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Sample records for divertor pump cryogenic

  1. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

  2. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1994-10-04

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

  3. A Magnetically Coupled Cryogenic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Walter; Jumper, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cryogenic pumps used for propellant loading at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and other NASA Centers have a bellows mechanical seal and oil bath ball bearings, both of which can be problematic and require high maintenance. Because of the extremely low temperatures, the mechanical seals are made of special materials and design, have wearing surfaces, are subject to improper installation, and commonly are a potential leak path. The ball bearings are non-precision bearings [ABEC-1 (Annular Bearing Engineering Council)] and are lubricated using LOX compatible oil. This oil is compatible with the propellant to prevent explosions, but does not have good lubricating properties. Due to the poor lubricity, it has been a goal of the KSC cryogenics community for the last 15 years to develop a magnetically coupled pump, which would eliminate these two potential issues. A number of projects have been attempted, but none of the pumps was a success. An off-the-shelf magnetically coupled pump (typically used with corrosive fluids) was procured that has been used for hypergolic service at KSC. The KSC Cryogenics Test Lab (CTL) operated the pump in cryogenic LN2 as received to determine a baseline for modifications required. The pump bushing, bearings, and thrust rings failed, and the pump would not flow liquid (this is a typical failure mode that was experienced in the previous attempts). Using the knowledge gained over the years designing and building cryogenic pumps, the CTL determined alternative materials that would be suitable for use under the pump design conditions. The CTL procured alternative materials for the bearings (bronze, aluminum bronze, and glass filled PTFE) and machined new bearing bushings, sleeves, and thrust rings. The designed clearances among the bushings, sleeves, thrust rings, case, and case cover were altered once again using experience gained from previous cryogenic pump rebuilds and designs. The alternative material parts were assembled into

  4. Cryogenic Vacuum Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachman, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    System provides high pumping capacity even for noble gases. First stage, removes water and CO2 from input gas. Second stage, removes noble gases except helium and some lighter gases not trapped by first stage. Third stage, traps all remaining gases. All three stages mounted inside liquid-nitrogen Dewar that cools first stage. Pump small enough for general laboratory use.

  5. Using Composite Materials in a Cryogenic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batton, William D.; Dillard, James E.; Rottmund, Matthew E.; Tupper, Michael L.; Mallick, Kaushik; Francis, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the design and operation of an extended-shaft cryogenic pump to increase the efficiency of pumping. In general, the efficiency of pumping a cryogenic fluid is limited by thermal losses which is itself caused by pump inefficiency and leakage of heat through the pump structure. A typical cryogenic pump includes a drive shaft and two main concentric static components (an outer pressure containment tube and an intermediate static support tube) made from stainless steel. The modifications made include replacement of the stainless-steel drive shaft and the concentric static stainless-steel components with components made of a glass/epoxy composite. The leakage of heat is thus reduced because the thermal conductivity of the composite is an order of magnitude below that of stainless steel. Taking advantage of the margin afforded by the decrease in thermal conductivity, the drive shaft could be shortened to increase its effective stiffness, thereby increasing the rotordynamic critical speeds, thereby further making it possible to operate the pump at a higher speed to increase pumping efficiency. During the modification effort, an analysis revealed that substitution of the shorter glass/epoxy shaft for the longer stainless-steel shaft was not, by itself, sufficient to satisfy the rotordynamic requirements at the desired increased speed. Hence, it became necessary to increase the stiffness of the composite shaft. This stiffening was accomplished by means of a carbon-fiber-composite overwrap along most of the length of the shaft. Concomitantly with the modifications described thus far, it was necessary to provide for joining the composite-material components with metallic components required by different aspects of the pump design. An adhesive material formulated specially to bond the composite and metal components was chosen as a means to satisfy these requirements.

  6. Miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump

    DOEpatents

    Keville, Robert F.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump for removing residual water molecules from an inlet sample prior to sample analysis in a mass spectroscopy system, such as ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectroscopy. The cryogenic pump is a battery operated, low power (<1.6 watts) pump with a .DELTA.T=100.degree. C. characteristic. The pump operates under vacuum pressures of 5.times.10.sup.-4 Torr to ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the range of 1.times.10.sup.-7 to 3.times.10.sup.-9 Torr and will typically remove partial pressure, 2.times.10.sup.-7 Torr, residual water vapor. The cryogenic pump basically consists of an inlet flange piece, a copper heat sink with a square internal bore, four two tier Peltier (TEC) chips, a copper low temperature square cross sectional tubulation, an electronic receptacle, and an exit flange piece, with the low temperature tubulation being retained in the heat sink at a bias angle of 5.degree., and with the TECs being positioned in parallel to each other with a positive potential being applied to the top tier thereof.

  7. Miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump

    DOEpatents

    Keville, R.F.

    1997-11-18

    A miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump is described for removing residual water molecules from an inlet sample prior to sample analysis in a mass spectroscopy system, such as ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectroscopy. The cryogenic pump is a battery operated, low power (<1.6 watts) pump with a {Delta}T=100 C characteristic. The pump operates under vacuum pressures of 5{times}10{sup {minus}4} Torr to ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the range of 1{times}10{sup {minus}7} to 3{times}10{sup {minus}9} Torr and will typically remove partial pressure, 2{times}10{sup {minus}7} Torr, residual water vapor. The cryogenic pump basically consists of an inlet flange piece, a copper heat sink with a square internal bore, four two tier Peltier (TEC) chips, a copper low temperature square cross sectional tubulation, an electronic receptacle, and an exit flange piece, with the low temperature tubulation being retained in the heat sink at a bias angle of 5{degree}, and with the TECs being positioned in parallel to each other with a positive potential being applied to the top tier thereof. 2 figs.

  8. Engineering design of cryocondensation pumps for the DIII-D Radiative Divertor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, A.S.; Baxi, C.B.; Del Bene, J.V.; Laughon, G.J.; Reis, E.E.; Shatoff, H.D.; Smith, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    A new double-null, slotted divertor configuration will be installed for the DIII-D Radiative Divertor Program at General Atomics in late 1996. Four cryocondensation pumps, three new and one existing, will be part of this new divertor. The purpose of the pumps is to provide plasma density control and to limit the impurities entering the plasma core by providing pumping at each divertor strike point. The three new pumps are based on the design of the existing pump, installed in 1992 as part of the Advanced Divertor Program. The new pumps require geometry modifications to the original design. Therefore, extensive modal and dynamic analyses were performed to determine the behavior of these pumps and their helium and nitrogen feed lines during disruption events. Thermal and fluid analyses were also performed to characterize the helium two-phase flow regime in the pumps and their feedlines. A flow testing program was completed to test the change in geometry of the pump feed lines with respect to helium flow stability. The results were compared to the helium thermal and fluid analyses to verify predicted flow regimes and flow stability.

  9. A cryocondensation pump for the DIII-D Advanced Divertor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.P.; Baxi, C.; Reis, E.; Sevier, L.

    1992-03-01

    A cryocondensation pump was designed for the baffle chamber of General Atomics DIII-D tokamak and will be installed in the fall of 1992. The purpose of the pump is to study plasma density control by pumping the divertor. The pump is toroidally continuous, approximately 10 m long and located in the lower outer corner of the vacuum chamber of the machine. It consists of a 1 m{sup 2} liquid helium-cooled surface surrounded by a liquid nitrogen-cooled shield to limit the heat load on the helium-cooled surface. The liquid nitrogen-cooled surface is surrounded by a radiation/particle shield to prevent energetic particles from impacting and releasing condensed water molecules. A thermal enhancement coating was applied to the nitrogen shell to lower the maximum temperature of the shell. The coating is non-continuous to keep the toroidal electrical resistance high. The whole pump is supported off the water-cooled vacuum vessel wall. Supports for the pump were designed to accommodate the thermal differences between the 4 K helium surface, the 77 K nitrogen shells, and the 300 K vacuum vessel supporting the pump and to provide a low heat leak structural support. Disruption loading on the pump was analyzed and a finite element structural analysis of the pump was completed. A testing program was completed to evaluate coating techniques to enhance heat transfer and emissivity of the various surfaces. Fabrication tests were performed to determine the best method of attaching the liquid nitrogen flow tubes to their shield surfaces and to determine the best alternative to fabricating the different shells of the pump. A prototype sector of the pump was built to verify fabrication and assembly techniques.

  10. Transmission of electrons inside the cryogenic pumps of ITER injector.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    Large cryogenic pumps are installed in the vessel of large neutral beam injectors (NBIs) used to heat the plasma in nuclear fusion experiments. The operation of such pumps can be compromised by the presence of stray secondary electrons that are generated along the beam path. In this paper, we present a numerical model to analyze the propagation of the electrons inside the pump. The aim of the study is to quantify the power load on the active pump elements, via evaluation of the transmission probabilities across the domain of the pump. These are obtained starting from large datasets of particle trajectories, obtained by numerical means. The transmission probability of the electrons across the domain is calculated for the NBI of the ITER and for its prototype Megavolt ITer Injector and Concept Advancement (MITICA) and the results are discussed. PMID:26932041

  11. Transmission of electrons inside the cryogenic pumps of ITER injector.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    Large cryogenic pumps are installed in the vessel of large neutral beam injectors (NBIs) used to heat the plasma in nuclear fusion experiments. The operation of such pumps can be compromised by the presence of stray secondary electrons that are generated along the beam path. In this paper, we present a numerical model to analyze the propagation of the electrons inside the pump. The aim of the study is to quantify the power load on the active pump elements, via evaluation of the transmission probabilities across the domain of the pump. These are obtained starting from large datasets of particle trajectories, obtained by numerical means. The transmission probability of the electrons across the domain is calculated for the NBI of the ITER and for its prototype Megavolt ITer Injector and Concept Advancement (MITICA) and the results are discussed.

  12. Comprehensive Testing of a Neon Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark C.; Ku, Jentung; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive test program of a cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL) using neon as the working fluid in the temperature range between 30 K and 40 K. The test article was originally designed to be used with nitrogen in the 70 K to 100 K temperature range, and was refurbished for testing with neon. Tests performed included start up from a supercritical state, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, heat transport limit, low power limit, reservoir set point change and long duration operation. The neon CCPL has demonstrated excellent performance under various conditions.

  13. NPBIE cryogenic vacuum pumping system integrated with fuel cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalilevand, A.; Calhoun, L. D., II; Poteat, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic vacuum pumping system to be used for the Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) accelerator subsystem, which will use hydrogen, rather than He, and which will be integrated with the fuel cell reactant supply system. The pumping system for the NPB Integrated Experiment is composed of two hydrogen storage tanks, a transfer manifold, eight cryopumps, two hydrogen compressors, a hydrogen heat exchanger, and a reservoir. Component analysis and system analysis were performed on a model of the cryopumping operation for the 168-hr mission. As a result, the cryopump average demand was reduced by thorough insulation of the cryosystem, a design of an efficient cryopump heat exchanger, and the expansion of hydrogen into the two-phase region. The average hydrogen consumption by the fuel cells was also reduced, using waste heat to warm fuel cell hydrogen.

  14. Flight Testing of a Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Kobel, Mark; Bugby, David; Kroliczek, Edward; Baumann, Jane; Cullimore, Brent

    1999-01-01

    Future space-based cryogenic systems will require enhanced integration flexibility, lower weight reduced parasitic penalties, better vibration isolation, and a variety of other improvements to meet performance goals. Additionally, there is an increasing need to locate cooling sources remotely from cooled components. In the past flexible conductive links were used and worked well in most cases. However, as the transport lengths increase, conductive couplings become heavier and less effective, and must be replaced by higher performance systems. One available option, which can meet many of these future requirements, is the cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL). The development of the CCPL technology started in 1992, following the success of the room temperature CPLS. The extrapolation of CCPL technology to cryogenic temperatures offers many performance benefits, which are not currently within the reach of traditional heat pipes or conductive links. Specific advantages of the CCPL technology pertaining to cryocooler integration include: (1) greater capillary pumping pressure for improved ground testability; (2) improved mechanical isolation; (3) faster diode shutdown and lower reverse heat leaks; (4) tighter control of detector temperature; (5) variable or fixed conductance operation; and (6) ease of integration due to their flexibility. The applications of CCPL technology are numerous. Military and commercial applications include surveillance satellites, earth observing satellites, deep space observation systems, medical devices, and many other cryogenic systems. Over the past few years, several breadboard and prototype CCPLs have been built and ground tested. A prototype CCPL has demonstrated successful operation between 80K and 110K with heat loads between O.5W and 12W using nitrogen as the working fluid, and 35K and 40K with head loads of 0.25W to 3.5W using neon. In order to verify CCPL performance in a microgravity environment, a flight unit, CCPL-5, was tested

  15. Modeling Results For the ITER Cryogenic Fore Pump. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pfotenhauer, John M.; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-03-31

    A numerical model characterizing the operation of a cryogenic fore-pump (CFP) for ITER has been developed at the University of Wisconsin – Madison during the period from March 15, 2011 through June 30, 2014. The purpose of the ITER-CFP is to separate hydrogen isotopes from helium gas, both making up the exhaust components from the ITER reactor. The model explicitly determines the amount of hydrogen that is captured by the supercritical-helium-cooled pump as a function of the inlet temperature of the supercritical helium, its flow rate, and the inlet conditions of the hydrogen gas flow. Furthermore the model computes the location and amount of hydrogen captured in the pump as a function of time. Throughout the model’s development, and as a calibration check for its results, it has been extensively compared with the measurements of a CFP prototype tested at Oak Ridge National Lab. The results of the model demonstrate that the quantity of captured hydrogen is very sensitive to the inlet temperature of the helium coolant on the outside of the cryopump. Furthermore, the model can be utilized to refine those tests, and suggests methods that could be incorporated in the testing to enhance the usefulness of the measured data.

  16. Traction drive for cryogenic boost pump. [hydrogen oxygen rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, S.; Connelly, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Two versions of a Nasvytis multiroller traction drive were tested in liquid oxygen for possible application as cryogenic boost pump speed reduction drives for advanced hydrogen-oxygen rocket engines. The roller drive, with a 10.8:1 reduction ratio, was successfully run at up to 70,000 rpm input speed and up to 14.9 kW (20 hp) input power level. Three drive assemblies were tested for a total of about three hours of which approximately one hour was at nominal full speed and full power conditions. Peak efficiency of 60 percent was determined. There was no evidence of slippage between rollers for any of the conditions tested. The ball drive, a version using balls instead of one row of rollers, and having a 3.25:1 reduction ratio, failed to perform satisfactorily.

  17. The development of a cryogenic over-pressure pump

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, M.; Cease, H.; Flaugher, B.; Flores, R.; Lathrop, A.; Garcia, J.; Ruiz, F.

    2014-01-29

    A cryogenic over-pressure pump (OPP) was tested in the prototype telescope liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling system for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Project. This OPP consists of a process cylinder (PC), gas generator, and solenoid operated valves (SOVs). It is a positive displacement pump that provided intermittent liquid nitrogen (LN2) flow to an array of charge couple devices (CCDs) for the prototype Dark Energy Camera (DECam). In theory, a heater submerged in liquid would generate the drive gas in a closed loop cooling system. The drive gas would be injected into the PC to displace that liquid volume. However, due to limitations of the prototype closed loop nitrogen system (CCD cooling system) for DECam, a quasiclosed-loop nitrogen system was created. During the test of the OPP, the CCD array was cooled to its designed set point temperature of 173K. It was maintained at that temperature via electrical heaters. The performance of the OPP was captured in pressure, temperature, and flow rate in the CCD LN2 cooling system at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL)

  18. Modeling results for the ITER cryogenic fore pump

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. S.; Miller, F. K.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.

    2014-01-29

    The cryogenic fore pump (CFP) is designed for ITER to collect and compress hydrogen isotopes during the regeneration process of torus cryopumps. Different from common cryopumps, the ITER-CFP works in the viscous flow regime. As a result, both adsorption boundary conditions and transport phenomena contribute unique features to the pump performance. In this report, the physical mechanisms of cryopumping are studied, especially the diffusion-adsorption process and these are coupled with standard equations of species, momentum and energy balance, as well as the equation of state. Numerical models are developed, which include highly coupled non-linear conservation equations of species, momentum and energy and equation of state. Thermal and kinetic properties are treated as functions of temperature, pressure, and composition. To solve such a set of equations, a novel numerical technique, identified as the Group-Member numerical technique is proposed. It is presented here a 1D numerical model. The results include comparison with the experimental data of pure hydrogen flow and a prediction for hydrogen flow with trace helium. An advanced 2D model and detailed explanation of the Group-Member technique are to be presented in following papers.

  19. Experimental and CFD analyses of a thermal radiation shield dimple plate for cryogenic pump application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scannapiego, M.; Day, C.

    2015-12-01

    Large customized cryogenic pumps are used in fusion reactors to evacuate the plasma exhaust from the torus. Cryopumps usually consist of an active pumping surface area cooled below 5 K and shielded from direct outer thermal radiation by plates cooled at 80K. In nuclear fusion applications, cryopumps are exposed to excessively high heat fluxes during pumping operation, and follow-up regeneration cycles with rapid warm-up and cool-down phases. Therefore, high cryogenic operational mass flows are required and thus pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics become key issues for the design of the pump cryogenic circuits. Actively cooled dimple plates are a preferred design solution for the thermal radiation shield. A test plate with a rhomb pattern of dimples has been manufactured and tested in terms of pressure drop with a dedicated test facility using water. In the present work, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the test dimple plate have been performed, and computed pressure drops have been compared to experimental results. Despite the complexity of the geometry, a good agreement with the experimental results was found. Then, the validated CFD approach has been further extended to relevant operation conditions, using gaseous helium at cryogenic temperature as working fluid. The resulting pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics are finally presented.

  20. Preliminary Study of a Piston Pump for Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, Arnold E.; Kohl, Robert C.

    1959-01-01

    Preliminary data are presented covering the performance of a low-speed, five-cylinder piston pump designed for handling boiling hydrogen. This pump was designed for a flow of 55 gallons per minute at 240 rpm with a discharge pressure of 135 pounds per square inch. Tests were made using JP-4 fuel, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen. Pump delivery and endurance characteristics were satisfactory for the range of operation covered. In connection with the foregoing pump development, the cavitation characteristics of a preliminary visual model, glass-cylinder pump and of a simple reciprocating disk were studied. Subcooling of approximately 0.60 F was obtained from the cavitation produced by reciprocating a disk in boiling nitrogen and in boiling water. The subcooling obtained in a similar manner with liquid hydrogen was somewhat less.

  1. Design and Testing of a Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugby, David C.; Kroliczek, Edward J.; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Ted; Tomlinson, B. J.; Davis, Thomas M.; Baumann, Jane; Cullimore, Brent

    1998-01-01

    This paper details the flight configuration and pre-flight performance test results of the fifth generation cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL-5). This device will fly on STS-95 in October 1998 as part of the CRYOTSU Flight Experiment. This flight represents the first in-space demonstration of a CCPL, a miniaturized two-phase fluid circulator for thermally linking cryogenic cooling sources to remote cryogenic components. CCPL-5 utilizes N2 as the working fluid and has a practical operating range of 75-110 K. Test results indicate that CCPL-5, which weighs about 200 grams, can transport over 10 W of cooling a distance of 0.25 m (or more) with less than a 5 K temperature drop.

  2. Divertor pumping and other reactor application issues for H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Stambaugh, R.D.; Brooks, N.H.; Allen, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    We summarize results from DIII-D in regard to issues for reactor application of H-mode. Recently, DIII-D has begun to operate a cryopump (D{sub 2} pumping speed = 31,000 {ell}/s at a pressure of 2 mTorr). Initial results are very favorable for density control in H-mode. The plasma density could be reduced by 50%. Energy confinement is unchanged so the temperature rises in proportion to the density drop. Ability to access these less collisional plasmas in H-mode is favorable to current drive application. With the all-graphite wall, impurity accumulation has been eliminated. The exceedingly good confinement of VH-mode offers the possibility of retaining good confinement while radiating copious power from the plasma edge using injected noble gas impurities.

  3. Design and Testing of a Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugby, David C.; Kroliczek, Edward J.; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Ted; Tomlinson, B. J.; Davis, Thomas M.; Baumann, Jane; Cullimore, Brent

    1998-01-01

    This paper details the flight configuration and pre-flight performance test results of the fifth generation cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL-5). This device will fly on STS-95 in October 1998 as part of the CRYOTSU Flight Experiment. This flight represents the first in-space demonstration of a CCPL; a miniaturized two-phase fluid circulator for thermally linking cryogenic components. CCPL-5 utilizes N2 as the working fluid and has a practical operating range of 75-110 K. Test results indicate that CCPL-5, which weighs about 200 grams, can transport over 10 W of cooling a distance of 0.25 m (or more) with less than a 5 K temperature drop.

  4. Divertor detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2015-11-01

    The heat exhaust is one of the main conceptual issues of magnetic fusion reactor. In a standard operational regime the large heat flux onto divertor target reaches unacceptable level in any foreseeable reactor design. However, about two decades ago so-called ``detached divertor'' regimes were found. They are characterized by reduced power and plasma flux on divertor targets and look as a promising solution for heat exhaust in future reactors. In particular, it is envisioned that ITER will operate in a partly detached divertor regime. However, even though divertor detachment was studied extensively for two decades, still there are some issues requiring a new look. Among them is the compatibility of detached divertor regime with a good core confinement. For example, ELMy H-mode exhibits a very good core confinement, but large ELMs can ``burn through'' detached divertor and release large amounts of energy on the targets. In addition, detached divertor regimes can be subject to thermal instabilities resulting in the MARFE formation, which, potentially, can cause disruption of the discharge. Finally, often inner and outer divertors detach at different plasma conditions, which can lead to core confinement degradation. Here we discuss basic physics of divertor detachment including different mechanisms of power and momentum loss (ionization, impurity and hydrogen radiation loss, ion-neutral collisions, recombination, and their synergistic effects) and evaluate the roles of different plasma processes in the reduction of the plasma flux; detachment stability; and an impact of ELMs on detachment. We also evaluate an impact of different magnetic and divertor geometries on detachment onset, stability, in- out- asymmetry, and tolerance to the ELMs. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-DE-FG02-04ER54739 at UCSD.

  5. Scrape-off layer and divertor theory meeting: Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-03-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: fluid modeling of neutrals in the SOL and divertor; instabilities of gas-fueled divertors -- theory and adaptive simulations; stability of ionization fronts of gaseous divertor plasmas; monte carlo calculation of heat transport; reduced charge model for edge impurity flows; thermally collapsed solutions for gaseous/radiative divertors; adaptive grid methods in transport simulation; advanced numerical solution algorithms applied to the multispecies edge plasma equations; two-dimensional edge plasma simulation using the multigrid method; neutral behavior and the effects of neutral-neutral and neutral-ion elastic scattering in the ITER gaseous divertor; particle throughput in the TPX divertor; marfes in tokamaks; a comparative study of the limiter and divertor edge plasmas in TEXT-U; issues of toroidal tokamak-type divertor simulators; ASDEX upgrade; the ITER divertor; the D3-D divertor program and TPX divertor; DEGAS 2 -- a transmission/escape probabilities model for neutral particle transport: comparison with DEGAS 2; a collisional radiative model of hydrogen for high recycling divertors; comparison of fluid and non- fluid neutral models in B2.5; D3-D radiative divertor simulations; 3-D fluid simulations of turbulence from conducting wall mode; turbulence and drifts in SOL plasmas; recent results for 1 1/2-D ITER gas target divertor modeling; evaluation of pumping and fueling in coupled core, SOL, and divertor chamber calculations; and ITER gas target divertors -- comparison of volume recombination and large radial transport scenarios using DEGAS.

  6. FINAL REPORT FOR THE DIII-D RADIATIVE DIVERTOR PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    O'NEIL, RC; STAMBAUGH, RD

    2002-06-01

    OAK A271 FINAL REPORT FOR THE DIII-D RADIATIVE DIVERTOR PROJECT. The Radiative Divertor Project originated in 1993 when the DIII-D Five Year Plan for the period 1994--1998 was prepared. The Project Information Sheet described the objective of the project as ''to demonstrate dispersal of divertor power by a factor of then with sufficient diagnostics and modeling to extend the results to ITER and TPX''. Key divertor components identified were: (1) Carbon-carbon and graphite armor tiles; (2) The divertor structure providing a gas baffle and cooling; and (3) The divertor cryopumps to pump fuel and impurities.

  7. Plasma Fueling, Pumping, and Tritium Handling Considerations for FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Gentile, C.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1999-11-13

    Tritium pellet injection will be utilized on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) for efficient tritium fueling and to optimize the density profile for high fusion power. Conventional pneumatic pellet injectors, coupled with a guidetube system to launch pellets into the plasma from the high, field side, low field side, and vertically, will be provided for fueling along with gas puffing for plasma edge density control. About 0.1 g of tritium must be injected during each 10-s pulse. The tritium and deuterium will be exhausted into the divertor. The double null divertor will have 16 cryogenic pumps located near the divertor chamber to provide the required high pumping speed of 200 torr-L/s.

  8. Snowflake divertor configuration studies for NSTX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A

    2011-11-12

    Snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX provide basis for PMI development toward NSTX-Upgrade. Snowflake configuration formation was followed by radiative detachment. Significant reduction of steady-state divertor heat flux observed in snowflake divertor. Impulsive heat loads due to Type I ELMs are partially mitigated in snowflake divertor. Magnetic control of snowflake divertor configuration is being developed. Plasma material interface development is critical for NSTX-U success. Four divertor coils should enable flexibility in boundary shaping and control in NSTX-U. Snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX provide good basis for PMI development in NSTX-Upgrade. FY 2009-2010 snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX: (1) Helped understand control of magnetic properties; (2) Core H-mode confinement unchanged; (3) Core and edge carbon concentration reduced; and (4) Divertor heat flux significantly reduced - (a) Steady-state reduction due to geometry and radiative detachment, (b) Encouraging results for transient heat flux handling, (c) Combined with impurity-seeded radiative divertor. Outlook for snowflake divertor in NSTX-Upgrade: (1) 2D fluid modeling of snowflake divertor properties scaling - (a) Edge and divertor transport, radiation, detachment threshold, (b) Compatibility with cryo-pump and lithium conditioning; (2) Magnetic control development; and (3) PFC development - PFC alignment and PFC material choice.

  9. Neutral recirculation—the key to control of divertor operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. S.; Pacher, H. D.

    2016-12-01

    Interaction of the plasma with neutral gas in the divertor affects virtually all aspects of divertor functionality (power loading of the targets, pumping and fuelling, sustaining the operational conditions of the core plasma). In the course of ITER design development, this interaction has been the subject of intense modelling analysis, supported by experiments on various tokamaks. Neutral gas puffing is found to be the most effective means of divertor control. The results of those studies are summarized and assessed in the paper.

  10. Divertor parameters and divertor operation in ASDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussmann, G.; Ditte, U.; Eckstein, W.; Grave, T.; Keilhacker, M.; McCormick, K.; Murmann, H.; Röhr, H.; Elshaer, M.; Steuer, K.-H.; Szymanski, Z.; Wagner, F.; Becker, G.; Bernhardi, K.; Eberhagen, A.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G. V.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hesse, M.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Kissel, S.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lisitano, G.; Mayer, H. M.; Meisel, D.; Müller, E. R.; Poschenrieder, W.; Ryter, F.; Rapp, H.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Vollmer, O.

    1984-12-01

    Recent measurements of plasma boundary and divertor scrape-off parameters for ohmically and neutral injection heated plasmas are presented. For these data the power flow onto the divertor plates and the sputtering rates at the plates are calculated and compared with separate measurements. The impurity behaviour in front of the plates is also discussed.

  11. Two-chamber model for divertors with plasma recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, W.D.; Singer, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    To model particle and heat-loss terms at the edge of a tokamak with a divertor or pumped limiter, a simple two-chamber formuluation of the scrapeoff has been constructed by integrating the fluid equations, including sources, along open field lines. The model is then solved for a wide range of density and temperature conditions in the scrapeoff, using geometrical parameters typical of the poloidal divertor in the poloidal divertor experiment (PDX). The solutions characterize four divertor operating conditions for beam-heated plasmas: plugged, unplugged, blowthrough, and blowback.

  12. Optimization and testing of the Beck Engineering free-piston cryogenic pump for LNG systems on heavy vehicles. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Douglas S.

    2003-01-10

    Task 7 was completed by reaching Milestone 7: Test free piston cryogenic pump (FPCP) in Integrated LNG System. Task 4: Alternative Pump Design was also completed. The type of performance of the prototype LNG system is consistent with requirements of fuel systems for heavy vehicles; however, the maximum flow capacity of the prototype LNG system is significantly less than the total flow requirement. The flow capacity of the prototype LNG system is determined by a cavitation limit for the FPCP.

  13. Modeling detachment physics in the NSTX snowflake divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, E. T.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B. P.; McLean, A. G.; Podestà, M.; Rognlien, T. D.; Scotti, F.

    2015-08-01

    The snowflake divertor is a proposed technique for coping with the tokamak power exhaust problem in next-step experiments and eventually reactors, where extreme power fluxes to material surfaces represent a leading technological and physics challenge. In lithium-conditioned National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) discharges, application of the snowflake divertor typically induced partial outer divertor detachment and severalfold heat flux reduction. UEDGE is used to analyze and compare conventional and snowflake divertor configurations in NSTX. Matching experimental upstream profiles and divertor measurements in the snowflake requires target recycling of 0.97 vs. 0.91 in the conventional case, implying partial saturation of the lithium-based pumping mechanism. Density scans are performed to analyze the mechanisms that facilitate detachment in the snowflake, revealing that increased divertor volume provides most of the parallel heat flux reduction. Also, neutral gas power loss is magnified by the increased wetted area in the snowflake, and plays a key role in generating volumetric recombination.

  14. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 4: Combined correlations for venturi, hydrofoil, ogives, and pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a series of experimental and analytical cavitation studies are presented. Cross-correlation is performed of the developed cavity data for a venturi, a hydrofoil and three scaled ogives. The new correlating parameter, MTWO, improves data correlation for these stationary bodies and for pumping equipment. Existing techniques for predicting the cavitating performance of pumping machinery were extended to include variations in flow coefficient, cavitation parameter, and equipment geometry. The new predictive formulations hold promise as a design tool and universal method for correlating pumping machinery performance. Application of these predictive formulas requires prescribed cavitation test data or an independent method of estimating the cavitation parameter for each pump. The latter would permit prediction of performance without testing; potential methods for evaluating the cavitation parameter prior to testing are suggested.

  15. Small, high-speed bearing technology for cryogenic turbo-pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, L. W.; Eusepi, M. W.; Smalley, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    The design of 20-mm bore ball bearings is described for cryogenic turbo-machinery applications, operating up to speeds of 120,000 rpm. A special section is included on the design of hybrid bearings. Each hybrid bearing is composed of a ball bearing in series with a conventional pressurized fluid-film journal bearing. Full details are presented on the design of a test vehicle which possesses the capability of testing the above named bearings within the given speed range under externally applied radial and axial loads.

  16. The lithium vapor box divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-02-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  17. Generation of 6.05J nanosecond pulses at a 1Hz repetition rate from a cryogenic cooled diode-pumped Yb:YAG MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaojin; Wang, Jianlei; Yang, Zhongguo; Liu, Jin; Li, Lei; Shi, Xiangchun; Huang, Wenfa; Wang, Jiangfeng; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    Diode-pumped solid state laser system based on cryogenic Yb:YAG active-mirror scheme are presented with recent energy output. With improved optical design, 6.05J/1Hz pulse energy is achieved and a conceptual design with 30J output energy is theoretical simulated. The doubling efficiency of YCa4O (BO3)(YCOB) crystal is also discussed in this paper.

  18. Divertor efficiency in ASDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, W.; Becker, G.; Behringer, K.; Campbell, D.; Eberhagen, A.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gierke, G. V.; Glock, E.; Haas, G.; Huang, M.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; KlÜber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lisitano, G.; Mayer, H.-M.; Meisel, D.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Rapp, H.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Steuer, K.-H.; Venus, G.; Vernickel, H.; Wagner, F.

    1982-12-01

    The divertor efficiency in ASDEX is discussed for ohmically heated plasmas. The parameters of the boundary layer both in the torus midplane and the divertor chamber have been measured. The results are reasonably well understood in terms of parallel and perpendicular transport. A high pressure of neutral hydrogen builds up in the divertor chamber and Franck-Condon particles recycle back through the divertor throat. Due to dissociation processes the boundary plasma is effectively cooled before it reaches the neutralizer plates. The shielding property of the boundary layer against impurity influx is comparable to that of a limiter plasma. The transport of iron is numerically simulated for an iron influx produced by sputtering of charge exchange neutrals at the wall. The results are consistent with the measured iron concentration. First results from a comparison of the poloidal divertor with toroidally closed limiters (stainless steel, carbon) are given. Diverted discharges are considerably cleaner and easier to create.

  19. Design Integration of Liquid Surface Divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R E; Cowgill, D F; Ulrickson, M A; Nelson, B E; Fogarty, P J; Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E; Hassanein, A; Smolentsev, S S; Kotschenreuther, M

    2003-11-13

    The US Enabling Technology Program in fusion is investigating the use of free flowing liquid surfaces facing the plasma. We have been studying the issues in integrating a liquid surface divertor into a configuration based upon an advanced tokamak, specifically the ARIES-RS configuration. The simplest form of such a divertor is to extend the flow of the liquid first wall into the divertor and thereby avoid introducing additional fluid streams. In this case, one can modify the flow above the divertor to enhance thermal mixing. For divertors with flowing liquid metals (or other electrically conductive fluids) MHD (magneto-hydrodynamics) effects are a major concern and can produce forces that redirect flow and suppress turbulence. An evaluation of Flibe (a molten salt) as a working fluid was done to assess a case in which the MHD forces could be largely neglected. Initial studies indicate that, for a tokamak with high power density, an integrated Flibe first wall and divertor does not seem workable. We have continued work with molten salts and replaced Flibe with Flinabe, a mixture of lithium and sodium fluorides, that has some potential because of its lower melting temperature. Sn and Sn-Li have also been considered, and the initial evaluations on heat removal with minimal plasma contamination show promise, although the complicated 3-D MHD flows cannot yet be fully modeled. Particle pumping in these design concepts is accomplished by conventional means (ports and pumps). However, trapping of hydrogen in these flowing liquids seems plausible and novel concepts for entrapping helium are also being studied.

  20. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 to 80 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Shannon; Gausa, Michael; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 80 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on two sounding rockets to the mesosphere. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void behind (relative to the direction of motion) an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed forward of an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened during flight to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region behind it. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ∼80 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  1. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 - 75 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, S.; Gausa, M. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 75 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on the two sounding rockets of the CHAMPS (CHarge And mass of Meteoritic smoke ParticleS) rocket campaign which were launched into the mesosphere in October 2011 from Andøya Rocket Range, Norway. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void beneath an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed above an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened on the downleg to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region below. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ~75 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  2. Two-chamber model for divertors with plasma recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, W.D.; Singer, C.E.

    1984-11-01

    To model particle and heat loss terms at the edge of a tokamak with a divertor or pumped limiter, a simple two-chamber formulation of the scrapeoff has been constructed by integrating the fluid equations, including sources, along open field lines. The model is then solved for a wide range of density and temperature conditions in the scrapeoff, using geometrical parameters typical of the PDX poloidal divertor. The solutions characterize four divertor operating conditions for beam-heated plasmas: plugged, unplugged, blowthrough, and blowback.

  3. Cryogenic Ho:CaF2 laser pumped by Tm:fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Michal; Kubeček, Václav; Ma, Weiwei; Zhao, Beibei; Jiang, Dapeng; Su, Liangbi

    2016-06-01

    The laser operation in the pulsed as well as continuous-wave regime of a modified-Bridgeman-grown 0.5 at.% Ho:CaF2 crystal at 83 K pumped by a Tm:fiber laser is reported. The maximum output power was 2.37 W at 2060 nm or 1.3 W at 2110 and 2130 nm. Continuous tuning range over 90 nm from 2030 to 2120 nm was achieved using a birefringent filter. The Ho:CaF2 fundamental spectroscopic properties as absorption and fluorescence spectra at 83 and 293 K are also presented.

  4. NSTX Tangential Divertor Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Roquemore; Ted Biewer; D. Johnson; S.J. Zweben; Nobuhiro Nishino; V.A. Soukhanovskii

    2004-07-16

    Strong magnetic field shear around the divertor x-point is numerically predicted to lead to strong spatial asymmetries in turbulence driven particle fluxes. To visualize the turbulence and associated impurity line emission near the lower x-point region, a new tangential observation port has been recently installed on NSTX. A reentrant sapphire window with a moveable in-vessel mirror images the divertor region from the center stack out to R 80 cm and views the x-point for most plasma configurations. A coherent fiber optic bundle transmits the image through a remotely selected filter to a fast camera, for example a 40500 frames/sec Photron CCD camera. A gas puffer located in the lower inboard divertor will localize the turbulence in the region near the x-point. Edge fluid and turbulent codes UEDGE and BOUT will be used to interpret impurity and deuterium emission fluctuation measurements in the divertor.

  5. Spectroscopy of divertor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Isler, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    The requirements for divertor spectroscopy are treated with respect to instrumentation and observations on present machines. Emphasis is placed on quantitative measurements.of impurity concentrations from the interpretation of spectral line intensities. The possible influence of non-Maxwellian electron distributions on spectral line excitation in the divertor is discussed. Finally the use of spectroscopy for determining plasma temperature, density, and flows is examined.

  6. Performance of the INTOR poloidal divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.E.; Petravic, M.; Schmidt, J.A.; Heifetz, D.

    1981-10-01

    The next generation of large tokamak experiments is expected to have large particle and heat outfluxes (approx. 10/sup 23/ particles/sec and 80 MW). These outfluxes must be controlled to provide adequate pumping of the helium ash and to minimize the sputtering erosion of the vacuum vessel walls, limiters, and neutralizer plates. A poloidal divertor design to solve these problems for INTOR has been done using a two-dimensional code which models the plasma as a fluid and solves equations for the flow of particles, momentum and energy, and calculates the neutral gas transport with Monte-Carlo techniques. These calculations show that there is a regime of operation where the density in the divertor is high and the temperature is low, thus easing the heat load and erosion problems. The neutral pressure at the plate is high, resulting in high gas throughputs, with modest pumping speeds.

  7. Divertor design for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.N.; Braams, B.; Brooks, J.N.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the present divertor design for the planned TPX tokamak, which will explore the physics and technology of steady-state (1000s pulses) heat and particle removal in high confinement (2--4{times} L-mode), high beta ({beta}{sub N} {ge} 3) divertor plasmas sustained by non-inductive current drive. The TPX device will operate in the double-null divertor configuration, with actively cooled graphite targets forming a deep (0.5 m) slot at the outer strike point. The peak heat flux on, the highly tilted (74{degrees} from normal) re-entrant (to recycle ions back toward the separatrix) will be in the range of 4--6 MW/m{sup 2} with 18 MW of neutral beams and RF heating power. The combination of active pumping and gas puffing (deuterium plus impurities), along with higher heating power (45 MW maximum) will allow testing of radiative divertor concepts at ITER-like power densities.

  8. 550 mJ Q-switched cryogenic Ho:YLF oscillator pumped with a 100 W Tm:fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Fonnum, Helge; Lippert, Espen; Haakestad, Magnus W

    2013-06-01

    We report 550 mJ pulses with 14 ns FWHM duration at 1 Hz repetition rate from a Q-switched cryogenic Ho:YLF oscillator pumped with 100 W in 35 ms by a Tm:fiber laser. The laser has a confocal unstable resonator with a graded-reflectance output coupler, resulting in a beam quality of M(2) = 1.5. Pulse energies of 416 and 343 mJ were obtained at 10 and 20 Hz repetition rate, respectively. PMID:23722777

  9. Status of National Spherical Torus Experiment Liquid Lithium Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugel, H. W.; Viola, M.; Ellis, R.; Bell, M.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Roquemore, A. L.; Schneider, H.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Nygren, R. E.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.

    2009-11-01

    Recent NSTX high power divertor experiments have shown significant and recurring benefits of solid lithium coatings on plasma facing components to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. The next step in this work is the 2009 installation of a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD). The 20 cm wide LLD located on the lower outer divertor, consists of four, 80 degree sections; each section is separated by a row of graphite diagnostic tiles. The temperature controlled LLD structure consists of a 0.01cm layer of vacuum flame-sprayed, 50 percent porous molybdenum, on top of 0.02 cm, 316-SS brazed to a 1.9 cm Cu base. The physics design of the LLD encompasses the desired plasma requirements, the experimental capabilities and conditions, power handling, radial location, pumping capability, operating temperature, lithium filling, MHD forces, and diagnostics for control and characterization.

  10. The snowflake divertor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryutov, D. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2015-11-17

    The snowflake magnetic configuration is characterized by the presence of two closely spaced poloidal field nulls that create a characteristic hexagonal (reminiscent of a snowflake) separatrix structure. The magnetic field properties and the plasma behaviour in the snowflake are determined by the simultaneous action of both nulls, this generating a lot of interesting physics, as well as providing a chance for improving divertor performance. One of the most interesting effects of the snowflake geometry is the heat flux sharing between multiple divertor channels. The authors summarise experimental results obtained with the snowflake configuration on several tokamaks. Wherever possible, relation tomore » the existing theoretical models is described. Divertor concepts utilizing the properties of a snowflake configuration are briefly discussed.« less

  11. The snowflake divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2015-11-17

    The snowflake magnetic configuration is characterized by the presence of two closely spaced poloidal field nulls that create a characteristic hexagonal (reminiscent of a snowflake) separatrix structure. The magnetic field properties and the plasma behaviour in the snowflake are determined by the simultaneous action of both nulls, this generating a lot of interesting physics, as well as providing a chance for improving divertor performance. One of the most interesting effects of the snowflake geometry is the heat flux sharing between multiple divertor channels. The authors summarise experimental results obtained with the snowflake configuration on several tokamaks. Wherever possible, relation to the existing theoretical models is described. Divertor concepts utilizing the properties of a snowflake configuration are briefly discussed.

  12. Divertor bias experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, G. M.

    1994-06-01

    Electrical biasing of the divertor target plates has recently been implemented on several tokamaks. The results of these experiments to date will be reviewed in this paper. The bias electrode configuration is unique in each experiment. The effects of biasing on the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma also differ. By comparing results between machines, and using theoretical models, an understanding of the basic physics of biasing begins to emerge. Divertor biasing has been demonstrated to have a strong influence on the particle and energy transport within the SOL. The ability to externally control the SOL plasma with biasing has promising applications to future tokamak reactors.

  13. Electron beam facility for divertor target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, A.; Gagen-Torn, V.; Giniyatulin, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    To test different concepts of divertor targets and bumpers an electron beam facility was assembled in Efremov Institute. It consists of a vacuum chamber (3m{sup 3}), vacuum pump, electron beam gun, manipulator to place and remove the samples, water loop and liquid metal loop. The following diagnostics of mock-ups is stipulated: (1) temperature distribution on the mock-up working surface (scanning pyrometer and infra-red imager); (2) temperature distribution over mocked-up thickness in 3 typical cross-sections (thermo-couples); (3) cracking dynamics during thermal cycling (acoustic-emission method), (4) defects in the mock-up before and after tests (ultra-sonic diagnostics, electron and optical microscopes). Carbon-based and beryllium mock-ups are made for experimental feasibility study of water and liquid-metal-cooled divertor/bumper concepts.

  14. Tokamak divertor maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punjabi, Alkesh; Verma, Arun; Boozer, Allen

    1994-08-01

    A mapping method is developed to investigate the problem of determination and control of heat-deposition patterns on the plates of a tokamak divertor. The deposition pattern is largely determined by the magnetic field lines, which are mathematically equivalent to the trajectories of a single-degree-of-freedom time-dependent Hamiltonian system. Maps are natural tools to study the generic features of such systems. The general theory of maps is presented, and methods for incorporating various features of the magnetic field and particle motion in divertor tokamaks are given. Features of the magnetic field include the profile of the rotational transform, single- versus double-null divertor, reverse map, the effects of naturally occurring low M and N, and externally imposed high-M, high-N perturbations. Particle motion includes radial diffusion, pitch angle and energy scattering, and the electric sheath at the plate. The method is illustrated by calculating the stochastic broadening in a single- null divertor tokamak. Maps provide an efficient, economic and elegant method to study the problem of motion of plasma particles in the stochastic scrape-off layer.

  15. Recursive approach of EEG-segment-based principal component analysis substantially reduces cryogenic pump artifacts in simultaneous EEG-fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Lee, Jong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) data simultaneously acquired with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data are preprocessed to remove gradient artifacts (GAs) and ballistocardiographic artifacts (BCAs). Nonetheless, these data, especially in the gamma frequency range, can be contaminated by residual artifacts produced by mechanical vibrations in the MRI system, in particular the cryogenic pump that compresses and transports the helium that chills the magnet (the helium-pump). However, few options are available for the removal of helium-pump artifacts. In this study, we propose a recursive approach of EEG-segment-based principal component analysis (rsPCA) that enables the removal of these helium-pump artifacts. Using the rsPCA method, feature vectors representing helium-pump artifacts were successfully extracted as eigenvectors, and the reconstructed signals of the feature vectors were subsequently removed. A test using simultaneous EEG-fMRI data acquired from left-hand (LH) and right-hand (RH) clenching tasks performed by volunteers found that the proposed rsPCA method substantially reduced helium-pump artifacts in the EEG data and significantly enhanced task-related gamma band activity levels (p=0.0038 and 0.0363 for LH and RH tasks, respectively) in EEG data that have had GAs and BCAs removed. The spatial patterns of the fMRI data were estimated using a hemodynamic response function (HRF) modeled from the estimated gamma band activity in a general linear model (GLM) framework. Active voxel clusters were identified in the post-/pre-central gyri of motor area, only from the rsPCA method (uncorrected p<0.001 for both LH/RH tasks). In addition, the superior temporal pole areas were consistently observed (uncorrected p<0.001 for the LH task and uncorrected p<0.05 for the RH task) in the spatial patterns of the HRF model for gamma band activity when the task paradigm and movement were also included in the GLM.

  16. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  17. Divertor plasma detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Pshenov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Regime with the plasma detached from the divertor targets (detached divertor regime) is a natural continuation of the high recycling conditions to higher density and stronger impurity radiation loss. Both the theoretical considerations and experimental data show clearly that the increase of the impurity radiation loss and volumetric plasma recombination causes the rollover of the plasma flux to the target when the density increases, which is the manifestation of detachment. Plasma-neutral friction (neutral viscosity effects), although important for the sustainment of high density/pressure plasma upstream and providing the conditions for efficient recombination and power loss, is not directly involved in the reduction of the plasma flux to the targets. The stability of detachment is also discussed.

  18. The snowflake divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2015-11-15

    The snowflake magnetic configuration is characterized by the presence of two closely spaced poloidal field nulls that create a characteristic hexagonal (reminiscent of a snowflake) separatrix structure. The magnetic field properties and the plasma behaviour in the snowflake are determined by the simultaneous action of both nulls, this generating a lot of interesting physics, as well as providing a chance for improving divertor performance. Among potential beneficial effects of this geometry are: increased volume of a low poloidal field around the null, increased connection length, and the heat flux sharing between multiple divertor channels. The authors summarise experimental results obtained with the snowflake configuration on several tokamaks. Wherever possible, relation to the existing theoretical models is described.

  19. Performance characteristics of the DIII-D advanced divertor cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Maingi, R.; Wade, M.R.; Baxi, C.B.; Campbell, G.L.; Holtrop, K.L.; Hyatt, A.W.; Laughon, G.J.; Makariou, C.C.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Reis, E.E.; Schaffer, M.J.; Schaubel, K.M.; Scoville, J.T.; Smith, J.P.; Stambaugh, R.D.

    1993-10-01

    A cryocondensation pump, cooled by forced flow of two-phase helium, has been installed for particle exhaust from the divertor region of the DIII-D tokamak. The Inconel pumping surface is of coaxial geometry, 25.4 mm in outer diameter and 11.65 m in length. Because of the tokamak environment, the pump is designed to perform under relatively high pulsed heat loads (300 Wm{sup {minus}2}). Results of measurements made on the pumping characteristics for D{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and Ar are discussed.

