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Sample records for dividing cellular asymmetry

  1. Application System Architecture for Cellular Phones by Dividing Interaction Logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Misayo; Todoroki, Nobutoshi; Akiyoshi, Masanori; Kojima, Taizo

    This paper describes application system architecture using cellular phones as user interface devices, which enables users to interact with the system by graphic symbols on a client screen. Our approach has the following features: (i) divided interaction logics running on a server and a Java phone client; both interaction logics cooperate to accomplish a user's operation using a simplified script, (ii) local interaction which enables users to handle figures on a client screen without connecting to a server, and (iii) device-independent script which hides the differences of API sets among various cellular phones. By using this architecture, complicated figures including lots of graphic symbols can be displayed in spite of program-size limitation on a client device, and application programs including same interaction logics are just described once for various cellular phones. Our experiments show the advantage of the local interaction. A client program can respond immediately when handling complicated figures. The ratio of requests to the server is reduced to 23%. It takes less than 9 seconds to display typical contents, which is good enough for practical use. This method also reduces development costs at the second development or later.

  2. Cellular mechanisms underlying growth asymmetry during stem gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Plant stems respond to gravitropic stimulation with a rapid, local and reversible change in cell growth rate (elongation), generally on both the upper and lower sides of the stem. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms for this differential growth are reviewed. Considerable evidence implicates an asymmetry in wall pH in the growth response. The strengths and weaknesses of the wall "loosening enzyme" concept are reviewed and the possibility of expansin involvement in the bending response of stems is considered. Also discussed is the possibility that wall stiffening processes, e.g. phenolic coupling driven by oxidative bursts or altered orientation of newly deposited cellulose, might mediate the growth responses during gravitropism.

  3. Cellular mechanisms underlying growth asymmetry during stem gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Plant stems respond to gravitropic stimulation with a rapid, local and reversible change in cell growth rate (elongation), generally on both the upper and lower sides of the stem. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms for this differential growth are reviewed. Considerable evidence implicates an asymmetry in wall pH in the growth response. The strengths and weaknesses of the wall "loosening enzyme" concept are reviewed and the possibility of expansin involvement in the bending response of stems is considered. Also discussed is the possibility that wall stiffening processes, e.g. phenolic coupling driven by oxidative bursts or altered orientation of newly deposited cellulose, might mediate the growth responses during gravitropism.

  4. Cellular mechanisms underlying growth asymmetry during stem gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, D J

    1997-09-01

    Plant stems respond to gravitropic stimulation with a rapid, local and reversible change in cell growth rate (elongation), generally on both the upper and lower sides of the stem. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms for this differential growth are reviewed. Considerable evidence implicates an asymmetry in wall pH in the growth response. The strengths and weaknesses of the wall "loosening enzyme" concept are reviewed and the possibility of expansin involvement in the bending response of stems is considered. Also discussed is the possibility that wall stiffening processes, e.g. phenolic coupling driven by oxidative bursts or altered orientation of newly deposited cellulose, might mediate the growth responses during gravitropism.

  5. The art of cellular communication: tunneling nanotubes bridge the divide

    PubMed Central

    Gurke, Steffen; Barroso, João F. V.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of cells to receive, process, and respond to information is essential for a variety of biological processes. This is true for the simplest single cell entity as it is for the highly specialized cells of multicellular organisms. In the latter, most cells do not exist as independent units, but are organized into specialized tissues. Within these functional assemblies, cells communicate with each other in different ways to coordinate physiological processes. Recently, a new type of cell-to-cell communication was discovered, based on de novo formation of membranous nanotubes between cells. These F-actin-rich structures, referred to as tunneling nanotubes (TNT), were shown to mediate membrane continuity between connected cells and facilitate the intercellular transport of various cellular components. The subsequent identification of TNT-like structures in numerous cell types revealed some structural diversity. At the same time it emerged that the direct transfer of cargo between cells is a common functional property, suggesting a general role of TNT-like structures in selective, long-range cell-to-cell communication. Due to the growing number of documented thin and long cell protrusions in tissue implicated in cell-to-cell signaling, it is intriguing to speculate that TNT-like structures also exist in vivo and participate in important physiological processes. PMID:18386044

  6. Chirality of the cytoskeleton in the origins of cellular asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Satir, Peter

    2016-12-19

    Self-assembly of two important components of the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells, actin microfilaments and microtubules (MTs) results in polar filaments of one chirality. As is true for bacterial flagella, in actin microfilaments, screw direction is important for assembly processes and motility. For MTs, polar orientation within the cell is paramount. The alignment of these elements in the cell cytoplasm gives rise to emergent properties, including the potential for cell differentiation and specialization. Complex MTs with a characteristic chirality are found in basal bodies and centrioles; this chirality is preserved in cilia. In motile cilia, it is reflected in the direction of the effective stroke. The positioning of the basal body or cilia on the cell surface depends on polarity proteins. In evolution, survival depends on global polarity information relayed to the cell in part by orientation of the MT and actin filament cytoskeletons and the chirality of the basal body to determine left and right coordinates within a defined anterior-posterior cell and tissue axis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Protein segregation between dividing hematopoietic progenitor cells in the determination of the symmetry/asymmetry of cell division.

    PubMed

    Nteliopoulos, Georgios; Gordon, Myrtle Y

    2012-09-20

    In the present study, we investigated how the symmetry/asymmetry of cell division in mitotic CD34(+) cells can be evaluated by determining the plane of cell division and the potential distribution of proteins between daughter cells. The orientation of the mitotic spindle is dependent upon the positioning of the centrosomes, which determine the plane of cell division and the sharing of proteins. If the functions of unequally shared proteins are relevant to the kinetics of cell division, they could determine whether the daughter cells undergo self-renewal or differentiation. The kinetic function of the proteins of interest was investigated using a colony-replating assay and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining. We used Notch/Numb as a model system, since they have a role in balancing symmetric/asymmetric divisions. Mitotic cells were examined microscopically and centrosomal markers γ-tubulin/pericentrin were used with activated Notch-1 and Numb. We monitored the first crucial divisions by CFSE staining and found an inverse relationship between activated Notch and Numb expression, suggesting a reciprocal regulation. We suggest that the subpopulations expressing activated Notch or Numb have different cell fates. To determine the influence of Notch signaling on progenitor cell self-renewal, we used the γ-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-Difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl)]-S-phenylglycine t-Butyl ester (DAPT). DAPT influences self-renewal/differentiation outcome by affecting the frequency of symmetric renewal divisions without affecting the rate of divisions. Overall, the purpose of this study was to establish a cellular system for predicting the symmetry/asymmetry of hematopoietic progenitor divisions at the level of centrosomes and protein distribution and to investigate the influence of these proteins on progenitor cell kinetics.

  8. New questions on the hemispheric encoding/retrieval asymmetry (HERA) model assessed by divided visual-field tachistoscopy in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, S; Desgranges, B; Denise, P; Lechevalier, B; Eustache, F; Faure, S

    2001-01-01

    According to the hemispheric encoding/retrieval asymmetry (HERA) model, based on data obtained through functional neuroimaging, the left and right prefrontal cortices are preferentially, and, respectively, involved in long-term episodic memory encoding and retrieval. In this study, the HERA model was tested from a behavioral perspective using divided visual-field tachistoscopy. A recognition paradigm with both verbal and visuospatial materials was devised to differentiate memory-related effects (encoding vs. retrieval) from effects linked to the materials. The paradigm used lists of 12 and four items to assess long-term episodic memory and short-term memory, respectively. The aim of the latter condition was to test whether the HERA model is applicable in short-term memory. For long-term episodic memory, the data obtained validated the HERA model; the direction of the hemispheric asymmetry was found to depend on the type of materials used, whereas its magnitude was determined by the type of memory process. For verbal short-term memory, the HERA model seems to be confirmed. The pre-existing representations of the material could take into account the similarity of the hemispheric asymmetry pattern between short-term memory and long-term memory. In contrast, for visuospatial short-term memory, Baddeley's working memory model seems to better explain our results insofar as the asymmetries were essentially linked to the material in encoding but not in retrieval. This latter difference between short-term memory and long-term indicates that processes involved in LTM depend on episodic processes per se, hence, lending more support for the HERA model. Accordingly, these two memory systems seem to bring into play two different modes of hemisphere specialization.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Sub-Cellular Asymmetry of Fat-Dachsous Heterodimer for Generation of Planar Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Sinha, Pradip

    2014-01-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is an evolutionarily conserved characteristic of animal tissues marked by coordinated polarization of cells or structures in the plane of a tissue. In insect wing epithelium, for instance, PCP is characterized by en masse orientation of hairs orthogonal to its apical-basal axis and pointing along the proximal-distal axis of the organ. Directional cue for PCP has been proposed to be generated by complex sets of interactions amongst three proteins - Fat (Ft), Dachsous (Ds) and Four-jointed (Fj). Ft and Ds are two atypical cadherins, which are phosphorylated by Fj, a Golgi kinase. Ft and Ds from adjacent cells bind heterophilically via their tandem cadherin repeats, and their binding affinities are regulated by Fj. Further, in the wing epithelium, sub-cellular levels of Ft-Ds heterodimers are seen to be elevated at the distal edges of individual cells, prefiguring their PCP. Mechanisms generating this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer in proximal and distal edges of cells, however, have not been resolved yet. Using a mathematical modeling approach, here we provide a framework for generation of this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. First, we explain how the known interactions within Ft-Ds-Fj system translate into sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Second, we show that this asymmetric localization of Ft-Ds heterodimer is lost when tissue-level gradient of Fj is flattened, or when phosphorylation of Ft by Fj is abolished, but not when tissue-level gradient of Ds is flattened or when phosphorylation of Ds is abrogated. Finally, we show that distal enrichment of Ds also amplifies Ft-Ds asymmetry. These observations reveal that gradient of Fj expression, phosphorylation of Ft by Fj and sub-cellular distal accumulation of Ds are three critical elements required for generating sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Our model integrates the known experimental data and presents testable predictions for future

