, intestinal obstruction, malabsorption, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and fistulas. A 37-year-old woman presented with pain in the right hypochondrium for 2 months following open cholecystectomy. As she did not improve with proton pump inhibitors, an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was done, which showed a possible gauze piece stained with bile in the first part of the duodenum. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) of the abdomen revealed an abnormal fistulous communication of the first part of duodenum with proximal transverse colon, with a hypodense, mottled lesion within the lumen of the proximal transverse colon plugging the fistula, suggestive of a gossypiboma. Excision of the coloduodenal fistula, primary duodenal repair, and feeding jejunostomy was done. The patient recovered well and is now tolerating normal diet. Coloduodenal fistula is usually caused by Crohn's disease, malignancy, right-sided diverticulitis, and gall stone disease. Isolated coloduodenal fistula due to gossypiboma has not been reported in the literature so far to the best of our knowledge. We report this case of coloduodenal fistula secondary to gossypiboma for its rarity and diagnostic challenge.

  11. How to Diagnose and Treat IBD Mimics in the Refractory IBD Patient Who Does Not Have IBD.

    PubMed

    Chachu, Karen A; Osterman, Mark T

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract and includes both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Patients with IBD often present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal bleeding but may also have a wide variety of other symptoms such as weight loss, fever, nausea, vomiting, and possibly obstruction. Given that the presentation of IBD is not specific, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses a wide spectrum of diseases, many of which can mimic and/or even coexist with IBD. It is important for physicians to differentiate symptoms due to refractory IBD from symptoms due to IBD mimics when a patient is not responding to standard IBD treatment. Many of the various IBD mimics include infectious etiologies (viral, bacterial, mycobacterial, fungal, protozoal, and helminthic infections), vascular causes, other immune causes including autoimmune etiologies, drug-induced processes, radiation-induced, and other etiologies such as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, diverticulitis, and bile acid malabsorption. Thoughtful consideration and evaluation of these potential etiologies through patient history and physical examination, as well as appropriate tests, endoscopic evaluation, and cross-sectional imaging is required to evaluate any patient presenting with symptoms consistent with IBD.

  12. The Use of PET-CT in the Assessment of Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Owen J; McDermott, Shanaugh; Slattery, James; Sahani, Dushyant; Blake, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer, accounting for 53,219 deaths in 2007 and an estimated 146,970 new cases in the USA during 2009. The combination of FDG PET and CT has proven to be of great benefit for the assessment of colorectal cancer. This is most evident in the detection of occult metastases, particularly intra- or extrahepatic sites of disease, that would preclude a curative procedure or in the detection of local recurrence. FDG PET is generally not used for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer although there are circumstances where PET-CT may make the initial diagnosis, particularly with its more widespread use. In addition, precancerous adenomatous polyps can also be detected incidentally on whole-body images performed for other indications; sensitivity increases with increasing polyp size. False-negative FDG PET findings have been reported with mucinous adenocarcinoma, and false-positive findings have been reported due to inflammatory conditions such as diverticulitis, colitis, and postoperative scarring. Therefore, detailed evaluation of the CT component of a PET/CT exam, including assessment of the entire colon, is essential.

  13. CT evaluation of the colon: inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Horton, K M; Corl, F M; Fishman, E K

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is valuable for detection and characterization of many inflammatory conditions of the colon. At CT, a dilated, thickened appendix is suggestive of appendicitis. A 1-4-cm, oval, fatty pericolic lesion with surrounding mesenteric inflammation is diagnostic of epiploic appendagitis. The key to distinguishing diverticulitis from other inflammatory conditions of the colon is the presence of diverticula in the involved segment. In typhlitis, CT demonstrates cecal distention and circumferential thickening of the cecal wall, which may have low attenuation secondary to edema. In radiation colitis, the clinical history is the key to suggesting the diagnosis because the CT findings can be nonspecific. The location of the involved segment and the extent and appearance of wall thickening may help distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. In ischemic colitis, CT typically demonstrates circumferential, symmetric wall thickening with fold enlargement. CT findings of graft-versus-host disease include small bowel and colonic wall thickening, which may result in luminal narrowing and separation of bowel loops. In infectious colitis, the site and thickness of colon affected may suggest a specific organism. The amount of wall thickening in pseudomembranous colitis is typically greater than in any other inflammatory disease of the colon except Crohn disease.

  14. Psoas abscesses complicating colonic disease: imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Lobo, D N; Dunn, W K; Iftikhar, S Y; Scholefield, J H

    1998-11-01

    Most surgeons think of psoas abscesses as a very rare condition related to tuberculosis of the spine, but in contemporary surgical practice they are more usually a complication of gastrointestinal disease. A case note study was undertaken on all patients treated for psoas abscess at two large hospitals in the mid-Trent region over a 2-year period. All seven patients presented with pyrexia, psoas spasm, a tender mass and leucocytosis. The diagnosis was made on abdominal radiographs in one patient, CT scan in three, MRI in two, and ultrasound in one. Aetiological factors included Crohn's disease in three, appendicitis in two, and sigmoid diverticulitis and metastatic colorectal carcinoma in one each. Six patients underwent transabdominal resection of the diseased bowel, retroperitoneal debridement and external drainage of the abscess cavity. Percutaneous drainage was performed in one. Two patients had more than one surgical exploration for complications. There were no deaths and the hospital stay ranged from 8-152 days. Psoas abscess can be a difficult and protracted problem. Bowel resection, thorough debridement, external drainage and concomitant antibiotics are essential for psoas abscesses complicating gastrointestinal disease. Defunctioning stomas may be necessary. However, in some cases a multidisciplinary approach may be required, as psoas abscesses can involve bone and joints.

  15. Percutaneous drainage of enteric-related abscesses.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, A S; Turner, M A

    1996-12-01

    Percutaneous drainage is a routinely performed radiologic procedure used in the management of abdominal abscesses. This technique has become the preferred method of treatment for most abdominal and pelvic abscesses, specifically those of enteric origin related to surgical procedures, appendicitis, diverticulitis, and Crohn disease. The well-documented safety and therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous abscess drainage (PAD) lead to the acceptance of this procedure as the primary means of managing abdominal abscesses, obviating the need for surgery in many instances. PAD may provide definitive therapy or may serve as a temporizing measure before delayed surgical treatment. Although PAD was originally reserved for treatment of unilocular, relatively superficial fluid collections, the role of PAD has evolved such that it is now used to manage complex multilocular fluid collections and abscesses that lie deep within the abdomen or pelvis. Although the standard transabdominal approach is preferred, a variety of approaches, including transgastric, transrectal, transvaginal, and transgluteal, may be used. PAD is performed using CT or sonographic guidance.

  16. Percutaneous catheter drainage of abdominal abscesses associated with perforated viscus.

    PubMed

    Flancbaum, L; Nosher, J L; Brolin, R E

    1990-01-01

    Improvements in radiologic localization have made percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) the initial procedure of choice for many intra-abdominal abscesses (IAA). During the past seven years 154 patients underwent PCD for treatment of abdominal abscesses. Fourteen of these patients had PCD as the initial treatment for IAA secondary to a perforated viscus and subsequently underwent an elective one-stage operation to treat the underlying disease. Etiologies of the abscesses included perforated appendicitis in six patients, sigmoid diverticulitis in three patients, Crohn's ileitis in two patients, and one case each of perforated gastric ulcer, perforated sigmoid carcinoma, and perforated gallbladder. Initial localization of the abscess was achieved by either CT or ultrasound. Seven abscesses were localized in the right lower quadrant, four were localized in the liver, and one was localized each in the left flank, right flank, subhepatic space, and pelvis. All patients subsequently underwent a definitive elective operation for their primary disease including six interval appendectomies, four sigmoid colectomies, two small-bowel resections, one subtotal gastrectomy and one cholecystectomy. There were no complications due to PCD and no deaths occurred. We conclude that PCD can be successfully performed as the initial treatment for IAA associated with a perforated viscus, obviating the first stage of the traditional two-stage surgical approach.