  20. Transport and divertor properties of the dynamic ergodic divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnen, M.; Abdullaev, S.; Biel, W.; de Bock, M. F. M.; Brezinsek, S.; Busch, C.; Classen, I.; Finken, K. H.; von Hellermann, M.; Jachmich, S.; Jakubowski, M.; Jaspers, R.; Koslowski, H. R.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Kikuchi, Y.; Liang, Y.; Nicolai, A.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Van Rompuy, T.; Samm, U.; Schmitz, O.; Sergienko, G.; Unterberg, B.; Wolf, R.; Zimmermann, O.; TEXTOR Team

    2005-12-01

    The concept of the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) is based on plasma edge ergodization by a resonant perturbation. Such a divertor concept is closely related to helical or island divertors in stellerators. The base mode of the DED perturbation field can be m/n = 12/4, 6/2 or 3/1. The 3/1 base mode with its deep penetration of the perturbation field provides the excitation of tearing modes. This topic was presented elsewhere. In this contribution we concentrate on the divertor properties of the DED. We report on the characterization of the topology, transport properties in ergodic fields, impurity transport and density limit behaviour. The 12/4 base where the perturbation is restricted to the plasma edge is suitable for divertor operation. With increasing perturbation field island chains are built up at the resonance layers. Overlapping islands lead to ergodization. The plasma is guided in the laminar region via open field lines of short connection length to the divertor target. The magnetic topology is not only controlled by the coil current but especially by the edge safety factor. For appropriate edge safety factor we observe a strong temperature drop in the plasma edge, indicating an expansion of the laminar region, which is necessary to decouple the divertor plasma from the core plasma. The modifications of the magnetic topology can be directly seen, for example, from carbon emission lines. The magnetic structure is calculated by the ATLAS code and shows good agreement with the experimental findings.

  1. Status of poloidal divertor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdavi, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The poloidal divertor was originally proposed as a means of impurity control and helium ash removal. Some variations of the concept were also proposed to achieve radiative cooling of the boundary plasma. The discovery of a regime of improved confinement in beam-heated diverted plasmas has further increased the potential value of this concept for tokamak reactors. This paper reviews the poloidal divertor experiments in ASDEX, Doublet III, and PDX and reviews the status of divertor theory and some aspects of the next-generation experiments.

  2. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  3. Turbopumps for cryogenic upper stage engines. [fabrication and evaluation of turbine pumps for liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachary, A. T.; Csomor, A.; Tignac, L. L.

    1973-01-01

    Small, high-performance LO2 and LH2 turbopump assembly configurations were selected, detail designs were prepared and two of each unit were fabricated with each unit consisting of pump, turbine gas generator, and appropriate controls. Following fabrication, development testing was conducted on each type to demonstrate performance, durability, transient characteristics, and heat transfer under simulated altitude conditions. Following successful completion of development effort, the two LO2 turbopump units and one LH2 turbopump unit were acceptance tested as specified. Inspection of the units following development testing revealed no deleterious effects of testing. The test results of LO2 turbopump assembly testing correlated well with predicted performance while the LH2 turbopump test results, though generally consistent with predicted values, did show lower than anticipated developed head at the design point and in the high flow range of operation.

  4. L-H power threshold studies with tungsten/carbon divertor on the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Xu, G. S.; Gao, W.; Zhang, L.; Nielsen, A. H.; Luo, Z. P.; Si, H.; Wang, Y. M.; Qu, H.; Sun, Z.; Duan, Y. M.; Liu, H. Q.; Wang, S. X.; Li, M. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Wu, B.; Chen, R.; Wang, L.; Wang, H. Q.; Ding, S. Y.; Yan, N.; Liu, S. C.; Shao, L. M.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. L.; Wu, X. Q.; Zhao, N.; Jia, M. N.

    2016-05-01

    The power threshold for low (L) to high (H) confinement mode transition achieved by radio-frequency heating and molybdenum first wall with lithium coating has been experimentally investigated on the EAST tokamak for two sets of divertor geometries and materials: tungsten/carbon divertor and full carbon divertor. For both sets of divertors, the power threshold was found to decrease with gradual accumulation of the lithium wall coating, suggesting the important role played by the low Z impurities and/or the edge neutral density on the L-H power threshold. When operating in the upper single null configuration, with the ion grad-B drift direction away from the primary X-point, a lower normalized power threshold is observed in EAST with the tungsten/carbon divertor, compared to the carbon divertor after intensive lithium wall coating. A newly installed cryopump increasing the pumping efficiency also plays an important part in the observed lower threshold. In addition, the H-mode in the Quasi-Snowflake divertor configuration has been obtained on EAST, exhibiting higher L-H power threshold compared to the lower single null configuration with similar IP/BT pairs.

  5. Design of a diagnostic residual gas analyzer for the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Biewer, T. M.; Graves, Van B; Andrew, P.; Marcus, Chris; Shimada, M.; Hughes, S.; Boussier, B.; Johnson, D. W.; Gardner, W. L.; Hillis, D. L.; Vayakis, G.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the ITER diagnostics having reached an advanced design stage is a diagnostic RGA for the divertor, i.e. residual gas analysis system for the ITER divertor, which is intended to sample the divertor pumping duct region during the plasma pulse and to have a response time compatible with plasma particle and impurity lifetimes in the divertor region. Main emphasis is placed on helium (He) concentration in the ducts, as well as the relative concentration between the hydrogen isotopes (H2, D2, T2). Measurement of the concentration of radiative gases, such as neon (Ne) and nitrogen (N2), is also intended. Numerical modeling of the gas flow from the sampled region to the cluster of analysis sensors, through a long (~8m long, ~110mm diameter) sampling pipe terminating in a pressure reducing orifice, confirm that the desired response time (~1s for He or D2) is achieved with the present design.

  6. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  7. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Volume 33 - Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Saint Charles, IL, June 14-18, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, R. W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on superconductivity applications including magnets, electronics, rectifiers, magnet stability, coil protection, and cryogenic techniques. Also considered are insulation, heat transfer to liquid helium and nitrogen, heat and mass transfer in He II, superfluid pumps, and refrigeration for superconducting systems. Other topics include cold compressors, refrigeration and liquefaction, magnetic refrigeration, and refrigeration for space applications. Papers are also presented on cryogenic applications, commercial cryogenic plants, the properties of cryogenic fluids, and cryogenic instrumentation and data acquisition.

  8. Impurity Transport in a Simulated Gas Target Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blush, L. M.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Whyte, D.; Conn, R. W.; Schmitz, L.

    1997-11-01

    Previous simulated gas target divertor experiments in the PISCES-A linear plasma device (n <= 3 × 10^19 m-3, kTe <= 20 eV) indicated enhanced impurity retention near the target in comparison to a high recycling divertor regime. A 1 1\\over2-D fluid modeling code suggested that impurities are impeded from transporting away from the target by friction with the neutral and ionized hydrogen. In recent experiments with a PISCES-A ``slot-type'' divertor configuration, we have implemented a spectroscopic detection system to measure the axial density profiles of several impurity charge states. Moreover, we envision adding two extended cylindrical baffles spanning a pumped vacuum section to achieve strong differential pumping. This arrangement will isolate the plasma source from the gas target region and allow us to seed the background hydrogen plasma with higher impurities concentrations and investigate a regime dominated by impurity radiation. In preliminary design experiments, PISCES-A was successfully operated with an electrically isolated, copper baffle (d=5 cm, l=33.5 cm) mounted to reduce the vacuum conductance between the source and target regions. This work supported by US-DoE contract DE-FG03-95ER-54301.

  9. Advanced divertor configurations with large flux expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaye, S.; Kolemen, E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; McLean, A.; Menard, J. E.; Paul, S. F.; Podesta, M.; Raman, R.; Ryutov, D. D.; Scotti, F.; Kaita, R.; Maingi, R.; Mueller, D. M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Reimerdes, H.; Canal, G. P.; Labit, B.; Vijvers, W.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Morgan, T.; Zielinski, J.; De Temmerman, G.; Tal, B.

    2013-07-01

    Experimental studies of the novel snowflake divertor concept (D. Ryutov, Phys. Plasmas 14 (2007) 064502) performed in the NSTX and TCV tokamaks are reviewed in this paper. The snowflake divertor enables power sharing between divertor strike points, as well as the divertor plasma-wetted area, effective connection length and divertor volumetric power loss to increase beyond those in the standard divertor, potentially reducing heat flux and plasma temperature at the target. It also enables higher magnetic shear inside the separatrix, potentially affecting pedestal MHD stability. Experimental results from NSTX and TCV confirm the predicted properties of the snowflake divertor. In the NSTX, a large spherical tokamak with a compact divertor and lithium-coated graphite plasma-facing components (PFCs), the snowflake divertor operation led to reduced core and pedestal impurity concentration, as well as re-appearance of Type I ELMs that were suppressed in standard divertor H-mode discharges. In the divertor, an otherwise inaccessible partial detachment of the outer strike point with an up to 50% increase in divertor radiation and a peak divertor heat flux reduction from 3-7 MW/m2 to 0.5-1 MW/m2 was achieved. Impulsive heat fluxes due to Type-I ELMs were significantly dissipated in the high magnetic flux expansion region. In the TCV, a medium-size tokamak with graphite PFCs, several advantageous snowflake divertor features (cf. the standard divertor) have been demonstrated: an unchanged L-H power threshold, enhanced stability of the peeling-ballooning modes in the pedestal region (and generally an extended second stability region), as well as an H-mode pedestal regime with reduced (×2-3) Type I ELM frequency and slightly increased (20-30%) normalized ELM energy, resulting in a favorable average energy loss comparison to the standard divertor. In the divertor, ELM power partitioning between snowflake divertor strike points was demonstrated. The NSTX and TCV experiments are

  10. Divertor plasma conditions and neutral dynamics in horizontal and vertical divertor configurations in JET-ILW low confinement mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Belo, P.; Brix, M.; Calabro, G.; Chankin, A.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Corrigan, G.; Drewelow, P.; Guillemaut, C.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Järvinen, A.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K. D.; Lehnen, M.; Maggi, C. F.; Marchetto, C.; Marsen, S.; Maviglia, F.; Meigs, A. G.; Moulton, D.; Silva, C.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of the plasma conditions at the low field side target plate in JET ITER-like wall ohmic and low confinement mode plasmas show minor differences in divertor plasma configurations with horizontally and vertically inclined targets. Both the reduction of the electron temperature in the vicinity of the strike points and the rollover of the ion current to the plates follow the same functional dependence on the density at the low field side midplane. Configurations with vertically inclined target plates, however, produce twice as high sub-divertor pressures for the same upstream density. Simulations with the EDGE2D-EIRENE code package predict significantly lower plasma temperatures at the low field side target in vertical than in horizontal target configurations. Including cross-field drifts and imposing a pumping by-pass leak at the low-field side plate can still not recover the experimental observations.

  11. ADX: A high Power Density, Advanced RF-Driven Divertor Test Tokamak for PMI studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, Dennis; ADX Team

    2015-11-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment, ADX; a divertor test tokamak dedicated to address critical gaps in plasma-material interactions (PMI) science, and the world fusion research program, on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. Basic ADX design features are motivated and discussed. In order to assess the widest range of advanced divertor concepts, a large fraction (>50%) of the toroidal field volume is purpose-built with innovative magnetic topology control and flexibility for assessing different surfaces, including liquids. ADX features high B-field (>6 Tesla) and high global power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) in order to access the full range of parallel heat flux and divertor plasma pressures foreseen for reactors, while simultaneously assessing the effect of highly dissipative divertors on core plasma/pedestal. Various options for efficiently achieving high field are being assessed including the use of Alcator technology (cryogenic cooled copper) and high-temperature superconductors. The experimental platform would also explore advanced lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron range of frequency actuators located at the high-field side; a location which is predicted to greatly reduce the PMI effects on the launcher while minimally perturbing the core plasma. The synergistic effects of high-field launchers with high total B on current and flow drive can thus be studied in reactor-relevant boundary plasmas.

  12. The edge plasma and divertor in TIBER

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, W.L.

    1987-10-16

    An open divertor configuration has been adopted for TIBER. Most recent designs, including DIII-D, NET and CIT use open configurations and rely on a dense edge plasma to shield the plasma from the gas produced at the neutralizer plate. Experiments on ASDEX, PDX, D-III, and recently on DIII-D have shown that a dense edge plasma can be produced by re-ionizing most of the gas produced at the plate. This high recycling mode allows a large flux of particles to carry the heat to the plate, so that the mean energy per particle can be low. Erosion of the plate can be greatly reduced if the average impact energy of the ions at the plate can be reduced to near or below the threshold for sputtering of the plate material. The present configuration allows part of the flux of edge plasma ions to be neutralized at the entrance to the pumping duct so that helium is pumped as well as hydrogen. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  14. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Henn, T; Kiessling, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

    2013-12-01

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast "white light" supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  15. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Henn, T.; Kiessling, T. Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Biermann, K.; Santos, P. V.

    2013-12-15

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast “white light” supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  16. Recent Progress in the NSTX/NSTX-U Lithium Program and Prospects for Reactor-Relevant Liquid-Lithium Based Divertor Development

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono, et al.

    2012-10-27

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor has been identified as a particularly challenging technology problem for magnetic confinement fusion. While tungsten has been identified as the most attractive solid divertor material, the NSTX/NSTX-U lithium (Li) program is investigating the viability of liquid lithium (LL) as a potential reactor compatible divertor plasma facing component (PFC) . In the near term, operation in NSTX-U is projected to provide reactor-like divertor heat loads < 40 MW/m^2 for 5 s. During the most recent NSTX campaign, ~ 0.85 kg of Li was evaporated onto the NSTX PFCs where a ~50% reduction in heat load on the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) was observed, attributable to enhanced divertor bolometric radiation. This reduced divertor heat flux through radiation observed in the NSTX LLD experiment is consistent with the results from other lithium experiments and calculations. These results motivate an LL-based closed radiative divertor concept proposed here for NSTX-U and fusion reactors. With an LL coating, the Li is evaporated from the divertor strike point surface due to the intense heat. The evaporated Li is readily ionized by the plasma due to its low ionization energies, and the ionized Li ions can radiate strongly, resulting in a significant reduction in the divertor heat flux. Due to the rapid plasma transport in divertor plasma, the radiation values can be significantly enhanced up to ~ 11 MJ/cc of LL. This radiative process has the desired function of spreading the focused divertor heat load to the entire divertor chamber facilitating the divertor heat removal. The LL divertor surface can also provide a "sacrificial" surface to protect the substrate solid material from transient high heat flux such as the ones caused by the ELMs. The closed radiative LLD concept has the advantages of providing some degree of partition in terms of plasma disruption forces on the LL, Li particle divertor retention, and strong divertor pumping action from the

  17. Pump for Saturated Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Boiling liquids pumped by device based on proven components. Expanding saturated liquid in nozzle and diverting its phases along separate paths in liquid/vapor separator raises pressure of liquid. Liquid cooled in process. Pump makes it unnecessary to pressurize cryogenic liquids in order to pump them. Problems of introducing noncondensable pressurizing gas avoided.

  18. Current convective instability in detached divertor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    The asymmetry of inner and outer divertors, which cause the inner divertor to detach first, while the outer one is still attached, results in the large temperature difference between the vicinities of inner and outer targets and the onset of large electric potential drop through detached plasma of the inner divertor. A large potential drop along with the inhomogeneity of the resistivity of detached plasma across the divertor leg drives the current convective instability in the inner divertor and subsequent fluctuations of radiation loss similar to that observed in experiments. The estimates of the frequency of plasma parameter fluctuations due to the current convective instability are in a reasonable agreement with experimental data. Once the outer divertor also detaches, the temperature difference between the vicinities of inner and outer targets disappears, and the driving force for the current convective instability, and resulting oscillations of radiation loss, vanishes. This feature is indeed observed in experiments.

  19. Divertor scenario development for NSTX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; McLean, A. G.; Meier, E. T.; Rognlien, T. D.; Ryutov, D. D.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kaita, R.; Kolemen, E.; Leblanc, B. P.; Menard, J. E.; Podesta, M.; Scotti, F.

    2012-10-01

    In the NSTX-U tokamak, initial plans for divertor plasma-facing components (PFCs) include lithium and boron coated graphite, with a staged transition to molybdenum. Steady-state peak divertor heat fluxes are projected to reach 20-30 MW/m^2 in 2 MA, 12 MW NBI-heated discharges of up to 5 s duration, thus challenging PFC thermal limits. Based on the recent NSTX divertor experiments and modeling with edge transport code UEDGE, a favorable basis for divertor power handling in NSTX-U is developed. The snowflake divertor geometry and feedback-controlled divertor impurity seeding applied to the lower and upper divertors are presently envisioned. In the NSTX snowflake experiments with lithium-coated graphite PFCs, the peak divertor heat fluxes from Type I ELMs and between ELMs were significantly reduced due to geometry effects, increased volumetric losses and null-point convective redistribution between strike points. H-mode core confinement was maintained at H98(y,2)<=1 albeit the radiative detachment. Additional CD4 seeding demonstrated potential for a further increase of divertor radiation.

  20. Crossed-field divertor for a plasma device

    DOEpatents

    Kerst, Donald W.; Strait, Edward J.

    1981-01-01

    A divertor for removal of unwanted materials from the interior of a magnetic plasma confinement device includes the division of the wall of the device into segments insulated from each other in order to apply an electric field having a component perpendicular to the confining magnetic field. The resulting crossed-field drift causes electrically charged particles to be removed from the outer part of the confinement chamber to a pumping chamber. This method moves the particles quickly past the saddle point in the poloidal magnetic field where they would otherwise tend to stall, and provides external control over the rate of removal by controlling the magnitude of the electric field.

  1. Recent progress in the NSTX/NSTX-U lithium programme and prospects for reactor-relevant liquid-lithium based divertor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H. W.; Ahn, J.-W.; Allain, J. P.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Clayton, D. J.; Canik, J. M.; Ding, S.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hirooka, Y.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; Kumar, D.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; McLean, A.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nygren, R.; Paul, S.; Podesta, M.; Raman, R.; Ren, Y.; Sabbagh, S.; Scotti, F.; Skinner, C. H.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Surla, V.; Taylor, C. N.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L. E.; the NSTX Research Team

    2013-11-01

    Developing a reactor-compatible divertor has been identified as a particularly challenging technology problem for magnetic confinement fusion. Application of lithium (Li) in NSTX resulted in improved H-mode confinement, H-mode power threshold reduction, and other plasma performance benefits. During the 2010 NSTX campaign, application of a relatively modest amount of Li (300 mg prior to the discharge) resulted in a ˜50% reduction in heat load on the liquid lithium divertor (LLD) attributable to enhanced divertor bolometric radiation. These promising Li results in NSTX and related modelling calculations motivated the radiative LLD concept proposed here. Li is evaporated from the liquid lithium (LL) coated divertor strike-point surface due to the intense heat flux. The evaporated Li is readily ionized by the plasma due to its low ionization energy, and the poor Li particle confinement near the divertor plate enables ionized Li ions to radiate strongly, resulting in a significant reduction in the divertor heat flux. This radiative process has the desired effect of spreading the localized divertor heat load to the rest of the divertor chamber wall surfaces, facilitating the divertor heat removal. The LL coating of divertor surfaces can also provide a ‘sacrificial’ protective layer to protect the substrate solid material from transient high heat flux such as the ones caused by the edge localized modes. By operating at lower temperature than the first wall, the LL covered large divertor chamber wall surfaces can serve as an effective particle pump for the entire reactor chamber, as impurities generally migrate towards lower temperature LL divertor surfaces. To maintain the LL purity, a closed LL loop system with a modest circulating capacity (e.g., ˜1 l s-1 for ˜1% level ‘impurities’) is envisioned for a steady-state 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant.

  2. Effect of Divertor Shaping on Divertor Plasma Behavior on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, T. W.; Leonard, A. W.; Luce, T. C.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Holcomb, C. T.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hill, D. N.; Lasnier, C. J.; Watkins, J. G.; Moyer, R. A.; Stangeby, P. C.

    2012-10-01

    Recent experiments examined the dependence of divertor density (nTAR), temperature (TTAR), and heat flux at the outer divertor separatrix target on changes in the divertor separatrix geometry. The responses of nTAR and TTAR to changes in the parallel connection length in the scrape-off layer (SOL) (L||) are consistent with the predictions of the Two Point Model (TPM). However, nTAR and TTAR display a more complex response to changes in the radial location of the outer divertor strike point (RTAR) than expected based on the TPM. SOLPS transport analysis indicates that small differences in divertor geometry can change neutral trapping sufficient to explain differences between experiment and TPM predictions. The response of the core and divertor plasmas to changes in L|| and RTAR, under both radiating and non-radiating divertor conditions, will be shown.

  3. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  4. Optimization of a bundle divertor for FED

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Rothe, K.E.; Minkoff, M.

    1982-01-01

    Optimal double-T bundle divertor configurations have been obtained for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED). On-axis ripple is minimized, while satisfying a series of engineering constraints. The ensuing non-linear optimization problem is solved via a sequence of quadratic programming subproblems, using the VMCON algorithm. The resulting divertor designs are substantially improved over previous configurations.

  5. Evaluating Stellarator Divertor Designs with EMC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Aaron; Anderson, D. T.; Feng, Y.; Hegna, C. C.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper various improvements of stellarator divertor design are explored. Next step stellarator devices require innovative divertor solutions to handle heat flux loads and impurity control. One avenue is to enhance magnetic flux expansion near strike points, somewhat akin to the X-Divertor concept in Tokamaks. The effect of judiciously placed external coils on flux deposition is calculated for configurations based on the HSX stellarator. In addition, we attempt to optimize divertor plate location to facilitate the external coil placement. Alternate areas of focus involve altering edge island size to elucidate the driving physics in the edge. The 3-D nature of stellarators complicates design and necessitates analysis of new divertor structures with appropriate simulation tools. We evaluate the various configurations with the coupled codes EMC3-EIRENE, allowing us to benchmark configurations based on target heat flux, impurity behavior, radiated power, and transitions to high recycling and detached regimes. Work supported by DOE-SC0006103.

  6. Rapidly Moving Divertor Plates In A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zweben

    2011-05-16

    It may be possible to replace conventional actively cooled tokamak divertor plates with a set of rapidly moving, passively cooled divertor plates on rails. These plates would absorb the plasma heat flux with their thermal inertia for ~10-30 sec, and would then be removed from the vessel for processing. When outside the tokamak, these plates could be cooled, cleaned, recoated, inspected, and then returned to the vessel in an automated loop. This scheme could provide nearoptimal divertor surfaces at all times, and avoid the need to stop machine operation for repair of damaged or eroded plates. We describe various possible divertor plate designs and access geometries, and discuss an initial design for a movable and removable divertor module for NSTX-U.

  7. X-point target divertor concept and the Alcator DX high power divertor test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Vieria, R.; Wolfe, S.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hutchinson, I.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Theiler, C.; Wallace, G.; White, A.; Whyte, D.; Wukitch, S.

    2013-10-01

    Three critical challenges must be met before a steady-state, power-producing fusion reactor can be realized: (1) safely handle extreme plasma exhaust power, (2) completely suppress material erosion at divertor targets and (3) do this while maintaining a burning plasma core. Advanced divertors such as `Super X' and `X-point target' have the potential to solve all three challenges by producing a stable, fully detached, low temperature plasma in the divertor while maintaining a hot boundary layer around a clean plasma core. The X-point target divertor may be particularly effective. It places a second X-point in the pathway of the peak parallel heat flux with the intention of forming an X-point MARFE in the divertor volume, well away from the primary X-point that defines the last closed flux surface and at larger major radius, providing detachment front stability. Divertor heat dissipation is via volumetric processes (radiation, ion-neutral collisions), virtually eliminating erosion by ion bombardment and reducing peak heat flux and neutron fluence on remote divertor target components. Alcator DX is conceived as a national facility to test these ideas. It employs the high magnetic field technology of Alcator combined with high-power ICRH to investigate advanced divertors at reactor-level parallel heat flux densities.

  8. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  9. Particle exhaust schemes in the DIII-D advanced divertor configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    For density control in long-pulse operation, the open divertor on the DIII-D tokamak will be equipped with a baffled chamber and a pumping system. The throat of the baffle chamber is sized to provide optimal pumping for the typical plasma equilibrium configuration. Severe limitations on the toroidal conductance of this baffle chamber require the use of in-vessel pumping to achieve the desired particle exhaust of about 25 Torr{center dot}l/s. Two separate pumping schemes are considered: an array of titanium getter modules based on the design developed by the Tore Supra team and a cryocondensation pump. The merits and demerits of each scheme are analyzed, and the design considerations introduced by the tokamak environment are brought out. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Poloidal divertor experiment with applied E vector x B vector/B/sup 2/ drift

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E J

    1980-05-01

    It has been proposed that the E vector x B vector/B/sup 2/ drift arising from an externally applied electric field could be used in a tokamak or other toroidal device to remove plasma and impurities from the region near the wall and to reduce the amount of plasma striking the wall, either assisting or replacing a conventional magnetic field divertor. A poloidal magnetic divertor (without pumping chamber) was added to the Wisconsin Levitated Toroidal Octupole, and the octupole was operated with a tokamak-like magnetic field configuration (q = 0.7). A radial electric field was applied in the scrape-off zone, causing an E vector x B vector/B/sup 2/ drift with a large poloidal component. This reduced plasma flux reaching the wall of the toroid by up to a factor of 5 beyond the effect of the magnetic divertor, for divertor configurations with both high and low magnetic mirror ratios, in good agreement with a simple theoretical model. Plasma density and density scale length were also reduced in the scrape-off zone, in qualitative agreement with the model. This was not accompanied by any new instabilities in the scrape-off zone, nor by any appreciable degradation of confinement of the central plasma.

  11. A helical hydrogen-MARFE-like phenomenon in the divertor of the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, U.; König, R.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; the W7-AS Team

    2015-01-01

    In the island divertor of the W7-AS stellarator a high-density zone (HDZ) near the divertor plates was discovered some years ago (Ramasubramanian et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 992-8) with electron densities up to 7 × 1020 m-3. We shed further light on this phenomenon by determining the poloidal and radial location of this zone and discussing potential implications of these findings. The HDZ is in the vicinity of, but clearly separated from the nearest X-point line. The carbon emission is clearly spatially separated, residing near or at the X-point lines. The HDZ shows many similarities with the hydrogen or wall MARFE in Textor-94 (Samm et al 1999 J. Nucl. Mater. 266-269 666). The structure is associated with a strongly increased neutral pressure, thus enabling efficient pumping. This offers the possibility for a very efficient exhaust regime in a stellarator with island divertor such as W7-X, simultaneously with significantly reduced convective heat loads onto the divertor itself. The spatial separation of the HDZ and the carbon radiation region may imply that such a state can be reached even in a non-carbon machine, and might therefore be DEMO-relevant.

  12. Divertor heat loads in RMP ELM controlled H-mode plasmas on DIII-D*

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, M; Lasnier, C; Schmitz, O; Evans, T; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Watkins, J; Eich, T; Moyer, R; Wolf, R; Baylor, L; Boedo, J; Burrell, K; Frerichs, H; deGrassie, J; Gohil, P; Joseph, I; Lehnen, M; Leonard, A; Petty, C; Pinsker, R; Reiter, D; Rhodes, T; Samm, U; Snyder, P; Stoschus, H; Osborne, T; Unterberg, B; West, W

    2008-10-13

    In this paper the manipulation of power deposition on divertor targets at DIII-D by application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) is analyzed. It has been found that heat transport shows a different reaction to the applied RMP depending on the plasma pedestal collisionality. At pedestal electron collisionality above 0.5 the heat flux during the ELM suppressed phase is of the same order as the inter-ELM in the non-RMP phase. Below this collisionality value we observe a slight increase of the total power flux to the divertor. This can be caused by much more negative potential at the divertor surface due to hot electrons reaching the divertor surface from the pedestal area and/or so called pump out effect. In the second part we discuss modification of ELM behavior due to the RMP. It is shown, that the width of the deposition pattern in ELMy H-mode depends linearly on the ELM deposited energy, whereas in the RMP phase of the discharge those patterns seem to be controlled by the externally induced magnetic perturbation. D{sub 2} pellets injected into the plasma bulk during ELM-free RMP H-mode lead in some cases to a short term small transients, which have very similar properties to ELMs in the initial RMP-on phase.

  13. Cryogenic Technology Development For The MEG Liquid Xenon Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Haruyama, Tomiyoshi

    2008-02-21

    Cryogenic key technologies have been developed for the muon rare decay experiment (MEG) at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. These technologies are the high power pulse tube cryocooler for precise temperature and pressure control of liquid xenon in the calorimeter, a purification system with a cryogenic liquid pump and a cryogenic dewar with 1000 L storage capacity. The paper describes the general concepts and the first test results of each technology. All the results imply a promising performance for the coming MEG experiment.

  14. First results from the dynamic ergodic divertor at TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnen, M.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Biel, W.; Brezinsek, S.; Finken, K. H.; Harting, D.; von Hellermann, M.; Jakubowski, M.; Jaspers, R.; Kobayashi, M.; Koslowski, H. R.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Matsunaga, G.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Reiter, D.; van Rompuy, T.; Samm, U.; Schmitz, O.; Sergienko, G.; Unterberg, B.; Wolf, R.; Zimmermann, O.; Textor Team

    2005-03-01

    Experimental results from the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) at TEXTOR are given, describing the complex structure of the edge plasma and the properties of the divertor as well as its influence on the plasma rotation.

  15. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Vols. 37A & 37B - Proceedings of the 1991 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, June 11-14, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, Ronald W.

    The present volume on advances in cryogenic engineering discusses heat and mass transfer in helium, heat transfer in cryogenic fluids, thermoacoustic oscillations, and insulation. Attention is given to applications of superconductivity with reference to magnetic stability and coil protection, cryogenic techniques, and refrigeration for electronics and superconducting systems. Topics addressed include compressors, expanders, and pumps for liquid helium, magnetic refrigerators, pulse tube refrigerators, and cryocoolers. Also examined are properties of cryogenic fluids, cryogenic applications in transportion and space science and technology, and cryogenic instrumentation.

  16. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ion transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. The implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.

  17. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smirnov, R. D.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-01-07

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ionmore » transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. As a result, the implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.« less

  18. Control for maintaining constant level of a cryogenic liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liberotti, J.

    1969-01-01

    Pressure formed as the cryogenic liquid vaporizes is used to pump new cryogenic liquid from a storage reservoir. Changes in volume of a gas resulting from changes in temperature actuate a valve which either replenishes the depleted liquid in the vessel or vents the evolving gas to the atmosphere.

  19. Role of edge turbulence in detached divertor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, F. Y.; Sigmar, D. J.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    1996-04-01

    The role of edge turbulence in detached divertor plasmas is investigated. It is shown that the edge turbulence, through poloidal transport of parallel momentum, can produce a significant plasma pressure drop along the magnetic field lines toward the divertor plate, a feature that characterizes the detached divertor plasma regime.

  20. Calculations of neutral transport in the PDX divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heifetz, D. B.; Petravic, M.; Post, D. E.; Lieberson-Heifetz, S.

    1984-05-01

    Neutral particle transport during a typical beam-heated PDX diverted discharge was modeled using the multidimensional code DEGAS. Plasma parameters were taken from probe measurements, and were assumed not to change during the calculations. A realistic plasma/divertor geometry was included in the model, along with a simple particle recycling scheme. Calculated results were compared with the experimentally measured neutral pressures. Without any pumping in the device, the computed pressures were found to be higher than those measured by a factor of approximately two. Introducing a simple pumping model for wall absorption, wherein 10% of the absorbed neutral particles were assumed not to desorb, reduced the calculated pressures to about the measured values. However the pressure was observed to monotonically increase during the discharge, whereas the model results peaked in mid-discharge. One possible explanation of the disagreement is that the saturation of the device walls increases during the discharge, so that the fraction of particles pumped decreases with time. Reduction of the permanently absorbed fraction from 10 to 4% during the course of the discharge caused the calculated pressure to monotonically increase.

  1. Designing divertor targets for uniform power load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekeyser, W.; Reiter, D.; Baelmans, M.

    2015-08-01

    Divertor design for next step fusion reactors heavily relies on 2D edge plasma modeling with codes as e.g. B2-EIRENE. While these codes are typically used in a design-by-analysis approach, in previous work we have shown that divertor design can alternatively be posed as a mathematical optimization problem, and solved very efficiently using adjoint methods adapted from computational aerodynamics. This approach has been applied successfully to divertor target shape design for more uniform power load. In this paper, the concept is further extended to include all contributions to the target power load, with particular focus on radiation. In a simplified test problem, we show the potential benefits of fully including the radiation load in the design cycle as compared to only assessing this load in a post-processing step.

  2. Liquid metal cooled divertor for ARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Muraviev, E.

    1995-01-01

    A liquid metal, Ga-cooled divertor design was completed for the double null ARIES-II divertor design. The design analysis indicated a surface heat flux removal capability of up to 15 MW/m{sup 2}, and its relative easy maintenance. Design issues of configuration, thermal hydraulics, thermal stresses, liquid metal loop and safety effects were evaluated. For coolant flow control, it was found that it is necessary to use some part of the blanket cooling ducts for the draining of liquid metal from the top divertor. In order to minimize the inventory of Ga, it was recommended that the liquid metal loop equipment should be located as close to the torus as possible. More detailed analysis of transient conditions especially under accident conditions was identified as an issue that will need to be addressed.

  3. Cool, high-density regime for poloidal divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Petravic, M.; Post, D.; Heifetz, D.; Schmidt, J.

    1981-08-01

    Calculations have been performed which demonstrate the possibility of operating poloidal divertors at high densities and low temperatures. This operating regime is caused primarily by ionization of recycling neutral gas near the divertor neutralizer plate which amplifies the input particle flux thereby raising the plasma density and lowering the plasma temperature. Low temperature, high density operation of poloidal divertors would ease the design requirements for future large tokamaks such as INTOR or FED by reducing the erosion rate in the divertor and reducing the neutral density and the associated charge exchange erosion near the main plasma. This regime may have already been observed on several divertor and limiter experiments.

  4. CRYOGENIC DEWAR

    DOEpatents

    Chamberlain, W.H.; Maseck, H.E.

    1964-01-28

    This patent relates to a dewar for storing cryogenic gase and is of the type having aii inner flask surrounded by a vacuum jacket and having a vent spout through which evaporating gas escapes. Heretofore substantial gas loss has resulted from the radiation of heat towards the flask from the warmer outer elements of the dewar. In this invention, the mask is surrounded by a thermally conducting shield which is disposed in the vacuum space between the flask and the outer elements of the dewar. The shield contacts only the vent spout, which is cooled by the evaporating gas, and thus is maintained at a temperature very close to that of the flask itself. Accordingly, heat radiated toward the flask is intercepted and conducted to the evaporating gas rather than being re-radiated towards the hask. In a liquid helium dewar of typical configniration the mention reduces the boil-off rate by approximately one-half.(AEC)

  5. Divertor target for magnetic containment device

    DOEpatents

    Luzzi, Jr., Theodore E.

    1982-01-01

    In a plasma containment device of a type having superconducting field coils for magnetically shaping the plasma into approximately the form of a torus, an improved divertor target for removing impurities from a "scrape off" region of the plasma comprises an array of water cooled swirl tubes onto which the scrape off flux is impinged. Impurities reflected from the divertor target are removed from the target region by a conventional vacuum getter system. The swirl tubes are oriented and spaced apart within the divertor region relative to the incident angle of the scrape off flux to cause only one side of each tube to be exposed to the flux to increase the burnout rating of the target. The divertor target plane is oriented relative to the plane of the path of the scrape off flux such that the maximum heat flux onto a swirl tube is less than the tube design flux. The containment device is used to contain the plasma of a tokamak fusion reactor and is applicable to other long pulse plasma containment systems.

  6. Theoretical design of an energy recovering divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baver, D. A.

    2010-11-01

    An energy recovering divertor (ERD) is a device for converting thermal to electrical energy in the divertor channel of a tokamak. Because ERD's are a type of heat engine operating at plasma temperatures, they have the thermodynamic potential for extremely high efficiencies. An ERD offers several important benefits to a tokamak fusion reactor. First, any energy recovered by the ERD is subtracted from divertor heat load, thus circumventing materials limitations. Second, energy recovered by the ERD is available for auxiliary heating, thus allowing the reactor to break even at a lower Lawson parameter. Third, an ERD can be used to power auxiliary current drive, thus reducing dependence on bootstrap current. We will present a design for an ERD based on amplification of Alfven waves in a manner analogous to a free-electron laser. While its projected efficiency falls short of the thermodynamic potential for this class of device, it nonetheless demonstrates the theoretical viability of direct power conversion in a tokamak divertor. We will also present potential approaches towards higher efficiency devices of this type. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under grant DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  7. The tungsten divertor experiment at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, R.; Asmussen, K.; Krieger, K.; Thoma, A.; Bosch, H.-S.; Deschka, S.; Dux, R.; Engelhardt, W.; García-Rosales, C.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Kaufmann, M.; Mertens, V.; Ryter, F.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Sokoll, M.; Stäbler, A.; Suttrop, W.; Weinlich, M.; Zohm, H.; Alexander, M.; Becker, G.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Behrisch, R.; Bergmann, A.; Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Brambilla, M.; Brinkschulte, H.; Büchl, K.; Carlson, A.; Chodura, R.; Coster, D.; Cupido, L.; de Blank, H. J.; de Peña Hempel, S.; Drube, R.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Feist, J.-H.; Feneberg, W.; Fiedler, S.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Fußmann, G.; Gafert, J.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Haas, G.; Herppich, G.; Herrmann, W.; Hirsch, S.; Hoek, M.; Hoenen, F.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Jacobi, D.; Junker, W.; Kardaun, O.; Kass, T.; Kollotzek, H.; Köppendörfer, W.; Kurzan, B.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L. L.; Leuterer, F.; Manso, M. E.; Maraschek, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P.; Meisel, D.; Merkel, R.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Napiontek, B.; Neu, G.; Neuhauser, J.; Niethammer, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pasch, E.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pitcher, C. S.; Poschenrieder, W.; Raupp, G.; Reinmüller, K.; Riedl, R.; Röhr, H.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schneider, H.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Speth, E.; Silva, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Verbeek, H.; Verplancke, Ph; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wolf, R.; Wunderlich, R.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    1996-12-01

    Tungsten-coated tiles, manufactured by plasma spray on graphite, were mounted in the divertor of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak and cover almost 90% of the surface facing the plasma in the strike zone. Over 600 plasma discharges have been performed to date, around 300 of which were auxiliary heated with heating powers up to 10 MW. The production of tungsten in the divertor was monitored by a W I line at 400.8 nm. In the plasma centre an array of spectral lines at 5 nm emitted by ionization states around W XXX was measured. From the intensity of these lines the W content was derived. Under normal discharge conditions W-concentrations around 0741-3335/38/12A/013/img12 or even lower were found. The influence on the main plasma parameters was found to be negligible. The maximum concentrations observed decrease with increasing heating power. In several low power discharges accumulation of tungsten occurred and the temperature profile was flattened. The concentrations of the intrinsic impurities carbon and oxygen were comparable to the discharges with the graphite divertor. Furthermore, the density and the 0741-3335/38/12A/013/img13 limits remained unchanged and no negative influence on the energy confinement or on the H-mode threshold was found. Discharges with neon radiative cooling showed the same behaviour as in the graphite divertor case.

  8. Cryogenic coolers and refrigerators. February 1972-October 1989 (A Bibliography from the US Patent data base). Report for February 1972-October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning cryogenic cooling equipment and cryogenic refrigerators. Associated components such as drive motors, insulation, temperature controls, vibration damping, actuators, pumps, and heat exchangers are discussed. Applications of cryogenic refrigeration and materials properties at cryogenic temperatures are considered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 123 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  9. Experimental studies on pump limiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioduszewski, P.

    1982-12-01

    Pump limiters are mechanical devices for He-ash removal, fuel particle control, and possibly impurity control. Different designs have been suggested by various authors over the past decade. However, the magnetic divertor concepts seemed to be more promising, mainly because of their remote plasma-material interactions. All of the characteristics of magnetic divertors have been proven experimentally, but the overall performance and complexity cause concern about their application to tokamak reactors. Consequently, it is now time to explore the potential of mechanical particle control devices, i.e. pump limiters. Because of the high recycling at the limiter, it is sufficient to exhaust only a small fraction, about 1-10%, of the limiter particle flux to remove e.g. He at its rate of production. Pump limiter experiments have been conducted so far on Alcator, PDX, Macrotor, and ISX. Depending on the experimental design, a pressure build-up of between 1 mTorr and 50 mTorr has been reported. The closed configuration pump limiters provide high collection efficiencies, but have to accomodate high power fluxes at the leading edge. An open configuration, on the other hand, avoids leading edges but provides only fairly low collection efficiencies. The pump limiter development program now calls for a full pump limiter to be implemented in a major tokamak device. Presently, full-size pump limiter experiments on PDX, ISX, and TEXTOR are in preparation.

  10. Electromagnetic dampers for cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Dirusso, Eliseo

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic turbomachinery of the type used to pump high-pressure liquid hydrogen at -423 F and liquid oxygen at -297 F to the main engines of the Space Shuttle are subjected to lateral rotor vibrations from unbalance forces and transient loads. Conventional dampers which utilize viscous fluids such as lubricating oil cannot be used in turbopumps because the bearing components are filled with either liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen, which have viscosity comparable to air and, therefore, are not effective in viscous dampers. Electromagentic dampers are currently being explored as a means of providing damping in cryogenic turbopumps because their damping effectiveness increases as temperature decreases and because they are compatible with the liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen in the turbopumps.

  11. The Lithium Vapor Box Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Robert; Hakim, Ammar; Hammett, Gregory; Jaworski, Michael; Myers, Rachel; Schwartz, Jacob

    2015-11-01

    Projections of scrape-off layer width to a demonstration power plant suggest an immense parallel heat flux, of order 12 GW/m2, which will necessitate nearly fully detached operation. Building on earlier work by Nagayama et al. and by Ono et al., we propose to use a series of differentially pumped boxes filled with lithium vapor to isolate the buffering vapor from the main plasma chamber, allowing stable detachment. This powerful differential pumping is only available for condensable vapors, not conventional gases. We demonstrate the properties of such a system through conservation laws for vapor mass and enthalpy, and then include plasma entrainment and ultimately an estimate of radiated power. We find that full detachment should be achievable with little leakage of lithium to the main plasma chamber. We also present progress towards solving the Navier-Stokes equation numerically for the chain of vapor boxes, including self-consistent wall boundary conditions and fully-developed shocks, as well as concepts for an initial experimental demonstration-of-concept. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. Design and analysis of the cryopump for the D3-D advanced divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, E.; Almajan, I.; Baxi, C. B.; Schaffer, M. J.; Sevier, D. L.; Smith, J. P.; Menon, M. M.

    1992-09-01

    A cryocondensation pump for the DIII-D advanced divertor program is to be installed in the vacuum vessel in the fall of 1992. The purpose of the cryopump is to remove gas from the divertor, reduce recycling to the plasma, and to provide reduced density plasmas for experimental study. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 50,000 l/s at 0.4 mtorr. The major pump components are toroidally continuous to minimize inductive voltages, thereby greatly reducing the risk of any electrical breakdown during disruptions. The cryopump consists of a 25 mm Inconel tube, 10 m long, cooled by liquid helium. It is surrounded by liquid nitrogen-cooled shields and a segmented ambient temperature radiation/particle shield. The outer nitrogen shield has a toroidally discontinuous copper coating to enhance thermal conductivity while maintaining a high toroidal electrical resistance to minimize electromagnetic loads during disruptions. The pump is cooled by 10 g/s of liquid helium at an inlet pressure of 115 kPa and temperature of 4.35 K. The pump is subjected to a steady-state heat load of less than 10 W due to conduction and radiation heat transfer. The helium tube will be subjected to Joule heating of less than 182J due to induced current and a particle load of less than 20 W during plasma operation. Thermal analysis and tests show that the helium tube can absorb a transient heat load of up to 100 W for 10 s and still pump deuterium at 6.3 K.

  13. Novel limiter pump topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of limiter pumps as the principle plasma exhaust system of a magnetic confinement fusion device promises significant simplification, when compared to previously investigating divertor based systems. Further simplifications, such as the integration of the exhaust system with a radio frequency heating system and with the main reactor shield and structure are investigated below. The integrity of limiters in a reactor environment is threatened by many mechanisms, the most severe of which may be erosion by sputtering. Two novel topolgies are suggested which allow high erosion without limiter failure.

  14. Flute mode fluctuations in the divertor mirror cell

    SciTech Connect

    Katanuma, I.; Yagi, K.; Nakashima, Y.; Ichimura, M.; Imai, T.

    2010-03-15

    The computer code by reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations were made which can simulate the flute interchange modes (similar to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability) and the instability associated with the presence of nonuniform plasma flows (similar to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability). This code is applied to a model divertor and the GAMMA10 [M. Inutake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 939 (1985)] with divertor in order to investigate the flute modes in these divertor cells. The linear growth rate of the flute instability determined by the nonlocal linear analysis agrees with that in the linear phase of the simulations. There is a stable nonlinear steady state in both divertor cells, but the nonlinear steady state is different between the model divertor and the GAMMA10 with divertor.

  15. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  16. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  17. Refrigeration for Cryogenic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, M. G. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Research in cryogenically cooled refrigerators is discussed. Low-power Stirling cryocoolers; spacecraft-borne long-life units; heat exchangers; performance tests; split-stirling, linear-resonant, cryogenic refrigerators; and computer models are among the topics discussed.

  18. Divertor and scoop limiter experiments on PDX

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Boyd, D.; Buchenauer, D.; Budny, R.; Cavallo, A.; Couture, P.; Crowley, T.

    1985-01-01

    Routine operation in the enhanced energy confinement (or H-mode) regime during neutral beam injection was achieved by modifying the PDX divertor hardware to inhibit the influx of neutral gas from the divertor region to the main plasma chamber. A particle scoop limiter has been studied as a mechanical means of controlling particles at the plasma edge, and neutral beam heated discharges with this limiter show similar confinement times (normalized to tau/sub E//I/sub p/) to average H-mode plasmas. Two new instabilities are observed near the plasma edge in PDX during H-mode operation. The first, a quasicoherent fluctuation, occurred in bursts at well-defined frequencies (..delta omega../..omega.. less than or equal to 0.1) in the range 50 to 180 kHz, and had no obvious effects on confinement. The second instability, the edge relaxation phenomena (ERP), did cause deterioration in the global confinement time. The ERP's are characterized by sharp spikes in the divertor plasma density, H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission, and on the x-ray signals they appear as sawtoothlike relaxations at the plasma edge with an inversion radius near the separatrix. Attempts to obtain high ..beta../sub T/ in the H-mode discharges were hampered by a deterioration in the H-mode confinement and major disruptions which limited the achievable ..beta../sub T/. A study of the stability of both the limiter L-mode and divertor H-mode discharges close to the theoretical ..beta.. boundary, showed that the major disruptions observed there are sometimes caused by a fast growing m/n = 1/1 mode with no observable external precursor oscillations.

  19. Physics Design Requirements for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Liquid Lithium Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, W.; Bell, M.; Berzak,L.; Brooks, A.; Ellis, R.; Gerhardt, S.; Harjes, H.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Menard, J.; Nygren,R. E.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stotler, D.; Wakeland, P.; Zakharov L. E.

    2008-09-26

    Recent NSTX high power divertor experiments have shown significant and recurring benefits of solid lithium coatings on PFC's to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. The next step in this work is installation of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) to achieve density control for inductionless current drive capability (e.g., about a 15-25% ne decrease from present highest non-inductionless fraction discharges which often evolve toward the density limit, ne/nGW~1), to enable ne scan capability (x2) in the H-mode, to test the ability to operate at significantly lower density for future ST-CTF reactor designs (e.g., ne/nGW = 0.25), and eventually to investigate high heat-flux power handling (10 MW/m2) with longpulse discharges (>1.5s). The first step (LLD-1) physics design encompasses the desired plasma requirements, the experimental capabilities and conditions, power handling, radial location, pumping capability, operating temperature, lithium filling, MHD forces, and diagnostics for control and characterization.

  20. High heat flux Langmuir probe array for the DIII-D divertor plates

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, J. G.; Nygren, R. E.; Taussig, D.; Boivin, R. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.

    2008-10-15

    Two modular arrays of Langmuir probes designed to handle a heat flux of up to 25 MW/m{sup 2} for 10 s exposures have been installed in the lower divertor target plates of the DIII-D tokamak. The 20 pyrolytic graphite probe tips have more than three times higher thermal conductivity and 16 times larger mass than the original DIII-D isotropic graphite probes. The probe tips have a fixed 12.5 deg. surface angle to distribute the heat flux more uniformly than the previous 6 mm diameter domed collectors and a symmetric 'rooftop' design to allow operation with reversed toroidal magnetic field. A large spring-loaded contact area improves heat conduction from each probe tip through a ceramic insulator into a cooled graphite divertor floor tile. The probe tips, brazed to molybdenum foil to ensure good electrical contact, are mounted in a ceramic tray for electrical isolation and reliable cable connections. The new probes are located 1.5 cm radially apart in a staggered arrangement near the entrance to the lower divertor pumping baffle and are linearly spaced 3 cm apart on the shelf above the in-vessel cryopump. Typical target plate profiles of J{sub sat}, T{sub e}, and V{sub f} with 4 mm spatial resolution are shown.

  1. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  2. Constrained ripple optimization of Tokamak bundle divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Rome, J.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Lyon, J.F.; Fowler, R.H.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Dory, R.A.

