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Sample records for diverticulitis

  1. Diverticulitis: A Progressive Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Jennifer R.; Dozois, Eric J.; Wolff, Bruce G.; Gullerud, Rachel E.; Larson, Dirk R.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Our understanding of complicated diverticulitis is based on outdated literature. Antecedent episodes of diverticulitis are felt to increase the risk of developing complicated diverticulitis, as well as its subsequent morbidity and mortality. Practice parameters recommend elective resection after 2 episodes of diverticulitis to reduce this morbidity and mortality. Methods: A total of 150 patients with prior episodes of diverticulitis who were hospitalized with complicated diverticulitis were retrospectively analyzed. Statistical analysis was conducted using χ2 and Fisher exact test tests. Results: Patients were separated into 2 groups for analysis: group A = those with 1 or 2 prior diverticulitis episodes (n = 118) versus group B = patients with more than 2 prior episodes (n = 32). Characteristics of the groups were similar for age and preexistent comorbid conditions. The majority of patients presented with pericolonic abscess and inflammatory phlegmon. Perforated diverticulitis occurred more often in group A compared with patients with >2 episodes of diverticulitis. Because of the higher rate of perforation, patients in group A underwent surgical diversion more often than group B patients. No significant differences in operative complications, morbidity, or mortality rates were identified between the groups. Conclusion: Patients with multiple (>2) episodes of diverticulitis are not at increased risk for poor outcomes if they develop complicated diverticulitis. Morbidity and mortality rates are not significantly different between patients with multiple episodes of diverticulitis compared with those with 1 or 2 prior attacks. Reevaluation of the practice of elective resection as a strategy for reducing the mortality and morbidity from complicated diverticulitis is needed. PMID:16772791

  2. Epidemiologic Analysis of Diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Jena, Marie D; Marcello, Peter W; Roberts, Patricia L; Read, Thomas E; Schoetz, David J; Hall, Jason F; Francone, Todd; Ricciardi, Rocco

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate geographic variation in the incidence of diverticulitis and examine behavioral and environmental factors associated with high rates of diverticulitis across the United States. We used state hospital discharge data from 20 states to determine rates of inpatient diverticulitis from January 2002 to December 2004 at patient's county of residence. Next, we merged the county level data with behavioral and environmental survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Finally, we determined the association between behavioral and environmental factors (i.e., teeth removal, dental cleaning, air quality, smoking, alcohol, vaccine, vitamins, and mental health) and high rates of diverticulitis. From January 1, 2002, to December 31, 2004, a total of 345,216 hospitalizations for acute diverticulitis were recorded for 1,055 counties. We identified rates of diverticulitis that ranged from 35.4 to 332.7 per 100,000 population. On univariate analysis, high diverticulitis burden was associated with regions of the country with substantial tooth loss from dental disease (45.8% for high diverticulitis counties vs. 37.5% for low diverticulitis counties; p = 0.0001). There is considerable variability in diverticulitis cases by county of residence across the nation. Potential triggers of diverticulitis may be associated with tooth removal and sun exposure. PMID:27582652

  3. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, Joseph D; Falchuk, Kenneth R

    2016-08-01

    Diverticular disease is a common condition that is associated with variable presentations. For this review article, we performed a review of articles in PubMed through February 1, 2016, by using the following MeSH terms: colon diverticula, colonic diverticulitis, colonic diverticulosis, colonic diverticulum, colonic diverticula, and diverticula. Diverticula are structural alterations within the colonic wall that classically form "pockets" referred to as diverticula. Diverticula form from herniation of the colonic mucosa and submucosa through defects in the circular muscle layers within the colonic wall. Often this is at the sites of penetrating blood vessels in the colon. Diverticular disease is extremely common, which resulted in 2,682,168 outpatient visits and 283,355 hospitalization discharges for diverticulitis or diverticulosis in 2009. Diverticulosis is one of the most common detected conditions found incidentally on colonoscopy. Risk factors for the development of diverticulitis include obesity, smoking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and opiates. In contrast, fiber may be protective, but recent studies have questioned the role of fiber in developing diverticular disease. Most patients with diverticulosis will be asymptomatic, but a subset of patients may develop nonspecific abdominal pain (isolated or recurrent), diverticulitis, or segmental colitis associated with diverticulosis. Classically, the treatment of diverticulitis has included antibiotics for all patients. More recent evidence indicates that in mild to even moderate uncomplicated diverticulitis, antibiotics may not be as necessary as initially believed. In more complicated diverticulitis, intravenous antibiotics and surgery may be necessary. Once a patient has had an attack of diverticulitis, increasing fiber may help prevent future attacks. Other modalities such as 5-aminosalicylate products, antibiotics, and probiotics are still of unclear benefit in preventing future

  4. Bladder diverticulitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Michael; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Bladder diverticulum, an outpouching of the mucosa through the muscular wall of the bladder, is a multifactorial disease process that can be either acquired or congenital. Although small diverticuli are usually asymptomatic, a large diverticulum may result in hematuria, urinary tract infection, acute abdomen due to its rupture, acute urinary retention, or neoplasm formation. We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and was ultimately diagnosed with bladder diverticulitis, a disease not previously described in the literature.

  5. Transverse Colon Diverticulitis with Calcified Fecalith

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Solak, Ilhami; Genç, Berhan; Sahin, Neslin; Yalaz, Seyhan

    2013-01-01

    Left colonic diverticula are common in Western populations, whereas right colonic diverticulosis primarily occurs in Oriental populations. Diverticulitis of the transverse colon is very rare, with very few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of transverse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone in a 69-year-old female. This was a solitary diverticulum. The signs and symptoms of the disease are similar to acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings of a patient with trans-verse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone. PMID:25610254

  6. [Surgical treatment of sigmoid diverticulitis].

    PubMed

    Vayre, P

    1990-11-01

    Diverticular disease is generally benign but may be life threatening should progressive complications occur. Under these circumstances cure may only be obtained if properly performed surgery is undertaken at the right moment. The end result of a low fibre diet, diverticular disease may affect the entire colon, but always tends to particularly affect the sigmoid region. This is the usual site of complications where the etiology is related to diverticular infection associated with fecal impaction proximal to the high pressure zone at the recto-sigmoid junction. The radical treatment of sigmoid diverticulitis is rectosigmoid resection, however, this concept may be altered according to the circumstances as follows: 1 - sigmoid diverticulitis without pericolic complications 2 - peri-sigmoid complications: peri-sigmoid abscess, intestinal and vesical fistulae. 3 - generalised peritonitis due to perforation into the peritoneal cavity. The advanced age of the patient should be stressed (mean age 65 years and 25% over 75 years) associated with a high incidence of multiple organ failure and hence the high mortality in more than 50% of cases in the event of peritonitis.

  7. Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... form. Eating a low-fiber diet mostly made up of processed foods may be a cause. Constipation and hard stools ... that you: Rest in bed and use a heating pad on your belly. Take ... eating foods. The provider may treat you with antibiotics. After ...

  8. Appendicitis/diverticulitis: diagnostics and conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Kruis, Wolfgang; Morgenstern, Julia; Schanz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Appendicitis and diverticulitis are very common entities that show some similarities in diagnosis and course of disease. Both are widely believed to be simple clinical diagnoses, which is in contrast to scientific evidence. An accurate diagnosis has to describe not only the initial detection, but particularly the severity of the disease. It is based mainly on cross-sectional imaging by ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT). Appendectomy is the standard treatment for acute appendicitis and is mandatory in complicated cases. Antibiotic therapy is similarly effective in uncomplicated appendicitis, but long-term results are not sufficiently known. Treatment of diverticulitis is related to the disease status. Complications such as perforation and bleeding require intervention. Uncomplicated diverticulitis as graded by US or CT are subject to conservative management, in the form of outpatient or hospital care. It is an unresolved debate as to whether antibiotic treatment offers benefits. Mesalazine seems at least to improve pain. The real challenge is treatment of recurrent diverticulitis. Lifestyle measures such as nutritional habits and physical activity are found to influence diverticular disease. Besides immunosuppression, obesity is a significant risk factor for complicated diverticulitis. Whether any medication such as chronic antibiotics, probiotics or mesalazine offers benefits is unclear. The indication for sigmoid resection has changed; it is no longer given by the number of attacks, but rather by structural changes as depicted by cross-sectional imaging.

  9. Diverticula and Diverticulitis: Time for a Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Alberto O.; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Colonic diverticula are very common and may be associated with symptoms or complicated by diverticulitis and its associated problems. Many of the traditional concepts relating to the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of these entities have been questioned recently based on findings from high-quality prospective studies. Although dietary fiber may protect against symptoms and complications, its impact on the formation of diverticula may be limited. It is now evident that the risk for an episode of diverticulitis in an individual with diverticula is lower than previously thought. Furthermore, the necessity for antibiotic use in uncomplicated diverticulitis has been questioned and serious doubt cast upon the belief that surgery should be performed when a second attack occurs. Although data are far from conclusive, there is some evidence to suggest that diverticulosis may be associated with chronic abdominal symptoms, with or without underlying chronic inflammatory changes in the involved segment of the colon. In addition, colonoscopy is not routinely required after an attack of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis, as the risk of cancer in this population is not much higher than in the general population. PMID:27330495

  10. Diverticula and Diverticulitis: Time for a Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Alberto O; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2015-10-01

    Colonic diverticula are very common and may be associated with symptoms or complicated by diverticulitis and its associated problems. Many of the traditional concepts relating to the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of these entities have been questioned recently based on findings from high-quality prospective studies. Although dietary fiber may protect against symptoms and complications, its impact on the formation of diverticula may be limited. It is now evident that the risk for an episode of diverticulitis in an individual with diverticula is lower than previously thought. Furthermore, the necessity for antibiotic use in uncomplicated diverticulitis has been questioned and serious doubt cast upon the belief that surgery should be performed when a second attack occurs. Although data are far from conclusive, there is some evidence to suggest that diverticulosis may be associated with chronic abdominal symptoms, with or without underlying chronic inflammatory changes in the involved segment of the colon. In addition, colonoscopy is not routinely required after an attack of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis, as the risk of cancer in this population is not much higher than in the general population. PMID:27330495

  11. Position paper: management of perforated sigmoid diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over the last three decades, emergency surgery for perforated sigmoid diverticulitis has evolved dramatically but remains controversial. Diverticulitis is categorized as uncomplicated (amenable to outpatient treatment) versus complicated (requiring hospitalization). Patients with complicated diverticulitis undergo computerized tomography (CT) scanning and the CT findings are used categorize the severity of disease. Treatment of stage I (phlegmon with or without small abscess) and stage II (phlegmon with large abscess) diverticulitis (which includes bowel rest, intravenous antibiotics and percutaneous drainage (PCD) of the larger abscesses) has not changed much over last two decades. On the other hand, treatment of stage III (purulent peritonitis) and stage IV (feculent peritonitis) diverticulitis has evolved dramatically and remains morbid. In the 1980s a two stage procedure (1st - segmental sigmoid resection with end colostomy and 2nd - colostomy closure after three to six months) was standard of care for most general surgeons. However, it was recognized that half of these patients never had their colostomy reversed and that colostomy closure was a morbid procedure. As a result starting in the 1990s colorectal surgical specialists increasing performed a one stage primary resection anastomosis (PRA) and demonstrated similar outcomes to the two stage procedure. In the mid 2000s, the colorectal surgeons promoted this as standard of care. But unfortunately despite advances in perioperative care and their excellent surgical skills, PRA for stage III/IV diverticulitis continued to have a high mortality (10-15%). The survivors require prolonged hospital stays and often do not fully recover. Recent case series indicate that a substantial portion of the patients who previously were subjected to emergency sigmoid colectomy can be successfully treated with less invasive nonoperative management with salvage PCD and/or laparoscopic lavage and drainage. These patients

  12. Laparoscopic rectosigmoid resection for acute sigmoid diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Zdichavsky, Marty; Königsrainer, Alfred; Granderath, Frank A

    2009-04-01

    Laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy has been widely accepted as elective approach but is, however, still discussed controversially for acute cases. Patients receiving a laparoscopic early single-stage procedure benefit from an early postoperative convalescence with a minimum of disability. As more surgeons gain expertise in minimally invasive surgery of the rectosigmoid, this video highlights the main steps of a rectosigmoid resection for acute complicated diverticulitis. PMID:18795376

  13. [Sigmoid diverticulitis in adolescent. Case report].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Salazar, Carlos; Orozco-Tapia, Luis Manuel; de la Concha Blankenagel, Erika; Gallardo-Ramírez, Mario Alberto; Blas-Franco, Miguel; Cárdenas-Lailson, Luis Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: la enfermedad diverticular colónica en niños y adolescentes es poco frecuente y sólo existen reportes de casos aislados en la bibliografía. La mayoría de los casos reportados se asocian con divertículos verdaderos congénitos y enfermedades genéticas de producción de la colágena. Caso clínico: paciente femenina de 13 años de edad, que ingresó a la División de Cirugía General y Endoscópica con diagnóstico de apendicitis aguda complicada. En la laparotomía se encontró enfermedad diverticular complicada de colon sigmoides. Se le practicó sigmoidectomía y colorrecto-anastomosis. El reporte histopatológico evidenció perforación de pseudodivertículo de colon sigmoides y peritonitis. La paciente fue dada de alta del hospital 72 horas posteriores a la cirugía, sin complicaciones. Conclusión: existen sólo reportes de casos aislados de niños y adolescentes con diverticulitis colónica, y su etiología no ha sido aún debidamente establecida. Esta paciente tuvo diverticulitis de sigmoides, similar a la enfermedad en adultos, sin padecimientos genéticos concomitantes. El caso es una excepción a lo reportado en la bibliografía de las diverticulitis en niños y adolescentes.

  14. [Current treatment for diverticulitis: state of affairs in 2016].

    PubMed

    van Dijk, S; Boermeester, M A

    2016-01-01

    - Uncomplicated diverticulitis does not routinely require antibiotic treatment and can even be managed in the outpatient setting.- As yet no medical therapies have proven themselves useful in the prevention of recurrence.- Complicated diverticulitis with an abscess smaller than 4 cm is treated with antibiotics, larger abscesses are treated by percutaneous drainage, and only if treatment fails surgery is required.- Laparoscopic lavage is no better than partial resection in purulent peritonitis.- Perforated diverticulitis with faecal peritonitis is treated by a Hartmann's procedure; in selected cases resection and primary anastomosis may be considered.- The decision whether a resection should be laparoscopic or open is based on the surgeon's experience.- The choice for elective resection for recurrent diverticulitis is still made on a patient-by-patient basis.- Only high-risk patients should have a follow-up colonoscopy to exclude malignancy. The remaining patients are referred back to the Dutch national colorectal cancer screening programme. PMID:27334091

  15. Acute Perforated Diverticulitis: Assessment With Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Barbara; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Pinto, Antonio; Trinci, Margherita; Miele, Vittorio

    2016-02-01

    Colonic diverticulitis is a common condition in the western population. Complicated diverticulitis is defined as the presence of extraluminal air or abscess, peritonitis, colon occlusion, or fistulas. Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) is the modality of choice for the diagnosis and the staging of diverticulitis and its complications, which enables performing an accurate differential diagnosis and addressing the patients to a correct management. MDCT is accurate in diagnosing the site of perforation in approximately 85% of cases, by the detection of direct signs (focal bowel wall discontinuity, extraluminal gas, and extraluminal enteric contrast) and indirect signs, which are represented by segmental bowel wall thickening, abnormal bowel wall enhancement, perivisceral fat stranding of fluid, and abscess. MDCT is accurate in the differentiation from complicated colon diverticulitis and colon cancer, often with a similar imaging. The computed tomography-guided classification is recommended to discriminate patients with mild diverticulitis, generally treated with antibiotics, from those with severe diverticulitis with a large abscess, which may be drained with a percutaneous approach.

  16. Fecal microbiome analysis as a diagnostic test for diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Daniels, L; Budding, A E; de Korte, N; Eck, A; Bogaards, J A; Stockmann, H B; Consten, E C; Savelkoul, P H; Boermeester, M A

    2014-11-01

    Disease-specific variations in intestinal microbiome composition have been found for a number of intestinal disorders, but little is known about diverticulitis. The purpose of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota of diverticulitis patients with control subjects from a general gastroenterological practice and to investigate the feasibility of predictive diagnostics based on complex microbiota data. Thirty-one patients with computed tomography (CT)-proven left-sided uncomplicated acute diverticulitis were included and compared with 25 control subjects evaluated for a range of gastrointestinal indications. A high-throughput polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based profiling technique (IS-pro) was performed on DNA isolates from baseline fecal samples. Differences in bacterial phylum abundance and diversity (Shannon index) of the resulting profiles were assessed by conventional statistics. Dissimilarity in microbiome composition was analyzed with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) based on cosine distance measures. To develop a prediction model for the diagnosis of diverticulitis, we used cross-validated partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratios and Proteobacteria load were comparable among patients and controls (p = 0.20). The Shannon index indicated a higher diversity in diverticulitis for Proteobacteria (p < 0.00002) and all phyla combined (p = 0.002). PCoA based on Proteobacteria profiles resulted in visually separate clusters of patients and controls. The diagnostic accuracy of the cross-validated PLS-DA regression model was 84 %. The most discriminative species derived largely from the family Enterobacteriaceae. Diverticulitis patients have a higher diversity of fecal microbiota than controls from a mixed population, with the phylum Proteobacteria defining the difference. The analysis of intestinal microbiota offers a novel way to diagnose diverticulitis.

  17. Solitary caecum diverticulitis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Hot, Semih; Eğin, Seracettin; Gökçek, Berk; Yeşiltaş, Metin; Alemdar, Ali; Akan, Arzu; Karahan, Servet Rüştü

    2015-12-01

    Solitary cecum diverticulum is a benign formation, but it can be complicated with inflammation, perforation and bleeding. Cecum diverticulitis (CD) is the most common complication of caecal diverticulum and it has the highest incidence among Asians, but it is a rare condition in the western world. The incidence of colonic diverticular disease can vary according to national origin, cultural structure and nutritional habits. CD is not common in our country, but it is an important situation because of its clinical similarity with the commonly seen acute right side abdominal diseases like acute appendicitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult, and hence, the actual frequency is not known. The treatment of CD can vary from medical therapy to right hemi colectomy. In this study, we presented ten CD cases on whom surgical resection was performed in our surgery unit during the last 8 years. Our purpose was to increase the awareness of surgeons about this situation, and so, make them pay attention for not having their first experience in the operating room. PMID:27054646

  18. Chronic Recurrent Esophageal Diverticulitis - A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Ashish; Smith, Ioana; Hatchett, Jeremy; Juneau, Jeffrey; Kodali, Sudha; Malik, Talha A.; Weber, Fred H.

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we seek to shed light on a 44-year-old Caucasian male with a known history of an esophageal diverticulum, who was transferred to our facility after an upper endoscopy at an outside hospital suggested a purulent discharge emanating from the mouth of a mid-esophageal diverticulum. A barium swallow done at the outside institution had reportedly demonstrated an 8 cm long barium collection parallel to and anterolateral to the mid-and distal esophagus which terminated several centimeters proximal to the gastroesophageal junction. At our facility, antibiotics (piperacillin/tazobactam) were continued, and a double-contrast esophagram was performed. The presence of an unusual mid-esophageal diverticulum was confirmed. He clinically improved after a 3-day course of intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics. No surgical or endoscopic repair was elected as the patient opted for continued medical management. While esophageal diverticula are not rare in humans, to our knowledge, this is the first report of development of esophageal diverticulitis in humans. We believe that antibiotic coverage in addition to dietary restriction is the logical mainstay of acute therapy. Optimal antibiotic coverage should likely include oral flora aerobes and anaerobes. Once symptoms resolve, diverticula may be managed expectantly.

  19. [Acute Meckel's diverticulitis perforated by a foreign body].

    PubMed

    Pahomeanu, M; Anghelide, A; Mandache, F

    1976-01-01

    The authors present the case of a patient with acute, right iliac fossa abdominal syndrome, simulating acute apendicitis. In the course of the intervention it was noted that the syndrome was determined by an acute Meckel diverticulitis, perforated by a foreign body (fish bone). In view of making the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis, that cannot be assessed before surgery, the importance is stressed of the correlation of the clinical aspects with the apendicular lesions found in the course of the operation, and, when there is no satisfactory concordance, careful checking of the cecum becomes necessary, as well as of the right annexe and of the ileon over at least three feet.

  20. [Diverticulitis and indication for surgery--are there new data?].

    PubMed

    Weimann, A; Hirsch, W D; Schiefke, I

    2013-12-01

    The treatment in acute diverticulitis has undergone a considerable shift from an offensive to a more restrictive and individual indication for surgery. This review of the very recent literature with special regard to long-term observation of conservatively treated patients clearly shows that surgery is not required in any case of a first episode of severe diverticulitis, but should be recommended in high-risk patients under immunosuppression or chronic renal failure. In all other groups of patients the indication for surgery should be weighed on an individual basis after each episode, again aiming for the laparoscopic procedure. A therapeutic algorithm is proposed according to the Hansen-Stock classification.

  1. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  2. Solitary Large Intestinal Diverticulitis in Leatherback Turtles (Dermochelys coriacea).

    PubMed

    Stacy, B A; Innis, C J; Daoust, P-Y; Wyneken, J; Miller, M; Harris, H; James, M C; Christiansen, E F; Foley, A

    2015-07-01

    Leatherback sea turtles are globally distributed and endangered throughout their range. There are limited data available on disease in this species. Initial observations of solitary large intestinal diverticulitis in multiple leatherbacks led to a multi-institutional review of cases. Of 31 subadult and adult turtles for which complete records were available, all had a single exudate-filled diverticulum, as large as 9.0 cm in diameter, arising from the large intestine immediately distal to the ileocecal junction. All lesions were chronic and characterized by ongoing inflammation, numerous intralesional bacteria, marked attenuation of the muscularis, ulceration, and secondary mucosal changes. In three cases, Morganella morganii was isolated from lesions. Diverticulitis was unrelated to the cause of death in all cases, although risk of perforation and other complications are possible. PMID:25239052

  3. [Prognostic factors in perforating diverticulitis of the large intestine].

    PubMed

    Hansen, O; Graupe, F; Stock, W

    1998-04-01

    Morbidity and mortality after emergency procedures in 105 patients with perforated colonic diverticulitis were evaluated in a retrospective study. In different stages of diverticulitis (Hinchey classification: I, 8.6%; II, 14.3%; III, 57.1%; IV, 20.0%) mortality was 12.4%. Preoperative sepsis syndrome with leucopenia and disturbed liver function, cardiac risk factors and obesity were independent prognostic factors in multiple logistic regression. Accompanied by immunosuppression the mortality rate remarkably increased to 33%. The stage of peritonitis showed no influence on the prognosis. In multivariate analysis, surgical procedure (primary resection 12.4%. Hartmann's procedure 61.9%, non-resection procedures 25.7%) showed influence only on increased general complications.

  4. Assessment of risk for recurrent diverticulitis: a proposal of risk score for complicated recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sallinen, Ville; Mali, Juha; Leppäniemi, Ari; Mentula, Panu

    2015-02-01

    Recurrence of acute diverticulitis is common, and--especially complicated recurrence--causes significant morbidity. To prevent recurrence, selected patients have been offered prophylactic sigmoid resection. However, as there is no tool to predict whose diverticulitis will recur and, in particular, who will have complicated recurrence, the indications for sigmoid resections have been variable. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors predicting recurrence of acute diverticulitis. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients presenting with computed tomography-confirmed acute diverticulitis and treated nonresectionally during 2006 to 2010. Risk factors for recurrence were identified using uni- and multivariate Cox regression. A total of 512 patients were included. History of diverticulitis was an independent risk factor predicting uncomplicated recurrence of diverticulitis (1-2 earlier diverticulitis HR 1.6, 3 or more--HR 3.2). History of diverticulitis (HR 3.3), abscess (HR 6.2), and corticosteroid medication (HR 16.1) were independent risk factors for complicated recurrence. Based on regression coefficients, risk scoring was created: 1 point for history of diverticulitis, 2 points for abscess, and 3 points for corticosteroid medication. The risk score was unable to predict uncomplicated recurrence (AUC 0.48), but was able to predict complicated recurrence (AUC 0.80). Patients were further divided into low-risk (0-2 points) and high-risk (>2 points) groups. Low-risk and high-risk groups had 3% and 43% 5-year complicated recurrence rates, respectively. Risk for complicated recurrence of acute diverticulitis can be assessed using risk scoring. The risk for uncomplicated recurrence increases along with increasing number of previous diverticulitis.