  10. Opt2 mediates the exposure of phospholipids during cellular adaptation to altered lipid asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Saori; Obara, Keisuke; Uchibori, Kenya; Kamimura, Akiko; Azumi, Kaoru; Kihara, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane lipid asymmetry is important for various membrane-associated functions and is regulated by membrane proteins termed flippases and floppases. The Rim101 pathway senses altered lipid asymmetry in the yeast plasma membrane. The mutant lem3Δ cells, in which lipid asymmetry is disturbed owing to the inactivation of the plasma membrane flippases, showed a severe growth defect when the Rim101 pathway was impaired. To identify factors involved in the Rim101-pathway-dependent adaptation to altered lipid asymmetry, we performed DNA microarray analysis and found that Opt2 induced by the Rim101 pathway plays an important role in the adaptation to altered lipid asymmetry. Biochemical investigation of Opt2 revealed its localization to the plasma membrane and the Golgi, and provided several lines of evidence for the Opt2-mediated exposure of phospholipids. In addition, Opt2 was found to be required for the maintenance of vacuolar morphology and polarized cell growth. These results suggest that Opt2 is a novel factor involved in cell homeostasis by regulating lipid asymmetry. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. On the effects of geometry, defects, and material asymmetry on the mechanical response of shape memory alloy cellular lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamooz Ravari, M. R.; Nasr Esfahani, S.; Taheri Andani, M.; Kadkhodaei, M.; Ghaei, A.; Karaca, H.; Elahinia, M.

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloy (such as NiTi) cellular lattice structures are a new class of advanced materials with many potential applications. The cost of fabrication of these structures however is high. It is therefore necessary to develop modeling methods to predict the functional behavior of these alloys before fabrication. The main aim of the present study is to assess the effects of geometry, microstructural imperfections and material asymmetric response of dense shape memory alloys on the mechanical response of cellular structures. To this end, several cellular and dense NiTi samples are fabricated using a selective laser melting process. Both cellular and dense specimens were tested in compression in order to obtain their stress-strain response. For modeling purposes, a three -dimensional (3D) constitutive model based on microplane theory which is able to describe the material asymmetry was employed. Five finite element models based on unit cell and multi-cell methods were generated to predict the mechanical response of cellular lattices. The results show the considerable effects of the microstructural imperfections on the mechanical response of the cellular lattice structures. The asymmetric material response of the bulk material also affects the mechanical response of the corresponding cellular structure.

  12. Trans-Membrane Area Asymmetry Controls the Shape of Cellular Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Pilyugin, Sergei S.; Geerts, Willie J. C.; Kozlov, Michael M.; Burger, Koert N. J.; Luini, Alberto; Derganc, Jure; Mironov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane organelles often have complicated shapes and differ in their volume, surface area and membrane curvature. The ratio between the surface area of the cytosolic and luminal leaflets (trans-membrane area asymmetry (TAA)) determines the membrane curvature within different sites of the organelle. Thus, the shape of the organelle could be critically dependent on TAA. Here, using mathematical modeling and stereological measurements of TAA during fast transformation of organelle shapes, we present evidence that suggests that when organelle volume and surface area are constant, TAA can regulate transformation of the shape of the Golgi apparatus, endosomal multivesicular bodies, and microvilli of brush borders of kidney epithelial cells. Extraction of membrane curvature by small spheres, such as COPI-dependent vesicles within the Golgi (extraction of positive curvature), or by intraluminal vesicles within endosomes (extraction of negative curvature) controls the shape of these organelles. For instance, Golgi tubulation is critically dependent on the fusion of COPI vesicles with Golgi cisternae, and vice versa, for the extraction of membrane curvature into 50–60 nm vesicles, to induce transformation of Golgi tubules into cisternae. Also, formation of intraluminal ultra-small vesicles after fusion of endosomes allows equilibration of their TAA, volume and surface area. Finally, when microvilli of the brush border are broken into vesicles and microvilli fragments, TAA of these membranes remains the same as TAA of the microvilli. Thus, TAA has a significant role in transformation of organelle shape when other factors remain constant. PMID:25761238

  13. Digital divide: variation in internet and cellular phone use among women attending an urban sexually transmitted infections clinic.

    PubMed

    Samal, Lipika; Hutton, Heidi E; Erbelding, Emily J; Brandon, Elizabeth S; Finkelstein, Joseph; Chander, Geetanjali

    2010-01-01

    We sought to describe: (1) the prevalence of internet, cellular phone, and text message use among women attending an urban sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic, (2) the acceptability of health advice by each mode of information and communication technology (ICT), and (3) demographic characteristics associated with ICT use. This study is a cross-sectional survey of 200 English-speaking women presenting to a Baltimore City STI clinic with STI complaints. Participants completed a self-administered survey querying ICT use and demographic characteristics. Three separate questions asked about interest in receiving health advice delivered by the three modalities: internet, cellular phone, and text message. We performed logistic regression to examine how demographic factors (age, race, and education) are associated with likelihood of using each modality. The median age of respondents was 27 years; 87% were African American, and 71% had a high school diploma. The rate of any internet use was 80%; 31% reported daily use; 16% reported weekly use; and 32% reported less frequent use. Almost all respondents (93%) reported cellular phone use, and 79% used text messaging. Acceptability of health advice by each of the three modalities was about 60%. In multivariate analysis, higher education and younger age were associated with internet use, text messaging, and cellular phone use. Overall rate of internet use was high, but there was an educational disparity in internet use. Cellular phone use was almost universal in this sample. All three modalities were equally acceptable forms of health communication. Describing baseline ICT access and the acceptability of health advice via ICT, as we have done, is one step toward determining the feasibility of ICT-delivered health interventions in urban populations.

  14. Control of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by the heterochronic genes and the cellular asymmetry machinery in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Omid F.; Ambros, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Transitions between asymmetric (self-renewing) and symmetric (proliferative) cell divisions are robustly regulated in the context of normal development and tissue homeostasis. To genetically assess the regulation of these transitions, we used the postembryonic epithelial stem (seam) cell lineages of Caenorhabditis elegans. In these lineages, the timing of these transitions is regulated by the evolutionarily conserved heterochronic pathway, whereas cell division asymmetry is conferred by a pathway consisting of Wnt (Wingless) pathway components, including posterior pharynx defect (POP-1)/TCF, APC related/adenomatosis polyposis coli (APR-1)/APC, and LIT-1/NLK (loss of intestine/Nemo-like kinase). Here we explore the genetic regulatory mechanisms underlying stage-specific transitions between self-renewing and proliferative behavior in the seam cell lineages. We show that mutations of genes in the heterochronic developmental timing pathway, including lin-14 (lineage defect), lin-28, lin-46, and the lin-4 and let-7 (lethal defects)-family microRNAs, affect the activity of LIT-1/POP-1 cellular asymmetry machinery and APR-1 polarity during larval development. Surprisingly, heterochronic mutations that enhance LIT-1 activity in seam cells can simultaneously also enhance the opposing, POP-1 activity, suggesting a role in modulating the potency of the cellular polarizing activity of the LIT-1/POP-1 system as development proceeds. These findings illuminate how the evolutionarily conserved cellular asymmetry machinery can be coupled to microRNA-regulated developmental pathways for robust regulation of stem cell maintenance and proliferation during the course of development. Such genetic interactions between developmental timing regulators and cell polarity regulators could underlie transitions between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell fates in other systems and could be deregulated in the context of developmental disorders and cancer. PMID:25561544

  15. Why do bacteria divide?

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Vic

    2015-01-01

    The problem of not only how but also why cells divide can be tackled using recent ideas. One idea from the origins of life – Life as independent of its constituents – is that a living entity like a cell is a particular pattern of connectivity between its constituents. This means that if the growing cell were just to get bigger the average connectivity between its constituents per unit mass – its cellular connectivity – would decrease and the cell would lose its identity. The solution is division which restores connectivity. The corollary is that the cell senses decreasing cellular connectivity and uses this information to trigger division. A second idea from phenotypic diversity – Life on the Scales of Equilibria – is that a bacterium must find strategies that allow it to both survive and grow. This means that it has learnt to reconcile the opposing constraints that these strategies impose. The solution is that the cell cycle generates daughter cells with different phenotypes based on sufficiently complex equilibrium (E) and non-equilibrium (NE) cellular compounds and structures appropriate for survival and growth, respectively, alias ‘hyperstructures.’ The corollary is that the cell senses both the quantity of E material and the intensity of use of NE material and then uses this information to trigger the cell cycle. A third idea from artificial intelligence – Competitive Coherence – is that a cell selects the active subset of elements that actively determine its phenotype from a much larger set of available elements. This means that the selection of an active subset of a specific size and composition must be done so as to generate both a coherent cell state, in which the cell’s contents work together harmoniously, and a coherent sequence of cell states, each coherent with respect to itself and to an unpredictable environment. The solution is the use of a range of mechanisms ranging from hyperstructure dynamics to the cell cycle itself. PMID

  16. DNA repair mechanisms in dividing and non-dividing cells.

    PubMed

    Iyama, Teruaki; Wilson, David M

    2013-08-01

    DNA damage created by endogenous or exogenous genotoxic agents can exist in multiple forms, and if allowed to persist, can promote genome instability and directly lead to various human diseases, particularly cancer, neurological abnormalities, immunodeficiency and premature aging. To avoid such deleterious outcomes, cells have evolved an array of DNA repair pathways, which carry out what is typically a multiple-step process to resolve specific DNA lesions and maintain genome integrity. To fully appreciate the biological contributions of the different DNA repair systems, one must keep in mind the cellular context within which they operate. For example, the human body is composed of non-dividing and dividing cell types, including, in the brain, neurons and glial cells. We describe herein the molecular mechanisms of the different DNA repair pathways, and review their roles in non-dividing and dividing cells, with an eye toward how these pathways may regulate the development of neurological disease.