    1983-02-01

    Magnetic field ripple from a tokamak bundle divertor is localized to a small toroidal sector and must be treated differently from the usual (distributed) toroidal field (TF) coil ripple. Generally, in a tokamak with an unoptimized divertor design, all of the banana-trapped fast ions are quickly lost due to banana drift diffusion or to trapping between the 1/R variation in absolute value vector B ..xi.. B and local field maxima due to the divertor. A computer code has been written to optimize automatically on-axis ripple subject to these constraints, while varying up to nine design parameters. Optimum configurations have low on-axis ripple (<0.2%) so that, now, most banana-trapped fast ions are confined. Only those ions with banana tips near the outside region (absolute value theta < or equal to 45/sup 0/) are lost. However, because finite-sized TF coils have not been used in this study, the flux bundle is not expanded.

  3. ADX - Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin; Labombard, Brian; Bonoli, Paul; Irby, Jim; Terry, Jim; Wallace, Greg; Vieira, Rui; Whyte, Dennis; Wolfe, Steve; Wukitch, Steve; Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment (ADX) is a design concept for a compact high-field tokamak that would address boundary plasma and plasma-material interaction physics challenges whose solution is critical for the viability of magnetic fusion energy. This device would have two crucial missions. First, it would serve as a Divertor Test Tokamak, developing divertor geometries, materials and operational scenarios that could meet the stringent requirements imposed in a fusion power plant. By operating at high field, ADX would address this problem at a level of power loading and other plasma conditions that are essentially identical to those expected in a future reactor. Secondly, ADX would investigate the physics and engineering of high-field-side launch of RF waves for current drive and heating. Efficient current drive is an essential element for achieving steady-state in a practical, power producing fusion device and high-field launch offers the prospect of higher efficiency, better control of the current profile and survivability of the launching structures. ADX would carry out this research in integrated scenarios that simultaneously demonstrate the required boundary regimes consistent with efficient current drive and core performance.

  4. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

    2008-08-04

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  5. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  6. A time dependent 2D divertor code with TVD scheme for complex divertor configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, K.; Takizuka, T.; Hirayama, T.

    1999-11-01

    In order to study the transport of heat and particles in the SOL and divertor plasmas, a two-dimensional divertor code, SOLDOR has been developed. The model used in this code is identical to the B2-code. Fluid equations are discretized in space under a non orthogonal mesh to treat accurately the W shape divertor configuration of JT-60U. The total variation diminishing scheme (TVD), which is a most familiar one in computational fluid dynamics, is applied for convective terms. The equations obtained by a finite volume method (FVM) are discretized in time with a full implicit scheme and are solved time-dependently using the Newton-Raphson method. The discretized equations are solved efficiently using approximate factorization method (AF). Test calculations in the slab geometry successfully reproduced the B2 results (B.J. Braams, NET report 1987) . We are going to apply this code to JT-60U divertor plasma and investigate the flow reversal and impurity transport.

  7. RELAP5 MODEL OF THE DIVERTOR PRIMARY HEAT TRANSFER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Emilian L; Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Kim, Seokho H

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the RELAP5 model that has been developed for the divertor primary heat transfer system (PHTS). The model is intended to be used to examine the transient performance of the divertor PHTS and evaluate control schemes necessary to maintain parameters within acceptable limits during transients. Some preliminary results are presented to show the maturity of the model and examine general divertor PHTS transient behavior. The model can be used as a starting point for developing transient modeling capability, including control system modeling, safety evaluations, etc., and is not intended to represent the final divertor PHTS design. Preliminary calculations using the models indicate that during normal pulsed operation, present pressurizer controls may not be sufficient to keep system pressures within their desired range. Additional divertor PHTS and control system design efforts may be required to ensure system pressure fluctuation during normal operation remains within specified limits.

  8. OEDGE Modeling of Divertor Fueling at DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, B. D.; Leonard, A. W.; Elder, J. D.; Stangeby, P. C.

    2015-11-01

    Onion-skin-modeling (OSM) is used to assess the affect of divertor closure on pedestal fueling sources. The OSM includes information from a wide range of diagnostic measurements at DIII-D to constrain the model background plasma for better simulation of neutrals and impurity ions and spectroscopy to compare to the results of the simulation. DIII-D has open lower divertor and closed upper divertor configurations which can be run with similar discharges. Progress toward modeling the pedestal fueling in low density plasmas for these cases will be presented as well as initial comparisons of recent lower single null discharges with the outer leg on the divertor shelf (fully open) and divertor floor (partially open). Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. High heat flux experiments of saddle type divertor module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Akiba, Masato; Araki, Masanori; Satoh, Kazuyoshi; Yokoyama, Kenji; Dairaku, Masayuki

    1994-09-01

    JAERI has been extensively developing plasma facing components for next tokomak devices. The authors have developed a saddle type divertor module which consists of saddle-shaped armor tiles brazed on metal heat sink. This paper presents the experimental and analytical results of thermal cycling experiments of the saddle type divertor module. The divertor module has unidirectional CFC armor tiles brazed on OFHC copper heat sink. A twisted tape was inserted in the cooling tube to enhance the heat transfer. In the experiments, thermal response of the divertor module was monitored by an infrared camera and thermocouples. The maximum incident heat flux was 24.5 MW/m 2 for a duration of 30 s. No degradation of thermal response was observed during the experiment. As a result, the saddle type divertor module successfully endured at an incident heat flux of over 20 MW/m 2 under steady state conditions for 1000 cycles.

  10. Comparison of ELM heat loads in snowflake and standard divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T D; Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D; Umansky, M V

    2012-05-08

    An analysis is given of the impact of the tokamak divertor magnetic structure on the temporal and spatial divertor heat flux from edge localized modes (ELMs). Two configurations are studied: the standard divertor where the poloidal magnetic field (B{sub p}) varies linearly with distance (r) from the magnetic null and the snowflake where B{sub p} varies quadratrically with r. Both one and two-dimensional models are used to analyze the effect of the longer magnetic field length between the midplane and the divertor plate for the snowflake that causes a temporal dilation of the ELM divertor heat flux. A second effect discussed is the appearance of a broad region near the null point where the poloidal plasma beta can substantially exceed unity, especially for the snowflake configuration during the ELM; such a condition is likely to drive additional radial ELM transport.

  11. The energy balance of divertor discharges in the PDX tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Grek, B.; Jaehnig, K. P.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S. M.; McBride, T.; Mueller, D.; Owens, D. K.; Schmidt, G. L.

    1984-05-01

    The energy balance of divertor discharges in the PDX tokamak has been studied as a function of the divertor geometry, heating method, and discharge parameters. In the original open divertor geometry, energy flow to the neutralizers accounted for 50-60% of the input energy, while radiation from the main plasma accounted for 20-40%, depending on the density and the heating source. For single-null discharges in the modified closed divertor geometry, the main plasma radiation remains at a similar level, but the neutralizer deposition decreases to < 20% and radiation from the divertor scrape-off must be included to achieve energy accountability. The energy deposition width on the neutralizers is found to vary with plasma conditions in the closed geometry.

  12. Alternative divertor target concepts for next step fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazul, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    The operational conditions of a divertor target in the next steps of fusion devices are more severe in comparison with ITER. The current divertor designs and technologies have a limited application concerning these conditions, and so new design concepts/technologies are required. The main reasons which practically prevent the use of the traditional motionless solid divertor target are analyzed. We describe several alternative divertor target concepts in this paper. The comparative analysis of these concepts (including the advantages and the drawbacks) is made and the prospects for their practical implementation are prioritized. The concept of the swept divertor target with a liquid metal interlayer between the moving armour and motionless heat-sink is presented in more detail. The critical issues of this design are listed and outlined, and the possible experiments are presented.

  13. Divertor for use in fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Uffe R.

    1979-01-01

    A poloidal divertor for a toroidal plasma column ring having a set of poloidal coils co-axial with the plasma ring for providing a space for a thick shielding blanket close to the plasma along the entire length of the plasma ring cross section and all the way around the axis of rotation of the plasma ring. The poloidal coils of this invention also provide a stagnation point on the inside of the toroidal plasma column ring, gently curving field lines for vertical stability, an initial plasma current, and the shaping of the field lines of a separatrix up and around the shielding blanket.

  14. Pumped limiter development on ISX

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, P.K.; Edmonds, P.H.; Sheffield, J.

    1981-01-01

    Pumped limiter configurations are being suggested for FED and INTOR for helium ash exhaust and fuel particle control. The goal of the pump limiter studies in ISX is the selection of the most promising concept and its evaluation in the ISX-C device under the following conditions: (1) quasi steady state operation (less than or equal to 30s), (2) high edge power densities, and (3) particle control by means of mechanical devices. We are considering various options, including particle scraper and ballistic particle collection concepts as well as the current FED design. In ISX-B we will test a full-size pump limiter and directly compare the heat removal and particle control capabilities with a bundle divertor. In ISX-C the steady state operation characteristics of pump limiters will be explored.

  15. Magnetic configuration flexibility of snowflake divertor for HL-2M [Analysis of snowflake divertor configurations for HL-2M

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, G. Y.; Xu, X. Q.; Ryutov, D. D.; Pan, Y. D.; Xia, T. Y.

    2014-07-09

    HL-2M (Li, 2013 [1]) is a tokamak device that is under construction. Based on the magnetic coils design of HL-2M, four kinds of divertor configurations are calculated by CORSICA code (Pearlstein et al., 2001 [2]) with the same main plasma parameters, which are standard divertor, exact snowflake divertor, snowflake-plus divertor and snowflake-minus divertor configurations. The potential properties of these divertors are analyzed and presented in this paper: low poloidal field area around X-point, connection length from outside mid-plane to the primary X-point, target plate design and magnetic field shear. The results show that the snowflake configurations not only can reduce the heat load at divertor target plates, but also may improve the magneto-hydrodynamic stability by stronger magnetic shear at the edge. Furthermore, a new divertor configuration, named “tripod divertor”, is designed by adjusting the positions of the two X-points according to plasma parameters and magnetic coils current of HL-2M.

  16. Simulation study of power load with impurity seeding in advanced divertor "short super-X divertor" for a tokamak reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakura, N.; Hoshino, K.; Shimizu, K.; Shinya, K.; Utoh, H.; Tokunaga, S.; Tobita, K.; Ohno, N.

    2015-08-01

    A short super-X divertor (SXD) is proposed as an option for the Demo divertor, where the field line length from the divertor null to the outer target was largely increased compared to a similar-size conventional divertor. Physics and engineering design studies for a 3 GW-level fusion power Demo reactor (SlimCS) (Tobita et al., 2009) have recently progressed. Minimal number of the divertor coils were installed inside the toroidal field coil, i.e. interlink-winding. Arrangement of the poloidal field coils and their currents were determined, taking into account of the engineering design such as vacuum vessel and the neutron shield structures, and the divertor maintenance scenario. Divertor plasma simulation showed that significant radiation region is produced between the super-X null and the target. Radiation loss in the divertor was increased, producing fully detached plasmas efficiently. Advantages of the short SXD were demonstrated, but the total peak heat load was a marginal level (10 MW m-2) for the engineering design.

  17. Magnetic configuration flexibility of snowflake divertor for HL-2M [Analysis of snowflake divertor configurations for HL-2M

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, G. Y.; Xu, X. Q.; Ryutov, D. D.; Pan, Y. D.; Xia, T. Y.

    2014-07-09

    HL-2M (Li, 2013 [1]) is a tokamak device that is under construction. Based on the magnetic coils design of HL-2M, four kinds of divertor configurations are calculated by CORSICA code (Pearlstein et al., 2001 [2]) with the same main plasma parameters, which are standard divertor, exact snowflake divertor, snowflake-plus divertor and snowflake-minus divertor configurations. The potential properties of these divertors are analyzed and presented in this paper: low poloidal field area around X-point, connection length from outside mid-plane to the primary X-point, target plate design and magnetic field shear. The results show that the snowflake configurations not only can reducemore » the heat load at divertor target plates, but also may improve the magneto-hydrodynamic stability by stronger magnetic shear at the edge. Furthermore, a new divertor configuration, named “tripod divertor”, is designed by adjusting the positions of the two X-points according to plasma parameters and magnetic coils current of HL-2M.« less

  18. Options for Cryogenic Load Cooling with Forced Flow Helium Circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Knudsen, Venkatarao Ganni, Roberto Than

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic pumps designed to circulate super-critical helium are commonly deemed necessary in many super-conducting magnet and other cooling applications. Acknowledging that these pumps are often located at the coldest temperature levels, their use introduces risks associated with the reliability of additional rotating machinery and an additional load on the refrigeration system. However, as it has been successfully demonstrated, this objective can be accomplished without using these pumps by the refrigeration system, resulting in lower system input power and improved reliability to the overall cryogenic system operations. In this paper we examine some trade-offs between using these pumps vs. using the refrigeration system directly with examples of processes that have used these concepts successfully and eliminated using such pumps

  19. Device applications of cryogenic optical refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgaard, Seth D.; Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard I.; Alden, Jay V.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2014-02-01

    With the coldest solid-state temperatures (ΔT <185K from 300K) achievable by optical refrigeration, it is now timely to apply this technology to cryogenic devices. Along with thermal management and pump absorption, this work addresses the most key engineering challenge of transferring cooling power to the payload while efficiently rejecting optical waste-heat fluorescence. We discuss our optimized design of such a thermal link, which shows excellent performance in optical rejection and thermal properties.

  20. High specific surface area aerogel cryoadsorber for vacuum pumping applications

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    2000-01-01

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  1. High Specific Surface area Aerogel Cryoadsorber for Vacuum Pumping Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    1998-12-22

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  2. Cryogenics program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the cryogenics program of the Goddard Space Flight Center is given in viewgraph form. Goddard's role and the flight programs requiring cryogenics are outlined. Diagrams are given of the Cosmic Background Explorer, the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope, an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, a liquid cryogenic cooler for the Shuttle Glow Experiment, a liquid helium dewar, and the X-ray spectrometer on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility.

  3. Fundamentals of Cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley; Tomsik, Thomas; Moder, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the extreme conditions that are encountered in cryogenic systems requires the most effort out of analysts and engineers. Due to the costs and complexity associated with the extremely cold temperatures involved, testing is sometimes minimized and extra analysis is often relied upon. This short course is designed as an introduction to cryogenic engineering and analysis, and it is intended to introduce the basic concepts related to cryogenic analysis and testing as well as help the analyst understand the impacts of various requests on a test facility. Discussion will revolve around operational functions often found in cryogenic systems, hardware for both tests and facilities, and what design or modelling tools are available for performing the analysis. Emphasis will be placed on what scenarios to use what hardware or the analysis tools to get the desired results. The class will provide a review of first principles, engineering practices, and those relations directly applicable to this subject including such topics as cryogenic fluids, thermodynamics and heat transfer, material properties at low temperature, insulation, cryogenic equipment, instrumentation, refrigeration, testing of cryogenic systems, cryogenics safety and typical thermal and fluid analysis used by the engineer. The class will provide references for further learning on various topics in cryogenics for those who want to dive deeper into the subject or have encountered specific problems.

  4. Modeling of extinguishing ELMs in detached divertor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigarov, A.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Hollmann, E.; Rognlien, T.

    2015-11-01

    Detached plasmas, the primary operational regime for divertors in next-step fusion devices, should be compatible with both good H-mode confinement and relatively small ELMs providing tolerable heat power loads on divertor targets. Here, dynamics of boundary plasma, impurities and material walls over a sequence of many type-I ELM events under detached divertor plasma conditions is studied with UEGDE-MB-W, the newest version of 2D edge plasma transport code, which incorporates Macro-Blob (MB) approach to simulate non-diffusive filamentary transport and various ``Wall'' (W) models for time-dependent hydrogen wall inventory and recycling. We present the results of multi-parametric analysis on the impact of the size and frequency of ELMs on the divertor plasma parameters where we vary the MB characteristics under different pedestals and divertor configurations. We discuss the conditions, under which small but frequent type-I ELMs (typical for high-power H-mode discharges on current tokamaks with hard deuterium gas puff) are not ``burning through'' the formed detached divertor plasma. In this case, the inner and outer divertors are filled by sub-eV, recombining, highly-impure plasma. Variations of impurity plasma content, radiation pattern, and deuterium wall inventory over the ELM cycle are analyzed. UEDGE-MB-W modeling results are compared to available experimental data.

  5. A super-cusp divertor configuration for tokamaks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryutov, D. D.

    2015-08-26

    Our study demonstrates a remarkable flexibility of advanced divertor configurations created with the remote poloidal field coils. The emphasis here is on the configurations with three poloidal field nulls in the divertor area. We are seeking the structures where all three nulls lie on the same separatrix, thereby creating two zones of a very strong flux expansion, as envisaged in the concept of Takase’s cusp divertor. It turns out that the set of remote coils can produce a cusp divertor, with additional advantages of: (i) a large stand-off distance between the divertor and the coils and (ii) a thorough controlmore » that these coils exert over the fine features of the configuration. In reference to these additional favourable properties acquired by the cusp divertor, the resulting configuration could be called ‘a super-cusp’. General geometrical features of the three-null configurations produced by remote coils are described. Furthermore, issues on the way to practical applications include the need for a more sophisticated control system and possible constraints related to excessively high currents in the divertor coils.« less

  6. A super-cusp divertor configuration for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.

    2015-08-26

    Our study demonstrates a remarkable flexibility of advanced divertor configurations created with the remote poloidal field coils. The emphasis here is on the configurations with three poloidal field nulls in the divertor area. We are seeking the structures where all three nulls lie on the same separatrix, thereby creating two zones of a very strong flux expansion, as envisaged in the concept of Takase’s cusp divertor. It turns out that the set of remote coils can produce a cusp divertor, with additional advantages of: (i) a large stand-off distance between the divertor and the coils and (ii) a thorough control that these coils exert over the fine features of the configuration. In reference to these additional favourable properties acquired by the cusp divertor, the resulting configuration could be called ‘a super-cusp’. General geometrical features of the three-null configurations produced by remote coils are described. Furthermore, issues on the way to practical applications include the need for a more sophisticated control system and possible constraints related to excessively high currents in the divertor coils.

  7. Current and Potential Distribution in a Divertor with Torioidally-Asymmetric Biasing of the Divertor Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D; Counsell, G F; Helander, P

    2006-06-06

    Toroidally-asymmetric biasing of the divertor plate may increase convective cross-field transport in SOL and thereby reduce the divertor heat load. Experiments performed with the MAST spherical tokamak generally agree with a simple theory of non-axisymmetric biasing. However, some of the experimental results have not yet received a theoretical explanation. In particular, existing theory seems to overestimate the asymmetry between the positive and the negative biasing. Also lacking a theoretical explanation is experimentally observed increase of the average floating potential in the main SOL in the presence of biasing. In this paper we attempt to solve these problems by accounting for the closing of the currents (driven by the biasing) in a strong-shear region near the X-point. We come up with the picture which, at least qualitatively, agrees with these experimental results.

  8. Disruption characteristics in PDX with limiter and divertor discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, P.; McGuire, K.

    1986-09-01

    A comparison has been made between the characteristics of disruptions with limiter and divertor configurations in PDX. A large data base on disruptions has been collected over four years of machine operation, and a total of 15,000 discharges are contained in the data file. It was found that divertor discharges have less disruptions during ramp up and flattop of the plasma current. However, for divertor discharges a large number of fast, low current disruptions take place during the current ramp down. These disruptions are probably caused by the deformation of the plasma shape.

  9. Simulations of NSTX with a Liquid Lithium Divertor Module

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Maingi, R.; Zakharov, L. E.; Kugel, H. W.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2010-02-18

    A strategy to develop self-consistent simulations of the behavior of lithium in the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) module to be installed in NSTX is described. In this initial stage of the plan, the UEDGE edge plasma transport code is used to simulate an existing NSTX shot, with UEDGE's transport coefficients set using midplane and divertor diagnostic data. The LLD is incorporated into the simulations as a reduction in the recycling coefficient over the outer divertor. Heat transfer calculations performed using the resulting heat flux profiles provide preliminary estimates on operating limits for the LLD as well as input data for subsequent steps in the LLD modeling effort.

  10. Simulations of NSTX with a Liquid Lithium Divertor Module

    SciTech Connect

    D. P. Stotler, R. Maingi, H.W. Kugel, A. Yu. Pigarov, T.D. Rognlien, V.A. Soukhanovskii

    2008-07-08

    The UEDGE edge plasma transport code is used to model the effect of the reduced recycling provided by the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) module that will be installed in NSTX. UEDGE's transport coefficients are calibrated against an existing NSTX shot using midplane and divertor diagnostic data. The LLD is then incorporated into the simulations as a reduction in the recycling coefficient over the outer divertor. Heat transfer calculations performed using the resulting heat flux profiles indicate that lithium evaporation will be negligible for pulse lengths < 2 s at low (~ 2 MW) input power. At high input power (~ 7 MW), the pulse length may have to be restricted.

  11. Modeling impurities and tilted plates in the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Rensink, M.E.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1996-07-29

    The UEDGE 2-D edge transport code is used to model the effect of impurities and tilted divertor plates for the ITER SOL/divertor region. The impurities are modeled as individual charge states using either the FMOMBAL 21-moment description or parallel force balance. Both helium and neon impurities are used together with a majority hydrogenic species. A fluid description of the neutrals is used that includes parallel inertia and neutral-neutral collisions. Effects of geometry are analyzed by using the nonorthogonal mesh capability of UEDGE to obtain solutions with the divertor plate tilted at various angles.

  12. Sheath over a finely structured divertor plate

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R. H., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    The surface of a divertor plate typically has fine structure. Depending on the material - and the duration of exposure to the plasma, the characteristic size of the surface imperfections may vary over a broad range. In this paper, we consider the case where these structures have scale h that is much smaller than the ion gyroradius {rho}{sub i} but greater than the electron gyroradius {rho}{sub e}. The magnetic field intersects the divertor plate at a shallow angle {alpha}<divertor region of a medium-size tokamak (plasma density n{approximately}4x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, plasma temperature T{approximately}50 eV, the magnetic field strength B{approximately} 2T), one has: {rho}{sub i} {approximately}500 {micro}m (hydrogen), {rho}{sub e}{approximately}10 {micro}m. We, therefore, are going to analyze the scales of imperfections in the range 10 {micro}m

  13. Cryogenic Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, Robert A.; Marquardt, Eric D.; Fusilier, Fred C.; Fesmire, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) is a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to preserving and distributing cryogenic information to government, industry, and academia. The heart of the CIC is a uniform source of cryogenic data including analyses, design, materials and processes, and test information traceable back to the Cryogenic Data Center of the former National Bureau of Standards. The electronic database is a national treasure containing over 146,000 specific bibliographic citations of cryogenic literature and thermophysical property data dating back to 1829. A new technical/bibliographic inquiry service can perform searches and technical analyses. The Cryogenic Material Properties (CMP) Program consists of computer codes using empirical equations to determine thermophysical material properties with emphasis on the 4-300K range. CMP's objective is to develop a user-friendly standard material property database using the best available data so government and industry can conduct more accurate analyses. The CIC serves to benefit researchers, engineers, and technologists in cryogenics and cryogenic engineering, whether they are new or experienced in the field.

  14. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  15. Divertor IR thermography on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.; LaBombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Payne, J.; Wurden, G. A.

    2010-10-01

    Alcator C-Mod is a particularly challenging environment for thermography. It presents issues that will similarly face ITER, including low-emissivity metal targets, low-Z surface films, and closed divertor geometry. In order to make measurements of the incident divertor heat flux using IR thermography, the C-Mod divertor has been modified and instrumented. A 6° toroidal sector has been given a 2° toroidal ramp in order to eliminate magnetic field-line shadowing by imperfectly aligned divertor tiles. This sector is viewed from above by a toroidally displaced IR camera and is instrumented with thermocouples and calorimeters. The camera provides time histories of surface temperatures that are used to compute incident heat-flux profiles. The camera sensitivity is calibrated in situ using the embedded thermocouples, thus correcting for changes and nonuniformities in surface emissivity due to surface coatings.

  16. Divertor transport study in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Feng, Y.; Masuzaki, S.; Shoji, M.; Miyazawa, J.; Morisaki, T.; Ohyabu, N.; Ashikawa, N.; Komori, A.; Motojima, O.; Igitkhanov, Y.; Sardei, F.; Reiter, D.; LHD Experimental Group

    2007-06-01

    The edge transport properties in LHD have been investigated in order to clarify divertor/SOL functions of heliotron type device. The momentum loss, mainly through friction of counter-flows induced by ergodic field lines, breaks the pressure conservation along flux tubes. This prevents high recycling regime even at high density operation, n bar ∼ 7 ×1019m-3 . The momentum loss is found to be larger than in W7-AS. This is because of the higher ratio of perpendicular and parallel transport scale length, ∼10-4, in the ergodic layer, which enhances the friction between counter-flows more than in the island divertor. In the heliotron configuration, a large temperature drop from LCFS to divertor by an order of magnitude is easily realized due to the long connection length in the ergodic layer. This is certainly a favourable feature for future reactors in terms of reduction of damage on the divertor plate.

  17. Transport studies in the snowflake divertor in TCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimerdes, H.; Canal, G. P.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Piras, F.; Vijvers, W.; de Temmerman, G.; Zielinski, J.; Tal, B.; Medvedev, S. Y.; Rognlien, T. D.; Ryutov, D. D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2011-10-01

    The transport of heat and particles in a tokamak plasma with a snowflake divertor has been studied in recent TCV experiments. Estimates of the power flux onto the divertor plates are obtained from measurements with multiple infrared cameras and Langmuir probes. The studies include L- and ELMy H-mode plasmas and confirm some of the advantageous properties of the snowflake configuration, such as the distribution of the exhaust power on more strike points than the two that characterize conventional divertor configurations. Modifications of the divertor configuration from single null towards a perfect snowflake (second-order null) show that already near-snowflake configurations lead to an appreciable power flux across the region of weak poloidal magnetic field. This work is partly funded by the Fonds National Suisse de la Recherche Scientifique. LLNL work was performed under DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Tritium concentration measurements in the JET divertor by optical spectroscopy of a Penning discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Hillis, D.L.; Morgan, P.D.; Ehrenberg, J.K.; Groth, M.; Stamp, M.F.; Hellermann, M. von; Kumar, V.

    1998-06-01

    Obtaining precision measurements of the relative concentrations of hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, and helium in the divertor of a tokamak are an important task for nuclear fusion research. Control of the deuterium-tritium isotopic ratio while limiting the helium ash content in a fusion plasma are key factors for optimizing the fuel burn in a fusion reactor, like the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER). A diagnostic technique has been developed to measure the deuterium-tritium isotopic ratio in the divertor of the Joint European Torus (JET) with a species-selective Penning vacuum gauge. The Penning discharge provides a source of electrons to excite the neutral hydrogen isotopes in the pumping duct. Subsequently, the visible light from the hydrogen isotopes is collected in an optical fiber bundle, transferred away from the tokamak into a low radiation background area, and analyzed in a high resolution Czerny-Turner spectrometer, which is equipped with a fast charge coupled device (CCD) camera for optical detection. The intensity of the observed line emission (D{sub {alpha}} -- 6561.03 {angstrom}; and T{sub {alpha}} -- 6560.44 {angstrom}) is directly proportional to the partial pressure of each gas found in the divertor. The line intensity of each isotope is calibrated as a function of pressure. The ratio of the line intensities thus provides a direct measurement of the deuterium-tritium isotopic ratio. The lower limit for the determination of the deuterium-tritium isotopic ratio is about 0.5%. The applicable pressure range for this system is from 10{sup {minus}5} mbar to a few times 10{sup {minus}3} mbar.

  19. Diagnostics for the DIII-D radiative divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Nilson, D.G.; Brooks, N.H.; Smith, J.P.; Snider, R.T.

    1995-10-01

    This paper reviews the design of new diagnostics and the modifications to existing diagnostics needed to carry out radiative divertor experiments in DIII-D following installation in late 1996 of a set of baffle structures that will restrict the backflow to the core plasma of neutral deuterium atoms and impurity gases. The divertor slots formed by the new baffle structures will inhibit the easy view of the divertor legs and target plates that the open divertor geometry in DIII-D currently affords. We review a basic set of diagnostics that are needed to demonstrate the reduction of divertor heat loading and radiative dissipation of energy within the divertor. This will include IR cameras, bolometry, foil bolometers, and Langmuir probes. Within the limits of available funding, we will implement a supplemental set of instruments which provide a more detailed understanding of the underlying physical processes. Many existing diagnostics require only re-aiming to provide proper coverage of the initial 23 cm long divertor plasma configuration (X- point to floor distance). Other diagnostics need extensive reconfiguration using in-vessel fiber-optic bundles or high power laser mirrors. The new divertor baffle panels provide a protective shelf for diagnostic hardware mounted underneath them, but the water cooling channels in the panels limit the permissible size of through holes and, thereby, restrict the available views of under-the- baffle diagnostics. The successful resolution of the design and implementation of these diagnostic modifications is dependent on a strong coordination between GA and its many diagnostic collaborators.

  20. Experimental studies on pump limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, P.

    1982-01-01

    Pump limiters are mechanical devices for He-ash removal, fuel particle control, and possibly impurity control. Different designs have been suggested by various authors over the past decade. However, the magnetic divertor concepts seemed to be more promising, mainly because of their remote plasma-material interactions. All of the characteristics of magnetic divertors have been proven experimentally, but the overall performance and complexity cause concern about their application to tokamak reactors. Consequently, it is time now to explore the potential of mechanical particle control devices, i.e. pump limiters. Because of the high recycling at the limiter, it is sufficient to exhaust only a small fraction, about 1 to 10%, of the limiter particle flux to remove e.g. He at its rate of production. Pump limiter experiments have been conducted so far on Alcator, PDX, Macrotor, and ISX. Depending on the experimental design, a pressure build-up of between 1 mTorr and 50 mTorr has been reported.

  1. Development of a radiative divertor for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.; Brooks, N.H.; Campbell, R.B.

    1994-07-01

    We have used experiments and modeling to develop a new radiative divertor configuration for DIII-D. Gas puffing experiments with the existing open divertor have shown the creation of a localized ({approximately}10 cm diameter) radiation zone which results in substantial reduction (3--10) in the divertor heat flux while {delta}{sub E} remains {approximately}2 times ITER-89P scaling. However, ne increases with D{sub 2} puffing, and Z{sub eff} increases with neon puffing. Divertor structures are required to minimize the effects on the core plasma. The UEDGE fluid code, benchmarked with DIII-D data, and the DEGAS neutrals transport code are used to estimate the effectiveness of divertor configurations; slots reduce the core ionization more than baffles. The overall divertor shape is set by confinement studies which indicate that high triangularity ({delta} {approximately}0.8) is important for high {tau}{sub E} VH-modes. Results from engineering feasibility studies, including diagnostic access, will be presented.

  2. Turbulent Simulations of Divertor Detachment Based On BOUT + + Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Xu, Xueqiao; Xia, Tianyang; Ye, Minyou

    2015-11-01

    China Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor is under conceptual design, acting as a bridge between ITER and DEMO. The detached divertor operation offers great promise for a reduction of heat flux onto divertor target plates for acceptable erosion. Therefore, a density scan is performed via an increase of D2 gas puffing rates in the range of 0 . 0 ~ 5 . 0 ×1023s-1 by using the B2-Eirene/SOLPS 5.0 code package to study the heat flux control and impurity screening property. As the density increases, it shows a gradually change of the divertor operation status, from low-recycling regime to high-recycling regime and finally to detachment. Significant radiation loss inside the confined plasma in the divertor region during detachment leads to strong parallel density and temperature gradients. Based on the SOLPS simulations, BOUT + + simulations will be presented to investigate the stability and turbulent transport under divertor plasma detachment, particularly the strong parallel gradient driven instabilities and enhanced plasma turbulence to spread heat flux over larger surface areas. The correlation between outer mid-plane and divertor turbulence and the related transport will be analyzed. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675075.

  3. Cryogenic Pound Circuits for Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi

    2006-01-01

    Two modern cryogenic variants of the Pound circuit have been devised to increase the frequency stability of microwave oscillators that include cryogenic sapphire-filled cavity resonators. The original Pound circuit is a microwave frequency discriminator that provides feedback to stabilize a voltage-controlled microwave oscillator with respect to an associated cavity resonator. In the present cryogenic Pound circuits, the active microwave devices are implemented by use of state-of-the-art commercially available tunnel diodes that exhibit low flicker noise (required for high frequency stability) and function well at low temperatures and at frequencies up to several tens of gigahertz. While tunnel diodes are inherently operable as amplitude detectors and amplitude modulators, they cannot, by themselves, induce significant phase modulation. Therefore, each of the present cryogenic Pound circuits includes passive circuitry that transforms the AM into the required PM. Each circuit also contains an AM detector that is used to sample the microwave signal at the input terminal of the high-Q resonator for the purpose of verifying the desired AM null at this point. Finally, each circuit contains a Pound signal detector that puts out a signal, at the modulation frequency, having an amplitude proportional to the frequency error in the input signal. High frequency stability is obtained by processing this output signal into feedback to a voltage-controlled oscillator to continuously correct the frequency error in the input signal.

  4. Fluid management system for a zero gravity cryogenic storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor I. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The fluid management system comprises a mixing/recirculation system including an external recirculation pump for receiving fluid from a zero gravity storage system and returning an output flow of the fluid to the storage system. An internal axial spray injection system is provided for receiving a portion of the output flow from the recirculation pump. The spray injection system thermally de-stratifies liquid and gaseous cryogenic fluid stored in the storage system.

  5. Cryogenic test technology, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, R. J.; Schimanski, D.; Hartzuiker, J. P.

    1985-04-01

    This report reviews the new information available on cryogenic test technology since the report of the Converters' Group on Cryogenic Test Technology was written in 1981. The present position is summarized. The major events since the Converters' report have been the completion and commissioning of the National Transonic Facility (NTF), the suspension of further work on the Douglas 4-WT blowdown tunnel, the conversion of ONERA T2 for cryogenic operation, the steady progress with the DF-LP KKK, and the slow but positive progress with the ETW project, including installation of the pilot tunnel PETW.

  6. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Casagrande, F.

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  7. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hatfield; F. Casagrande; I. Campisi; P. Gurd; M. Howell; D. Stout; H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; and P. Knudsen

    2005-08-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  8. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, D.; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Gurd, P.; Howell, M.; Stout, D.; Strong, H.; Arenius, D.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2006-04-27

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  9. CRYOGENICS IN BEPCII UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.; WANG,L.; LI,S.

    2002-07-22

    THIS PAPER PRESENTS A CRYOGENIC DESIGN FOR UPGRADING THE BEIJING ELECTRON POSITRON COLLIDER AT THE INSTITUTE OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS IN BEIJING. THE UPGRADE INVOLVES 3 NEW SUPERCONDUCTING FACILITIES, THE INTERACTION REGION QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS, THE DETECTOR SOLENOID MAGNETS AND THE SRF CAVITIES. FOR COOLING OF THESE DEVICES, A NEW CRYPLANT WITH A TOTAL CAPACITY OF 1.0KW AT 4.5K IS TO BE BUILT AT IHEP. AN INTEGRATED CRYOGENIC DESIGN TO FIT THE BEPCII CRYOGENIC LOADS WITH HIGH EFFICIENCY IS CARRIEDOUT USING COMPUTATIONAL PROCESS ANALYSIS SOFTWARE WITH THE EMPHASES ON ECONOMICS AND SAFETY IN BOTH CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF THE PLANT. THIS PAPER DESCRIBES THE CRYOGENIC CHARACTERISTICS OF EACH SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICE, THEIR COOLING SCHEMES AND THE OVERALL CRYOPLANT.

  10. Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.; Wikstrom, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a comparative study of cryogenic insulation systems performed are presented. The key aspects of thermal insulation relative to cryogenic system design, testing, manufacturing, and maintenance are discussed. An overview of insulation development from an energy conservation perspective is given. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications provide three levels of thermal conductivity. Actual thermal performance of standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is several times less than laboratory performance and often 10 times worse than ideal performance. The cost-effectiveness of the insulation system depends on thermal performance; flexibility and durability; ease of use in handling, installation, and maintenance; and overall cost including operations, maintenance, and life cycle. Results of comprehensive testing of both conventional and novel materials such as aerogel composites using cryostat boil-off methods are given. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems that operate at a soft vacuum level is the primary focus of this paper.

  11. Comment on "Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake" [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Umansky, M. V.

    2014-05-01

    In the recently published paper "Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake" [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)], the authors raise interesting and important issues concerning divertor physics and design. However, the paper contains significant errors: (a) The conceptual framework used in it for the evaluation of divertor "quality" is reduced to the assessment of the magnetic field structure in the outer Scrape-Off Layer. This framework is incorrect because processes affecting the pedestal, the private flux region and all of the divertor legs (four, in the case of a snowflake) are an inseparable part of divertor operation. (b) The concept of the divertor index focuses on only one feature of the magnetic field structure and can be quite misleading when applied to divertor design. (c) The suggestion to rename the divertor configurations experimentally realized on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) and DIII-D (Doublet III-D) from snowflakes to X-divertors is not justified: it is not based on comparison of these configurations with the prototypical X-divertor, and it ignores the fact that the NSTX and DIII-D poloidal magnetic field geometries fit very well into the snowflake "two-null" prescription.

  12. Design concepts for the ASTROMAG cryogenic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.; Castles, S.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a proposed cryogenic system used to cool the superconducting magnet for the Space Station based ASTROMAG Particle Astrophysics Facility. This 2-meter diameter superconducting magnet will be cooled using stored helium II. The paper presents a liquid helium storage concept which would permit cryogenic lifetimes of up to 3 years between refills. It is proposed that the superconducting coil be cooled using superfluid helium pumped by the thermomechanical effect. It is also proposed that the storage tank be resupplied with helium in orbit. A method for charging and discharging the magnet with minimum helium loss using split gas-cooled leads is discussed. A proposal to use a Stirling cycle cryocooler to extend the storage life of the cryostat will also be presented.

  13. 49 CFR 178.338-17 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... come in contact with oxygen (cryogenic liquid) may not be installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen (cryogenic liquid) unless the parts are anodized in accordance with ASTM B 580 (IBR, see § 171.7... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-17 Pumps and compressors. (a)...

  14. 49 CFR 178.338-17 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... come in contact with oxygen (cryogenic liquid) may not be installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen (cryogenic liquid) unless the parts are anodized in accordance with ASTM B 580 (IBR, see § 171.7... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-17 Pumps and compressors. (a)...

  15. 49 CFR 178.338-17 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... come in contact with oxygen (cryogenic liquid) may not be installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen (cryogenic liquid) unless the parts are anodized in accordance with ASTM B 580 (IBR, see § 171.7... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-17 Pumps and compressors. (a)...

  16. 49 CFR 178.338-17 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... parts that may come in contact with oxygen (cryogenic liquid) may not be installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen (cryogenic liquid) unless the parts are anodized in accordance with ASTM B 580.... (a) Liquid pumps and gas compressors, if used, must be of suitable design, adequately...

  17. 49 CFR 178.338-17 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... come in contact with oxygen (cryogenic liquid) may not be installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen (cryogenic liquid) unless the parts are anodized in accordance with ASTM B 580 (IBR, see § 171.7... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-17 Pumps and compressors. (a)...

  18. Settled Cryogenic Propellant Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutter, Bernard F.; Zegler, Frank; Sakla, Steve; Wall, John; Hopkins, Josh; Saks, Greg; Duffey, Jack; Chato, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic propellant transfer can significantly benefit NASA s space exploration initiative. LMSSC parametric studies indicate that "Topping off" the Earth Departure Stage (EDS) in LEO with approx.20 mT of additional propellant using cryogenic propellant transfer increases the lunar delivered payload by 5 mT. Filling the EDS to capacity in LEO with 78 mT of propellants increases the delivered payload by 20 mT. Cryogenic propellant transfer is directly extensible to Mars exploration in that it provides propellant for the Mars Earth Departure stage and in-situ propellant utilization at Mars. To enable the significant performance increase provided by cryogenic propellant transfer, the reliability and robustness of the transfer process must be guaranteed. By utilizing low vehicle acceleration during the cryogenic transfer the operation is significantly simplified and enables the maximum use of existing, reliable, mature upper stage cryogenic-fluid-management (CFM) techniques. Due to settling, large-scale propellant transfer becomes an engineering effort, and not the technology development endeavor required with zero-gravity propellant transfer. The following key CFM technologies are all currently implemented by settling on both the Centaur and Delta IV upper stages: propellant acquisition, hardware chilldown, pressure control, and mass gauging. The key remaining technology, autonomous rendezvous and docking, is already in use by the Russians, and must be perfected for NASA whether the use of propellant transfer is utilized or not.

  19. Cryogenic Moisture Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James; Smith, Trent; Breakfield, Robert; Baughner, Kevin; Heckle, Kenneth; Meneghelli, Barry

    2010-01-01

    The Cryogenic Moisture Apparatus (CMA) is designed for quantifying the amount of moisture from the surrounding air that is taken up by cryogenic-tank-insulating material specimens while under typical conditions of use. More specifically, the CMA holds one face of the specimen at a desired low temperature (e.g., the typical liquid-nitrogen temperature of 77 K) while the opposite face remains exposed to humid air at ambient or near-ambient temperature. The specimen is weighed before and after exposure in the CMA. The difference between the "after" and "before" weights is determined to be the weight of moisture absorbed by the specimen. Notwithstanding the term "cryogenic," the CMA is not limited to cryogenic applications: the low test temperature can be any temperature below ambient, and the specimen can be made of any material affected by moisture in air. The CMA is especially well suited for testing a variety of foam insulating materials, including those on the space-shuttle external cryogenic tanks, on other cryogenic vessels, and in refrigerators used for transporting foods, medicines, and other perishables. Testing is important because absorbed moisture not only adds weight but also, in combination with thermal cycling, can contribute to damage that degrades insulating performance. Materials are changed internally when subjected to large sub-ambient temperature gradients.

  20. Design, R&D and commissioning of EAST tungsten divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, D. M.; Luo, G. N.; Zhou, Z. B.; Cao, L.; Li, Q.; Wang, W. J.; Li, L.; Qin, S. G.; Shi, Y. L.; Liu, G. H.; Li, J. G.

    2016-02-01

    After commissioning in 2005, the EAST superconducting tokamak had been operated with its water cooled divertors for eight campaigns up to 2012, employing graphite as plasma facing material. With increase in heating power over 20 MW in recent years, the heat flux going to the divertors rises rapidly over 10 MW m-2 for steady state operation. To accommodate the rapid increasing heat load in EAST, the bolting graphite tile divertor must be upgraded. An ITER-like tungsten (W) divertor has been designed and developed; and firstly used for the upper divertor of EAST. The EAST upper W divertor is modular structure with 80 modules in total. Eighty sets of W/Cu plasma-facing components (PFC) with each set consisting of an outer vertical target (OVT), an inner vertical target (IVT) and a DOME, are attached to 80 stainless steel cassette bodies (CB) by pins. The monoblock W/Cu-PFCs have been developed for the strike points of both OVT and IVT, and the flat type W/Cu-PFCs for the DOME and the baffle parts of both OVT and IVT, employing so-called hot isostatic pressing (HIP) technology for tungsten to CuCrZr heat sink bonding, and electron beam welding for CuCrZr to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to other material bonding. Both monoblock and flat type PFC mockups passed high heat flux (HHF) testing by means of electron beam facilities. The 80 divertor modules were installed in EAST in 2014 and results of the first commissioning are presented in this paper.

  1. Carbon flows in attached divertor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Isler, R.C.; Brooks, N.H.; West, W.P.; Porter, G.D. |; The DIII-D Divertor Team

    1999-05-01

    Parallel flow velocities of carbon ions in the DIII-D divertor [J. Luxon {ital et al.}, {ital Plasma Physics Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research}, 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159; S. L. Allen {ital et al.}, {ital Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics}, 1987 (Proc. 24th European Conf. Berchtesgaden, 1997), Vol. 21 A, Part III, p. 1129] have been studied under various operating conditions: L-mode (low-confinement mode), H-mode (high-confinement mode) with low-frequency ELMs (edge-localized modes), and H-mode with high-frequency ELMs. Both normal and reversed flows (toward the target plate and away from the target plate, respectively) are observed under all conditions, with the reversed speeds being as much as a factor of four greater than normal speeds. Magnitudes are approximately the same for L-mode and H-mode operation with high-frequency ELMs. In H-mode conditions with low-frequency ELMs, normal velocities are frequently observed to decline while reversed velocities increase in comparison to the other two conditions. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. BBQ Modeling of Recycling from the Tore Supra Ergodic Divertor Neutraliser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannella, R.; Guirlet, R.; Demichelis, C.; Hogan, J.; Cherigier, L.

    1998-11-01

    Generation and recycling of carbon and hydrocarbon impurities, and recycling of neon at the Tore Supra pumped ergodic divertor have been analyzed using the BBQ 3-D scrape-off layer transport code. Code results are compared with spectroscopic observations from fibres located on the neutralizer plates, and background plasma conditions used in the code are constrained with data from langmuir probes embedded in the plates. The sensitivity of neon recycling to assumed reflection coefficients has been studied. A detailed 3-D geometry model for the neutralizer, including all 4 plates, and recycling from the notches between plates, has been prepared. A version of the code describing deuterium processes is being developed to study conditions during the onset of detachment at high density

  3. Cryogenic systems for the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    1988-01-01

    There are five technologies which may have application for Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), one passive and four active. In order of maturity, they are passive stored cryogen systems, and mechanical, sorption, magnetic, and pulse-tube refrigerators. In addition, deep space radiators will be required to reject the heat of the active systems, and may be useful as auxiliary coolers for the stored cryogen systems. Hybrid combinations of these technologies may well be more efficient than any one alone, and extensive system studies will be required to determine the best trade-offs. Stored cryogen systems were flown on a number of missions. The systems are capable of meeting the temperature requirements of LDR. The size and weight of stored cryogen systems are proportional to heat load and, as a result, are applicable only if the low-temperature heat load can be kept small. Systems using chemisorption and physical adsorption for compressors and pumps have received considerable attention in the past few years. Systems based on adiabatic demagnetization of paramagnetic salts were used for refrigeration for many years. Pulse-tube refrigerators were recently proposed which show relatively high efficiency for temperatures in the 60 to 80 K range. The instrument heat loads and operating temperatures are critical to the selection and design of the cryogenic system. Every effort should be made to minimize heat loads, raise operating temperatures, and to define these precisely. No one technology is now ready for application to LDR. Substantial development efforts are underway in all of the technologies and should be monitored and advocated. Magnetic and pulse-tube refrigerators have high potential.

  4. Spacecraft cryogenic gas storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, G.

    1971-01-01

    Cryogenic gas storage systems were developed for the liquid storage of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium. Cryogenic storage is attractive because of the high liquid density and low storage pressure of cryogens. This situation results in smaller container sizes, reduced container-strength levels, and lower tankage weights. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used cryogenic gas storage systems as standard spacecraft equipment. In addition to the Gemini and Apollo cryogenic gas storage systems, other systems were developed and tested in the course of advancing the state of the art. All of the cryogenic storage systems used, developed, and tested to date for manned-spacecraft applications are described.

  5. Upgraded divertor Thomson scattering system on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, F.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Du, D.; McLean, A. G.; Taussig, D. A.; Boivin, R. L.

    2016-11-01

    A design to extend the unique divertor Thomson scattering system on DIII-D to allow measurements of electron temperature and density in high triangularity plasmas is presented. Access to this region is selectable on a shot-by-shot basis by redirecting the laser beam of the existing divertor Thomson system inboard — beneath the lower floor using a moveable, high-damage threshold, in-vacuum mirror — and then redirecting again vertically. The currently measured divertor region remains available with this mirror retracted. Scattered light is collected from viewchords near the divertor floor using in-vacuum, high temperature optical elements and relayed through the port window, before being coupled into optical fiber bundles. At higher elevations from the floor, measurements are made by dynamically re-focusing the existing divertor system collection optics. Nd:YAG laser timing, analysis of the scattered light spectrum via polychromators, data acquisition, and calibration are all handled by existing systems or methods of the current multi-pulse Thomson scattering system. Existing filtered polychromators with 7 spectral channels are employed to provide maximum measurement breadth (Te in the range of 0.5 eV-2 keV, ne in the range of 5 × 1018-1 × 1021 m3) for both low Te in detachment and high Te measurement up beyond the separatrix.

  6. Divertor and midplane materials evaluation system in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. P. C.; Rudakov, D. L.; Allain, J. P.; Bastasz, R. J.; Brooks, N. H.; Brooks, J. N.; Doerner, R. P.; Evans, T. E.; Hassanein, A.; Jacob, W.; Krieger, K.; Litnovsky, A.; McLean, A. G.; Philipps, V.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Wampler, W. R.; Watkins, J. G.; West, W. P.; Whaley, J.; Wienhold, P.