  5. Smoking Is Associated with an Increased Risk for Surgery in Diverticulitis: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Michael J.; Schaffer, Samuel; Coward, Stephanie; Kuenzig, M. Ellen; Hubbard, James; Eksteen, Bertus; Heitman, Steven; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Kaplan, Gilaad G.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Cigarette smoking increases the risk of surgery in Crohn’s disease. However, the effect of smoking on the need for surgery for diverticulitis is unknown. Objective We evaluated whether smoking was a risk factor for surgery among patients admitted to hospital with acute diverticulitis. Design We conducted a population-based comparative cohort study of patients admitted to hospital for diverticulitis who were treated with medical versus surgical management. Setting & Participants We used the population-based Discharge Abstract Database to identify 176 adults admitted emergently with a diagnosis of diverticulitis between 2009 and 2010 in Calgary. Intervention & Main Outcome We performed a medical chart review to confirm the diagnosis of diverticulitis and to extract clinical data. The primary outcome was a partial colectomy during hospitalization. Logistic regression evaluated the association between smoking and surgery after adjusting for potential confounders, including age, sex, comorbidity, and disease severity. Results A partial colectomy was performed on 35.6% of patients with diverticulitis and 1.3% died. Among diverticulitis patients, 26.8% were current smokers, 31.5% were ex-smokers, and 41.6% never smoked. Compared to non-smokers, current smokers (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 9.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.47–32.97) and former smokers (adjusted OR 5.41; 95% CI: 1.54–18.96) had increased odds of surgery. Conclusion and Relevance Smoking is associated with the need for surgical management of diverticulitis. PMID:27467077

  6. Colonic diverticulitis in adolescents: an index case and associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santin, Brian J; Prasad, Vinay; Caniano, Donna A

    2009-10-01

    Diverticular disease of the colon, a common problem among adults, is diagnosed rarely in children. We report an adolescent patient with sigmoid diverticulitis who required operative treatment. Pediatric patients with the complications of diverticula typically have conditions that result in genetic alterations affecting the components of the colonic wall. Our patient had Williams-Beuren syndrome, although Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and cystic fibrosis may also be associated with colonic diverticula in adolescence. Pediatric patients with these disorders who experience abdominal pain should be evaluated for the presence of colonic diverticular complications. PMID:19711089

  7. WSES Guidelines for the management of acute left sided colonic diverticulitis in the emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Ansaloni, Luca; Coccolini, Federico; Griffiths, Ewen A; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Di Saverio, Salomone; Ulrych, Jan; Kluger, Yoram; Ben-Ishay, Ofir; Moore, Frederick A; Ivatury, Rao R; Coimbra, Raul; Peitzman, Andrew B; Leppaniemi, Ari; Fraga, Gustavo P; Maier, Ronald V; Chiara, Osvaldo; Kashuk, Jeffry; Sakakushev, Boris; Weber, Dieter G; Latifi, Rifat; Biffl, Walter; Bala, Miklosh; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Inaba, Kenji; Ordonez, Carlos A; Hecker, Andreas; Augustin, Goran; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Melo, Renato Bessa; Marwah, Sanjay; Zachariah, Sanoop K; Shelat, Vishal G; McFarlane, Michael; Rems, Miran; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Faro, Mario Paulo; Júnior, Gerson Alves Pereira; Negoi, Ionut; Cui, Yunfeng; Sato, Norio; Vereczkei, Andras; Bellanova, Giovanni; Birindelli, Arianna; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Kok, Kenneth Y; Gachabayov, Mahir; Gkiokas, Georgios; Bouliaris, Konstantinos; Çolak, Elif; Isik, Arda; Rios-Cruz, Daniel; Soto, Rodolfo; Moore, Ernest E

    2016-01-01

    Acute left sided colonic diverticulitis is one of the most common clinical conditions encountered by surgeons in acute setting. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference on acute diverticulitis was held during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES in Jerusalem, Israel, on July 7th, 2015. During this consensus conference the guidelines for the management of acute left sided colonic diverticulitis in the emergency setting were presented and discussed. This document represents the executive summary of the final guidelines approved by the consensus conference. PMID:27478494

  8. Acute left-sided colonic diverticulitis: clinical expressions, therapeutic insights, and role of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosetti, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach of patients with suspected acute diverticulitis remains debated. On the one hand, a scoring system with the best predictive value in diagnosing acute diverticulitis has been developed in order to reduce the use of computed tomography (CT) scan, while, on the other hand, patients with a high probability of acute diverticulitis should benefit from CT scan from a clinical viewpoint, ensuring that they will receive the most appropriate treatment. The place and classification of CT scan for acute diverticulitis need to be reassessed. If the management of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis, abscess, and fecal peritonitis is now well codified, urgent surgical or medical treatment of hemodynamically stable patients presenting with intraperitoneal air or fluid without uncontrolled sepsis is still under discussion. Furthermore, the indications for laparoscopic lavage are not yet well established. It is known for years that episode(s) of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis may induce painful recurrent bowel symptoms, known as symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease and irritable bowel syndrome-like diverticular disease. These two clinical expressions of diverticular disease, that may darken quality of life, are treated medically aimed at symptom relief. The possible place of surgery should be discussed. Clinical and CT scan classifications should be separated entities. PMID:27574459

  9. Trends in Hospital Admission and Surgical Procedures Following ED visits for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Ericksen, Margaret B.; Havens, Joaquim M.; Ma, Jiemin; Weissman, Joel S.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diverticulitis is a common diagnosis in the emergency department (ED). Outpatient management of diverticulitis is safe in selected patients, yet the rates of admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis are unknown, as are the predictive patient characteristics. Our goal is to describe trends in admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis, and to determine which patient characteristics predict admission. Methods : We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analysis using data on ED visits from 2006–2011 to determine change in admission and surgical patterns over time. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database, a nationally representative administrative claims dataset, was used to analyze ED visits for diverticulitis. We included patients with a principal diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9 codes 562.11, 562.13). We analyzed the rate of admission and surgery in all admitted patients and in low-risk patients, defined as age <50 with no comorbidities (Elixhauser). We used hierarchical multivariate logistic regression to identify patient characteristics associated with admission for diverticulitis. Results Fryom 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased by 21.3% from 238,248 to 302,612, while the admission rate decreased from 55.7% to 48.5% (−7.2%, 95% CI [−7.78 to −6.62]; p<0.001 for trend). The admission rate among low-risk patients decreased from 35.2% in 2006 to 26.8% in 2011 (−8.4%, 95% CI [−9.6 to −7.2]; p<0.001 for trend). Admission for diverticulitis was independently associated with male gender, comorbid illnesses, higher income and commercial health insurance. The surgical rate decreased from 6.5% in 2006 to 4.7% in 2011 (−1.8%, 95% CI [−2.1 to −1.5]; p<0.001 for trend), and among low-risk patients decreased from 4.0% to 2.2% (−1.8%, 95% CI [−4.5 to −1.7]; p<0.001 for trend). Conclusion From 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased

  10. Diverticulitis in immunosuppressed patients: A fatal outcome requiring a new approach?

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Andreas; Kratzer, Theresa; Kafka-Ritsch, Reinhold; Braunwarth, Eva; Denecke, Christian; Weiss, Sascha; Atanasov, Georgi; Sucher, Robert; Biebl, Matthias; Aigner, Felix; Pratschke, Johann; Öllinger, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of diverticulitis in immunosuppressed patients are more challenging than in immunocompetent patients, as maintenance immunosuppressive therapies may mask symptoms or impair the patient’s ability to counteract the local and systemic infective sequelae of diverticulitis. The purpose of this study was to compare the in-hospital mortality and morbidity due to diverticulitis in immunosuppressed and immunocompetent patients and identify risk factors for lethal outcomes. Methods This retrospective study included consecutive in-patients who received treatment for colonic diverticulitis at our institution between April 2008 and April 2014. Patients were divided into immunocompetent and immunosuppressed groups. Primary end points were mortality and morbidity during treatment. Risk factors for death were evaluated. Results Of the 227 patients included, 15 (6.6%) were on immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation, autoimmune disease, or cerebral metastasis. Thirteen of them experienced colonic perforation and showed higher morbidity (p = 0.039). Immunosuppressed patients showed longer stays in hospital (27.6 v. 14.5 d, p = 0.016) and in the intensive care unit (9.8 v. 1.1 d, p < 0.001), a higher rate of emergency operations (66% v. 29.2%, p = 0.004), and higher in-hospital mortality (20% v. 4.7%, p = 0.045). Age, perforated diverticulitis with diffuse peritonitis, emergency operation, C-reactive protein > 20 mg/dL, and immunosuppressive therapy were significant predictors of death. Age (hazard ratio [HR] 2.57, p = 0.008) and emergency operation (HR 3.03, p = 0.003) remained significant after multivariate analysis. Conclusion Morbidity and mortality due to sigmoid diverticulitis is significantly higher in immunosuppressed patients. Early diagnosis and treatment considering elective sigmoid resection for patients with former episodes of diverticulitis who are wait-listed for transplant is crucial to prevent death. PMID:27240131

  11. Role of Damage Control Surgery in the Treatment of Hinchey III and IV Sigmoid Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; Cavaliere, Davide; Farinella, Eriberto; Renzi, Claudio; Cannata, Gaspare; Desiderio, Jacopo; Farinacci, Federico; Barberini, Francesco; Trastulli, Stefano; Parisi, Amilcare; Fingerhut, Abe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Many of the treatment strategies for sigmoid diverticulitis are actually focusing on nonoperative and minimally invasive approaches. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the actual role of damage control surgery (DCS) in the treatment of generalized peritonitis caused by perforated sigmoid diverticulitis. A literature search was performed in PubMed and Google Scholar for articles published from 1960 to July 2013. Comparative and noncomparative studies that included patients who underwent DCS for complicated diverticulitis were considered. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score, duration of open abdomen, intensive care unit length of stay, reoperation, bowel resection performed at first operation, fecal diversion, method, and timing of closure of abdominal wall were the main outcomes of interest. According to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses algorithm for the literature search and review, 10 studies were included in this systematic review. DCS was exclusively performed in diverticulitis patients with septic shock or requiring vasopressors intraoperatively. Two surgical different approaches were highlighted: limited resection of the diseased colonic segment with or without stoma or reconstruction in situ, and laparoscopic washing and drainage without colonic resection. Despite the heterogeneity of patient groups, clinical settings, and interventions included in this review, DCS appears to be a promising strategy for the treatment of Hinchey III and IV diverticulitis, complicated by septic shock. A tailored approach to each patient seems to be appropriate. PMID:25437034

  12. SILS Sigmoidectomy Versus Multiport Laparoscopic Sigmoidectomy for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Pottel, Hans; Devriendt, Dirk; Van Rooy, Frank; Vansteenkiste, Franky; Van Ooteghem, Barbara; De Corte, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In this single-institution study, we aimed to compare the safety, feasibility, and outcomes of single-incision laparoscopic sigmoidectomy (SILSS) with multiport laparoscopic sigmoidectomy (MLS) for recurrent diverticulitis. Methods: Between October 2011 and February 2013, 60 sigmoidectomies were performed by the same surgeon. Forty patients had a MLS and 20 patients had a SILSS. Outcomes were compared. Results: Patient characteristics were similar. There was no difference in morbidity, mortality or readmission rates. The mean operative time was longer in the SILSS group (P = .0012). In a larger proportion of patients from the SILSS group, 2 linear staplers were needed for transection at the rectum (P = .006). The total cost of disposable items was higher in the SILSS group (P < .0001). No additional ports were placed in the SILSS group. Return to bowel function or return to oral intake was faster in the SILSS group (P = .0446 and P = .0137, respectively). Maximum pain scores on postoperative days 1 and 2 were significantly less for the SILSS group (P = .0014 and P = .047, respectively). Hospital stay was borderline statistically shorter in the SILSS group (P = .0053). SILSS was also associated with better cosmesis (P < .0011). Conclusion: SILSS is feasible and safe and is associated with earlier recovery of bowel function, a significant reduction in postoperative pain, and better cosmesis. PMID:25392639

  13. [Colo-uterine fistula, a complication of sigma diverticulitis].

    PubMed

    Nistri, R; Basili, G; Vitali, A; Carrieri, P; Nardi, S

    1998-10-01

    The colo-uterine fistula is a rare complication of diverticular disease of the colon; the literature review has shown only few well studied cases. The fistula, among the complications of the sigma diverticulitis, is 20% of the observed cases; generally, the bladder is the most involved organ, but also the skin or gut can be interested. If we consider the aetiology of the colo=uterine fistula of the observed case, the presence of the sigma locked stenosis with an endocolic pressure increase, associated with a peridiverticulitis condition, seems to have a relevant rule. The clinical symptomatology is represented by vague abdominal pain localized in particular in the left iliac cavity and by emission of blood, purulent material and stools from the vagina. The diagnosis of colo-uterine fistula is not easily reached: barium enema, Fallopian tube endoscopy and colon endoscopy not always allow to visualize in a right manner the fistula and only the oral administration of non-absorbable substances to be searched in the vaginal tampon, clear each doubt. Regarding the therapy to be carried out, we think that, colic resection en bloc with the uterus is the treatment of choice, while, in emergency, the Hartman operation is the most suitable to avoid the beginning of septic complications.

  14. Morphologic Basis for Developing Diverticular Disease, Diverticulitis, and Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, Thilo; Barrenschee, Martina; Lange, Christina; Cossais, François; Böttner, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Diverticula of the colon are pseudodiverticula defined by multiple outpouchings of the mucosal and submucosal layers penetrating through weak spots of the muscle coat along intramural blood vessels. A complete prolapse consists of a diverticular opening, a narrowed neck, and a thinned diverticular dome underneath the serosal covering. The susceptibility of diverticula to inflammation is explained by local ischemia, translocation of pathogens due to retained stool, stercoral trauma by fecaliths, and microperforations. Local inflammation may lead to phlegmonous diverticulitis, paracolic/mesocolic abscess, bowel perforation, peritonitis, fistula formation, and stenotic strictures. Diverticular bleeding is due to an asymmetric rupture of distended vasa recta at the diverticular dome and not primarily linked to inflammation. Structural and functional changes of the bowel wall in diverticular disease comprise: i) Altered amount, composition, and metabolism of connective tissue; ii) Enteric myopathy with muscular thickening, deranged architecture, and altered myofilament composition; iii) Enteric neuropathy with hypoganglionosis, neurotransmitter imbalance, deficiency of neurotrophic factors and nerve fiber remodeling; and iv) Disturbed intestinal motility both in vivo (increased intraluminal pressure, motility index, high-amplitude propagated contractions) and in vitro (altered spontaneous and pharmacologically triggered contractility). Besides established etiologic factors, recent studies suggest that novel pathophysiologic concepts should be considered in the pathogenesis of diverticular disease. PMID:26989376

  15. Caecal diverticulitis--a review of eight cases in Taiping, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, K G

    1999-06-01

    Most patients presenting with acute right sided peritonitic pain are diagnosed and managed as acute appendicitis. In a series of 336 patients, eight were found to have caecal diverticulitis. The occurrence of such diverticula appears to be more frequent in Asian populations. The diagnosis can be established at operation on the basis of surgical findings. The aim of this retrospective review is to discuss the management of such patients when acute diverticulitis is found at the time of appendicectomy. It is advocated that management be conservative where possible, with appendicectomy and antibiotics. Where the possibility of a carcinoma remains, investigation after surgery by colonoscopy may be undertaken.

  16. Use of Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Increases Risk for Diverticulitis and Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Liu, Yan L.; Huang, Edward S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, have been implicated in diverticular complications. We examined the influence of aspirin and NSAID use on risk of diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding in a large prospective cohort. METHODS We studied 47,210 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohort who were 40–75 years old at baseline, in 1986. We assessed use of aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and other risk factors biennially. We identified men with diverticulitis or diverticular bleeding based on responses to biennial and supplemental questionnaires. RESULTS We documented 939 cases of diverticulitis and 256 cases of diverticular bleeding during a 22-year period of follow-up. After adjustment for risk factors, men who used aspirin regularly (≥2 times per week) had a multivariable relative risk (RR) of 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.47) for diverticulitis and RR of 1.70 (95% CI, 1.21–2.39) for diverticular bleeding, compared with non-users of aspirin and NSAIDs. Use of aspirin at intermediate doses (2–5.9 standard, 325 mg, tablets per week) and frequency (4–6 days per week) were associated with the highest risk of bleeding (multivariable RR=2.32; 95% CI, 1.34–4.02, and multivariable RR=3.13; 95% CI, 1.82–5.38, respectively). Regular users of non-aspirin NSAIDs also had an increased risk of diverticulitis (multivariable RR=1.72; 95% CI, 1.40–2.11) and diverticular bleeding (multivariable RR=1.74; 95% CI, 1.15–2.64), compared with men who denied use of these medications. CONCLUSIONS Regular use of aspirin or NSAIDs is associated with an increased risk for diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding. Patients at risk of diverticular complications should carefully consider the potential risks and benefits of using these medications. PMID:21320500

  17. Laparoscopic Lavage Is Feasible and Safe for the Treatment of Perforated Diverticulitis With Purulent Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Angenete, Eva; Thornell, Anders; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Skullman, Stefan; Bisgaard, Thue; Jess, Per; Läckberg, Zoltan; Matthiessen, Peter; Heath, Jane; Rosenberg, Jacob; Haglind, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate short-term outcomes of a new treatment for perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis in a randomized controlled trial. Background: Perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis (Hinchey III) has traditionally been treated with surgery including colon resection and stoma (Hartmann procedure) with considerable postoperative morbidity and mortality. Laparoscopic lavage has been suggested as a less invasive surgical treatment. Methods: Laparoscopic lavage was compared with colon resection and stoma in a randomized controlled multicenter trial, DILALA (ISRCTN82208287). Initial diagnostic laparoscopy showing Hinchey III was followed by randomization. Clinical data was collected up to 12 weeks postoperatively. Results: Eighty-three patients were randomized, out of whom 39 patients in laparoscopic lavage and 36 patients in the Hartmann procedure groups were available for analysis. Morbidity and mortality after laparoscopic lavage did not differ when compared with the Hartmann procedure. Laparoscopic lavage resulted in shorter operating time, shorter time in the recovery unit, and shorter hospital stay. Conclusions: In this trial, laparoscopic lavage as treatment for patients with perforated diverticulitis Hinchey III was feasible and safe in the short-term. PMID:25489672

  18. Toxic Megacolon and Acute Ischemia of the Colon due to Sigmoid Stenosis Related to Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulos, P.; Almyroudi, M.; Kolonia, V.; Kouris, S.; Troumpoukis, N.; Economou, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of toxic megacolon accompanied by necrosis of the colon due to chronic dilation caused by stenosis of the sigmoid colon as a complication of diverticulitis. The patient presented at the emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain, fever (38.8°C) and tachycardia (120 beats/min). Physical examination revealed distension and tenderness on deep palpation on the left lower quadrant without peritoneal signs. Abdominal computed tomography showed located stenosis in the sigmoid colon and marked dilation of the descending (12 cm diameter) and transverse (7.5 cm diameter) colon. A few hours later, the patient developed severe septic shock with electrolyte abnormalities. He had a history of two prior admissions to our hospital due to crises of acute diverticulitis. Based on Jalan's criteria the diagnosis was compatible with toxic megacolon. The patient's condition deteriorated suddenly and an emergency colectomy was performed. The operative findings revealed a necrotic colon. Histology examination confirmed the diagnosis of ischemia of the colon. To our knowledge this is the first published report in the literature which refers to a rare complication of diverticulitis, namely chronic stenosis which complicated to colonic ischemia and toxic megacolon. PMID:24163654

  19. Hospital volume and other risk factors for in-hospital mortality among diverticulitis patients: A nationwide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Michael J; Coward, Stephanie; Buie, W Donald; MacLean, Anthony; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G; Schaffer, Samuel; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have found that a higher volume of colorectal surgery was associated with lower mortality rates. While diverticulitis is an increasingly common condition, the effect of hospital volume on outcomes among diverticulitis patients is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between hospital volume and other factors on in-hospital mortality among patients admitted for diverticulitis. METHODS: Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 1993 to 2008) were analyzed to identify 822,865 patients representing 4,108,726 admissions for diverticulitis. Hospitals were divided into quartiles based on the volume of diverticulitis cases admitted over the study period, adjusted for years contributed to the dataset. Mortality according to hospital volume was modelled using logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, race, comorbidities, health care insurance, admission type, calendar year, colectomy, disease severity and clustering. Risk estimates were expressed as adjusted ORs with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Patients at high-volume hospitals were more likely to be admitted emergently, undergo surgical treatment and have more severe disease. In-hospital mortality was higher among the lowest quartile of hospital volume compared with the highest volume (OR 1.13 [95% CI 1.05 to 1.21]). In-hospital mortality was increased among patients admitted emergently (OR 2.58 [95% CI 2.40 to 2.78]) as well as those receiving surgical treatment (OR 3.60 [95% CI 3.42 to 3.78]). CONCLUSIONS: Diverticulitis patients admitted to hospitals with a low volume of diverticulitis cases had an increased risk for death compared with those admitted to high-volume centres. PMID:25965439

  20. [Sigmoidoperianal fistula associated with diverticulitis and Cul de Sac situation--diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Weyand, G; Rinast, E; Englert, A; Houf, M

    2002-07-01

    We report on the case of a 64-year-old female patient who presented herself in our outpatient clinic because of a perianal fistula with recurrent abscesses. We describe the step diagnostics and the surgical treatment of the causal sigmoido-perianal fistula with diverticulitis and Cul de sac situation. Clinical examination, fistulography, colonoscopy and MRT were part of the precise representation and preparation for the high anterior rectosigmoidal resection with simultaneous rectopexy according to Sudeck which were performed without complications. The sigmoidoperianal fistula must be taken into account as a differential diagnosis of a recalcitrant high perianal fistula. PMID:12122593

  1. Anaphylaxis to Polyethylene Glycol (Colyte®) in a Patient with Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are believed to be chemically inert agents, but larger PEG polymers could have immunogenicity. A 39-year-old man was referred to emergency room for loss of consciousness and dyspnea after taking of PEG-3350 (Colyte®). In laboratory findings, the initial serum tryptase level was increased to 91.9 mg/L (normal range: 0.00-11.40 mg/L) without any other laboratory abnormalities. The intradermal test with 10 mg/mL Colyte® showed a 5 × 5 mm wheal, but basophil activation and histamine releasability tests were negative. PEG-3350 is widely used as an osmotic laxative due to its lack of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. However, the loss of mucosal integrity at gastrointestinal membrane such as diverticulitis may be a predisposing factor for anaphylaxis to Colyte®. We report a case of anaphylaxis induced by the ingestion of PEG-3350 in a patient with diverticulitis which might be a risk factor of anaphylaxis. PMID:27550498

  2. Anaphylaxis to Polyethylene Glycol (Colyte®) in a Patient with Diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Hee; Hwang, Sun Hyuk; Park, Jin Soo; Park, Hae Sim; Shin, Yoo Seob

    2016-10-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are believed to be chemically inert agents, but larger PEG polymers could have immunogenicity. A 39-year-old man was referred to emergency room for loss of consciousness and dyspnea after taking of PEG-3350 (Colyte®). In laboratory findings, the initial serum tryptase level was increased to 91.9 mg/L (normal range: 0.00-11.40 mg/L) without any other laboratory abnormalities. The intradermal test with 10 mg/mL Colyte® showed a 5 × 5 mm wheal, but basophil activation and histamine releasability tests were negative. PEG-3350 is widely used as an osmotic laxative due to its lack of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. However, the loss of mucosal integrity at gastrointestinal membrane such as diverticulitis may be a predisposing factor for anaphylaxis to Colyte®. We report a case of anaphylaxis induced by the ingestion of PEG-3350 in a patient with diverticulitis which might be a risk factor of anaphylaxis. PMID:27550498

  3. Acute diverticulitis--an unusual cause of liver abcesses in a young man: a case report.

    PubMed

    Al Hajjar, N; Crişan, D; Grigorescu, M; Boruah, P

    2012-01-01

    Liver abscess is a rare complication of sigmoid diverticulitis and must be considered within the differential diagnosis. We report a case of a male patient, age 42, admitted to our hospital with chief complaints of a dull pain in upper right abdominal quadrant, fever, weakness, diarrhoea and weight loss of approximately 3 weeks duration. Physical examination on initial work-up revealed tenderness on palpation in upper right abdomen, and left iliac fosa and a 39 degrees C fever. Biochemistry showed marked inflammatory syndrome, leukocitosis, increased level of platelets, altered liver function. Ultrasound examination revealed inhomogeneous liver nodules and the thickening of the sigmoid wall. Further CT scan examination and MRI confirmed the lesions as beeing abscesses and also revealed trombosis of right portal vein. The sigmoid wall lesions proved to be an acute diverticulitis with perisigmoiditis, stenosis and abscess. Patient underwent a surgical treatment of sigmoid resection, but the punction of the abscesses revealed no pus at aspiration, making the surgical excision of the lesions unnecessary. After the surgery, during the antibiotic treatment, the patient developed pseudomembranous colitis treated with specific antibiotics. The evolution under this treatment was positive and the aspect of the liver lesions was improuved.