  17. DNA repair mechanisms in dividing and non-dividing cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyama, Teruaki; Wilson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage created by endogenous or exogenous genotoxic agents can exist in multiple forms, and if allowed to persist, can promote genome instability and directly lead to various human diseases, particularly cancer, neurological abnormalities, immunodeficiency and premature aging. To avoid such deleterious outcomes, cells have evolved an array of DNA repair pathways, which carry out what is typically a multiple-step process to resolve specific DNA lesions and maintain genome integrity. To fully appreciate the biological contributions of the different DNA repair systems, one must keep in mind the cellular context within they operate. For example, the human body is composed of non-dividing and dividing cell types, including, in the brain, neurons and glial cells. We describe herein the molecular mechanisms of the different DNA repair pathways, and review their roles in non-dividing and dividing cells, with an eye towards how these pathways may regulate the development of neurological disease. PMID:23684800

  18. Timing divided attention.

    PubMed

    Hogendoorn, Hinze; Carlson, Thomas A; VanRullen, Rufin; Verstraten, Frans A J

    2010-11-01

    Visual attention can be divided over multiple objects or locations. However, there is no single theoretical framework within which the effects of dividing attention can be interpreted. In order to develop such a model, here we manipulated the stage of visual processing at which attention was divided, while simultaneously probing the costs of dividing attention on two dimensions. We show that dividing attention incurs dissociable time and precision costs, which depend on whether attention is divided during monitoring or during access. Dividing attention during monitoring resulted in progressively delayed access to attended locations as additional locations were monitored, as well as a one-off precision cost. When dividing attention during access, time costs were systematically lower at one of the accessed locations than at the other, indicating that divided attention during access, in fact, involves rapid sequential allocation of undivided attention. We propose a model in which divided attention is understood as the simultaneous parallel preparation and subsequent sequential execution of multiple shifts of undivided attention. This interpretation has the potential to bring together diverse findings from both the divided-attention and saccade preparation literature and provides a framework within which to integrate the broad spectrum of divided-attention methodologies.

  19. Magnetic-Flux-Compensated Voltage Divider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos T.

    2005-01-01

    A magnetic-flux-compensated voltage-divider circuit has been proposed for use in measuring the true potential across a component that is exposed to large, rapidly varying electric currents like those produced by lightning strikes. An example of such a component is a lightning arrester, which is typically exposed to currents of the order of tens of kiloamperes, having rise times of the order of hundreds of nanoseconds. Traditional voltage-divider circuits are not designed for magnetic-flux-compensation: They contain uncompensated loops having areas large enough that the transient magnetic fluxes associated with large transient currents induce spurious voltages large enough to distort voltage-divider outputs significantly. A drawing of the proposed circuit was not available at the time of receipt of information for this article. What is known from a summary textual description is that the proposed circuit would contain a total of four voltage dividers: There would be two mixed dividers in parallel with each other and with the component of interest (e.g., a lightning arrester), plus two mixed dividers in parallel with each other and in series with the component of interest in the same plane. The electrical and geometric configuration would provide compensation for induced voltages, including those attributable to asymmetry in the volumetric density of the lightning or other transient current, canceling out the spurious voltages and measuring the true voltage across the component.

  20. The nondeterministic divide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlesworth, Arthur

    1990-01-01

    The nondeterministic divide partitions a vector into two non-empty slices by allowing the point of division to be chosen nondeterministically. Support for high-level divide-and-conquer programming provided by the nondeterministic divide is investigated. A diva algorithm is a recursive divide-and-conquer sequential algorithm on one or more vectors of the same range, whose division point for a new pair of recursive calls is chosen nondeterministically before any computation is performed and whose recursive calls are made immediately after the choice of division point; also, access to vector components is only permitted during activations in which the vector parameters have unit length. The notion of diva algorithm is formulated precisely as a diva call, a restricted call on a sequential procedure. Diva calls are proven to be intimately related to associativity. Numerous applications of diva calls are given and strategies are described for translating a diva call into code for a variety of parallel computers. Thus diva algorithms separate logical correctness concerns from implementation concerns.

  1. Crossing the phantom divide

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Sapone, Domenico

    2006-12-15

    We consider fluid perturbations close to the 'phantom divide' characterized by p=-{rho} and discuss the conditions under which divergencies in the perturbations can be avoided. We find that the behavior of the perturbations depends crucially on the prescription for the pressure perturbation {delta}p. The pressure perturbation is usually defined using the dark energy rest-frame, but we show that this frame becomes unphysical at the divide. If the pressure perturbation is kept finite in any other frame, then the phantom divide can be crossed. Our findings are important for generalized fluid dark energy used in data analysis (since current cosmological data sets indicate that the dark energy is characterized by p{approx_equal}-{rho} so that p<-{rho} cannot be excluded) as well as for any models crossing the phantom divide, like some modified gravity, coupled dark energy, and braneworld models. We also illustrate the results by an explicit calculation for the 'Quintom' case with two scalar fields.

  2. A Hill Divided

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-07

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows an elevated group of hills east of Phlegra Montes. This highland is divided by a linear channel that is most likely of tectonic origin. Orbit Number: 61195 Latitude: 31.5513 Longitude: 167.142 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-09-30 13:26 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20109

  3. The Great Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2005-01-01

    Steps away from where a concrete wall once divided this city east from west, a group of Muslim 1st graders at E.O. Plauen Elementary School sing a phrase that is unfamiliar to most German ears. Though the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches have long provided voluntary religion classes in Berlin schools, only recently have the courts allowed an…

  4. The Great Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2005-01-01

    Steps away from where a concrete wall once divided this city east from west, a group of Muslim 1st graders at E.O. Plauen Elementary School sing a phrase that is unfamiliar to most German ears. Though the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches have long provided voluntary religion classes in Berlin schools, only recently have the courts allowed an…

  5. Crossing the divide

    Treesearch

    Florence Rose Shepard

    2007-01-01

    “This is a divide.” Dad delivered this proclamation with the verve of a discoverer. This memory from childhood frequently surfaces as I struggle to interpret the topology, the complicated relationship between the topography and cultural history of my home, the Green River Basin, that great expanse of sagebrush/ bunchgrass steppe crowned with wilderness.

  6. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence

    1982-01-01

    Hemispheric specialization tasks were given to different-aged boys. Asymmetries were demonstrated on manual, visual, and auditory tasks; however, the degree of asymmetries did not change across age groups. There appears to be a dissociation between visual and auditory perceptual asymmetries. (Author/RD)

  7. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence

    1982-01-01

    Hemispheric specialization tasks were given to different-aged boys. Asymmetries were demonstrated on manual, visual, and auditory tasks; however, the degree of asymmetries did not change across age groups. There appears to be a dissociation between visual and auditory perceptual asymmetries. (Author/RD)

  8. What’s Left in Asymmetry?

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Sherry

    2008-01-01

    Left-right patterning is a fascinating problem of morphogenesis, linking evolutionary and cellular signaling mechanisms across many levels of organization. In the last 15 years, enormous progress has been made in elucidating the molecular details of this process in embryos of several model species. While many outside the field seem to believe that the fundamental aspects of this pathway are now solved, workers on asymmetry are faced with considerable uncertainties over the details of specific mechanisms, a lack of conceptual unity of mechanisms across phyla, and important questions that are not being pursued in any of the popular model systems. Here, we suggest that data from clinical syndromes, cryptic asymmetries, and bilateral gynandromorphs, while not figuring prominently in the mainstream work on LR asymmetry, point to crucial and fundamental gaps of knowledge about asymmetry. We identify 12 big questions that provide exciting opportunities for fundamental new advances in this field. PMID:18488999

  9. Palatal asymmetry during development: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Moreira, R S; Sgrott, E A; Stuker, H; Alonso, L G; Smith, R L

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate hard palate asymmetry during development. The palates of 248 dry skulls were photographed and evaluated digitally. The skulls were divided into seven groups: fetus, newborn, infant, child, adolescent, adult, and aged. Linear measures were obtained from great palatine foramen (GPF) to incisive fossa (INC) and to posterior nasal spine (PNS). Angular measures were obtained from the former landmarks plus the point on sutures intersection between maxillary and palatine bones. Asymmetry was evaluated intra and intergroups. All skulls showed some degree of right-left asymmetry in the hard palate. Regardless of hard palate asymmetry, none of the right-left side differences was statistically significant. For the intergroups assessment, none of the asymmetry index means were statistically different. The posterior part of palate (PNS x GPF) measures was more asymmetric than the anterior part (INC x GPF), showing, respectively, 4.6% and 2.8% of mean asymmetry index. Angular measures showed a more symmetric behavior than the linear ones. Hard palate asymmetry occurs even in the absence of masticatory function, showing that this feature begins early in fetal life and persists through development.