    2007-06-01

    The Divertor Materials Evaluation System (DiMES) at General Atomics has successfully advanced the understanding of plasma surface interaction phenomena involving ITER-relevant materials and has been utilized for advanced diagnostic designs in the lower divertor of DIII-D. This paper describes a series of recent successful experiments. These include the study of carbon deposition in gaps and metallic mirrors as a function of temperature, study of dust migration from the divertor, study of methane injection in order to benchmark chemical sputtering diagnostics, and the measurement of charge exchange neutrals with a hydrogen sensor. In concert with the modification of the lower divertor of DIII-D, the DiMES sample vertical location was modified to match the raised divertor floor. The new Mid-plane Material Exposure Sample (MiMES) design will also be presented. MiMES will allow the study and measurement of erosion and redeposition of material at the outboard mid-plane of DIII-D, including effects from convective transport. We will continue to expose relevant materials and advanced diagnostics to different plasma configurations under various operational regimes, including material erosion and redeposition experiments, and gaps and mirror exposures at elevated temperature.

  7. Cryogenic Infrastructure for Fermilab's Ilc Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-03-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  8. CRYOGENIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR FERMILAB'S ILC VERTICAL CAVITY TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-03-16

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  9. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  10. Modeling of Alcator C-Mod Divertor Baffling Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D. P. Stotler; C. S. Pitcher; C. J. Boswell; T. K. Chung; B. LaBombard; B. Lipschultz; J. L. Terry; R. J. Kanzleiter

    2000-11-29

    A specific Alcator C-Mod discharge from the series of divertor baffling experiments is simulated with the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. A simple two-point plasma model is used to describe the plasma variation between Langmuir probe locations. A range of conductances for the bypass between the divertor plenum and the main chamber are considered. The experimentally observed insensitivity of the neutral current flowing through the bypass and of the D alpha emissions to the magnitude of the conductance is reproduced. The current of atoms in this regime is being limited by atomic physics processes and not the bypass conductance. The simulated trends in the divertor pressure, bypass current, and D alpha emission agree only qualitatively with the experimental measurements, however. Possible explanations for the quantitative differences are discussed.

  11. A novel approach to magnetic divertor configuration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blommaert, M.; Baelmans, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Gauger, N. R.; Reiter, D.

    2015-08-01

    Divertor exhaust system design and analysis tools are crucial to evolve from experimental fusion reactors towards commercial power plants. In addition to material research and dedicated vessel geometry design, improved magnetic configurations can contribute to sustaining the diverted heat loads. Yet, computational design of the magnetic divertor is a challenging process involving a magnetic equilibrium solver, a plasma edge grid generator and a computationally demanding plasma edge simulation. In this paper, an integrated approach to efficient sensitivity calculations is discussed and applied to a set of slightly reduced divertor models. Sensitivities of target heat load performance to the shaping coil currents are directly evaluated. Using adjoint methods, the cost for a sensitivity evaluation is reduced to about two times the simulation cost of one specific configuration. Further, the use of these sensitivities in an optimal design framework is illustrated by a case with realistic Joint European Torus (JET) configurational parameters.

  12. Plasma transport in a simulated magnetic-divertor configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Strawitch, C. M.

    1981-03-01

    The transport properties of plasma on magnetic field lines that intersect a conducting plate are studied experimentally in the Wisconsin internal ring D.C. machine. The magnetic geometry is intended to simulate certain aspects of plasma phenomena that may take place in a tokamak divertor. It is found by a variety of measurements that the cross field transport is non-ambipolar; this may have important implications in heat loading considerations in tokamak divertors. The undesirable effects of nonambipolar flow make it preferable to be able to eliminate it. However, we find that though the non-ambipolarity may be reduced, it is difficult to eliminate entirely. The plasma flow velocity parallel to the magnetic field is found to be near the ion acoustic velocity in all cases. The experimental density and electron temperature profiles are compared to the solutions to a one dimensional transport model that is commonly used in divertor theory.

  13. CRYOGENICS FOR FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Dauguet, P.; Bonneton, M.; Fauve, E.; Bernhardt, J. M.; Beauvisage, J.; Andrieu, F.; Gistau-Baguer, G. M.; Boissin, J. C.

    2008-03-16

    Fusion of Hydrogen to produce energy is one of the technologies under study to meet the mankind raising need in energy and as a substitute to fossil fuels for the future. This technology is under investigation for more than 30 years already, with, for example, the former construction of the experimental reactors Tore Supra, DIII-D and JET. With the construction of ITER to start, the next step to 'fusion for energy' will be done. In these projects, an extensive use of cryogenic systems is requested. Air Liquide has been involved as cryogenic partner in most of former and presently constructed fusion reactors. In the present paper, a review of the cryogenic systems we delivered to Tore Supra, JET, IPR and KSTAR will be presented.

  14. Cryogenic process simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, J.; Johnson, S.

    1994-01-01

    Combining accurate fluid property databases with a commercial equation-solving software package running on a desktop computer allows simulation of cryogenic processes without extensive computer programming. Computer simulation can be a powerful tool for process development or optimization. Most engineering simulations to date have required extensive programming skills in languages such as Fortran, Pascal, etc. Authors of simulation code have also usually been responsible for choosing and writing the particular solution algorithm. This paper describes a method of simulating cryogenic processes with a commercial software package on a desktop personal computer that does not require these traditional programming tasks. Applications include modeling of cryogenic refrigerators, heat exchangers, vapor-cooled power leads, vapor pressure thermometers, and various other engineering problems.

  15. Turbulence studies in Tokamak boundary plasmas with realistic divertor geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.Q.

    1998-10-14

    Results are presented from the 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code BOUT [1] and the linearized shooting code BAL[2] to study turbulence in tokamak boundary plasmas and its relationship to the L-H transition, in a realistic divertor plasma geometry. The key results include: (1) the identification of the dominant, resistive X-point mode in divertor geometry and (2) turbulence suppression in the L-H transition by shear in the ExB drift speed, ion diamagnetism and finite polarization. Based on the simulation results, a parameterization of the transport is given that includes the dependence on the relevant physical parameters.

  16. An analytic model for flow reversal in divertor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, P.I.H.; Prinja, A.K.

    1987-04-01

    An analytic model is developed and used to study the phenomenon of flow reversal which is observed in two-dimensional simulations of divertor plasmas. The effect is shown to be caused by the radial spread of neutral particles emitted from the divertor target which can lead to a strong peaking of the ionization source at certain radial locations. The results indicate that flow reversal over a portion of the width of the scrape-off layer is inevitable in high recycling conditions. Implications for impurity transport and particle removal in reactors are discussed.

  17. Non-ambipolar transport in a magnetic divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Strawitch, C M; Emmert, G A

    1980-02-01

    Plasma transport is studied in a simulated magnetic divertor in the Wisconsin single ring DC machine. The transport perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field is shown to be non-ambipolar by a variety of measurements, but can be forced to be ambipolar by an appropriately designed divertor target plate. The density profile in the scrape-off zone agrees with the predictions of a one-dimensional diffusion equation that assumes classical cross-field transport and plasma flow parallel to the field at the local ion acoustic velocity.

  18. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-06-23

    A method is disclosed for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N[sub 2] is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation. 7 figs.

  19. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    1992-01-01

    A method for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N.sub.2 is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation.

  20. Cryogenic cavitating flow in 2D laval nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Naoki; Nagashima, Toshio

    2003-05-01

    Cavitation is one of the troublesome problems in rocket turbo pumps, and since most of high-efficiency rocket propellants are cryogenic fluids, so called “thermodynamic effect” becomes more evident than in water. In the present study, numerical and experimental study of liquid nitrogen cavitation in 2D Laval nozzle was carried out, so that the influence of thermodynamic effect was examined. It was revealed that temperature and cavitation have strong inter-relationship with each other in thermo-sensitive cryogenic fluids.

  1. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1990-06-29

    A method for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N{sub 2} is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation.

  2. Cryogenic Propellant Densification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewart, R. O.; Dergance, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ground and vehicle system requirements are evaluated for the use of densified cryogenic propellants in advanced space transportation systems. Propellants studied were slush and triple point liquid hydrogen, triple point liquid oxygen, and slush and triple point liquid methane. Areas of study included propellant production, storage, transfer, vehicle loading and system requirements definition. A savings of approximately 8.2 x 100,000 Kg can be achieved in single stage to orbit gross liftoff weight for a payload of 29,484 Kg by utilizing densified cryogens in place of normal boiling point propellants.

  3. Cryogenic generator cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckels, P. W.; Fagan, T. J.; Parker, J. H., Jr.; Long, L. J.; Shestak, E. J.; Calfo, R. M.; Hannon, W. F.; Brown, D. B.; Barkell, J. W.; Patterson, A.

    The concept for a hydrogen cooled aluminum cryogenic generator was presented by Schlicher and Oberly in 1985. Following their lead, this paper describes the thermal design of a high voltage dc, multimegawatt generator of high power density. The rotor and stator are cooled by saturated liquid and supercritical hydrogen, respectively. The brushless exciter on the same shaft is also cooled by liquid hydrogen. Component development testing is well under way and some of the test results concerning the thermohydraulic performance of the conductors are reported. The aluminum cryogenic generator's characteristics are attractive for hydrogen economy applications.

  4. Unique Cryogenic Welded Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushchenko, K. A.; Monko, G. G.

    2004-06-01

    For the last few decades, the E. O. Paton Electric Welding Institute has been active in the field of cryogenic materials science. Integrated research on development of new grades of steels and alloys for cryogenic engineering was carried out in collaboration with the leading institutions of Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia. Commercially applied welding technologies and consumables were developed. They include large, spherical tanks for storage of liquefied gases (from oxygen to helium) under high pressures; space simulators with a capacity of 10 000 m3 and more; and load-carrying elements of superconducting fusion magnetic systems for the TOKAMAK, MGD, and ITER series.

  5. Unique Cryogenic Welded Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yushchenko, K.A.; Monko, G.G.

    2004-06-28

    For the last few decades, the E. O. Paton Electric Welding Institute has been active in the field of cryogenic materials science. Integrated research on development of new grades of steels and alloys for cryogenic engineering was carried out in collaboration with the leading institutions of Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia. Commercially applied welding technologies and consumables were developed. They include large, spherical tanks for storage of liquefied gases (from oxygen to helium) under high pressures; space simulators with a capacity of 10 000 m3 and more; and load-carrying elements of superconducting fusion magnetic systems for the TOKAMAK, MGD, and ITER series.

  6. Thermal Analysis of the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System Piping During the Gas Baking Process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Harvey, Karen; Ferrada, Juan J

    2011-02-01

    A preliminary analysis has been performed examining the temperature distribution in the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS) piping and the divertor itself during the gas baking process. During gas baking, it is required that the divertor reach a temperature of 350 C. Thermal losses in the piping and from the divertor itself require that the gas supply temperature be maintained above that temperature in order to ensure that all of the divertor components reach the required temperature. The analysis described in this report was conducted in order to estimate the required supply temperature from the gas heater.

  7. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  8. Neutral gas compression in the Alcator C-Mod divertor, experimental observations

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczewski, A.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; McCracken, G.

    1994-11-01

    One of the high heat flux solutions envisioned for ITER is the gas target divertor. This scheme requires high neutral pressure to be sustained in the divertor chamber with a minimal effect on the pressure in the main tokamak chamber (i.e. high gas compression). The neutral gas compression has been studied in the Alcator C-Mod closed divertor under various central and edge plasma conditions. The neutral pressure measured by a fast, in-situ, ionization gauge, installed behind the divertor target plate was compared with the midplane pressure, measured by a shielded Bayard-Alpert gauge. Divertor pressures up to 30 mTorr with compression factors p{sub div}/p{sub mid} {le} 70 have been observed. It has been found that the neutral pressure in the divertor does not depend strongly on the fueling location but rather on the core plasma density and the resulting divertor plasma regime. Divertor detachment leads to a considerable drop in the compression ratio, suggesting a partial {open_quotes}unplugging{close_quotes} of the divertor volume. An examination of the local particle flux balance in the divertor indicates that the single most important factor determining divertor pressure and compression is the private-flux plasma channel opacity to neutrals.

  9. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  10. Compact cryogenic inductors

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Carr, W.J. Jr.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Hordubay, T.D.; Chuboy, H.L. . Science and Technology Center)

    1994-07-01

    Power systems requiring power levels as high as a few megawatts to a few gigawatts for periods of several microseconds to several milliseconds with repetitive frequencies of a few hertz to a few kilohertz are being considered for potential space applications. The impulsive nature of the power presents the opportunity to use inductive energy storage techniques for pulse duty to enhance economic and practical considerations. An inductors must be efficient, lightweight, and reliable, and it must have high energy density if it is to be used in space based power systems. Cryogenic inductors are best studied for such an application. Parametric analyses of the two potential types of cryogenic inductors (superconducting and hyperconducting reveal that the hyperconducting (high purity aluminum)) inductor would be significantly lighter and achieve higher energy densities without the added penalty of a helium refrigeration system, thus resulting in improved overall system reliability. The lightweight hyperconducting cryogenic inductor technology is, however, in its infancy. This paper describes the required technology base which would allow the eventual application of the lightweight cryogenic inductor in space power systems, and also conclusively demonstrates the underlying principles.

  11. Valve for cryogenic service

    DOEpatents

    Worwetz, H.A.

    1975-09-02

    This patent relates to a valve for use with a liquefied gas at cryogenic temperatures in which a pair of joined knife edges are bellows controlled to contact an indium alloy seat in an annular slot when flow is to be stopped. The sealing alloy may be renewed by heating in situ. (auth)

  12. Taming the plasma-material interface with the snowflake divertor.

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A

    2015-04-24

    Experiments in several tokamaks have provided increasing support for the snowflake configuration as a viable tokamak heat exhaust concept. This white paper summarizes the snowflake properties predicted theoretically and studied experimentally, and identifies outstanding issues to be resolved in existing and future facilities before the snowflake divertor can qualify for the reactor interface.

  13. Line Shapes and Opacity Studies in Divertor Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosato, J.

    2008-10-22

    Large or dense divertor plasmas of magnetic fusion devices can be optically thick to the resonance lines of the hydrogen isotopes. In this work we examine the sensitivity of the line radiation transport to the detailed structure of the spectral profiles.

  14. Mechanical Design of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    R. Ellis, R. Kaita, H. Kugel, G. Paluzzi, M. Viola and R. Nygren

    2009-02-19

    The Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) on NSTX will be the first test of a fully-toroidal liquid lithium divertor in a high-power magnetic confinement device. It will replace part of the lower outboard divertor between a specified inside and outside radius, and ultimately provide a lithium surface exposed to the plasma with enough depth to absorb a significant particle flux. There are numerous technical challenges involved in the design. The lithium layer must be as thin as possible, and maintained at a temperature between 200 and 400 degrees Celsius to minimize lithium evaporation. This requirement leads to the use of a thick copper substrate, with a thin stainless steel layer bonded to the plasma-facing surface. A porous molybdenum layer is then plasma-sprayed onto the stainless steel, to provide a coating that facilitates full wetting of the surface by the liquid lithium. Other challenges include the design of a robust, vacuumcompatible heating and cooling system for the LLD. Replacement graphite tiles that provided the proper interface between the existing outer divertor and the LLD also had to be designed, as well as accommodation for special LLD diagnostics. This paper describes the mechanical design of the LLD, and presents analyses showing the performance limits of the LLD.

  15. Theoretical design of a compact energy recovering divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baver, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    An energy recovering divertor (ERD) is a type of plasma direct converter (PDC) designed to fit in the divertor channel of a tokamak. Such a device reduces the heat load to the divertor plate by converting a portion of it into electrical energy. This recovered energy can then be used for auxiliary heating and current drive, fundamentally altering the relationship between scientific and engineering breakeven and reducing dependence on bootstrap current. Previous work on the ERD concept focused on amplification of Alfven waves in a manner similar to a free-electron laser. While conceptually straightforward, this concept was also bulky, thus limiting its applicability to existing tokamak experiments. A design is presented for an ERD based on sheath-localized waves. This makes possible a device sufficiently compact to fit in the divertor channel of many existing tokamak experiments, and moreover requires no new shaping coils to achieve the desired magnetic geometry or topology. In addition, incidental advantages of this concept will be discussed.

  16. R&D ERL: Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect

    Than, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL cryogenic system will supply cooling to a super-conducting RF (SCRF) gun and the 5-cell super-conducting RF cavity system that need to be held cold at 2K. The engineering of the cavity cryomodules were carried out by AES in collaboration with BNL. The 2K superfluid bath is produced by pumping on the bath using a sub-atmospheric warm compression system. The cryogenic system makes use of mainly existing equipment relocated from other facilities: a 300W 4.5K coldbox, an 45 g/s screw compressor, a 3800 liter liquid helium storage dewar, a 170 m{sup 3} warm gas storage tank, and a 40,000 liter vertical low pressure liquid nitrogen storage dewar. An existing wet expander obtained from another facility has been added to increase the plant capacity. In order to deliver the required 3 to 4 bar helium to the cryomodules while using up stored liquid capacity at low pressure, a new subcooler will be installed to function as the capacity transfer device. A 2K to 4K recovery heat exchanger is also implemented for each cryomodule to recover refrigeration below 4K, thus maximizing 2K cooling capacity with the given sub-atmospheric pump. No 4K-300K refrigeration recovery is implemented at this time of the returning sub-atmospheric cold vapor, hence the 2K load appears as a liquefaction1 load on the cryogenic plant. A separate LN2 cooling loop supplies liquid nitrogen to the superconducting gun's cathode tip.

  17. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive use of a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives data base, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented in 1986. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings relating the status of air liquefaction technology are presented both as a singular technical area, and also as that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; Heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; Para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; Hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; Hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sinks; Liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket type combustion devices; Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES); and Technically related engine concepts.

  18. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabiers, R. L.; Siebenhaar, A.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate pump and driver systems for low thrust cargo orbit transfer vehicle engines which deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit and beyond are evaluated. The pumps operate to 68 atmospheres (1000 psi) discharge pressure and flowrates suited to cryogenic engines using either LOX/methane or LOX/hydrogen propellants in thrust ranges from 445 to 8900 N (100 to 2000 lb F). Analysis of the various pumps and drivers indicate that the low specific speed requirement will make high fluid efficiencies difficult to achieve. As such, multiple stages are required. In addition, all pumps require inducer stages. The most attractive main pumps are the multistage centrifugal pumps.

  19. Cryogenic pellet production developments for long-pulse plasma operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitner, S. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; McGill, J. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; McGinnis, W. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Long pulse plasma operation on large magnetic fusion devices require multiple forms of cryogenically formed pellets for plasma fueling, on-demand edge localized mode (ELM) triggering, radiative cooling of the divertor, and impurity transport studies. The solid deuterium fueling and ELM triggering pellets can be formed by extrusions created by helium cooled, twin-screw extruder based injection system that freezes deuterium in the screw section. A solenoid actuated cutter mechanism is activated to cut the pellets from the extrusion, inserting them into the barrel, and then fired by the pneumatic valve pulse of high pressure gas. Fuel pellets are injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, and ELM triggering pellets are injected at rates up to 20 Hz. The radiative cooling and impurity transport study pellets are produced by introducing impurity gas into a helium cooled section of a pipe gun where it deposits in-situ. A pneumatic valve is opened and propellant gas is released downstream where it encounters a passive punch which initially accelerates the pellet before the gas flow around the finishes the pellet acceleration. This paper discusses the various cryogenic pellet production techniques based on the twin-screw extruder, pipe gun, and pellet punch designs.

  20. Cryogenic pellet production developments for long-pulse plasma operation

    SciTech Connect

    Meitner, S. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; McGill, J. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; McGinnis, W. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-01-29

    Long pulse plasma operation on large magnetic fusion devices require multiple forms of cryogenically formed pellets for plasma fueling, on-demand edge localized mode (ELM) triggering, radiative cooling of the divertor, and impurity transport studies. The solid deuterium fueling and ELM triggering pellets can be formed by extrusions created by helium cooled, twin-screw extruder based injection system that freezes deuterium in the screw section. A solenoid actuated cutter mechanism is activated to cut the pellets from the extrusion, inserting them into the barrel, and then fired by the pneumatic valve pulse of high pressure gas. Fuel pellets are injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, and ELM triggering pellets are injected at rates up to 20 Hz. The radiative cooling and impurity transport study pellets are produced by introducing impurity gas into a helium cooled section of a pipe gun where it deposits in-situ. A pneumatic valve is opened and propellant gas is released downstream where it encounters a passive punch which initially accelerates the pellet before the gas flow around the finishes the pellet acceleration. This paper discusses the various cryogenic pellet production techniques based on the twin-screw extruder, pipe gun, and pellet punch designs.

  1. The cryogenic cooling program at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.; Mills, D.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the experimental and analytical program in cryogenic cooling of high-heat-load optics at the Advanced-Photon Source. A prototype liquid nitrogen pumping system has been procured. This pump provides a variable flow rate of 1 to 10 gpm of pressurized liquid nitrogen and is sized to handle up to 5 kW of optic heat load. Also, a high-vacuum, double-crystal monochromator testing tank has been fabricated. This system will be used to test cryogenic crystals at existing synchrotron sources. A finite element analysis has been performed for a cryogenically cooled Si crystal in the inclined geometry for Undulator A at 100 mA. The inclination angle was 80{degrees}. It was set to diffract from the (111) planes at the first harmonic energy of 4.2 keV. The maximum slope error in the diffraction plane was calculated to be about 1 {mu}rad with a peak temperature of 94 K. An analysis has also been performed for a cryogenically-cooled ``thin`` crystal oriented in the Bragg geometry which accepts 87% of the lst harmonic photons at 3.866 keV. The total absorbed power was 131 W at 100 mA current and the peak temperature was 124 K.

  2. Diagnostic options for radiative divertor feedback control on NSTX-Ua)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kaita, R.; McLean, A. G.; Raman, R.

    2012-10-01

    A radiative divertor technique is used in present tokamak experiments and planned for ITER to mitigate high heat loads on divertor plasma-facing components (PFCs) to prevent excessive material erosion and thermal damage. In NSTX, a large spherical tokamak with lithium-coated graphite PFCs and high divertor heat flux (qpeak ⩽ 15 MW/m2), radiative divertor experiments have demonstrated a significant reduction of divertor peak heat flux simultaneously with good core H-mode confinement using pre-programmed D2 or CD4 gas injections. In this work diagnostic options for a new real-time feedback control system for active radiative divertor detachment control in NSTX-U, where steady-state peak divertor heat fluxes are projected to reach 20-30 MW/m2, are discussed. Based on the NSTX divertor detachment measurements and analysis, the control diagnostic signals available for NSTX-U include divertor radiated power, neutral pressure, spectroscopic deuterium recombination signatures, infrared thermography of PFC surfaces, and thermoelectric scrape-off layer current. In addition, spectroscopic "security" monitoring of possible confinement or pedestal degradation is recommended. These signals would be implemented in a digital plasma control system to manage the divertor detachment process via an actuator (impurity gas seeding rate).

  3. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    DOEpatents

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Wines, Robin Renee; Takacs, James Joseph

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament.

  4. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  5. Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, M. G.; Sherman, A.; Studer, P. A.; Daniels, A.; Goldowsky, M. P.

    1983-06-01

    A long lifetime Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler particularly adapted for space applications is described. It consists of a compressor section centrally aligned end to end with an expansion section, and respectively includes a reciprocating compressor piston and displacer radially suspended in interconnecting cylindrical housings by active magnetic bearings and has adjacent reduced clearance regions so as to be in noncontacting relationship therewith and wherein one or more of these regions operate as clearance seals. The piston and displacer are reciprocated in their housings by linear drive motors to vary the volume of respectively adjacent compression and expansion spaces which contain a gaseous working fluid and a thermal regenerator to effect Stirling cycle cryogenic cooling.

  6. Cryogenic support system

    DOEpatents

    Nicol, Thomas H.; Niemann, Ralph C.; Gonczy, John D.

    1988-01-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member.

  7. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, Jose Luis; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  8. Cryogenic Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Goloborod'ko, S.; /Fermilab

    1989-02-27

    The control system (CS) for the cryogenic arrangement of the DO Liquid Argon Calorimeter consists of a Texas instruments 560/565 Programmable Logical Controller (PLC), two remote bases with Remote Base Controllers and a corresponding set of input/output (I/O) modules, and a PC AST Premium 286 (IBM AT Compatible). The PLC scans a set of inputs and provides a set of outputs based on a ladder logic program and PID control loops. The inputs are logic or analog (current, voltage) signals from equipment status switches or transducers. The outputs are logic or analog (current or voltage) signals for switching solenoids and positioning pneumatic actuators. Programming of the PLC is preformed by using the TISOFT2/560/565 package, which is installed in the PC. The PC communicates to the PLC through a serial RS232 port and provides operator interface to the cryogenic process using Xpresslink software.

  9. Cryogenic support system

    DOEpatents

    Nicol, T.H.; Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.

    1988-11-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member. 7 figs.

  10. Computing Thermal Effects of Cavitation in Cryogenic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Dash, Sanford M.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program implements a numerical model of thermal effects of cavitation in cryogenic fluids. The model and program were developed for use in designing and predicting the performances of turbopumps for cryogenic fluids. Prior numerical models used for this purpose do not account for either the variability of properties of cryogenic fluids or the thermal effects (especially, evaporative cooling) involved in cavitation. It is important to account for both because in a cryogenic fluid, the thermal effects of cavitation are substantial, and the cavitation characteristics are altered by coupling between the variable fluid properties and the phase changes involved in cavitation. The present model accounts for both thermal effects and variability of properties by incorporating a generalized representation of the properties of cryogenic fluids into a generalized compressible-fluid formulation for a cavitating pump. The model has been extensively validated for liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Using the available data on the properties of these fluids, the model has been shown to predict accurate temperature-depression values.

  11. Cryogenic Selective Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Under our NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) project we have theoretically demonstrated a novel selective surface that reflects roughly 100 times more solar radiation than any other known coating. If this prediction holds up under experimental tests it will allow cryogenic temperatures to be reached in deep space even in the presence of the sun. It may allow LOX to be carried to the Moon and Mars. It may allow superconductors to be used in deep space without a refrigeration system.

  12. Development and implementation of the TPX structural and cryogenic design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zatz, I.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Schultz, J.H.

    1993-11-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is a superconducting tokamak utilizing both Nb{sub 3}Sn and NbTi superconducting magnets and will feature a low-activation titanium alloy vacuum vessel and carbon-carbon composite divertors. Due to the unique nature of the component designs, materials, and environment, the TPX project felt it necessary to develop a design criteria (code) which will specifically address the structural and cryogenic design aspects of such a device. The developed code is intended to serve all components of the device; namely, the TF and PF magnets, vacuum vessel, first wall and divertor, cryostat, diagnostics, heating devices, shielding, and all associated structural elements. The structural portion is based largely on that developed for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), which was modeled after the CIT Vacuum Vessel Structural Design Criteria and ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B & PV) Code. The cryogenic criteria is largely modeled after that proposed in the ITER CDA. This paper summarizes the TPX Criteria document.

  13. Optimizing stability, transport, and divertor operation through plasma shaping for steady-state scenario development in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C T; Ferron, J R; Luce, T C; Petrie, T W; Politzer, P A; Rhodes, T L; Doyle, E J; Makowski, M A; Kessel, C; DeBoo, J C; Groebner, R J; Osborne, T H; Snyder, P B; Greenfield, C M; La Haye, R J; Murakami, M; Hyatt, A W; Challis, C; Prater, R; Jackson, G L; Park, J; Reimerdes, H; Turnbull, A D; McKee, G R; Shafer, M W; Groth, M; Porter, G D; West, W P

    2008-12-19

    Recent studies on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] have elucidated key aspects of the dependence of stability, confinement, and density control on the plasma magnetic configuration, leading to the demonstration of nearly noninductive operation for >1 s with pressure 30% above the ideal no-wall stability limit. Achieving fully noninductive tokamak operation requires high pressure, good confinement, and density control through divertor pumping. Plasma geometry affects all of these. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics modeling of external kink stability suggests that it may be optimized by adjusting the shape parameter known as squareness ({zeta}). Optimizing kink stability leads to an increase in the maximum stable pressure. Experiments confirm that stability varies strongly with {zeta}, in agreement with the modeling. Optimization of kink stability via {zeta} is concurrent with an increase in the H-mode edge pressure pedestal stability. Global energy confinement is optimized at the lowest {zeta} tested, with increased pedestal pressure and lower core transport. Adjusting the magnetic divertor balance about a double-null configuration optimizes density control for improved noninductive auxiliary current drive. The best density control is obtained with a slight imbalance toward the divertor opposite the ion grad(B) drift direction, consistent with modeling of these effects. These optimizations have been combined to achieve noninductive current fractions near unity for over 1 s with normalized pressure of 3.5<{beta}{sub N}<3.9, bootstrap current fraction of >65%, and a normalized confinement factor of H{sub 98(y,2)}{approx}1.5.

  14. Advances in Helium Cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciver, S. W. Van

    This review provides a survey of major advances that have occurred in recent years in the area of helium cryogenics. Helium-temperature cryogenics is the enabling technology for a substantial and growing number of low-temperature systems from superconducting magnets to space-based experimental facilities. In recent years there have been many advances in the technology of low-temperature helium, driven mostly by new applications. However, to keep the review from being too broad, this presentation focuses mainly on three of the most significant advances. These are: (1) the development of large-scale recuperative refrigeration systems mainly for superconducting magnet applications in accelerators and other research facilities; (2) the use of stored superfluid helium (He II) as a coolant for spacebased astrophysics experiments; and (3) the application of regenerative cryocoolers operating at liquid helium temperatures primarily for cooling superconducting devices. In each case, the reader should observe that critical technologies were developed to facilitate these applications. In addition to these three primary advances, other significant helium cryogenic technologies are briefly reviewed at the end of this chapter, along with some vision for future developments in these areas.

  15. Cryogenic Treatment of Metal Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Chillar, Rahul; Agrawal, S. C.

    2006-03-31

    Cryogenic treatment and its variables have been described. Results of eight engineering tests carried out on cryotreated parts have been presented. Cryogenic treatment of metal parts enhances useful properties which in turn, improves various strengths. Our tests viz. Abrasion, Torsion, Fatigue, Tensile, Shear, Hardness and Impact on Mild steel, Cast Iron, Brass and Copper show that the cryogenic treatment improved useful properties of mild steel parts appreciably but did not show promise with brass and copper parts.

  16. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  17. PUMP CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

    1960-09-27

    A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

  18. Divertor heat and particle control experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdavi, M.A; Baker, D.R.; Allen, S.L.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper we present a summary of recent DIII-D divertor physics activity and plans for future divertor upgrades. During the past year, DIII-D experimental effort was focused on areas of active heat and particle control and divertor target erosion studies. Using the DIII-D Advanced Divertor system we have succeeded for the first time to control the plasma density and demonstrate helium exhaust in H-mode plasmas. Divertor heat flux control by means of D{sub 2} gas puffing and impurity injection were studied separately and in, both cases up to a factor of five reduction of the divertor peak heat flux was observed. Using the DiMES sample transfer system we have obtained erosion data on various material samples in well diagnosed plasmas and compared the results with predictions of numerical models.

  19. The influence of the radial particle transport on the divertor plasma detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, K.; Shimizu, K.; Takizuka, T.; Asakura, N.; Nakano, T.

    2015-08-01

    Divertor plasma detachment is the most promising candidate to reduce the divertor heat load in fusion reactors. Present understanding of detachment physics is not sufficient to adequately reproduce experimental observations. Understanding and control of detachment physics is indispensable to design the divertor in future machines. To improve the quality of divertor modeling and reveal limitations of the detachment physics built into state-of-the-art codes, an integrated divertor code SONIC has been applied to modeling of the JT-60U detached divertor plasma. In this study, the radial diffusion coefficient in the private region or the far SOL region is increased to investigate the influence of radial plasma transport on detachment characteristics. Saturation of the reduction in ion flux after roll-over is improved by the radial transport enhancement, while the radial profile at the mid-plane agreed with the experimental data.

  20. Tungsten spectroscopy relevant to the diagnostics development of ITER divertor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; McLean, H S; Wood, R D

    2009-12-01

    The ITER tokamak will have tungsten divertor tiles and, consequently, the divertor plasmas are expected to contain tungsten ions. The spectral emission from these ions can serve to diagnose the divertor for plasma parameters such as tungsten concentrations, densities, ion and electron temperatures, and flow velocities. The ITER divertor plasmas will likely have densities around 10{sup 14-15} cm{sup -3} and temperatures below 150 eV. These conditions are similar to the plasmas at the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) in Livermore. To simulate ITER divertor plasmas, a tungsten impurity was introduced into the SSPX spheromak by prefilling it with tungsten hexacarbonyl prior to the usual hydrogen gas injection and initiation of the plasma discharge. The possibility of using the emission from low charge state tungsten ions to diagnose tokamak divertor plasmas has been investigated using a high-resolution extreme ultraviolet spectrometer.

  1. An automated approach to magnetic divertor configuration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blommaert, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Baelmans, M.; Gauger, N. R.; Reiter, D.

    2015-01-01

    Automated methods based on optimization can greatly assist computational engineering design in many areas. In this paper an optimization approach to the magnetic design of a nuclear fusion reactor divertor is proposed and applied to a tokamak edge magnetic configuration in a first feasibility study. The approach is based on reduced models for magnetic field and plasma edge, which are integrated with a grid generator into one sensitivity code. The design objective chosen here for demonstrative purposes is to spread the divertor target heat load as much as possible over the entire target area. Constraints on the separatrix position are introduced to eliminate physically irrelevant magnetic field configurations during the optimization cycle. A gradient projection method is used to ensure stable cost function evaluations during optimization. The concept is applied to a configuration with typical Joint European Torus (JET) parameters and it automatically provides plausible configurations with reduced heat load.

  2. Detached divertor operation in DIII-D helium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D. N., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    This paper presents results from operating helium plasmas in DIII-D in which helium gas puffing is used to reduce the peak divertor heat flux by factors of four or more. The threshold density for achieving these conditions is nearly the same as for deuterium plasmas, which is surprising given the fact that lack of chemical sputtering reduces the carbon concentration in the plasma by more than a factor of five. Spectroscopic analysis shows that helium becomes the primary radiation in these plasmas, which is possible because, unlike carbon, it is the primary species present. These plasmas differ from the usual partially detached divertor (PDD) plasmas in that there is no concomitant reduction in target plate ion flux with target plate heat flux in the scrape off later outside the separatrix.

  3. Preliminary activation calculations for the Poloidal Divertor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, J.L.; Scott, A.J.; Nigg, D.W.; Bohn, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) tokamak is being operated by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to study plasma cross section shaping, high power neutral beam heating, and divertor control of plasma impurities in tokamaks. Experiments to date have been performed at relatively low power, but with 6 MW of neutral beam power eventually available, high D-D plasma reaction rates are expected that will yield up to 10/sup 15/ 2.45-MeV neutrons per pulse. This neutron emission level is high enough to cause significant neutron-induced machine activation that will limit the occupancy time of personnel entering the room to repair or change parts. The dose rate depends on the location in the room and, of course, the pulsing history prior to entry. This paper describes one-dimensional activation calculations that have been done for PDX to provide preliminary dose rate information for various times after shutdown following one week of high power operation.

  4. Diagnosing transient plasma status: from solar atmosphere to tokamak divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunta, A. S.; Henderson, S.; O'Mullane, M.; Harrison, J.; Doyle, J. G.; Summers, H. P.

    2016-09-01

    This work strongly exploits the interdisciplinary links between astrophysical (such as the solar upper atmosphere) and laboratory plasmas (such as tokamak devices) by sharing the development of a common modelling for time-dependent ionisation. This is applied to the interpretation of solar flare data observed by the UVSP (Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter), on-board the Solar Maximum Mission and the IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph), and also to data from B2-SOLPS (Scrape Off Layer Plasma Simulations) for MAST (Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak) Super-X divertor upgrade. The derived atomic data, calculated in the framework of the ADAS (Atomic Data and Analysis Structure) project, allow equivalent prediction in non-stationary transport regimes and transients of both the solar atmosphere and tokamak divertors, except that the tokamak evolution is about one thousand times faster.

  5. The investigation of opacity in the JET tokomak divertor region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachin, Tracey

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate Lyman line absorption by deuterium atoms in the divertor region of the JET tokamak for four high density, low temperature, detached plasma pulses. A collisional radiative model of deuterium level populations has been used to estimate the extent of Lybeta radiative absorption in the divertor along the same line of sight as a VUV spectrometer. This uses a first order escape probability method to evaluate the line escape probabilities and gives a self consistent model of the level populations and radiation field. These results are compared with experimental measurements of the branching ratio of Lybeta to Dalpha from the VUV spectrometer and various visible diagnostics. Both the theoretical and experimental results agree that opacity reduces the level of Lybeta emission from the divertor plasma. The effects of opacity on the ionisation and power balance of the plasma are examined for various conditions. The results of this investigation are compared with other theoretical work in the field. It is shown that the levels of opacity are not great enough to significantly alter the ionisation and power balance of the plasma for the conditions presently being created within the JET tokamak. The population code requires information about the background plasma. This can be provided by either a fluid code or an 'onion-skin' plasma simulation. Both models are used in this investigation and their levels of accuracy are compared. Finally, a brief investigation into the level of opacity in a future tokamak, ITER, is carried out using predicted plasma profiles. It is shown that opacity levels in the divertor region of the ITER tokamak could match those of JET and by creating highly detached plasmas could easily exceed these levels.

  6. Tokamak power exhaust with the snowflake divertor: Present results and outstanding issues

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Xu, X.

    2015-09-15

    Here, a snowflake divertor magnetic configuration (Ryutov in Phys Plasmas 14(6):064502, 2007) with the second-order poloidal field null offers a number of possible advantages for tokamak plasma heat and particle exhaust in comparison with the standard poloidal divertor with the first-order null. Results from snowflake divertor experiments are briefly reviewed and future directions for research in this area are outlined.

  7. Material deposition on inner divertor quartz-micro balances during ITER-like wall operation in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, H. G.; Philipps, V.; Freisinger, M.; Widdowson, A.; Heinola, K.; Kirschner, A.; Möller, S.; Petersson, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Huber, A.; Matthews, G. F.; Rubel, M.; Sergienko, G.

    2015-08-01

    The migration of beryllium, tungsten and carbon to remote areas of the inner JET-ILW divertor and the accompanying co-deposition of deuterium has been investigated using post-mortem analysis of the housings of quartz-micro balances (QMBs) and their quartz crystals. The analysis of the deposition provides that the rate of beryllium atoms is significantly reduced compared to the analogue deposition rate of carbon during the carbon wall conditions (JET-C) at the same locations of the QMBs. A reduction factor of 50 was found at the entrance gap to the cryo-pumps while it was 14 under tile 5, the semi-horizontal target plate. The deposits consist of C/Be atomic ratios of typically 0.1-0.5 showing an enrichment of carbon in remote areas compared to directly exposed areas with less carbon. The deuterium retention fraction D/Be is between 0.3 and 1 at these unheated locations in the divertor.

  8. Analytical calculations for impurity seeded partially detached divertor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, A.; Bernert, M.; Dux, R.; Reimold, F.; Wischmeier, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-04-01

    A simple analytical formula for the impurity seeded partially detached divertor operational point has been developed using 1D modelling. The inclusion of charge exchange momentum loss terms improves the 1D modelling for ASDEX Upgrade conditions and its extrapolation to larger devices. The investigations are concentrated around a partially detached divertor working point of low heat flux and an electron temperature around 2.5 eV at the target which are required to maintain low sputtering rates at a tungsten target plate. An experimental formula for the onset of detachment by nitrogen seeding in ASDEX Upgrade is well reproduced, and predictions are given for N, Ne and Ar seeding for variable device size. Moderate deviations from a linear {{P}\\text{sep}}/R size dependence of the detachment threshold are seen in the modelling caused by upstream radiation at longer field line lengths. The presented formula allows the prediction of the neutral gas or seed impurity pressure which is required to achieve partial detachment for a given {{P}\\text{sep}} in devices with a closed divertor similar to the geometry in ASDEX Upgrade.

  9. Particle recirculation in the ergodic divertor of Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, J. P.; Azéroual, A.; Bécoulet, M.; Bucalossi, J.; Bush, C.; Corre, Y.; Costanzo, L.; Devynck, P.; Ghendrih, Ph; Gianella, R.; Grisolia, C.; Guirlet, R.; Grosman, A.; Laugier, F.; Loarer, T.; Martin, G.; Meslin, B.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Moulin, D.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Pégourié, B.; Reichle, R.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Schunke, B.; Vallet, J.-C.

    1999-12-01

    The present paper addresses the issue of particle recirculation in discharges where low-energy flux to ergodic divertor target plates is achieved in highly-radiating detached ohmic plasmas. Plasma temperature and particle flux are measured by flush-mounted probes in the divertor plates and by an upstream fast scanning Mach probe. The scalings with core density of the ion flux and electron temperature are well described by the simple two-point model used in axisymmetric poloidal divertors. The detachment signature is a pressure drop that occurs when the edge temperature falls below 10 eV. The parallel ion flux gradient is always positive, indicating that recombination is unlikely to play an important role in detachment. Visible spectroscopy of a neutralizer plate shows that attainment of cold detached plasmas near the density limit coincides with an abrupt increase of fuelling efficiency for both deuterium and impurities. A feedback algorithm based on real-time Langmuir probe measurements has been developed to monitor detachment and avoid disruptions.

  10. Power distribution in the snowflake divertor in TCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimerdes, H.; Canal, G. P.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Lunt, T.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Coda, S.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; Nespoli, F.; Tal, B.; the TCV Team

    2013-12-01

    TCV experiments demonstrate the basic power exhaust properties of the snowflake (SF) plus and SF minus divertor configurations by measuring the heat fluxes at each of their four divertor legs. The measurements indicate an enhanced transport into the private flux region and a reduction of peak heat fluxes compared to a similar single null configuration. There are indications that this enhanced transport cannot be explained by the modified field line geometry alone and likely requires an additional or enhanced cross-field transport channel. The measurements, however, do not show a broadening of the scrape-off layer (SOL) and, hence, no increased cross-field transport in the common flux region. The observations are consistent with the spatial limitation of several characteristic SF properties, such as a low poloidal magnetic field in the divertor region and a long connection length to the inner part of the SOL closest to the separatrix. Although this limitation is typical in a medium sized tokamak like TCV, it does not apply to significantly larger devices where the SF properties are enhanced across the entire expected extent of the SOL.

  11. Fast reciprocating Langmuir probe for the DIII-D divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. G.; Hunter, J.; Tafoya, B.; Ulrickson, M.; Watson, R. D.; Moyer, R. A.; Cuthbertson, J. W.; Gunner, G.; Lehmer, R.; Luong, P.; Hill, D. N.; Mascaro, M.; Robinson, J. I.; Snider, R.; Stambaugh, R.

    1997-01-01

    A new reciprocating Langmuir probe was used to measure density and temperature profiles, ion flow, and potential fluctuation levels from the lower divertor floor up to the X point on the DIII-D Tokamak. This probe is designed to make fast (2 kHz swept, 20 kHz Mach, 500 kHz Vfloat) measurements with 2 mm spatial resolution in the region where the largest gradients on the plasma open flux tubes are found and therefore provide the best benchmarks for scrap-off layer and divertor numerical models. Profiles are constructed using the 300 ms time history of the probe measurements during the 25 cm reciprocating stroke. Both single and double null plasmas can be measured and compared with a 20 Hz divertor Thomson scattering system. The probe head is constructed of four different kinds of graphite to optimize the electrical and thermal characteristics. Electrically insulated pyrolytic graphite rings act as a heat shield to absorb the plasma heat flux on the probe shaft and are mounted on a carbon/carbon composite core for mechanical strength. The Langmuir probe sampling tips are made of a linear carbon fiber composite. The mechanical, electrical, data acquisition, and power supply systems will be described. Initial measurements will also be presented.

  12. Island Divertor Plate Modeling for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwell, G. J.; Massidda, S. D.; Ennis, D. A.; Knowlton, S. F.; Maurer, D. A.; Bader, A.

    2015-11-01

    Edge magnetic island divertors can be used as a method of plasma particle and heat exhaust in long pulse stellarator experiments. Detailed power loading on these structures and its relationship to the long connection length scrape off layer physics is a new Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) research thrust. CTH is a five field period, l = 2 torsatron with R0 = 0 . 75 m, ap ~ 0 . 2 m, and | B | <= 0 . 7 T. For these studies CTH is configured as a pure stellarator using a 28 GHz, 200 kW gyrotron operating at 2nd harmonic for ECRH. We report the results of EMC3-EIRENE modeling of divertor plates near magnetic island structures. The edge rotational transform is varied by adjusting the ratio of currents in the helical and toroidal field coils. A poloidal field coil adjusts the shear of the rotational transform profile, and width of the magnetic island, while the phase of the island is rotated with a set of five error coils producing an n = 1 perturbation. For the studies conducted, a magnetic configuration with a large n = 1 , m = 3 magnetic island at the edge is generated. Results from multiple potential divertor plate locations will be presented and discussed. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  13. Active control of divertor asymmetry on EAST by localized D2 and Ar puffing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongsheng; Guo, Houyang; Wang, Huiqian; Luo, Guangnan; Wu, Zhenwei; Wu, Jinhua; Gao, Wei; Wang, Liang; Li, Qiang; East Team

    2011-03-01

    The divertor asymmetry in particle and power fluxes has been investigated on the EAST superconducting tokamak [S. Wu and EAST Team, Fusion Eng. Des. 82, 463 (2007)] for both single null (SN) and double null (DN) divertor configurations. D2 and Ar puffing at various divertor locations has also been explored as an active means to reduce peak target heat load and control divertor asymmetry. For SN, peak heat load on the outer divertor target is 2-3 times that on the inner divertor target under typical ohmic plasma conditions. DN operation leads to a stronger in-out asymmetry favoring the outer divertor. D2 and Ar puffing promotes partial detachment near the strike points, greatly reducing peak target heat load (over 50%), while the far-SOL divertor plasma remains attached. What is remarkable is that the particle flux is even increased away from the strike points when the B×∇B drift is directed toward the divertor target, thus facilitating particle removal.

  14. The effect of the magnetic topology on particle recycling in the ergodic divertor of TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnen, M.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Brezinsek, S.; Finken, K. H.; Harting, D.; von Hellermann, M.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Jaspers, R.; Kirschner, A.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Schmitz, O.; Sergienko, G.; Unterberg, B.; Wolf, R.; Textor Team

    2007-06-01

    The influence of the divertor geometry of the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) in TEXTOR on particle recycling is discussed. The geometry can be varied by the choice of the base mode, the edge safety factor and the divertor coil current. The divertor volume is split into the upstream and the downstream area. Strong plasma flows in the downstream area, essential for high screening efficiency, are predicted. The source strength of deuterium and carbon in the downstream area is estimated by using the two-dimensional distribution of Dα and CIII emission in front of the target. The results are compared to EMC3 and ERO-code calculations.

  15. Cryogenic Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justak, John

    2010-01-01

    An acousto-optic cryogenic flow sensor (CFS) determines mass flow of cryogens for spacecraft propellant management. The CFS operates unobtrusively in a high-pressure, high-flowrate cryogenic environment to provide measurements for fluid quality as well as mass flow rate. Experimental hardware uses an optical plane-of-light (POL) to detect the onset of two-phase flow, and the presence of particles in the flow of water. Acousto-optic devices are used in laser equipment for electronic control of the intensity and position of the laser beam. Acousto-optic interaction occurs in all optical media when an acoustic wave and a laser beam are present. When an acoustic wave is launched into the optical medium, it generates a refractive index wave that behaves like a sinusoidal grating. An incident laser beam passing through this grating will diffract the laser beam into several orders. Its angular position is linearly proportional to the acoustic frequency, so that the higher the frequency, the larger the diffracted angle. If the acoustic wave is traveling in a moving fluid, the fluid velocity will affect the frequency of the traveling wave, relative to a stationary sensor. This frequency shift changes the angle of diffraction, hence, fluid velocity can be determined from the diffraction angle. The CFS acoustic Bragg grating data test indicates that it is capable of accurately determining flow from 0 to 10 meters per second. The same sensor can be used in flow velocities exceeding 100 m/s. The POL module has successfully determined the onset of two-phase flow, and can distinguish vapor bubbles from debris.

  16. Vibration dampers for cryogenic turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Olan, Emmanuel; Ibrahim, Azman Syed; Kascak, Albert F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development of effective and reliable minimum-weight and minimum-envelope vibration dampers for cryogenic turbines. To meet this objective, a high speed test rig was designed and fabricated, which is currently used to test a curved beam type damper. The operation, capacity, structural characteristics, measurement system, and safety features of the cryogenic damper test rig are discussed.

  17. Optical Detection Of Cryogenic Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system identifies leakage without requiring shutdown for testing. Proposed device detects and indicates leaks of cryogenic liquids automatically. Detector makes it unnecessary to shut equipment down so it can be checked for leakage by soap-bubble or helium-detection methods. Not necessary to mix special gases or other materials with cryogenic liquid flowing through equipment.

  18. Cryogenic container compound suspension strap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A support strap for use in a cryogenic storage vessel for supporting the inner shell from the outer shell with a minimum heat leak is presented. The compound suspension strap is made from a unidirectional fiberglass epoxy composite material with an ultimate tensile strength and fatigue strength which are approximately doubled when the material is cooled to a cryogenic temperature.