  17. Multimodality approach for imaging of non-traumatic acute abdominal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Gangadhar, Kiran; Kielar, Ania; Dighe, Manjiri K; O'Malley, Ryan; Wang, Carolyn; Gross, Joel A; Itani, Malak; Lalwani, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    "Acute abdomen" includes spectrum of medical and surgical conditions ranging from a less severe to life-threatening conditions in a patient presenting with severe abdominal pain that develops over a period of hours. Accurate and rapid diagnosis of these conditions helps in reducing related complications. Clinical assessment is often difficult due to availability of over-the-counter analgesics, leading to less specific physical findings. The key clinical decision is to determine whether surgical intervention is required. Laboratory and conventional radiographic findings are often non-specific. Thus, cross-sectional imaging plays a pivotal role for helping direct management of acute abdomen. Computed tomography is the primary imaging modality used for these cases due to fast image acquisition, although US is more specific for conditions such as acute cholecystitis. Magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound is very helpful in patients who are particularly sensitive to radiation exposure, such as pregnant women and pediatric patients. In addition, MRI is an excellent problem-solving modality in certain conditions such as assessment for choledocholithiasis in patients with right upper quadrant pain. In this review, we discuss a multimodality approach for the usual causes of non-traumatic acute abdomen including acute appendicitis, diverticulitis, cholecystitis, and small bowel obstruction. A brief review of other relatively less frequent but important causes of acute abdomen, such as perforated viscus and bowel ischemia, is also included.

  18. Encountering Meckel's diverticulum in emergency surgery for ascaridial intestinal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract. In children with intestinal ascariasis, the diverticulum remains asymptomatic or rarely the Ascaris lumbricoides may lead to its complications in the presence of massive intestinal roundworm load. Given that preoperative diagnosis is seldom carried out, when Meckel's diverticulum is found at laparotomy for obstructive intestinal complications of roundworm, the diverticulum should be removed as complications may occur at any time. The aim of this study was to describe the findings of concomitant presence of Meckel's diverticulum who had surgical intervention in symptomatic intestinal ascariasis in children. Methods A retrospective case review study of 14 children who had surgical intervention for symptomatic intestinal ascariasis having the presence of concomitant Meckel's diverticulum was done. The study was done at SMHS Hospital Srinagar, Kashmir. Results A total of the 14 children who had ascaridial intestinal obstruction with concomitant presence of Meckel's diverticulum were studied. Age of children ranged from 4-12 years, male:female ratio was 1.8:1. Nine patients had asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum, whereas 5 patients with symptomatic signs were found in the course of emergency surgery for ascaridial intestinal obstruction. Conclusion Meckel's diverticulum in intestinal ascariasis may pursue silent course or may be accompanied with complications of the diverticulitis, perforation or the gangrene. Incidental finding of the Meckel's diverticulum in the intestinal ascariasis should have removal. PMID:20529382

  19. Inactivation of corticosteroids in intestinal mucosa by 11 beta-hydroxysteroid: NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1. 1. 1. 146)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, A.F.; Anderson, F.H.

    1983-10-01

    Activity of the enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid:NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.146) in human intestinal mucosa was determined by incubating scraped mucosa with /sup 3/H-cortisone and /sup 14/C-cortisol; these steroids were then extracted, separated chromatographically, and the radioactivity assayed to determine simultaneously both reductase and dehydrogenase activities. This was the only significant metabolic alteration which the substrate underwent. Only two cases had slight (5 and 13%) reductase activity. In 35 patients, 16 male and 19 female, including seven cases of Crohn's disease, three ulcerative colitis, five diverticulitis, two undergoing surgery for repair of injuries and 18 for carcinoma of colon or rectum, cortisol was converted to cortisone in 15 min with a wide range of values distributed uniformly up to 85% dehydrogenation, with a mean of 42%. When tissue homogenates were fortified with coenzymes, excess NADPH lowered dehydrogenase activity 81%; excess NADP increased dehydrogenase activity 2-fold in three cases. It is possible that a value is characteristic of an individual but perhaps more likely enzyme activity varies with metabolic events involving changes in the coenzyme levels in mucosa, and a random sampling might be expected to yield such a distribution of values. In any event, where activity is high most of the cortisol is inactivated within minutes. It is suggested that synthetic corticoids which escape such metabolic alteration might, except during pregnancy, prove superior in the treatment of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. Laparoscopic Treatment of Bowel Obstruction Due to a Bezoar in a Meckel's Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    de Moya, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Meckel's diverticulum is a common anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract that may result in gastrointestinal bleeding, diverticulitis, and small bowel obstruction. This report describes the use of laparoscopy to treat a rare complication of Meckel's diverticulum–small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoar impaction. More generally, it provides an example of the feasibility and utility of a laparoscopic approach to small bowel obstructions of unknown causes. Methods: A 34-year-old male presented to the emergency department complaining of episodic abdominal pain and vomiting. He had no history of abdominal surgery. His vital signs were stable, and his abdomen was distended, but only mildly tender. He had no abdominal wall hernias on examination. Imaging was consistent with small bowel obstruction. He was brought to the operating room where laparoscopy revealed a Meckel's diverticulum with an impacted phytobezoar as the source of obstruction. The diverticulum was resected and the phytobezoar removed laparoscopically. Results: The patient recovered well and was discharged home on the third postoperative day, tolerating a regular diet. Conclusions: Phytobezoar impaction in a Meckel's diverticulum causing small bowel obstruction is a rare event. It can be effectively treated laparoscopically. This case provides an example of the potential utility of laparoscopy in treating small bowel obstructions of unclear etiology. PMID:22643518

  1. Enterolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Lan, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Enterolithiasis or formation of gastrointestinal concretions is an uncommon medical condition that develops in the setting of intestinal stasis in the presence of the intestinal diverticula, surgical enteroanastomoses, blind pouches, afferent loops, incarcerated hernias, small intestinal tumors, intestinal kinking from intra-abdominal adhesions, and stenosing or stricturing Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis. Enterolithiasis is classified into primary and secondary types. Its prevalence ranges from 0.3% to 10% in selected populations. Proximal primary enteroliths are composed of choleic acid salts and distal enteroliths are calcified. Clinical presentation includes abdominal pains, distention, nausea, and vomiting of occasionally sudden but often fluctuating subacute nature which occurs as a result of the enterolith tumbling through the bowel lumen. Thorough history and physical exam coupled with radiologic imaging helps establish a diagnosis in a patient at risk. Complications include bowel obstruction, direct pressure injury to the intestinal mucosa, intestinal gangrene, intussusceptions, afferent loop syndrome, diverticulitis, iron deficiency anemia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and perforation. Mortality of primary enterolithiasis may reach 3% and secondary enterolithiasis 8%. Risk factors include poorly conditioned patients with significant obstruction and delay in diagnosis. Treatment relies on timely recognition of the disease and endoscopic or surgical intervention. With advents in new technology, improved outcome is expected for patients with enterolithiasis. PMID:25548480

  2. Multidetector CT cystography for imaging colovesical fistulas and iatrogenic bladder leaks.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Massimo; Bianco, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography currently represents the modality of choice to image the urinary bladder in traumatized patients. In this review we present our experience with MDCT cystography applications outside the trauma setting, particularly for diagnosing bladder fistulas and leaks. A detailed explanation is provided concerning exam preparation, acquisition technique, image reconstruction and interpretation. Colovesical fistulas most commonly occur as a complication of sigmoid diverticular disease, and often remain occult after extensive diagnostic work-up including cystoscopy and contrast-enhanced CT. We consistently achieved accurate preoperative visualization of colovesical fistulas using MDCT cystography. Urinary leaks and injuries represent a non-negligible occurrence after pelvic surgery, particularly obstetric and gynaecological procedures: in our experience MDCT cystography is useful to investigate iatrogenic bladder leaks or fistulas. In our opinion, MDCT cystography should be recommended as the first line modality for direct visualization or otherwise confident exclusion of both spontaneous enterovesical fistulas and bladder injuries following instrumentation procedures, obstetric or surgical interventions. Main Messages • Explanation of exam preparation, acquisition technique, image reconstruction and interpretation. • Preoperative visualization of colovesical fistulas, usually secondary to sigmoid diverticulitis. • Visualization or exclusion of iatrogenic bladder injuries following instrumentation or surgery.