  10. Universal freezing of asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Jian; Yu, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Hua-Lin; Tong, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    Asymmetry of quantum states is a useful resource in applications such as quantum metrology, quantum communication, and reference frame alignment. However, asymmetry of a state tends to be degraded in physical scenarios where environment-induced noise is described by covariant operations, e.g., open systems constrained by superselection rules, and such degradations weaken the abilities of the state to implement quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we investigate under which dynamical conditions asymmetry of a state is totally unaffected by the noise described by covariant operations. We find that all asymmetry measures are frozen for a state under a covariant operation if and only if the relative entropy of asymmetry is frozen for the state. Our finding reveals the existence of universal freezing of asymmetry, and provides a necessary and sufficient condition under which asymmetry is totally unaffected by the noise.

  11. Melting the Divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Presenting Quaternary Environmental Change to students who fall into Widening Participation criteria at the University of Cambridge, gives a unique opportunity to present academic debate in an approachable and entertaining way. Literally by discussing the melting of our ice caps, melts the divide Cambridge has between its reputation and the reality for the brightest, underprivileged, students. There is a balance between presenting cutting edge research with the need to come across as accessible (and importantly valuable to "learning"). Climate change over the Quaternary lends itself well to this aim. By lecturing groups of potential students through the entire Quaternary in an hour, stopping to discuss how our ancestors interacted with past Interglacials and what are the mechanisms driving change (in generalized terms), you are able to introduce cutting edge research (such as the latest NEEM ice core) to the students. This shows the evolution and importance of higher education and academic research. The lecture leads well onto group discussions (termed "supervisions" in Cambridge), to explore their opinions on the concern for present Anthropogenic Climate Change in relation to Past Climate Change after being presented with images that our ancestors "made it". Here discussion thrives off students saying obvious things (or sarcastic comments!) which quickly can lead into a deep technical discussion on their terms. Such discussions give the students a zest for higher education, simply throwing Ruddiman's (2003) "The Anthroprocene Started Several Thousand Years Ago" at them, questions in a second their concept of Anthropogenic Climate Change. Supervisions lend themselves well to bright, articulate, students and by offering these experiences to students of Widening Participation criteria we quickly melt the divide between the reputation of Cambridge ( and higher education as a whole) and the day to day practice. Higher education is not for the privileged, but a free and

  12. Divided electrochemical cell assembly

    SciTech Connect

    King, Ch. J. H.

    1985-02-19

    A divided electrochemical cell assembly comprises stacked bipolar substantially square parallel planar electrodes and membranes. The corners and edges of the electrodes with bordering insulative spacers in juxtaposition with the chamber walls define four electrolyte circulation manifolds. Anolyte and catholyte channeling means permit the separate introduction of anolyte and catholyte into two of the manifolds and the withdrawal of anolyte and catholyte separately from at least two other manifolds. The electrodes and membranes are separated from one another by the insulative spacers which are also channeling means disposed to provide electrolyte channels across the interfaces of adjacent electrodes and membranes.

  13. Monitoring the Digital Divide

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, Les

    2003-05-28

    It is increasingly important to support the large numbers of scientists working in remote areas and having low bandwidth access to the Internet. This will continue to be the case for years to come since there is evidence from PingER performance measurements that the, so-called, digital divide is not decreasing. In this work, we review the collaborative work of The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, a leading organization promoting science dissemination in the developing world- and SLAC in Stanford, to monitor by PingER, Universities and Research Institutions all over the developing world following the recent ''Recommendations of Trieste'' to help bridge the digital divide. As a result, PingER's deployment now covers the real-time monitoring of worldwide Internet performance and, in particular, West and Central Africa for the first time. We report on the results from the ICTP sites and quantitatively identify regions with poor performance, identify trends, discuss experiences and future work.

  14. PULSE RATE DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, H.C. Jr.

    1962-12-18

    A compact pulse-rate divider circuit affording low impedance output and high input pulse repetition rates is described. The circuit features a single secondary emission tube having a capacitor interposed between its dynode and its control grid. An output pulse is produced at the anode of the tube each time an incoming pulse at the control grid drives the tube above cutoff and the duration of each output pulse corresponds to the charging time of the capacitor. Pulses incoming during the time the grid bias established by the discharging capacitor is sufficiently negative that the pulses are unable to drive the tube above cutoff do not produce output pulses at the anode; these pulses are lost and a dividing action is thus produced by the circuit. The time constant of the discharge path may be vanied to vary in turn the division ratio of the circuit; the time constant of the charging circuit may be varied to vary the width of the output pulses. (AEC)

  15. Laser dividing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    English, Jr., R. Edward; Johnson, Steve A.

    1995-01-01

    A laser beam dividing apparatus (10) having a first beam splitter (14) with an aperture (16) therein positioned in the path of a laser beam (12) such that a portion of the laser beam (12) passes through the aperture (16) onto a second beam splitter (20) and a portion of the laser beam (12) impinges upon the first beam splitter (14). Both the first beam splitter (14) and the second beam splitter (20) are, optionally, made from a dichroic material such that a green component (24) of the laser beam (12) is reflected therefrom and a yellow component (26) is refracted therethrough. The first beam splitter (14) and the second beam splitter (20) further each have a plurality of facets (22) such that the components (24, 26) are reflected and refracted in a number equaling the number of facets (22).

  16. Chaos, brain and divided consciousness.

    PubMed

    Bob, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Modern trends in psychology and cognitive neuroscience suggest that applications of nonlinear dynamics, chaos and self-organization seem to be particularly important for research of some fundamental problems regarding mind-brain relationship. Relevant problems among others are formations of memories during alterations of mental states and nature of a barrier that divides mental states, and leads to the process called dissociation. This process is related to a formation of groups of neurons which often synchronize their firing patterns in a unique spatial maner. Central theme of this study is the relationship between level of moving and oscilating mental processes and their neurophysiological substrate. This opens a question about principles of organization of conscious experiences and how these experiences arise in the brain. Chaotic self-organization provides a unique theoretical and experimental tool for deeper understanding of dissociative phenomena and enables to study how dissociative phenomena can be linked to epileptiform discharges which are related to various forms of psychological and somatic manifestations. Organizing principles that constitute human consciousness and other mental phenomena from this point of view may be described by analysis and reconstruction of underlying dynamics of psychological or psychophysiological measures. These nonlinear methods in this study were used for analysis of characteristic changes in EEG and bilateral electrodermal activity (EDA) during reliving of dissociated traumatic and stressful memories and during psychopathological states. Analysis confirms a possible role of chaotic transitions in the processing of dissociated memory. Supportive finding for a possible chaotic process related to dissociation found in this study represent also significant relationship of dissociation, epileptiform discharges measured by typical psychopathological manifestations and characteristic laterality changes in bilateral EDA in patients

  17. The Principles of Asymmetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-26

    THE PRINCIPLES OF ASYMMETRY A monograph presented to the Faculty of the US Army School of Advanced Military Studies in...DATES COVERED Monograph 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Principles pf Asymmetry 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Stephen D. Pomper Major, USA 7... principles of asymmetry. The ultimate goal of producing principles should allow soldiers to better appreciate a difficult, but important concept in

  18. Structural Asymmetry of Anterior Insula: Behavioral Correlates and Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    Chiarello, Christine; Vazquez, David; Felton, Adam; Leonard, Christiana M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated behavioral correlates of structural asymmetry of the insula, and traditional perisylvian language regions, in a large sample of young adults (N=200). The findings indicated 1) reliable leftward surface area asymmetry of the anterior insula, 2) association of this asymmetry with divided visual field lateralization of visual word recognition, and 3) modulation of the correlation of structural and linguistic asymmetry by consistency of hand preference. Although leftward asymmetry of cortical surface area was observed for the anterior insula, pars opercularis and triangularis, and planum temporale, only the anterior insula asymmetry was associated with lateralized word recognition. We interpret these findings within the context of recent structural and functional findings about the human insula. We suggest that leftward structural lateralization of earlier developing insular cortex may bootstrap asymmetrical functional lateralization even if the insula is only a minor component of the adult language network. PMID:23681069

  19. Asymmetries at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, Pavol

    2014-10-28

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark pair production asymmetry and present the new result of bottom-quark pair production asymmetry. By looking at the results obtained by the CDF experiment, one can see a discrepancy in both $t\\bar{t}$ inclusive and lepton-based measurements. The D0 results of the $t\\bar{t}$ production asymmetry are compatible with the standard-model predictions as well as with the CDF results. The CDF measurement of $b\\bar{b}$ production asymmetry presents consistency with both zero and with the standard-model predictions.

  20. Asymmetry of Blinking

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Iris S.; Evinger, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Too investigate asymmetry in eyelid movements with blinking, the stability of the asymmetry, and its modifiability in normal humans. Methods Differences in the start time and amplitude between the two eyelids were assessed for voluntary blinks and reflex blinks evoked by supraorbital trigeminal nerve stimulation. These variables were also measured before and up to 18 months after 2 hours of unilateral upper lid restraint. Results With voluntary blinks, one eyelid consistently began to close earlier and made a larger eyelid movement than the other eyelid. Stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve evoked relatively larger amplitude blinks in one eyelid that correlated with the asymmetries of voluntary blinks. There was a continuum of eyelid asymmetry across all subjects that was stable and independent of other biological asymmetries, such as handedness. Briefly reducing eyelid mobility created a long-lasting change in eyelid asymmetry with blinking. Conclusions Eyelid asymmetry results from differences in the excitability of motoneurons in the left and right facial motor nuclei and does not appear to involve asymmetries in cortical inputs to the brain stem. Because adaptive processes modify the motoneuron excitability that creates eyelid asymmetry, these processes may underlie changes in blinking associated with facial palsy and may play a role in the development of disorders that affect one side of the face, such as hemifacial spasm. PMID:16384962

  1. Challenging the Digital Divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kembhavi, Ajit

    2006-08-01

    Vast quantities of astronomical data in the form of images, spectra and catalogues are now freely available over the internet, and tools for producing science from these resources are also becoming available, particularly through the emerging Virtual Observatories. In addition to this, most astronomical literature from research journals is available at no cost through the ADS and preprint service. This situation, in principle, provides equal opportunity to astronomers located anywhere in the world to participate in the process of discovery. The only requirement is that the astronomers have access to the internet, and a fertile imagination. But in the real world, astronomers in many countries have very limited bandwidth and computing power, and are therefore excluded from meaningful participation in astronomical research, even though they may have the ideas and experience to contribute substantially to the effort. The lack of connectivity and computing hardware also makes it difficult for astronomers in many countries from exposing adequately any data resources that they may have produced locally. This situation prevents many aspiring and experienced astronomers from reaching their creative potential, and from attracting young persons to the charms of modern astronomy; it also leads to opportunity loss to astronomy, as it loses out on the the human resources and fresh ideas and talents which astronomers from developing countries could bring to the subject. I will discuss in my talk the nature and extent of this digital divide, the ways in which it could be mitigated, and the benefits which would arise from the unification. I will base some of my discussion on my experiences in setting up a major programme to take the advantages of the internet revolution to hundreds of universities in India.