  19. Cryogenic insulation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhard, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    Multilayer insulations for long term cryogenic storage are described. The development effort resulted in an insulation concept using lightweight radiation shields, separated by low conductive Dacron fiber tufts. The insulation is usually referred to as Superfloc. The fiber tufts are arranged in a triangular pattern and stand about .040 in. above the radiation shield base. Thermal and structural evaluation of Superfloc indicated that this material is a strong candidate for the development of high performance thermal protection systems because of its high strength, purge gas evacuation capability during boost, its density control and easy application to a tank.

  20. Refrigerated cryogenic envelope

    DOEpatents

    Loudon, John D.

    1976-11-16

    An elongated cryogenic envelope including an outer tube and an inner tube coaxially spaced within said inner tube so that the space therebetween forms a vacuum chamber for holding a vacuum. The inner and outer tubes are provided with means for expanding or contracting during thermal changes. A shield is located in the vacuum chamber intermediate the inner and outer tubes; and, a refrigeration tube for directing refrigeration to the shield is coiled about at least a portion of the inner tube within the vacuum chamber to permit the refrigeration tube to expand or contract along its length during thermal changes within said vacuum chamber.

  1. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced NEP.

  2. Cryogenic support member

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, Ralph C.; Gonczy, John D.; Nicol, Thomas H.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is comprised of a non-metallic rod having a depression in at least one end and a metallic end connection assembled to the rod. The metallic end connection comprises a metallic plug which conforms to the shape and is disposed in the depression and a metallic sleeve is disposed over the rod and plug. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod to form a connection good in compression, tension and bending.

  3. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Laverdure, Nathaniel A.; Knudsen, Peter N.; Arenius, Dana M.; Barrios, Matthew N.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  4. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D.; Barrios, M.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, F.

    2014-01-29

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  5. Biological Applications of Cryogenic Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S

    2003-12-03

    High energy resolution and broadband efficiency are enabling the use of cryogenic detectors in biological research. Two areas where they have found initial application are X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). In synchrotron-based fluorescence-detected XAS cryogenic detectors are used to examine the role of metals in biological systems by measuring their oxidation states and ligand symmetries. In time-of-flight mass spectrometry cryogenic detectors increase the sensitivity for biomolecule detection and identification for masses above {approx}50 kDa, and thus enable TOF-MS on large protein complexes or even entire viruses. More recently, cryogenic detectors have been proposed as optical sensors for fluorescence signals from biomarkers. We discuss the potential for cryogenic detectors in biological research, as well as the challenges the technology faces.

  6. Cryogenic fluid management experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.; Fester, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The cryogenic fluid management experiment (CFME), designed to characterize subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and expulsion in the low-q space environment, is discussed. The experiment utilizes a fine mesh screen fluid management device to accomplish gas-free liquid expulsion and a thermodynamic vent system to intercept heat leak and control tank pressure. The experiment design evolved from a single flight prototype to provision for a multimission (up to 7) capability. A detailed design of the CFME, a dynamic test article, and dedicated ground support equipment were generated. All materials and parts were identified, and components were selected and specifications prepared. Long lead titanium pressurant spheres and the flight tape recorder and ground reproduce unit were procured. Experiment integration with the shuttle orbiter, Spacelab, and KSC ground operations was coordinated with the appropriate NASA centers, and experiment interfaces were defined. Phase 1 ground and flight safety reviews were conducted. Costs were estimated for fabrication and assembly of the CFME, which will become the storage and supply tank for a cryogenic fluid management facility to investigate fluid management in space.

  7. Cryogenic magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwinski, R.E.; Purcell, J.R.; Parker, J.W.; Burnett, S.C.

    1987-07-21

    This patent describes a cryogenic superconducting magnet system for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices, the system comprising: an evacuated container, a first tank mounted within the evacuated container and thermally insulated; boiling liquid helium disposed in the first tank and exhausted to the outside of the container; a cryogenic superconducting magnet disposed in the first tank, a metallic heat radiation shield disposed in the evacuated container and substantially surrounding the first tank, the shield being thermally insulated from both the container and the first tank; and a neon refrigeration system external to the shield for cooling the shield, the neon refrigeration system including neon refrigerant. A second tank contains the neon refrigerant in its liquid state, at least one thermal siphon for circulating the neon refrigerant by convection from the second tank to the shield. The boiling of the neon refrigerant at the shield acts to circulate the neon refrigerant in the thermal siphon and cool the shield. A mechanical cryoccooler is remote from the container for condensing the neon refrigerant from the gaseous to the liquid state, and thermally insulated transfer means for transferring the neon refrigerant in its gaseous state from the second tank to the cryocooler. The neon refrigerant is in its liquid state from the cryocooler to the second tank.

  8. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  9. Cryogenics maintenance strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzat, Fabiola

    2012-09-01

    ALMA is an interferometer composed of 66 independent systems, with specific maintenance requirements for each subsystem. To optimize the observation time and reduce downtime maintenance, requirements are very demanding. One subsystem with high maintenance efforts is cryogenics and vacuum. To organize the maintenance, the Cryogenic and Vacuum department is using and implementing different tools. These are monitoring and problem reporting systems and CMMS. This leads to different maintenance approaches: Preventive Maintenance, Corrective Maintenance and Condition Based Maintenance. In order to coordinate activities with other departments the preventive maintenance schedule is kept as flexible as systems allow. To cope with unavoidable failures, the team has to be prepared to work under any condition with the spares on time. Computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) will help to manage inventory control for reliable spare part handling, the correct record of work orders and traceability of maintenance activities. For an optimized approach the department is currently evaluating where preventive or condition based maintenance applies to comply with the individual system demand. Considering the change from maintenance contracts to in-house maintenance will help to minimize costs and increase availability of parts. Due to increased number of system and tasks the cryo team needs to grow. Training of all staff members is mandatory, in depth knowledge must be built up by doing complex maintenance activities in the Cryo group, use of advanced computerized metrology systems.

  10. Investigations on the heat flux and impurity for the HL-2M divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, G. Y.; Cai, L. Z.; Duan, X. R.; Xu, X. Q.; Ryutov, D. D.; Cai, L. J.; Liu, X.; Li, J. X.; Pan, Y. D.

    2016-12-01

    The controllability of the heat load and impurity in the divertor is very important, which could be one of the critical problems to be solved in order to ensure the success for a steady state tokamak. HL-2M has the advantage of the poloidal field (PF) coils placed inside the demountable toroidal field (TF) coils and close to the main plasma. As a result, it is possible to make highly accurate configuration control of the advanced divertor for HL-2M. The divertor target geometry of HL-2M has been designed to be compatible with different divertor configurations to study the divertor physics and support the high performance plasma operations. In this paper, the heat loads and impurities with different divertor configurations, including the standard X-point divertor, the snowflake-minus divertor and two tripod divertor configurations for HL-2M, are investigated by numerical simulations with the SOLPS5.0 code under the current design of the HL-2M divertor geometry. The plasmas with different conditions, such as the low discharge parameters with {{I}\\text{p}}   =  0.5 MA at the first stage of HL-2M and the high parameters with {{I}\\text{p}}   =  2.0 MA during the normal operations, are simulated. The heat load profiles and the impurity distributions are obtained, and the control of the peak heat load and the effect of impurity on the core plasma are discussed. The compatibility of different divertor configurations for HL-2M is also evaluated. It is seen that the excellent compatibility of different divertor configurations with the current divertor geometry has been verified. The results show that the snowflake-minus divertor and the tripod divertor with {{d}x}=30 \\text{cm} present good performance in terms of the heat load profiles and the impurity distributions under different conditions, which may not have a big effect on the core plasma. In addition, it is possible to optimize the distance between the two X-points, {{d}x} , to achieve a better

  11. Magnetocaloric pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    Very cold liquids and gases such as helium, neon, and nitrogen can be pumped by using magnetocaloric effect. Adiabatic magnetization and demagnetization are used to alternately heat and cool slug of pumped fluid contained in closed chamber.

  12. Casing pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, H.E.; Bass, R.E.

    1987-09-29

    A natural gas operated pump is described for use in the casing of an oil well, comprising: a tubular pump body having an open lower end for admitting well fluids to the interior of the pump body and an open upper end, wherein a downwardly facing seating surface is formed on the inner periphery of the pump body adjacent the upper end thereof; means for forming a seal between the pump body and the casing of the well; a rod extending longitudinally through the seating surface formed in the pump body and protruding from the upper end of the pump body; a valve member mounted on the rod below the seating surface and shaped to mate with the seating surface; and means for vertically positioning the rod in proportion to fluid pressure within the pump body.

  13. ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, O.O.

    1954-08-17

    This patent reiates to electromagnetic pumps for electricity-conducting fluids and, in particular, describes several modifications for a linear conduction type electromagnetic interaction pump. The invention resides in passing the return conductor for the current traversing the fiuid in the duct back through the gap in the iron circuit of the pump. Both the maximum allowable pressure and the efficiency of a linear conduction electromagnetic pump are increased by incorporation of the present invention.

  14. Cryogenic Viscous Compressor Development and Modeling for the ITER Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Meitner, Steven J; Barbier, Charlotte N; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Duckworth, Robert C; Edgemon, Timothy D; Rasmussen, David A; Hechler, Michael P; Kersevan, R.; Dremel, M.; Pearce, R.J.H.; Boissin, Jean Claude

    2011-01-01

    The ITER vacuum system requires a roughing pump system that can pump the exhaust gas from the torus cryopumps to the tritium exhaust processing plant. The gas will have a high tritium content and therefore conventional vacuum pumps are not suitable. A pump called a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed for the roughing system to pump from ~500 Pa to 10 Pa at flow rates of 200 Pa-m3/ s. A unique feature of this pump is that is allows any helium in the gas to flow through the pump where it is sent to the detritiation system before exhausting to atmosphere. A small scale prototype of the CVC is being tested for heat transfer characteristics and compared to modeling results to ensure reliable operation of the full scale CVC. Keywords- ITER; vacuum; fuel cycle

  15. Ultrastable Cryogenic Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Anthony G.

    Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are secondary frequency standards in the microwave domain. The best of these oscillators have demonstrated a short term frequency stability in the range 10-14 to a few times 10-16. The main application for these oscillators is as flywheel oscillators for the next generation of passive atomic frequency standards, and as local oscillators in space telemetry ground stations to clean up the transmitter close in phase noise. Fractional frequency stabilities of passive atomic frequency standards are now approaching 3 x10^-14 /τ where τ is the measurement time, limited only by the number of atoms that are being interrogated. This requires an interrogation oscillator whose short-term stability is of the order of 10-14 or better, which cannot be provided by present-day quartz technology. Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are based on resonators which have very high electrical Q-factors. The resolution of the resonator's linewidth is typically limited by electronics noise to about 1ppm and hence Q-factors in excess of 108 are required. As these are only attained in superconducting cavities or sapphire resonators at low temperatures, use of liquid helium cooling is mandatory, which has so far restricted these oscillators to the research or metrology laboratory. Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make compact flywheel oscillators for the new generation of primary frequency standards. Work is under way to achieve this goal in space-borne and mobile liquid-nitrogen-cooled systems. The best cryogenic oscillators developed to date are the ``whispering gallery'' (WG) mode sapphire resonator-oscillators of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of Western Australia (UWA), as well as Stanford University's superconducting cavity stabilized oscillator (SCSO). All of these oscillators have demonstrated frequency

  16. Study on Axially Distributed Divertor Magnetic Field Configuration in a Mirror Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M.K.; Nakashima, Y.; Higashizono, Y.; Katanuma, I.; Cho, T

    2005-01-15

    A mirror magnetic field configuration (MFC) is studied in which a divertor is distributed axially using multipole coils. Both configurations of divertor and minimum-B are obtained in a mirror cell. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability of a mirror cell can be eliminated in this way. Concept of the design and properties of the MFC are discussed.

  17. Investigation of scrape-off layer and divertor heat transport in ASDEX Upgrade L-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieglin, B.; Eich, T.; Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Scarabosio, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-05-01

    Power exhaust is one of the major challenges for the development of a fusion power plant. Predictions based upon a multimachine database give a scrape-off layer power fall-off length {λq}≤slant 1 mm for large fusion devices such as ITER. The power deposition profile on the target is broadened in the divertor by heat transport perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. This profile broadening is described by the power spreading S. Hence both {λq} and S need to be understood in order to estimate the expected divertor heat load for future fusion devices. For the investigation of S and {λq} L-Mode discharges with stable divertor conditions in hydrogen and deuterium were conducted in ASDEX Upgrade. A strong dependence of S on the divertor electron temperature and density is found which is the result of the competition between parallel electron heat conductivity and perpendicular diffusion in the divertor region. For high divertor temperatures it is found that the ion gyro radius at the divertor target needs to be considered. The dependence of the in/out asymmetry of the divertor power load on the electron density is investigated. The influence of the main ion species on the asymmetric behaviour is shown for hydrogen, deuterium and helium. A possible explanation for the observed asymmetry behaviour based on vertical drifts is proposed.

  18. Near-infrared spectroscopy for divertor plasma diagnosis and control in DIII-D tokamaka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; McLean, A. G.; Allen, S. L.

    2014-11-01

    New near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic measurements performed in the DIII-D tokamak divertor plasma suggest new viable diagnostic applications: divertor recycling and low-Z impurity flux measurements, a spectral survey for divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) diagnostic, and Te monitoring for divertor detachment control. A commercial 0.3 m spectrometer coupled to an imaging lens via optical fiber and a InGaAs 1024 pixel array detector enabled deuterium and impurity emission measurements in the range 800-2300 nm. The first full NIR survey identified D, He, B, Li, C, N, O, Ne lines and provided plasma Te, ne estimates from deuterium Paschen and Brackett series intensity and Stark line broadening analysis. The range 1.000-1.060 mm was surveyed in high-density and neon seeded divertor plasmas for spectral background emission studies for λ = 1.064 μm laser-based DTS development. The ratio of adjacent deuterium Paschen-α and Brackett Br9 lines in recombining divertor plasmas is studied for divertor Te monitoring aimed at divertor detachment real-time feedback control.

  19. Near-infrared spectroscopy for divertor plasma diagnosis and control in DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V. A. McLean, A. G.; Allen, S. L.

    2014-11-15

    New near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic measurements performed in the DIII-D tokamak divertor plasma suggest new viable diagnostic applications: divertor recycling and low-Z impurity flux measurements, a spectral survey for divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) diagnostic, and T{sub e} monitoring for divertor detachment control. A commercial 0.3 m spectrometer coupled to an imaging lens via optical fiber and a InGaAs 1024 pixel array detector enabled deuterium and impurity emission measurements in the range 800–2300 nm. The first full NIR survey identified D, He, B, Li, C, N, O, Ne lines and provided plasma T{sub e}, n{sub e} estimates from deuterium Paschen and Brackett series intensity and Stark line broadening analysis. The range 1.000–1.060 mm was surveyed in high-density and neon seeded divertor plasmas for spectral background emission studies for λ = 1.064 μm laser-based DTS development. The ratio of adjacent deuterium Paschen-α and Brackett Br9 lines in recombining divertor plasmas is studied for divertor T{sub e} monitoring aimed at divertor detachment real-time feedback control.

  20. Near-infrared spectroscopy for divertor plasma diagnosis and control in DIII-D tokamak.

    PubMed

    Soukhanovskii, V A; McLean, A G; Allen, S L

    2014-11-01

    New near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic measurements performed in the DIII-D tokamak divertor plasma suggest new viable diagnostic applications: divertor recycling and low-Z impurity flux measurements, a spectral survey for divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) diagnostic, and Te monitoring for divertor detachment control. A commercial 0.3 m spectrometer coupled to an imaging lens via optical fiber and a InGaAs 1024 pixel array detector enabled deuterium and impurity emission measurements in the range 800-2300 nm. The first full NIR survey identified D, He, B, Li, C, N, O, Ne lines and provided plasma Te, ne estimates from deuterium Paschen and Brackett series intensity and Stark line broadening analysis. The range 1.000-1.060 mm was surveyed in high-density and neon seeded divertor plasmas for spectral background emission studies for λ = 1.064 μm laser-based DTS development. The ratio of adjacent deuterium Paschen-α and Brackett Br9 lines in recombining divertor plasmas is studied for divertor Te monitoring aimed at divertor detachment real-time feedback control. PMID:25430325

  1. Near-infrared spectroscopy for divertor plasma diagnosis and control in DIII-D tokamak.

    PubMed

    Soukhanovskii, V A; McLean, A G; Allen, S L

    2014-11-01

    New near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic measurements performed in the DIII-D tokamak divertor plasma suggest new viable diagnostic applications: divertor recycling and low-Z impurity flux measurements, a spectral survey for divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) diagnostic, and Te monitoring for divertor detachment control. A commercial 0.3 m spectrometer coupled to an imaging lens via optical fiber and a InGaAs 1024 pixel array detector enabled deuterium and impurity emission measurements in the range 800-2300 nm. The first full NIR survey identified D, He, B, Li, C, N, O, Ne lines and provided plasma Te, ne estimates from deuterium Paschen and Brackett series intensity and Stark line broadening analysis. The range 1.000-1.060 mm was surveyed in high-density and neon seeded divertor plasmas for spectral background emission studies for λ = 1.064 μm laser-based DTS development. The ratio of adjacent deuterium Paschen-α and Brackett Br9 lines in recombining divertor plasmas is studied for divertor Te monitoring aimed at divertor detachment real-time feedback control.

  2. Magnetic turbulence and resistive MHD instabilities in a 0. 6 < q < 3 poloidal divertor tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Agim, Y.Z.; Callen, J.D.; Chang, Z.; Dexter, R.N.; Goetz, J.A.; Graessle, D.E.; Haines, E.; Kortbawi, D.; LaPointe, M.A.; Moyer, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Detailed statistical properties of internal magnetic turbulence, and internal disruptions in magnetically- and materially-limited discharges, are studied in the Tokapole II poloidal divertor tokamak over the safety factor range 0.6 < q{sub a} < 3. A nonlinear MHD code treats tearing modes in the divertor geometry. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  3. OSCILLATORY PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, N.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to a pump suitable fur pumping highly corrosive gases wherein no lubricant is needed in the pumping chamber thus eliminating possible contamination sources. The chamber contains a gas inlet and outlet in each side, with a paddle like piston suspended by a sylphon seal between these pcrts. An external arrangement causes the paddle to oscillate rapidly between the ports, alternately compressing and exhausting the gas trapped on each side of the paddle. Since the paddle does nnt touch the chamber sides at any point, no lubricant is required. This pump is useful for pumping large quantities of uranium hexafluorine.

  4. Superfluid helium cryogenic systems for superconducting RF cavities at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, H.; Hara, K.; Honma, T.; Hosoyama, K.; Kojima, Y.; Nakanishi, K.; Kanekiyo, T.; Morita, S.

    2014-01-29

    Recent accelerator projects at KEK, such as the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) for R and D of the International Linear Collider (ILC) project and the compact Energy Recovery Linac (cERL), employ superconducting RF cavities made of pure niobium, which can generate high gradient acceleration field. Since the operation temperature of these cavities is selected to be 2 K, we have developed two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for stable operation of superconducting RF cavities for each of STF and cERL. These two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems are identical in principle. Since the operation mode of the cavities is different for STF and cERL, i.e. the pulse mode for STF and the continuous wave mode for cERL, the heat loads from the cavities are quite different. The 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems mainly consists of ordinary helium liquefiers/refrigerators, 2 K refrigerator cold boxes, helium gas pumping systems and high-performance transfer lines. The 2 K refrigerators and the high-performance transfer lines are designed by KEK. Some superconducting RF cavity cryomodules have been already connected to the 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for STF and cERL respectively, and cooled down to 2 K successfully.

  5. Cryogenic controls for Fermilab's SRF cavities and test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, B.; Bossert, R.; Klebaner, A.; Lackey, S.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Soyars, W.; Sirotenko, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    A new superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities test facility is now operational at Fermilab's Meson Detector Building (MDB). The facility is supplied cryogens from the Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) located in a separate building 500-m away. The design incorporates ambient temperature pumping for super-fluid helium production, as well as three 0.6-kW at 4.5-K refrigerators, five screw compressors, a helium purifier, helium and nitrogen inventory, cryogenic distribution system, and a variety of test cryostats. To control and monitor the vastly distributed cryogenic system, a flexible scheme has been developed. Both commercial and experimental physics tools are used. APACS+{trademark}, a process automation control system from Siemens-Moore, is at the heart of the design. APACS+{trademark} allows engineers to configure an ever evolving test facility while maintaining control over the plant and distribution system. APACS+{trademark} nodes at CTF and MDB are coupled by a fiber optic network. DirectLogic205 PLC's by KOYO{reg_sign} are used as the field level interface to most I/O. The top layer of this system uses EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) as a SCADA/HMI. Utilities for graphical display, control loop setting, real time/historical plotting and alarming have been implemented by using the world-wide library of applications for EPICS. OPC client/server technology is used to bridge across each different platform. This paper presents this design and its successful implementation.

  6. Cryogenic expansion machine

    DOEpatents

    Pallaver, Carl B.; Morgan, Michael W.

    1978-01-01

    A cryogenic expansion engine includes intake and exhaust poppet valves each controlled by a cam having adjustable dwell, the valve seats for the valves being threaded inserts in the valve block. Each cam includes a cam base and a ring-shaped cam insert disposed at an exterior corner of the cam base, the cam base and cam insert being generally circular but including an enlarged cam dwell, the circumferential configuration of the cam base and cam dwell being identical, the cam insert being rotatable with respect to the cam base. GI CONTRACTUAL ORIGIN OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION.

  7. Cryogenic nuclear gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gallop, J.C.; Potts, S.P.

    1980-09-30

    A cryogenic nuclear gyroscope is described that is comprised of a cylinder of niobium cooled within a helium cryostat so as to be superconducting and to provide a trapped, substantially homogeneous magnetic field, a helium-3 sample contained within a spherical pyrex cell having nuclei possessing a net magnetic moment, coils provided to polarize the sample to provide that net magnetic moment, and a SQUID magnetometer coupled to the sample by a pick-up coil of a transformer and frequency sensitive means coupled to the SQUID to detect changes in the precession of the nuclear moments of the sample caused by rotation of the gyroscope about an axis parallel to the direction of the homogeneous magnetic field. A superconducting lead shield isolates the helium-3 sample from external magnetic fields.

  8. Cryogenic cooler apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Paulson, D.N.; Allen, P.C.

    1983-01-04

    A Malone-type final stage for utilization in a Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler apparatus includes a displacer slidable within a vessel. [sup 4]He, [sup 3]He, or a mixture thereof is made to flow in a pulsating unidirectional manner through a regenerator in the displacer by utilization of check valves in separate fluid channels. Stacked copper screen members extend through the channels and through a second static thermodynamic medium within the displacer to provide efficient lateral heat exchange and enable cooling to temperatures in the range of 3--4 K. Another embodiment utilizes sintered copper particles in the regenerator. Also described is a final stage that has a non-thermally conducting displacer having passages with check valves for directing fluid past a regenerator formed in the surrounding vessel. 10 figs.

  9. Cryogenic cooler apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Paulson, Douglas N.; Allen, Paul C.

    1983-01-01

    A Malone-type final stage for utilization in a Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler apparatus includes a displacer slidable within a vessel. .sup.4 He, .sup.3 He, or a mixture thereof is made to flow in a pulsating unidirectional manner through a regenerator in the displacer by utilization of check valves in separate fluid channels. Stacked copper screen members extend through the channels and through a second static thermodynamic medium within the displacer to provide efficient lateral heat exchange and enable cooling to temperatures in the range of 3-4 K. Another embodiment utilizes sintered copper particles in the regenerator. Also described is a final stage that has a non-thermally conducting displacer having passages with check valves for directing fluid past a regenerator formed in the surrounding vessel.

  10. Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, David

    2011-01-01

    The CPS is an in-space cryogenic propulsive stage based largely on state of the practice design for launch vehicle upper stages. However, unlike conventional propulsive stages, it also contains power generation and thermal control systems to limit the loss of liquid hydrogen and oxygen due to boil-off during extended in-space storage. The CPS provides the necessary (Delta)V for rapid transfer of in-space elements to their destinations or staging points (i.e., E-M L1). The CPS is designed around a block upgrade strategy to provide maximum mission/architecture flexibility. Block 1 CPS: Short duration flight times (hours), passive cryo fluid management. Block 2 CPS: Long duration flight times (days/weeks/months), active and passive cryo fluid management.

  11. Reconstruction of Detached Divertor Plasma Conditions in DIII-D Using Spectroscopic and Probe Data

    SciTech Connect

    Stangeby, P; Fenstermacher, M

    2004-12-03

    For some divertor aspects, such as detached plasmas or the private flux zone, it is not clear that the controlling physics has been fully identified. This is a particular concern when the details of the plasma are likely to be important in modeling the problem--for example, modeling co-deposition in detached inner divertors. An empirical method of ''reconstructing'' the plasma based on direct experimental measurements may be useful in such situations. It is shown that a detached plasma in the outer divertor leg of DIII-D can be reconstructed reasonably well using spectroscopic and probe data as input to a simple onion-skin model and the Monte Carlo hydrogenic code, EIRENE. The calculated 2D distributions of n{sub e} and T{sub e} in the detached divertor were compared with direct measurements from the divertor Thomson scattering system, a diagnostic capability unique to DIII-D.

  12. Facilities for technology testing of ITER divertor concepts, models, and prototypes in a plasma environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.

    1991-12-01

    The exhaust of power and fusion-reaction products from ITER plasma are critical physics and technology issues from performance, safety, and reliability perspectives. Because of inadequate pulse length, fluence, flux, scrape-off layer plasma temperature and density, and other parameters, the present generation of tokamaks, linear plasma devices, or energetic beam facilities are unable to perform adequate technology testing of divertor components, though they are essential contributors to many physics issues such as edge-plasma transport and disruption effects and control. This Technical Requirements Documents presents a description of the capabilities and parameters divertor test facilities should have to perform accelerated life testing on predominantly technological divertor issues such as basic divertor concepts, heat load limits, thermal fatigue, tritium inventory and erosion/redeposition. The cost effectiveness of such divertor technology testing is also discussed.

  13. The dynamical mechanical properties of tungsten under compression at working temperature range of divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C. C.; Song, Y. T.; Peng, X. B.; Wei, Y. P.; Mao, X.; Li, W. X.; Qian, X. Y.

    2016-02-01

    In the divertor structure of ITER and EAST with mono-block module, tungsten plays not only a role of armor material but also a role of structural material, because electromagnetic (EM) impact will be exerted on tungsten components in VDEs or CQ. The EM loads can reach to 100 MN, which would cause high strain rates. In addition, directly exposed to high-temperature plasma, the temperature regime of divertor components is complex. Aiming at studying dynamical response of tungsten divertors under EM loads, an experiment on tungsten employed in EAST divertors was performed using a Kolsky bar system. The testing strain rates and temperatures is derived from actual working conditions, which makes the constitutive equation concluded by using John-Cook model and testing data very accurate and practical. The work would give a guidance to estimate the dynamical response, fatigue life and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under EM impact loads.

  14. Experience with Dry Running Vacuum Pumps in Helium Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arztmann, R.

    2008-03-01

    A process vacuum system for helium using dry running vacuum pumps only was shop tested and installed in a refrigeration plant to serve cavities operating at 2K for a cryogenic storage ring. The paper explains the joint development steps of Busch AG and Linde Kryotechnik AG to use dry running vacuum pumps for helium service at ambient temperature. A roots type booster pump followed by a non lube rotary screw pump provides very good performance in a helium vacuum pump system. Variable frequency drives on both pumps allow to adjust the pump characteristics to a wide range of operating parameters. Operation without friction of sealing elements in the compression space also of the screw pump promises extended maintenance intervals and virtually no wear on the rotors. The current plant operation at Max Plank Institute in Heidelberg, Germany Laboratory will provide additional experience for further applications.

  15. Improved cryogenic aluminum mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukobratovich, Daniel; Don, Ken; Sumner, Richard E.

    1998-09-01

    Optical surface deformation of metal mirrors used at cryogenic temperatures is reduced through the use of a new process of plating amorphous aluminum on aluminum. The AlumiPlateTM process (produced by AlumiPlate, Inc. in Minneapolis, MN) plates a layer of 99.9+% high purity aluminum about 125 micrometers thick atop the substrate. Very good surface finishes are produced by direct diamond turning of the plating, with some samples below 40 angstroms RMS. Optical testing of a 175-mm diameter, 550-mm optical radius of curvature 6061-T651/AlumiPlateTM aluminum sphere was performed at 65 K to determine cryogenic optical surface figure stability. In five cycles from 300 to 65 K, an average optical surface change of 0.047 wave RMS (1 wave equals 633 nm) was observed. A total optical figure change of 0.03 wave RMS at 65 K was observed from the first to last cycle. The cause of this relatively small long-term change is not yet determined. The test mirror is bi-concave, with a semi- kinematic toroidal mount, and is machined from the axis of a billet. An `uphill quench' heat treatment consisting of five cycles from liquid nitrogen to boiling water temperatures is used to minimize residual stress in the test mirror. Initial diamond turning of the mirror by the Optical Filter Corp., Keene, NH, produced a 300 K unmounted optical surface figure of 0.380 wave peak-to-valley and 0.059 wave RMS. A second effort at diamond turning by II-VI, Inc., Saxonburg, PA produced a 300 K optical figure of 0.443 wave peak-to-valley and 0.066 wave RMS, with a surface roughness varying from 29 to 42 angstroms.

  16. Ballooning Modes in the Systems Stabilized by Divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V.V.; Skovoroda, A.A.; Zvonkov, A.V.

    2005-01-15

    MHD stability of a plasma in systems with closed magnetic field lines and open systems containing the nonparaxial stabilizing cells with large field lines curvature, in particular, divertors is analyzed. It is shown that population of particles trapped in such cells has a stabilizing effect not only on flute modes, but also on ballooning modes that determine the {beta} limit. At kinetic description that accounts for different effect of trapped and passing particles on perturbations, {beta} limit permitted by stability may be much greater then it follows from MHD model.

  17. JET divertor diagnostic upgrade for neutral gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Kruezi, Uron; Sergienko, G; Morgan, P D; Matthews, G F; Brezinsek, S; Vartanian, S

    2012-10-01

    With installation of the ITER-like wall in JET a major diagnostic upgrade to measure the neutral gas pressure and composition in the sub-divertor region has been completed, to characterise retention and outgassing of the new metallic first wall. The upgrade includes two new magnetically shielded systems consisting of sensitive capacitance manometers and residual gas analysers, both capable of providing data during plasma operation. These enable absolute pressure and gas composition measurements (pressure range: 10(-5)-10(-1) mbar, mass range: 1-200 amu, respectively) and have been used to characterise the neutral gas behaviour under various plasma conditions.

  18. Ground-Based Investigations with the Cryogenic Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.; Mattison, Edward; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    2003-01-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen maser (CHM) developed at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) was designed to be functionally similar to SAO room temperature hydrogen masers with appropriate modifications made for operation at cryogenic temperatures. A schematic of the SAO CHM is shown in Figure 1, and a description of this device and its operation follows. A beam of molecular hydrogen is dissociated into atoms at room temperature. The resultant beam of atomic hydrogen is then cooled, magnetically state selected, and focused into a quartz storage bulb centered inside of a microwave cavity resonant with the hydrogen hyperfine transition at 1420 MHz. The quartz storage bulb is coated with a superfluid He-4 film, and both the bulb and cavity are maintained near 0.5 K. The maser signal is coupled out inductively and carried to room temperature via semi-rigid coaxial cable. After passing through a room temperature isolator and preamp, the maser signal is detected with a low-noise heterodyne receiver as used in the room temperature SAO hydrogen masers. The maser temperature is lowered to 0.5 K using a recirculating He-3 refrigerator. This refrigerator consists of several cooling stages: a liquid nitrogen stage at 77 K, a liquid 4He bath at 4.2 K, a pumped He-4 pot at approximately 1.7 K, and the pumped, recirculating He-3 stage at 0.5 K. The atomic hydrogen beam, state selector, storage bulb and cavity are all connected inside a single, maser vacuum chamber (MVC). This space is pumped out from below by a turbo pump. Above the MVC, an inlet to the space allows for the input of flowing superfluid 4He film. External to the MVC is a second, outer vacuum chamber (OVC), maintained for operation of the cryostat and also pumped by a turbo pump. Inside the OVC, there is radiation shielding at 77 K and 1.7 K.

  19. Introduction to cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The background to the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel is outlined, with particular reference to the late 60's/early 70's when efforts were begun to re-equip with larger wind tunnels. The problems of providing full scale Reynolds numbers in transonic testing were proving particularly intractible, when the notion of satisfying the needs with the cryogenic tunnel was proposed, and then adopted. The principles and advantages of the cryogenic tunnel are outlined, along with guidance on the coolant needs when this is liquid nitrogen, and with a note on energy recovery. Operational features of the tunnels are introduced with reference to a small low speed tunnel. Finally the outstanding contributions are highlighted of the 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at NASA Langley Research Center, and its personnel, to the furtherance of knowledge and confidence in the concept.

  20. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  1. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  2. Latest developments in cryogenic safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Cryogenic Safety Manual, sponsored by the British Cryogenics Council, was published over 10 years ago. A new updated version is now available. Some general aspects of cryogenic safety are highlighted, and attention is drawn to some of the more unusual hazardous situations. An awareness of the physical properties of the cryogenic fluids being dealt with is important in directing attention to hazardous situations which may arise. Because of this, the more important properties of the cryogenic fluids are given, such as molecular weight, boiling point and freezing point. From these properties, hazardous situations can be deduced. There are hidden dangers that are not always easy to spot. Some of the unexpected hazards, most of which have led to deaths, are: asphyxiation (anoxia), frost bites and hypothermia, explosions, and combustion. The aim of this publication is to help bring about increased safety in the production and use of cryogenic products through a deeper appreciation of the scientific, technological and administrative steps which must be made if accidents, some fatal, are to be voided in the future.

  3. Latest developments in cryogenic safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, T. J.

    1983-03-01

    The Cryogenic Safety Manual, sponsored by the British Cryogenics Council, was published over 10 years ago. A new updated version is now available. Some general aspects of cryogenic safety are highlighted, and attention is drawn to some of the more unusual hazardous situations. An awareness of the physical properties of the cryogenic fluids being dealt with is important in directing attention to hazardous situations which may arise. Because of this, the more important properties of the cryogenic fluids are given, such as molecular weight, boiling point and freezing point. From these properties, hazardous situations can be deduced. There are hidden dangers that are not always easy to spot. Some of the unexpected hazards, most of which have led to deaths, are: asphyxiation (anoxia), frost bites and hypothermia, explosions, and combustion. The aim of this publication is to help bring about increased safety in the production and use of cryogenic products through a deeper appreciation of the scientific, technological and administrative steps which must be made if accidents, some fatal, are to be voided in the future.

  4. Power deposition in the JET divertor during ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, S.; Chankin, A.; Ciric, D.; Coad, J. P.; Falter, J.; Gauthier, E.; Lingertat, J.; Puppin, S.

    The power deposited in the JET divertor during ELMs has been evaluated using an infrared camera specifically designed for fast measurements. The first results [E. Gauthier, A. Charkin, S. Clement et al., Proc. 24th Euro. conf. on contr. Fusion and Plasma Phys., Berchtesgaden, 1997 (European Physical Society, 1998), vol. 21A, p. 61.] indicated that during type I ELMs, surface temperatures in excess of 2000°C were measured, leading to peak power fluxes in the order of 4 GW/m 2. The time integrated power flux exceeded the measured plasma energy loss per ELM by a factor of four. The reasons for this discrepancy are studied in this paper. Redeposited carbon layers of up to 40 μm have been found on the divertor surface in the places where the highest temperatures are measured. The impact of such layers on the power flux evaluation has been studied with numerical calculations, and a controlled simulation of ELM heating has been performed in the JET neutral beam test facility. It is found that neglecting the existence of layers on the surface in a 2D calculation can lead to overestimating the power by a factor of 3, whereas the error in the calculation of the energy is much smaller. An energy based calculation reduces the peak power during type I ELMs to values around 1.2 GW/m 2.

  5. Ion Temperature Measurements in the DIII--D Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, N. H.; Isler, R. C.; McKee, G. R.; Tugarinov, S.

    1996-11-01

    Doppler profile measurements of the D_α, He II, C II and C III line emission in the DIII--D divertor have been performed with two high resolution spectrometers: an instrument of Russian design with high optical throughput and 7 ms readout, and a conventional Czerny Turner spectrometer with slower response time, but greater dynamic range in its detector system. In continuous ELMing H--mode plasmas the Doppler profiles are usually single-gaussian, but during operation at low density or during large, discrete ELM events the profiles of the hydrogen-like species are often multi-gaussian. Comparison of ion temperatures inferred from the single-gaussian profiles and electron temperatures measured by Thomson scattering and by spectroscopic line ratio methods yields good agreement for the higher charge states, where equilibration of ion and electron temperatures is expected. When strong D2 puffing triggers the MARFE-like conditions of Partially Detached Divertor plasmas, the D_α line profile, usually a complex asymmetric profile with multiple components, evolves into a single-gaussian profile fitted by a very low temperature (<2 eV) similar to that measured for the electrons by Thomson scattering.

  6. Ballooning modes localized near the null point of a divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.

    2014-04-15

    The stability of ballooning modes localized to the null point in both the standard and snowflake divertors is considered. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics is used. A series expansion of the flux function is performed in the vicinity of the null point with the lowest, non-vanishing term retained for each divertor configuration. The energy principle is used with a trial function to determine a sufficient instability threshold. It is shown that this threshold depends on the orientation of the flux surfaces with respect to the major radius with a critical angle appearing due to the convergence of the field lines away from the null point. When the angle the major radius forms with respect to the flux surfaces exceeds this critical angle, the system is stabilized. Further, the scaling of the instability threshold with the aspect ratio and the ratio of the scrape-off-layer width to the major radius is shown. It is concluded that ballooning modes are not a likely candidate for driving convection in the vicinity of the null for parameters relevant to existing machines. However, the results place a lower bound on the width of the heat flux in the private flux region. To explain convective mixing in the vicinity of the null point, new consideration should be given to an axisymmetric mixing mode [W. A. Farmer and D. D. Ryutov, Phys. Plasmas 20, 092117 (2013)] as a possible candidate to explain current experimental results.

  7. First EMC3-Eirene simulations of the TCV snowflake divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, T.; Canal, G. P.; Feng, Y.; Reimerdes, H.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Coster, D.; Lackner, K.; Wischmeier, M.

    2014-03-01

    One of the approaches to solve the heat load problem in a divertor tokamak is the so called ‘snowflake’ (SF) configuration, a magnetic equilibrium with two nearby x-points and two additional divertor legs. Here we report on the first EMC3-Eirene simulations of plasma- and neutral particle transport in the scrape-off layer of a series of TCV SF equilibria with different values of σ, the distance between the x-points normalized to the minor radius of the plasma. The constant cross-field transport coefficients were chosen such that the power- and particle deposition profiles at the primary inner strike point (SP) match the Langmuir probe measurements for the σ = 0.1 case. At the secondary SP on the floor, however, a significantly larger power flux than that predicted by the simulation was measured by the probes, indicating an enhanced transport across the primary separatrix. As the ideal SF configuration (σ = 0) is approached, the density as well as the radiation maximum are predicted to move from the target plates upward to the x-point by the simulation.

  8. Towards a Lithium Radiative / Vapor-Box Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Robert; Constantin, Marius; Jaworski, Michael; Myers, Rachel; Ono, Masayuki; Schwartz, Jacob; Scotti, Filippo; Qu, Zhaonan

    2014-10-01

    Recent research has indicated that the peak perpendicular heat flux on reactor divertor targets will be hundreds of MW/m2 in the absence of dissipation and/or spatial spreading. Thus we are attracted to both enhanced radiative cooling and continuous vapor shielding. Lithium particle lifetimes <=100 micro-sec enhance radiation efficiency at T < 10 eV, while lithium charge-exchange with neutral hydrogen may enhance radiative efficiency for T > 10 eV and n0/ni > 0.1. We are examining if the latter mechanism plays a role in the narrowing of the heat-flux footprint in lithiated NSTX discharges. In parallel we are investigating the possibility of immersing a reactor divertor leg in a channel of lithium vapor. If we approximate the vapor channel as in local equilibrium with lithium-wetted walls ranging from 300 oC at the entrance point to 950 oC 10m downstream in the parallel direction, we find that the vapor can both balance reactor levels of upstream plasma pressure and stop energetic ions and electrons with energies up to at least 25 keV, as might be produced in ELMs. Each 10 l/sec of lithium evaporated deep in the channel and recondensed in cooler regions spreads 100 MW over a much wider area than the original strike point. This work supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  9. Axisymmetric curvature-driven instability in a model divertor geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.; Ryutov, D. D.

    2013-09-15

    A model problem is presented which qualitatively describes a pressure-driven instability which can occur near the null-point in the divertor region of a tokamak where the poloidal field becomes small. The model problem is described by a horizontal slot with a vertical magnetic field which plays the role of the poloidal field. Line-tying boundary conditions are applied at the planes defining the slot. A toroidal field lying parallel to the planes is assumed to be very strong, thereby constraining the possible structure of the perturbations. Axisymmetric perturbations which leave the toroidal field unperturbed are analyzed. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics is used, and the instability threshold is determined by the energy principle. Because of the boundary conditions, the Euler equation is, in general, non-separable except at marginal stability. This problem may be useful in understanding the source of heat transport into the private flux region in a snowflake divertor which possesses a large region of small poloidal field, and for code benchmarking as it yields simple analytic results in an interesting geometry.

  10. Insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Pickup, J

    2010-02-01

    Insulin pump therapy is now more than 30 years old, and is an established part of the routine care of selected people with type 1 diabetes. Nevertheless, there are still significant areas of concern, particularly how pumps compare with modern injection therapy, whether the increasingly sophisticated pump technologies like onboard calculators and facility for computer download offer any real benefit, and whether we have a consensus on the clinical indications. The following papers offer some insight into these and other current questions.

  11. An exploration of advanced X-divertor scenarios on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covele, B.; Valanju, P.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S.

    2014-07-01

    It is found that the X-divertor (XD) configuration (Kotschenreuther et al 2004 Proc. 20th Int. Conf. on Fusion Energy (Vilamoura, Portugal, 2004) (Vienna: IAEA) CD-ROM file [IC/P6-43] www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/physics/fec/fec2004/datasets/index.html, Kotschenreuther et al 2006 Proc. 21st Int. Conf. on Fusion Energy 2006 (Chengdu, China, 2006) (Vienna: IAEA), CD-ROM file [IC/P7-12] www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/physics/FEC/FEC2006/html/index.htm, Kotschenreuther et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 072502) can be made with the conventional poloidal field (PF) coil set on ITER (Tomabechi et al and Team 1991 Nucl. Fusion 31 1135), where all PF coils are outside the TF coils. Starting from the standard divertor, a sequence of desirable XD configurations are possible where the PF currents are below the present maximum design limits on ITER, and where the baseline divertor cassette is used. This opens the possibility that the XD could be tested and used to assist in high-power operation on ITER, but some further issues need examination. Note that the increased major radius of the super-X-divertor (Kotschenreuther et al 2007 Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53 11, Valanju et al 2009 Phys. Plasmas 16 5, Kotschenreuther et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 035003, Valanju et al 2010 Fusion Eng. Des. 85 46) is not a feature of the XD geometry. In addition, we present an XD configuration for K-DEMO (Kim et al 2013 Fusion Eng. Des. 88 123) to demonstrate that it is also possible to attain the XD configuration in advanced tokamak reactors with all PF coils outside the TF coils. The results given here for the XD are far more encouraging than recent calculations by Lackner and Zohm (2012 Fusion Sci. Technol. 63 43) for the Snowflake (Ryutov 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 064502, Ryutov et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 092501), where the required high PF currents represent a major technological challenge. The magnetic field structure in the outboard divertor SOL (Kotschenreuther 2013 Phys. Plasmas 20 102507) in the recently created

  12. SOLPS5.1 analysis of detachment with drifts and gas pumping effects in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hailong; Sang, Chaofeng; Wang, Liang; Bonnin, Xavier; Guo, Houyang; Sun, Jizhong; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to estimate the effects of usual drifts and gas puffing/pumping locations on divertor detachment and Ar ion transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) by using the edge plasma code package SOLPS5.1. The simulated results reveal that which target plate first detaches depends strongly on the usual drifts, but not on the location of impurity gas puffing, which could be one of the possible explanations for the experimentally observed phenomenon (Chen et al 2013 Phys. Plasmas 20 022311) that the lower inner target first detached compared to the lower outer target with the lower outer gas puffing. The physics behind this phenomenon is that drifts not only can induce background ion flux, plasma density and temperature redistribution in the scrape-off layer (SOL) and divertor region, but also can change the Ar impurity force balance leading to Ar ions being dragged from bottom to top. Furthermore, the simulated results illustrate that the Ar ion transport in the SOL and divertor region is similar for different gas puffing locations including upstream and divertor region before partial detachment. However, the Ar ions penetrate into the core more easily, giving rise to more discharge disruption during complete detachment with upstream gas puffing than with divertor region puffing. Finally, we also estimate the effect of gas pumping on the detachment in order to realize long-pulse partial detachment in EAST. The results indicate that long-pulse partial detachment could be obtained by improving the pumping speed to match the puffing speed in case the excess Ar atoms accumulate in the core plasma during partial detachment in EAST.

  13. Numerical calculation of thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Suguo; Wang, Guoyu

    2012-11-01

    A key design issue related to the turbopump of the rocket engine is that cavitation occurs in cryogenic fluids when the fluid pressure is lower than the vapor pressure at a local thermodynamic state. Cavitation in cryogenic fluids generates substantial thermal effects and strong variations in fluid properties, which in turn alter the cavity characteristics. To date, fewer investigate the thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluids clearly by the numerical methods due to the difficulty of the heat transfer in the phase change process. In order to study the thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluid, computations are conducted around a 2D quarter caliber hydrofoil in liquid nitrogen and hydrogen respectively by implementing modified Merkle cavitation model, which accounts for the energy balance and variable thermodynamic properties of the fluid. The numerical results show that with the thermal effect, the vapour content in constant location decreases, the cavity becomes more porous and the interface becomes less distinct which shows increased spreading while getting shorter in length. In the cavity region, the temperature around the cavity depresses due to absorb the evaporation latent heat and the saturation pressure drops. When the vapour volume fraction is higher, the temperature depression and pressure depression becomes larger. It is also observed that a slight temperature rise is found above the reference fluid temperature at the cavity rear end attributed to the release of latent heat during the condensation process. When the fluid is operating close to its critical temperature, thermal effects on cavitation are more obviously in both the liquid nitrogen and hydrogen. The thermal effect on cavitation in liquid hydrogen is more distinctly compared with that in liquid nitrogen due to the density ratio, vapour pressure and other variable properties of the fluid. The investigation provides aid for the design of the cryogenic pump of the liquid rocket.

  14. Simulation of tokamak SOL and divertor region including heat flux mitigation by gas puffing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Woo; Na, Y. S.; Hong, S. H.; Ahn, J.W.; Kim, D. K.; Han, Hyunsun; Shim, Seong Bo; Lee, Hae June

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D), scrape-off layer (SOL)-divertor transport simulations are performed using the integrated plasma-neutral-impurity code KTRAN developed at Seoul National University. Firstly, the code is applied to reproduce a National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) discharge by using the prescribed transport coefficients and the boundary conditions obtained from the experiment. The plasma density, the heat flux on the divertor plate, and the D (alpha) emission rate profiles from the numerical simulation are found to follow experimental trends qualitatively. Secondly, predictive simulations are carried out for the baseline operation mode in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) to predict the heat flux on the divertor target plates. The stationary peak heat flux in the KSTAR baseline operation mode is expected to be 6.5 MW/m(2) in the case of an orthogonal divertor. To study the mitigation of the heat flux, we investigated the puffing effects of deuterium and argon gases. The puffing position is assumed to be in front of the strike point at the outer lower divertor plate. In the simulations, mitigation of the peak heat flux at the divertor target plates is found to occur when the gas puffing rate exceeds certain values, similar to 1.0 x 10(20) /s and similar to 5.0 x 10(18) /s for deuterium and argon, respectively. Multi-charged impurity transport is also investigated for both NSTX and KSTAR SOL and divertor regions.

  15. Heat loads to divertor nearby components from secondary radiation evolved during plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sizyuk, V. Hassanein, A.

    2015-01-15

    A fundamental issue in tokamak operation related to power exhaust during plasma instabilities is the understanding of heat and particle transport from the core plasma into the scrape-off layer and to plasma-facing materials. During abnormal and disruptive operation in tokamaks, radiation transport processes play a critical role in divertor/edge-generated plasma dynamics and are very important in determining overall lifetimes of the divertor and nearby components. This is equivalent to or greater than the effect of the direct impact of escaped core plasma on the divertor plate. We have developed and implemented comprehensive enhanced physical and numerical models in the upgraded HEIGHTS package for simulating detailed photon and particle transport in the evolved edge plasma during various instabilities. The paper describes details of a newly developed 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport model, including optimization methods of generated plasma opacities in the full range of expected photon spectra. Response of the ITER divertor's nearby surfaces due to radiation from the divertor-developed plasma was simulated by using actual full 3D reactor design and magnetic configurations. We analyzed in detail the radiation emission spectra and compared the emission of both carbon and tungsten as divertor plate materials. The integrated 3D simulation predicted unexpectedly high damage risk to the open stainless steel legs of the dome structure in the current ITER design from the intense radiation during a disruption on the tungsten divertor plate.