  4. Mortality and complications following surgery for diverticulitis: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Jason M; Singh, Maharaj

    2015-01-01

    Background The surgical treatment of diverticulitis is in a state of evolution. Clinicians across many disciplines need to counsel patients regarding surgical choices. Objectives A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to determine the mortality and complication rates following surgery for diverticulitis in both the emergent and elective setting. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) for relevant articles published from 1980 to 2012. The primary outcome of interest was the point estimate of mortality, following surgery for diverticulitis. Results Of the 289 citations reviewed, we included 59 studies. Overall, the point estimate for mortality was 3.05%, with a 95% confidence intereval (CI) of 1.73–5.32 and p < 0.001. Mortality following emergent surgery was 10.64% (95% CI 7.95–14.11; p < 0.001), versus 0.50% (95% CI 0.46–0.54; p < 0.001) following elective operations. A laparoscopic approach had an estimated mortality of 0.75% (95% CI 0.35–1.58; p < 0.001), compared to an open surgical approach, which had a mortality of 4.69% (95% CI 2.29–9.36, p < 0.001). The mortality following a resection with primary anastomosis was 1.96% (95% CI 1.22–3.13; p < 0.001) and for the Hartmann’s procedure was 14.18% (95% CI 9.83–20.03; p < 0.001). A comparative analysis found that the risk of post-operative mortality was significantly higher following emergent surgery, compared to elective surgery (odds ratio (OR): 6.12 with 95% CI 1.62–23.10; p = 0.008; Q = 2.56, p = 0.46 and I2 = 0); the open approach, compared to a laparoscopic approach (OR: 36.43 with 95% CI 9.94–133.6; p = 0.13; and Q = 2.79, p = 0.25 and I2 = 28.26); and for Hartmann’s procedure, compared to primary anastomosis without diversion (OR: 25.45 with 95% CI 15.13–42.81, p < 0.001; and Q = 23.34, p = 0.14 and I2 = 27.16). The overall reported post

  5. Patients with end-stage renal disease were at an increased risk of hospitalization for acute diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Huang, Nicole; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2016-09-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) show a high incidence of bacterial translocation and impaired gastrointestinal motility. The intestinal tract is believed to be the most crucial source of translocated bacteria. To evaluate the risk of colonic diverticulitis in patients with ESRD, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. Patients who met the following 3 criteria were defined as patients with ESRD: patients diagnosed with ESRD who received regular hemodialysis between 2000 and 2005, patients who received hemodialysis for more than 90% of the time during the observation period (2000-2011), and patients with no prior history of hemodialysis between 1997 and 1999. We matched every patient with ESRD with 1 matched control on the basis of propensity scores. The first diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9-CM codes 562.11 and 562.13) within the follow-up period was defined as the primary endpoint. Hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the patients in the control group as the reference. We included 32,547 and 32,547 patients in the ESRD and matched control cohorts, respectively. The 12-year cumulative incidence of acute colonic diverticulitis for patients with ESRD was significantly higher than that for the controls (P < 0.001). After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities, and medication use, the HR of acute colonic diverticulitis in the ESRD cohort was 11.20 times greater than that in the control cohort (95% CI: 8.14-15.42). The results indicated that patients with ESRD are at an increased risk for acute colonic diverticulitis. PMID:27684821

  6. Acute colonic diverticulitis: an update on clinical classification and management with MDCT correlation.

    PubMed

    Barat, Maxime; Dohan, Anthony; Pautrat, Karine; Boudiaf, Mourad; Dautry, Raphael; Guerrache, Youcef; Pocard, Marc; Hoeffel, Christine; Eveno, Clarisse; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the most commonly used classification of acute colonic diverticulitis (ACD) is the modified Hinchey classification, which corresponds to a slightly more complex classification by comparison with the original description. This modified classification allows to categorize patients with ACD into four major categories (I, II, III, IV) and two additional subcategories (Ia and Ib), depending on the severity of the disease. Several studies have clearly demonstrated the impact of this classification for determining the best therapeutic approach and predicting perioperative complications for patients who need surgery. This review provides an update on the classification of ACD along with a special emphasis on the corresponding MDCT features of the different categories and subcategories. This modified Hinchey classification should be known by emergency physicians, radiologists, and surgeons in order to improve patient care and management because each category has a specific therapeutic approach. PMID:27138434

  7. Recurrent retroperitoneal abscess due to perforated colonic diverticulitis in a patient with polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Szu-Yuan; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Chang, Yen-Hwa; Wu, Te-Chang; Yang, Wu-Chang; Ng, Yee-Yung

    2009-03-01

    Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) usually have extrarenal manifestations. We report the case of a 53-year-old man with ADPKD who presented with a retroperitoneal abscess of the left side after undergoing bilateral nephrectomy for a cyst that had repeatedly bled for 1 year. The abscess recurred despite drainage with a pig-tail catheter and antibiotic treatment. Fistulography with injection of diluted contrast medium via the pig-tail catheter showed an accumulation of contrast medium in the descending colon, which indicated a fistula between the abscess and the descending colon. A portion of the descending colon was resected, and multiple diverticulitis with 1 perforation in the resected specimen was observed. The findings support a diagnosis of retroperitoneal abscess caused by a perforated diverticulum---an extrarenal manifestation of ADPKD.

  8. Comparison between open and laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann’s procedure for diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    de’Angelis, Nicola; Brunetti, Francesco; Memeo, Riccardo; Batista da Costa, Jose; Schneck, Anne Sophie; Carra, Maria Clotilde; Azoulay, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare the open and laparoscopic Hartmann’s reversal in patients first treated for complicated diverticulitis. METHODS: Forty-six consecutive patients with diverticular disease were included in this retrospective, single-center study of a prospectively maintained colorectal surgery database. All patients underwent conventional Hartmann’s procedures for acute complicated diverticulitis. Other indications for Hartmann’s procedures were excluded. Patients underwent open (OHR) or laparoscopic Hartmann’s reversal (LHR) between 2000 and 2010, and received the same pre- and post-operative protocols of cares. Operative variables, length of stay, short- (at 1 mo) and long-term (at 1 and 3 years) post-operative complications, and surgery-related costs were compared between groups. RESULTS: The OHR group consisted of 18 patients (13 males, mean age ± SD, 61.4 ± 12.8 years), and the LHR group comprised 28 patients (16 males, mean age 54.9 ± 14.4 years). The mean operative time and the estimated blood loss were higher in the OHR group (235.8 ± 43.6 min vs 171.1 ± 27.4 min; and 301.1 ± 54.6 mL vs 225 ± 38.6 mL respectively, P = 0.001). Bowel function returned in an average of 4.3 ± 1.7 d in the OHR group, and 3 ± 1.3 d in the LHR group (P = 0.01). The length of hospital stay was significantly longer in the OHR group (11.2 ± 5.3 d vs 6.7 ± 1.9 d, P < 0.001). The 1 mo complication rate was 33.3% in the OHR (6 wound infections) and 3.6% in the LHR group (1 hemorrhage) (P = 0.004). At 12 mo, the complication rate remained significantly higher in the OHR group (27.8% vs 10.7%, P = 0.03). The anastomotic leak and mortality rates were nil. At 3 years, no patient required re-intervention for surgical complications. The OHR procedure had significantly higher costs (+56%) compared to the LHR procedure, when combining the surgery-related costs and the length of hospital stay. CONCLUSION: LHR appears to be a safe and feasible procedure that is associated with

  9. Le diverticule de l'urètre féminin: à propos de 18 cas

    PubMed Central

    Statoua, Mouad; El Ghanmi, Jihad; Karmouni, Tarik; El Khader, Khalid; Koutani, Abdellatif; Attya, Ahmed Iben

    2014-01-01

    Le diverticule de l'urètre ou poche sous urétrale est une affection rare, d’étiopathogénie non clairement établie, le diagnostique est clinique confirmé par l'urétrocystographie et le traitement est principalement chirurgicale consistant en une diverticulectomie par voie transvaginale. Nous rapportons l'expérience de notre service dans la prise en charge de cette affection en présentons une étude rétrospective sur une durée de 14 ans (entre 2000 et 2014) où on a pris en charge 18 patientes qui présentait un diverticule de l'urètre, l’âge moyen était de 36 ans, une symptomatologie urinaire ramenait les patientes à consulter où le diagnostic de DU a été posé par examen clinique confirmé en précisant ses caractéristiques en urétrocystographie, la prise en charge était chirurgicale et consistait en une diverticulectomie par voie transvaginale. Les suites post-opératoire était simples, la sonde vésicale retirée en moyenne 5,8 jours après l'intervention, on n'a noté aucune complication chez toute nos patientes, hormis un cas de récidives repris. Devant des troubles mictionnels récidivants de la femme, il est indispensable de rechercher un diverticule uréthral à l'examen clinique. La diverticulectomie transvaginale est l'intervention de choix offrant les meilleurs résultats. PMID:25400845

  10. Cochleo-saccular degeneration in one of three sisters with hereditary deafness, absent gastric motility, small bowel diverticulitis and progressive sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, M; MacRae, D; O-Uchi, T; Alford, B R

    1981-01-01

    This is a report of cochleo-saccular degeneration found in temporal bones from a patient who had suffered from slowly progressive and total sensorineural deafness which had an inherited origin. At age 8, this patient began to complain of hearing loss, and by age 10 she was totally deaf. The patient was 1 of 3 female siblings who have suffered from an exactly identical progressive disease: deafness, absent gastric motility, small bowel diverticulitis and ulceration, and sensory neuropathy. The temporal bone pathology found in this case was the degenerative change in the cochlear duct and sacculus. No pathology was found in the utriculus and semicircular canals. PMID:6937848

  11. Un diverticule géant para urétéral chez l’enfant révélé par une masse pelvienne

    PubMed Central

    Kassogué, Amadou; Diarra, Alkadri; Benzekri, Younes; Doumbia, Aliou; Bouabdallah, Youssef; Traoré, Zacharia; Tizniti, Siham; Mellas, Soufiane; Tazi, Mohammed Fald; Ammari, Jalal Eddine El; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Fassi, Mohammed Jamal El; Farih, My Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Résumé Nous rapportons un cas de diverticule géant para-urétéral chez un enfant de 18 mois, du point de vue des aspects cliniques, diagnostiques et thérapeutiques. Aucune anomalie associée n’a été relevée. Le patient était un enfant de sexe masculin, et la symptomatologie était dominée par la rétention aiguë d’urine et la présence d’une infection urinaire. La chirurgie a consisté en une diverticulectomie laparoscopique avec réimplantation urétéro-vésicale. L’évolution a été favorable avec disparition des signes urinaires. PMID:24940473

  12. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  13. Diverticulitis and diverticulosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... In the beginning, you may need to avoid whole-grain foods, fruits, and vegetables. This will help your colon ... you eat for a few days. High fiber foods include: Fruits, such ... and cream of wheat Whole-grain breads (whole wheat or whole rye)

  14. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for cancer. A high-fiber diet and mild pain reliever will often relieve symptoms. If the pouches become ... tests to diagnose it. Treatment may include antibiotics, pain relievers, and a liquid diet. A serious case may ...

  15. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Medline Plus GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel ... GI Symptoms Gastroparesis See All Topics (A-Z) GI Procedures Colonoscopy Colorectal Cancer Screening See All Procedures ( ...

  16. Diverticulitis - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    Fox JM, Stollman NH. Diverticular disease of the colon. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger & Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010: ...

  17. United States Guidelines for Diverticulitis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Floch, Martin H; Longo, Walter E

    2016-10-01

    Guidelines for diverticular disease management were last supported and published by the American Gastroenterology Association and the American College of Gastroenterology 2 decades ago. Guidelines have been published in other countries and by some societies. These guidelines are suggested as United States of America guidelines. In reality, they are what is practiced in Connecticut at Yale New Haven hospitals. The epidemiology and pathophysiology is described. This is still considered a dietary fiber-deficiency disease that results in high intracolonic pressure with resultant outpocketing of diverticula in the weakest point of the colon at the sites of vascular penetration with developing elastin deposition in the colon wall. The age and gender distribution is described. They are most common in the sigmoid. The guidelines of management are described according to accepted classification of the disease at all stages from onset, to early formation, to mild disease, to complicated disease, to rare specific states. The outcomes and mortality are discussed. PMID:27622366

  18. Diverticula, Diverticulosis, Diverticulitis: What's the Difference?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and how improve living with these conditions . Publication Library Books of Interest Medical Definitions About IFFGD About us Our Mission Awareness Activities Advocacy Activities Research Leadership IFFGD Symposium Report Industry Council Contact Us News Industry Treatment News Medical ...

  19. Dealing with Diverticulitis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseased section of my colon, then joined the healthy ends together. Today, depending on someone's condition, laparoscopy probably would be used instead of traditional surgery. That wasn't an option for me. Although I was in the hospital ...

  20. Understanding Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... that the body cannot digest. Some fiber, called soluble fiber, dissolves easily in water. It takes on a soft, jelly-like texture in the intestines. You get soluble fiber from oats, barley, and fruits such as ...

  1. 'Pointing' in the wrong direction--a case of diverticulitis presenting at the hip.

    PubMed

    Haleem, S; Clifton, R; Quraishi, N A; Hallett, J P

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old lady who was seen with an infected sinus leaking from the wound of a recently inserted right total hip joint prosthesis. Plain radiographs revealed gas shadows in the region of the wound. An intra-operative sinogram showed the sinus to be coming from a pelvic diverticular abscess and the hip to be an innocent bystander. Our case emphasises the importance of having a clear preoperative plan with relevant investigations before a radical operative procedure is undertaken, to avoid unnecessary risk to a non-infected hip prosthesis. PMID:18645976

  2. Dynamic FDG PET/CT imaging with diuresis demonstrates an enterovesical fistula in a lymphoma patient with repeated colon diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pan-Fu; Ting, Wen-Chien; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Kao, Yu-Lin; Chang, Pai-Jung; Lee, Jong-Kang

    2013-04-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with follicular B-cell lymphoma was referred for a FDG PET/CT scan due to severe left lower abdominal pain to rule out recurrent cancer. These FDG PET/CT images and previous FDG PET/CT images 5 months ago both revealed an air bubble in the urinary bladder on the CT images. He had a recurrent urinary tract infection history for 6 months. A list-mode dynamic data acquisition with diuresis intravenous injection revealed linear FDG activity extending from the upper-left portion of the bladder to a soft tissue mass in the lower-left pelvic region. An enterovesical fistula was confirmed by surgery.

  3. A case of perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in which gram staining of ascitic fluid was useful for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Junko; Fujita, Shouhei; Kawano, Fumihiro; Tsukamoto, Ryoichi; Honjo, Kunpei; Naito, Shigetoshi; Ishiyama, Shun; Miyano, Shozo; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Fujisawa, Minoru; Kojima, Kuniaki; Ogura, Kanako; Matsumoto, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    An 85-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for steroid therapy for relapsing nephrotic syndrome. During hospitalization, she complained of sudden epigastric pain at night. Although there were signs of peritoneal irritation, CT showed a large amount of ascitic fluid, but no free intraperitoneal gas. Gram staining of ascitic fluid obtained by abdominal paracentesis showed Gram-negative rods, which raised a strong suspicion of gastrointestinal perforation and peritonitis. Therefore, emergency surgery was performed. Exploration of the colon showed multiple sigmoid diverticula, one of which was perforated. The patient underwent an emergency Hartmann's procedure. Imaging studies failed to reveal any evidence of gastrointestinal perforation, presenting a diagnostic challenge. However, a physician performed rapid Gram staining of ascitic fluid at night when laboratory technicians were absent, had a strong suspicion of gastrointestinal perforation, and performed emergency surgery. Gram staining is superior in rapidity, and ascitic fluid Gram staining can aid in diagnosis, suggesting that it should be actively performed. We report this case, with a review of the literature on the significance of rapid diagnosis by Gram staining.

  4. Diverticular Disease of the Colon: News From Imaging.

    PubMed

    Flor, Nicola; Soldi, Simone; Zanchetta, Edoardo; Sbaraini, Sara; Pesapane, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    Different scenarios embrace computed tomography imaging and diverticula, including asymptomatic (diverticulosis) and symptomatic patients (acute diverticulitis, follow-up of acute diverticulitis, chronic diverticulitis). If the role of computed tomography is validated and widely supported by evidence in case of acute diverticulitis, this is not the case of patients in their follow-up for acute diverticulitis or with symptoms related to diverticula, but without acute inflammation. In these settings, computed tomography colonography is gaining consensus as the preferred radiologic test. PMID:27622355

  5. Colonoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colorectal cancer - colonoscopy; Colonoscopy - screening; Colon polyps - colonoscopy; Ulcerative colitis - colonoscopy; Crohn disease - colonoscopy; Diverticulitis - colonoscopy; Diarrhea - colonoscopy; ...

  6. Diverticulosis

    MedlinePlus

    Diverticula - diverticulosis; Diverticulitis - diverticulosis; Diverticular disease - diverticulosis; G.I. bleed - diverticulosis; Gastrointestinal hemorrhage - diverticulosis; Gastrointestinal bleed - diverticulosis

  7. Conservative management.

    PubMed

    Kruis, W; Leifeld, L; Pfützer, R

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of diverticulitis comprises at least two options: conservative or surgical management. There is a recent trend to limit surgical treatment of acute diverticulitis and to favor conservative management. This review addresses general aspects of conservative patient care with special focus on the treatment of patients with a first attack of diverticulitis. The presentation does not include a discussion of specific drugs which is given in other sections of this issue.

  8. Treatment of Diverticular Disease With Aminosalicylates: The Evidence.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Barbaro, Maria R; Bellacosa, Lara; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    Colonic diverticulosis is an increasingly common condition in Western industrialized countries. About 20% of patients develop symptoms, including abdominal pain, bloating, changes in bowel habits, and, eventually, diverticulitis or other complications. The management of symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease (SUDD) and the prevention of acute diverticulitis remains a challenge for the clinician. The rationale for the use of aminosalicylates, such as mesalazine, is based on the assumption of low-grade inflammation in SUDD and symptoms generation, whereas an overt inflammation may induce diverticulitis in patients with diverticular disease. Clinical scenarios in which the efficacy and safety of mesalazine have been studied include SUDD, prevention of diverticulitis, and of recurrent diverticulitis. Data from uncontrolled studies suggest a benefit of mesalazine on patients with SUDD, whereas data from randomized controlled trials showed some evidence of improvement of symptoms, although contrasting results are reported. The largest study so far published on the efficacy of mesalamine in the prevention of recurrence of diverticulitis showed that mesalamine was not superior to placebo. At this time, the role of mesalazine in the prevention of acute diverticulitis remains to be defined with many issues open and unresolved. PMID:27622369

  9. Low-fiber diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... restricted diet; Crohn disease - low fiber diet; Ulcerative colitis - low fiber diet; Surgery - low fiber diet ... of: Irritable bowel syndrome Diverticulitis Crohn disease Ulcerative colitis Sometimes people are put on this diet after ...

  10. Diverticular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ordered for a different reason, such as routine screening that checks for colorectal cancer or other digestive ... For mild cases of diverticulitis, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics. He or she may also suggest that you ...

  11. Digestive Health Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vegetables Highest in Fiber Per Serving Fruits Artichokes Apples, pears (with skin) Berries (blackberries, blueberries, raspberries) Dates ... Usually no symptoms Complications of diverticulosis include: Bright red rectal bleeding with clots Diverticulitis Ways to prevent ...

  12. Eat fresh vegetables, fruit, and whole grain products | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... which could have complications. Although this was major surgery, thanks to good pain management at the hospital, I had little or none ... link between diverticular disease and inflammatory bowel disease management of ... for uncomplicated diverticulitis Participants in clinical trials can ...

  13. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... leg pain from clogged arteries Stomach/Digestive: Gallstones, intestinal obstruction, diverticulitis, ulcers, severe indigestion, severe gas pain, inflammatory bowel disease, colitis Urinary/Reproductive: Kidney stones, pelvic pain, vulvodynia, ...

  14. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many potential causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  15. Right-Sided Sigmoid Diverticular Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Little, Andrew; Culver, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Diverticulosis is a common disorder among geriatric patients, of whom 10% to 25% go on to develop diverticulitis. Known complications of diverticulitis include formation of phlegmon, fistula, bowel obstruction, bleeding, perforation, and colonic abscess. A less common complication is perforation with formation of an extra-abdominal necrotizing abscess. This case is a report of an 83-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with a necrotizing abdominal wall abscess secondary to right-sided diverticular microperforation. PMID:22461936

  16. The Role of Biomarkers in Diverticular Disease.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Antonella; Ianiro, Gianluca; Montalto, Massimo; Cammarota, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Diverticulosis of the colon is a common condition in western countries. Acute diverticulitis may occur in 10% to 25% of the patients, sometimes associated with the presence of complications such as abscess, fistula, and perforation. Early diagnosis and accurate assessment of acute diverticulitis are necessary to start an efficacious treatment promptly, either conservatively or by surgery. The clinical picture may mimic other abdominal conditions; therefore, imaging techniques such as ultrasound or computed tomography are usually recommended, although they are expensive, examiner dependent, and potentially harmful. Recently, there has been increasing interest about the role of biological markers in diverticular disease as noninvasive, reliable, and inexpensive tools, conceivably able to support physicians in the diagnosis, the assessment of activity, and the monitoring of acute diverticulitis. By a MEDLINE search, most of the relevant data derived from C-reactive protein showed that it strongly supported the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis at values of >50 mg/L. It also represents a stronger marker compared with other serum biomarkers, able to correlate with the histologic severity in acute diverticulitis, the risk of perforation, and the response to therapy. Regarding fecal biomarkers, an interesting role has been reported for fecal calprotectin. It significantly correlates with inflammatory infiltrate. More relevantly, it correlates with the response to therapy and may predict the recurrence of colonic diverticulitis, as it is reliable in detecting subclinical intestinal inflammation, as reported already for inflammatory bowel disease. These represent encouraging results, but need to be confirmed in further larger studies. PMID:27622356

  17. Complicated Meckel’s diverticulum and therapeutic management

    PubMed Central

    Erol, Varlık; Yoldaş, Tayfun; Cin, Samet; Çalışkan, Cemil; Akgün, Erhan; Korkut, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the treatment options and compare patient management with the literature for patients operated on for an acute abdomen who had complications due to inflammation of the Meckel’s diverticulum at our clinics. Material and Methods: This study retrospectively evaluated 14 patients who had been operated on for acute abdomen and had been diagnosed with Meckel’s diverticulitis (MD) in Ege University Medical Faculty Department of General Surgery, between October 2007 and October 2012. Results: Fourteen patients with a diagnosis of Meckel’s diverticulitis (MD) were retrospectively analyzed. Radiologically, the abdominal computer tomography showed pathologies compatible with mechanical intestinal obstruction, Meckel’s diverticulitis and peridiverticular abscess, as well as detection of free air within the abdomen on direct abdominal X-ray. Among patients diagnosed with complicated Meckel’s diverticuli (obstruction, diverticulitis, perforation) 10 patients had partial small bowel resection and end-to-end anastomosis (71.5%), three patients underwent diverticulum excision (21.4%), and one patient underwent right hemicolectomy+ileotransversostomy (7.1%). Conclusion: Meckel’s diverticulum is a vestigial remnant of an omphalomesenteric channel in the small bowel. It is a real congenital diverticular abnormality that contains all three layers of the small bowel. Surgical excision should be performed if Meckel’s diverticulum is detected in order to avoid incidental complications such as ulceration, bleeding, bowel obstruction, diverticulitis or perforation. Meckel’s diverticulitis does not have specific clinical and radiological findings. Delayed diagnosis can lead to lethal septic complications. Complications associated with Meckel’s diverticulitis, especially if a definite diagnosis is not made during the preoperative period, should be considered in the differential diagnosis. In the presence of a complicated

  18. Management of Diverticular Disease in Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Johannes K; Yaqub, Sheraz; Øresland, Tom

    2016-10-01

    Throughout the last century, the incidence of diverticular disease of the colon has increased tremendously in industrialized countries; nevertheless, the management of this condition is still controversial. Although several international guidelines for the management of diverticular disease are based on the same evidence, the recommendations differ greatly, emphasizing the lack of high-quality prospective studies. In Scandinavia, official guidelines for the management of diverticular disease exist only in Denmark. However, the treatment policies are quite similar in all Scandinavian countries. Computed tomography is the first choice for imaging of acute diverticulitis and its complications. Furthermore, the use of antibiotics in uncomplicated diverticulitis is nearly abandoned in Scandinavia, whereas several international guidelines still recommend their use. There is a broad consensus that abscesses secondary to acute diverticulitis can safely be managed with percutaneous drainage, which is in line with international recommendations. The surgical management of perforated diverticulitis with peritonitis is still as controversial in Scandinavia as elsewhere. Common surgical options are laparoscopic peritoneal lavage, primary resection with anastomosis, and primary resection with terminal colostomy (Hartmann's procedure). Elective sigmoid resection in patients with diverticular disease seems to be performed less frequently in Scandinavia than in other European countries; the right indications are a current matter of debate. Symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease in the absence of diverticulitis has not gained great attention in Scandinavia. PMID:27622365

  19. Diverticulosis today: unfashionable and still under-researched

    PubMed Central

    Tursi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Diverticulosis of the colon is a widespread disease, and its prevalence is increasing especially in the developing world. The underlying pathological mechanisms that cause the formation of colonic diverticula remain unclear but are likely to be the result of complex interactions among age, diet, genetic factors, colonic motility, and changes in colonic structure. The large majority of patients remain asymptomatic throughout their life, one fifth of them become symptomatic (developing the so-called ‘diverticular disease’) while only a minority of these will develop acute diverticulitis. The factors predicting the development of symptoms remain to be identified. Again, it is generally recognized that diverticular disease occurrence is probably related to complex interactions among colonic motility, diet, lifestyle, and genetic features. Changes in intestinal microflora due to low-fiber diet and consequent low-grade inflammation are thought to be one of the mechanisms responsible for symptoms occurrence of both diverticular disease and acute diverticulitis. Current therapeutic approaches with rifaximin and mesalazine to treat the symptoms seem to be promising. Antibiotic treatment is currently advised only in acute complicated diverticulitis, and no treatment has currently proven effective in preventing the recurrence of acute diverticulitis. Further studies are required in order to clarify the reasons why diverticulosis occurs and the factors triggering occurrence of symptoms. Moreover, the reasons why rifaximin and mesalazine work in symptomatic diverticular disease but not in acute diverticulitis are yet to be elucidated. PMID:26929783

  20. Prognostic Indicators as Provided by the EPIC ClearView

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-11-18

    Coronary Artery Disease; Congestive Heart Failure; Valvular Heart Disease; Atrial Fibrillation; Hypertension; Pyelonephritis; Acute Renal Failure; Renal Failure; Viral Hepatitis; Alcoholic Hepatitis; Steatohepatitis; Cirrhosis; Asthma; COPD; Bronchitis; Emphysema; Pneumonia; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Colitis; Diverticulitis; Peptic Ulcer Disease; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Cholecystitis; Pancreatitis; Malabsorption Disorders; Celiac Sprue; Diabetes

  1. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... the small intestine (duodenum) may be caused by cancer of the pancreas, scarring from an ulcer, or Crohn disease . Rarely, a gallstone, a mass of undigested food, or a collection of parasitic worms may block ... commonly caused by cancer, diverticulitis , or a hard lump of stool (fecal ...