  2. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger…

  3. Lowering of Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, K. K.; Hiremath, K. M.; Yellaiah, G.

    2017-03-01

    Asymmetry, a well established fact, can be extracted from various solar atmospheric activity indices. Although asymmetry is being localized within short time scale, it also persists at different time scales. In the present study we examine the character and nature of asymmetry at various time scales by optimizing the data set, in units of Carrington Rotations (CRs), for Sunspot Area (SA) and soft X-ray flare index (FI SXR). We find from three solar cycles (21-23) that at a small time scale (viz., daily, CRs and monthly) activity appears to be asymmetric with less significance. At larger time scales (≥01 CRs) strength of asymmetry enhances. Number of significant asymmetry points probably depends upon the solar heights. For different combination of data, asymmetry strength appears to be lowered at certain periods ˜06, ˜12, ˜18 CRs (164, 327 and 492 days i.e., harmonics of ˜1.3 years. Owing to similar behavior of emergence of magnetic flux, it is conjectured that emergence of flux on the surface probably contributes to the asymmetry of the solar activity.

  4. Comments on biological asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Opitz, J M; Utkus, A

    2001-07-15

    Gross forms of asymmetry of biological structure, hence of development, are generally considered abnormalities of conformation with "perfect" symmetry, whether bilateral or radial, being regarded as the "ideal" form. This notion, primarily a cultural deceit of neo-Platonic origin, can easily be shown to be wrong or at best only skin-deep by any student of anatomy or surgery who finds the heart not in the midline but, most of the time on the left, liver on the right, gut coiled and disposed in a certain direction with appendix in the right lower quadrant, and so forth. Indeed, since the beginning of Amphioxus, a major effect of evolutionary developmental modification has been the abolition of the visceral symmetry which characterized this cephalochordate with introduction of a specific pattern of asymmetry called laterality determination. This embryonic process, which is beginning to yield its universal molecular basis, is probably not responsible for another type of biological phenomenon designated fluctuating asymmetry well known to anthropologists (on the basis of quantitative studies of morphometric traits of teeth, appendicular skeleton, dermatoglyphics) and well-known to the ancients who in their most beautiful Hellenistic sculptures introduced deliberate asymmetries into facial structure and expression. Photographic images constructed of 2 right or 2 left facial halves may differ to a starling degree from the authentic face (Fig. 1). The relatively random nature of fluctuating asymmetry makes it less likely to be under strong natural selection. 1 Middle panel: Frontal view of face of a normal man. Left panel: "Artificial" face constructed out of two right halves of the same face. Right panel: Face constructed out of two left halves. A careful study of the right and left panels makes it easier to appreciate the actual degree of asymmetry present in the unaltered middle image/face. However, in addition to laterality determination and fluctuating asymmetry

  5. Asymmetry through time dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantzaris, Alexander V.; Higham, Desmond J.

    2016-03-01

    Given a single network of interactions, asymmetry arises when the links are directed. For example, if protein A upregulates protein B and protein B upregulates protein C, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may affect C but not vice versa. This type of imbalance is reflected in the associated adjacency matrix, which will lack symmetry. A different type of imbalance can arise when interactions appear and disappear over time. If A meets B today and B meets C tomorrow, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may pass a message or disease to C, but not vice versa. Hence, even when each interaction is a two-way exchange, the effect of time ordering can introduce asymmetry. This observation is very closely related to the fact that matrix multiplication is not commutative. In this work, we describe a method that has been designed to reveal asymmetry in static networks and show how it may be combined with a measure that summarizes the potential information flow between nodes in the temporal case. This results in a new method that quantifies the asymmetry arising through time ordering. We show by example that the new tool can be used to visualize and quantify the amount of asymmetry caused by the arrow of time.

  6. Cerebral asymmetry in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Linden, David E J

    2011-10-01

    The hemispheres of the human brain are anatomically and functionally asymmetric, and many cognitive and motor functions such as language and handedness are lateralized. This review examines anatomical, psychological, and physiological approaches to the understanding of separate hemispheric functions and their integration. The concept of hemispheric laterality plays a central role in current neuropsychological and pathophysiological models of schizophrenia. Reduced hemispheric asymmetry has also been reported for other mental disorders, for example, bipolar disorder. Recent research reflects an increasing interest in the molecular and population genetics of laterality and its potential link with animal models of schizophrenia. The authors review the principles of laterality and brain asymmetry and discuss the evidence for changes in asymmetry in schizophrenia and other mental disorders.

  7. Nuclear asymmetry enthalpy

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L. G.

    2011-07-15

    Recent work has sought to extract the asymmetry energy at very low density from observables in heavy-ion collisions. The logic employed starts from the assumption that the fragment yields are determined by a minimization of the Helmholtz free energy. As volume is in reality unconstrained, nor can a single freeze-out volume be expected, the physical relevance of the Helmholtz free energy must be questioned. If, for example, the identical logic were used, but the Gibbs free energy was the more relevant quantity to minimize, it would be the asymmetry enthalpy that would be extracted. The purpose of this report is to provide one measure of the difference between the asymmetry energy and enthalpy.

  8. The Digital Divide: A Global View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntoko, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Huge progress was made in bridging the digital divide in first decade of 21^st century. This was largely due to the explosive growth of mobile, which saw numbers rise from under 500 million to over five billion mobile cellular subscriptions in just ten years. With household mobile penetration rates of over 50% even in rural areas of developing countries, we have achieved the dream of bringing all the world's people within reach of communications technology. We must now, however, replicate the mobile miracle for the Internet, and especially broadband, if we are to avoid creating a new broadband breach to replace the digital divide. Three things need to happen for this to be achieved: firstly, broadband needs to be brought to the top of the development agenda; secondly, broadband needs to become much more affordable and thirdly, security needs to be part of the strategy.

  9. Manufacture of finely divided carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.G.

    1980-01-22

    Finely divided carbon is manufactured by a process producing a gaseous stream containing carbon monoxide by reacting coal and air in a slagging ash gasifier, separating carbon monoxide from the gaseous mixture, and disproportionating the carbon monoxide to produce finely divided carbon and carbon dioxide, the latter of which is recycled to the gasifier.

  10. Essays on the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdelfattah, Belal M. T.

    2013-01-01

    The digital divide is a phenomenon that is globally persistent, despite rapidly decreasing costs in technology. While much of the variance in the adoption and use of information communication technology (ICT) that defines the digital divide can be explained by socioeconomic and demographic variables, there is still significant unaccounted variance…

  11. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  12. Early signs of brain asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Corballis, Michael C

    2013-11-01

    A new study shows a leftward asymmetry of the choroid plexus in two-thirds of first-trimester human fetuses. This is the earliest brain asymmetry so far identified and may be a precursor to other asymmetries, including that of the temporal planum, which is evident from the 31st week of gestation.

  13. Sociology: The growing climate divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    2011-07-01

    Climate change has reached the level of a 'scientific consensus', but is not yet a 'social consensus'. New analysis highlights that a growing divide between liberals and conservatives in the American public is a major obstacle to achieving this end.

  14. Neutrino helicity asymmetries in leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bento, Luis; Santos, Francisco C.

    2005-05-01

    It is pointed out that the heavy singlet neutrinos characteristic of leptogenesis develop asymmetries in the abundances of the two helicity states as a result of the same mechanism that generates asymmetries in the standard lepton sector. Neutrinos and standard leptons interchange asymmetries in collisions with each other. It is shown that an appropriate quantum number, B-L{sup '}, combining baryon, lepton and neutrino asymmetries, is not violated as fast as the standard B-L. This suppresses the washout effects relevant for the derivation of the final baryon asymmetry. One presents detailed calculations for the period of neutrino thermal production in the framework of the singlet seesaw mechanism.