  16. Simulation of tokamak SOL and divertor region including heat flux mitigation by gas puffing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Na, Yong-Su; Hong, Sang Hee; Ahn, Joon-Wook; Kim, Deok-Kyu; Han, Hyunsun; Shim, Seong Bo; Lee, Hae June

    2012-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D), scrape-off layer (SOL)-divertor transport simulations are performed using the integrated plasma-neutral-impurity code KTRAN developed at Seoul National University. Firstly, the code is applied to reproduce a National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) discharge by using the prescribed transport coefficients and the boundary conditions obtained from the experiment. The plasma density, the heat flux on the divertor plate, and the D α emission rate profiles from the numerical simulation are found to follow experimental trends qualitatively. Secondly, predictive simulations are carried out for the baseline operation mode in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) to predict the heat flux on the divertor target plates. The stationary peak heat flux in the KSTAR baseline operation mode is expected to be 6.5 MW/m2 in the case of an orthogonal divertor. To study the mitigation of the heat flux, we investigated the puffing effects of deuterium and argon gases. The puffing position is assumed to be in front of the strike point at the outer lower divertor plate. In the simulations, mitigation of the peak heat flux at the divertor target plates is found to occur when the gas puffing rate exceeds certain values, ˜1.0 × 1020 /s and ˜5.0 × 1018 /s for deuterium and argon, respectively. Multi-charged impurity transport is also investigated for both NSTX and KSTAR SOL and divertor regions.

  17. Probe measurements of the PDX divertor plasma in ohmic and neutral beam heated discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, D. K.; Kaye, S. M.; Fonck, R. J.; Schmidt, G. L.

    1984-05-01

    A graphite-shielded probe was recently installed in the divertor region of PDX to continuously monitor local electron temperature, electron density (from the ion saturation current), and plasma floating potential throughout divertor discharges. In ohmically heated deuterium plasmas, the electron temperature near the separatrix was 6 to 12 eV; these values confirm the low Te inferred from the density dependence of Balmer line emission from the divertor plasmas. During neutral beam heating, PDX divertor discharges were characterized by a sharp transition at which time the main chamber plasma density increased rapidly, the divertor H α emission dropped, and the global energy confinement increased abruptly. At later times, edge relaxation oscillations, characterized by spikes in the H α emission, occurred and were accompanied by a clamp in the density rise and lower confinement time. Limited scans of the temperature and density measured by the divertor probe indicated that these parameters changed with discharge conditions primarily near the separatrix. With the onset of neutral beam injection the temperature and density rose by a factor of 1.5 and 2-4 respectively. Transient drops in Te to values as low as 2 eV and concomitant rises in ne were sometimes observed near the time of the transition into the high confinement mode. Later in the discharge, the values returned to their pre-H-mode level. TV camera observations of the divertor probe revealed a "shadow" along the field lines indicating a well-defined flow in the vicinity of the separatrix.

  18. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the D3-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.; Menon, M. M.

    1994-06-01

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the D3-D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the heat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid . helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,000 1/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  19. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Menon, M. M.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the DIII=D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the beat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,0001/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  20. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  1. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-06-23

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  2. Dual Cryogenic Capacitive Density Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Mata, Carlos; Vokrot, Peter; Cox, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A dual cryogenic capacitive density sensor has been developed. The device contains capacitive sensors that monitor two-phase cryogenic flow density to within 1% accuracy, which, if temperature were known, could be used to determine the ratio of liquid to gas in the line. Two of these density sensors, located a known distance apart, comprise the sensor, providing some information on the velocity of the flow. This sensor was constructed as a proposed mass flowmeter with high data acquisition rates. Without moving parts, this device is capable of detecting the density change within a two-phase cryogenic flow more than 100 times a second. Detection is enabled by a series of two sets of five parallel plates with stainless steel, cryogenically rated tubing. The parallel plates form the two capacitive sensors, which are measured by electrically isolated digital electronics. These capacitors monitor the dielectric of the flow essentially the density of the flow and can be used to determine (along with temperature) the ratio of cryogenic liquid to gas. Combining this information with the velocity of the flow can, with care, be used to approximate the total two-phase mass flow. The sensor can be operated at moderately high pressures and can be lowered into a cryogenic bath. The electronics have been substantially improved over the older sensors, incorporating a better microprocessor, elaborate ground loop protection and noise limiting circuitry, and reduced temperature sensitivity. At the time of this writing, this design has been bench tested at room temperature, but actual cryogenic tests are pending

  3. Multiobjective Optimization of Rocket Engine Pumps Using Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, Akira; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2001-01-01

    A design optimization method for turbopumps of cryogenic rocket engines has been developed. Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm (MOEA) is used for multiobjective pump design optimizations. Performances of design candidates are evaluated by using the meanline pump flow modeling method based on the Euler turbine equation coupled with empirical correlations for rotor efficiency. To demonstrate the feasibility of the present approach, a single stage centrifugal pump design and multistage pump design optimizations are presented. In both cases, the present method obtains very reasonable Pareto-optimal solutions that include some designs outperforming the original design in total head while reducing input power by one percent. Detailed observation of the design results also reveals some important design criteria for turbopumps in cryogenic rocket engines. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the EA-based design optimization method in this field.

  4. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, Robin H.; Holt, James B.; Hastings, Leon J.

    2001-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space, and would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray-bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray-bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger, and a spray-bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses.

  5. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, Robin H.; Holt, James B.; Hastings, Leon J.

    1999-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy is required. a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point. the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating, boil-off losses.

  6. Enhanced visible and near-infrared capabilities of the JET mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Lomanowski, B. A. Sharples, R. M.; Meigs, A. G.; Conway, N. J.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Heesterman, P.; Kinna, D. [EURATOM Collaboration: JET-EFDA Team

    2014-11-15

    The mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy diagnostic on JET has been upgraded with a new visible and near-infrared grating and filtered spectroscopy system. New capabilities include extended near-infrared coverage up to 1875 nm, capturing the hydrogen Paschen series, as well as a 2 kHz frame rate filtered imaging camera system for fast measurements of impurity (Be II) and deuterium Dα, Dβ, Dγ line emission in the outer divertor. The expanded system provides unique capabilities for studying spatially resolved divertor plasma dynamics at near-ELM resolved timescales as well as a test bed for feasibility assessment of near-infrared spectroscopy.

  7. Ferroelectric Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A ferroelectric pump has one or more variable volume pumping chambers internal to a housing. Each chamber has at least one wall comprising a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature and a dome height that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and outside surface of the actuator. A pumped medium flows into and out of each pumping chamber in response to displacement of the ferroelectric actuator. The ferroelectric actuator is mounted within each wall and isolates each ferroelectric actuator from the pumped medium, supplies a path for voltage to be applied to each ferroelectric actuator, and provides for positive containment of each ferroelectric actuator while allowing displacement of the entirety of each ferroelectric actuator in response to the applied voltage.

  8. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  9. Latest developments in cryogenic safety

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, T.J.

    1983-03-01

    The Cryogenic Safety Manual, sponsored by the British Cryogenics Council, was published over 10 years ago. A new updated version is now available. Some general aspects of cryogenic safety are highlighted, and attention is drawn to some of the more unusual hazardous situations. An awareness of the physical properties of the cryogenic fluids being dealt with is important in directing attention to hazardous situations which may arise. Because of this, the more important properties of the cryogenic fluids are given, such as molecular weight, boiling point and freezing point. From these properties, hazardous situations can be deduced. There are hidden dangers that are not always easy to spot. Some of the unexpected hazards, most of which have led to deaths, are: asphyxiation (anoxia), frost bites and hypothermia, explosions, and combustion. The aim of this publication is to help bring about increased safety in the production and use of crygenic products through a deeper appreciation of the scientific, technological and administrative steps which must be made if accidents, some fatal, are to be voided in the future.

  10. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  11. Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

    2011-03-28

    A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m{sup 3} storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

  12. Is Carbon a Realistic Choice for ITER's Divertor?

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; G. Federici

    2005-05-13

    Tritium retention by co-deposition with carbon on the divertor target plate is predicted to limit ITER's DT burning plasma operations (e.g. to about 100 pulses for the worst conditions) before the in-vessel tritium inventory limit, currently set at 350 g, is reached. At this point, ITER will only be able to continue its burning plasma program if technology is available that is capable of rapidly removing large quantities of tritium from the vessel with over 90% efficiency. The removal rate required is four orders of magnitude faster than that demonstrated in current tokamaks. Eighteen years after the observation of co-deposition on JET and TFTR, such technology is nowhere in sight. The inexorable conclusion is that either a major initiative in tritium removal should be funded or that research priorities for ITER should focus on metal alternatives.

  13. Prediction of Pressure Drop in the ITER Divertor Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, S.T.; Chen, J.L.

    2005-04-15

    This study investigated the pressure drop in the divertor cooling channels of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The water in the cooling channels will encounter the following flow and boiling regimes: 1) single-phase convection, 2) highly-subcooled boiling, 3) onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), and 4) fully-developed subcooled boiling. The upper operating boundary is limited by the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) or burnout conditions. Twisted-tape insert will be used to enhance local heat transfer. Analytical models, validated with relevant databases, were proposed for the above-identified flow regimes. A user-friendly computer code was developed to calculate the overall pressure drop and the exit pressure of a specific local segment throughout the entire flow circuit. Although the operating parameters were based on the CDA phase input the results are found in general agreement when compared with the ITER EDA results.

  14. Performance of JT-60SA divertor Thomson scattering diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Hatae, Takaki; Tojo, Hiroshi; Hamano, Takashi; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Kawashima, Hisato; Enokuchi, Akito

    2015-08-15

    For the satellite tokamak JT-60 Super Advanced (JT-60SA), a divertor Thomson scattering measurement system is planning to be installed. In this study, we improved the design of the collection optics based on the previous one, in which it was found that the solid angle of the collection optics became very small, mainly because of poor accessibility to the measurement region. By improvement, the solid angle was increased by up to approximately five times. To accurately assess the measurement performance, background noise was assessed using the plasma parameters in two typical discharges in JT-60SA calculated from the SONIC code. Moreover, the influence of the reflection of bremsstrahlung radiation by the wall is simulated by using a ray tracing simulation. The errors in the temperature and the density are assessed based on the simulation results for three typical field of views.

  15. Latest developments in cryogenic safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, T.

    1982-05-01

    The Cryogenic Safety Manual, published under the auspices of the British Cryogenics Council, is summarized. Since an awareness of the physical properties of the cryogenic fluids being dealt with is considered important in directing attention to hazardous situations which may arise, the manual lists the more important properties, such as molecular weight, boiling point, and freezing point. Since hydrogen and helium are very light, the possibility arises of explosive mixtures being formed at high points in buildings. Since argon is unexpectedly heavy, its removal requires suction rather than blowing. It is also pointed out that the use of inert liquid nitrogen can lead to the creation of a noninert atmosphere which supports combustion because it contains oxygen. Attention is also given to the danger of asphyxiation posed by the growing use of inert gases.

  16. Other cryogenic wind tunnel projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The first cryogenic tunnel was built in 1972. Since then, many cryogenic wind-tunnel projects were started at aeronautical research centers around the world. Some of the more significant of these projects are described which are not covered by other lecturers at this Special Course. Described are cryogenic wind-tunnel projects in five countries: China (Chinese Aeronautical Research and Development Center); England (College of Aeronautics at Cranfield, and Royal Aerospace Establishment-Bedford); Japan (National Aerospace Laboratory, University of Tsukuba, and National Defense Academy); United States (Douglas Aircraft Co., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and NASA Langley); and U.S.S.R. (Central Aero-Hydronamics Institute (TsAGI), Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (ITAM), and Physical-Mechanical Institute at Kharkov (PMI-K).

  17. Other Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    The first cryogenic tunnel was built at the NASA Langley Research Center in 1972. Since then, many cryogenic wind-tunnels have been built at aeronautical research centers around the world. In this lecture some of the more interesting and significant of these projects that have not been covered by other lecturers at this Special Course are described. In this lecture authors describe cryogenic wind-tunnel projects at research centers in four countries: China (Chinese Aeronautical Research and Development Center); England (College of Aeronautics at Cranfield, and Defence Research Agency - Bedford); Japan (National Aerospace Laboratory, University of Tsukuba, and National Defense Academy); and United States (Douglas Aircraft Co., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and NASA Langley).

  18. Low cryogen inventory, forced flow Ne cooling system with room temperature compression stage and heat recuperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shornikov, A.; Krantz, C.; Wolf, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present design and commissioning results of a forced flow cooling system utilizing neon at 30 K. The cryogen is pumped through the system by a room-temperature compression stage. To decouple the cold zone from the compression stage a recuperating counterflow tube-in-tube heat exchanger is used. Commissioning demonstrated successful condensation of neon and transfer of up to 30 W cooling power to the load at 30 K using only 30 g of the cryogen circulating in the system at pressures below 170 kPa.

  19. Gauging Systems Monitor Cryogenic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Rocket fuel needs to stay cool - super cool, in fact. The ability to store gas propellants like liquid hydrogen and oxygen at cryogenic temperatures (below -243 F) is crucial for space missions in order to reduce their volumes and allow their storage in smaller (and therefore, less costly) tanks. The Agency has used these cryogenic fluids for vehicle propellants, reactants, and life support systems since 1962 with the Centaur upper stage rocket, which was powered with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. During proposed long-duration missions, super-cooled fluids will also be used in space power systems, spaceports, and lunar habitation systems. In the next generation of launch vehicles, gaseous propellants will be cooled to and stored for extended periods at even colder temperatures than currently employed via a process called densification. Densification sub-cools liquids to temperatures even closer to absolute zero (-459 F), increasing the fluid s density and shrinking its volume beyond common cryogenics. Sub-cooling cryogenic liquid hydrogen, for instance, from 20 K (-423 F) to 15 K (-432.4 F) reduces its mass by 10 percent. These densified liquid gases can provide more cost savings from reduced payload volume. In order to benefit from this cost savings, the Agency is working with private industry to prevent evaporation, leakage, and other inadvertent loss of liquids and gases in payloads - requiring new cryogenic systems to prevent 98 percent (or more) of boil-off loss. Boil-off occurs when cryogenic or densified liquids evaporate, and is a concern during launch pad holds. Accurate sensing of propellants aboard space vehicles is also critical for proper engine shutdown and re-ignition after launch, and zero boil-off fuel systems are also in development for the Altair lunar lander.

  20. Self-pumping impurity control by in-situ metal deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.N.; Mattas, R.F.

    1983-05-01

    A system for in-situ removal of helium by trapping in freshly deposited metal surface layers of a limiter or divertor has been studied. The system would trap helium on a limiter front surface, or a divertor plate, at low plasma edge temperatures, or in a limiter slot region, at high edge temperatures. Fresh material, introduced to the plasma and/or scrape-off zone, would be added at a rate of about five times the alpha production rate. The material would be reprocessed periodically, e.g., once year. Possible materials are nickel, vanadium, niobium, and tantalum. Advantages of a self-pumping system are the absence of vacuum ducts and pumps, and the minimization of tritium processing and inventory.

  1. Submersible pump

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, D. B.

    1985-08-27

    A method and apparatus for using a submersible pump to lift reservoir fluids in a well while having the tubing/casing annulus isolated from the produced fluids. The apparatus allows the submersible pump to be positioned above the annular packoff device. The apparatus comprises an outer shield that encloses the pump and can be attached to the production tubing. The lower end of the shield attaches to a short tubing section that seals with the annular packoff device or a receptacle above the annular packoff device.

  2. Flute instability and the associated radial transport in the tandem mirror with a divertor mirror cell

    SciTech Connect

    Katanuma, I.; Yagi, K.; Haraguchi, Y.; Ichioka, N.; Masaki, S.; Ichimura, M.; Imai, T.

    2010-11-15

    The flute instability and the associated radial transport are investigated in the tandem mirror with a divertor mirror cell (the GAMMA10 A-divertor) with help of computer simulation, where GAMMA10 is introduced [Inutake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 939 (1985)]. The basic equations used in the simulation were derived on the assumption of an axisymmetric magnetic field. So the high plasma pressure in a nonaxisymmetric minimum-B anchor mirror cell, which is important for the flute mode stability, is taken into account by redefining the specific volume of a magnetic field line. It is found that the flute modes are stabilized by the minimum-B magnetic field even with a divertor mirror although its stabilizing effects are weaker than that without the divertor mirror. The flute instability enhances the radial transport by intermittently repeating the growing up and down of the Fourier amplitude of the flute instability in time.

  3. Divertor electron temperature and impurity diffusion measurements with a spectrally resolved imaging radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, D. J.; Kumar, D.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Jaworski, M. A.

    2012-10-15

    A divertor imaging radiometer (DIR) diagnostic is being studied to measure spatially and spectrally resolved radiated power P{sub rad}({lambda}) in the tokamak divertor. A dual transmission grating design, with extreme ultraviolet ({approx}20-200 A) and vacuum ultraviolet ({approx}200-2000 A) gratings placed side-by-side, can produce coarse spectral resolution over a broad wavelength range covering emission from impurities over a wide temperature range. The DIR can thus be used to evaluate the separate P{sub rad} contributions from different ion species and charge states. Additionally, synthetic spectra from divertor simulations can be fit to P{sub rad}({lambda}) measurements, providing a powerful code validation tool that can also be used to estimate electron divertor temperature and impurity transport.

  4. Development of microwave interferometer system for divertor simulation experiments in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohagura, J.; Wang, X.; Kanno, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kuwahara, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Shima, Y.; Chikatsu, M.; Nojiri, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Imai, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Mase, A.

    2015-12-01

    Microwave interferometer has newly been installed on GAMMA 10/PDX for divertor simulation study. A divertor simulation experimental module (D-module) is used to investigate the physics of divertor in the end-cell of GAMMA 10/PDX where an open magnetic field configuration is formed. D-module has a rectangular chamber with an inlet aperture. Two tungsten target plates are mounted in V-shape inside the chamber. In order to develop understandings of divertor simulation experiments the microwave interferometer using heterodyne scheme and a 1D horn-antenna mixer array (HMA) is applied to obtain electron density and density distribution inside the V-shaped target plates. Line-averaged electron density distributions inside D-module are first observed in H2 gas injection experiments.

  5. Cryogenic thermal diode heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.

    1979-01-01

    The development of spiral artery cryogenic thermal diode heat pipes was continued. Ethane was the working fluid and stainless steel the heat pipe material in all cases. The major tasks included: (1) building a liquid blockage (blocking orifice) thermal diode suitable for the HEPP space flight experiment; (2) building a liquid trap thermal diode engineering model; (3) retesting the original liquid blockage engineering model, and (4) investigating the startup dynamics of artery cryogenic thermal diodes. An experimental investigation was also conducted into the wetting characteristics of ethane/stainless steel systems using a specially constructed chamber that permitted in situ observations.

  6. Optical Cryogenic Tank Level Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffell, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic fluids play an important role in space transportation. Liquid oxygen and hydrogen are vital fuel components for liquid rocket engines. It is also difficult to accurately measure the liquid level in the cryogenic tanks containing the liquids. The current methods use thermocouple rakes, floats, or sonic meters to measure tank level. Thermocouples have problems examining the boundary between the boiling liquid and the gas inside the tanks. They are also slow to respond to temperature changes. Sonic meters need to be mounted inside the tank, but still above the liquid level. This causes problems for full tanks, or tanks that are being rotated to lie on their side.

  7. The Two-Dimensional Structure of Partially Detached Divertor Plasmas in the DIII--D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenstermacher, M. E.

    1996-11-01

    In this paper we present recent measurements of the 2-D spatial profiles of divertor plasma density, temperature, and emissivity in the DIII--D tokamak under highly radiating conditions in which there is a strong reduction in plasma pressure and energy conduction along the open field lines of the scrape-off layer (Partially Detached Divertor). This regime is desirable because the energy flux to the divertor targets can be reduced by up to a factor of 10 by the increased radiation, thus allowing for reliable divertor designs in high power tokamaks such as ITER. The data presented here are obtained using a newly installed Divertor Thomson Scattering (DTS) system specifically optimized for measuring the high electron densities and low temperatures expected in these detached divertor plasmas (ne <= 10^21 m-3, 0.5 eV <= T_e). These data are correlated with simultaneous measurements from fixed and fast-plunging Langmuir probes, VUV spectrometers, bolometers, and visible-light TV cameras. The DTS data confirm that electron pressure is nearly constant along field lines in attached plasmas, consistent with upstream and target plate diagnostics. D2 gas puffing in the divertor increases the plasma radiation and lowers Te to <2 eV in most of the divertor volume. Modeling shows that this temperature is low enough to allow ion-neutral collisions, charge exchange, and volume recombination to play significant roles in reducing the electron pressure along the magnetic separatrix by 3--5×, consistent with the measurements. At these temperatures, molecules may also be present in significant numbers and can further increase the recombination rates (Krasheninnikov, et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 1996). Farther out in the SOL, the electron density and pressure rise to values higher than those on the same flux surface at the midplane, so only part of the divertor plasma is detached. Absolutely-calibrated VUV spectroscopy and 2-D images of impurity emission show that the reduction in Te results

  8. Overview of Stellarator Divertor Studies: Final Report of LDRD Project 01-ERD-069

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M E; Rognlien, T D; Koniges, A; Unmansky, M; Hill, D N

    2003-01-21

    A summary is given of the work carried out under the LDRD project 01-ERD-069 entitled Stellarator Divertor Studies. This project has contributed to the development of a three-dimensional edge-plasma modeling and divertor diagnostic design capabilities at LLNL. Results are demonstrated by sample calculations and diagnostic possibilities for the edge plasma of the proposed U.S. National Compact Stellarator Experiment device. Details of the work are contained in accompanying LLNL reports that have been accepted for publication.

  9. Survivability of dust in tokamaks: Dust transport in the divertor sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Tang, Xianzhu

    2014-02-15

    The survivability of dust being transported in the magnetized sheath near the divertor plate of a tokamak and its impact on the desired balance of erosion and redeposition for a steady-state reactor are investigated. Two different divertor scenarios are considered. The first is characterized by an energy flux perpendicular to the plate q{sub 0}≃1 MW/m{sup 2} typical of current short-pulse tokamaks. The second has q{sub 0}≃10 MW/m{sup 2} and is relevant to long-pulse machines like ITER or Demonstration Power Plant. It is shown that micrometer dust particles can survive rather easily near the plates of a divertor plasma with q{sub 0}≃1 MW/m{sup 2} because thermal radiation provides adequate cooling for the dust particle. On the other hand, the survivability of micrometer dust particles near the divertor plates is drastically reduced when q{sub 0}≃10 MW/m{sup 2}. Micrometer dust particles redeposit their material non-locally, leading to a net poloidal mass migration across the divertor. Smaller particles (with radius ∼0.1 μm) cannot survive near the divertor and redeposit their material locally. Bigger particle (with radius ∼10 μm) can instead survive partially and move outside the divertor strike points, thus causing a net loss of divertor material to dust accumulation inside the chamber and some non-local redeposition. The implications of these results for ITER are discussed.

  10. Design and analysis of the DII-D radiative divertor water-cooled structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, M.A.; Smith, J.P.; Baxi, C.B.; Bozek; Chin, E.; Phelps, R.D.; Redler, K.M.; Reis, E.E.

    1995-10-01

    The Radiative Divertor is a major modification to the divertor of DIII-D and is being designed and fabricated for installation in late 1996. The Radiative Divertor Program (RDP) will enhance the dissipative processes in the edge and divertor plasmas to reduce the heat flux and plasma erosion at the divertor target. This approach will have major implications for the heat removal methods used in future devices. The divertor is of slot-type configuration designed to minimize the flow of sputtered and injected impurities back to the core plasma. The new divertor will be composed of toroidally continuous, Inconel 625 water-cooled rings of sandwich construction with an internal water channel, incorporating seam welding to provide the water-to-vacuum seal as well as structural integrity. The divertor structure is designed to withstand electromagnetic loads as a result of halo currents and induced toroidal currents. It also accommodates the thermal differences experienced during the 400 {degrees}C bake used on DIII-D. A low Z plasma-facing surface is provided by mechanically attached graphite tiles. Water flow through the rings will inertially cool these tiles which will be subjected to 38 MW, 10 second pulses. Current schedules call for detailed design in 1996 with installation completed in March 1997. A full size prototype, one-quarter of one ring, is being built to validate manufacturing techniques, machining, roll-forming, and seam welding. The experience and knowledge gained through the fabrication of the prototype is discussed. The design of the electrically isolated (5 kV) vacuum-to-air water feedthroughs supplying the water-cooled rings is also discussed.

  11. ION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1961-01-01

    An ion pump and pumping method are given for low vacuum pressures in which gases introduced into a pumping cavity are ionized and thereafter directed and accelerated into a quantity of liquid gettering metal where they are absorbed. In the preferred embodiment the metal is disposed as a liquid pool upon one electrode of a Phillips ion gauge type pump. Means are provided for continuously and remotely withdrawing and degassing the gettering metal. The liquid gettering metal may be heated if desired, although various combinations of gallium, indium, tin, bismuth, and lead, the preferred metals, have very low melting points. A background pressure of evaporated gettering metal may be provided by means of a resistance heated refractory metal wick protruding from the surface of the pcol of gettering metal.

  12. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2007-11-20

    A method for altering the surface properties of a particle bed. In application, the method pertains particularly to an electrokinetic pump configuration where nanoparticles are bonded to the surface of the stationary phase to alter the surface properties of the stationary phase including the surface area and/or the zeta potential and thus improve the efficiency and operating range of these pumps. By functionalizing the nanoparticles to change the zeta potential the electrokinetic pump is rendered capable of operating with working fluids having pH values that can range from 2-10 generally and acidic working fluids in particular. For applications in which the pump is intended to handle highly acidic solutions latex nanoparticles that are quaternary amine functionalized can be used.

  13. Mechanistic modeling of destratification in cryogenic storage tanks using ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, T K; Mohanan, Srijith; Nagarajan, R

    2014-01-01

    Stratification is one of the main causes for vaporization of cryogens and increase of tank pressure during cryogenic storage. This leads subsequent problems such as cavitation in cryo-pumps, reduced length of storage time. Hence, it is vital to prevent stratification to improve the cost efficiency of storage systems. If stratified layers exist inside the tank, they have to be removed by suitable methods without venting the vapor. Sonication is one such method capable of keeping fluid layers mixed. In the present work, a mechanistic model for ultrasonic destratification is proposed and validated with destratification experiments done in water. Then, the same model is used to predict the destratification characteristics of cryogenic liquids such as liquid nitrogen (LN₂), liquid hydrogen (LH₂) and liquid ammonia (LNH₃). The destratification parameters are analysed for different frequencies of ultrasound and storage pressures by considering continuous and pulsed modes of ultrasonic operation. From the results, it is determined that use of high frequency ultrasound (low-power/continuous; high-power/pulsing) or low frequency ultrasound (continuous operation with moderate power) can both be effective in removing stratification. PMID:23810463

  14. Mechanistic modeling of destratification in cryogenic storage tanks using ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, T K; Mohanan, Srijith; Nagarajan, R

    2014-01-01

    Stratification is one of the main causes for vaporization of cryogens and increase of tank pressure during cryogenic storage. This leads subsequent problems such as cavitation in cryo-pumps, reduced length of storage time. Hence, it is vital to prevent stratification to improve the cost efficiency of storage systems. If stratified layers exist inside the tank, they have to be removed by suitable methods without venting the vapor. Sonication is one such method capable of keeping fluid layers mixed. In the present work, a mechanistic model for ultrasonic destratification is proposed and validated with destratification experiments done in water. Then, the same model is used to predict the destratification characteristics of cryogenic liquids such as liquid nitrogen (LN₂), liquid hydrogen (LH₂) and liquid ammonia (LNH₃). The destratification parameters are analysed for different frequencies of ultrasound and storage pressures by considering continuous and pulsed modes of ultrasonic operation. From the results, it is determined that use of high frequency ultrasound (low-power/continuous; high-power/pulsing) or low frequency ultrasound (continuous operation with moderate power) can both be effective in removing stratification.

  15. Solid deposition in the ITER cryogenic viscous compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongsheng; Miller, Franklin K.; Pfotenhauer, John M.

    2016-09-01

    A transient model for the ITER cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is presented. The CVC is designed to separate hydrogen isotopes from helium in the gas-mixture exhaust from the ITER torus. During their residence in the CVC, hydrogen isotopes are captured along the pump wall while helium flows through. The CVC thereby provides the first stage of helium compression. The transient model characterizes the transport phenomena (species, momentum, and energy) that occur in the CVC. The numerical results are compared with experimental data from a scaled down test of the ITER CVC using pure hydrogen. Although the model has been developed for a hydrogen-helium mixture, it is simplified here in order to compare with the experimental data. The transient model, along with other numerical models we have developed, provide guidance for the design and optimization of the ITER CVC. The model can also be a useful tool or a reference for similar analyses, such as those for cryogenic carbon capture and air ingress in vacuum isolated cryogenic vessels.

  16. The electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR - Mechanical concept and realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hahn, R.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Kühnel, K.-U.; Lange, M.; Menk, S.; Laux, F.; Orlov, D. A.; Repnow, R.; Schröter, C. D.; Shornikov, A.; Sieber, T.; Ullrich, J.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.; Zajfman, D.

    2011-12-01

    A new and technologically challenging project, the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR, is presently under construction at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Applying liquid helium cooling, the CSR, with 35 m circumference, will provide a low temperature environment of only a few Kelvin and an extremely high vacuum of better than 10 -13 mbar. To realize these conditions the mechanical design has been completed and now the first quarter section is in the construction phase. For the onion skin structure of the cryogenic system we have at the outer shell the cryostat chambers, realized by welded rectangular stainless steel frames with aluminum plates. The next two shells are fabricated as aluminum shields kept at 80 and 40 K. The inner vacuum chambers for the experimental vacuum consist of stainless steel chambers cladded with external copper sheets connected to the LHe lines for optimized thermal equilibration and cryopumping. Additional large surface 2 K units are installed for cryogenic pumping of H 2. The mechanical concepts and the realization will be presented in detail.

  17. Spectroscopic imaging system for quantitative analysis of the divertor plasma of the Tokamak de Varennes

    SciTech Connect

    Meo, F.; Stansfield, B.L.; Chartre, M.; de Villers, P.; Marchand, R.; Ratel, G.

    1997-09-01

    A toroidally viewing spectroscopic imaging system has been developed for the Tokamak de Varennes providing measurements of the poloidal distribution of the absolute radiated power of deuterium and impurity species in the upper divertor region. Real time digitization is achieved using a low cost PC based digital imaging system. This system is used to obtain measurements of the divertor strike point as well as the shape of the flux surfaces in the divertor. The diagnostic{close_quote}s excellent spatial resolution and toroidal view provides an opportunity to quantitatively compare the measured two dimensional (2D) radiated power distribution to that calculated from 2D Monte Carlo transport codes. These 2D images provide unique and valuable information on the physics of local plasma interactions with divertor components and particle transport in a closed divertor. Additionally, by using two cameras simultaneously, the line ratio technique can be applied to the images to estimate plasma parameters in the divertor. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics. }

  18. Favorable effects of turbulent plasma mixing on the performance of innovative tokamak divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2013-10-01

    The problem of reducing the heat load on plasma-facing components is one of the most demanding issues for MFE devices. The general approach to the solution of this problem is the use of a specially configured poloidal magnetic field, so called magnetic divertors. In recent years, novel divertors possessing the 2-nd and 3-rd order nulls of the poloidal field (PF) have been proposed. They are called a ``snowflake'' (SF) and a ``cloverleaf'' (CL) divertor, respectively, due to characteristic shape of the magnetic separatrix. Among several beneficial features of such divertors is an effect of strong turbulent plasma mixing that is intrinsic to the zone of weak PF near the null-point. The turbulence spreads the heat flux between multiple divertor exhaust channels and increases the heat flux width within each channel. Among physical processes affecting the onset of convection the curvature-driven mode of axisymmetric rolls is most prominent. The effect is quite significant for the SF and is even stronger for the CL divertor. Projections to future ITER-scale facilities are discussed. Work performed for U.S. DoE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Critical need for MFE: the Alcator DX advanced divertor test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Wolf, S.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hutchinson, I.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Theiler, C.; Wallace, G.; White, A.; Whyte, D.; Wukitch, S.

    2013-10-01

    Three critical challenges must be met before a steady-state, power-producing fusion reactor can be realized: how to (1) safely handle extreme plasma exhaust power, (2) completely suppress material erosion at divertor targets and (3) do this while maintaining a burning plasma core. Advanced divertors such as ``Super X'' and ``X-point target'' may allow a fully detached, low temperature plasma to be produced in the divertor while maintaining a hot boundary layer around a clean plasma core - a potential game-changer for magnetic fusion. No facility currently exists to test these ideas at the required parallel heat flux densities. Alcator DX will be a national facility, employing the high magnetic field technology of Alcator combined with high-power ICRH and LHCD to test advanced divertor concepts at FNSF/DEMO power exhaust densities and plasma pressures. Its extended vacuum vessel contains divertor cassettes with poloidal field coils for conventional, snowflake, super-X and X-point target geometries. Divertor and core plasma performance will be explored in regimes inaccessible in conventional devices. Reactor relevant ICRF and LH drivers will be developed, utilizing high-field side launch platforms for low PMI. Alcator DX will inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of next-step fusion facilities.

  20. A Fast Visible Camera Divertor-Imaging Diagnostic on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Roquemore, A; Maingi, R; Lasnier, C; Nishino, N; Evans, T; Fenstermacher, M; Nagy, A

    2007-06-19

    In recent campaigns, the Photron Ultima SE fast framing camera has proven to be a powerful diagnostic when applied to imaging divertor phenomena on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Active areas of NSTX divertor research addressed with the fast camera include identification of types of EDGE Localized Modes (ELMs)[1], dust migration, impurity behavior and a number of phenomena related to turbulence. To compare such edge and divertor phenomena in low and high aspect ratio plasmas, a multi-institutional collaboration was developed for fast visible imaging on NSTX and DIII-D. More specifically, the collaboration was proposed to compare the NSTX small type V ELM regime [2] and the residual ELMs observed during Type I ELM suppression with external magnetic perturbations on DIII-D[3]. As part of the collaboration effort, the Photron camera was installed recently on DIII-D with a tangential view similar to the view implemented on NSTX, enabling a direct comparison between the two machines. The rapid implementation was facilitated by utilization of the existing optics that coupled the visible spectral output from the divertor vacuum ultraviolet UVTV system, which has a view similar to the view developed for the divertor tangential TV camera [4]. A remote controlled filter wheel was implemented, as was the radiation shield required for the DIII-D installation. The installation and initial operation of the camera are described in this paper, and the first images from the DIII-D divertor are presented.

  1. Characterization of energetic deuterium striking the divertor of the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bastasz, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Whaley, J.A.; Whyte, D.G.; Parks, P.B.; Brooks, N.H.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1996-06-01

    The flux and energy of particles striking the divertor during steady state operation and during disruptions are parameters of central interest in the design of power producing tokamaks. The energetic particle flux to the divertor is a critical factor, as it has a large effect on material behavior and the lifetime of plasma-facing components. Here, measurements of the deuterium particle flux and energy to the divertor of the DIII-D tokamak during a series of plasmas that terminated in disruptions have been made using a silicon collector probe installed on the divertor materials exposure system (DiMES). During the steady state portion of each discharge, the probe was located under the separatrix, but immediately before disrupting the plasma, by injecting either Ar or D{sub 2} gas, the strike point of the outer divertor leg was positioned over the probe. Comparison of the amount of retained D in the probe for the two types of disruptions indicates that much of the trapped D could have resulted from exposure in the private flux zone prior to the disruption. Measurements of the depth distribution of the trapped D in the Si imply that the incident ion energy was approximately 100 eV at normal incidence and decreased slightly at oblique angles. The measurements give an upper bound to the energy of deuterons striking the divertor floor in the vicinity of the strikepoint during disruptions.

  2. Exploration of magnetic perturbation effects on advanced divertor configurations in NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Waters, I.; Canal, G. P.; Evans, T. E.; Feng, Y.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    The control of divertor heat loads - both steady state and transient - remains a key challenge for the successful operation of ITER and FNSF. Magnetic perturbations provide a promising technique to control ELMs (Edge Localized Modes) (transients), but understanding their detailed impact is difficult due to their symmetry breaking nature. One approach for reducing steady state heat loads is so called "advanced divertors" which aim at optimizing the magnetic field configuration: the snowflake and the (super-)X-divertor. It is likely that both concepts - magnetic perturbations and advanced divertors - will have to work together, and we explore their interaction based on the NSTX-U setup. An overview of different divertor configurations under the impact of magnetic perturbations is presented, and the resulting impact on plasma edge transport is investigated with the EMC3-EIRENE code. Variations in size of the magnetic footprint of the perturbed separatrix are found, which are related to the level of flux expansion on the divertor target. Non-axisymmetric peaking of the heat flux related to the perturbed separatrix is found at the outer strike point, but only in locations where flux expansion is not too large.

  3. Divertor Target Heat Load Reduction by Electrical Biasing, and Application to COMPASS-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, S J; Cohen, R H; Helander, P; Ryutov, D D

    2001-03-07

    A toroidally-asymmetric potential structure in the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma may be formed by toroidally distributed electrical biasing of the divertor target tiles. The resulting ExB convective motions should increase the plasma radial transport in the SOL and thereby reduce the heat load at the divertor [1]. In this paper we develop theoretical modeling and describe the implementation of this concept to the COMPASS-D divertor. We show that strong magnetic shear near the X-point should cause significant squeezing of the convective cells preventing convection from penetrating above the X-point. This should result in reduced heat load at the divertor target without increasing the radial transport in the portion of the SOL in direct contact with the core plasma, potentially avoiding any confinement degradation. implementation of divertor biasing is in hand on COMPASS-D involving insulation of, and modifications to, the present divertor tiles. Calculations based on measured edge parameters suggest that modest currents {approx} 8 A/tile are required, at up to 150V, to drive the convection. A technical test is preceeding full bias experiments.

  4. Optimising the efficiency of pulsed diode pumped Yb:YAG laser amplifiers for ns pulse generation.

    PubMed

    Ertel, K; Banerjee, S; Mason, P D; Phillips, P J; Siebold, M; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Collier, J C

    2011-12-19

    We present a numerical model of a pulsed, diode-pumped Yb:YAG laser amplifier for the generation of high energy ns-pulses. This model is used to explore how optical-to-optical efficiency depends on factors such as pump duration, pump spectrum, pump intensity, doping concentration, and operating temperature. We put special emphasis on finding ways to achieve high efficiency within the practical limitations imposed by real-world laser systems, such as limited pump brightness and limited damage fluence. We show that a particularly advantageous way of improving efficiency within those constraints is operation at cryogenic temperature. Based on the numerical findings we present a concept for a scalable amplifier based on an end-pumped, cryogenic, gas-cooled multi-slab architecture.

  5. Cryogenic Treatment of Production Components in High-Wear Rate Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, M.

    2002-04-29

    Deep Cryogenic Tempering (DCT) is a specialized process whereby the molecular structure of a material is ''re-trained'' through cooling to -300 F and then heating to +175-1100 F. Cryocon, Inc. (hereafter referred to as Cryocon) and RMOTC entered an agreement to test the process on oilfield production components, including rod pumps, rods, couplings, and tubing. Three Shannon Formation wells were selected (TD about 500 ft) based on their proclivity for high component wear rates. Phase 1 of the test involved operation for a nominal 120 calendar day period with standard, non-treated components. In Phase 2, treated components were installed and operated for another nominal 120 calendar day period. Different cryogenic treatment profiles were used for components in each well. Rod pumps (two treated and one untreated) were not changed between test phases. One well was operated in pumped-off condition, resulting in abnormal wear and disqualification from the test. Testing shows that cryogenic treatment reduced wear of rods, couplers, and pump barrels. Testing of production tubing produced mixed results.

  6. Filling an Unvented Cryogenic Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Phillip; Willen, Gary S.

    1987-01-01

    Slow-cooling technique enables tank lacking top vent to be filled with cryogenic liquid. New technique: pressure buildup prevented through condensation of accumulating gas resulting in condensate being added to bulk liquid. Filling method developed for vibration test on vacuum-insulated spherical tank containing liquid hydrogen.

  7. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  8. Cryogenics Testbed Technology Focus Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2000-01-01

    Our mission is to bring together the mutual elements of research, industry, and training in the field of cryogenics to advance technology development for the spaceports of the future. Successful technology and productive collaboration comes from these three ingredients working together in a triangle of interaction.

  9. Status Of Sorption Cryogenic Refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews sorption refrigeration. Developed for cooling infrared detectors, cryogenic research, and other advanced applications, sorption refrigerators have few moving parts, little vibration, and lifetimes of 10 years or more. Describes types of sorption stages, multistage and hybrid refrigeration systems, power requirements, cooling capacities, and advantages and disadvantages of various stages and systems.

  10. Background Reduction in Cryogenic Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.

    2005-09-08

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  11. Foam shell cryogenic ICF target

    DOEpatents

    Darling, Dale H.

    1987-01-01

    A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

  12. Dust Charge in Cryogenic Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, J.; Kojima, C.; Sekine, W.; Ishihara, O.

    2008-09-07

    Dust charges in a complex helium gas plasma, surrounded by cryogenic liquid, are studied experimentally. The charge is determined by frequency and equilibrium position of damped dust oscillation proposed by Tomme et al.(2000) and is found to decrease with ion temperature of the complex plasma.

  13. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  14. Operation of large cryogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, C.H.; Ferry, B.; Fowler, W.B.; Makara, J.; Peterson, T.; Theilacker, J.; Walker, R.

    1985-06-01

    This report is based on the past 12 years of experiments on R and D and operation of the 27 kW Fermilab Tevatron Cryogenic System. In general the comments are applicable for all helium plants larger than 1000W (400 l/hr) and non mass-produced nitrogen plants larger than 50 tons per day. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Sources of Cryogenic Data and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohling, R. A.; Hufferd, W. L.; Marquardt, E. D.

    It is commonly known that cryogenic data, technology, and information are applied across many military, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and civilian product lines. Before 1950, however, there was no centralized US source of cryogenic technology data. The Cryogenic Data Center of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) maintained a database of cryogenic technical documents that served the national need well from the mid 1950s to the early 1980s. The database, maintained on a mainframe computer, was a highly specific bibliography of cryogenic literature and thermophysical properties that covered over 100 years of data. In 1983, however, the Cryogenic Data Center was discontinued when NBS's mission and scope were redefined. In 1998, NASA contracted with the Chemical Propulsion Information Agency (CPIA) and Technology Applications, Inc. (TAI) to reconstitute and update Cryogenic Data Center information and establish a self-sufficient entity to provide technical services for the cryogenic community. The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) provided this service until 2004, when it was discontinued due to a lack of market interest. The CIC technical assets were distributed to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Plans are under way in 2006 for CPIA to launch an e-commerce cryogenic website to offer bibliography data with capability to download cryogenic documents.

  16. In-out asymmetry of divertor particle flux in H-mode with edge localized modes on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. B.; Guo, H. Y.; Wang, L.; Xu, G. S.; Xia, T. Y.; Liu, S. C.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, Jie; Chen, L.; Yan, N.; Wang, H. Q.; Xu, J. C.; Feng, W.; Shao, L. M.; Deng, G. Z.; Liu, H.; EAST Probe Team

    2016-06-01

    The in-out divertor asymmetry in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), as manifested by particle fluxes measured by the divertor triple Langmuir probe arrays, is significantly enhanced during type-I edge localized modes (ELMs), favoring the inner divertor in lower single null (LSN) for the normal toroidal field (B t) direction, i.e. with the ion B  ×  \

  17. Optical testing cryogenic thermal vacuum facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohogne, Patrick W.; Carpenter, Warren A.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of a turnkey cryogenic vacuum test facility was recently completed. The facility will be used to measure and record the surface profile of large diameter and 540 kg optics under simulated space conditions. The vacuum test chamber is a vertical stainless steel cylinder with a 3.5 diameter and a 7 m tangent length. The chamber was designed to maximize optical testing quality by minimizing the vibrations between the laser interferometer and the test specimen. This was accomplished by designing the chamber for a high natural frequency and vibration isolating the chamber. An optical test specimen is mounted on a movable presentation stage. During thermal vacuum testing, the specimen may be positioned to + or - 0.00025 cm accuracy with a fine adjustment mechanism. The chamber is evacuated by a close coupled Roots-type blower and rotary vane pump package and two cryopumps. The chamber is equipped with an optically dense gaseous nitrogen cooled thermal shroud. The thermal shroud is used to cool or warm the optical test specimen at a controlled rate. A control system is provided to automatically evacuate the chamber and cooldown the test specimen to the selected control temperature.

  18. PERFORMANCE OF A LIQUID XENON CALORIMETER CRYOGENIC SYSTEM FOR THE MEG EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Haruyama, T.; Kasami, K.; Hisamitsu, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Mihara, S.; Mori, T.; Nishiguchi, H.; Otani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2008-03-16

    The {mu}-particle rare decay physics experiment, the MU-E-GAMMA (MEG) experiment, will soon be operational at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Zurich. To achieve the extremely high sensitivity required to detect gamma rays, 800 L of liquid xenon is used as the medium in the calorimeter, viewed by 830 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) immersed in it. The required liquid xenon purity is of the order of ppb of water, and is obtained by using a cryogenic centrifugal pump and cold molecular sieves. The heat load of the calorimeter at 165 K is to be approximately 120 W, which is removed by a pulse-tube cryocooler developed at KEK and built by Iwatani Industrial Gas Corp., with a cooling power of about 200 W at 165 K. The cryogenic system is also equipped with a 1000-L dewar. This paper describes the results of an initial performance test of each cryogenic component.

  19. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies for combined-cycle propulsion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a technical assessment of the realization of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction technologies in a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process setting. The technical findings related to the status of air liquefaction technologies are reviewed. Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers, heat exchanger atmospheric constituent fouling alleviation measures, para/ortho-hydrogen shift-conversion catalysts, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps, hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as a heat sink, liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices, and technically related engine concepts are discussed. Much of the LACE work is related to aerospaceplane propulsion concepts that were developed in the 1960's. Emphasis is placed on the Liquid Air Cycle Engine (LACE).

  20. Developing and validating advanced divertor solutions on DIII-D for next-step fusion devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guo, H. Y.; Hill, D. N.; Leonard, A. W.; Allen, S. L.; Stangeby, P. C.; Thomas, D.; Unterberg, E. A.; Abrams, T.; Boedo, J.; Briesemeister, A. R.; et al

    2016-09-14

    A major challenge facing the design and operation of next-step high-power steady-state fusion devices is to develop a viable divertor solution with order-of-magnitude increases in power handling capability relative to present experience, while having acceptable divertor target plate erosion and being compatible with maintaining good core plasma confinement. A new initiative has been launched on DIII-D to develop the scientific basis for design, installation, and operation of an advanced divertor to evaluate boundary plasma solutions applicable to next step fusion experiments beyond ITER. Developing the scientific basis for fusion reactor divertor solutions must necessarily follow three lines of research, whichmore » we plan to pursue in DIII-D: (1) Advance scientific understanding and predictive capability through development and comparison between state-of-the art computational models and enhanced measurements using targeted parametric scans; (2) Develop and validate key divertor design concepts and codes through innovative variations in physical structure and magnetic geometry; (3) Assess candidate materials, determining the implications for core plasma operation and control, and develop mitigation techniques for any deleterious effects, incorporating development of plasma-material interaction models. These efforts will lead to design, installation, and evaluation of an advanced divertor for DIII-D to enable highly dissipative divertor operation at core density (n e/n GW), neutral fueling and impurity influx most compatible with high performance plasma scenarios and reactor relevant plasma facing components (PFCs). In conclusion, this paper highlights the current progress and near-term strategies of boundary/PMI research on DIII-D.« less

  1. Developing and validating advanced divertor solutions on DIII-D for next-step fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hill, D. N.; Leonard, A. W.; Allen, S. L.; Stangeby, P. C.; Thomas, D.; Unterberg, E. A.; Abrams, T.; Boedo, J.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Buchenauer, D.; Bykov, I.; Canik, J. M.; Chrobak, C.; Covele, B.; Ding, R.; Doerner, R.; Donovan, D.; Du, H.; Elder, D.; Eldon, D.; Lasa, A.; Groth, M.; Guterl, J.; Jarvinen, A.; Hinson, E.; Kolemen, E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lore, J.; Makowski, M. A.; McLean, A.; Meyer, B.; Moser, A. L.; Nygren, R.; Owen, L.; Petrie, T. W.; Porter, G. D.; Rognlien, T. D.; Rudakov, D.; Sang, C. F.; Samuell, C.; Si, H.; Schmitz, O.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wampler, W.; Wang, H.; Watkins, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    A major challenge facing the design and operation of next-step high-power steady-state fusion devices is to develop a viable divertor solution with order-of-magnitude increases in power handling capability relative to present experience, while having acceptable divertor target plate erosion and being compatible with maintaining good core plasma confinement. A new initiative has been launched on DIII-D to develop the scientific basis for design, installation, and operation of an advanced divertor to evaluate boundary plasma solutions applicable to next step fusion experiments beyond ITER. Developing the scientific basis for fusion reactor divertor solutions must necessarily follow three lines of research, which we plan to pursue in DIII-D: (1) Advance scientific understanding and predictive capability through development and comparison between state-of-the art computational models and enhanced measurements using targeted parametric scans; (2) Develop and validate key divertor design concepts and codes through innovative variations in physical structure and magnetic geometry; (3) Assess candidate materials, determining the implications for core plasma operation and control, and develop mitigation techniques for any deleterious effects, incorporating development of plasma-material interaction models. These efforts will lead to design, installation, and evaluation of an advanced divertor for DIII-D to enable highly dissipative divertor operation at core density (n e/n GW), neutral fueling and impurity influx most compatible with high performance plasma scenarios and reactor relevant plasma facing components (PFCs). This paper highlights the current progress and near-term strategies of boundary/PMI research on DIII-D.