  3. Management of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related perforations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Seup; Kim, In-Gyu; Ryu, Byoung Yoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Yoo, Kyo Sang; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Jin Bong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to analyze the treatment strategies of patients with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related perforations. This is a retrospective study. Methods We experienced 13 perforations associated with ERCP. We reviewed the medical recordsand classified ERCP-related perforations according to mechanism of injury in terms of perforating device. Injury by endoscopic tip or insertion tube was classified as type I, injury by cannulation catheter or sphincterotomy knife as type II, and injury by guidewire as type III. Results Of four type I injuries, one case was managed by conservative management after primary closure with a hemoclip during ERCP. The other three patients underwent surgical treatments such as primary closure orpancreatico-duodenectomy. Of five type II injuries, two patients underwent conservative management and the other three cases were managed by surgical treatment such as duodenojejunostomy, duodenal diverticulization and pancreatico-duodenectomy. Of four type III injuries, three patients were managed conservatively and the remaining patient was managed by T-tube choledochostomy. Conclusion Type I injuries require immediate surgical management after EPCP or immediate endoscopic closure during ERCP whenever possible. Type II injuries require surgical or conservative treatment according to intra- and retro-peritoneal dirty fluid collection findings following radiologic evaluation. Type III injuries almost always improve after conservative treatment with endoscopic nasobilliary drainage. PMID:22066121

  4. Intestinal anastomotic injury alters spatially defined microbiome composition and function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When diseased intestine (i.e., from colon cancer, diverticulitis) requires resection, its reconnection (termed anastomosis) can be complicated by non-healing of the newly joined intestine resulting in spillage of intestinal contents into the abdominal cavity (termed anastomotic leakage). While it is suspected that the intestinal microbiota have the capacity to both accelerate and complicate anastomotic healing, the associated genotypes and functions have not been characterized. Results Using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of samples collected on the day of surgery (postoperative day 0 (POD0)) and the 6th day following surgery (postoperative day 0 (POD6)), we analyzed the changes in luminal versus tissue-associated microbiota at anastomotic sites created in the colon of rats. Results indicated that anastomotic injury induced significant changes in the anastomotic tissue-associated microbiota with minimal differences in the luminal microbiota. The most striking difference was a 500-fold and 200-fold increase in the relative abundance of Enterococcus and Escherichia/Shigella, respectively. Functional profiling predicted the predominance of bacterial virulence-associated pathways in post-anastomotic tissues, including production of hemolysin, cytolethal toxins, fimbriae, invasins, cytotoxic necrotizing factors, and coccolysin. Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest that compositional and functional changes accompany anastomotic tissues and may potentially accelerate or complicate anastomotic healing. PMID:25250176

  5. Laparoscopic versus open end colostomy closure: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Studer, Peter; Schnüriger, Beat; Umer, Melika; Kröll, Dino; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Candinas, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to review our experience with laparoscopic end colostomy closure. A retrospective review of a prospectively entered database was performed. Proportions and continuous variables were compared using the Fisher's exact and the Mann-Whitney U tests, respectively. Within the study period, 53 patients underwent closure of end colostomies. The main reasons for the colonic resections were perforated diverticulitis (52.7%) and neoplasms (20.8%). In 28 patients (53%), laparoscopic closure (LC) was attempted. Demographics did not differ between the attempted LC and the primary open closure (OC) group. The conversion rate from an LC to an OC was 50 per cent (14 of 28), mostly as a result of adhesions (71.4%). Hospital length of stay (HLOS) was significantly longer for the OC than with the attempted LC group (15.4 ± 11.9 days vs 11.3 ± 8.5 days, P = 0.046). The overall complication rate was not different between the completed LC and the OC groups (43 vs 56%, P = 0.634). The majority of complications detected (91.1%) were minor and could be treated conservatively. The role of laparoscopy to close end colostomies is questionable, because the conversion rate is high. However, a shorter HLOS can be expected when laparoscopy is successful. To reduce morbidity resulting from prolonged operation times, it is crucial to convert early and pre-emptively if hostile adhesions are found.

  6. Primary epiploic appendagitis: CT diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Maglinte, Dean D; Rajesh, Arumugam; Akisik, Fatih M

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the CT signs of primary epiploic appendagitis. A retrospective search of the CT database over 12 months for this diagnosis revealed 11 cases. The clinical findings were recorded. Softcopy CT images were reviewed by two experienced abdominal radiologists (KS, DM) for location of lesion, size, shape, presence of central hyperdense focus, degree of bowel wall thickening, mass effect, and ancillary signs. Abdominal pain was the primary symptom in all patients. Preliminary diagnoses were appendicitis (n=2), diverticulitis (n=5), pancreatitis (n=1), ovarian lesion (n=1), or unknown (n=2). Abdominal examination and white blood cell count were uninformative. CT examination revealed a solitary (n=11), ovoid (n=9) fatty lesion with some soft tissue stranding adjacent to the left colon (n=6), transverse colon (n=3), or right colon (n=2). Central hyperdensity (n=5), mild bowel wall thickening (n=2), and parietal peritoneal thickening (n=4) were also seen. In 4 patients the lesions were not visible on follow-up CT examination performed 23-184 days later. Primary epiploic appendagitis can clinically mimic other, more serious inflammatory conditions. Knowledge of its findings on CT would help the radiologist make the diagnosis and allow a more conservative approach to patient care.

  7. Assessment of platyhelminth diversity within amphibians of French Guiana revealed a new species of Nanopolystoma (Monogenea: Polystomatidae) in the caecilian Typhlonectes compressicauda.

    PubMed

    du Preez, Louis H; Badets, Mathieu; Verneau, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    An expedition was undertaken to French Guiana in search of amphibian parasites. Of the 23 anuran species collected and screened for polystomes, the toad Rhinella margaritifera (Laurenti) was the sole species found to be infected with a polystome, namely Wetapolystoma almae Gray, 1983. Of the two caecilian species collected, a new species of Nanopolystoma du Preez, Huyse et Wilkinson, 2008 was discovered from the urinary bladder of the aquatic caecilian Typhlonectes compressicauda (Duméril et Bibron). The small size of the mature worm, two non-diverticulated caeca of equal length that are non-confluent posteriorly, vitelline follicles in two dense lateral fields, a single follicular testis in the middle of the body, small ovary and a single operculated egg in utero, vaginae present and the caecilian host allowed the identification of the specimen as Nanopolystoma. Larger body size, hamulus length, egg diameter and occurrence in the caecilian family Typhlonectidae distinguishes the new species from the two other known polystomes in Nanopolystoma; thus, the description of Nanopolystoma tinsleyi sp. n. is provided within this paper.