  2. 76 FR 35950 - Agency Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 3) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... Form 21-0960G-2. f. Intestinal Disorders (Other Than Surgical or Infectious) (Including ] Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, and Diverticulitis) Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960G-3. g. Intestines Surgical and/or Infectious Intestinal Disorders...

  3. Laparoscopic treatment of colovesical fistulas: technique and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tsivian, Alexander; Kyzer, Shlomo; Shtricker, Avraham; Benjamin, Shalva; Sidi, Abraham Ami

    2006-05-01

    Colovesical fistula is an uncommon complication of diverticulitis. We present our technique of a laparoscopic approach for treatment of vesicosigmoid fistulas and review the available published literature. We believe that a laparoscopic approach is a feasible and advantageous alternative for the treatment of colovesical fistulas, with low morbidity and short hospital stay. PMID:16771754

  4. Acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ricardo; Fernandes, Teresa; Oliveira, Maria I; Castro, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Pylephlebitis is defined as septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein. It is a rare but serious complication of an intraabdominal infection, more commonly diverticulitis and appendicitis. It has an unspecific clinical presentation and the diagnosis is difficult. The authors report a case of a 21-year-old man with acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis. The diagnosis was made with contrast enhanced CT.

  5. Point of Care 3D Ultrasound for Various Applications: A Pilot Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Appendicitis; Evidence of Cholecystectomy; Gallstones; Pregnancy, Ectopic; Aortic Aneurysm; Kidney Stones; Intrauterine Pregnancy; Diverticulitis; Abdominal Injuries; Tumors; Pancreatitis; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intraabdominal Infections; Intestinal Diseases; Pregnancy; Vascular Disease; Uterine Fibroids; Ovarian Cysts; Uterine Abnominalies; Bladder Abnominalies; Testicular Abnominalies; Polyps

  6. Laparoscopic Peritoneal Lavage: A Definitive Treatment for Diverticular Peritonitis or a “Bridge” to Elective Laparoscopic Sigmoidectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Trastulli, Stefano; Vettoretto, Nereo; Milani, Diego; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Adamenko, Olga; Desiderio, Jacopo; Burattini, Maria Federica; Parisi, Amilcare; Arezzo, Alberto; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To this day, the treatment of generalized peritonitis secondary to diverticular perforation is still controversial. Recently, in patients with acute sigmoid diverticulitis, laparoscopic lavage and drainage has gained a wide interest as an alternative to resection. Based on this backdrop, we decided to perform a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of peritoneal lavage in perforated diverticular disease. A bibliographic search was performed in PubMed for case series and comparative studies published between January 1992 and February 2014 describing laparoscopic peritoneal lavage in patients with perforated diverticulitis. A total of 19 articles consisting of 10 cohort studies, 8 case series, and 1 controlled clinical trial met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. In total these studies analyzed data from 871 patients. The mean follow-up time ranged from 1.5 to 96 months when reported. In 11 studies, the success rate of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage, defined as patients alive without surgical treatment for a recurrent episode of diverticulitis, was 24.3%. In patients with Hinchey stage III diverticulitis, the incidence of laparotomy conversion was 1%, whereas in patients with stage IV it was 45%. The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 2.9%. The 30-day postoperative reintervention rate was 4.9%, whereas 2% of patients required a percutaneous drainage. Readmission rate after the first hospitalization for recurrent diverticulitis was 6%. Most patients who were readmitted (69%) required redo surgery. A 2-stage laparoscopic intervention was performed in 18.3% of patients. Laparoscopic peritoneal lavage should be considered an effective and safe option for the treatment of patients with sigmoid diverticulitis with Hinchey stage III peritonitis; it can also be consider as a “bridge” surgical step combined with a delayed and elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in order to avoid a Hartmann procedure

  7. [Diverticular disease - clinical patterns and treatment].

    PubMed

    Lembcke, Bernhard; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Diverticulosis, diverticular disease and diverticulitis have come into focus again because new aspects concerning diagnosis, risk factors and treatment arose only recently which prompted a new Guideline released by the DGVS and DGAV summarising the current evidence. Along with the guideline's essentials for medical practice a diagnosis of diverticulitis is considered unsatisfactory unless a cross-sectional imaging method (either ultrasonography [US] or computed tomography [CT] ) has proven that the clinical findings and inflammation (CRP considered superior to WBC and temperature) are due to diverticular inflammation. For reasons of practicability and considering relevant legislation for radiation exposure protection, US is the primary - and usually effectual - diagnostic method of choice as it is equipotent to CT. While US offers better resolution and enables precise imaging exactly at the location of pain as well as reiterative application, the latter implies advantages in the case of a deep abscess or diverticulitis in difficult locations (e. g. the small pelvis). Clinical evidence and laboratory and imaging findings allow for distinguishing a large number of differential diagnoses and also form the basis of a new classification (classification of diverticular disease, CDD) which comprises all forms of diverticular disease, from diverticulosis to bleeding and to the different facettes of diverticulitis. This classification -which should be applied in any patient with the diagnosis of diverticular disease- is independent of specific diagnostic preferences and applicable both to conservative and operative treatment options. While the number of recurrent episodes is no longer a significant indicator for surgery in diverticulitis, severity and / or complications determine treatment options along with the patients preferences. According to first data, conservative treatment may waive antibiotics under certain circumstances, however they are indispensible in

  8. Kyste géant para-urétral feminine

    PubMed Central

    Kassogué, Amadou; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Ouattara, Zanafon; Diarra, Alkadri; Tembely, Aly; Ouattara, Kalilou; Farih, My Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Le kyste géant para-urétral féminin infecté est rarement rapporté dans la littérature. Ce kyste est différent du diverticule sous urétral sur le plan clinique, diagnostique et thérapeutique. Sa pathogénie se confond avec celle des diverticules sous urétraux. Son traitement n'est pas bien codifié, vu sa rareté. Nous rapportons un cas atypique de kyste géant para urétral infecté chez une jeune femme de 26 ans. Le kyste était symptomatique et la patiente a eu un traitement chirurgical. Nous discutons les aspects cliniques, diagnostiques et thérapeutiques de cette entité rare à travers une revue de la littérature.

  9. Erroneous diagnosis of left ureteric injury leading to insertion of double J catheter to the left spermatic vein.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Chaimoff, C

    1995-01-01

    A case of erroneous diagnosis of left ureteric injury and its results is reported. An 86-year-old man was operated on for perforated diverticulitis. A tubular structure was injured at the left paracolic gutter and repaired over double J catheter. Six months later the proximal side of the catheter was found in the right ventricle, because it has been introduced into the spermatic vein and not into the left ureter. PMID:23511802

  10. Open or Laparoscopic Treatment: Differences and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Enio C; Bafutto, Mauro; Almeida, Jose R

    2016-10-01

    Surgical treatment of diverticulitis is still characterized by high morbidity and mortality. Surgical approach evolved from the early 20th century with 3-stage laparotomy to colon resection with primary anastomosis. In the last 2 decades, laparoscopic colectomy has been applied to elective and emergency setting of diverticular disease. Recently, laparoscopic lavage and drainage has been used to treat purulent peritonitis. All those modalities of treatment have been discussed and pointed pros and cons. PMID:27622372

  11. Prognostic Role of the Endoscopic Classification "DICA".

    PubMed

    Tursi, Antonio; Brandimarte, Giovanni; Di Mario, Francesco; Elisei, Walter; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Picchio, Marcello

    2016-10-01

    Diverticular inflammation and complication assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease. Its predictive value in those patients was recently retrospectively assessed. For each patient, the following parameters were recorded: age, severity of DICA, presence of abdominal pain, C-reactive protein, fecal calprotectin test (if available) at the time of diagnosis, months of follow-up, therapy taken during the follow-up to maintain remission (if any), occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis, and need of surgery. A total of 1651 patients (793 male, 858 female, mean age 66.6±11.1 y) were enrolled: 939 (56.9%) classified as DICA 1, 501 (30.3%) as DICA 2, and 211 (12.8%) as DICA 3. The median follow-up was 24 (9 to 138) months. Acute diverticulitis (AD) occurred/recurred in 263 (15.9%) patients, and surgery was necessary in 57 (21.7%) cases. DICA was the only factor significantly associated with the occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis and surgery either at univariate (χ=405.029; P<0.0001) or multivariate analysis (hazard ratio=4.319; 95% CI, 3.639-5.126; P<0.0001). Only in DICA 2 patients scheduled therapy was effective for prevention of AD occurrence/recurrence with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.598 (0.391-0.914) (P=0.006, log-rank test). Mesalazine-based therapies reduced the risk of AD occurrence/recurrence and need of surgery with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.2103 (0.122-0.364) and 0.459 (0.258-0.818), respectively. DICA classification seems to be a valid parameter to predict the risk of diverticulitis occurrence/recurrence in patients suffering from diverticular disease of the colon. PMID:27622352

  12. Peritoneal malignant mesothelioma in a patient with recurrent peritonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Riddell, R.H.; Goodman, M.J.; Moossa, A.R.

    1981-07-01

    A patient is presented who developed a peritoneal malignant mesothelioma in association with severe persistent and recurrent diverticulitis. The case is unusual in that a spectrum of mesothelial proliferation was documented beginning initially as benign foci of mesothelial proliferation and passing through a stage of atypical proliferation before terminating as a malignant process. The possible role of the diverticular disease in the pathogenesis of the tumor is discussed.

  13. Rapid eye movement-sleep is reduced in patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis—an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Alamili, Mahdi; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sleep disturbances are commonly found in patients in the postoperative period. Sleep disturbances may give rise to several complications including cardiopulmonary instability, transient cognitive dysfunction and prolonged convalescence. Many factors including host inflammatory responses are believed to cause postoperative sleep disturbances, as inflammatory responses can alter sleep architecture through cytokine-brain interactions. Our aim was to investigate alteration of sleep architecture during acute infection and its relationships to inflammation and clinical symptoms. Materials & Methods. In this observational study, we included patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis as a model to investigate the isolated effects of inflammatory responses on sleep. Eleven patients completed the study. Patients were admitted and treated with antibiotics for two nights, during which study endpoints were measured by polysomnography recordings, self-reported discomfort scores and blood samples of cytokines. One month later, the patients, who now were in complete remission, were readmitted and the endpoints were re-measured (the baseline values). Results. Total sleep time was reduced 4% and 7% the first (p = 0.006) and second (p = 0.014) nights of diverticulitis, compared to baseline, respectively. The rapid eye movement sleep was reduced 33% the first night (p = 0.016), compared to baseline. Moreover, plasma IL-6 levels were correlated to non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep and fatigue. Conclusion. Total sleep time and rapid eye movement sleep were reduced during nights with active diverticulitis and correlated with markers of inflammation. PMID:26290799

  14. Diverticular Disease in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Wensaas, Knut-Arne; Hungin, Amrit Pali

    2016-10-01

    Diverticular disease is a chronic and common condition, and yet the impact of diverticular disease in primary care is largely unknown. The diagnosis of diverticular disease relies on the demonstration of diverticula in the colon, and the necessary investigations are often not available in primary care. The specificity and sensitivity of symptoms, clinical signs and laboratory tests alone are generally low and consequently the diagnostic process will be characterized by uncertainty. Also, the criteria for symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease in the absence of macroscopic inflammation are not clearly defined. Therefore both the prevalence of diverticular disease and the incidence of diverticulitis in primary care are unknown. Current recommendations for treatment and follow-up of patients with acute diverticulitis are based on studies where the diagnosis has been verified by computerized tomography. The results cannot be directly transferred to primary care where the diagnosis has to rely on the interpretation of symptoms and signs. Therefore, one must allow for greater diagnostic uncertainty, and safety netting in the event of unexpected development of the condition is an important aspect of the management of diverticulitis in primary care. The highest prevalence of diverticular disease is found among older patients, where multimorbidity and polypharmacy is common. The challenge is to remember the possible contribution of diverticular disease to the patient's overall condition and to foresee its implications in terms of advice and treatment in relation to other diseases. PMID:27622376

  15. Colonic diverticular disease. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Gargallo Puyuelo, Carla J; Sopeña, Federico; Lanas Arbeloa, Angel

    2015-12-01

    Diverticular disease represents the most common disease affecting the colon in the Western world. Most cases remain asymptomatic, but some others will have symptoms or develop complications. The aims of treatment in symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease are to prevent complications and reduce the frequency and intensity of symptoms. Fibre, probiotics, mesalazine, rifaximin and their combinations seem to be usually an effective therapy. In the uncomplicated diverticulitis, outpatient management is considered the optimal approach in the majority of patients, and oral antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment. Admission to hospital and intravenous antibiotic are recommended only when the patient is unable to intake food orally, affected by severe comorbidity or does not improve. However, inpatient management and intravenous antibiotics are necessary in complicated diverticulitis. The role of surgery is also changing. Most diverticulitis-associated abscesses can be treated with antibiotics and/or percutaneous drainage and emergency surgery is considered only in patients with acute peritonitis. Finally, patient related factors, and not the number of recurrences, play the most important role in selecting recipients of elective surgery to avoid recurrences. PMID:25979437

  16. [Diverticular disease: towards 2020. An evidence-based approach].

    PubMed

    Koch, Maurizio; Festa, Virginia; Chiesara, Francesca; Moretti, Alessandra; Bianchi, Marco; Dezi, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    Diverticular disease (DD) of the colon has an increasing burden on health service resources, in terms of hospital admissions, mortality and surgery rate. We present an overview of the clinical history of DD, and of the ways that gastroenterologists have to modify it. Prevalence of the disease increases with aging. Most of diverticulosis are occasionally identified on colonscopy, and most of them remain asymptomatic for all life. Only 4% of these subjects develop diverticulitis. However, 4-25% of these patients are expected to present a second episode of diverticulitis, and 15% of them develop complications. Hospitalizations for diverticulitis and relapses of diverticulitis show strong growth (+21% 2013 vs 2003 in USA). The total annual costs for hospitalization for DD in USA are over 2,2 billion of dollars, and in Italy exceed 63 million of euros. In-hospital mortality can reach 0,5%. Diagnosis of diverticulitis is based on clinical history, lab tests and imaging (ultrasonography, CAT). Clinical diagnosis has a sensitivity of 68% and specificity around 98%. According to a meta-analysis, the performance of ultrasonograhy and CAT results very high ("pooled" sensitivity 92-94%, and specificity 90-99%; "pooled" Likelihood Ratio positive 9.6 for ultrasonography and 78.4 for CAT. Likelihood Rato negative 0.09 and 0.06 respectively). Evidences for preventing relapse are poor. Anyway, a very recent meta-analysis on 6 RCTs suggests no role for mesalazine (GRADE SCALE for evidence 3). Non absorbable antibiotics (rifaximin) have been used in two studies (one RCT, one retrospective observational). Data from the two studies suggest some evidence in favour of its use (GRADE SCALE 1). The number of admitted patients is 291. Considering a base-line risk of 19 relapses every 100 patients (5-year observation period), the absolute risk difference is minus 9 patients with relapse (CI 95% -14 a + 3) in the RCT and minus 14 patients (CI 95% -17 a -5) in the observational study. A 2020

  17. Peracreadium akenovae sp. nov. (Trematoda: Opecoelidae) parasitising the highfin moray eel Gymnothorax pseudothyrsoideus (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae) from Moreton Bay, Australia.

    PubMed

    Cribb, Thomas H; Bray, Rodney A; Cutmore, Scott C

    2013-09-01

    A new opecoelid trematode, Peracreadium akenovae sp. nov., is described from the highfin moray eel Gymnothorax pseudothyrsoideus (Bleeker) (Anguilliformes; Muraenidae), collected from Moreton Bay off southeast Queensland, Australia. The new species is distinctive in its body shape, transversely elongate irregular testes, vitelline follicles interrupted at the level of the ventral sucker, and diverticulate excretory vesicle. The Muraenidae is a new host family for Peracreadium Nicoll, 1909. Peracreadium is the seventh opecoelid genus reported from temperate eastern Australian marine fishes and this is its first report from Australian waters.

  18. Perisigmoid Abscess Leading to a Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Anil; Srikumar, Pillai B.; McConnie, Randolph M.

    2016-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by triad of joint hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV places patients at risk for life-threatening, spontaneous, vascular or visceral rupture due to reduced or abnormal secretion of type III collagen. We present an adolescent male who was found to have a perisigmoid abscess with a fistula connecting to adjacent sigmoid colon secondary to undiagnosed EDS type IV. Conservative management with antibiotics and bowel rest was pursued to allow for elective resection for his acute complicated diverticulitis at a safer time. PMID:26958560

  19. Tubo-Ovarian Abscess: Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Newton G.

    1986-01-01

    That a female patient with abdominal pain is often considered to have pelvic inflammatory disease until proven otherwise is ubiquitous in the medical literature. This view is dangerous and should be challenged because it has resulted in episodes of ruptured appendix, death from ruptured ectopic pregnancies, and serious morbidity from delayed diagnoses of such entities as diverticulitis and endometriosis. Proper diagnostic steps should be taken for all patients with abdominal pain of unclear etiology. This article reviews the pathogenesis of tubo-ovarian abscesses so as to separate and clearly identify fact from fiction. Diagnostic steps and management guidelines are discussed. PMID:3537321

  20. Small-bowel Diverticulosis:Imaging Findings and Review of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    De Peuter, B.; Box, I.; Vanheste, R.; Dymarkowski, S.

    2009-01-01

    Complicated small-bowel diverticulosis is a rather uncommon cause of upper abdominal pain. It may lead to symptoms presenting with an acute onset or to chronic and nonspecific complaints. As the presentation is often similar to other pathologies (acute appendicitis, pancreatitis, or acute cholecystis) and in many cases diagnosis is made on basis of surgical findings, careful analysis of the imaging landmarks may be warranted to aid in the early stages of detection. In this report, we present clinical and morphological findings in three patients where small-bowel diverticulitis was surgically proven. The relevant literature is reviewed, and typical imaging properties are discussed. PMID:19657452

  1. Predictive value of the Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification on the outcome of diverticular disease of the colon: An international study

    PubMed Central

    Brandimarte, Giovanni; Di Mario, Francesco; Annunziata, Maria L; Bafutto, Mauro; Bianco, Maria A; Colucci, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita; Danese, Silvio; De Bastiani, Rudi; Elisei, Walter; Escalante, Ricardo; Faggiani, Roberto; Ferrini, Luciano; Forti, Giacomo; Latella, Giovanni; Graziani, Maria G; Oliveira, Enio C; Papa, Alfredo; Penna, Antonio; Portincasa, Piero; Søreide, Kjetil; Spadaccini, Antonio; Usai, Paolo; Bonovas, Stefanos; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Picchio, Marcello; Lecca, Piera G; Zampaletta, Costantino; Cassieri, Claudio; Damiani, Alberto; Desserud, Kari F; Fiorella, Serafina; Landi, Rosario; Goni, Elisabetta; Lai, Maria A; Pigò, Flavia; Rotondano, Gianluca; Schiaccianoce, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease. Aims We assessed retrospectively the predictive value of DICA in patients for whom endoscopic data and clinical follow-up were available. Methods For each patient, we recorded: age, severity of DICA, presence of abdominal pain, C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin test (if available) at the time of diagnosis; months of follow-up; therapy taken during the follow-up to maintain remission (if any); occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis; need of surgery. Results We enrolled 1651 patients (793 M, 858 F, mean age 66.6 ± 11.1 years): 939 (56.9%) patients were classified as DICA 1, 501 (30.3%) patients as DICA 2 and 211 (12.8%) patients as DICA 3. The median follow-up was 24 (9–38) months. Acute diverticulitis (AD) occurred/recurred in 263 (15.9%) patients; surgery was necessary in 57 (21.7%) cases. DICA was the only factor significantly associated to the occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis and surgery either at univariate (χ2 = 405.029; p < 0.0001) or multivariate analysis (hazard ratio = 4.319, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.639–5.126; p < 0.0001). Only in DICA 2 patients was therapy effective for prevention of AD occurrence/recurrence with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.598 (0.391–0.914) (p = 0.006, log rank test). Mesalazine-based therapies reduced the risk of AD occurrence/recurrence and needs of surgery with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.2103 (0.122–0.364) and 0.459 (0.258–0.818), respectively. Conclusions DICA classification is a valid parameter to predict the risk of diverticulitis occurrence/recurrence in patients suffering from diverticular disease of the colon. PMID:27536372

  2. New strategies for the management of diverticular disease: insights for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Floch, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Diverticulosis is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions affecting the general population in the Western world. It is estimated that over 2.5 million people are affected by diverticular disease in the United States. The spectrum of clinical manifestations of diverticulosis ranges from asymptomatic diverticulosis to complicated diverticulitis. Treatment for symptomatic diverticular disease is largely based on symptoms. Traditional therapy includes fiber, bowel rest, antibiotics, pain control and surgery for selected cases. This review discusses recent advances in the medical treatment of diverticular disease such as the use of mesalamine, rifaximin and probiotics as our understanding of the disease evolves. PMID:23634185

  3. Atypical Presentations of Epiploic Appendagitis: Early Diagnosis and Non-Operative Management is the Optimal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Zackariah

    2012-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis is a benign self-limiting inflammation of the appendices epiplocae of the colon. It often presents as abdominal pain rarely accompanied by fever, nausea, or vomiting or any other abdominal symptoms. It can mimick acute diverticulitis or appendicitis on clinical exam. The diagnosis of epiploic appendagitis primarily relies on imaging modalities such as CT. The treatment is analgesia and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are usually sufficient to control pain and no surgical intervention is needed. This report illustrates two cases with epiploic appendagitis who presented with atypical symptoms, clinical and radiological findings and management of this condition.

  4. [Emergency ultrasound in patients with abdominal pain - where should we "look"].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Tanja; Heinz, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound is without doubt the imaging technique of choice in patients with acute abdominal pain. Point-of-care ultrasound examinations can help to reduce the number of possible differential diagnoses by exclusion or - as a best case scenario - show us directly the correct diagnosis. Hence patients can benefit from a very early appropriate therapeutic approach. This article illustrates where and how we should "look". After focusing on basic technical settings, typical pathological sonomorphologic changes in patients with some of the most important illnesses are characterized (e. g. acute appendicitis, acute cholecystitis, acute diverticulitis, acute pancreatitis and urinary tract occlusion). Ultrasound beginners are the target group of this survey.