  15. Bridging the Health Data Divide

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental quality, safety, and cost problems have not been resolved by the increasing digitization of health care. This digitization has progressed alongside the presence of a persistent divide between clinicians, the domain experts, and the technical experts, such as data scientists. The disconnect between clinicians and data scientists translates into a waste of research and health care resources, slow uptake of innovations, and poorer outcomes than are desirable and achievable. The divide can be narrowed by creating a culture of collaboration between these two disciplines, exemplified by events such as datathons. However, in order to more fully and meaningfully bridge the divide, the infrastructure of medical education, publication, and funding processes must evolve to support and enhance a learning health care system. PMID:27998877

  16. Extent of Structural Asymmetry in Homodimeric Proteins: Prevalence and Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Swapna, Lakshmipuram Seshadri; Srikeerthana, Kuchi; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Most homodimeric proteins have symmetric structure. Although symmetry is known to confer structural and functional advantage, asymmetric organization is also observed. Using a non-redundant dataset of 223 high-resolution crystal structures of biologically relevant homodimers, we address questions on the prevalence and significance of asymmetry. We used two measures to quantify global and interface asymmetry, and assess the correlation of several molecular and structural parameters with asymmetry. We have identified rare cases (11/223) of biologically relevant homodimers with pronounced global asymmetry. Asymmetry serves as a means to bring about 2∶1 binding between the homodimer and another molecule; it also enables cellular signalling arising from asymmetric macromolecular ligands such as DNA. Analysis of these cases reveals two possible mechanisms by which possible infinite array formation is prevented. In case of homodimers associating via non-topologically equivalent surfaces in their tertiary structures, ligand-dependent mechanisms are used. For stable dimers binding via large surfaces, ligand-dependent structural change regulates polymerisation/depolymerisation; for unstable dimers binding via smaller surfaces that are not evolutionarily well conserved, dimerisation occurs only in the presence of the ligand. In case of homodimers associating via interaction surfaces with parts of the surfaces topologically equivalent in the tertiary structures, steric hindrance serves as the preventive mechanism of infinite array. We also find that homodimers exhibiting grossly symmetric organization rarely exhibit either perfect local symmetry or high local asymmetry. Binding of small ligands at the interface does not cause any significant variation in interface asymmetry. However, identification of biologically relevant interface asymmetry in grossly symmetric homodimers is confounded by the presence of similar small magnitude changes caused due to artefacts of

  17. Bessel Weighted Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harut; Gamberg, Leonard; Rossi, Patrizia; Prokudin, Alexei

    2016-05-01

    We review the concept of Bessel weighted asymmetries for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and focus on the cross section in Fourier space, conjugate to the outgoing hadron’s transverse momentum, where convolutions of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions become simple products. Individual asymmetric terms in the cross section can be projected out by means of a generalized set of weights involving Bessel functions. The procedure is applied to studies of the double longitudinal spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model. We observe a few percent systematic offset of the Bessel-weighted asymmetry obtained from Monte Carlo extraction compared to input model calculations, which is due to the limitations imposed by the energy and momentum conservation at the given energy and hard scale Q2. We find that the Bessel weighting technique provides a powerful and reliable tool to study the Fourier transform of TMDs with controlled systematics due to experimental acceptances and resolutions with different TMD model inputs.

  18. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  19. Getting Past the "Digital Divide"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Sean

    2011-01-01

    As most educators know, there is a lot more to addressing the so-called "digital divide" than having enough working machines in classrooms. Effective information technology (IT) in schools requires useful software, reliable and speedy Internet access, effective teacher training, and well-considered goals with transformative outcomes. Educators who…

  20. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  1. Getting Past the "Digital Divide"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Sean

    2011-01-01

    As most educators know, there is a lot more to addressing the so-called "digital divide" than having enough working machines in classrooms. Effective information technology (IT) in schools requires useful software, reliable and speedy Internet access, effective teacher training, and well-considered goals with transformative outcomes. Educators who…

  2. Getting Past the "Digital Divide"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Sean

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, "digital divide" has become a catchphrase for the stubborn disparity in IT resources between communities, especially in regard to education. Low-income, rural and minority populations have received special scrutiny as the technological "have-nots." This article presents success stories of educators who can work around obstacles…

  3. Facial asymmetry: a current review

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The term "asymmetry" is used to make reference to dissimilarity between homologous elements, altering the balance between structures. Facial asymmetry is common in the overall population and is often presented subclinically. Nevertheless, on occasion, significant facial asymmetry results not only in functional, but also esthetic issues. Under these conditions, its etiology should be carefully investigated in order to achieve an adequate treatment plan. Facial asymmetry assessment comprises patient's first interview, extra- as well as intraoral clinical examination, and supplementary imaging examination. Subsequent asymmetry treatment depends on patient's age, the etiology of the condition and on the degree of disharmony, and might include from asymmetrical orthodontic mechanics to orthognathic surgery. Thus, the present study aims at addressing important aspects to be considered by the orthodontist reaching an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan of facial asymmetry, in addition to reporting treatment of some patients carriers of such challenging disharmony. PMID:26691977

  4. White matter microstructure asymmetry: effects of volume asymmetry on fractional anisotropy asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Takao, H; Hayashi, N; Ohtomo, K

    2013-02-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information regarding white matter microstructure; however, macroscopic fiber architectures can affect DTI measures. A larger brain (fiber tract) has a 'relatively' smaller voxel size, and the voxels are less likely to contain more than one fiber orientation and more likely to have higher fractional anisotropy (FA). Previous DTI studies report left-to-right differences in the white matter; however, these may reflect true microscopic differences or be caused purely by volume differences. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated left-to-right differences in white matter microstructure across the whole brain. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a large number of white matter volume asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. In many white matter regions, FA asymmetry was positively correlated with volume asymmetry. Voxel-wise analysis with adjustment for volume asymmetry revealed many white matter FA asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. The voxel-wise analysis showed a reduced number of regions with significant FA asymmetry compared with analysis performed without adjustment for volume asymmetry; however, the overall trend of the results was unchanged. The results of the present study suggest that these FA asymmetries are not caused by volume differences and reflect microscopic differences in the white matter.

  5. How Giardia Swim and Divide

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudip; Frisardi, Marta; Rogers, Rick; Samuelson, John

    2001-01-01

    To determine how binuclear giardia swim, we used video microscopy to observe trophozoites of Giardia intestinalis, which were labeled with an amino-specific Alexa Fluor dye that highlighted the flagella and adherence disc. Giardia swam forward by means of the synchronous beating of anterior, posterolateral, and ventral flagella in the plane of the ventral disc, while caudal flagella swam in a plane perpendicular to the disc. Giardia turned in the plane of the disc by means of a rudder-like motion of its tail, which was constant rather than beating. To determine how giardia divide, we used three-dimensional confocal microscopy, the same surface label, nuclear stains, and antitubulin antibodies. Giardia divided with mirror-image symmetry in the plane of the adherence disc, so that the right nucleus of the mother became the left nucleus of the daughter. Pairs of nuclei were tethered together by microtubules which surrounded nuclei and prevented mother or daughter giardia from receiving two copies of the same nucleus. New adherence discs formed upon a spiral backbone of microtubules, which had a clockwise rotation when viewed from the ventral surface. These dynamic observations of the parasite begin to reveal how giardia swim and divide. PMID:11705969

  6. Position sense asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Diane E; Martin, Bernard J

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetries in upper limb position sense have been explained in the context of a left limb advantage derived from differences in hemispheric specialization in the processing of kinesthetic information. However, it is not clearly understood how the comparison of perceptual information associated with passive limb displacement and the corresponding matching movement resulting from the execution of a motor command contributes to these differences. In the present study, upper limb position sense was investigated in 12 right-hand-dominant young adults performing wrist position matching tasks which varied in terms of interhemispheric transfer, memory retrieval and whether the reference position was provided by the same or opposite limb. Right and left hand absolute matching errors were similar when the reference and matching positions were produced by the same hand but were 36% greater when matching the reference position with the opposite hand. When examining the constant errors generated from matching movements made with the same hand that provided the reference, the right and left hand matching errors (approximately 3 degrees) were similar. However, when matching with the opposite limb, a large overshoot (P < 0.05) characterized the error when the right hand matched the left hand reference while a large undershoot (P < 0.05) characterized the error when the left hand matched the right hand reference. The overshoot and undershoot were of similar magnitude (approximately 4 degrees). Although asymmetries in the central processing of proprioceptive information such as interhemispheric transfer may exist, the present study suggests that asymmetries in position sense predominantly result from a difference in the "gain of the respective proprioceptive sensory-motor loops". This new hypothesis is strongly supported by a dual-linear model representing the right and left hand sensory-motor systems as well as morphological and physiological data.

  7. Rubber friction directional asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, A.; Dorogin, L.; Steenwyk, B.; Warhadpande, A.; Motamedi, M.; Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-12-01

    In rubber friction studies it is usually assumed that the friction force does not depend on the sliding direction, unless the substrate has anisotropic properties, like a steel surface grinded in one direction. Here we will present experimental results for rubber friction, where we observe a strong asymmetry between forward and backward sliding, where forward and backward refer to the run-in direction of the rubber block. The observed effect could be very important in tire applications, where directional properties of the rubber friction could be induced during braking.

  8. Wealth and the marital divide.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    Marriage patterns differ dramatically in the United States by race and education. The author identifies a novel explanation for these marital divides, namely, the important role of personal wealth in marriage entry. Using event-history models and data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort, the author shows that wealth is an important predictor of first marriage and that differences in asset ownership by race and education help to explain a significant portion of the race and education gaps in first marriage. The article also tests possible explanations for why wealth plays an important role in first marriage entry.

  9. GALLATIN DIVIDE ROADLESS AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Frank S.; Close, Terry J.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Gallatin Divide Roadless Area in the Gallatin Range of southwestern Montana was made. The area has probable and substantiated mineral-resource potential for phosphate rock, but most of the phosphate beds are thin, discontinuous, low grade, and deeply buried. Petrified wood is abundant but is scattered and of poor quality. Oil and gas resources are unlikely because possible productive structures are small and deeply eroded. The roadless area has little promise for the occurrence of other mineral or energy resources.