  8. Emphysematous epididymo-orchitis as a camouflage of prostate invasion secondary to rectum cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ching-Heng; Liu, Chin-Yu; Cha, Tai-Lung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Meng, En; Sun, Guang-Huan; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Chen, Hong-I; Chang, Sun-Yran; Tsao, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Emphysematous epididymo-orchitis is a rare cause of acute scrotum pain characterized by gas formation within the tissue. Diabetes mellitus and recto-seminal fistula secondary to sigmoid diverticulitis are generally accepted as being responsible for this disease. However, prostate invasion secondary to rectal cancer may be considered to be a newly identified pathogenetic mechanism. Herein, we report this rare case and illustrate the pathogenesis. Case presentation: A 69-year-old man arrived at our emergency department presenting with sepsis and acute scrotal pain. Emphysematous epididymo-orchitis was diagnosed by scrotal sonography initially; however, advanced rectal cancer with prostate invasion was diagnosed by CT after a recurrent episode. An exploratory laparotomy with abdominoperineal resection and radical prostectomy were performed after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Histopathologic analysis confirmed the previous diagnosis. Emphysematous epididymo-orchitis caused by advanced rectal cancer is very rare, and our case is the first to be reported according to a literature search. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy plus extended surgery can achieve a good oncological outcome. Conclusion: This case indicated that the very rare presentation as emphysematous epididymo-orchitis caused by locally advanced colorectal cancer. PMID:27472731

  9. Laparoscopic Reversal of Hartmann's Procedure: State of the Art 20 Years after the First Reported Case

    PubMed Central

    Ardiri, Annalisa; Mannino, Maurizio; Politi, Antonio; Di Stefano, Andrea; Aftab, Zia; Abdelaal, Abdelrahman; Arcerito, Maria Concetta; Cavallaro, Andrea; Cavallaro, Marco; Bertino, Gaetano; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of the present work is to review the literature to point out the role of laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann procedure. Material and Methods. Number of patients, age, sex, etiology, Hinchey classification, interval between procedure and reversal, position of the first trocars, mean operative time (min), number and causes of conversion, length of stay, mortality, complications, and quality of life were considered. Results. 238 males (52.4%) and 216 females (47.6%) between 38 and 67 years were analyzed. The etiology was diverticulitis in 292 patients (72.1%), carcinoma in 43 patients (10.6%), and other in 70 patients (17.3%). Only 7 articles (22.6%) reported Hinchey classification. The interval between initial procedure and reversal was between 50 and 330 days. The initial trocar was open positioned in 182 patients (43.2%) through umbilical incision, in 177 patients (41.9%) in right upper quadrant, and in 63 patients (14.9%) in colostomy site. The operative time was between 69 and 285 minutes. A total of 83 patients (12.1%) were converted and the causes were reported in 67.4%. The length of stay was between 3 and 12 days. 5 patients (0.7%) died. The complications concern 112 cases (16.4%). Conclusion. The laparoscopic Hartmann's reversal is safer and achieves faster positive results. PMID:25210510

  10. Diverticular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: Incidental Diagnosis or Real Association? Final Answer.

    PubMed

    Regula, Jaroslaw

    2016-10-01

    Associations between diverticular disease of the colon and the colorectal cancer has been studied for >60 years. Observational, cross-sectional, and case-control studies as well as large population-based studies gave conflicting results and association was not fully proven. Obtaining the proof was difficult because both diseases share similar clinical characteristics, both increase with age, and both involve similar dietary factors. Long-term observations are difficult as diagnostic methods changed over time from barium enema 50 to 60 years ago, through endoscopy, up to CT and MR in recent years. Cancer or adenomas may be missed within diverticular segment; diverticula may be underreported in patients with colon cancer diagnosis. Most recent 2 large cohort studies have solved the dilemma. These studies have clearly shown that diverticular disease does not increase the risk of colon cancer after the first year of diagnosis. Within the first year of diagnosis the association is strong, most probably due to difficulties with differential diagnosis and misclassifications and shared symptoms. Findings of these studies have led to the conclusion that colon cancer has to be excluded using modern techniques after the first episode of suspected diverticulitis.

  11. Acute gastrointestinal complications after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Halm, M A

    1996-03-01

    Gastrointestinal problems, with an incidence of about 1%, may complicate the postoperative period after cardiovascular surgery, increasing morbidity, length of stay, and mortality. Several risk factors for the development of these complications, including preexisting conditions; advancing age; surgical procedure, especially valve, combined bypass/valve, emergency, reoperative, and aortic dissection repair; iatrogenic conditions; stress; ischemia; and postpump complications, have been identified in multiple research studies. Ischemia is the most significant of these risk factors after cardiovascular surgery. Mechanisms that have been implicated include longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and hypoperfusion states, especially if inotropic or intra-aortic balloon pump support is required. These risk factors have been linked to upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding, paralytic ileus, intestinal ischemia, acute diverticulitis, acute cholecystitis, hepatic dysfunction, hyperamylasemia, and acute pancreatitis. Gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for almost half of all complications, followed by hepatic dysfunction, intestinal ischemia, and acute cholecystitis. Identification of these gastrointestinal complications may be difficult because manifestations may be masked by postoperative analgesia or not reported by patients because they are sedated or require prolonged mechanical ventilation. Furthermore, clinical manifestations may be nonspecific and not follow the "classic" clinical picture. Therefore, astute assessment skills are needed to recognize these problems in high-risk patients early in their clinical course. Such early recognition will prompt aggressive medical and/or surgical management and therefore improve patient outcomes for the cardiovascular surgical population.

  12. Systematic review of emergent laparoscopic colorectal surgery for benign and malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Manish; Siddiqui, Muhammed RS; Gupta, Ashish; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Tekkis, Paris; Parvaiz, Amjad; Mirnezami, Alex H; Qureshi, Tahseen

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become well established in the management of both and malignant colorectal disease. The last decade has seen increasing numbers of surgeons trained to a high standard in minimally-invasive surgery. However there has not been the same enthusiasm for the use of laparoscopy in emergency colorectal surgery. There is a perception that emergent surgery is technically more difficult and may lead to worse outcomes. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive and critical appraisal of the available literature on the use of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) in the emergency setting. The literature is broadly divided by the underlying pathology; that is, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis and malignant obstruction. There were no randomized trials and the majority of the studies were case-matched series or comparative studies. The overall trend was that LCS is associated with shorter hospital stay, par or fewer complications but an increased operating time.Emergency LCS can be safely undertaken for both benign and malignant disease providing there is appropriate patient selection, the surgeon is adequately experienced and there are sufficient resources to allow for a potentially more complex operation. PMID:25493008

  13. Laparoscopic Reversal of Hartmann's Procedure: State of the Art 20 Years after the First Reported Case.

    PubMed

    Toro, Adriana; Ardiri, Annalisa; Mannino, Maurizio; Politi, Antonio; Di Stefano, Andrea; Aftab, Zia; Abdelaal, Abdelrahman; Arcerito, Maria Concetta; Cavallaro, Andrea; Cavallaro, Marco; Bertino, Gaetano; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of the present work is to review the literature to point out the role of laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann procedure. Material and Methods. Number of patients, age, sex, etiology, Hinchey classification, interval between procedure and reversal, position of the first trocars, mean operative time (min), number and causes of conversion, length of stay, mortality, complications, and quality of life were considered. Results. 238 males (52.4%) and 216 females (47.6%) between 38 and 67 years were analyzed. The etiology was diverticulitis in 292 patients (72.1%), carcinoma in 43 patients (10.6%), and other in 70 patients (17.3%). Only 7 articles (22.6%) reported Hinchey classification. The interval between initial procedure and reversal was between 50 and 330 days. The initial trocar was open positioned in 182 patients (43.2%) through umbilical incision, in 177 patients (41.9%) in right upper quadrant, and in 63 patients (14.9%) in colostomy site. The operative time was between 69 and 285 minutes. A total of 83 patients (12.1%) were converted and the causes were reported in 67.4%. The length of stay was between 3 and 12 days. 5 patients (0.7%) died. The complications concern 112 cases (16.4%). Conclusion. The laparoscopic Hartmann's reversal is safer and achieves faster positive results.