  5. Omental infarction and its mimics: imaging features of acute abdominal conditions presenting with fat stranding greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Tonerini, Michele; Calcagni, Francesca; Lorenzi, Silvia; Scalise, Paola; Grigolini, Alessandro; Bemi, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    The segmental omental infarction is a rare self-limited disorder presenting with aspecific clinical symptoms that may mimic several acute abdominal conditions. Therefore, a correct noninvasive diagnosis is important because treatment approaches range from monitoring to surgery. As omental infarction results in an important fat stranding that is much greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening, it suggests a narrower differential diagnosis: appendicitis, diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, and mesenteric panniculitis. In this pictorial essay, we point out the importance of imaging in identifying this typical sign allowing alternate diagnoses such as segmental omental infarction that can be conservatively managed.

  6. Duodenal gland cysts and pseudodiverticula in sheep.

    PubMed

    Penadés, Mariola; Guerrero, Irene; Benito-Peña, Alberto; Corpa, Juan M

    2010-07-01

    Six cases of acquired duodenal diverticulitis (pseudodiverticula) were found in a flock of sheep over a short period of time. All the animals had duodenal lesions characterized by the presence of multiple saccular dilations filled with feed material. The mucosal surface was elevated by multiple small nodules that histologically corresponded to cystic dilatations of the duodenal glands, which likely caused the displacement, atrophy, and disappearance of the muscular layer, leading to pseudodiverticula. The gross appearance, microscopic findings, and epidemiological characteristics suggest that this is a different pathological process to that described for diverticula in animals to date.

  7. Multiple giant diverticula of the jejunum causing intestinal obstruction: report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Multiple diverticulosis of jejunum represents an uncommon pathology of the small bowel. The disease is usually asymptomatic and must be taken into consideration in cases of unexplained malabsorption, anemia, chronic abdominal pain or discomfort. Related complications such as diverticulitis, perforation, bleeding or intestinal obstruction appear in 10-30% of the patients increasing morbidity and mortality rates. We herein report a case of a 55 year-old man presented at the emergency department with acute abdominal pain, vomiting and fever. Preoperative radiological examination followed by laparotomy revealed multiple giant jejunal diverticula causing intestinal obstruction. We also review the literature for this uncommon disease. PMID:21385440

  8. Perisigmoid Abscess Leading to a Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV.

    PubMed

    Normatov, Inessa; Kesavan, Anil; Srikumar, Pillai B; McConnie, Randolph M

    2016-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by triad of joint hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV places patients at risk for life-threatening, spontaneous, vascular or visceral rupture due to reduced or abnormal secretion of type III collagen. We present an adolescent male who was found to have a perisigmoid abscess with a fistula connecting to adjacent sigmoid colon secondary to undiagnosed EDS type IV. Conservative management with antibiotics and bowel rest was pursued to allow for elective resection for his acute complicated diverticulitis at a safer time. PMID:26958560

  9. Endorectal sonography in the evaluation of rectal and perirectal disease.

    PubMed

    St Ville, E W; Jafri, S Z; Madrazo, B L; Mezwa, D G; Bree, R L; Rosenberg, B F

    1991-09-01

    Endorectal sonography initially was developed for evaluation of the prostate and now has been adapted for evaluation of rectal and perirectal disease. We used endorectal sonography to evaluate a spectrum of diseases, including primary and recurrent rectal carcinoma, metastases, villous adenoma, leiomyosarcoma, endometriosis, sacrococcygeal teratoma, chordoma, retroperitoneal cystic hamartoma, pelvic lipomatosis, diverticulitis, and perirectal abscess. The technique has been useful in localization of perirectal abscesses and in sonographically guided biopsy of perirectal masses. Knowledge of normal sonographic anatomy of the rectum is essential in the evaluation of rectal and perirectal disease. In this essay, we describe the technique of endorectal sonography and illustrate the sonographic findings in a variety of diseases.

  10. Management of diverticular disease.

    PubMed

    Pfützer, Roland H; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Diverticular disease is a common condition in Western countries and the incidence and prevalence of the disease is increasing. The pathogenetic factors involved include structural changes in the gut that increase with age, a diet low in fibre and rich in meat, changes in intestinal motility, the concept of enteric neuropathy and an underlying genetic background. Current treatment strategies are hampered by insufficient options to stratify patients according to individual risk. One of the main reasons is the lack of an all-encompassing classification system of diverticular disease. In response, the German Society for Gastroenterology and Digestive Diseases (DGVS) has proposed a classification system as part of its new guideline for the diagnosis and management of diverticular disease. The classification system includes five main types of disease: asymptomatic diverticulosis, acute uncomplicated and complicated diverticulitis, as well as chronic diverticular disease and diverticular bleeding. Here, we review prevention and treatment strategies stratified by these five main types of disease, from prevention of the first attack of diverticulitis to the management of chronic complications and diverticular bleeding.

  11. Outcomes of Colostomy Reversal in a Public Safety Net Hospital: The End or Beginning of a New Problem?

    PubMed

    Adam, Nadir; Rahbar, Shahrzad; Skinner, Ruby

    2015-10-01

    Colostomy reversals can be technically challenging and linked to significant morbidity. There is sparse evidence that evaluates outcomes after colostomy reversals performed by acute care surgeons. We performed a review of 61 colostomy reversals from January 2011 to January 2014. Colostomies for acute diverticulitis were predominate, n = 32 (52%). Traumatic colorectal injuries were n = 15, 25 per cent. Colorectal cancer was n = 8, 13 per cent. Sigmoid volvulus accounted for n = 2 cases. Abdominal sepsis from adhesions was n = 3. A rectal foreign body was for n = 1 case. The time to reversal was 360 ± 506 days. Completion of reversals was successful in 90 per cent of cases and protecting stoma use was in n = 12, (22%). Surgical site infections occurred in n = 20, patients (32%). Surgical site infections were prevalent in obese patients, (55%). Anastomotic leaks (ALs) occurred at 12 per cent, and were prevalent in obese, [obese (22%) vs nonobese (8%), P = 0.1]. The majority of AL n = 6, (85%) were in acute diverticulitis and trauma. There were no ALs in cases with protective diversion. No deaths occurred. The elective nature of colostomy reversals does not imply low morbidity. Obesity and major inflammatory processes were associated with major surgical complications. These data suggest that protective stomas should be applied liberally, particularly in high-risk cases. PMID:26463313

  12. Is prophylactic resection valid as an indication for elective surgery in diverticular disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lorimer, John W.

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine whether interval resection in asymptomatic patients after 1 or 2 episodes of acute diverticulitis (prophylactic resection) is justified as a means of preventing late inflammatory complications of diverticular disease. Design A retrospective analysis. Setting A university-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Patients Those requiring hospitalization from 1987 to 1995 for treatment of acquired diverticular disease of the colon. Twenty-eight patients underwent elective resection and 154 were treated for inflammatory complications (perforation, fistula, complete large-bowel obstruction). Interventions Standard surgical management for diverticular disease, but only 3 prophylactic resections were undertaken during this period. Outcome measures Type of operation, stoma creation and closure, hospital death. In those treated for complicated disease, the effects on outcome of all previous outpatient treatment and hospitalizations. Results Only 10% of those presenting with complications had been treated conservatively for acute diverticulitis and only 5% had been hospitalized for this reason. Conclusions Prophylactic resection is unlikely to prevent late major complications of diverticular disease; therefore, as an elective indication for surgery in this disease its use is questionable. PMID:9416254

  13. Laparoscopic treatment of complicated colonic diverticular disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Ronald; Barouki, Elie; Chouillard, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of acute colonic diverticulitis may necessitate a surgical intervention. Although associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, Hartmann’s procedure (HP) has been considered for many years to be the gold standard for the treatment of generalized peritonitis. To reduce the burden of surgery in these situations and as driven by the accumulated experience in colorectal and minimally-invasive surgery, laparoscopy has been increasingly adopted in the management of abdominal emergencies. Multiple case series and retrospective comparative studies confirmed that with experienced hands, the laparoscopic approach provided better outcomes than the open surgery. This technique applies to all interventions related to complicated diverticular disease, such as HP, sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis (RPA) and reversal of HP. The laparoscopic approach also provided new therapeutic possibilities with the emergence of the laparoscopic lavage drainage (LLD), particularly interesting in the context of purulent peritonitis of diverticular origin. At this stage, however, most of our knowledge in these fields relies on studies of low-level evidence. More than ever, well-built large randomized controlled trials are necessary to answer present interrogations such as the exact place of LLD or the most appropriate sigmoid resection procedure (laparoscopic HP or RPA), as well as to confirm the advantages of laparoscopy in chronic complications of diverticulitis or HP reversal. PMID:26981187

  14. Italian Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Annibale, Bruno; Carabotti, Marilia; Cuomo, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Diverticular disease (DD) is a widespread condition, however limited evidences are available about its management and complications. In the last years, an Italian Consensus Conference promoted by GRIMAD (Gruppo Italiano Malattia Diverticolare, Italian Group on Diverticular Diseases) and a Guideline, by Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery (SICCR) were published. The aim of the Consensus was to provide clinical recommendation for appropriate definition, diagnosis, and management of DD, in particular 4 areas of interest were identified, namely: (i) definition and epidemiology, (ii) pathophysiology, (iii) diagnosis, and (iv) medical and surgical treatment. A total of 55 statements graded according to different level of evidence and strength of recommendation were approved. However, if we consider the grade of recommendation, their strength remains suboptimal, with only 3 statements with grade of evidence A in the area of diagnosis. The Clinical guidelines by SICCR focus mainly on acute diverticulitis, and surgical treatment of complicated DD. One of the main topic analyzed, is represented by the management of the acute uncomplicated diverticulitis, in particular about the use of antibiotics and need of hospitalization. Despite the presence of many recent European and western country guidelines, there is a lack of robust data on epidemiology, risk factors, and medical and surgical management of DD, calling the need of further studies aimed to obtain an evidence-based approach in this condition. PMID:27622363

  15. Towards an evidence-based management of right iliac fossa pain in the over 50-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Gammeri, E; Catton, A; van Duren, B H; Appleton, S G; van Boxel, G I

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Right iliac fossa pain is a common presenting complaint to general surgery. The differential diagnosis is wide, particularly in the elderly. Computed tomography (CT) is often used in the 'older' population, as they have a higher prevalence of acute colonic diverticulitis and colonic neoplasia, both of which should be identified prior to surgery. There is, however, no published evidence to support this practice. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients aged over 50 years who presented with right iliac fossa (RIF) pain to a district general hospital. We determined whether tenderness was predominantly right- or left-sided and whether systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was present on admission. The use of imaging modalities, their results and, if performed, operative findings were recorded. Results Of 3160 patients identified, 89 met the inclusion criteria. Diagnoses included appendicitis (27%), neoplasia (15%), non-specific abdominal pain (15%) and acute colonic diverticulitis (10%). CT was performed in 82% of patients, with a sensitivity of 97% based on operative findings. Six patients underwent surgery without a scan, two of whom required a change in the planned procedure due to unexpected findings. Conclusions Unless contraindicated, CT scanning should be mandatory in patients aged over 50 years presenting with signs of peritonism in the RIF or lower abdomen. PMID:27269436

  16. Hartmann's procedure or primary anastomosis?

    PubMed

    Kreis, Martin E; Mueller, Mario H; Thasler, Wolfgang H

    2012-01-01

    Perforation following acute diverticulitis is a typical scenario during the first attack. Different classification systems exist to classify acute perforated diverticulitis. While the Hinchey classification, which is based on intraoperative findings, is internationally best known, the German Hansen-Stock classification which is based on CT scan is widely accepted within Germany. When surgery is necessary, sigmoid colectomy is the standard of care. An important question is whether patients should receive primary anastomosis or a Hartmann procedure subsequently. A priori there are several arguments for both procedures. Hartmann's operation is extremely safe and, therefore, represents the best option in severely ill patients and/or extensive peritonitis. However, this operation carries a high risk of stoma nonreversal, or, when reversal is attempted, a high risk in terms of morbidity and mortality. In contrast, primary anastomosis with or without loop ileostoma is a slightly more lengthy procedure as normally the splenic flexure needs to be mobilized and construction of the anastomosis may consume more time than the Hartmann operation. The big advantage of primary anastomosis, however, is that there is no need for the potentially risky stoma reversal operation. The most interesting question is when to do the Hartmann operation or primary anastomosis. Several comparative case series were published showing that primary anastomosis is feasible in many patients. However, no randomized trial is available to date. It is of note, that all non-randomized case series are biased, i.e. that patients in better condition received anastomosis and those with severe peritonitis underwent Hartmann's operation. This bias is undoubtedly likely to be present, even if not obvious, in the published papers! Our own data suggest that this decision should not be based on the extent of peritonitis but rather on patient condition and comorbidity. In conclusion, sigmoid colectomy and primary

  17. Enterovesical fistula caused by regressive change of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YU-TING; CHEN, YING-YUAN; WU, CHIA-YUN; CHEN, HUNG-MING; TZENG, CHENG-HWAI; CHIOU, TZEON-JYE

    2016-01-01

    Enterovesical fistula (EVF) is a rare complication of diverticulitis, as well as Crohn's disease, intestinal malignancy, radiotherapy and trauma. EVF formation is associated with inflammation of the involved bowel segments. The current study presents the case of a 35-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who developed pneumaturia, fecaluria and recurrent urinary tract infections following chemotherapy, accompanied by regressive change of the lymphoma. Abdominal computed tomography scans revealed that the terminal ileum had adhered to the bladder wall. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and partial resection of the terminal ileum, and EVF was confirmed. Histological examination revealed an inflammatory response but no evidence of residual lymphoma. The diagnosis of EVF is occasionally difficult and requires appropriate radiographic examination. Surgical treatment is recommended. PMID:27347146

  18. Jejunal diverticular disease complicated by enteroliths: Report of two different presentations

    PubMed Central

    Chugay, Paul; Choi, John; Dong, Xiang Da

    2010-01-01

    Jejunal diverticula are quite rare. Furthermore, small bowel diverticular disease resulting in enteroliths can lead to complications necessitating surgical intervention. In this manuscript, we report two presentations of jejunal diverticulum with complications from enteroliths followed by a review of the literature. The first case was that of a 79-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain and was found, on computed tomography (CT) scan, to have evidence of intestinal perforation. A laparotomy showed that he had perforated jejunal diverticulitis. The second case was that of an 89-year-old female who presented with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction. A laparotomy showed that she had an enterolith impacted in her jejunum in the presence of significant diverticular disease. Although a rare entity, familiarity with jejunal diverticular disease, its complications, and its management, should be part of every surgeon’s base of knowledge when considering abdominal pathology. PMID:21160831

  19. Modified tension-free mesh repair used in rare case of Littre’s hernia

    PubMed Central

    Duysenovich, Raimkhanov Aidar; Zhaksybekvich, Aimagambetov Meyirbek; Bakytbekovich, Omarov Nazarbek; Yermukhambetovichzhan, Zhagniyev Zhandos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Meckel’s diverticulum is found at the antimesenteric border of the ileum, usually located from 30 to 90 cm from the ileocecal valve. Meckel’s diverticulum complications, such as bowel obstruction, diverticulitis, hemorrhage and rarely, hernias containing a Meckel’s diverticulum (Littre’s Hernia) required surgical intervention. Case presentation We introduce the case report of 77-year-old man with inguinal hernia containing Meckel’s diverticulum operated by the modified tension-free mesh repair. Discussion Although Meckel’s diverticulum is a relatively common anomaly, herniation of these embryological remnants is an exceedingly rare event. It can be difficult to diagnose Littre’s hernia before operation. Conclusion The important thing is not to hesitate to perform diverticulectomy, to avoid complications of the patient in the future. PMID:26036457

  20. Perforation of the Peptic Ulcer Localized in the Proximal Jejunum - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, Andrzej Ż; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic perforation of the digestive tract occurs most often in the duodenum and stomach (peptic ulcer), as well as the colon (diverticulitis, cancer or ischemic lesions). Perforation of the small bowel is very rare. The Authors of the study presented a case of proximal jejunum perforation, which occurred in a patient with a history of duodenal peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis posed no difficulties, and treatment included the excision of the ulceration and suturing of the bowel. The patient recovered without complications and the histological examination failed to reveal the nature of the ulcer. However, based on the medical history, one may suppose that it might be of peptic etiology, which makes this case exceptional. PMID:27648623

  1. Ulcerative Colitis in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Rukunuzzaman, Md; Karim, A. S. M. Bazlul

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory disorder of colon. Frequency of UC is gradually increasing over few years worldwide. Prevalence is 35 to 100/100 000 people in USA, 1% of them are infants. UC develops in a genetically predisposed individual with altered intestinal immune response. An eight-month-old girl presented with loose bloody stool, growth failure, and moderate pallor. The girl was diagnosed as a case of UC by colonoscopy and biopsy. Treatment was thereafter started with immunosuppressive drugs. After initial induction therapy with parenteral steroid and infliximab, the patient is now on remission with azathioprine and mesalamine. UC is rare in Bangladesh, especially in children, and it is rarer during infancy. Several conditions like infective colitis, allergic colitis, Meckel's diverticulitis, Crohn's disease, etc. may mimic the features of UC. So, if a child presents with recurrent bloody diarrhea, UC should be considered as differential diagnosis. PMID:22064342

  2. Colonic diverticular abscess presenting as chronic diarrhea: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Several complications have been reported with diverticular disease of colon. Perforation of the diverticulum of colon may lead to development of abdominal abscesses which can have diverse manifestations. Case presentation This report describes a 72 year-old woman presented with a one month history of non-bloody diarrhea, abdominal pain, and low grade fever. Computed tomography scan confirmed presence of a large local air-fluid level within the culdesac area. Laparotomy revealed a large pelvic abscess which was surrounded between rectosigmoid and uterus with severe tissue necrosis of rectosigmoid colon and uterus. Conclusion Although rarely reported, abdominal abscesses due to colonic diverticulitis may present as refractory chronic diarrhea. PMID:20076780

  3. Pneumatosis intestinalis associated with enteral tube feeding

    PubMed Central

    Zorgdrager, Marcel; Pol, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with a Hinchey II perforated diverticulitis and underwent laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. During the postoperative course the patient received enteral tube feeding which was followed by a bowel obstruction accompanied with pneumatosis intestinalis (PI). Explorative laparotomy showed an omental band adhesion without signs of ischaemia. After a short period of total parenteral nutrition PI resolved almost completely and enteral tube feeding could be continued once again. In the weeks that followed the patient developed atypical bowel symptoms and recurrent PI which resolved each time the drip feeding was discontinued. Despite the mild clinical course, a CT scan showed massive PI on day 21 after the laparotomy. After excluding life-threatening conditions conservative management was instituted and the patient recovered completely after discontinuing the drip feeding. We present one of the few cases of subclinical PI associated with enteral tube feeding that could be managed conservatively. PMID:24302661

  4. Use of bovine pericardium graft for abdominal wall reconstruction in contaminated fields

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambra, Luigi; Berti, Stefano; Feleppa, Cosimo; Magistrelli, Prospero; Bonfante, Pierfrancesco; Falco, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To employ, in such conditions, a biological graft such as bovine pericardium that offers resistance to infection. METHODS: In our surgical department, from January 2006 to June 2010, 48 patients underwent abdominal wall reconstruction using acellular bovine pericardium; of these 34 patients had a contaminated wound due to diffuse peritonitis (complicated diverticulitis, bowel perforation, intestinal infarction, strangled hernia, etc.) and 14 patients had hernia relapse on infected synthetic mesh. RESULTS: In our series, one patient died of multi-organ failure 3 d after surgery. After placement of the pericardium mesh four cases of hernia relapse occurred. CONCLUSION: Recurrence rate is similar to that of prosthetic mesh repair and the application of acellular bovine pericardium (Tutomesh®, Tutogen Medical Gmbh Germany) is moreover a safe and feasible option that can be employed to manage complicated abdominal wall defects where prosthetic mesh is unsuitable. PMID:22905285

  5. CT in the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Gatewood, O.M.B.; Jones, B.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    Enterovesical fistulae are difficult to demonstrate by conventional radiographic methods. Computed tomography (CT), a sensitive, noninvasive method of documenting the presence of such fistulae, is unique in its ability to outline the extravesical component of the primary disease process. Twenty enterovesical fistulae identified by CT were caused by diverticulitis (nine), carcinoma of the rectosigmoid (two), Crohn disease (three), gynecologic tumors (two), bladder cancer (one), cecal carcinoma (one), prostatic neoplasia (one), and appendiceal abscess (one). The CT findings included intravesical air (90%), passage of orally or rectally administered contrast medium into the bladder (20%), focal bladder-wall thickening (90%), thickening of adjacent bowel wall (85%), and an extraluminal mass that often contained air (75%). CT proved to be an important new method in the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae.

  6. Removal of gallstone from mesorectum after laparoscopic cholecystectomy – new indication for transanal endoscopic microsurgery technique

    PubMed Central

    Przywózka, Alicja; Zieliński, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) is a minimally invasive technique for local excision of benign and malignant neoplasms in the rectum. Indications for this technique are constantly changing and extending. The aim of this study is to describe a case of a unique and innovative application of this surgical technique. A 72-year-old patient was admitted to the Clinical Department of General and Colorectal Surgery for elective resection of a tumor located in the perianal area using the TEM surgical technique. In August 2005 the patient underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to symptomatic cholecystitis. From March 2011 the patient complained about ongoing sharp pain in the perianal and presacral area. Computed tomography revealed two oval areas approximately 30 mm in size to the right of the sigmoido-rectal region communicating with the colon lumen. Subsequently diverticulitis was diagnosed. The TEM technique was uniquely used to successfully remove the gallstone from the 72-year-old patient's presacral area. PMID:26865896

  7. [A case of papillary renal cell carcinoma mimicking a hemorrhagic renal cyst].

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Taku; Mitsuzuka, Koji; Sato, Masahiko; Izumi, Hideaki; Kawamorita, Naoki; Saito, Hideo; Kaiho, Yasuhiro; Ito, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Haruo; Arai, Yoichi

    2012-12-01

    A right renal cyst was found in a 69-year-old man with stage IV chronic kidney disease on abdominal ultrasonography performed to investigate a right upper abdominal swelling. Aspiration cytology of the cyst revealed no malignancy, but malignancy could not be ruled out on magnetic resonance imaging because of the cyst's wall thickness and heterogeneous contents. At one-year of follow-up, emergent abdominal surgery was performed due to incidental perforation of ascending colon diverticulitis. At that time, cystic fenestration was performed because the large renal cyst obstructed the operative procedure. Pathological examination showed type-1 papillary renal cell carcinoma, and radical nephrectomy was performed after the patient's general condition improved. Hemodialysis was started after the operation, and there has been no disease recurrence for two years. PMID:23328163

  8. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema and pneumomediastinum due to a diastatic rupture of the cecum

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; INTAGLIATA, E.; BASILE, F.; SPATARO, C.; GIULIA, G.; LEANZA, V.; MARCHESE, S.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum usually occurs after esophageal or chest trauma. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema as a presentation of non-traumatic colonic perforation following colorectal cancer or diverticulitis, is very rare. We report a case of a patient with rectal cancer who developed a diastatic cecum retroperitoneal perforation with a secondary pneumo-mediastinum and cervical emphysema. The patient was in treatment with a neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy for a low rectal cancer. Treatment consisted in an emergency right hemi-colectomy with ileostomy and performance of distal colonic fistula. The Authors discuss the occurrence of pneumomediastinum and cervical emphysema complicating rectal cancer, pointing out ethio-pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. The importance of performing a diverting colostomy when neoadjuvant chemotherapy is scheduled in patients with stenotic rectal cancer, although not clinically occluded PMID:26888704

  9. [The intraoperative colonic irrigation in emergency surgery].

    PubMed

    Kiss, L

    2001-01-01

    Bowel preparations is frequently impossible in various ante colonic diseases, such as left-sided colonic obstruction. The goal of intraoperative colonic irrigation is to obtain, during surgery, a bowel preparation offering the possibility of primary resection with immediate anastomosis, when preoperative bowel preparation has not been feasible. Technical aspects of intra-operative colonic irrigation are described. Indications for this methods are presented: left-sided obstructing carcinomas, diverticulitis, more rarely inflammatory stenosis or functional obstruction. The surgical management of left colonic emergencies has evolved in the past few decades. Recently, there has been increasing interest in resection with primary anastomosis in selected cases. The post operative mortality rate was 13 per cent. The incidence of clinical anastomotic leakage was 6.65 per cent. PMID:12731192

  10. Perforation of the Peptic Ulcer Localized in the Proximal Jejunum - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, Andrzej Ż; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic perforation of the digestive tract occurs most often in the duodenum and stomach (peptic ulcer), as well as the colon (diverticulitis, cancer or ischemic lesions). Perforation of the small bowel is very rare. The Authors of the study presented a case of proximal jejunum perforation, which occurred in a patient with a history of duodenal peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis posed no difficulties, and treatment included the excision of the ulceration and suturing of the bowel. The patient recovered without complications and the histological examination failed to reveal the nature of the ulcer. However, based on the medical history, one may suppose that it might be of peptic etiology, which makes this case exceptional.