  2. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  3. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth R.; Sartor, George B.

    2004-08-03

    An electrokinetic pump in which the porous dielectric medium of conventional electrokinetic pumps is replaced by a patterned microstructure. The patterned microstructure is fabricated by lithographic patterning and etching of a substrate and is formed by features arranged so as to create an array of microchannels. The microchannels have dimensions on the order of the pore spacing in a conventional porous dielectric medium. Embedded unitary electrodes are vapor deposited on either end of the channel structure to provide the electric field necessary for electroosmotic flow.

  4. Cryogenics and the Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current plans within NASA involve extending the human exploration of space from low earth orbit into the solar system, with the first human exploration of Mars presently planned in 2011. Integral to all hum Mars mission phases is cryogenic fluid management. Cryogenic fluids will be required both as propellant and for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Without safe and efficient cryogen storage human Mars missions will not be possible. Effective control and handling of cryogenic fluids is the key to affordable Mars missions, and advancing active thermal control technology is synergistic with all of NASA's exploration initiatives and with existing and future instrument cooling programs, including MTPE and Origins. Present mission scenarios for human exploration require cryogenic propellant storage for up to 1700 days and for up to 60 metric tons. These requirements represent increases of an order of magnitude over previous storage masses and lifetimes. The key cryogenic terminology areas to be addressed in human Mars missions are long-term propellant storage, cryogenic refrigeration, cryogenic liquefaction, and zero gravity fluid management. Long-term storage for the thermal control of cryogenic propellants is best accomplished with a mix of passive and active technologies. Passive technologies such as advanced multilayer insulation (MLI) concepts will be combined with the development of active coolers (cryogenic refrigerators). Candidates for long-life active cooling applications include Reverse Turbo-Brayton, Stirling, and Pulse-Tube coolers. The integration of passive and active technologies will form a hybrid system optimized to minimize the launch mass while preserving the cryogenic propellants. Since cryogenic propellants are the largest mass that Mars missions must launch from earth, even a modest reduction in the percentage of propellant carried results in a significant weight saving. This paper will present a brief overview of cryogenic fluid management

  5. APT/LEDA RFQ vacuum pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S., LLNL

    1997-07-21

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a vacuum pumping system for the ATP/LEDA (Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator) RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) linac. Resulted from the lost proton beam, gas streaming from the LEBT (Low Energy Beam Transport) and out-gassing from the surfaces of the RFQ cavity and vacuum plumbing, the total gas load will be on the order of 7.2 x 10{sup -4} Torr-liters/sec, consisting mainly of hydrogen. The system is designed to pump on a continual basis with redundancy to ensure that the minimal operating vacuum level of 1 x 10{sup -6} Torr is maintained even under abnormal conditions. Details of the design, performance analysis and the preliminary test results of the cryogenic pumps are presented.

  6. Lithium-Metal Infused Trenches: Progress toward a Divertor Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Fiflis, P.; Christenson, M.; Szott, M.; Xu, W.; Jung, S.; Morgan, T. W.; Kalathiparambil, K.

    2014-10-01

    The application of liquid metal, especially liquid lithium, as a plasma facing component (PFC) has the capacity to offer a strong alternative to solid PFCs by reducing damage concerns and enhancing plasma performance. The Liquid-Metal Infused Trenches (LiMIT) concept is a liquid metal divertor alternative which employs thermoelectric current from either plasma or external heating in tandem with the toroidal field to self-propel liquid lithium through a series of trenches. LiMIT has been tested in several devices, namely HT-7, the UIUC SLiDE and TELS facilities and Magnum PSI at heat fluxes of up to 3 MW/m-2. Results of these experiments, including velocity and temperature measurements, power handling considerations, and preliminary vapor shielding results will be discussed, focusing on the 117 shots performed at Magnum scanning magnetic fields and heat fluxes up to ~ 0.3 T and 3 MW/m-2. Concerns over tritium retention and MHD droplet ejection will additionally be addressed. LiMIT has also been proposed to function as a limiter on the EAST moveable limiter arm and tests have been performed with a prototype module inclined at various angles.

  7. Solid-Liquid Lithium Divertor Experiment: SLiDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Michael; Ruzic, David

    2006-10-01

    Liquid lithium has been proposed as a material for the first wall and divertor/limiter of a fusion device. One objection raised against the use of liquid lithium is the high vapor pressure at modest temperature increases. Recent experiments on the CDX-U device show however, that lithium absorbs a surface heat flux of greater than 40 MW/m^2 with negligible evaporation. Observation of a focused electron beam hitting solid lithium in the CDX-U lithium tray saw melting of a large section of the tray. Macroscopic liquid flows were observed which redistributed the incident power. Surface tension effects caused by temperature gradients have been proposed as a mechanism for this convection. These flows were insensitive to MHD effects in fields up to 600G [1]. This paper presents a design of an experiment which will diagnose the flows induced by an intense heat flux onto a lithium pool and measure the maximum heat flux lithium can absorb in an incident magnetic field. A number of diagnostics are considered and evaluated with the goal of being minimally invasive to the induced flows. These results are the first step in the creation of an experimental facility to study the heat transfer capabilities of free-surface liquid lithium at the University of Illinois. [1] Majeski, et al., Final results from the CDX-U lithium program, Presentation at APS-DPP05, Denver, Colorado. 2005.

  8. Response of NSTX Liquid Lithium divertor to High Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Tyler; Kallman, J; Kaitaa, R; Foley, E L; Grayd, T K; Kugel, H; Levinton, F; McLean, A G; Skinner, C H

    2012-07-18

    Samples of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) with and without an evaporative Li coating were directly exposed to a neutral beam ex-situ at a power of ~1.5 MW/m2 for 1-3 seconds. Measurements of front face and bulk sample temperature were obtained. Predictions of temperature evolution were derived from a 1D heat flux model. No macroscopic damage occurred when the "bare" sample was exposed to the beam but microscopic changes to the surface were observed. The Li-coated sample developed a lithium hydroxide (LiOH) coating, which did not change even when the front face temperature exceeded the pure Li melting point. These results are consistent with the lack of damage to the LLD surface and imply that heating alone may not expose pure liquid Li if the melting point of surface impurities is not exceeded. This suggests that flow and heat are needed for future PFCs requiring a liquid Li surface. __________________________________________________

  9. An Experimental Examination of the Loss-of-Flow Accident Phenomenon for Prototypical ITER Divertor Channels of Y = 0 and Y = 2

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Theron D.; McDonald, Jimmie M.; Cadwallader, Lee C.; Steiner, Don

    2000-01-15

    This paper discusses the thermal response of two prototypical International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor channels during simulated loss-of-flow-accident (LOFA) experiments. The thermal response was characterized by the time-to-burnout (TBO), which is a figure of merit on the mockups' survivability. Data from the LOFA experiments illustrate that (a) the pre-LOFA inlet velocity does not significantly influence the TBO, (b) the incident heat flux (IHF) does influence the TBO, and (c) a swirl tape insert significantly improves the TBO and promotes the initiation of natural circulation. This natural circulation enabled the mockup to absorb steady-state IHFs after the coolant circulation pump was disabled. Several methodologies for thermal-hydraulic modeling of the LOFA were attempted.

  10. The cryogenic cooling program in high-heat-load optics at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes some of the aspects of the cryogenic optics program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). A liquid-nitrogen-cooled, high-vacuum, double crystal monochromator is being fabricated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A pumping system capable of delivering a variable flow rate of up to 10 gallons per minute of pressurized liquid nitrogen and removing 5 kilowatts of x-ray power is also being constructed. This specialized pumping system and monochromator will be used to test the viability of cryogenically cooled, high-heat-load synchrotron optics. It has been determined that heat transfer enhancement will be required for optics used with APS insertion devices. An analysis of a porous-matrix-enhanced monochromator crystal is presented. For the particular case investigated, a heat transfer enhancement factor of 5 to 6 was calculated.

  11. Cryogenic High-Sensitivity Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Peter; Chui, Talso; Goodstein, David

    2005-01-01

    A proposed magnetometer for use in a cryogenic environment would be sensitive enough to measure a magnetic-flux density as small as a picogauss (10(exp -16) Tesla). In contrast, a typical conventional flux-gate magnetometer cannot measure a magnetic-flux density smaller that about 1 microgauss (10(exp -10) Tesla). One version of this device, for operation near the low end of the cryogenic temperature range, would include a piece of a paramagnetic material on a platform, the temperature of which would be controlled with a periodic variation. The variation in temperature would be measured by use of a conventional germanium resistance thermometer. A superconducting coil would be wound around the paramagnetic material and coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer.

  12. A cryogenic receiver for EPR.

    PubMed

    Narkowicz, R; Ogata, H; Reijerse, E; Suter, D

    2013-12-01

    Cryogenic probes have significantly increased the sensitivity of NMR. Here, we present a compact EPR receiver design capable of cryogenic operation. Compared to room temperature operation, it reduces the noise by a factor of ≈2.5. We discuss in detail the design and analyze the resulting noise performance. At low microwave power, the input noise density closely follows the emission of a cooled 50Ω resistor over the whole measurement range from 20K up to room temperature. To minimize the influence of the microwave source noise, we use high microwave efficiency (≈1.1-1.7mTW(-1/2)) planar microresonators. Their efficient conversion of microwave power to magnetic field permits EPR measurements with very low power levels, typically ranging from a few μW down to fractions of nW.

  13. Advanced cryogenic tank development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, G. F.; Tack, W. T.; Scholz, E. F.

    1993-06-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of materials, structures, and manufacturing technologies for the next generation of cryogenic propellant tanks under the auspices of a joint U.S. Air Force/NASA sponsored advanced development program. This paper summarizes the achievements of this three-year program, particularly in the evolution and properties of Weldalite 049, net shape component technology, Al-Li welding technology, and efficient manufacturing concepts. Results of a recent mechanical property characterization of a full-scale integrally stiffened barrel panel extrusion are presented, as well as plans for an additional weld process optimization program using response surface design of experiment techniques. A further discussion is given to the status of hardware completed for the Advanced Manufacturing Development Center and Martin Marietta's commitment to the integration of these technologies into the production of low-cost, light-weight cryogenic propellant tanks.

  14. Cryogenic VPH grisms for MOIRCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Takashi; Ichiyama, Kotaro; Ebizuka, Noboru; Murata, Chihiro; Taniguchi, Yuichiro; Okura, Tsutomu; Harashima, Masakazu; Uchimoto, Yuka Katsuno; Maruyama, Miyoko; Iye, Masanori; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2008-07-01

    We present the development and first astronomical applications of VPH grisms which are now operated at cryogenic temperature in MOIRCS, a Cassegrain near-infrared instrument of the Subaru Telescope. We designed and fabricated the VPH grisms with a resolving power ~3000 for the use in near-infrared bands. The VPH grating, encapsulated in BK7 glass, is glued between two ZnSe prisms with vertex angle of 20 deg. After repeating several thermal cycles down to ~100 K carefully enough not to cause irreparable damage on the grism during cooling, we evaluated the performance at cryogenic temperature in the laboratory and found no deterioration and no large difference in the performance from that measured in room temperature. Based on commissioning observations with MOIRCS, we have confirmed the high efficiency (~0.8) and the resolving power of the original design. Common use of the grisms is due to start in the second semester of 2008.

  15. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Joel

    2004-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is an experiment to search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The experiment initially was deployed at a shallow underground site, and is currently deployed at a deep underground site at the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. The detectors operate at cryogenic temperature, and are capable of distinguishing nuclear recoils from WIMP interactions from various backgrounds. The detectors are shielded from background by both active and passive elements. We will describe the components of the overall experiment, and focus on the novel data acquisition system that has been develop to control and monitor the experiment via the World Wide Web. Preliminary signals from the operation at Soudan will be discussed.

  16. Cryogenic Flange and Seal Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of flanges, seals, and pipes are used to carry cryogenic fluid from a storage tank to the vehicle at launch sites. However, after a certain amount of cycles these raised face flanges with glass-filled Teflon gaskets have been found to have torque relaxation and are as a result susceptible to cryogenic fluid leakage if not re-torqued. The intent of this project is to identify alternate combinations of flanges and seals which may improve thermal cycle performance and decrease re-torque requirements. The general approach is to design a test fixture to evaluate leak characteristics between spiral and concentric serrations and to test alternate flange and seal combinations. Due to insufficient time, it was not possible to evaluate these different types of combinations for the combination that improved thermal cycle performance the most. However, the necessary drawings for the test fixture were designed and assembled along with the collection of the necessary parts.

  17. Pump jack

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, G. E.

    1985-02-26

    A pump jack of the type comprising a rocker arm pivotably mounted intermediate its ends on a support member, said rocker arm being divided by said pivot mounting into a sucker-rod limb and a drive limb wherein the improvement comprises a pneumatic motor pivotably attached to the drive support member and further pivotably attached to the mounting base of the pump jack to provide the power to reciprocate the pump jack. The working fluid of said pneumatic motor being natural gas which is available from the well casing of the well without any interference with the flow of the oil in the oil tube of the well thereby making use of an energy source available at any oil well without having to provide gasoline to drive a rotating type gasoline engine or electricity to drive an electric motor usually of the rotating variety. Also the stroke of a pneumatic cylinder inherently smooths out and eliminates the shock loading at the extremes of motion at the piston mounted to the sucker rods of such pump jack at the bottom of the well.

  18. Geometrical Effects in Plasma Stability and Dynamics of Coherent Structures in the Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Cohen, R H

    2007-05-16

    Plasma dynamics in the divertor region is strongly affected by a variety of phenomena associated with the magnetic field geometry and the shape of the divertor plates. One of the most universal effects is the squeezing of a normal cross-section of a thin magnetic flux-tube on its way from the divertor plate to the main SOL. It leads to decoupling of the most unstable perturbations in the divertor legs from those in the main SOL. For perturbations on either side of the X-point, this effect can be cast as a boundary condition at some 'control surface' situated near the X-point. We discuss several boundary conditions proposed thus far and assess the influence of the magnetic field geometry on them. Another set of geometrical effects is related to the transformation of a flux-tube that occurs when it is displaced in such a way that its central magnetic field line coincides with some other field line, and the magnetic field is not perturbed. These flute-like displacements are of a particular interest for the low-beta edge plasmas. It turns out that this transformation may also lead to a considerable deformation of a flux-tube cross-section; in addition, the distance between plasma particles occupying the flux-tube may change significantly even if there is no parallel plasma motion. We present expressions describing aforementioned transformations for the general tokamak geometry and simplify them for the divertor region (using the proximity of the X-point). We also discuss the effects associated with the shape of the plasma-limiting surfaces, both those designed to intercept the plasma (like divertor plates and limiters) and those that can be hit in some 'abnormal' events, e.g., in the course of a radial motion of an isolated plasma filament. The orientation of the limiting surface with respect to the magnetic field affects the plasma dynamics via the sheath boundary conditions. One can enhance or suppress plasma instabilities in the divertor legs by tilting the divertor

  19. Reciprocating and fixed probe measurements of density and temperature in the DIII-D divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. G.; Moyer, R. A.; Cuthbertson, J. W.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Hill, D. N.; Ulrickson, M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes divertor density and temperature measurements using both a new reciprocating Langmuir probe (XPT-RCP) which plunges vertically above the divertor floor up to the X-point height and swept, single, Langmuir probes fixed horizontally across the divertor floor. These types of measurements are important for testing models of the SOL and divertor which then are used to determine engineering design criteria for plasma facing components in reactor size tokamaks. The 6 mm diameter fixed single probes (19 domed and 2 flat at radially equivalent locations) are incorporated into the lower divertor floor at 19 radial locations and swept at 250 Hz. These probes are critical for determining plasma detachment from the floor during operation with high density, highly radiating divertors. By sweeping the divertor strike point across the fixed probes, different regions of the target plate incident flux profile can be sampled and a high resolution spatial profile can be obtained from each probe tip as the strike point moves past. The X-point reciprocating probe (XPT-RCP) provides ne and Te profiles with high spatial (2 mm) and temporal (0.5 ms) resolution from the target plate to the X-point along a single vertical chord at the same radial location as a fixed probe tip at a different azimuthal location. The probe ne and Te are compared to the divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) ne and Te (eight vertical points at 20 Hz, RThomson = RX- point- rcp). Recent observations have also shown divertor densities from 3 × 10 19to 4 × 10 20m-3 near the target plate with the highest densities observed with D 2 gas puffing. Electron temperature is typically of the order of 15-25 eV at the target rising to about 70 eV near the X-point. Lower temperature, higher density plasmas are observed along the inner leg. Generally good agreement among the XPT-RCP, the fixed floor probes, and the DTS is observed. Differences between these diagnostic measurements will also be discussed with

  20. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  1. Vent System Analysis for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage Transfer Ground Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A

    2013-01-01

    To test and validate key capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements such as large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots, NASA is leading the efforts to develop and design the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) payload. The primary objectives of CPST payload are to demonstrate: 1) in-space storage of cryogenic propellants for long duration applications; and 2) in-space transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Ground Test Article (GTA) is a technology development version of the CPST payload. The GTA consists of flight-sized and flight-like storage and transfer tanks, liquid acquisition devices, transfer, and pressurization systems with all of the CPST functionality. The GTA is designed to perform integrated passive and active thermal storage and transfer performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a vacuum environment. The GTA storage tank is designed to store liquid hydrogen and the transfer tank is designed to be 5% of the storage tank volume. The LH2 transfer subsystem is designed to transfer propellant from one tank to the other utilizing pressure or a pump. The LH2 vent subsystem is designed to prevent over-pressurization of the storage and transfer tanks. An in-house general-purpose computer program was utilized to model and simulate the vent subsystem operation. The modeling, analysis, and the results will be presented in the final paper.

  2. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-29

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  3. A Micro Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based Cryogenic Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Kataza, H.; Bierden, P.

    2009-03-01

    We present our first results on the development and evaluation of a cryogenic deformable mirror (DM) based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. A MEMS silicon-based DM chip with 32 channels, in which each channel is 300 μm × 300 μm in size, was mounted on a silicon substrate in order to minimize distortion and prevent it from being permanently damaged by thermal stresses introduced by cooling. The silicon substrate was oxidized to obtain electric insulation and had a metal fan-out pattern on the surface. For cryogenic tests, we constructed a measurement system consisting of a Fizeau interferometer, a cryostat cooled by liquid N2, zooming optics, electric drivers. The surface of the mirror at 95 K deformed in response to the application of a voltage, and no significant difference was found between the deformation at 95 K and that at room temperature. The power dissipation by the cryogenic DM was also measured, and we suggest that this is small enough for it to be used in a space cryogenic telescope. The properties of the DM remained unchanged after five cycles of vacuum pumping, cooling, warming, and venting. We conclude that fabricating cryogenic DMs employing MEMS technology is a promising approach. Therefore, we intend to develop a more sophisticated device for actual use, and to look for potential applications including the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology & Astrophysics (SPICA), and other missions.

  4. Cryogenic moderator simulations : confronting reality.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-06

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities.

  5. Cryogenic properties of unidirectional composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Golda, M.

    The tensile, compressive, fatigue, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and specific heat of unidirectional laminates reinforced with boron, alumina, aramid, S-glass, E-glass, and high strength, high modulus and medium modulus carbon fibres are reviewed. The ratio of strength to thermal conductivity is used to assess the suitability of various fibre-reinforced laminates for supporting struts (experiencing compression) or straps (experiencing tension) at cryogenic temperatures. The relationships between laminate properties and reinforcement fibres are discussed.

  6. Insulating Cryogenic Pipes With Frost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, J. G.; Bova, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Crystallized water vapor fills voids in pipe insulation. Small, carefully controlled amount of water vapor introduced into dry nitrogen gas before it enters aft fuselage. Vapor freezes on pipes, filling cracks in insulation. Ice prevents gaseous nitrogen from condensing on pipes and dripping on structure, in addition to helping to insulate all parts. Industrial applications include large refrigeration plants or facilities that use cryogenic liquids.

  7. Conceptual design of divertor and first wall for DEMO-FNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. Yu.; Kuteev, B. V.; Bykov, A. S.; Gervash, A. A.; Glazunov, D. A.; Goncharov, P. R.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.; Klishchenko, A. V.; Lukash, V. E.; Mazul, I. V.; Molchanov, P. A.; Petrov, V. S.; Rozhansky, V. A.; Shpanskiy, Yu. S.; Sivak, A. B.; Skokov, V. G.; Spitsyn, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Key issues of design of the divertor and the first wall of DEMO-FNS are presented. A double null closed magnetic configuration was chosen with long external legs and V-shaped corners. The divertor employs a cassette design similar to that of ITER. Water-cooled first wall of the tokamak is made of Be tiles and CuCrZr-stainless steel shells. Lithium injection and circulation technologies are foreseen for protection of plasma facing components. Simulations of thermal loads onto the first wall and divertor plates suggest a possibility to distribute heat loads making them less than 10 MW m-2. Evaluations of sputtering and evaporation of plasma-facing materials suggest that lithium may protect the first wall. To prevent Be erosion at the outer divertor plates either the full detached divertor operation or arrangement of the renewal lithium flow on targets should be implemented. Test bed experiments on the Tsefey-M facility with the first wall mockup coated by Ве tiles and cooled by water are presented. The temperature of the surface of tiles reached 280-300 °С at 5 MW m-2 and 600-650 °С at 10.5 MW m-2. The mockup successfully withstood 1000 cycles with the lower thermal loading and 100 cycles with higher thermal loading.

  8. Intermittent Divertor Filaments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment and Their Relation to Midplane Blobs

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Maqueda, D.P. Stotler and the NSTX Team.

    2010-05-19

    While intermittent filamentary structures, also known as blobs, are routinely seen in the low-field-side scrape-off layer of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), fine structured filaments are also seen on the lower divertor target plates of NSTX. These filaments, not associated with edge localized modes, correspond to the interaction of the turbulent blobs seen near the midplane with the divertor plasma facing components. The fluctuation level of the neutral lithium light observed at the divertor, and the skewness and kurtosis of its probability distribution function, is similar to that of midplane blobs seen in Dα; e.g. increasing with increasing radii outside the outer strike point (OSP) (separatrix). In addition, their toroidal and radial movement agrees with the typical movement of midplane blobs. Furthermore, with the appropriate magnetic topology, i.e. mapping between the portion of the target plates being observed into the field of view of the midplane gas puff imaging diagnostic, very good correlation is observed between the blobs and the divertor filaments. The correlation between divertor plate filaments and midplane blobs is lost close to the OSP. This latter observation is consistent with the existence of ‘magnetic shear disconnection’ due to the lower X-point, as proposed by Cohen and Ryutov (1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 621).

  9. Power exhaust in all geometric variations of the snowflake divertor on TCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijvers, Wouter; Canal, Gustavo; Duval, Basil; Labit, Benoit; Reimerdes, Holger; Coda, Stefano; Lunt, Tilmann; Morgan, Thomas; de Temmerman, Greg

    2013-10-01

    The snowflake (SF) divertor is recognized as a potential exhaust solution for large-scale, high-performance tokamaks. TCV has advanced to a detailed study of the transport through the SF's scrape-off layer (SOL), null region and divertor legs to determine the optimal geometry and quantify parallel and cross-field transport. Experimental SF plasmas have two closely spaced x-points, leading to two additional strike points (SPs) and a larger region of low poloidal field than in a conventional divertor. The relative x-point positions determine the divertor geometry and hence the exhaust properties. The results show that if parallel transport is dominant, either the HFS or LFS SOL power can be distributed to two SPs, with the power ratio depending on the SOL width, inter-x-point distance (D) and geometrical divertor asymmetry. Cross-field transport allows power to reach SPs in the private flux region. Experiments show significant power reaching such SPs already at large D, particularly during ELMs, enabling a 2-3x reduction in flux to the main SPs. As EMC3-Eirene simulations predict much smaller SP powers, additional transport mechanisms beyond perpendicular diffusion are considered. The SF's beneficial magnetic properties are shown to be enhanced in reactor-size devices.

  10. Impact of Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Fields on NSTX-U Advanced Divertor Topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Ian; Frerichs, Heinke; Schmitz, Oliver; Ahn, Joon-Wook; Canal, Gustavo; Evans, Todd; Soukhanovskii, Vlad

    2015-11-01

    Explorations are under way to optimize the magnetic topology in the plasma edge of NSTX-U with the goal of improving neutral and impurity fueling and exhaust. The use of magnetic perturbation fields is being considered to spread heat and particle fluxes in the divertor, adjust plasma refueling, control impurity transport, and improve coupling to the exhaust systems. Also, advanced divertor configurations are being considered to improve peak heat loads on divertors. An assessment is made of the topologies of a number of representative NSTX-U advanced divertor configurations: lower single null, exact snowflake, and snowflake minus. Wall to wall magnetic connection lengths for each configuration are assessed in both their perturbed and axisymmetric configurations with perturbation coil currents of 1kA and 3kA. The magnetic perturbations yield complex strike patterns on divertor elements that are expected to be resolvable experimentally. The EMC3-EIRENE fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code will be used to study neutral and impurity transport and exhaust in these topologies. This work was funded in part by the Department of Energy under grant DE-SC0012315 and by startup funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  11. Scaling and transport analysis of divertor conditions on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Goetz, J.; Kurz, C.; Jablonski, D.; Lipschultz, B.; McCracken, G.; Niemczewski, A.; Boivin, R. L.; Bombarda, F.; Christensen, C.; Fairfax, S.; Fiore, C.; Garnier, D.; Graf, M.; Golovato, S.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Horne, S.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.; Kesner, J.; Luke, T.; Marmar, E.; May, M.; O'Shea, P.; Porkolab, M.; Reardon, J.; Rice, J.; Schachter, J.; Snipes, J.; Stek, P.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Tinios, G.; Watterson, R.; Welch, B.; Wolfe, S.

    1995-06-01

    Detailed measurements and transport analysis of divertor conditions in Alcator C-Mod [Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] are presented for a range of line-averaged densities, 0.7divertor, and detached divertor, which can coexist in the same discharge. Local cross-field pressure gradients are found to scale simply with a local electron temperature. This scaling is consistent with classical electron parallel conduction being balanced by anomalous cross-field transport (χ⊥˜0.2 m2 s-1) proportional to the local pressure gradient. A 60%-80% of divertor power is radiated in attached discharges, approaching 100% in detached discharges. Detachment occurs when the heat flux to the plate is low and the plasma pressure is high (Te˜5 eV). High neutral pressures in the divertor are nearly always present (1-20 mTorr), sufficient to remove parallel momentum via ion-neutral collisions.

  12. Sputtering and Reflection Data for Mixed Tungsten/Beryllium Layers Under Typical FIRE Divertor Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Nieto, M.; Alman, D. A.; Brooks, J. N.

    2001-10-01

    Computer modeling has been done as part of the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) design study. The current focus is on beryllium/tungsten mixed-material erosion. The FIRE design calls for a beryllium first wall and tungsten divertors. Beryllium can be sputtered from the first wall and transported to the divertor, forming a Be/W mixture on the divertor. The beryllium sputtering from the first wall is obtained from fluxes calculated by the DEGAS2 neutral transport code. Subsequent transport to the divertor is calculated by the REDEP code. VFTRIM-3D, a variant of the TRIM-SP binary-collision code, is used to investigate the sputtering properties of the Be/W divertor. Finally, WBC can compute beryllium and tungsten erosion and core plasma contamination using the sputtering and reflection coefficients obtained with VFTRIM-3D. In the present work, the VFTRIM-3D code was run on a W/Be surface with the Be content varied from 0 to 100 atomic percent. Deuterium and tritium (ions and neutrals), oxygen, beryllium from the first wall, and tungsten being redeposited are all incident on this mixed W/Be layer. Data on reflection and sputtering coefficients as a function of beryllium content in the bombarded surface will be presented.

  13. Positronium production in cryogenic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, B. S.; Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Liszkay, L.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-03-01

    We report measurements of positronium (Ps) formation following positron irradiation of mesoporous SiO2 films and Ge(100) single crystals at temperatures ranging from 12-700 K. As both of these materials generate Ps atoms via nonthermal processes, they are able to function as positron-positronium converters at cryogenic temperatures. Our data show that such Ps formation is possibly provided the targets are not compromised by adsorption of residual gas. In the case of SiO2 films, we observe a strong reduction in the Ps formation efficiency following irradiation with UV laser light (λ =243.01 nm) below 250 K, in accordance with previous observations of radiation-induced surface paramagnetic centers. Conversely, Ps emission from Ge is enhanced by irradiation with visible laser light (λ =532 nm) via a photoemission process that persists at cryogenic temperatures. Both mesoporous SiO2 films and Ge crystals were found to produce Ps efficiently in cryogenic environments. Accordingly, these materials are likely to prove useful in several areas of research, including Ps mediated antihydrogen formation conducted in the cold bore of a superconducting magnet, the production of Rydberg Ps for experiments in which the effects of black-body radiation must be minimized, and the utilization of mesoporous structures that have been modified to produce cold Ps atoms.

  14. Cryogenic fluid management in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1988-01-01

    Many future space based vehicles and satellites will require on orbit refuelling procedures. Cryogenic fluid management technology is being developed to assess the requirements of such procedures as well as to aid in the design and development of these vehicles. Cryogenic fluid management technology for this application could be divided into two areas of study, one is concerned with fluid transfer process and the other with cryogenic liquid storage. This division is based upon the needed technology for the development of each area. In the first, the interaction of fluid dynamics with thermodynamics is essential, while in the second only thermodynamic analyses are sufficient to define the problem. The following specific process related to the liquid transfer area are discussed: tank chilldown and fill; tank pressurization; liquid positioning; and slosh dynamics and control. These specific issues are discussed in relation with the required technology for their development in the low gravity application area. In each process the relevant physics controlling the technology is identified and methods for resolving some of the basic questions are discussed.

  15. Cryogenic microwave anisotropic artificial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, Frank

    This thesis addresses analysis and design of a cryogenic microwave anisotropic wave guiding structure that isolates an antenna from external incident fields from specific directions. The focus of this research is to design and optimize the radome's constituent material parameters for maximizing the isolation between an interior receiver antenna and an exterior transmitter without significantly disturbing the transmitter antenna far field characteristics. The design, characterization, and optimization of high-temperature superconducting metamaterials constitutive parameters are developed in this work at X-band frequencies. A calibrated characterization method for testing arrays of split-ring resonators at cryogenic temperature inside a TE10 waveguide was developed and used to back-out anisotropic equivalent material parameters. The artificial material elements (YBCO split-ring resonators on MgO substrate) are optimized to improve the narrowband performance of the metamaterial radome with respect to maximizing isolation and minimizing shadowing, defined as a reduction of the transmitted power external to the radome. The optimized radome is fabricated and characterized in a parallel plate waveguide in a cryogenic environment to demonstrate the degree of isolation and shadowing resulting from its presence. At 11.12 GHz, measurements show that the HTS metamaterial radome achieved an isolation of 10.5 dB and the external power at 100 mm behind the radome is reduced by 1.9 dB. This work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating a structure that provides good isolation between two antennas and low disturbance of the transmitter's fields.

  16. ZERODUR TAILORED for cryogenic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, R.; Westerhoff, T.

    2014-07-01

    ZERODUR® glass ceramic from SCHOTT is known for its very low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) at room temperature and its excellent CTE homogeneity. It is widely used for ground-based astronomical mirrors but also for satellite applications. Many reference application demonstrate the excellent and long lasting performance of ZERODUR® components in orbit. For space application a low CTE of the mirror material is required at cryogenic temperatures together with a good match of the thermal expansion to the supporting structure material. It is possible to optimize the coefficient of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® for cryogenic applications. This paper reports on measurements of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® down to cryogenic temperatures of 10 K performed by the PTB (Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstallt, Braunschweig, Germany, the national metrology laboratory). The ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO presented in this paper has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion down to 70 K. The maximum absolute integrated thermal expansion down to 10 K is only about 20 ppm. Mirror blanks made from ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO can be light weighted to almost 90% with our modern processing technologies. With ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO, SCHOTT offers the mirror blank material for the next generation of space telescope applications.

  17. Shuttle cryogenic supply system optimization study. Volume 4: Cryogenic cooling in environmental control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of cryogenic fluid cooling in the environmental control system of the space shuttle was conducted. The technique for treating the cryogenic fluid storage and supply tanks and subsystems as integrated systems was developed. It was concluded that a basic incompatibility exists between the heat generated and the cryogen usage rate and cryogens cannot be used to absorb the generated heat. The use of radiators and accumulators to provide additional cooling capability is recommended.

  18. 18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps in background formerly drew water from the clear well. They went out of service when use of the beds was discontinued. Pumps in the foreground provide high pressure water to Hamden. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Armory Street Pumphouse, North side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  19. Properties of cryogenically worked metals. [stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; Kiefer, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine whether the mechanical properties of cryogenically worked 17-7PH stainless steel are suitable for service from ambient to cryogenic temperatures. It was determined that the stress corrosion resistance of the cryo-worked material is quite adequate for structural service. The tensile properties and fracture toughness at room temperature were comparable to titanium alloy 6Al-4V. However, at cryogenic temperatures, the properties were not sufficient to recommend consideration for structural service.

  20. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  1. Cryogenics at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisend, J. G., II; Arnold, P.; Hees, J. Fydrych. W.; Jurns, J. M.; Wang, X. L.

    Cryogenics plays an important role at the European Spallation Source, a world class neutron science center, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. Three principal applications of cryogenics are found at ESS. The SRF cryomodules of the ESS proton linac require cooling at 2 K, 4.5 K and 40 K; the hydrogenmoderator surrounding the target that produces neutrons, requires cooling via 16.5 K helium and LHe is required for many of the scientific instruments. These needs will be met by a set of three cryogenic refrigeration/liquefaction plants and an extensive cryogenic distribution system. Significant progress has been made on the ESS cryogenic system in preparation for the expected first beam on target in 2019. This work includes: funding of industry studies for the accelerator cryoplant, preliminary design of the cryogenic distribution system, investigation of possible in kind contributors and release of the invitation to tender for the accelerator cryoplant.This paper describes the requirements, design solutions and current status of the ESS cryogenic system. The planned recovery of waste heat from the cryogenic plants, a unique aspect of ESS, is described. The procurement of the cryogenic system, expected to be done via a combination of purchase via competitive bids and in kind contributions is also discussed.

  2. Eddy Current Damper for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starin, Scott; Crosno, Fred

    2002-09-01

    This presentation considers the following topics: the need for cryogenic energy absorption, high speed damper characteristics, gearbox characteristics, composite assembly characteristics, performance tests, simulation models.

  3. Cryogenic Technology Development for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the status and findings of different cryogenic technology research projects in support of the President s Vision for Space Exploration. The exploration systems architecture study is reviewed for cryogenic fluid management needs. It is shown that the exploration architecture is reliant on the cryogenic propellants of liquid hydrogen, liquid oxygen and liquid methane. Needs identified include: the key technologies of liquid acquisition devices, passive thermal and pressure control, low gravity mass gauging, prototype pressure vessel demonstration, active thermal control; as well as feed system testing, and Cryogenic Fluid Management integrated system demonstration. Then five NASA technology projects are reviewed to show how these needs are being addressed by technology research. Projects reviewed include: In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot; Experimentation for the Maturation of Deep Space Cryogenic Refueling Technology; Cryogenic Propellant Operations Demonstrator; Zero Boil-Off Technology Experiment; and Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development. Advances are found in the areas of liquid acquisition of liquid oxygen, mass gauging of liquid oxygen via radio frequency techniques, computational modeling of thermal and pressure control, broad area cooling thermal control strategies, flight experiments for resolving low gravity issues of cryogenic fluid management. Promising results are also seen for Joule-Thomson pressure control devices in liquid oxygen and liquid methane and liquid acquisition of methane, although these findings are still preliminary.

  4. Thermal Design and Analysis for the Cryogenic MIDAS Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth McElroy

    1997-01-01

    The Materials In Devices As Superconductors (MIDAS) spaceflight experiment is a NASA payload which launched in September 1996 on the Shuttle, and was transferred to the Mir Space Station for several months of operation. MIDAS was developed and built at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The primary objective of the experiment was to determine the effects of microgravity and spaceflight on the electrical properties of high-temperature superconductive (HTS) materials. The thermal challenge on MIDAS was to maintain the superconductive specimens at or below 80 K for the entire operation of the experiment, including all ground testing and 90 days of spaceflight operation. Cooling was provided by a small tactical cryocooler. The superconductive specimens and the coldfinger of the cryocooler were mounted in a vacuum chamber, with vacuum levels maintained by an ion pump. The entire experiment was mounted for operation in a stowage locker inside Mir, with the only heat dissipation capability provided by a cooling fan exhausting to the habitable compartment. The thermal environment on Mir can potentially vary over the range 5 to 40 C; this was the range used in testing, and this wide range adds to the difficulty in managing the power dissipated from the experiment's active components. Many issues in the thermal design are discussed, including: thermal isolation methods for the cryogenic samples; design for cooling to cryogenic temperatures; cryogenic epoxy bonds; management of ambient temperature components self-heating; and fan cooling of the enclosed locker. Results of the design are also considered, including the thermal gradients across the HTS samples and cryogenic thermal strap, electronics and thermal sensor cryogenic performance, and differences between ground and flight performance. Modeling was performed in both SINDA-85 and MSC/PATRAN (with direct geometry import from the CAD design tool Pro/Engineer). Advantages of both types of models are discussed

  5. Cryogenic Detectors (Narrow Field Instruments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoevers, H.; Verhoeve, P.

    Two cryogenic imaging spectrometer arrays are currently considered as focal plane instruments for XEUS. The narrow field imager 1 (NFI 1) will cover the energy range from 0.05 to 3 keV with an energy resolution of 2 eV, or better, at 500 eV. A second narrow field imager (NFI 2) covers the energy range from 1 to 15 keV with an energy resolution of 2 eV (at 1 keV) and 5 eV (at 7 keV), creating some overlap with part of the NFI 1 energy window. Both narrow field imagers have a 0.5 arcmin field of view. Their imaging capabilities are matched to the XEUS optics of 2 to 5 arcsec leading to 1 arcsec pixels. The detector arrays will be cooled by a closed cycle system comprising a mechanical cooler with a base temperature of 2.5 K and either a low temperature 3He sorption pump providing the very low temperature stage and/or an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR). The ADR cooler is explicitly needed to cool the NFI 2 array. The narrow field imager 1} Currently a 48 times 48 element array of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) is envisaged. Its operating temperature is in the range between 30 and 350 mK. Small, single Ta STJs (20-50 mum on a side) have shown 3.5 eV (FWHM) resolution at E = 525 eV and small arrays have been successfully demonstrated (6 times 6 pixels), or are currently tested (10 times 12 pixels). Alternatively, a prototype Distributed Read-Out Imaging Device (DROID), consisting of a linear superconducting Ta absorber of 20 times 100 mum2, including a 20 times 20 mum STJ for readout at either end, has shown a measured energy resolution of 2.4 eV (FWHM) at E = 500 eV. Simulations involving the diffusion properties as well as loss and tunnel rates have shown that the performance can be further improved by slight modifications in the geometry, and that the size of the DROIDS can be increased to 0.5-1.0 mm without loss in energy resolution. The relatively large areas and good energy resolution compared to single STJs make DROIDS good candidates for the

  6. Development of divertor plate with CFCs bonded onto DSCu cooling tube for fusion reactor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, T.; Araki, M.; Nakamura, K.; Akiba, M.

    1998-10-01

    This paper presents the high heat flux experiment of divertor mock-ups with CFC-Cu duplex structure. A plasma-facing component (PFC), which is served as a protection wall against heat and particle loads from fusion plasma, is one of the critical components of next fusion devices such as ITER. A divertor plate which is one of the PFCs must be capable of withstanding cyclic heat load of 5-20 MW/m 2 in ITER. To investigate the thermal fatigue behavior, a thermal cycling experiment was conducted in Particle Beam Engineering Facility. As a result, the divertor mock-up with a dispersion strengthened copper cooling tube could withstand a heat flux of 20 MW/m 2 for 1000 cycles. On the other hand, the mock-up with an oxygen-free-high conductivity copper cooling tube showed a water leakage at about 400 cycles due to thermal fatigue cracking.

  7. Exposures of tungsten nanostructures to divertor plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakov, D. L.; Wong, C. P. C.; Doerner, R. P.; Wright, G. M.; Abrams, T.; Baldwin, M. J.; Boedo, J. A.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Chrobak, C. P.; Guo, H. Y.; Hollmann, E. M.; McLean, A. G.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Moyer, R. A.; Pace, D. C.; Thomas, D. M.; Watkins, J. G.

    2016-02-01

    Tungsten nanostructures (W-fuzz) prepared in the PISCES-A linear device have been found to survive direct exposure to divertor plasmas in DIII-D. W-fuzz was exposed in the lower divertor of DIII-D using the divertor material evaluation system. Two samples were exposed in lower single null (LSN) deuterium H-mode plasmas. The first sample was exposed in three discharges terminated by vertical displacement event disruptions, and the second in two discharges near the lowered X-point. More recently, three samples were exposed near the lower outer strike point in predominantly helium H-mode LSN plasmas. In all cases, the W-fuzz survived plasma exposure with little obvious damage except in the areas where unipolar arcing occurred. Arcing is effective in W-fuzz removal, and it appears that surfaces covered with W-fuzz can be more prone to arcing than smooth W surfaces.

  8. Simulation of Turbulence in the Divertor Region of Tokamak Edge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M; Rognlien, T; Xu, X

    2004-10-04

    Results are presented for turbulence simulations with the fluid edge turbulence code BOUT [1]. The present study is focused on turbulence in the divertor leg region and on the role of the X-point in the structure of turbulence. Results of the present calculations indicate that the ballooning effects are important for the divertor fluctuations. The X-point shear leads to weak correlation of turbulence across the X-point regions, in particular for large toroidal wavenumber. For the saturated amplitudes of the divertor region turbulence it is found that amplitudes of density fluctuations are roughly proportional to the local density of the background plasma. The amplitudes of electron temperature and electric potential fluctuations are roughly proportional to the local electron temperature of the background plasma.

  9. Investigation of SOL parameters and divertor particle flux from electric probe measurements in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Bae, M. K.; Juhn, J. W.; Seo, D. C.; Bang, E. N.; Shim, S. B.; Chung, K. S.; Lee, H. J.; Hong, S. H.

    2015-08-01

    The upstream scrape-off layer (SOL) profiles and downstream particle fluxes are measured with a fast reciprocating Langmuir probe assembly (FRLPA) at the outboard mid-plane and a fixed edge Langmuir probe array (ELPA) at divertor region, respectively in the KSTAR. It is found that the SOL has a two-layer structure in the outboard wall-limited (OWL) ohmic and L-mode: a near SOL (∼5 mm zone) with a narrow feature and a far SOL with a broader profile. The near SOL width evaluated from the SOL profiles in the OWL plasmas is comparable to the scaling for the L-mode divertor plasmas in the JET and AUG. In the SOL profiles and the divertor particle flux profile during the ELMy H-modes, the characteristic e-folding lengths of electron temperature, plasma density and particle flux during an ELM phase are about two times larger than ones at the inter ELM.

  10. Co-deposited layers in the divertor region of JET-ILW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, P.; Rubel, M.; Esser, H. G.; Likonen, J.; Koivuranta, S.; Widdowson, A.

    2015-08-01

    Tungsten-coated carbon tiles from a poloidal cross-section of the divertor and several types of erosion-deposition probes from the shadowed areas in the divertor were studied using heavy ion elastic recoil detection to obtain quantitative and depth-resolved deposition patterns. Deuterium, beryllium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen along with tungsten and Inconel components are the main species detected in the studied surface region. The top of Tile 1 in the inner divertor is the main deposition area where the greatest amounts of deposited species are measured. Beryllium and tungsten-containing deposits on the probes (test mirrors and quartz microbalance) indicate that both low-Z and high-Z metals are transported to remote areas. Deposition of nitrogen-15 tracer used for edge cooling only at the end of experimental campaigns in 2012 was also detected giving evidence that nitrogen is effectively retained in wall components.

  11. Divertor with a third-order null of the poloidal field

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2013-09-15

    A concept and preliminary feasibility analysis of a divertor with the third-order poloidal field null is presented. The third-order null is the point where not only the field itself but also its first and second spatial derivatives are zero. In this case, the separatrix near the null-point has eight branches, and the number of strike-points increases from 2 (as in the standard divertor) to six. It is shown that this magnetic configuration can be created by a proper adjustment of the currents in a set of three divertor coils. If the currents are somewhat different from the required values, the configuration becomes that of three closely spaced first-order nulls. Analytic approach, suitable for a quick orientation in the problem, is used. Potential advantages and disadvantages of this configuration are briefly discussed.

  12. Flute instability in the tandem mirror with the divertor/dipole regions

    SciTech Connect

    Katanuma, I.; Masaki, S.; Sato, S.; Sekiya, K.; Ichimura, M.; Imai, T.

    2011-11-15

    The numerical simulation is performed in GAMMA10 A-divertor magnetic configuration, which is a candidate of remodeled device of the GAMMA10 tandem mirror [M. Inutake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 939 (1985)]. Both divertor and dipole regions are included in the numerical calculation, which is a new point. The electron short circuit effect along x-point, therefore, is not assumed so that it is not used the boundary condition of the electrostatic perturbations being zero at the separatrix on which the magnetic field lines pass through x-point. The simulation results reveal that the dipole field plays a role of a good magnetic field line curvature to the GAMMA10 A-divertor, and so the flute modes are stabilized without help of electron short circuit effects.

  13. The dynamic ergodic divertor in the TEXTOR tokamak: plasma response to dynamic helical magnetic field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finken, K. H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Biel, W.; de Bock, M. F. M.; Busch, C.; Farshi, E.; von Hellermann, M.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Jakubowski, M.; Jaspers, R.; Koslowski, H. R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Lazaros, A.; Lehnen, M.; Liang, Y.; Nicolai, A.; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, B.; Westerhof, E.; Wolf, R.; Zimmermann, O.; de Baar, M.; Bertschinger, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Classen, I. G. J.; Donné, A. J. H.; Esser, H. G.; Gerhauser, H.; Giesen, B.; Harting, D.; Hoekzema, J. A.; Huettemann, P. W.; Jachmich, S.; Jakubowska, K.; Kalupin, D.; Kelly, F.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kirschner, A.; Koch, R.; Korten, M.; Kreter, A.; Krom, J.; Kruezi, U.; Litnovsky, A.; Loozen, X.; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; Lyssoivan, A.; Marchuk, O.; Mertens, Ph; Messiaen, A.; Neubauer, O.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Reiser, D.; Reiter, D.; Rogister, A. L.; Van Rompuy, T.; Savtchkov, A.; Samm, U.; Schorn, R. P.; Schueller, F. C.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Telesca, K. H. G.; Tokar, M.; Van Oost, G.; Uhlemann, R.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Weynants, R.; Wiesen, S.; Xu, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Recently, the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) of TEXTOR has been studied in an m/n = 3/1 set-up which is characterized by a relatively deep penetration of the perturbation field. The perturbation field creates (a) a helical divertor, (b) an ergodic pattern and/or (c) excitation of tearing modes, depending on whether the DED current is static, rotating in the co-current direction or in the counter-current direction. Characteristic divertor properties such as the high recycling regime or enhanced shielding have been studied. A strong effect of the ergodization is spin up of the plasma rotation, possibly due to the electric field at the plasma edge. Tearing modes are excited in a rather reproducible way and their excitation threshold value, their motion and their reduction due to the ECRH/ECCD have been studied. The different scenarios are characterized by strong modifications of the toroidal velocity profile and by a reduced or enhanced radial transport.