  14. Morbidity after reversal of Hartmann operation: retrospective analysis of 56 patients

    PubMed Central

    Zarnescu (Vasiliu), EC; Zarnescu, NO; Costea, R; Rahau, L; Neagu, S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite patient selection, postoperative morbidity after reversal of Hartmann’s procedure remains significant. Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate risk factors associated with morbidity after conversion of Hartmann’s operation. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed data of 56 patients who underwent reversal procedures between January 2004 and May 2015 in a single center. We evaluated the following variables: demographic characteristics, medical comorbidities, etiology for Hartmann operation, preoperative lab values, intraoperative surgical details and short-term outcomes (hospital stay, medical and surgical complications, mortality). Results: There were 37 men (66.1%) and the mean age was 57 years. The most frequent indications for Hartmann’s procedure were colorectal cancer in 25 patients (44.6%) and complicated diverticulitis in 10 patients (17.9%). The mean time to the reversal procedure was 9 months. Morbidity rate was 16.1% (9 patients) with an anastomotic leakage rate of 3.6% (2 patients) and mortality rate was 3.6% (2 patients). The most common medical complication was diarrhea (4 patients, 7.2%). Bivariate analysis demonstrated that the only factor significantly associated with postoperative complications was presence of multiple comorbidities. Conclusions: Multiple medical comorbidities is the only predictive factor for postoperative complications after Hartmann’s reversal and therefore patient selection for this type of surgery is critical. PMID:26664476

  15. Laparoscopic management of intra-abdominal infections: Systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Coccolini, Federico; Tranà, Cristian; Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Saverio, Salomone Di; Manfredi, Roberto; Montori, Giulia; Ceresoli, Marco; Falcone, Chiara; Ansaloni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of intra abdominal infections. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed including studies where intra abdominal infections were treated laparoscopically. RESULTS: Early laparoscopic approaches have become the standard surgical technique for treating acute cholecystitis. The laparoscopic appendectomy has been demonstrated to be superior to open surgery in acute appendicitis. In the event of diverticulitis, laparoscopic resections have proven to be safe and effective procedures for experienced laparoscopic surgeons and may be performed without adversely affecting morbidity and mortality rates. However laparoscopic resection has not been accepted by the medical community as the primary treatment of choice. In high-risk patients, laparoscopic approach may be used for exploration or peritoneal lavage and drainage. The successful laparoscopic repair of perforated peptic ulcers for experienced surgeons, is demonstrated to be safe and effective. Regarding small bowel perforations, comparative studies contrasting open and laparoscopic surgeries have not yet been conducted. Successful laparoscopic resections addressing iatrogenic colonic perforation have been reported despite a lack of literature-based evidence supporting such procedures. In post-operative infections, laparoscopic approaches may be useful in preventing diagnostic delay and controlling the source. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy has a good diagnostic accuracy and enables to better identify the causative pathology; laparoscopy may be recommended for the treatment of many intra-abdominal infections. PMID:26328036

  16. Renal insufficiency predicts mortality in geriatric patients undergoing emergent general surgery.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubian, Arezou; Ge, Phillip; Tolan, Amy; Saltmarsh, Guy; Kaji, Amy H; Neville, Angela L; Bricker, Scott; De Virgilio, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Clinical predictors of perioperative mortality in geriatric patients undergoing emergent general surgery have not been well described. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of postoperative morbidity and mortality in geriatric patients and factors associated with mortality. A retrospective review of patients 65 years of age or older undergoing emergent general surgery at a public teaching hospital was performed over a 7-year period. Data collected included demographics, comorbidities, laboratory studies, perioperative morbidities, and mortality. Descriptive statistics and predictors of morbidity and mortality are described. The mean age was 74 years. Indications for surgery included small bowel obstruction (24%), diverticulitis (20%), perforated viscous (16%), and large bowel obstruction (9%). The overall complication rate was 41 per cent with six cardiac complications (14%) and seven perioperative (16%) deaths. Mean admission serum creatinine was significantly higher in patients who died (3.6 vs 1.5 mg/dL, P = 0.004). Mortality for patients with an admission serum creatinine greater than 2.0 mg/dL was 42 per cent (5 of 12) compared with 3 per cent (2 of 32) for those 2.0 mg/dL or less (OR, 10.7; CI, 1.7 to 67; P = 0.01). Morbidity and mortality in geriatric patients undergoing emergency surgery remains high with the most significant predictor of mortality being the presence of renal insufficiency on admission.

  17. Helical CT in emergency radiology.

    PubMed

    Novelline, R A; Rhea, J T; Rao, P M; Stuk, J L

    1999-11-01

    Today, a wide range of traumatic and nontraumatic emergency conditions are quickly and accurately diagnosed with helical computed tomography (CT). Many traditional emergency imaging procedures have been replaced with newer helical CT techniques that can be performed in less time and with greater accuracy, less patient discomfort, and decreased cost. The speed of helical technology permits CT examination of seriously ill patients in the emergency department, as well as patients who might not have been taken to CT previously because of the length of the examinations of the past. Also, helical technology permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, a great advance for the multiple-trauma patient. Higher quality CT examinations result from decreased respiratory misregistration, enhanced intravenous contrast material opacification of vascular structures and parenchymal organs, greater flexibility in image reconstruction, and improved multiplanar and three-dimensional reformations. This report summarizes the role and recommended protocols for the helical CT diagnosis of thoracic aortic trauma; aortic dissection; pulmonary embolism; acute conditions of the neck soft tissues; abdominal trauma; urinary tract stones; appendicitis; diverticulitis; abdominal aortic aneurysm; fractures of the face, spine, and extremities; and acute stroke.

  18. Complicated Jejunal Diverticulosis: Small Bowel Volvulus with Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mohi, Rommel Singh; Moudgil, Ashish; Bhatia, Suresh Kumar; Seth, Kaushal; Kaur, Tajinder

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of the diverticulum of the small bowel varies from 0.2-1.3% in autopsy studies to 2.3% when assessed on enteroclysis. It occurs mostly in patients in the 6th decade of their life. Of all the small bowel diverticuli, jejunal diverticulum is the most common type. This rare entity is usually asymptomatic. However, they may cause chronic non-specific symptoms for a long period of time like dyspepsia, chronic postprandial pain, nausea, vomiting, borborgymi, alternating diarrhoea and constipation, weight loss, anaemia, steatorrhea or rarely lead to complications like haemorrhage, obstruction, perforation. Obstruction can be due to enterolith, adhesions, intussusception, and volvulus. The condition is difficult to diagnose because patients are generally presented with symptoms that mimic other diseases. It is important for clinicians to have awareness of this entity. Here, we present a case of multiple jejunal diverticuli with a history of repeated attacks of diverticulitis over past 20 years, which were misdiagnosed and now presented with intestinal obstruction due to volvulus of the involved segment along with mesentery around its axis. Resection of the diverticuli segment of jejunum was done with end-to-end jejuno-jejunal anastomosis. The patient is asymptomatic since 10 months of follow-up. PMID:27853337

  19. Use of rifaximin in gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shayto, Rani H; Abou Mrad, Rachel; Sharara, Ala I

    2016-01-01

    Rifaximin is a broad spectrum oral antibiotic with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. It is poorly absorbed and thus has a highly favorable safety profile. Rifaximin has been shown to be effective in the treatment of traveler’s diarrhea, functional bloating and irritable bowel syndrome, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and in the prevention of recurrent overt hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, there is emerging evidence for a possible beneficial effect of rifaximin in the treatment of uncomplicated diverticular disease and in the prevention of recurrent diverticulitis. The use of rifaximin is associated with a low incidence of development, or persistence of spontaneous bacterial mutants. Moreover, the development of important drug resistance among extra-intestinal flora during rifaximin therapy is unlikely because of minimal systemic absorption and limited cross-resistance of rifaximin with other antimicrobials. This review addresses the current and emerging role of rifaximin in the treatment of gastrointestinal and liver disorders. PMID:27547007