  11. [Diverticulosis of the sigmoid colon from the radiological point of view (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ellegast, H H; Fischer, B; Strasser, E

    1976-11-01

    Diverticulosis is one of the most common diseases of the colon. Its importance arises from complications. In countries of the Western hemisphere the incidence is 10-20% beyond the age of 50. Among the natives of Africa and South-Eastern Asia it is practically unknown. It is suggested that the disease is caused by low residue diet, modern living conditions. and constitutional disorders. 500 barium enemas revealed 13,4% patients with diverticula including a 5-year-old child and a 32-year-old woman. The incidence of diverticulosis among patients over 40 years of age is 19,6%. The sex distribution is 1 : 1,9 male to female. The complications are demonstrated by case histories: Diverticulitis with ileus, foreign body trap, sub-acute perforation, sigmoid-vaginal fistula, sigmoid-bladder fistula, sigmoid-uterus fistula in a 5-year-old girl.

  12. Recurrence of an NSAID-induced diaphragmatic disease of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Daniel; Sahota, Jagjit; Schofield, John

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman was referred to the surgical team from clinic, reporting of a 1-week history of vomiting and abdominal distension on a background of previous large bowel resection for a flare up of diverticulitis with a suspicion of diaphragm disease of the small intestine diagnosed at the same time. She was initially managed conservatively owing to the likely diagnosis of adhesion(s) leading to small bowel obstruction, but a CT of the abdomen a day later revealed a recurrence of diaphragmatic disease of the small bowel causing an obstruction, most likely due to chronic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. She was taken to theatre for an emergency laparotomy and small bowel resection due to previous resections, from which she made a good recovery; she was discharged from hospital 8 days later. PMID:27170609

  13. Idiopathic Intractable Diarrhoea Leading to Torsade de Pointes.

    PubMed

    Mouyis, Kyriacos; Okonko, Darlington; Missouris, Constantinos G

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old lady was admitted to our hospital with a 3-year history of noninfective diarrhoea and recurrent syncopal events over the last 3 months. Her initial electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed trigeminy and prolonged QTc interval. She had a structurally normal heart with no coronary artery disease. Investigations revealed low potassium at 3.0 mmol/L. Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy suggested a possible diagnosis of diverticulitis. Soon after admission she had an unresponsive episode with spontaneous recovery. Telemetry and Holter analysis confirmed multiple episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (Torsade de Pointes). Following electrolyte supplementation the episodes of polymorphic VT improved. Due to the protracted nature of the diarrhoea, the recurrent syncopal events, and recurrent hypokalaemia documented over recent years, an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) was sanctioned by the multidisciplinary team (MDT). In summary, chronic diarrhoea may result in life threatening polymorphic VT due to hypokalaemia and QTc prolongation. In these patients an ICD may be considered. PMID:27313906

  14. ‘Fungal spondylodiscitis in a non-immunocompromised patient’

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Vanda Cristina; Cardoso, Catarina; Noronha, Carla; Simões, José; Riso, Nuno; Vaz Riscado, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Spondylodiscitis is an inflammatory disease, usually infectious, of one or more vertebral bodies and of corresponding intervertebral discs. The fungal aetiology is rare (less than 5% of cases), affecting mostly immunocompromised individuals. It is often a delayed diagnosis by the indolence of symptoms, presenting itself as a serious infection, which may result in important functional consequences. The authors present the case of a 75-year-old male, with constitutional complaints and intense back pain. Prior recent history of left hemicolectomy due to diverticulitis with multiple surgical complications, resulted in prolonged intensive care unit hospitalisation, and, later on, an episode of fungal endophthalmitis. The diagnosis of spondylodiscitis L5/S1 was performed by MRI. The patient underwent surgical disco-vertebral debridement and isolation of a Candida albicans was seen in the collected surgical material. No evidence of an immunossupressive status was found. Treatment was complemented with liposomal amphotericin B in the maximum recommended dose. PMID:22605604

  15. Fecal Impaction: A Cause for Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Obokhare, Izi

    2012-01-01

    Fecal impaction (FI) is a common cause of lower gastrointestinal tract obstruction lagging behind stricture for diverticulitis and colon cancer. It is the result of chronic or severe constipation and most commonly found in the elderly population. Early recognition and diagnosis is accomplished by way of an adequate history and physical examination in conjunction with an acute abdominal series. Prompt identification and treatment minimizes the risks of complications such as bowel obstruction leading to aspiration, stercoral ulcers, perforation, and peritonitis. Treatment options include gentle proximal softening in the absence of complete bowel obstruction, distal washout, and manual extraction. Surgical resection of the involved colon or rectum is reserved for cases of FI complicated by ulceration and perforation leading to peritonitis. Recurrence is common, and can be managed by increasing dietary fiber content to 30 gm/day, increased water intake, and discontinuation of medications that can contribute to colonic hypomotility. PMID:23449376

  16. Use of rifaximin in gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Shayto, Rani H; Abou Mrad, Rachel; Sharara, Ala I

    2016-08-01

    Rifaximin is a broad spectrum oral antibiotic with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. It is poorly absorbed and thus has a highly favorable safety profile. Rifaximin has been shown to be effective in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea, functional bloating and irritable bowel syndrome, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and in the prevention of recurrent overt hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, there is emerging evidence for a possible beneficial effect of rifaximin in the treatment of uncomplicated diverticular disease and in the prevention of recurrent diverticulitis. The use of rifaximin is associated with a low incidence of development, or persistence of spontaneous bacterial mutants. Moreover, the development of important drug resistance among extra-intestinal flora during rifaximin therapy is unlikely because of minimal systemic absorption and limited cross-resistance of rifaximin with other antimicrobials. This review addresses the current and emerging role of rifaximin in the treatment of gastrointestinal and liver disorders. PMID:27547007

  17. Small-bowel perforation caused by fish bone.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Der; Chan, De-Chuan; Liu, Yao-Chi

    2005-03-28

    A diagnosis of small-bowel perforation, caused by a sharp or pointed foreign body, is rarely made preoperatively because the clinical symptoms are usually nonspecific and can mimic other surgical conditions, such as appendicitis and diverticulitis. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman who experienced severe pain in the right iliac fossa and fever for about five days before arrival at our hospital. The presumptive diagnosis was acute purulent appendicitis and an emergency appendectomy was planned. Swelling and erythema were noted in a segment of the small bowel in the lower right abdomen. A tiny pointed object was found penetrating the inflamed portion of the bowel, which proved to be a sharp fish bone (gray snapper). The bone was removed, followed by segmental resection of the terminal ileum and ascending colon. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  18. Review of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, K E

    1989-01-01

    In reviewing the literature on pancreatic trauma (1,984 cases), I found that it resulted from penetrating trauma in 73% and blunt trauma in 27% of cases. Associated injuries were common (average 3.0 per patient). Increased mortality was associated with shotgun wounds, an increasing number of associated injuries, the proximity of the injury to the head of the pancreas, preoperative shock, and massive hemorrhage. High mortality was found for total pancreatectomy, duct reanastomosis, and lack of surgical treatment, with lower mortality for Roux-en-Y anastomoses, suture and drainage, distal pancreatectomy, and duodenal exclusion and diverticulization techniques. Most patients required drainage only. The preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is difficult, with the diagnosis usually made during surgical repair for associated injuries. Blood studies such as amylase levels, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, and plain radiographs are not reliable. Computed tomographic scanning may be superior, but data are limited. PMID:2669347

  19. Inverting bilateral figure-of-eight suture of the rectus sheath after burst abdomen with destruction of the linea alba: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Dietz, U A; Debus, E-S; Thiede, A; Kuhfuss, I

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a new technique for secondary abdominal closure after burst abdomen as illustrated by the case of a patient who developed a perforated sigmoid diverticulitis following septic polyarthritis. Sigmoid resection was followed on the sixth day postoperative by a burst abdomen. Upon abdominal revision the burst abdomen was found to be caused by necrotic destruction of the linea alba. Abdominal wall closure was achieved using the novel technique of inverting bilateral interrupted figure-of-eight suture of the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths in combination with relieving lateral incisions and mesh implantation in the sublay technique. It remains for future studies to show whether this technique can reduce the high incisional hernia rate following secondary abdominal wall closure.

  20. Folate Receptor-Beta Has Limited Value for Fluorescent Imaging in Ovarian, Breast and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Esther; van der Vegt, Bert; van der Sluis, Tineke; Kooijman, Paulien; Low, Philip S.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Arts, Henriette J. G.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Bart, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Aims Tumor-specific targeted imaging is rapidly evolving in cancer diagnosis. The folate receptor alpha (FR-α) has already been identified as a suitable target for cancer therapy and imaging. FR-α is present on ~40% of human cancers. FR-β is known to be expressed on several hematologic malignancies and on activated macrophages, but little is known about FR-β expression in solid tumors. Additional or simultaneous expression of FR-β could help extend the indications for folate-based drugs and imaging agents. In this study, the expression pattern of FR-β is evaluated in ovarian, breast and colorectal cancer. Methods FR-β expression was analyzed by semi-quantitative scoring of immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarrays (TMAs) of 339 ovarian cancer patients, 418 breast cancer patients, on 20 slides of colorectal cancer samples and on 25 samples of diverticulitis. Results FR-β expression was seen in 21% of ovarian cancer samples, 9% of breast cancer samples, and 55% of colorectal cancer samples. Expression was weak or moderate. Of the diverticulitis samples, 80% were positive for FR-β expression in macrophages. FR-β status neither correlated to known disease-related variables, nor showed association with overall survival and progression free survival in ovarian and breast cancer. In breast cancer, negative axillary status was significantly correlated to FR-β expression (p=0.022). Conclusions FR-β expression was low or absent in the majority of ovarian, breast and colorectal tumor samples. From the present study we conclude that the low FR-β expression in ovarian and breast tumor tissue indicates limited practical use of this receptor in diagnostic imaging and therapeutic purposes. Due to weak expression, FR-β is not regarded as a suitable target in colorectal cancer. PMID:26248049

  1. Cause-specific mortality in individuals with severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency in comparison with the general population in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Tanash, Hanan A; Ekström, Magnus; Wagner, Philippe; Piitulainen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZZ) predisposes to morbidity and mortality due to early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The risk of death from other causes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer, has not been well investigated. We aimed to analyze cause-specific mortality in PiZZ individuals compared with the general Swedish population. Methods Data on 1,561 PiZZ individuals from the Swedish National AAT Deficiency Register, prospectively followed from 1991 to 2014, were analyzed. Causes of death according to the Swedish National Causes of Death Register for the study group were compared with those for the general Swedish population matched for age, sex, and calendar year, with the excess mortality expressed as standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results There were 524 deaths during the follow-up period. PiZZ individuals had excess all-cause mortality compared with the Swedish general population (SMR 3.6, 95% CI 3.3–3.9). SMR for ischemic heart disease (IHD) was 0.5 (95% CI 0.3–0.8) and was similar for never and ever-smokers, and in males and females. SMR for lung cancer was 0.9 (95% CI 0.4–1.7). PiZZ individuals had increased mortality compared with the general population for the following diseases: respiratory disease, SMR 48.4 (95% CI 43.0–54.5); primary liver carcinoma, SMR 90.0 (95% CI 59.3–130.9); complicated colon diverticulitis, SMR 20.8 (95% CI 6.7–48.6); and pulmonary embolism, SMR 6.9 (95% CI 3.3–12.7). Conclusion PiZZ individuals had a reduced mortality risk of IHD. Mortality due to respiratory, hepatic disease, diverticulitis, and pulmonary embolism was markedly increased compared with the age- and sex-matched Swedish population. PMID:27555756

  2. CT evaluation of the colon: inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Horton, K M; Corl, F M; Fishman, E K

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is valuable for detection and characterization of many inflammatory conditions of the colon. At CT, a dilated, thickened appendix is suggestive of appendicitis. A 1-4-cm, oval, fatty pericolic lesion with surrounding mesenteric inflammation is diagnostic of epiploic appendagitis. The key to distinguishing diverticulitis from other inflammatory conditions of the colon is the presence of diverticula in the involved segment. In typhlitis, CT demonstrates cecal distention and circumferential thickening of the cecal wall, which may have low attenuation secondary to edema. In radiation colitis, the clinical history is the key to suggesting the diagnosis because the CT findings can be nonspecific. The location of the involved segment and the extent and appearance of wall thickening may help distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. In ischemic colitis, CT typically demonstrates circumferential, symmetric wall thickening with fold enlargement. CT findings of graft-versus-host disease include small bowel and colonic wall thickening, which may result in luminal narrowing and separation of bowel loops. In infectious colitis, the site and thickness of colon affected may suggest a specific organism. The amount of wall thickening in pseudomembranous colitis is typically greater than in any other inflammatory disease of the colon except Crohn disease. PMID:10715339

  3. Probiotics for the Treatment of Symptomatic Uncomplicated Diverticular Disease: Rationale and Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, Carmelo; Bertelé, Anna; Tursi, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Changes in the colonic microbiota are critical to the pathogenesis of diverticular complications such as diverticulitis and peridiverticular abscesses. However, more subtle changes in microbiota composition may well be important to the more chronic manifestations of diverticulosis. Some studies have shown the presence of bacterial overgrowth in subgroups of patients with diverticular disease and recent studies, using molecular biology techniques, found an increase of proteobacteria and actinobacteria in patients with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease (SUDD), compared with healthy controls. The use of probiotics to modulate intestinal microecology in SUDD appears therefore rational. Although several investigations evaluating the clinical efficacy of probiotics have been performed, no definitive results have yet been achieved, mainly due to the heterogeneity of the available studies. Most of the studies used probiotics in combination with poorly absorbed antimicrobials or anti-inflammatory drugs. In only 4 studies, there was a harm using probiotics alone, but only 1 was a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. The analysis of the available evidence reveals a poor quality of the published studies, whose design was heterogeneous, with only 2 out of 11 trials being double-blind and randomized. Therefore, available data can only suggest a benefit of probiotics in SUDD, but do not allow any evidence-based definite conclusion. As a consequence, current guidelines state that there is insufficient evidence to recommend probiotics for symptom relief in patients with diverticular disease. PMID:27622371

  4. Pneumoretroperitoneum and Pneumomediastinum Revealing a Left Colon Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Montori, Giulia; Di Giovanni, Giacomo; Mzoughi, Zeineb; Angot, Cedric; Al Samman, Sophie; Solaini, Leonardo; Cheynel, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Left colon perforation usually occurs in complicated diverticulitis or cancer. The most frequent signs are intraperitoneal abscess or peritonitis. In cases of retroperitoneal colonic perforation, diagnosis may be difficult. A 59-year-old woman presented with left thigh pain and with abdominal discomfort associated with mild dyspnea. Computed tomography scan showed air bubbles and purulent collection in the retroperitoneum, with subcutaneous emphysema extending from the left thigh to the neck. Computed tomography scan also revealed portal vein gas and thrombosis with multiple liver abscesses. An emergency laparotomy revealed a perforation of the proximal left colon. No masses were found. A left colectomy was performed. The retroperitoneum was drained and washed extensively. A negative pressure wound therapy was applied. A second-look laparotomy was performed 48 hours later. The retroperitoneum was drained and an end colostomy was performed. Intensive Care Unit postoperative stay was 9 days, and the patient was discharged on the 32nd postoperative day. Pneumoretroperitoneum and pneumomediastinum are rare signs of colonic retroperitoneal perforation. The diagnosis may be delayed, especially in the absence of peritoneal irritation. Clinical, laboratory, and especially radiologic parameters might be useful. Surgical treatment must be prompt to improve prognosis. PMID:26414818

  5. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Multimodality Imaging Approach with Clinical-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Revzin, Margarita V; Mathur, Mahan; Dave, Haatal B; Macer, Matthew L; Spektor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a common medical problem, with almost 1 million cases diagnosed annually. Historically, PID has been a clinical diagnosis supplemented with the findings from ultrasonography (US) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, the diagnosis of PID can be challenging because the clinical manifestations may mimic those of other pelvic and abdominal processes. Given the nonspecific clinical manifestations, computed tomography (CT) is commonly the first imaging examination performed. General CT findings of early- and late-stage PID include thickening of the uterosacral ligaments, pelvic fat stranding with obscuration of fascial planes, reactive lymphadenopathy, and pelvic free fluid. Recognition of these findings, as well as those seen with cervicitis, endometritis, acute salpingitis, oophoritis, pyosalpinx, hydrosalpinx, tubo-ovarian abscess, and pyometra, is crucial in allowing prompt and accurate diagnosis. Late complications of PID include tubal damage resulting in infertility and ectopic pregnancy, peritonitis caused by uterine and/or tubo-ovarian abscess rupture, development of peritoneal adhesions resulting in bowel obstruction and/or hydroureteronephrosis, right upper abdominal inflammation (Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome), and septic thrombophlebitis. Recognition of these late manifestations at CT can also aid in proper patient management. At CT, careful assessment of common PID mimics, such as endometriosis, adnexal torsion, ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst, adnexal neoplasms, appendicitis, and diverticulitis, is important to avoid misinterpretation, delay in management, and unnecessary surgery. Correlation with the findings from complementary imaging examinations, such as US and MR imaging, is useful for establishing a definitive diagnosis. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618331

  6. [Complicated jejunoileal diverticulosis. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Rogati, L; Bosco, A; Destradis, E; Ciaccio, V; Pucciarini, L G; Tristaino, B

    1991-01-01

    The diverticulosis of jejunum ileum is an uncommon pathology, that is often revealed just from the complications which it presents. The clinical case reported by the Authors describes a woman who reached to admission for a serious condition of shock secondary to a jejunum bleeding diverticulosis and who underwent an intestinal resection. The patient was discharged home on IX p.o. day. From the review of literature results that the incidence of the diverticulosis of jejunum ileum consists of 0.1%-0.11% of all the gastrointestinal's diverticula and the predominance is for the female, especially in the middle age. The diverticulosis of jejunum ileum can be congenital or acquired; the first one came to the antimesenteric side of the intestines, the second one to the mesenteric side of the same. The diverticulosis is generally asymptomatic, but often produces many complications as the intestinal occlusion, secondary to a bridle, a volvulus, an invagination, also if the peritonitis caused by a diverticulosis's perforation represents the most frequent complication of them. Others rarest complications are the massive haemorrhage of diverticula, the stagnant loop syndrome, the malabsorption's syndrome due to lack of B12 vitamin and growth of bacteria within them, the diverticulitis caused by infection. The therapy of all complicated cases of jejunum ileum diverticula is necessarily the surgery only and exactly the intestinal resection.

  7. The Use of PET-CT in the Assessment of Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Owen J.; McDermott, Shanaugh; Slattery, James; Sahani, Dushyant; Blake, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer, accounting for 53,219 deaths in 2007 and an estimated 146,970 new cases in the USA during 2009. The combination of FDG PET and CT has proven to be of great benefit for the assessment of colorectal cancer. This is most evident in the detection of occult metastases, particularly intra- or extrahepatic sites of disease, that would preclude a curative procedure or in the detection of local recurrence. FDG PET is generally not used for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer although there are circumstances where PET-CT may make the initial diagnosis, particularly with its more widespread use. In addition, precancerous adenomatous polyps can also be detected incidentally on whole-body images performed for other indications; sensitivity increases with increasing polyp size. False-negative FDG PET findings have been reported with mucinous adenocarcinoma, and false-positive findings have been reported due to inflammatory conditions such as diverticulitis, colitis, and postoperative scarring. Therefore, detailed evaluation of the CT component of a PET/CT exam, including assessment of the entire colon, is essential. PMID:22312527

  8. Complicated jejunal diverticulosis: A case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nejmeddine, Affes; Bassem, Abid; Mohamed, Hammami; Hazem, Ben ameur; Ramez, Beyrouti; Issam, Beyrouti Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Context: Jejunal diverticuli are rare and usually asymptomatic. More commonly, they are seen as incidental findings on CT images, enteroclysis, or during surgery. Complications such as bleeding, perforation, obstruction, malabsorption, diverticulitis, blind loop syndrome, volvulus, and intussusceptions may warrant surgical intervention. Case report: We report a case of 47-year old woman who had suffered from intestinal obstruction for 3 days. The symptoms did not improve after conservative treatment. An exploratory laparotomy found small bowel obstruction due to proximal jejunal diverticulum with an adhesion epiploic band. Strangulation of the jejunum resulted from the internal hernia caused by the band. The band was removed and the proximal jejunum segmentally resected. The postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion: Although this phenomenon is rare, we should keep in mind that intestinal diverticulosis may induce intestinal obstructions of different kinds, repeat physical examinations and X-ray films are needed and enteroclysis studies or CT scan are helpful in diagnosis. Surgery is indicated for acute abdominal or repeated intestinal obstruction. PMID:22666695

  9. Myenteric plexitis: A frequent feature in patients undergoing surgery for colonic diverticular disease

    PubMed Central

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Sidoni, Angelo; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Dore, Maria P; Binda, Gian A; Bandelloni, Roberto; Salemme, Marianna; Del Sordo, Rachele; Cadei, Moris; Manca, Alessandra; Bernardini, Nunzia; Maurer, Christoph A; Cathomas, Gieri

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticular disease of the colon is frequent in clinical practice, and a large number of patients each year undergo surgical procedures worldwide for their symptoms. Thus, there is a need for better knowledge of the basic pathophysiologic mechanisms of this disease entity. Objectives Because patients with colonic diverticular disease have been shown to display abnormalities of the enteric nervous system, we assessed the frequency of myenteric plexitis (i.e. the infiltration of myenteric ganglions by inflammatory cells) in patients undergoing surgery for this condition. Methods We analyzed archival resection samples from the proximal resection margins of 165 patients undergoing left hemicolectomy (60 emergency and 105 elective surgeries) for colonic diverticulitis, by histology and immunochemistry. Results Overall, plexitis was present in almost 40% of patients. It was subdivided into an eosinophilic (48%) and a lymphocytic (52%) subtype. Plexitis was more frequent in younger patients; and it was more frequent in those undergoing emergency surgery (50%), compared to elective (28%) surgery (p = 0.007). All the severe cases of plexitis displayed the lymphocytic subtype. Conclusions In conclusion, myenteric plexitis is frequent in patients with colonic diverticular disease needing surgery, and it might be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26668745

  10. Outpatient Antibiotic Use and the Incidence of Acute Appendicitis in Finland: A Nationwide Study from 1990–2008

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Pekka; Huovinen, Pentti; Herzig, Karl H.; Alajääski, Jennyl; Salminen, Paulina; Paajanen, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The incidence of acute appendicitis (AA) has decreased in Finland. We hypothesized that changing trends in outpatient antibiotic use might explain at least part of this declining incidence of AA. Methods The number of all patients with AA in Finland was extracted from the national data base from 1990 to 2008. For comparison, the incidence of acute diverticulitis of the colon (AD) was also recorded. All outpatient prescriptions of antibiotics belonging to the major groups of these drugs were also recorded. We used unit root and co-integration analyses for statistical analysis of the data in the study. Results The incidence of AA in Finland declined from 14.5 to 9.8 per 10,000 inhabitants (32%) and the incidence of AD increased by 47% between 1993 and 2007. The total outpatient use of antibiotics did not increase during this same period, but the use of antibiotics effective widely against colonic pathogens (macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and cephalosporins) increased significantly. No correlation was found between the incidence of AA, that of AD, and the use of different groups of antibiotics. Conclusions Our nationwide registry study indicated that changes in outpatient antibiotic use do not explain the decreasing trend in AA in Finland. Other factors, such as improved diagnosis of AA, may have some role in the decreasing incidence of AA. PMID:23859685

  11. Use of rifaximin in gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shayto, Rani H; Abou Mrad, Rachel; Sharara, Ala I

    2016-01-01

    Rifaximin is a broad spectrum oral antibiotic with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. It is poorly absorbed and thus has a highly favorable safety profile. Rifaximin has been shown to be effective in the treatment of traveler’s diarrhea, functional bloating and irritable bowel syndrome, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and in the prevention of recurrent overt hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, there is emerging evidence for a possible beneficial effect of rifaximin in the treatment of uncomplicated diverticular disease and in the prevention of recurrent diverticulitis. The use of rifaximin is associated with a low incidence of development, or persistence of spontaneous bacterial mutants. Moreover, the development of important drug resistance among extra-intestinal flora during rifaximin therapy is unlikely because of minimal systemic absorption and limited cross-resistance of rifaximin with other antimicrobials. This review addresses the current and emerging role of rifaximin in the treatment of gastrointestinal and liver disorders. PMID:27547007

  12. The role of vitamin D in reducing gastrointestinal disease risk and assessment of individual dietary intake needs: Focus on genetic and genomic technologies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Laing, Bobbi; Marlow, Gareth; Bishop, Karen

    2016-01-01

    With the endogenous formation of vitamin D being significantly curtailed because of public awareness of skin cancer dangers, attention is turning to dietary sources. Cumulative evidence has implicated vitamin D deficiency in increasing susceptibility to various gastrointestinal disorders, including colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, diverticulitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. There is also reason to suggest adjunct vitamin D therapy for such diseases. Although there is justification for increasing vitamin D intake overall, optimal intakes will vary among individuals. Genomic technologies have revealed several hundreds of genes associated with vitamin D actions. The nature of these genes emphasizes the potentially negative implications of modulating vitamin D intakes in the absence of complementary human genetic and genomic data, including information on the gut microbiome. However, we are not yet in a position to apply this information. Genomic data (transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) could provide evidence that vitamin D sufficiency has been achieved. We suggest that there is an increasingly strong case for considering the more widespread use of vitamin D fortified foods and/or dietary supplements to benefit gastrointestinal health. However, intake levels might beneficially be informed by personalized genetic and genomic information, for optimal disease prevention and maintenance of remission. PMID:26251177

  13. [Laparoscopic lavage and drainage in the surgical treatment of diverticular disease complicated by peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lippi, Carlo Ettore; Beatini, Luca; Cervia, Silvio; Fabbricotti, Alaido; Miaruelli, Piero Antonio; Spessa, Elisabetta; Sturlese, Ivarco; Braini, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of peritonitis complicating diverticular disease of the colon is yet to be universally regarded as established practice and major differences in management are to be noted in the various surgical institutions. In the emergency setting, the minimally invasive approach is used by few surgeons and the most frequent therapeutic options are sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis (with or without a diverting stoma) and Hartmann's procedure. The Authors report their preliminary experience (13 cases) with laparoscopic lavage and drainage without colonic resection in diverticulitis complicated by peritonitis and describe the technical details of the surgical procedure. They conduct a systematic review of the literature and, on the basis of their latest experience, compare the results of the traditional resective operations (resection with primary anastomosis and Hartmann's procedure) with those of laparoscopic conservative and non-resective treatment. Laparoscopic non-resective procedures reduce the frequency and severity of the surgical complications, as well as the hospital stay and costs of treatment. In conclusion, laparoscopic lavage and drainage can be used in the majority of patients, with excellent prospects of recovery, without disabling stomas, in a single operative stage. PMID:19845268

  14. Pneumoretroperitoneum and Pneumomediastinum Revealing a Left Colon Perforation.

    PubMed

    Montori, Giulia; Di Giovanni, Giacomo; Mzoughi, Zeineb; Angot, Cedric; Al Samman, Sophie; Solaini, Leonardo; Cheynel, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Left colon perforation usually occurs in complicated diverticulitis or cancer. The most frequent signs are intraperitoneal abscess or peritonitis. In cases of retroperitoneal colonic perforation, diagnosis may be difficult. A 59-year-old woman presented with left thigh pain and with abdominal discomfort associated with mild dyspnea. Computed tomography scan showed air bubbles and purulent collection in the retroperitoneum, with subcutaneous emphysema extending from the left thigh to the neck. Computed tomography scan also revealed portal vein gas and thrombosis with multiple liver abscesses. An emergency laparotomy revealed a perforation of the proximal left colon. No masses were found. A left colectomy was performed. The retroperitoneum was drained and washed extensively. A negative pressure wound therapy was applied. A second-look laparotomy was performed 48 hours later. The retroperitoneum was drained and an end colostomy was performed. Intensive Care Unit postoperative stay was 9 days, and the patient was discharged on the 32nd postoperative day. Pneumoretroperitoneum and pneumomediastinum are rare signs of colonic retroperitoneal perforation. The diagnosis may be delayed, especially in the absence of peritoneal irritation. Clinical, laboratory, and especially radiologic parameters might be useful. Surgical treatment must be prompt to improve prognosis.