  10. Exchange asymmetry in experimental settings

    Treesearch

    Thomas C. Brown; Mark D. Morrison; Jacob A. Benfield; Gretchen Nurse Rainbolt; Paul A. Bell

    2015-01-01

    We review past trading experiments and present 11 new experiments designed to show how the trading rate responds to alterations of the experimental procedure. In agreement with earlier studies, results show that if the trade decision is converted to one resembling a choice between goods the exchange asymmetry disappears, but otherwise the asymmetry is...

  11. Lepton forward-backward asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, R. ); DELPHI Collaboration,

    1992-02-01

    Results of Forward-Backward Asymmetries with Leptons measured at [ital Z][sup 0] energies are presented. Details of the analysis by the DELPHI Collaboration are given together with the most recent values of the peak Asymmetries for electrons, muons, and taus obtained by ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL Collaborations at LEP.

  12. Lip asymmetry and smile aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Batwa, Waeil; McDonald, Fraser; Cash, Alex

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To determine if lip asymmetry can affect lip aesthetics. Setting and Participants : A group of dentists (n = 40) and cleft patients (n = 40) were recruited from the dental hospital and cleft service. Interventions : Still photographic digital images of lips and teeth were manipulated to produce a computerized gradient of smile appearance with different degrees of upper-lip vertical asymmetry. These five photographs (with 0 mm representing "symmetry," and 1, 2, 2.5, and 3 mm, asymmetries) were assessed by participants using a 5-point Likert scale. Statistics : Descriptive statistics in addition to chi-square test were used to analyze the data. In order to satisfy the requirement of the chi-square test, the five smile ratings were reduced to three. Results : Lip asymmetry did affect relative smile aesthetics, as determined by dentists and cleft patients. Both the dentists and cleft patients rated the 0-mm photograph more attractive than the 2.5-mm and 3-mm smiles (P < .05). The 0-, 1-, and 2-mm smiles were indistinguishable for both dentists and cleft patients. Conclusion : Lip asymmetry affects smile aesthetics. However, cleft patients and dentists were tolerant of minor asymmetries. This suggests that small degrees of lip asymmetry do not affect relative smile aesthetics as much as large degrees of lip asymmetry (2.5 mm or more).

  13. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbauer, J. L.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  14. A house divided cannot stand

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, S.M. )

    1994-01-01

    When it comes to the relationships between electric utilities and public service commissions, utilities would do well to remember the words of Abraham Lincoln -- [open quotes]A house divided against itself cannot stand.[close quotes] For just as distrust, dissension, and division threatened the future of the United States during the Civil War, they threaten the future of utilities today.In an effort to lower their costs and increase their competitive advantage, utility companies are increasingly looking to reinvent cultures, reengineer work processes, and redefine corporate missions, values, and strategies. But unless utilities also rebuild regulatory relations, such efforts are doomed to fail. If this prognosis sounds overly simplistic or melodramatic -- especially as utilities appear to be moving toward an era of reduced regulation -- think again. History shows that regulatory relationships drive a utility's ability to successfully integrate demand-side management (DSM) programs that are often critical to business strategies and goals.

  15. Hypnosis and hemispheric asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Naish, Peter L N

    2010-03-01

    Participants of low and high hypnotic susceptibility were tested on a temporal order judgement task, both with and without hypnosis. Judgements were made of the order of presentation of light flashes appearing in first one hemi-field then the other. There were differences in the inter-stimulus intervals required accurately to report the order, depending upon which hemi-field led. This asymmetry was most marked in hypnotically susceptible participants and reversed when they were hypnotized. This implies not only that brain activity changes in hypnosis, but also that there is a difference in brain function between people of low and high hypnotic susceptibility. The latter exhibited a faster-acting left hemisphere in the waking state, but faster right when hypnotized.

  16. Septins and Generation of Asymmetries in Fungal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Anum; McQuilken, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Polarized growth is critical for the development and maintenance of diverse organisms and tissues, but particularly central to fungi where nutrient uptake, communication, and reproduction all rely on cell asymmetries. To achieve polarized growth, fungi spatially organize both their cytosol and cortical membranes. The septins, a family of GTP-binding proteins, have emerged as key regulators of spatial compartmentalization in fungi and other eukaryotes. By forming higher-order structures on fungal plasma membranes, septins are thought to contribute to the generation of cell asymmetries by acting as molecular scaffolds and forming diffusional barriers. Here we discuss the links between septins and polarized growth and consider molecular models for how septins contribute to cellular asymmetry in fungi. PMID:26488282

  17. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  18. Lateral cephalometric diagnosis of asymmetry in Angle Class II subdivision compared to Class I and II

    PubMed Central

    Meloti, Aparecida Fernanda; Gonçalves, Renata de Cássia; Silva, Ertty; Martins, Lídia Parsekian; dos Santos-Pinto, Ary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lateral cephalometric radiographs are traditionally required for orthodontic treatment, yet rarely used to assess asymmetries. Objective The objective of the present study was to use lateral cephalometric radiographs to identify existing skeletal and dentoalveolar morphological alterations in Class II subdivision and to compare them with the existing morphology in Class I and II relationship. Material and Methods Ninety initial lateral cephalometric radiographs of male and female Brazilian children aged between 12 to 15 years old were randomly and proportionally divided into three groups: Group 1 (Class I), Group 2 (Class II) and Group 3 (Class II subdivision). Analysis of lateral cephalometric radiographs included angular measurements, horizontal linear measurements and two indexes of asymmetry that were prepared for this study. Results In accordance with an Index of Dental Asymmetry (IDA), greater mandibular dental asymmetry was identified in Group 3. An Index of Mandibular Asymmetry (IMA) revealed less skeletal and dental mandibular asymmetry in Group 2, greater skeletal mandibular asymmetry in Group 1, and greater mandibular dental asymmetry in Group 3. Conclusion Both IDA and IMA revealed greater mandibular dental asymmetry for Group 3 in comparison to Groups 1 and 2. These results are in accordance with those found by other diagnostic methods, showing that lateral cephalometric radiography is an acceptable method to identify existing skeletal and dentoalveolar morphological alterations in malocclusions. PMID:25279525

  19. The Southern Ocean biogeochemical divide.

    PubMed

    Marinov, I; Gnanadesikan, A; Toggweiler, J R; Sarmiento, J L

    2006-06-22

    Modelling studies have demonstrated that the nutrient and carbon cycles in the Southern Ocean play a central role in setting the air-sea balance of CO(2) and global biological production. Box model studies first pointed out that an increase in nutrient utilization in the high latitudes results in a strong decrease in the atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2). This early research led to two important ideas: high latitude regions are more important in determining atmospheric pCO2 than low latitudes, despite their much smaller area, and nutrient utilization and atmospheric pCO2 are tightly linked. Subsequent general circulation model simulations show that the Southern Ocean is the most important high latitude region in controlling pre-industrial atmospheric CO(2) because it serves as a lid to a larger volume of the deep ocean. Other studies point out the crucial role of the Southern Ocean in the uptake and storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and in controlling global biological production. Here we probe the system to determine whether certain regions of the Southern Ocean are more critical than others for air-sea CO(2) balance and the biological export production, by increasing surface nutrient drawdown in an ocean general circulation model. We demonstrate that atmospheric CO(2) and global biological export production are controlled by different regions of the Southern Ocean. The air-sea balance of carbon dioxide is controlled mainly by the biological pump and circulation in the Antarctic deep-water formation region, whereas global export production is controlled mainly by the biological pump and circulation in the Subantarctic intermediate and mode water formation region. The existence of this biogeochemical divide separating the Antarctic from the Subantarctic suggests that it may be possible for climate change or human intervention to modify one of these without greatly altering the other.

  20. CMB maximum temperature asymmetry axis: Alignment with other cosmic asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, Antonio; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2013-02-01

    We use a global pixel-based estimator to identify the axis of the residual Maximum Temperature Asymmetry (MTA) (after the dipole subtraction) of the WMAP seven-year Internal Linear Combination (ILC) cosmic microwave background temperature sky map. The estimator is based on considering the temperature differences between opposite pixels in the sky at various angular resolutions (4°-15°) and selecting the axis that maximizes this difference. We consider three large-scale HEALPix resolutions: Nside=16(3.7°), Nside=8(7.3°) and Nside=4(14.7°). We compare the direction and magnitude of this asymmetry with three other cosmic asymmetry axes (α dipole, dark energy dipole and dark flow) and find that the four asymmetry axes are abnormally close to each other. We compare the observed MTA axis with the corresponding MTA axes of 104 Gaussian isotropic simulated ILC maps (based on ΛCDM). The fraction of simulated ILC maps that reproduce the observed magnitude of the MTA asymmetry and alignment with the observed α dipole is in the range of 0.1%-0.5% (depending on the resolution chosen for the cosmic microwave background map). The corresponding magnitude+alignment probabilities with the other two asymmetry axes (dark energy dipole and dark flow) are at the level of about 1%. We propose Extended Topological Quintessence as a physical model qualitatively consistent with this coincidence of directions.

  1. Intrasubject corneal thickness asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Khachikian, Stephen S; Belin, Michael W; Ciolino, Joseph B

    2008-06-01

    To establish the normal distribution for intrasubject (right eye/left eye) central corneal pachymetry in a refractive surgery population. A retrospective analysis was performed on 1448 eyes of 724 consecutive patients evaluated for refractive surgery. Pachymetric data were obtained from the Pentacam Eye Scanner. Right and left eye pachymetry values were compared for the corneal apex, pupil center, and thinnest point. Statistical analysis was performed to determine normal levels of variance. The average apex reading was 539.3+/-36.8 microm, median 542 microm, and mode 539 microm (range: 411 to 664 microm). Values for the pupil center (average 538.7 microm) and thinnest point (average 536.1 microm) followed a similar distribution. The average pachymetry difference between fellow eyes was 8.8+/-7.2 microm at the apex, 8.9+/-8.3 microm at the pupil center, and 9.0+/-8.3 microm at the thinnest region. Individuals with a greater than 23.2 microm apical pachymetry difference represent less than 5% of the population. Individuals with an apical difference greater than 30.4 microm represent less than 0.5%. Pachymetric asymmetry outside the normal range should alert the clinician to examine for other parameters that are more established refractive surgery risk factors.