  20. Diagnostic difficulties in inflammatory bowel disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Yantiss, R K; Odze, R D

    2006-01-01

    This review summarizes some of the common diagnostic problems encountered by pathologists when evaluating patients with chronic colitis and in whom inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is either suspected or within the differential diagnosis. Both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) show characteristic, but non-specific, pathological features that may overlap and result in a diagnosis of 'indeterminate colitis' (IC). However, other reasons why pathologists may entertain a diagnosis of IC include failure to recognize or accept certain 'hardcore' histological features as indicative of CD, an attempt to classify cases of chronic colitis based on mucosal biopsy material or in the absence of adequate clinical and radiographic information, and the presence of other disease processes that mask, or mimic, IBD. In addition, some cases of UC may show unusual CD-like features, such as discontinuous or patchy disease, ileal inflammation, extracolonic inflammation, granulomatous inflammation in response to ruptured crypts, aphthous ulcers, or transmural inflammation. Furthermore, other forms of colitis, such as microscopic colitis, diverticulitis and diversion colitis may, on occasion, also show IBD-like changes. The clinical and pathological features that aid in the distinction between these entities, and others, are covered in detail in this review.

  1. [Current diagnostic-therapeutic trends in treatment of pediatric appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Malnati, R; Capasso, G; Stagni, S; Bua, L; Albisetti, A; Erenbourg, L; Paesano, P L

    1994-03-01

    Acute appendicitis is the first cause of emergency surgery in children. Actually, emergency abdominal sonography has evolved in differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children to differentiate it from other causes of acute abdomen as mesenteric lymphoadenitis, acute right pyelonephritis, acute diverticulitis in Meckel's diverticulum, intestinal intussusception, regional enterits, primary peritonitis, anaphylactoid purpura of Henoch-Schonlein. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the usefulness of abdominal sonography in diagnosing acute appendicitis in our current series of pediatric patients. We have operated 102 patients afflicted by appendicitis admitted to the pediatric department of Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano in a period of 5 years and operated on for appendectomy. In the last 2 years 36 patients were evaluated with abdominal sonography. This diagnostic tool showed in 34 (94.4%) a liquid effusion, sometimes thick of the right iliac fossa. In 2 patients the appendix had thickened layers, was edematous and the lumen was clearly filled with debris. Abdominal sonography has given a clear cut picture of the acute inflammatory process of the appendix. None of these patients has suffered from septic or obstructive complications. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.35 days (3-15 days). Differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis can be extremely variable, from simple, paradigmatic situations to the most intriguing ones. This concept is well emphasized by William Silen when he says that "differential diagnosis of acute appendicits is an encyclopedic compendium of every abdominal disease that causes pain" in the 11th edition of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Frank W.; Roberts, Christian K.; Laye, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause vs. treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction [including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity]; and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [Accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life

  3. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-14

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  4. Phase I Study of Vandetanib With Radiotherapy and Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Drappatz, Jan; Norden, Andrew D.; Wong, Eric T.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Increasing evidence has suggested that angiogenesis inhibition might potentiate the effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). In addition, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition might be of therapeutic benefit, because the epidermal growth factor receptor is upregulated in GBM and contributes to radiation resistance. We conducted a Phase I study of vandetanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor, in patients with newly diagnosed GBM combined with RT and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: A total of 13 GBM patients were treated with vandetanib, radiotherapy, and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ, using a standard '3 + 3' dose escalation. The maximal tolerated dose was defined as the dose with <1 of 6 dose-limiting toxicities during the first 12 weeks of therapy. The eligible patients were adults with newly diagnosed GBM, Karnofsky performance status of {>=}60, normal organ function, who were not taking enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. Results: Of the 13 patients, 6 were treated with vandetanib at a dose of 200mg daily. Of the 6 patients, 3 developed dose-limiting toxicities within the first 12 weeks, including gastrointestinal hemorrhage and thrombocytopenia in 1 patient, neutropenia in 1 patient, and diverticulitis with gastrointestinal perforation in 1 patient. The other 7 patients were treated with 100 mg daily, with no dose-limiting toxicities observed, establishing this dose as the maximal tolerated dose combined with TMZ and RT. Conclusion: Vandetanib can be safely combined with RT and TMZ in GBM patients. A Phase II study in which patients are randomized to vandetanib 100 mg daily with RT and TMZ or RT and TMZ alone is underway.

  5. Routine Histopathologic Examination of Appendectomy Specimens: Retrospective Analysis of 1255 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Emre, Arif; Akbulut, Sami; Bozdag, Zehra; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kanlioz, Murat; Emre, Rabia; Sahin, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical benefit of histopathologic analysis of appendectomy specimens from patients with an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We retrospectively analyzed the demographic and histopathologic data of 1255 patients (712 males, 543 females; age range, 17–85 years) who underwent appendectomy to treat an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients who underwent incidental appendectomy during other surgeries were excluded from the study. Histopathologic findings of the appendectomy specimens were used to confirm the initial diagnosis. Ninety-four percent of the appendectomy specimens were positive for appendicitis. Of those, 880 were phlegmonous appendicitis, 148 were gangrenous appendicitis with perforation, and the remaining 88 showed unusual histopathologic findings. In the 88 specimens with unusual pathology, fibrous obliteration was observed in 57 specimens, carcinoid tumor in 11, Encheliophis vermicularis parasite infection in 8, granulatomous inflammation in 6, appendiceal endometriosis in 2, and 1 specimen each showed mucocele, eosinophilic infiltration, Taenia saginata parasite infection, and appendicular diverticulitis. All carcinoid tumors were located in the distal appendix. Six of the 11 carcinoid tumors were defined by histopathology as involving tubular cells, and the other 5 as involving enterochromaffin cells. Six patients had muscularis propria invasion, 2 patients had submucosa invasion, 2 patients had mesoappendix invasion, and 1 patient had serosal invasion. All patients with tumors remained disease free during the follow-up (range, 1–27 months). We conclude that when the ratio of unusual pathologic findings for appendectomy specimens is considered, it is evident that all surgical specimens should be subjected to careful histologic examination. PMID:24229023

  6. [Deglutition disorders in the elderly. Epidemiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Finiels, H; Strubel, D; Jacquot, J M

    2001-11-10

    THE PREVALENCE: The exact prevalence of deglutition disorders in the elderly is not known. It appears frequent in very old patients and in those suffering from polypathological symptoms, affecting 50% of the populations in long-term care units. THE EFFECTS OF AGING: Physiological aging alters various parameters of swallowing, however it seems that these modifications related to age have little effect on healthy subjects. However, they may increase vulnerability in those presenting with intercurrent pathologies. CONCOMITANT DISORDERS: Other than the decrease in efficient mastication and the existence of xerostomia, frequently observed contributing factors, many diseases may be responsible for dysphagia in the elderly. Neurological disorders, particularly cerebral vascular diseases, central nervous system degenerative disorders and neuro-motor diseases predominate. In the aging, muscular disorders and after effects of various diseases can set-in. Modifications in oropharyngeal anatomy generally results from cancerous lesions of the aero-digestive junction, but also, occasionally from extrinsic compression that does not necessarily reflect a neoplastic etiology. Zenker's diverticulitis represents a cause of dysphagia specific to the elderly. Problems in swallowing of iatrogenic origin are also frequent, following cervical radiotherapy or after oropharyngeal surgery, during tracheal intubation or when using feeding tubes and also during various medical treatments. UNDERRATED CONSEQUENCES: Dysphagia leads to multiple morbid after effects, primarily alteration in quality of life, dehydration, undernutrition, asphyxia and congestion and recurrent infections of the respiratory tract. The responsibility of deglutition disorders in the occurrence of these complications is difficult to assess in weak elderly subjects because of the frequent concomitance with multiple deficiencies and incapacities.