  15. [Multidetector computed tomography in acute abdomen].

    PubMed

    Carreras Aja, M; Arrieta Artieda, I; Borruel Nacenta, S

    2011-10-01

    MDCT has become a fundamental tool for determining the causes of acute abdomen. CT is considered the imaging technique of choice in the diagnostic workup of both localized and diffuse acute abdomen, except in patients in whom acute cholecystitis or acute gynecological disease is suspected and in children, adolescents, and pregnant patients, in whom ultrasonography is the imaging technique of choice. Plain-film X-ray examination has been relegated to the initial management of renal colic, suspected foreign bodies, and intestinal obstruction. One of the drawbacks of MDCT is its use of ionizing radiation, which makes it necessary to filter and direct the examinations as well as to ensure that the most appropriate protocols are used. For this reason, low dose protocols have been developed so that diagnostic studies can be performed with doses of radiation between 2 and 3 mSv; these are normally used in the diagnosis of renal colic and can also be used in selected patients with suspected appendicitis and acute diverticulitis. PMID:21742357

  16. Use of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with surgical abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Geis, W P; Kim, H C

    1995-02-01

    Patients often present to the surgeon with abdominal pain, tenderness, and fever. Many exhibit progressive sepsis due to abdominal pathology. Delay in diagnosis and treatment often occurs due to the use of multiple, time-consuming, expensive diagnostic studies. We delineate the use of diagnostic laparoscopy in subsets of patients in whom confusion exists as to the cause of abdominal sepsis--i.e., females in child-bearing years, elderly patients, obese patients, immunosuppressed patients, and patients with suppression of physical findings. The methodical assessment of the entire abdominal cavity is performed utilizing manipulation of the patient's position (Trendelenburg, supine, reverse Trendelenburg, left side up, right side up) and meticulous inspection of the entire small bowel. Diagnoses included acute appendicitis, gangrenous appendicitis, perforated appendicitis with peritonitis or abscess, gangrenous cholecystitis, ischemic bowel disease, perforating carcinoma of the colon, perforating diverticulitis with abscess or peritonitis, tubo-ovarian abscess, closed-loop small-bowel obstruction, megacolon, and perforation of the colon. Laparoscopic treatment of 96% of the patients was performed successfully and a laparoscopic-assisted approach was used in the remainder. There was one mortality (cardiac) and no major morbidity. The development of a Formal Diagnostic Exploratory Laparoscopic (FDEL) approach has aided in the assessment of each of the diagnoses of sepsis in the abdominal cavity. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach laparoscopically avoids extensive preoperative studies, avoids delay in operative intervention, and appears to minimize morbidity and shorten the postoperative recovery interval.

  17. Spontaneous perforation of Meckel's diverticulum: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Robleh Hassan; Avala, Prude; Khaiz, Driss; Bensardi, Fatmazahra; Elhattabi, Khalid; Lefriyekh, Rachid; Berrada, Saad; Fadil, Abdelaziz; Zerouali, Najib Ouariti

    2015-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the commonest congenital abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract. Hemorrhage, obstruction and inflammation are the three main categories of complications resulting from Meckel's diverticulum. Spontaneously perforation of Meckel's diverticulum is very rare and mimics acute appendicitis. We report a case of 26 year-old male, who presented since 5 days worsening abdominal pain predominantly in the right iliac fossa associated with high grade fever. On physical examination his abdomen was distended with guarding and rigidity. A provisional diagnosis of appendiculaire peritonitis was made. Our patient had an emergency laparotomy, where a perforated Meckel's diverticulum and advanced peritonitis were discovered. A diverticulectomy with ileostomy were performed. Heterotopic mucosa of diverticulitis was confirmed on histopathology. The patient made an uneventful recovery postoperatively and ileostomy reconstruction was done two months later. This case report is an interesting and unusual case of Meckel's diverticulum complications and highlights the importance of considering Meckel's diverticulum as a differential diagnosis in every patient presenting with acute abdomen. PMID:26175810

  18. Inactivation of corticosteroids in intestinal mucosa by 11 beta-hydroxysteroid: NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1. 1. 1. 146)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, A.F.; Anderson, F.H.

    1983-10-01

    Activity of the enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid:NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.146) in human intestinal mucosa was determined by incubating scraped mucosa with /sup 3/H-cortisone and /sup 14/C-cortisol; these steroids were then extracted, separated chromatographically, and the radioactivity assayed to determine simultaneously both reductase and dehydrogenase activities. This was the only significant metabolic alteration which the substrate underwent. Only two cases had slight (5 and 13%) reductase activity. In 35 patients, 16 male and 19 female, including seven cases of Crohn's disease, three ulcerative colitis, five diverticulitis, two undergoing surgery for repair of injuries and 18 for carcinoma of colon or rectum, cortisol was converted to cortisone in 15 min with a wide range of values distributed uniformly up to 85% dehydrogenation, with a mean of 42%. When tissue homogenates were fortified with coenzymes, excess NADPH lowered dehydrogenase activity 81%; excess NADP increased dehydrogenase activity 2-fold in three cases. It is possible that a value is characteristic of an individual but perhaps more likely enzyme activity varies with metabolic events involving changes in the coenzyme levels in mucosa, and a random sampling might be expected to yield such a distribution of values. In any event, where activity is high most of the cortisol is inactivated within minutes. It is suggested that synthetic corticoids which escape such metabolic alteration might, except during pregnancy, prove superior in the treatment of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  19. The role of vitamin D in reducing gastrointestinal disease risk and assessment of individual dietary intake needs: Focus on genetic and genomic technologies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Laing, Bobbi; Marlow, Gareth; Bishop, Karen

    2016-01-01

    With the endogenous formation of vitamin D being significantly curtailed because of public awareness of skin cancer dangers, attention is turning to dietary sources. Cumulative evidence has implicated vitamin D deficiency in increasing susceptibility to various gastrointestinal disorders, including colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, diverticulitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. There is also reason to suggest adjunct vitamin D therapy for such diseases. Although there is justification for increasing vitamin D intake overall, optimal intakes will vary among individuals. Genomic technologies have revealed several hundreds of genes associated with vitamin D actions. The nature of these genes emphasizes the potentially negative implications of modulating vitamin D intakes in the absence of complementary human genetic and genomic data, including information on the gut microbiome. However, we are not yet in a position to apply this information. Genomic data (transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) could provide evidence that vitamin D sufficiency has been achieved. We suggest that there is an increasingly strong case for considering the more widespread use of vitamin D fortified foods and/or dietary supplements to benefit gastrointestinal health. However, intake levels might beneficially be informed by personalized genetic and genomic information, for optimal disease prevention and maintenance of remission.

  20. Indium-111 oxine-labeled autologous leukocyte scans in the management of colorectal diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, R.F.; Palace, F.

    1984-04-01

    The accuracy and usefulness of indium-111 oxine-labeled autologous leukocyte scans in the management of infectious complications of colon and rectal surgery and of inflammatory diseases of the colon have been studied by review of the records of all patients undergoing such scans at Morristown Memorial Hospital during the first six months such scans were performed there. A total of 20 scans was performed on 18 patients. Twelve scans were performed on 11 patients being treated for diseases of the colon and rectum. Of these 12 scans, one was normal, four demonstrated intra-abdominal abscesses, three demonstrated wound infections (two abdominal, one perineal), one was positive for granulomatous colitis, one for pseudomembranous colitis, one for chronic diverticulitis, and one for enterocutaneous fistula. One allergic reaction to the labeled leukocytes occurred. Comparisons with other corroborative localizing diagnostic tests were made. Subsequent treatment was reviewed. Analysis of these cases indicates that the majority of all scans were performed to evaluate complications of colorectal surgery or inflammatory diseases of the colon and that these scans were highly accurate. In all instances where appropriate, delineation of a lesion in the colorectal cases was followed by corrective treatment.

  1. Intestinal Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis and Management of Colonic Diverticular Disease.

    PubMed

    Maconi, Giovanni; Carmagnola, Stefania; Guzowski, Tom

    2016-10-01

    Diverticula of the colon and their symptomatic manifestations, including acute diverticulitis (AD), are frequent complaints and the cause of an increasing burden of ambulatory visits, diagnostic procedures, and hospital admissions. Endoscopic and radiologic diagnostic procedures have a well-known role in the diagnosis and management of the disease, but recently intestinal ultrasonography has been proposed as a complementary tool in the diagnosis and follow-up of diverticular disease. This review shows the main sonographic features of diverticula and discusses the potential role of ultrasound in suggesting the presence of symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease of the colon. Moreover, the sonographic features of AD, diagnostic accuracy, advantages, and limitations of the technique will be discussed. We place special emphasis on the present role of intestinal ultrasonography in patients with suspected AD. Owing to its high sensitivity and high positive predictive value in assessing AD, intestinal ultrasound is currently suggested by some European national consensus guidelines as the first-line examination in this setting. In fact, to minimize false-negative findings and avoid unnecessary radiation exposure in patients with suspected AD, intestinal ultrasound might be used as the first-line examination in a sequential diagnostic strategy, followed by computed tomography only in the case of negative or inconclusive findings. PMID:27622354

  2. Diverticular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: Incidental Diagnosis or Real Association? Final Answer.

    PubMed

    Regula, Jaroslaw

    2016-10-01

    Associations between diverticular disease of the colon and the colorectal cancer has been studied for >60 years. Observational, cross-sectional, and case-control studies as well as large population-based studies gave conflicting results and association was not fully proven. Obtaining the proof was difficult because both diseases share similar clinical characteristics, both increase with age, and both involve similar dietary factors. Long-term observations are difficult as diagnostic methods changed over time from barium enema 50 to 60 years ago, through endoscopy, up to CT and MR in recent years. Cancer or adenomas may be missed within diverticular segment; diverticula may be underreported in patients with colon cancer diagnosis. Most recent 2 large cohort studies have solved the dilemma. These studies have clearly shown that diverticular disease does not increase the risk of colon cancer after the first year of diagnosis. Within the first year of diagnosis the association is strong, most probably due to difficulties with differential diagnosis and misclassifications and shared symptoms. Findings of these studies have led to the conclusion that colon cancer has to be excluded using modern techniques after the first episode of suspected diverticulitis. PMID:27622360

  3. Systematic review of emergent laparoscopic colorectal surgery for benign and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Chand, Manish; Siddiqui, Muhammed R S; Gupta, Ashish; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Tekkis, Paris; Parvaiz, Amjad; Mirnezami, Alex H; Qureshi, Tahseen

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become well established in the management of both and malignant colorectal disease. The last decade has seen increasing numbers of surgeons trained to a high standard in minimally-invasive surgery. However there has not been the same enthusiasm for the use of laparoscopy in emergency colorectal surgery. There is a perception that emergent surgery is technically more difficult and may lead to worse outcomes. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive and critical appraisal of the available literature on the use of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) in the emergency setting. The literature is broadly divided by the underlying pathology; that is, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis and malignant obstruction. There were no randomized trials and the majority of the studies were case-matched series or comparative studies. The overall trend was that LCS is associated with shorter hospital stay, par or fewer complications but an increased operating time.Emergency LCS can be safely undertaken for both benign and malignant disease providing there is appropriate patient selection, the surgeon is adequately experienced and there are sufficient resources to allow for a potentially more complex operation. PMID:25493008

  4. Rectal Ischemia Mimicked Tumor Mass

    PubMed Central

    Zikos, Nicolaos; Aggeli, Panagiota; Louka, Evangelia; Pappas-Gogos, George

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic proctitis is a rare disease which is usually encountered in elderly with comorbidities. We present a case of an 80-year old man with severe coronary disease who presented with severe hematochezia and hypotension. Endoscopy revealed a rectal mass 3-4 cm above the dental line and rectosigmoid mucosal inflammation compatible with ischemic colitis. The rectal insult was so intense that it resembled a neoplasmatic lesion. We discuss the causes, the prognostic factors, and the clinical and therapeutic challenges of this rare, albeit life-threatening entity, and we review the relative literature. A percentage of 10%–20% of patients with ischemic colitis usually have a distal potentially obstructing lesion or disorder such as cancer, diverticulitis or fecal impaction. Ischemic colitis, when mucosal and submucosal edema is severe and hemorrhagic nodules are large enough, can mimic a neoplasmatic lesion. The best treatment approach is a conservative management initially with a close clinical followup and after stabilization a repetition of rectal endoscopy with new biopsies. Early recognition of this clinical entity is of paramount importance to implement appropriate therapy (conservative or surgical) and avoid potentially fatal treatment of presumed inflammatory or infectious bowel diseases. PMID:24109523

  5. Systematic review of emergent laparoscopic colorectal surgery for benign and malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Manish; Siddiqui, Muhammed RS; Gupta, Ashish; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Tekkis, Paris; Parvaiz, Amjad; Mirnezami, Alex H; Qureshi, Tahseen

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become well established in the management of both and malignant colorectal disease. The last decade has seen increasing numbers of surgeons trained to a high standard in minimally-invasive surgery. However there has not been the same enthusiasm for the use of laparoscopy in emergency colorectal surgery. There is a perception that emergent surgery is technically more difficult and may lead to worse outcomes. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive and critical appraisal of the available literature on the use of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) in the emergency setting. The literature is broadly divided by the underlying pathology; that is, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis and malignant obstruction. There were no randomized trials and the majority of the studies were case-matched series or comparative studies. The overall trend was that LCS is associated with shorter hospital stay, par or fewer complications but an increased operating time.Emergency LCS can be safely undertaken for both benign and malignant disease providing there is appropriate patient selection, the surgeon is adequately experienced and there are sufficient resources to allow for a potentially more complex operation. PMID:25493008

  6. Meckel's diverticulum--a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adults.

    PubMed

    Bălălău, C; Bacalbaşa, N; Motofei, I; Popa, Fl; Voiculescu, S; Scăunaşu, R V

    2015-01-01

    Although many people have Meckel's diverticulum, only some experience any symptoms, most under the age of 10. In adults it is usually asymptomatic but approximately 4% develop complications. Meckel's diverticulum is usually diagnosed in the first years of life and after that the risk of the complications decreases with increasing age, with no predictive factors for the development of complications. We describe the case of a 34-year-old man admitted in the emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain, nausea, flatulence and lack of transit for feces and gas. The patient had been previously operated for peritonitis due to a perforated ulcer. Clinical examination and paraclinical investigations (abdominal radiography and ultrasound) suggested the diagnosis of intestinal obstruction, probably produced by adhesions due to previous abdominal intervention. The diverticulum was resected using a linear stapler and the patient recovered without any complications. Small bowel obstruction due to Meckel's diverticulitis may be caused by entangled loop of small bowel around a fibrous cord, intussusception, volvulus, or incarceration within a hernia sac. The discovery of a Meckel's diverticulum complication in a mid thirties patient represented an intra-operatory surprise and is the peculiarity of the case. PMID:25970960

  7. Life-threatening hyperkalemia – an overlooked acute kidney injury with a serum creatinine rise in the ‘normal’ range

    PubMed Central

    Latus, Joerg; Braun, Niko; Alscher, M Dominik; Kimmel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman (51 kg, 158 cm, body mass index 20.5) was admitted to the hospital because of an acute kidney injury with hyperkalemia. On admission, she reported progredient muscle weakness of all limbs for several days. Serum potassium level was dramatically elevated and ECG showed QRS with a ‘sine-wave’ pattern and haemodialysis was started. 45 days ago, Hartmann’s operation was done because of stenosing sigmoid diverticulitis. At this time, the serum creatinine was 0.4 mg/dl (‘normal’ 0.5–1.2). Thereafter, she got severe ‘high output-ileostoma’ with severe intestinal fluid losses and treatment with potassium supplementation and spironolactone was started by the surgeons. She was discharged with elevated serum potassium levels and serum creatinine of 1.0 mg/dl (‘normal’ range (0.5–1.2 mg/dl)). This case illustrates impressively the lack of serum creatinine as an ideal kidney function test, because it is depending on muscle mass and there is no interindividual normal range. PMID:22605836

  8. Medical Treatment of Diverticular Disease: Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lué, Alberto; Laredo, Viviana; Lanas, Angel

    2016-10-01

    Diverticular disease (DD) of the colon represents the most common disease affecting the large bowel in western countries. Its prevalence is increasing. Recent studies suggest that changes in gut microbiota could contribute to development of symptoms and complication. For this reason antibiotics play a key role in the management of both uncomplicated and complicated DD. Rifaximin has demonstrated to be effective in obtaining symptoms relief at 1 year in patients with uncomplicated DD and to improve symptoms and maintain periods of remission following acute colonic diverticulitis (AD). Despite absence of data that supports the routine use of antibiotic in uncomplicated AD, they are recommended in selected patients. In patients with AD that develop an abscess, conservative treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics is successful in up to 70% of cases. In patients on conservative treatment where percutaneous drainage fails or peritonitis develops, surgery is considered the standard therapy. In conclusion antibiotics seem to remain the mainstay of treatment in symptomatic uncomplicated DD and AD. Inpatient management and intravenous antibiotics are necessary in complicated AD, while outpatient management is considered the best strategy in the majority of uncomplicated patients. PMID:27622367

  9. Assessment of platyhelminth diversity within amphibians of French Guiana revealed a new species of Nanopolystoma (Monogenea: Polystomatidae) in the caecilian Typhlonectes compressicauda.

    PubMed

    du Preez, Louis H; Badets, Mathieu; Verneau, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    An expedition was undertaken to French Guiana in search of amphibian parasites. Of the 23 anuran species collected and screened for polystomes, the toad Rhinella margaritifera (Laurenti) was the sole species found to be infected with a polystome, namely Wetapolystoma almae Gray, 1983. Of the two caecilian species collected, a new species of Nanopolystoma du Preez, Huyse et Wilkinson, 2008 was discovered from the urinary bladder of the aquatic caecilian Typhlonectes compressicauda (Duméril et Bibron). The small size of the mature worm, two non-diverticulated caeca of equal length that are non-confluent posteriorly, vitelline follicles in two dense lateral fields, a single follicular testis in the middle of the body, small ovary and a single operculated egg in utero, vaginae present and the caecilian host allowed the identification of the specimen as Nanopolystoma. Larger body size, hamulus length, egg diameter and occurrence in the caecilian family Typhlonectidae distinguishes the new species from the two other known polystomes in Nanopolystoma; thus, the description of Nanopolystoma tinsleyi sp. n. is provided within this paper.

  10. [Current diagnostic-therapeutic trends in treatment of pediatric appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Malnati, R; Capasso, G; Stagni, S; Bua, L; Albisetti, A; Erenbourg, L; Paesano, P L

    1994-03-01

    Acute appendicitis is the first cause of emergency surgery in children. Actually, emergency abdominal sonography has evolved in differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children to differentiate it from other causes of acute abdomen as mesenteric lymphoadenitis, acute right pyelonephritis, acute diverticulitis in Meckel's diverticulum, intestinal intussusception, regional enterits, primary peritonitis, anaphylactoid purpura of Henoch-Schonlein. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the usefulness of abdominal sonography in diagnosing acute appendicitis in our current series of pediatric patients. We have operated 102 patients afflicted by appendicitis admitted to the pediatric department of Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano in a period of 5 years and operated on for appendectomy. In the last 2 years 36 patients were evaluated with abdominal sonography. This diagnostic tool showed in 34 (94.4%) a liquid effusion, sometimes thick of the right iliac fossa. In 2 patients the appendix had thickened layers, was edematous and the lumen was clearly filled with debris. Abdominal sonography has given a clear cut picture of the acute inflammatory process of the appendix. None of these patients has suffered from septic or obstructive complications. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.35 days (3-15 days). Differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis can be extremely variable, from simple, paradigmatic situations to the most intriguing ones. This concept is well emphasized by William Silen when he says that "differential diagnosis of acute appendicits is an encyclopedic compendium of every abdominal disease that causes pain" in the 11th edition of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Christian K; Laye, Matthew J

    2012-04-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause versus treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction (including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity); and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life

  12. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Frank W.; Roberts, Christian K.; Laye, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause vs. treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction [including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity]; and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [Accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life

  13. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Fiscon, Valentino; Portale, Giuseppe; Mazzeo, Antonio; Migliorini, Giovanni; Frigo, Flavio

    2014-12-01

    Reestablishing continuity after a Hartmann's procedure is considered a major surgical procedure with high morbidity/mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the short-/long-term outcome of laparoscopic restoration of bowel continuity after HP. A prospectively collected database of colorectal laparoscopic procedures (>800) performed between June 2005 and June 2013 was used to identify 20 consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure (LHR). Median age was 65.4. Ten patients (50 %) had undergone surgery for perforated diverticulitis, 3 (15 %) for cancer, and 7 (35 %) for other reasons (volvulus, posttraumatic perforation, and sigmoid perforation from foreign body). Previous HP had been performed laparoscopically in only 3 patients. Median operative time was 162.5 min. All the procedures were completed laparoscopically. Intraoperative complication rate was nil. Post-operative mortality and morbidity were respectively 0 and 10 % (1 pneumonia, 1 bowel obstruction from post-anastomotic stenosis which required resection and redo of the anastomosis). Median time to first flatus was 3 days, to normal diet 5 days. Median hospital stay was 9 days without readmissions. We followed up the patients for a median of 44 months: when asked, all 20 (100 %) said they would undergo the operation (LHR) again; 3 (15 %) had been re-operated of laparoscopic mesh repair for incisional hernia. When performed by experienced surgeons, LHR is a feasible, safe, reproducible operation, which allows early return of bowel function, early discharge and fast return to work for the patient. It has a low morbidity rate.