  14. Attainment of high confinement in neutral beam heated divertor discharges in the PDX tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, S. M.; Bell, M. G.; Bol, K.; Boyd, D.; Brau, K.; Buchenauer, D.; Budny, R.; Cavallo, A.; Couture, P.; Crowley, T.; Darrow, D. S.; Eubank, H.; Fonck, R. J.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Jaehnig, K. P.; Johnson, D.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Leblanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Manos, D.; Mansfield, D.; Mazzucato, E.; McCann, R.; McCune, D.; McGuire, K.; Mueller, D.; Murdock, A.; Okabayashi, M.; Okano, K.; Owens, D. K.; Post, D. E.; Reusch, M.; Schmidt, G. L.; Sesnic, S.; Slusher, R.; Suckewer, S.; Surko, C.; Takahashi, H.; Tenney, F.; Towner, H.; Valley, J.

    1984-05-01

    The PDX divertor configuration has recently been converted from an open to a closed geometry to inhibit the return of neutral gas from the divertor region to the main chamber. Since then, operation in a regime with high energy confinement in neutral beam heated discharges (ASDEX H-mode) has been routine over a wide range of operating conditions. These H-mode discharges are characterized by a sudden drop in divertor density and H α emission and a spontaneous rise in main chamber plasma density during neutral beam injection. The confinement time is found to scale nearly linearly with plasma current, but can be degraded due either to the presence of edge instabilities or heavy gas puffing. Detailed Thomson scattering temperature profiles show high values of Tc near the plasma edge (˜ 450 eV) with sharp radial gradients (˜ 400 eV/cm) near the separatrix. Density profiles are broad and also exhibit steep gradients close to the separatrix.

  15. Modelling the transport of deuterium and tritium neutral particles in a divertor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.; Kotov, V.

    2012-10-01

    A fluid model for transport of deuterium and tritium atoms in two-dimensional geometry of a poloidal divertor is elaborated by taking into account the coupling of both isotopes through the processes of cross-charge-exchange. Calculations are performed for the plasma parameters predicted with the code package B2-EIRENE (SOLPS4.3) for the divertor region in ITER. The results demonstrate that the transparency of the scrape-off layer for neutral particles generated by recycling on target plates and recombination of electrons and ions in the plasma volume can be significantly different for deuterium and tritium atoms. This difference has to be taken into account by considering the global particle balances in a reactor. The numerical approach applied for calculations is verified by comparing with an analytical model elaborated for the case of plasma parameters homogeneous in the divertor domain.

  16. Modeling and Commissioning of a Cold Compressor String for the Superfluid Cryogenic Plant at Fermilab's Cryo-module Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueresin, C.; Decker, L.; Treite, P.

    In 2011, Linde Cryogenics, a division of Linde Process Plants, Tulsa, Oklahoma, was awarded the contract to deliver a 500 W at 2 K superfluid cryogenic plant to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois, USA. This system includes a cold compressor string with three centrifugal compressors and a vacuum pump skid with five volumetric pumps in parallel used to pump down helium to its saturation pressure corresponding to 2 K. Linde Kryotechnik AG, Pfungen Switzerland engineered and supplied the cold compressor system and commissioned it with its control logic to cover the complete range of system operation. The paper outlines issues regarding compressor design, compressor string modeling, control algorithms, controller performance, and surge protection.

  17. Optimization of tungsten castellated structures for the ITER divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Matveev, D.; Komm, M.; van den Berg, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Rudakov, D.; Ding, F.; Luo, G.-N.; Krieger, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Pitts, R. A.; Petersson, P.

    2015-08-01

    In ITER, the plasma-facing components (PFCs) of the first wall and the divertor armor will be castellated to improve their thermo-mechanical stability and to limit forces due to induced currents. The fuel accumulation in the gaps may significantly contribute to the in-vessel fuel inventory. Castellation shaping may be the most straightforward way to minimize the fuel inventory and to alleviate the thermal loads onto castellations. A new castellation shape was proposed and comparative modeling of conventional (rectangular) and shaped castellation was performed for ITER conditions. Shaped castellation was predicted to be capable to operate under stationary heat load of 20 MW/m2. An 11-fold decrease of beryllium (Be) content in the gaps of the shaped cells alone with a 7-fold decrease of carbon content was predicted. In order to validate the predictive capabilities of modeling tools used for ITER conditions, the dedicated modeling with the same codes was made for existing tokamaks and benchmarked with the results of multi-machine experiments. For the castellations exposed in TEXTOR and DIII-D, the carbon amount in the gaps of shaped cells was 1.9-2.3 times smaller than that of rectangular ones. Modeling for TEXTOR conditions yielded to 1.5-fold decrease of carbon content in the gaps of shaped castellation outlining fair agreement with the experiment. At the same time, a number of processes, like enhanced erosion of molten layer yet need to be implemented in the codes in order to increase the accuracy of predictions for ITER.

  18. Enhancement of cross-field transport into the private region of detached-divertor in Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Ohno, N.; Tsuji, Y.; Kajita, S.; Masuzaki, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Morisaki, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Komori, A.

    2010-10-15

    The fluctuation of ion saturation currents in the attached- and detached-divertor plasmas of the Large Helical Device [Fujiwara et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1355 (2001)] has been measured using a Langmuir probe array embedded in a divertor plate. Analytical results indicate that these fluctuation properties differ considerably from each other; for instance, the mean value distribution expands to and positive spikes propagate toward a private region from the divertor leg in the detached-divertor. We investigated the magnetic field lines traced from probe electrodes by using the KMAG code [Nakamura et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. 69, 41 (1993)], and it is then confirmed that the propagation direction of positive spikes corresponds to that predicted by the theory of blobby plasma transport. This phenomenon is expected to lead to the broadening of plasma particle and heat fluxes to the divertor plate.

  19. 2-K pump down studies at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, M.; Casagrande, F.; DeGraff, B.; Ganni, V.; Kim, S.-H.; Knudsen, P.; Martinez, M.; Morris, B.; Neustadt, T.; Norton, R.; Scanlon, C.; Strong, H.; Vandygriff, D.; Wilson, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linear accelerator (LINAC) consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities cooled to 2.1 K by a cryogenic refrigeration system. The 2-K cold box consists of four stages of cold compressors with liquid nitrogen cooled variable speed motors. Transitioning from 4.5-K operation to 2.1-K operation in the cryomodules involves pumping the cryomodules down from approximately 1 bar to 0.040 bar. This effort is conducted through the use of several sequences developed as a collaborative effort between Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) and SNS personnel during the original commissioning of the SNS cryogenic system. Over the last ten years, multiple lessons have been learned about VFD behavior, thermal stability, procedural development and refining the sequences. From 2012 to 2014, there were multiple pump down iterations that were not successful. Studies have been conducted to determine the cause of these unsuccessful iterations. The results of these studies including components replaced and aspects that have not yet been solved are presented in this paper. Future plans to refine the sequence and determine the cause of unsuccessful pump downs will also be presented.

  20. ELM PARTICLE AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    FENSTERMACHER,ME; LEONARD,AW; SNYDER,PB; BOEDO,JA; COLCHIN,RJ; GROEBNER,RJ; GRAY,DS; GROTH,M; HOLLMANN,E; LASNIER,CJ; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; RUDAKOV,DL; TAKAHASHI,H; WATKINS,JG; ZENG,L

    2003-04-01

    A271 ELM PARTICLE AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D. Results from a series of dedicated experiments measuring the effect of particle and energy pulses from Type-I Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in the DIII-D scrape-off layer (SOL) and divertor are compared with a simple model of ELM propagation in the boundary plasma. The simple model asserts that the propagation of ELM particle and energy perturbations is dominated by ion parallel convection along SOL fields lines and the recovery from the ELM perturbation is determined by recycling physics. Time scales associated with the initial changes of boundary plasma parameters are expected to be on the order of the ion transit time from the outer midplane, where the ELM instability is initiated, to the divertor targets. To test the model, the ion convection velocity is changed in the experiment by varying the plasma density. At moderate to high density, n{sub e}/n{sub Gr} = 0.5-0.8, the delays in the response of the boundary plasma to the midplane ELM pulses, the density dependence of those delays and other observations are consistent with the model. However, at the lowest densities, n{sub e}/n{sub Gr} {approx} 0.35, small delays between the response sin the two divertors, and changes in the response of the pedestal thermal energy to ELM events, indicate that additional factors including electron conduction in the SOL, the pre-ELM condition of the divertor plasma, and the ratio of ELM instability duration to SOL transit time, may be playing a role. The results show that understanding the response of the SOL and divertor plasmas to ELMs, for various pre-ELM conditions, is just as important to predicting the effect of ELM pulses on the target surfaces of future devices as is predicting the characteristics of the ELM perturbation of the core plasma.

  1. Cryosorption Pumps for a Neutral Beam Injector Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremel, M.; Mack, A.; Day, C.; Jensen, H.

    2006-04-01

    We present the experiences of the manufacturing and the operating of a system of two identical cryosorption pumps used in a neutral beam injector test facility for fusion reactors. Calculated and measured heat loads of the cryogenic liquid helium and liquid nitrogen circuits of the cryosorption pumps are discussed. The design calculations concerning the thermo-hydraulics of the helium circuit are compared with experiences from the operation of the cryosorption pumps. Both cryopumps are integrated in a test facility of a neutral beam injector that will be used to heat the plasma of a nuclear fusion reactor with a beam of deuterium or hydrogen molecules. The huge gas throughput into the vessel of the test facility results in challenging needs on the cryopumping system. The developed cryosorption pumps are foreseen to pump a hydrogen throughput of 20 - 30 mbarṡl/s. To establish a mean pressure of several 10-5 mbar in the test vessel a pumping speed of about 350 m3/s per pump is needed. The pressure conditions must be maintained over several hours pumping without regeneration of the cryopanels, which necessitates a very high pumping capacity. A possibility to fulfill these requirements is the use of charcoal coated cryopanels to pump the gasloads by adsorption. For the cooling of the cryopanels, liquid helium at saturation pressure is used and therefore a two-phase forced flow in the cryopump system must be controlled.

  2. Gas fueling with an axisymmetric magnetic divertor in the Tara tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.S.; Brau, K.; Horne, S.; Casey, J.; Golovato, S.; Sevillano, E.; Shuy, G.; Smith, D.K.

    1987-07-01

    An axisymmetric divertor has been installed at the central cell midplane of Tara to provide magnetohydrodynamics stability and to generate a high-density halo at the edge of the plasma. A dense halo aids sloshing ion buildup in the plug cells and increases shielding of the core plasma from charge exchange recombination. Separate gas fueling of the halo in the divertor allows for the different fueling requirements of the potential-confined core plasma and the flow-confined edge during plugged operation.

  3. Nonlinear Impact of Edge Localized Modes on Carbon Erosion in the Divertor of the JET Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kreter, A.; Esser, H. G.; Brezinsek, S.; Kirschner, A.; Philipps, V.; Coad, J. P.; Fundamenski, W.; Widdowson, A.; Pitts, R. A.

    2009-01-30

    The impact of edge localized modes (ELMs) carrying energies of up to 450 kJ on carbon erosion in the JET inner divertor is assessed by means of time resolved measurements using an in situ quartz microbalance diagnostic. The inner target erosion is strongly nonlinearly dependent on the ELM energy: a single 400 kJ ELM produces the same carbon erosion as ten 150 kJ events. The ELM-induced enhanced erosion is attributed to the presence of codeposited carbon-deuterium layers on the inner divertor target, which are thermally decomposed under the impact of ELMs.

  4. The dynamic ergodic divertor in the TEXTOR tokamak: First results and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R. C.; Finken, K. H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Giesen, B.; Jakubowski, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Koslowski, H. R.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Lehnen, M.; Neubauer, O.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Unterberg, B.; Zimmermann, O.; Jaspers, R.; Westerhof, E.; Jachmich, S.; Koch, R.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2003-10-01

    The tokamak TEXTOR has been equipped with a dynamic ergodic divertor which is resonant to the edge magnetic flux surface with q=3 and can be operated between DC and 10 kHz. First results indicate a redistribution of particle and energy fluxes which becomes evident in a characteristic stripe pattern. The dynamic mode leads to a uniform divertor target load. Prospects of confinement and MHD stability control, based on the specific edge properties outside the last closed flux surface (an ergodic region followed by a laminar zone with short connection lengths) together with the possibility to transfer momentum to the plasma, are discussed.

  5. Fracture control of H-O engine components. [titanium tin alloy fuel pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made to obtain the material characterization and fatigue crack propagation data necessary to establish the salient characteristics of a Ti-6Al-2.5Sn(ELI) alloy fuel pump impeller to be used in a cryogenic service environment. Testing variables considered were: coupon orientation, frequency, load range ratio, and temperature. Data analysis correlated crack propagation data from conventional laboratory coupons with data from a parallel sided rotating disk used to model rotor stresses. Four major design recommendations when bore regions of fuel pump impellers to be operated in cryogenic environments are to be relatively highly stressed are discussed.

  6. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  7. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System was tested with LH2 and LOX in a vacuum chamber to simulate space vacuum and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. Testing was successful and results validated the scaling study model that predicts active cooling reduces upper stage cryogenic propulsion mass for loiter periods greater than 2 weeks.

  8. Continuous-Reading Cryogen Level Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barone, F. E.; Fox, E.; Macumber, S.

    1984-01-01

    Two pressure transducers used in system for measuring amount of cryogenic liquid in tank. System provides continuous measurements accurate within 0.03 percent. Sensors determine pressure in liquid and vapor in tank. Microprocessor uses pressure difference to compute mass of cryogenic liquid in tank. New system allows continuous sensing; unaffected by localized variations in composition and density as are capacitance-sensing schemes.

  9. Neutron Detection with Cryogenics and Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    bell, Z.W.; Carpenter, D.A.; Cristy, S.S.; Lamberti, V.E.

    2005-03-10

    The common methods of neutron detection are reviewed with special attention paid to the application of cryogenics and semiconductors to the problem. The authors' work with LiF- and boron-based cryogenic instruments is described as well as the use of CdTe and HgI{sub 2} for direct detection of neutrons.

  10. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    DOEpatents

    Spear, Jonathan D

    2011-07-05

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  11. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service

    DOEpatents

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Niikura, M.

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4 to 6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4 to 6% manganese, 0.02 to 0.06% carbon, 0.1 to 0.4% molybdenum and 0 to 3% nickel.

  12. Self-Sealing Cryogenic Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Lin Xiang; Chow, Wen Lung; Moslemian, Davood; Lin, Gary; Melton, Greg

    1994-01-01

    Self-sealing fitting for cryogenic tubes remains free of leakage from room temperature to liquid-helium temperature even at internal pressure as high as 2.7 MPa. Fitting comprises parts made of materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion to prevent leakage gaps from forming as temperature decreases. Consists of coupling nut, two flared tube ends, and flared O-ring spacer. Spacer contracts more than tube ends do as temperature decreases. This greater contraction seals tube ends more tightly, preventing leakage.

  13. Fiberglass supports for cryogenic tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis, design, fabrication, and test activities were conducted to develop additional technology needed for application of filament-wound fiberglass struts to cryogenic flight tankage. It was conclusively verified that monocoque cylinder or ogive struts are optimum or near-optimum for the range of lengths and loads studied, that a higher strength-to-weight ratio can be achieved for fiberglass struts than for any metallic struts, and that integrally-wrapped metallic end fittings can be used to achieve axial load transfer without reliance on bond strength or mechanical fasteners.

  14. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  15. ISOCAM experiment cryogenic test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sa, L.; Collaudin, B.

    The thermal requirements for ISOCAM, an IR camera to be mounted aboard the ISO satellite, are reviewed, and model predictions are matched with test results. The degree of model validation suggested by analytical prediction vs test results is described. Predictions of thermal conduction through mounting screws, from ball bearings, and of the heat distribution in the rotor and stator of a cryogenic stepper motor correlate well with actual test results. It is shown that ISOCAM meets the thermal requirements necessary for successful on-orbit operation. The model predicted such phenomena as 'chopped' motor function and the twofold increase in temperature resulting from continuous motor operation.

  16. Techniques for on-orbit cryogenic servicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLee, C. H.; Barfknecht, P.; Breon, S.; Boyle, R.; DiPirro, M.; Francis, J.; Huynh, J.; Li, X.; McGuire, J.; Mustafi, S.; Tuttle, J.; Wegel, D.

    2014-11-01

    NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) has a renewed interest in on-orbit cryogen storage and transfer to support its mission to explore near-earth objects such as asteroids and comets. The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission (CPST-TDM), managed by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and scheduled for launch in 2018, will demonstrate numerous key technologies applicable to a cryopropellant fuel depot. As an adjunct to the CPST-TDM work, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) will support the development of techniques to manage and transfer cryogens on-orbit and expand these techniques as they may be applicable to servicing science missions using solid cryogens such as the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The results of several ground experiments are described, including autogenous pressurization used for transfer of liquid nitrogen and argon, characterization of the transfer and solidification of argon, and development of robotic tools for cryogen transfer.

  17. Numerical simulations of cryogenic cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunji; Kim, Hyeongjun; Min, Daeho; Kim, Chongam

    2015-12-01

    The present study deals with a numerical method for cryogenic cavitating flows. Recently, we have developed an accurate and efficient baseline numerical scheme for all-speed water-gas two-phase flows. By extending such progress, we modify the numerical dissipations to be properly scaled so that it does not show any deficiencies in low Mach number regions. For dealing with cryogenic two-phase flows, previous EOS-dependent shock discontinuity sensing term is replaced with a newly designed EOS-free one. To validate the proposed numerical method, cryogenic cavitating flows around hydrofoil are computed and the pressure and temperature depression effect in cryogenic cavitation are demonstrated. Compared with Hord's experimental data, computed results are turned out to be satisfactory. Afterwards, numerical simulations of flow around KARI turbopump inducer in liquid rocket are carried out under various flow conditions with water and cryogenic fluids, and the difference in inducer flow physics depending on the working fluids are examined.

  18. Well pump

    DOEpatents

    Ames, Kenneth R.; Doesburg, James M.

    1987-01-01

    A well pump includes a piston and an inlet and/or outlet valve assembly of special structure. Each is formed of a body of organic polymer, preferably PTFE. Each includes a cavity in its upper portion and at least one passage leading from the cavity to the bottom of the block. A screen covers each cavity and a valve disk covers each screen. Flexible sealing flanges extend upwardly and downwardly from the periphery of the piston block. The outlet valve block has a sliding block and sealing fit with the piston rod.

  19. Well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Page, J.S.

    1983-03-08

    Well fluid pumping apparatus comprises: (A) body structure defining an upright plunger bore, (B) a plunger reciprocable in that bore, (C) the body structure also defining a chamber sidewardly offset from an axis defined by the plunger bore and communicating with the bore, and (D) valving carried by the body structure to pass intake fluid via the chamber into the plunger bore in response to stroking of the plunger in one direction in the bore, and to pass discharge fluid from the plunger bore into and from the chamber in response to stroking of the plunger in the opposite direction in the bore.

  20. Cryogenic techniques for large superconducting magnets in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    A large superconducting magnet is proposed for use in a particle astrophysics experiment, ASTROMAG, which is to be mounted on the United States Space Station. This experiment will have a two-coil superconducting magnet with coils which are 1.3 to 1.7 meters in diameter. The two-coil magnet will have zero net magnetic dipole moment. The field 15 meters from the magnet will approach earth's field in low earth orbit. The issue of high Tc superconductor will be discussed in the paper. The reasons for using conventional niobium-titanium superconductor cooled with superfluid helium will be presented. Since the purpose of the magnet is to do particle astrophysics, the superconducting coils must be located close to the charged particle detectors. The trade off between the particle physics possible and the cryogenic insulation around the coils is discussed. As a result, the ASTROMAG magnet coils will be operated outside of the superfluid helium storage tank. The fountain effect pumping system which will be used to cool the coil is described in the report. Two methods for extending the operating life of the superfluid helium dewar are discussed. These include: operation with a third shield cooled to 90 K with a sterling cycle cryocooler, and a hybrid cryogenic system where there are three hydrogen-cooled shields and cryostat support heat intercept points.

  1. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Kelly D.; Wright, Mathew C.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2014-01-01

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  2. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V.

    2014-01-29

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations of tungsten redeposition at the divertor target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chankin, A. V.; Coster, D. P.; Dux, R.

    2014-02-01

    Recent modeling of controlled edge-localized modes (ELMs) in ITER with tungsten (W) divertor target plates by the SOLPS code package predicted high electron temperatures (>100 eV) and densities (>1 × 1021 m-3) at the outer target. Under certain scenarios W sputtered during ELMs can penetrate into the core in quantities large enough to cause deterioration of the discharge performance, as was shown by coupled SOLPS5.0/STRAHL/ASTRA runs. The net sputtering yield, however, was expected to be dramatically reduced by the ‘prompt redeposition’ during the first Larmor gyration of W1+ (Fussman et al 1995 Proc. 15th Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (Vienna: IAEA) vol 2, p 143). Under high ne/Te conditions at the target during ITER ELMs, prompt redeposition would reduce W sputtering by factor p-2 ˜ 104 (with p ≡ τionωgyro ˜ 0.01). However, this relation does not include the effects of multiple ionizations of sputtered W atoms and the electric field in the magnetic pre-sheath (MPS, or ‘Chodura sheath’) and Debye sheath (DS). Monte Carlo simulations of W redeposition with the inclusion of these effects are described in the paper. It is shown that for p ≪ 1, the inclusion of multiple W ionizations and the electric field in the MPS and DS changes the physics of W redeposition from geometrical effects of circular gyro-orbits hitting the target surface, to mainly energy considerations; the key effect is the electric potential barrier for ions trying to escape into the main plasma. The overwhelming majority of ions are drawn back to the target by a strong attracting electric field. It is also shown that the possibility of a W self-sputtering avalanche by ions circulating in the MPS can be ruled out due to the smallness of the sputtered W neutral energies, which means that they do not penetrate very far into the MPS before ionizing; thus the W ions do not gain a large kinetic energy as they are accelerated back to the surface by the

  4. Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid neon cooled magnet was designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors, tensile shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives, and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will consist of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

  5. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  6. CRYOTE (Cryogenic Orbital Testbed) Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravlee, Mari; Kutter, Bernard; Wollen, Mark; Rhys, Noah; Walls, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrating cryo-fluid management (CFM) technologies in space is critical for advances in long duration space missions. Current space-based cryogenic propulsion is viable for hours, not the weeks to years needed by space exploration and space science. CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed (CRYOTE) provides an affordable low-risk environment to demonstrate a broad array of critical CFM technologies that cannot be tested in Earth's gravity. These technologies include system chilldown, transfer, handling, health management, mixing, pressure control, active cooling, and long-term storage. United Launch Alliance is partnering with Innovative Engineering Solutions, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and others to develop CRYOTE to fly as an auxiliary payload between the primary payload and the Centaur upper stage on an Atlas V rocket. Because satellites are expensive, the space industry is largely risk averse to incorporating unproven systems or conducting experiments using flight hardware that is supporting a primary mission. To minimize launch risk, the CRYOTE system will only activate after the primary payload is separated from the rocket. Flying the testbed as an auxiliary payload utilizes Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle performance excess to cost-effectively demonstrate enhanced CFM.

  7. Cryogenic Capillary Screen Heat Entrapment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, L.G.; Hastings, L.J.; Stathman, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic liquid acquisition devices (LADs) for space-based propulsion interface directly with the feed system, which can be a significant heat leak source. Further, the accumulation of thermal energy within LAD channels can lead to the loss of sub-cooled propellant conditions and result in feed system cavitation during propellant outflow. Therefore, the fundamental question addressed by this program was: "To what degree is natural convection in a cryogenic liquid constrained by the capillary screen meshes envisioned for LADs.?"Testing was first conducted with water as the test fluid, followed by LN2 tests. In either case, the basic experimental approach was to heat the bottom of a cylindrical column of test fluid to establish stratification patterns measured by temperature sensors located above and below a horizontal screen barrier position. Experimentation was performed without barriers, with screens, and with a solid barrier. The two screen meshes tested were those typically used by LAD designers, "200x1400" and "325x2300", both with Twill Dutch Weave. Upon consideration of both the water and LN2 data it was concluded that heat transfer across the screen meshes was dependent upon barrier thermal conductivity and that the capillary screen meshes were impervious to natural convection currents.

  8. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  9. Models for cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1989-01-01

    Model requirements, types of model construction methods, and research in new ways to build models are discussed. The 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel was in operation for 16 years and many 2-D airfoil pressure models were tested. In addition there were airfoil models dedicated to transition detection techniques and other specialized research. There were also a number of small 3-D models tested. A chronological development in model building technique is described which led to the construction of many successful models. The difficulties of construction are illustrated by discussing several unsuccessful model fabrication attempts. The National Transonic Facility, a newer and much larger tunnel, was used to test a variety of models including a submarine, transport and fighter configurations, and the Shuttle Orbiter. A new method of building pressure models was developed and is described. The method is centered on the concept of bonding together plates with pressure channels etched into the bond planes, which provides high density pressure instrumentation with minimum demand on parent model material. With care in the choice of materials and technique, vacuum brazing can be used to produce strong bonds without blocking pressure channels and with no bonding voids between channels. Using multiple plates, a 5 percent wing with 96 orifices was constructed and tested in a transonic cryogenic wind tunnel. Samples of test data are presented and future applications of the technology are suggested.

  10. Shadowgraphy of transcritical cryogenic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. D.; Talley, D. G.; Anderson, T. J.; Winter, M.

    1994-01-01

    The future of liquid-rocket propulsion depends heavily on continued development of high pressure liquid oxygen/hydrogen systems that operate near or above the propellant critical states; however, current understanding of transcritical/supercritical injection and combustion is yet lacking. The Phillips Laboratory and the United Technologies Research Center are involved in a collaborative effort to develop diagnostics for and make detailed measurements of transcritical droplet vaporization and combustion. The present shadowgraph study of transcritical cryogenic fluids is aimed at providing insight into the behavior of liquid oxygen or cryogenic stimulants as they are injected into a supercritical environment of the same or other fluids. A detailed history of transcritical injection of liquid nitrogen into gaseous nitrogen at reduced pressures of 0.63 (subcritical) to 1.05 (supercritical) is provided. Also, critical point enhancement due to gas phase solubility and mixture effects is investigated by adding helium to the nitrogen system, which causes a distinct liquid phase to re-appear at supercritical nitrogen pressures. Liquid oxygen injection into supercritical argon or nitrogen, however, does not indicate an increase in the effective critical pressure of the system.

  11. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    PubMed

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  12. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  13. A new cryogenic diode thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. S.; Swinehart, P. R.; Yeager, C. J.

    2002-05-01

    While the introduction of yet another cryogenic diode thermometer is not earth shattering, a new diode thermometer, the DT-600 series, recently introduced by Lake Shore Cryotronics, possesses three features that make it unique among commercial diode thermometers. First, these diodes have been probed at the chip level, allowing for the availability of a bare chip thermometer matching a standard curve-an important feature in situations where real estate is at a premium (IR detectors), or where in-situ calibration is difficult. Second, the thermometry industry has assumed that interchangeability should be best at low temperatures. Thus, good interchangeability at room temperatures implies a very good interchangeability at cryogenic temperature, resulting in a premium priced sensor. The DT-600 series diode thermometer is available in an interchangeability band comparable to platinum RTDs with the added advantage of interchangeability to 2 K. Third, and most important, the DT-600 series diode does not exhibit an instability in the I-V characteristic in the 8 K to 20 K temperature range that is observed in other commercial diode thermometer devices [1]. This paper presents performance characteristics for the DT-600 series diode thermometer along with a comparison of I-V curves for this device and other commercial diode thermometers exhibiting an I-V instability.

  14. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    PubMed

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams. PMID:27370434

  15. 100  J-level nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state laser.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Mason, Paul D; Ertel, Klaus; Jonathan Phillips, P; De Vido, Mariastefania; Chekhlov, Oleg; Divoky, Martin; Pilar, Jan; Smith, Jodie; Butcher, Thomas; Lintern, Andrew; Tomlinson, Steph; Shaikh, Waseem; Hooker, Chris; Lucianetti, Antonio; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Mocek, Tomas; Edwards, Chris; Collier, John L

    2016-05-01

    We report on the successful demonstration of a 100 J-level, diode pumped solid state laser based on cryogenic gas cooled, multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG amplifier technology. When operated at 175 K, the system delivered a pulse energy of 107 J at a 1 Hz repetition rate and 10 ns pulse duration, pumped by 506 J of diode energy at 940 nm, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 21%. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the highest energy obtained from a nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state laser. This demonstration confirms the energy scalability of the diode pumped optical laser for experiments laser architecture.

  16. High efficiency pump for space helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael G.; Swift, Walter L.; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    A centrifugal pump was developed for the efficient and reliable transfer of liquid helium in space. The pump can be used to refill cryostats on orbiting satellites which use liquid helium for refrigeration at extremely low temperatures. The pump meets the head and flow requirements of on-orbit helium transfer: a flow rate of 800 L/hr at a head of 128 J/kg. The overall pump efficiency at the design point is 0.45. The design head and flow requirements are met with zero net positive suction head, which is the condition in an orbiting helium supply Dewar. The mass transfer efficiency calculated for a space transfer operation is 0.99. Steel ball bearings are used with gas fiber-reinforced teflon retainers to provide solid lubrication. These bearings have demonstrated the longest life in liquid helium endurance tests under simulated pumping conditions. Technology developed in the project also has application for liquid helium circulation in terrestrial facilities and for transfer of cryogenic rocket propellants in space.

  17. Pump apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kime, J.A.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a gas-oil well production system for pumping formation fluid wherein a down hole pump is provided having a barrel including a barrel fluid inlet, a barrel fluid outlet, a barrel chamber, and a plunger mounted in the barrel chamber having a plunger chamber. The plunger is reciprocally driven between an upper terminal position at the end of the plunger upstroke and a lower terminal position at the end of the plunger downstroke. The method for removing developed gaseous fluids in the formation fluid from the barrel chamber comprises: drawing formation fluid into the barrel chamber during the plunger upstroke; providing gas port means in the barrel; expelling the developed gaseous fluids from the barrel chamber through the gas port means during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from the upper terminal position of the gas port means; and substantially blocking the gas port means and moving formation fluid into the plunger chamber during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from below the gas port means to the lower terminal position.

  18. Density fluctuations at high density in the ergodic divertor configuration of Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devynck, P.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Garbet, X.; Antar, G.; Beyer, P.; Boucher, C.; Honore, C.; Gervais, F.; Hennequin, P.; Quémeneur, A.; Truc, A.

    2001-03-01

    The effect of the ergodic divertor on the plasma edge in Tore Supra is to enhance the perpendicular transport through ergodization of the magnetic field lines [Ph. Ghendrih et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 32 (3&4) (1992) 179]. Nevertheless, the hot spots observed on the divertor plates during ergodic divertor operation indicate that the cross-field transport driven by the fluctuations is still playing an important role, although measurements by CO 2 laser scattering and reflectometry show a decrease of the turbulence level [J. Payan, X. Garbet, J.H. Chatenet et al., Nucl. Fusion 35 (1995) 1357; P. Beyer, X. Garbet, P. Ghendrih, Phys. Plasmas 5 (12) (1998) 4271]. In order to gain more understanding, fluctuation level and poloidal velocity have been measured with a reciprocating Langmuir probe biased to collect the ion saturation current ( jsat) and with a CO 2 laser scattering diagnostic. Though the relative fluctuation level behaves as previously observed at low density, a new interesting result is that this picture is gradually modified when the density is increased. Both diagnostics observe an increase of δn/ n with density in the ergodic region, which is not the usual behavior observed in limiter configuration. This increase is detected on both sides of the Er inversion radius and is therefore also affecting the plasma bulk. Finally, the confinement time is found to follow an L-mode law at all densities indicating that the ergodic divertor does not change the global confinement properties of the plasma.

  19. Effect of separatrix magnetic geometry on divertor behavior in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, T. W.; Canik, J. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Watkins, J. G.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferron, J. R.; Groebner, R. J.; Hill, D. N.; Hyatt, A. W.; Holcomb, C. T.; Luce, T. C.; Moyer, R. A.; Stangeby, P. C.

    2013-07-01

    We report on recent experiments on DIII-D that examined the effects that variations in the parallel connection length in the scrape-off layer (SOL), L||, and the radial location of the outer divertor target, RTAR, have on divertor plasma properties. Two-point modeling of the SOL plasma predicts that larger values of L|| and RTAR should lower temperature and raise density at the outer divertor target for fixed upstream separatrix density and temperature, i.e., nTAR ∝ [RTAR]2[L||]6/7 and TTAR ∝ [RTAR]-2[L||]-4/7. The dependence of nTAR and TTAR on L|| was consistent with our data, but the dependence of nTAR and TTAR on RTAR was not. The surprising result that the divertor plasma parameters did not depend on RTAR in the predicted way may be due to convected heat flux, driven by escaping neutrals, in the more open configuration of the larger RTAR cases. Modeling results using the SOLPS code support this postulate.

  20. A tangentially viewing visible TV system for the DIII-D divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Meyer, W.H.; Wood, R.D.

    1996-02-01

    A video camera system has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak for 2-D spatial studies of line emission in the lower divertor region. The system views the divertor tangentially from an outer port at approximately the height of the X-point. At the tangency plane the entire divertor from inner wall to outside the DIII-D bias ring is viewed with spatial resolution of approximately 1 cm. The image contains information from approximately 90 degrees of toroidal angle. In a recent upgrade, remotely controllable filter changers were added which have produced images from nominally identical shots using a series of spectral lines. Software was developed to calculate the response function matrix using distributed computing techniques and assuming toroidal symmetry. Standard sparse matrix algorithms are then used to invert the 3-D images onto a poloidal plane. Spatial resolution of the inverted images is 2 cm; higher resolution simply increases the size of the response function matrix. Initial results from a series of experiments with multiple identical shots show that the emission from CII and CIII, which appears along the inner scrape-off layer above and below the X-point during ELMing H-mode, moves outward and becomes localized near the X-point in Partially Detached Divertor (PDD) operation.

  1. L to H mode transitions and associated phenomena in divertor tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1990-09-01

    This is the final report for the research project titled, L to H Mode Transitions and Associated Phenomena in Divertor Tokamaks. The period covered by this project is the fiscal year 1990. This report covers the development of Advanced Two Chamber Model.

  2. Development of ion source for simulation of edge localized mode in divertor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Daibo, A. Okamoto, A.; Takahashi, H.; Kumagai, T.; Takahashi, T.; Tsubota, S.; Kitajima, S.

    2014-02-15

    A helium ion beam is injected into a linear plasma device for the development of an ion beam source simulating high energy particle flux in divertor plasma. Beam current density more than 10 mA/cm{sup 2} is extracted. Measurement of beam currents indicates that the beam is transported along the linear device and reaches to the downstream end plate.

  3. Melt damage to the JET ITER-like Wall and divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, G. F.; Bazylev, B.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Coenen, J.; Heinola, K.; Kiptily, V.; Maier, H.; Reux, C.; Riccardo, V.; Rimini, F.; Sergienko, G.; Thompson, V.; Widdowson, A.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    In October 2014, JET completed a scoping study involving high power scenario development in preparation for DT along with other experiments critical for ITER. These experiments have involved intentional and unintentional melt damage both to bulk beryllium main chamber tiles and to divertor tiles. This paper provides an overview of the findings of concern for machine protection in JET and ITER, illustrating each case with high resolution images taken by remote handling or after removal from the machine. The bulk beryllium upper dump plate tiles and some other protection tiles have been repeatedly flash melted by what we believe to be mainly fast unmitigated disruptions. The flash melting produced in this way is seen at all toroidal locations and the melt layer is driven by j × B forces radially outward and upwards against gravity. In contrast, the melt pools caused while attempting to use MGI to mitigate deliberately generated runaway electron beams are localized to several limiters and the ejected material appears less influenced by j × B forces and shows signs of boiling. In the divertor, transient melting of bulk tungsten by ELMs was studied in support of the ITER divertor material decision using a specially prepared divertor module containing an exposed edge. Removal of the module from the machine in 2015 has provided improved imaging of the melt and this confirms that the melt layers are driven by ELMs. No other melt damage to the other 9215 bulk tungsten lamellas has yet been observed.

  4. Enhanced \\boldsymbol{\\vec{{E}}\\times \\vec{{B}}} drift effects in the TCV snowflake divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, G. P.; Lunt, T.; Reimerdes, H.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; the TCV Team

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of various plasma parameters at the divertor targets of snowflake (SF) and conventional single-null configurations indicate an enhanced effect of the E× B drift in the scrape-off layer of plasmas in the SF configuration. Plasma boundary transport simulations using the EMC3-Eirene code show that the poloidal gradients of the kinetic profiles in the vicinity of the null-point of a SF divertor are substantially larger than those of a conventional single-null configuration. These gradients are expected to drive larger E× B flows in the SF divertor and are thought to be responsible for the formation of the double-peaked particle and heat flux target profiles observed experimentally. Experiments in forward and reversed toroidal magnetic field directions further support this conclusion. The formation of such a double-peaked profiles is enhanced at higher plasma densities and may have beneficial effects on the divertor heat loads since they lead to broader target profiles and lower peak heat fluxes.

  5. Parametric analysis of the thermal effects on the divertor in tokamaks during plasma disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, M.L.

    1988-04-01

    Plasma disruptions are an ever present danger to the plasma-facing components in today's tokamak fusion reactors. This threat results from our lack of understanding and limited ability to control this complex phenomenon. In particular, severe energy deposition occurs on the divertor component of the double-null configured tokamak reactor during such disruptions. A hybrid computational model developed to estimate and graphically illustrate global thermal effects of disruptions on the divertor plates is described in detail. The quasi-two-dimensional computer code, TADDPAK (Thermal Analysis Divertor during Disruptions PAcKage), is used to conduct parametric analysis for the TIBER II Tokamak Engineering Test Reactor Design. The dependence of these thermal effects on divertor material choice, disruption pulse length, disruption pulse shape, and the characteristic thickness of the plasma scrape-off layer is investigated for this reactor design. Results and conclusions from this analysis are presented. Improvements to this model and issues that require further investigation are discussed. Cursory analysis for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is also presented in the appendix. 75 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. 49 CFR 173.318 - Cryogenic liquids in cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... not be installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen, cryogenic liquid unless the parts are... installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen, cryogenic liquid or any flammable cryogenic liquid. (6) A cargo tank used to transport oxygen, cryogenic liquid must be provided with a manhole (see §...

  7. 49 CFR 173.318 - Cryogenic liquids in cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... not be installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen, cryogenic liquid unless the parts are... installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen, cryogenic liquid or any flammable cryogenic liquid. (6) A cargo tank used to transport oxygen, cryogenic liquid must be provided with a manhole (see §...

  8. 49 CFR 173.318 - Cryogenic liquids in cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... not be installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen, cryogenic liquid unless the parts are... installed on any cargo tank used to transport oxygen, cryogenic liquid or any flammable cryogenic liquid. (6) A cargo tank used to transport oxygen, cryogenic liquid must be provided with a manhole (see §...

  9. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravex, Alain; Flachbart, Robin; Holt, Barney

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses. TVS performance testing demonstrated that the spray bar was effective in providing tank pressure control within a 6

  10. Throttling Cryogen Boiloff To Control Cryostat Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    An improved design has been proposed for a cryostat of a type that maintains a desired low temperature mainly through boiloff of a liquid cryogen (e.g., liquid nitrogen) at atmospheric pressure. (A cryostat that maintains a low temperature mainly through boiloff of a cryogen at atmospheric pressure is said to be of the pour/fill Dewar-flask type because its main component is a Dewar flask, the top of which is kept open to the atmosphere so that the liquid cryogen can boil at atmospheric pressure and cryogenic liquid can be added by simply pouring it in.) The major distinguishing feature of the proposed design is control of temperature and cooling rate through control of the flow of cryogen vapor from a heat exchanger. At a cost of a modest increase in complexity, a cryostat according to the proposal would retain most of the compactness of prior, simpler pour/fill Dewar-flask cryostats, but would utilize cryogen more efficiently (intervals between cryogen refills could be longer).

  11. Effect of changes in separatrix magnetic geometry on divertor behaviour in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, T. W.; Canik, J. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Watkins, J. G.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferron, J. R.; Groebner, R. J.; Hill, D. N.; Hyatt, A. W.; Holcomb, C. T.; Luce, T. C.; Makowski, M.; Moyer, R. A.; Osborne, T. E.; Stangeby, P. C.

    2013-11-01

    Results and interpretation of recent experiments on DIII-D designed to evaluate divertor geometries favourable for radiative heat dispersal are presented. Two approaches examined here involved lengthening the parallel connection in the scrape-off layer, L‖, and increasing the radius of the outer divertor separatrix strike point, ROSP, with the goal of reducing target temperature, TTAR, and increasing target density, nTAR. From one-dimensional (1D) two-point modelling based on conducted parallel heat flux, it is expected that: n_{TAR} \\propto R_{OSP}^{2} L_{\\parallel}^{6/7} n_{SEP}^{3} and T_{TAR} \\propto R_{OSP}^{-2} L_{\\parallel}^{{-4}/7} n_{SEP}^{-2} , where nSEP is the midplane separatrix density. These scalings suggest that conditions conducive to a radiative divertor solution can be achieved at low nSEP by increasing either ROSP or L‖. Our data are consistent with the above L‖ scalings. On the other hand, the observed dependence of nTAR and TTAR on ROSP displayed a more complex behaviour, under certain conditions deviating from the above scalings. Our analysis indicates that deviations from the ROSP scaling were due to the presence of convected heat flux, driven by escaping neutrals, in the more open configurations of the larger ROSP cases. A comparison of ‘open’ versus ‘closed’ divertor configurations for the H-mode plasmas in this study show that the ‘closed’ case provides at least 30% reduction in the peaked heat flux at common density with the ‘open’ case and partial divertor detachment at lower plasma density.

  12. Assessment of erosion and surface tritium inventory issues for the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.N.; Causey, R.; Federici, G.; Ruzic, D.N.

    1996-08-01

    The authors analyzed sputtering erosion and tritium codeposition for the ITER vertical target divertor design using erosion and plasma codes (WBC/REDEP/DEGAS+) coupled to available materials data. Computations were made for a beryllium, carbon, and tungsten coated divertor plate, and for three edged plasma regimes. New data on tritium codeposition in beryllium was obtained with the TPE facility. This shows codeposited H/Be ratios of the order of 10% for surface temperatures {le} 300 C, beryllium thereby being similar to carbon in this respect. Hydrocarbon transport calculations show significant loss (10--20%) of chemically sputtered carbon for detached conditions (T{sub e} {approx} 1 eV at the divertor), compared to essentially no loss (100% redeposition) for higher temperature plasmas. Calculations also show a high, non-thermal, D-T molecular flux for detached conditions. Tritium codeposition rates for carbon are very high for detached conditions ({approximately} 20g-T/1000 s discharge), due to buildup of chemically sputtered carbon on relatively cold surfaces of the divertor cassette. Codeposition is lower ({approximately} 10X) for higher edge temperatures ({approximately} 8--30 eV) and is primarily due to divertor plate buildup of physically sputtered carbon. Peak net erosion rates for carbon are of order 30 cm/burn-yr. Erosion and codeposition rates for beryllium are much lower than for carbon at detached conditions, but are similar to carbon for the higher temperatures. Both erosion and tritium codeposition are essentially nil for tungsten for the regimes studied.

  13. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  14. Field applications of cryogenic nitrogen as a hydraulic-fracturing fluid

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    New techniques allow liquid nitrogen to be delivered safely to a moderate-depth formation at typical fracturing rates and cryogenic temperatures while protecting the casing from damage. This process provides a thermal shock to the reservoir rock that physically alters the fracture walls to prevent closure of hydraulically or thermally induced fractures. The results of this field project indicate that use of cryogenic nitrogen in refracture applications appears to reduce the damage caused by gel filter-cake residue from earlier fracturing treatments successfully. Carbon-steel alloys used for surface-iron manifolding, wellhead configuration, and wellbore tubulars cannot withstand even very-short-term exposure to cryogenic temperatures. All stainless-steel surface piping, manifolding, and wellhead components were constructed, and free-hanging fiberglass tubing was used to protect the casing from thermal-shock damage. Four coalbed-methane (CBM) wells and a tight sandstone reservoir were successfully fracture stimulated by use of cryogenic-nitrogen treatments. Standard oilfield nitrogen pumping units were modified to deliver either high-pressure liquid nitrogen or vaporized nitrogen gas. Initial post-fracture response was very good in all five wells. Long-term production enhancement was achieved in only two of the wells. This process has not been applied as an initial stimulation treatment on a new well.

  15. Design and testing of the New Muon Lab cryogenic system at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A.L.; Theilacker, J.C.; DeGraff, B.D.; Leibfritz, J.; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is constructing a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab building. The facility will be used for testing and validating cryomodule designs as well as support systems. For the initial phase of the project, a single Type III plus 1.3 GHz cryomodule will be cooled and tested using a single Tevatron style standalone refrigerator. Subsequent phases involve testing as many as two full RF units consisting of up to six 1.3 GHz cryomodules with the addition of a new cryogenic plant. The cryogenic infrastructure consists of the refrigerator system, cryogenic distribution system as well as an ambient temperature pumping system to achieve 2 K operations with supporting purification systems. A discussion of the available capacity for the various phases versus the proposed heat loads is included as well as commissioning results and testing schedule. This paper describes the plans, status and challenges of this initial phase of the New Muon Lab cryogenic system.

  16. Operational modes and control philosophy of the SSCL Magnet Test Lab. (MTL) cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Than, R.; Thirumaleshwar, M.

    1993-05-01

    The MTL`s function is to test prototype and industrially manufactured magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). The cryogenic system of the MTL has a main refrigeration system consisting of a two-stage compression system, a refrigerator/liquefier coldbox, a liquid helium dewar, warm gas storage, and a regeneration skid. The MTL cryogenic system also includes the following auxiliary equipment: two cleaning, cooling, warmup and purification (CCWP) coldbox modules with a regeneration skid for the charcoal beds, two CCWP compressors, a dehydration skid with its own regeneration system, a pump box, a refrigeration recovery unit, and five distribution boxes. At any given time, the refrigeration system has the capacity to simultaneously test at least six magnets under normally required testing conditions. Every magnet will undergo cleaning, cooldown, and filling prior to general testing, conditioning, quench testing, and other experiments. At the completion of general testing, etc., the magnet must be emptied prior to warming it up to ambient temperature. Furthermore, conditioning, training, and testing of the magnets can be carried out at different temperatures between 4.5 K and 2.5 K. The cryogenic system is designed to test multiple magnets, not all of which are necessarily in the same preparational or operational stage. This paper describes the different operational modes and the behavior and control of the total cryogenic system during multiple magnet tests.

  17. Structural damping studies at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    1994-01-01

    Results of an engineering study to measure changes in structural damping properties of two cryogenic wind tunnel model systems and two metallic test specimens at cryogenic temperatures are presented. Data are presented which indicate overall, a trend toward reduced structural damping at cryogenic temperatures (-250 degrees F) when compared with room temperature damping properties. The study was focused on structures and materials used for model systems tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The study suggests that the significant reductions in damping at extremely cold temperatures are most likely associated with changes in mechanical joint compliance damping rather than changes in material (solid) damping.

  18. Cryogenic denervation of the intermetatarsal space neuroma.

    PubMed

    Hodor, L; Barkal, K; Hatch-Fox, L D

    1997-01-01

    Cryoanalgesia is commonly used by pain management specialists to alleviate painful nerve disorders of the back, face, and thoracic region. While cryogenic denervation results in pain relief, there is little to no incidence of neuritis or amputation-neuroma formation. The authors have used the Neurostat unit (Westco Medical Corporation), which was designed for cryogenic denervation of sensory and motor nerves, in the treatment of the intermetatarsal space neuroma. The authors present an overview of cryoanalgesic therapy, including a discussion of history, mechanism of action, indications, and description of the apparatus. The authors submit a case study of cryogenic denervation of the third intermetatarsal space.

  19. Nanosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser

    SciTech Connect

    Perevezentsev, E A; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Vadimova, O L; Palashov, O V

    2014-05-30

    A cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser is modernised to increase its average and peak power. The master oscillator unit of the laser is considerably modified so that the pulse duration decreases to several nanoseconds with the same pulse energy. A cryogenic disk laser head with a flow-through cooling system is developed. Based on two such laser heads, a new main amplifier is assembled according to an active multipass cell scheme. The total small-signal gain of cryogenic cascades is ∼10{sup 8}. (lasers)

  20. Other cryogenic wind-tunnel projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Following the development of the cryogenic wind tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center in 1972, a large number of cryogenic wind-tunnel projects have been undertaken at various research establishments around the world. Described in this lecture are cryogenic wind-tunnel projects in China (Chinese Aeronautical Research and Development Center), England (College of Aeronautics at Cranfield, Royal Aircraft Establishment - Bedford, and University of Southampton), Japan (National Aerospace Laboratory, University of Tsukuba, and National Defense Academy), Sweden (Rollab), and the United States (Douglas Aircraft Co., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and NASA Langley).