  7. Isolation of the anaerobic intestinal spirochaete Brachyspira pilosicoli from long-term residents and Indonesian visitors to Perth, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Margawani, K Rini; Robertson, Ian D; Hampson, David J

    2009-02-01

    Brachyspira pilosicoli is an anaerobic spirochaete that colonizes the large intestine of humans and various species of animals and birds. The spirochaete is an important enteric pathogen of pigs and poultry, but its pathogenic potential in humans is less clear. In the current study, the occurrence of B. pilosicoli in faecal samples from 766 individuals in two different population groups in Perth, Western Australia, was investigated by selective anaerobic culture. Of 586 individuals who were long-term residents of Perth, including children, elderly patients in care and in hospital and individuals with gastrointestinal disease, only one was culture positive. This person had a history of diverticulitis. In comparison, faeces from 17 of 180 (9.4 %) Indonesians who were short- or medium-term visitors to Perth were positive for B. pilosicoli. The culture-positive individuals had been in the city for between 10 days and 4.5 years (median 5 months). Resampling of subsets of the Indonesians indicated that all negative people remained negative and that some positive individuals remained positive after 5 months. Two individuals had pairs of isolates recovered after 4 and 5 months that had the same PFGE types, whilst another individual had isolates with two different PFGE types that were identified 2 months apart. Individuals who were culture-positive were likely to have been either colonized in Indonesia before arriving in Perth or infected in Perth following contact with other culture-positive Indonesians with whom they socialized. Colonization with B. pilosicoli was not significantly associated with clinical signs at the time the individuals were tested, although faeces with wet-clay consistency were 1.5 times more likely (confidence interval 0.55-4.6) than normal faeces to contain B. pilosicoli.

  8. [Current developments in the diagnosis and therapy of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Hammer, B

    1994-03-19

    The etiology and pathogenesis of idiopathic chronic-inflammatory bowel diseases, i.e. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are still unknown. This has no effect on diagnosis, yet does affect treatment of these diseases, which has thus remained symptomatic. Clinical features, laboratory findings, endoscopy in conjunction with histologic examination and radiologic studies are all of proven value in the diagnosis of these disorders. Microbiologic and, if indicated, serologic studies are employed to search for colitis caused by microorganisms. Other bowel disorders to be considered in differential diagnosis include ischemic, radiation and drug-induced forms of colitis, as well as diverticulitis. More recently introduced techniques for the detection of secondary intra-abdominal processes are CT-scan and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Ultrasound examination of the abdomen can be used to search for thickening of the bowel wall. Use of the rather complicated hydrocolon sonography is rarely necessary. Endo-sonography is an established method for exploration of the rectum and is particularly useful for the detection of abscesses. The role of this technique in the diagnosis of colon processes remains to be determined. Studies using radiolabeled leukocytes are of theoretical interest but not usually required in the routine work-up of such patients. The same is true of chemical analyses of the feces and testing for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Standard systemic treatment is based on the administration of salicylic acid derivatives and corticosteroids. Azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine can be used in patients refractory to standard treatment. Metronidazole has been proven quite effective in patients with Crohn's disease of the colon, particularly in the perianal region.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Intra-abdominal Infections: The Role of Anaerobes, Enterococci, Fungi, and Multidrug-Resistant Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Gil; Levy, Samuel; Salhab, Ghaleb; Mengesha, Bethlehem; Tzuman, Oran; Shur, Shira; Burke, Erica; Mayeda, Rebecca Cruz; Cochavi, Lior; Perluk, Idan; Zaidenstein, Ronit; Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Dadon, Mor

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intra-abdominal infections (IAI) constitute a common reason for hospitalization. However, there is lack of standardization in empiric management of (1) anaerobes, (2) enterococci, (3) fungi, and (4) multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO). The recommendation is to institute empiric coverage for some of these organisms in “high-risk community-acquired” or in “healthcare-associated” infections (HCAI), but exact definitions are not provided. Methods. Epidemiological study of IAI was conducted at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center (May–November 2013). Logistic and Cox regressions were used to analyze predictors and outcomes of IAI, respectively. The performances of established HCAI definitions to predict MDRO-IAI upon admission were calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Results. After reviewing 8219 discharge notes, 253 consecutive patients were enrolled (43 [17%] children). There were 116 patients with appendicitis, 93 biliary infections, and 17 with diverticulitis. Cultures were obtained from 88 patients (35%), and 44 of them (50%) yielded a microbiologically confirmed IAI: 9% fungal, 11% enterococcal, 25% anaerobic, and 34% MDRO. Eighty percent of MDRO-IAIs were present upon admission, but the area under the ROC curve of predicting MDRO-IAI upon admission by the commonly used HCAI definitions were low (0.73 and 0.69). Independent predictors for MDRO-IAI were advanced age and active malignancy. Conclusions. Multidrug-resistant organism-IAIs are common, and empiric broad-spectrum coverage is important among elderly patients with active malignancy, even if the infection onset was outside the hospital setting, regardless of current HCAI definitions. Outcomes analyses suggest that empiric regimens should routinely contain antianaerobes (except for biliary IAI); however, empiric antienterococcal or antifungals regimens are seldom needed. PMID:28018930

  10. [Adenocarcinoma mucoproductor in Meckel's diverticulum. Case report and review].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-González, Luis Ricardo; Leonher-Ruezga, Karla Lisseth; Plascencia-Posadas, Francisco Javier; Jiménez-Gómez, José Alfredo; López-Zamudio, José; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el divertículo de Meckel es la anomalía congénita más frecuente en el intestino delgado, que resulta de la obliteración incompleta del conducto onfalomesentérico; su diagnóstico suele ser incidental, pocas veces con sangrado, obstrucción, diverticulitis o en casos raros una neoplasia. Caso clínico: paciente femenina de 67 años de edad, que inició su padecimiento con síntomas urinarios (disuria, polaquiuria, pujo y tenesmo vesical). El cistograma demostró: defecto en el domo de la vejiga, bordes irregulares y efecto de compresión. La tomografía computada reportó: vejiga con lesión hipodensa infiltrante en el domo vesical, al resecarla se encontró un divertículo de Meckel con un tumor infiltrante; el estudio histopatológico confirmó el diagnóstico y demostró los bordes libres; todos los estudios de extensión resultaron sin actividad tumoral. Conclusiones: el adenocarcinoma mucoproductor derivado de un divertículo de Meckel es una entidad clínica que debido a sus síntomas inespecíficos y variabilidad de presentación sólo se diagnostica por lo que se aprecia en las imágenes radiológicas. Este adenocarcinoma tiene un alto índice de mortalidad pero baja prevalencia.