  14. Phase I Study of Vandetanib With Radiotherapy and Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Drappatz, Jan; Norden, Andrew D.; Wong, Eric T.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Increasing evidence has suggested that angiogenesis inhibition might potentiate the effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). In addition, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition might be of therapeutic benefit, because the epidermal growth factor receptor is upregulated in GBM and contributes to radiation resistance. We conducted a Phase I study of vandetanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor, in patients with newly diagnosed GBM combined with RT and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: A total of 13 GBM patients were treated with vandetanib, radiotherapy, and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ, using a standard '3 + 3' dose escalation. The maximal tolerated dose was defined as the dose with <1 of 6 dose-limiting toxicities during the first 12 weeks of therapy. The eligible patients were adults with newly diagnosed GBM, Karnofsky performance status of {>=}60, normal organ function, who were not taking enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. Results: Of the 13 patients, 6 were treated with vandetanib at a dose of 200mg daily. Of the 6 patients, 3 developed dose-limiting toxicities within the first 12 weeks, including gastrointestinal hemorrhage and thrombocytopenia in 1 patient, neutropenia in 1 patient, and diverticulitis with gastrointestinal perforation in 1 patient. The other 7 patients were treated with 100 mg daily, with no dose-limiting toxicities observed, establishing this dose as the maximal tolerated dose combined with TMZ and RT. Conclusion: Vandetanib can be safely combined with RT and TMZ in GBM patients. A Phase II study in which patients are randomized to vandetanib 100 mg daily with RT and TMZ or RT and TMZ alone is underway.

  15. Human resident CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes have progenitor capacity and are a source of αSMA+ cells during repair.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, L; Gutiérrez, R; García, M P; González, M; Sáez, F J; Aparicio, F; Díaz-Flores, L; Madrid, J F

    2015-05-01

    We studied the progenitor capacity of human resident CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes (SC/TCs) in the enteric wall affected by inflammatory/repair processes (appendicitis, diverticulitis of large bowel and Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum) at different stages of evolution (inflammatory, proliferative and remodelling). In these conditions, CD34+ SC/TCs are activated, showing changes, which include the following overlapping events: 1) separation from adjacent structures (e.g., from vascular walls) and location in oedematous spaces, 2) morphological modifications (in cell shape and size) with presence of transitional cell forms between quiescent and activated CD34+ SC/TCs, 3) rapid proliferation and 4) loss of CD34 expression and gain of αSMA expression. These events mainly occur in the inflammatory and proliferative stages. During the loss of CD34 expression, the following findings are observed: a) irregular cell labelling intensity for anti-CD34, b) co-localization of CD34 and actin, c) concurrent irregular labelling intensity for αSMA and d) αSMA expression in all stromal cells, with total loss of CD34 expression. While CD34 expression was conserved, a high proliferative capacity (Ki-67 expression) was observed and vice versa. In the segments of the ileum affected by Crohn's disease, the stromal cells around fissures were αSMA+ and, in the transitional zones with normal enteric wall, activated CD34+ SC/TCs were observed. In conclusion, human resident CD34+ SC/TCs in the enteric wall have progenitor capacity and are activated with or without differentiation into αSMA+ stromal cells during inflammatory/repair processes.

  16. Blood flukes (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) infecting body cavity of South American catfishes (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae): two new species from rivers in Bolivia, Guyana and Peru with a re-assessment of Plehniella Szidat, 1951.

    PubMed

    Orelis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Bullard, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Plehniella Szidat, 1951 is emended based on new collections from South American long-whiskered catfishes. It is clearly differentiated from Sanguinicola Plehn, 1905 by lacking lateral tegumental body spines and by having 6 asymmetrical caeca. Plehniella sabajperezi sp. n. infects body cavity of Pimelodus albofasciatus (Mees) from the Demerara and Rupununi Rivers (Guyana) and Pimelodus blochii (Valenciennes) from Lake Tumi Chucua (Bolivia) and Napo River (Peru). It differs from Plehniella coelomicola Szidat, 1951 (type species) by having a thin-walled vas deferens that greatly exceeds the length of cirrus-sac and that joins the cirrus-sac at level of ovovitelline duct and ootype, an internal seminal vesicle that is absent or diminutive, and a cirrus-sac that is spheroid, nearly marginal, and envelops the laterally-directed distal portion of the male genitalia. Plehniella armbrusteri sp. n. infects body cavity of P. blochii from Lake Tumi Chucua (Bolivia). It differs from P. coelomicola and P. sabajperezi by having a relatively ovoid body, a massive intestine comprising caeca that are deeply-lobed to diverticulate and terminate in the posterior half of the body, a testis that flanks the distal tips of the posteriorly-directed caeca, and a proximal portion of the vas deferens that loops ventral to the testis. Small adults (Plehniella sp.) collected from body cavity of Pimelodus grosskopfii (Steindachner) from Cienega de Jobo and Canal del Dique (Colombia) differ from congeners by having a posteriorly-constricted body region, an anterior sucker with concentric rows of minute spines, an elongate anterior oesophageal swelling, short and wide caeca, and a male genital pore that opens proportionally more anteriad. This study nearly doubles the number of aporocotylids documented from South America Rivers and comprises the first record of a fish blood fluke from P. blochii, P. albofasciatus and P. grosskopfii as well as from Bolivia, Colombia, Guyana or Peru. PMID:26373332

  17. Unexpected Histopathological Findings in Appendectomy Specimens: a Retrospective Study of 1627 Cases.

    PubMed

    Limaiem, Faten; Arfa, Nafaa; Marsaoui, Lobna; Bouraoui, Saadia; Lahmar, Ahlem; Mzabi, Sabeh

    2015-12-01

    Pathologic evaluation of the appendix after appendectomy is routine and can occasionally identify unexpected findings. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence and type of pathologic diagnoses found in appendectomy specimens at our institution. The clinicopathological data of 1627 patients who underwent appendectomies for presumed acute appendicitis from January 2008 to October 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. There were 986 men and 641 women (sex ratio M/F = 1.5) aged between 16 months and 90 years (mean = 30 years). All patients underwent appendectomy (either open or laparoscopic). Histological examination of the surgical specimen showed acute inflammation of the appendix in 1455 cases (89.42 %), fibrosed appendix in 37 cases (2.27 %), and Enterobius vermicularis (n = 23). In 101 cases (6.2 %), the appendix was histologically normal. Incidental unexpected pathological diagnoses were noted in 57 appendectomy specimens. They included pinworm (n = 23), mucinous neoplasms (n = 12), neuroendocrine tumors (NET) (n = 8), adenocarcinoma (n = 2), granulomatous inflammation (n = 5), tuberculosis (n = 2), hyperplastic polyp (n = 1), tubular adenoma (n = 1), diverticulitis (n = 1), endometriosis (n = 1), and actinomycosis (n = 1). The routine histopathological examination of the appendix is of value for identifying unsuspected conditions requiring further postoperative management. Gross examination alone does not appear to be a good indicator of an unexpected finding on microscopic exam. It is recommended that in order to avoid misdiagnoses, all appendices should be histopathologically examined. PMID:27011552

  18. Laparoscopic Colon Resections With Discharge Less Than 24 Hours

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Maedeh; Alam, Shaan E.; Kar, Pran M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A short hospital stay is one of the main advantages of laparoscopic surgery. Previous studies have shown that after a multimodal fast-track process, the hospital length of stay can be shortened to between 2 and 5 days. The objective of this review is to show that the hospital length of stay can, in some cases, be reduced to <24 hours. Methods: This study retrospectively reviews a surgeon's experience with laparoscopic surgery over a 12-month period. Seven patients were discharged home within 24 hours after minimally invasive laparoscopic surgical treatment, following a modified fast-track protocol that was adopted for perioperative care. Results: Of the 7 patients, 4 received laparoscopic right hemicolectomy for malignant disease and 3 underwent sigmoid colectomies for recurrent diverticulitis. The mean hospital stay was 21 hours, 47 minutes; the mean volume of intraoperative fluid (lactated Ringer) was 1850 mL; the mean surgical blood loss was only 74.3 mL; the mean duration of surgery was 118 minutes; and the patients were ambulated and fed a liquid diet after recovery from anesthesia. The reviewed patients had functional gastrointestinal tracts and were agreeable to the timing of discharge. On the follow-up visit, they showed no adverse consequences such as bleeding, infection, or anastomotic leak. Conclusion: Laparoscopic colon surgery that incorporated multimodal perioperative care allowed patients to be discharged within the first 24 hours. Careful postoperative outpatient follow-up is important in monitoring complications such as anastomotic leak, which may not present until postoperative day 5. PMID:23925012

  19. Computed tomography colonography in 2014: an update on technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Laghi, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Twenty years after its introduction, computed tomographic colonography (CTC) has reached its maturity, and it can reasonably be considered the best radiological diagnostic test for imaging colorectal cancer (CRC) and polyps. This examination technique is less invasive than colonoscopy (CS), easy to perform, and standardized. Reduced bowel preparation and colonic distention using carbon dioxide favor patient compliance. Widespread implementation of a new image reconstruction algorithm has minimized radiation exposure, and the use of dedicated software with enhanced views has enabled easier image interpretation. Integration in the routine workflow of a computer-aided detection algorithm reduces perceptual errors, particularly for small polyps. Consolidated evidence from the literature shows that the diagnostic performances for the detection of CRC and large polyps in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals are similar to CS and are largely superior to barium enema, the latter of which should be strongly discouraged. Favorable data regarding CTC performance open the possibility for many different indications, some of which are already supported by evidence-based data: incomplete, failed, or unfeasible CS; symptomatic, elderly, and frail patients; and investigation of diverticular disease. Other indications are still being debated and, thus, are recommended only if CS is unfeasible: the use of CTC in CRC screening and in surveillance after surgery for CRC or polypectomy. In order for CTC to be used appropriately, contraindications such as acute abdominal conditions (diverticulitis or the acute phase of inflammatory bowel diseases) and surveillance in patients with a long-standing history of ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease and in those with hereditary colonic syndromes should not be overlooked. This will maximize the benefits of the technique and minimize potential sources of frustration or disappointment for both referring clinicians and patients. PMID:25492999

  20. The Role of Hand Assist Laparoscopic Surgery (HALS) in Pelvic Surgery for Nonmalignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCarus, Steven; Jones, Kathy Y.; Redan, Jay; Kim, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Hand assist laparoscopic surgery (HALS) is a surgical modality rarely used in benign gynecology. We analyzed nonmalignant pelvic disorders that utilized HALS to see whether there is any benefit over standard laparotomy. Methods: A case control chart review identified patients who underwent HALS for a variety of benign gynecological conditions from 2004 through 2007. Cases were then compared with a control group of all the patients who underwent similar procedures for the same diagnosis via laparotomy (ELAP) in our center within the same time period. The groups were comparable with respect to age, BMI, and surgical indication. Results: Twenty-nine patients were analyzed: 12 cases (HALS) and 17 controls (ELAP). Each group was broken up into 2 subsets: Group A, older patients who underwent surgery for pelvic organ prolapse or diverticulitis with adnexectomy and Group B, younger patients who underwent surgery for pelvic pain, endometriosis, or both. Hospital stay in Group B was statistically lower in the HALS cases vs. the ELAP controls, (2.9 vs. 5.4 days, P=0.04). All HALS and ELAP patients were then analyzed for overall trends. HALS cases had shorter hospitalization than ELAP controls had (3.3 vs 4.5 days, P=0.035). Estimated blood loss was also less overall in the HALS cases vs. the ELAP controls (175 vs 355.9 mL, P=0.021). There were 2 adverse outcomes reported in Group A of the HALS cases. These 2 patients experienced postoperative hernias though the hand-assist port-site incision. Conclusion: Compared with laparotomy, overall, HALS offers the advantage of decreased hospitalization and decreased intraoperative blood loss. Postoperative hernias through the HA port site may be a potential problem with this technique. PMID:20529531

  1. Gastroparesis - a novel cause of persistent thyroid stimulating hormone elevation in hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    O S, Khraisha; M M, Al-Madani; A N, Peiris; T K, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is easily treated by levothyroxine therapy which has an 80 percent absorption rate, mostly in the jejunum. The replacement dose of daily levothyroxine is usually calculated at 1.6 mcg/kg body weight per day. We report a 77-year-old man who required supraphysiologic thyroxine replacement (>2.7 mcg/ kg/day) to treat his hypothyroidism. The patient was referred for persistent thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) elevation (40 mcIU/ml) while on 175 mcg of levothyroxine. Patient was compliant with medication. Medical history included diabetes mellitus type 2, cerebrovascular accident, depression, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, vitamin B12 deficiency, Addison’s disease, as well as a colostomy secondary to diverticulitis. He was taking aspirin, carvedilol, cholecalciferol, finasteride, fluoxetine, furosemide, ketoconazole, levothyroxine, prednisone, and albuterol/ipratropium inhaler. His height was 180.3 cm; weight, 107 kg. Thyroid was impalpable, and he was clinically euthyroid. Despite discontinuation of iron and statin which are known to interfere with thyroxine absorption and crushing of thyroxine tablets to enhance absorption, his TSH remained elevated. Celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection were ruled out with serological testing. There was no proteinuria and anti-parietal cell antibody was positive. Gastroparesis was confirmed by gastric emptying study. He continued to require increasing doses of thyroxine with increment to 300 mcg daily. To our knowledge, this is the first documented association between gastroparesis and thyroxine malabsorption. We recommend that gastroparesis be considered in any patient with persistent TSH elevation despite usual thyroxine doses. PMID:25978052

  2. [Deglutition disorders in the elderly. Epidemiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Finiels, H; Strubel, D; Jacquot, J M

    2001-11-10

    THE PREVALENCE: The exact prevalence of deglutition disorders in the elderly is not known. It appears frequent in very old patients and in those suffering from polypathological symptoms, affecting 50% of the populations in long-term care units. THE EFFECTS OF AGING: Physiological aging alters various parameters of swallowing, however it seems that these modifications related to age have little effect on healthy subjects. However, they may increase vulnerability in those presenting with intercurrent pathologies. CONCOMITANT DISORDERS: Other than the decrease in efficient mastication and the existence of xerostomia, frequently observed contributing factors, many diseases may be responsible for dysphagia in the elderly. Neurological disorders, particularly cerebral vascular diseases, central nervous system degenerative disorders and neuro-motor diseases predominate. In the aging, muscular disorders and after effects of various diseases can set-in. Modifications in oropharyngeal anatomy generally results from cancerous lesions of the aero-digestive junction, but also, occasionally from extrinsic compression that does not necessarily reflect a neoplastic etiology. Zenker's diverticulitis represents a cause of dysphagia specific to the elderly. Problems in swallowing of iatrogenic origin are also frequent, following cervical radiotherapy or after oropharyngeal surgery, during tracheal intubation or when using feeding tubes and also during various medical treatments. UNDERRATED CONSEQUENCES: Dysphagia leads to multiple morbid after effects, primarily alteration in quality of life, dehydration, undernutrition, asphyxia and congestion and recurrent infections of the respiratory tract. The responsibility of deglutition disorders in the occurrence of these complications is difficult to assess in weak elderly subjects because of the frequent concomitance with multiple deficiencies and incapacities. PMID:11759342

  3. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Christian K; Laye, Matthew J

    2012-04-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause versus treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction (including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity); and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life.

  4. Routine histopathologic examination of appendectomy specimens: retrospective analysis of 1255 patients.

    PubMed

    Emre, Arif; Akbulut, Sami; Bozdag, Zehra; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kanlioz, Murat; Emre, Rabia; Sahin, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical benefit of histopathologic analysis of appendectomy specimens from patients with an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We retrospectively analyzed the demographic and histopathologic data of 1255 patients (712 males, 543 females; age range, 17-85 years) who underwent appendectomy to treat an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients who underwent incidental appendectomy during other surgeries were excluded from the study. Histopathologic findings of the appendectomy specimens were used to confirm the initial diagnosis. Ninety-four percent of the appendectomy specimens were positive for appendicitis. Of those, 880 were phlegmonous appendicitis, 148 were gangrenous appendicitis with perforation, and the remaining 88 showed unusual histopathologic findings. In the 88 specimens with unusual pathology, fibrous obliteration was observed in 57 specimens, carcinoid tumor in 11, Encheliophis vermicularis parasite infection in 8, granulatomous inflammation in 6, appendiceal endometriosis in 2, and 1 specimen each showed mucocele, eosinophilic infiltration, Taenia saginata parasite infection, and appendicular diverticulitis. All carcinoid tumors were located in the distal appendix. Six of the 11 carcinoid tumors were defined by histopathology as involving tubular cells, and the other 5 as involving enterochromaffin cells. Six patients had muscularis propria invasion, 2 patients had submucosa invasion, 2 patients had mesoappendix invasion, and 1 patient had serosal invasion. All patients with tumors remained disease free during the follow-up (range, 1-27 months). We conclude that when the ratio of unusual pathologic findings for appendectomy specimens is considered, it is evident that all surgical specimens should be subjected to careful histologic examination. PMID:24229023

  5. Laparoscopic colon surgery: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Martel, Guillaume; Boushey, Robin P

    2006-08-01

    Since its first described case in 1991, laparoscopic colon surgery has lagged behind minimally invasive surgical methods for solid intra-abdominal organs in terms of acceptability, dissemination, and ease of learning. In colon cancer, initial concerns over port site metastases and adequacy of oncologic resection have considerably dampened early enthusiasm for this procedure. Only recently, with the publication of several large, randomized controlled trials, has the incidence of port site metastases been shown to be equivalent to that of open resection. Laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer has also been demonstrated to be at least equivalent to traditional laparotomy in terms of adequacy of oncologic resection, disease recurrence, and long-term survival. In addition, numerous reports have validated short-term benefits following laparoscopic resection for cancer, including shorter hospital stay, shorter time to recovery of bowel function, and decreased analgesic requirements, as well as other postoperative variables. In benign colonic disease, much less high-quality literature exists supporting the use of laparoscopic methods. Two recent randomized controlled trials have demonstrated some short-term benefits to laparoscopic ileocolic resection for CD, in addition to evident cosmetic advantages. On the other hand, the current evidence on laparoscopic surgery for UC does not support its routine use among nonexpert surgeons outside of specialized centers. Laparoscopic colonic resection for diverticular disease appears to provide several short-term benefits, although these advantages may not translate to cases of complicated diverticulitis. Despite the increasing acceptability of minimally invasive methods for the management of benign and malignant colonic pathologies, laparoscopic colon resection remains a prohibitively difficult technique to master. Numerous technological innovations have been introduced onto the market in an effort to decrease the steep learning

  6. CN-15ADVERSE EFFECTS OF BEVACIZUMAB IN BRAIN TUMOR PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Tushar; Ladha, Harshad; Mandel, Jacob; Gilbert, Mark; O'Brien, Barbara; Hamza, Mohamed; Armstrong, Terri

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bevacizumab is humanized monoclonal antibody inhibiting angiogenesis and the only FDA approved treatment for recurrent glioblastoma. The aim of this study was to look at the occurrence of various adverse effects associated with use of bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma. METHODS: In this retrospective chart review, we studied 280 patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with Bevacizumab between 2005-2011 to characterize the known adverse effects of bevacizumab including hypertension, grade 3-4 myelosuppression, wound healing complications, thrombo-embolic events, stroke, hemorrhage and gastrointestinal complications. RESULTS: The study population included 168 males and 112 females. The median age was 53.5 years(range 8.1-81.3). TREATMENT: Bevacizumab only(58), Bevacizumab + CPT(11), Bevacizumab + TMZ(32) or Bevacizumab + Other(34). Patients were treated at recurrence(1st = 96; 2nd = 126, 3rd = 58). Hypertension was the most common adverse effect occurring in 131(49%). The median duration from treatment start to development was 82 days (Range 7-1143). However, only 33(25%) were started on antihypertensive medication. Grade 3-4 Myelosuppression occurred in 52(19%)causing treatment discontinuation in 8. Thrombo-embolic events were reported in 5%(15) patients including DVT(9), PE(2), Central venous thrombosis(1) and Stroke(3). Thirty-six patients (13%) were on anti-coagulant medication at bevacizumab initiation. Median time to a thromboembolic complication was 113 days (Range 8-1145). Wound healing complications were noted in 7(3%) patients, 3 craniotomy dehiscence and 4 at soft tissue sites. Five patients (2%) developed GI complications, including perforations(3), pancreatitis(1), and diverticulitis(1). Median time to development was 92 days(Range 10-651). There was a high rate 46%(129) of grade 3-4 lymphocytopenia; median time to develop lymphocytopenia was 50 days(Range = 3-564). CONCLUSION: The range of toxicities was similar to other reports

  7. Complicated diverticular disease of the colon, do we need to change the classical approach, a retrospective study of 110 patients in southeast England

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Abdulzahra; Mahmood, Hind; Subhas, Gokulakkrishna; EL-Hasani, Shamsi

    2008-01-01

    Background Complicated diverticular disease of the colon imposes a serious risk to patient's life, challenge to surgeons and has cost implications for health authority. The aim of this study is to evaluate the management outcome of complicated colonic diverticular disease in a district hospital and to explore the current strategies of treatment. Methods This is a retrospective study of all patients who were admitted to the surgical ward between May 2002 and November 2006 with a diagnosis of complicated diverticular disease. A proforma of patients' details, admission date, ITU admission, management outcomes and the follow up were recorded from the patients case notes and analyzed. The mean follow-up was 34 months (range 6–60 months) Results The mean age of patients was 72.7 years (range 39–87 years). Thirty-one men (28.18 %) and Seventy-nine women (71.81%) were included in this study. Male: female ratio was 1:2.5. Sixty-eight percent of patients had one or more co-morbidities. Forty-one patients (37.27%) had two or more episodes of diverticulitis while 41.8% of them had no history of diverticular disease. Eighty-six percent of patients presented with acute abdominal pain while bleeding per rectum was the main presentation in 14%. Constipation and erratic bowel habit were the commonest chronic symptoms in patients with history of diverticular disease. Generalized tenderness was reported in 64.28% while 35.71% have left iliac fossa tenderness. Leukocytosis was reported in 58 patients (52.72%). The mean time from the admission until the start of operative intervention was 20.57 hours (range 4–96 hours). Perforation was confirmed in 59.52%. Mortality was 10.90%. Another 4 (3.63%) died during follow up for other reasons. Conclusion Complicated diverticular disease carries significant morbidity and mortality. These influenced by patient-related factors. Because of high mortality and morbidities, we suggest the need to target a specific group of patients for

  8. Implications of the colonic deposition of free hemoglobin-alpha chain: a previously unknown tissue by-product in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeremy N.; Schäffer, Michael W.; Korolkova, Olga Y.; Williams, Amanda D.; Gangula, Pandu R.; M’Koma, Amosy E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed inflamed mucosal/submucosal layers of ulcerative colitis (UC=63) and Crohn’s colitis (CC=50) and unexpectedly we unveiled a pool of free-hemoglobin-alpha (Hb-α) chain. Patients with colitides have increased ROS, DNA-oxidation products, free-iron in mucosa, in pre-neoplastic, and in colitis-cancers and increased risks of developing colorectal-cancer (CRC). All IBD-related-CRC lesions are found in segments with colitis. Linking this information we investigated whether free-Hb-α is key transformational stepping that increases colitis-related-CRC vulnerability. Methods UC/CC samples were profiled using MALDI-MS; protein identification was made by LCM. Diverticulitis (DV) was used as control (Ctrl). The presence of Hb(n) (n=α, β and hemin)/Hb was validated by Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We tested for DNA-damage (DNAD) by exposing normal colonic-epithelial-cell-line, NCM460, to 10μM and 100μM of Hb(n)/Hb, individually for 2 h, 6 h, and 12 h. Quantification of Hb-α-staining was done by Nikon Elements Advance Research Analysis software. ROS was measured by the production of 8-OHdG. DNAD was assessed by Comet-assay. Colonic tissue homogenate antioxidants Nrf2-, CAT-, SOD- and GPx-expressions was analyzed densitometrically/ normalized by β-actin. Results IHC of CC/UC mucosal/submucosal-compartments stained strongly positive for Hb-α and significantly higher vs. Ctrl. NCM460 exposed to Hb(n)/Hb exhibited steadily-increasing ROS and subsequent DNAD. DNAD was higher in 10μM than 100μM in Hb-β/hemin the first 2 h then plateaued followed by DNAD-repair. This may be likely due to apoptosis in the later concentration. Nrf2 enzyme activities among UC, CC and UCAC were observed impaired in all IBD subjects. Decreased levels of Nrf2 among UC vs. CC patients with active disease was insignificant as well as vs. Ctrls but significantly lower in UCAC vs. Ctrl. SOD was decreased in UC and UCAC and GPx in CC but statistically not