  11. A multi-omic analysis of an Enterococcus faecium mutant reveals specific genetic mutations and dramatic changes in mRNA and protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For a long time, Enterococcus faecium was considered a harmless commensal of the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract and was used as a probiotic in fermented foods. In recent decades, E. faecium has been recognised as an opportunistic pathogen that causes diseases such as neonatal meningitis, urinary tract infections, bacteremia, bacterial endocarditis and diverticulitis. E. faecium could be taken into space with astronauts and exposed to the space environment. Thus, it is necessary to observe the phenotypic and molecular changes of E. faecium after spaceflight. Results An E. faecium mutant with biochemical features that are different from those of the wild-type strain was obtained from subculture after flight on the SHENZHOU-8 spacecraft. To understand the underlying mechanism causing these changes, the whole genomes of both the mutant and the WT strains were sequenced using Illumina technology. The genomic comparison revealed that dprA, a recombination-mediator gene, and arpU, a gene associated with cell wall growth, were mutated. Comparative transcriptomic and proteomic analyses showed that differentially expressed genes or proteins were involved with replication, recombination, repair, cell wall biogenesis, glycometabolism, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, predicted general function and energy production/conversion. Conclusion This study analysed the comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes of an E. faecium mutant from subcultures that were loaded on the SHENZHOU-8 spacecraft. The implications of these gene mutations and expression changes and their underlying mechanisms should be investigated in the future. We hope that the current exploration of multiple “-omics” analyses of this E. faecium mutant will provide clues for future studies on this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:24373636

  12. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-01

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  13. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Fiscon, Valentino; Portale, Giuseppe; Mazzeo, Antonio; Migliorini, Giovanni; Frigo, Flavio

    2014-12-01

    Reestablishing continuity after a Hartmann's procedure is considered a major surgical procedure with high morbidity/mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the short-/long-term outcome of laparoscopic restoration of bowel continuity after HP. A prospectively collected database of colorectal laparoscopic procedures (>800) performed between June 2005 and June 2013 was used to identify 20 consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure (LHR). Median age was 65.4. Ten patients (50 %) had undergone surgery for perforated diverticulitis, 3 (15 %) for cancer, and 7 (35 %) for other reasons (volvulus, posttraumatic perforation, and sigmoid perforation from foreign body). Previous HP had been performed laparoscopically in only 3 patients. Median operative time was 162.5 min. All the procedures were completed laparoscopically. Intraoperative complication rate was nil. Post-operative mortality and morbidity were respectively 0 and 10 % (1 pneumonia, 1 bowel obstruction from post-anastomotic stenosis which required resection and redo of the anastomosis). Median time to first flatus was 3 days, to normal diet 5 days. Median hospital stay was 9 days without readmissions. We followed up the patients for a median of 44 months: when asked, all 20 (100 %) said they would undergo the operation (LHR) again; 3 (15 %) had been re-operated of laparoscopic mesh repair for incisional hernia. When performed by experienced surgeons, LHR is a feasible, safe, reproducible operation, which allows early return of bowel function, early discharge and fast return to work for the patient. It has a low morbidity rate.

  14. Epidemiology and outcomes of acute abdominal pain in a large urban Emergency Department: retrospective analysis of 5,340 cases

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Riccardo; Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Comelli, Ivan; Catena, Fausto; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute abdominal pain (AAP) accounts for 7–10% of all Emergency Department (ED) visits. Nevertheless, the epidemiology of AAP in the ED is scarcely known. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology and the outcomes of AAP in an adult population admitted to an urban ED. Methods We made a retrospective analysis of all records of ED visits for AAP during the year 2014. All the patients with repeated ED admissions for AAP within 5 and 30 days were scrutinized. Five thousand three hundred and forty cases of AAP were analyzed. Results The mean age was 49 years. The most frequent causes were nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) (31.46%), and renal colic (31.18%). Biliary colic/cholecystitis, and diverticulitis were more prevalent in patients aged >65 years (13.17% vs. 5.95%, and 7.28% vs. 2.47%, respectively). Appendicitis (i.e., 4.54% vs. 1.47%) and renal colic (34.48% vs. 20.84%) were more frequent in patients aged <65 years. NSAP was the most common cause in both age classes. Renal colic was the most frequent cause of ED admission in men, whereas NSAP was more prevalent in women. Urinary tract infection was higher in women. Overall, 885 patients (16.57%) were hospitalized. Four hundred and eighty-five patients had repeated ED visits throughout the study period. Among these, 302 patients (6.46%) were readmitted within 30 days, whereas 187 patients (3.82%) were readmitted within 5 days. Renal colic was the first cause for ED readmission, followed by NSAP. In 13 cases readmitted to the ED within 5 days, and in 16 cases readmitted between 5–30 days the diagnosis was changed. Conclusions Our study showed that AAP represented 5.76% of total ED visits. Two conditions (i.e., NSAP and renal colic) represented >60% of all causes. A large use of active clinical observations during ED stay (52% of our patients) lead to a negligible percentage of changing diagnosis at the second visit. PMID:27826565

  15. Laparoscopic colon surgery: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Martel, Guillaume; Boushey, Robin P

    2006-08-01

    Since its first described case in 1991, laparoscopic colon surgery has lagged behind minimally invasive surgical methods for solid intra-abdominal organs in terms of acceptability, dissemination, and ease of learning. In colon cancer, initial concerns over port site metastases and adequacy of oncologic resection have considerably dampened early enthusiasm for this procedure. Only recently, with the publication of several large, randomized controlled trials, has the incidence of port site metastases been shown to be equivalent to that of open resection. Laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer has also been demonstrated to be at least equivalent to traditional laparotomy in terms of adequacy of oncologic resection, disease recurrence, and long-term survival. In addition, numerous reports have validated short-term benefits following laparoscopic resection for cancer, including shorter hospital stay, shorter time to recovery of bowel function, and decreased analgesic requirements, as well as other postoperative variables. In benign colonic disease, much less high-quality literature exists supporting the use of laparoscopic methods. Two recent randomized controlled trials have demonstrated some short-term benefits to laparoscopic ileocolic resection for CD, in addition to evident cosmetic advantages. On the other hand, the current evidence on laparoscopic surgery for UC does not support its routine use among nonexpert surgeons outside of specialized centers. Laparoscopic colonic resection for diverticular disease appears to provide several short-term benefits, although these advantages may not translate to cases of complicated diverticulitis. Despite the increasing acceptability of minimally invasive methods for the management of benign and malignant colonic pathologies, laparoscopic colon resection remains a prohibitively difficult technique to master. Numerous technological innovations have been introduced onto the market in an effort to decrease the steep learning

  16. Implications of the colonic deposition of free hemoglobin-alpha chain: a previously unknown tissue by-product in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeremy N.; Schäffer, Michael W.; Korolkova, Olga Y.; Williams, Amanda D.; Gangula, Pandu R.; M’Koma, Amosy E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed inflamed mucosal/submucosal layers of ulcerative colitis (UC=63) and Crohn’s colitis (CC=50) and unexpectedly we unveiled a pool of free-hemoglobin-alpha (Hb-α) chain. Patients with colitides have increased ROS, DNA-oxidation products, free-iron in mucosa, in pre-neoplastic, and in colitis-cancers and increased risks of developing colorectal-cancer (CRC). All IBD-related-CRC lesions are found in segments with colitis. Linking this information we investigated whether free-Hb-α is key transformational stepping that increases colitis-related-CRC vulnerability. Methods UC/CC samples were profiled using MALDI-MS; protein identification was made by LCM. Diverticulitis (DV) was used as control (Ctrl). The presence of Hb(n) (n=α, β and hemin)/Hb was validated by Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We tested for DNA-damage (DNAD) by exposing normal colonic-epithelial-cell-line, NCM460, to 10μM and 100μM of Hb(n)/Hb, individually for 2 h, 6 h, and 12 h. Quantification of Hb-α-staining was done by Nikon Elements Advance Research Analysis software. ROS was measured by the production of 8-OHdG. DNAD was assessed by Comet-assay. Colonic tissue homogenate antioxidants Nrf2-, CAT-, SOD- and GPx-expressions was analyzed densitometrically/ normalized by β-actin. Results IHC of CC/UC mucosal/submucosal-compartments stained strongly positive for Hb-α and significantly higher vs. Ctrl. NCM460 exposed to Hb(n)/Hb exhibited steadily-increasing ROS and subsequent DNAD. DNAD was higher in 10μM than 100μM in Hb-β/hemin the first 2 h then plateaued followed by DNAD-repair. This may be likely due to apoptosis in the later concentration. Nrf2 enzyme activities among UC, CC and UCAC were observed impaired in all IBD subjects. Decreased levels of Nrf2 among UC vs. CC patients with active disease was insignificant as well as vs. Ctrls but significantly lower in UCAC vs. Ctrl. SOD was decreased in UC and UCAC and GPx in CC but statistically not