  2. [Dreams and interhemispheric asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Korabel'nikova, E A; Golubev, V L

    2001-01-01

    The dreams of 103 children and adolescents, aged 10-17 years, have been studied. The test group included 78 patients with neurotic disorders; control one consisted of 25 healthy subjects. Dream features, which were common for those with preferentially left asymmetry profile both in patients as well as in healthy subjects, were: less expressed novelty factor and frequent appearance of rare phenomena, such as "déjà vu in wakefulness", reality, "mixed" (overlapped) dreams, prolonged dreams in repeat sleep, frequent changes of personages and scenes of action. Left-hander dream peculiarities, being detected only in neurotic patients but not in healthy subjects, emerged as lucid phenomena deficit, "dream in dreams" and "dream reminiscence in dream" syndrome, which have been found only in left-handers. Right and left hemispheres seem to contribute in different ways to a dream formation. In authors believe that the left hemisphere seems to provide dream origin while the right hemisphere provides dream vividness, figurativeness and affective activation level.

  3. Asymmetry and dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Christiana M; Eckert, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    Developmental language disorders are characterized by a maturational trajectory that deviates or lags that of normal children. Given the wide variation in the rate of normal language development, diagnosis and classification of these disorders poses severe problems for the clinician. Our laboratory has been searching for anatomical signatures that could aid the development of a neurobiologically based classification. Quantitative analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans of a series of samples of children and adults with reading and language disorders has identified two clusters with contrasting anatomical and reading profiles. Individuals with small symmetrical brain structures tend to have deficits in multiple domains of written and oral language whereas those with larger asymmetrical structures are more likely to have the isolated phonological deficits seen in adults with compensated dyslexia. Surprisingly, the anatomical risk factors that define these clusters do not form a continuum of increasing severity but deviate in opposite directions from normal. Individuals with moderate brain size and asymmetry typically demonstrate the best overall performance. Further research should determine if phonological impairments in the two clusters are associated with differing genetic and environmental risk factors requiring different types of intervention.

  4. 40 CFR 1065.248 - Gas divider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas divider. 1065.248 Section 1065.248... PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.248 Gas divider. (a) Application. You may use a gas divider to blend calibration gases. (b) Component requirements. Use a gas divider that...

  5. Beam normal spin asymmetries: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    M. Vanderhaeghen

    2007-06-01

    The beam normal spin asymmetry in elastic electron-nucleon scattering is discussed. This beam normal spin asymmetry depends on the imaginary part of two-photon exchange processes between electron and nucleon, and measures the non-forward structure functions of the nucleon. After briefly reviewing the theoretical formalism, we discuss calculations in the threshold region, in the resonance region, as well as in the diffractive region, corresponding with high energy and forward angles.

  6. Electrodermal asymmetry during human sleep.

    PubMed

    Freixa i Baqué, E; de Bonis, M

    1983-01-01

    The bilateral spontaneous electrodermal activity (EDA) of four paid volunteer male students was recorded during three consecutive complete nights (after a habituation night). The results showed that: (a) there was a high proportion of electrodermal asymmetry (80%) during human sleep; (b) there were no significant differences in asymmetry between sleep stages; (c) electrodermal laterality during sleep seems to be under a random effects model; and (d) laterality appears to be an unreliable parameter. These results are discussed in terms of the activation theory.

  7. Intrachromosomal karyotype asymmetry in Orchidaceae

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros-Neto, Enoque; Nollet, Felipe; Moraes, Ana Paula; Felix, Leonardo P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The asymmetry indexes have helped cytotaxonomists to interpret and classify plant karyotypes for species delimitation efforts. However, there is no consensus about the best method to calculate the intrachromosomal asymmetry. The present study aimed to compare different intrachromosomal asymmetry indexes in order to indicate which are more efficient for the estimation of asymmetry in different groups of orchids. Besides, we aimed to compare our results with the Orchidaceae phylogenetic proposal to test the hypothesis of Stebbins (1971). Through a literature review, karyotypes were selected and analyzed comparatively with ideal karyotypes in a cluster analysis. All karyotypes showed some level of interchromosomal asymmetry, ranging from slightly asymmetric to moderately asymmetric. The five tested intrachromosomal asymmetry indexes indicated Sarcoglottis grandiflora as the species with the most symmetrical karyotype and Christensonella pachyphylla with the most asymmetrical karyotype. In the cluster analysis, the largest number of species were grouped with the intermediary ideal karyotypes B or C. Considering our results, we recommend the combined use of at least two indexes, especially Ask% or A1 with Syi, for cytotaxonomic analysis in groups of orchids. In an evolutionary perspective, our results support Stebbins’ hypothesis that asymmetric karyotypes derive from a symmetric karyotypes. PMID:28644507

  8. Intrachromosomal karyotype asymmetry in Orchidaceae.

    PubMed

    Medeiros-Neto, Enoque; Nollet, Felipe; Moraes, Ana Paula; Felix, Leonardo P

    2017-01-01

    The asymmetry indexes have helped cytotaxonomists to interpret and classify plant karyotypes for species delimitation efforts. However, there is no consensus about the best method to calculate the intrachromosomal asymmetry. The present study aimed to compare different intrachromosomal asymmetry indexes in order to indicate which are more efficient for the estimation of asymmetry in different groups of orchids. Besides, we aimed to compare our results with the Orchidaceae phylogenetic proposal to test the hypothesis of Stebbins (1971). Through a literature review, karyotypes were selected and analyzed comparatively with ideal karyotypes in a cluster analysis. All karyotypes showed some level of interchromosomal asymmetry, ranging from slightly asymmetric to moderately asymmetric. The five tested intrachromosomal asymmetry indexes indicated Sarcoglottis grandiflora as the species with the most symmetrical karyotype and Christensonella pachyphylla with the most asymmetrical karyotype. In the cluster analysis, the largest number of species were grouped with the intermediary ideal karyotypes B or C. Considering our results, we recommend the combined use of at least two indexes, especially Ask% or A1 with Syi, for cytotaxonomic analysis in groups of orchids. In an evolutionary perspective, our results support Stebbins' hypothesis that asymmetric karyotypes derive from a symmetric karyotypes.

  9. Fluctuating asymmetry and testing isolation of Montana grizzly bear populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Picton, Harold D.; Palmisciano, Daniel A.; Nelson, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry of adult skulls was used to test he genetic isolation of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population from its nearest neighbor. An overall summary statistic was used in addition to 16 other parameters. Tests found the males of the Yellowstone populaion to be more vaiable than those of the North Conitinental Divide Exosystem. Evidence for precipitaiton effects is also included. This test tends to support the existing management haypothesis that the Yellowstone population is isolatied.

  10. Cerebral asymmetry in insomnia sufferers.

    PubMed

    St-Jean, Geneviève; Turcotte, Isabelle; Bastien, Célyne H

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetry is used to describe the differences in electroencephalographic activity between regions of the brain. The objective of this study was to document frontal, central, and parietal asymmetry in psychophysiological (Psy-I) and paradoxical (Para-I) insomnia sufferers as well as good sleeper (GS) controls, and to compare their patterns of asymmetry to others already found in anxiety and depression. Additionally, asymmetry variations between nights were assessed. Participants were 17 Psy-I, 14 Para-I, and 19 GS (mean age = 40 years, SD = 9.4). They completed three nights of polysomnography (PSG) recordings following a clinical evaluation in a sleep laboratory. All sleep cycles of Nights 2 and 3 were retained for power spectral analysis. The absolute activity in frequency bands (0.00-125.00 Hz) was computed at multiple frontal, central, and parietal sites in rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep to provide cerebral asymmetry measures. Mixed model ANOVAs were computed to assess differences between groups and nights. Correlations were performed with asymmetry and symptoms of depression and anxiety from self-reported questionnaires. Over the course of the two nights, Para-I tended to present hypoactivation of their left frontal region but hyperactivation of their right one compared with GS. As for Psy-I, they presented increased activation of their right parietal region compared with Para-I. Asymmetry at frontal, central, and parietal region differed between nights. On a more disrupted night of sleep, Psy-I had increased activity in their right parietal region while Para-I presented a decrease in cerebral activity in the right central region on their less disrupted night of sleep. Anxious and depressive symptoms did not correlate with asymmetry at any region. Therefore, Psy-I and Para-I present unique patterns of cerebral asymmetry that do not relate to depression or anxiety, and asymmetry varies between nights, maybe as a

  11. Asymmetry in grasp force matching and sense of effort.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Diane E; Scotland, Samantha; Martin, Bernard J

    2012-03-01

    While asymmetries in upper limb force matching have been observed, the mechanisms underlying asymmetry in the sense of effort have not been conceptualized. The aim of this study was to investigate asymmetries in the perception and reproduction of grasp force. Forty-two young adults, 22 right-handed (RH) and 20 left-handed (LH), were, respectively, divided into three groups according to differences between their right and left-hand strength (left stronger than right, right stronger than left and right & left equivalent). A reference force, representing 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) produced by the right or left hand, was matched with same hand (Ipsilateral Remembered--IR) or opposite (Contralateral Remembered--CR) hand. The matching relative error was 92% (for RH) and 46% (for LH) greater in the CR than IR condition. Asymmetries in matching were significant for RH participants only in the CR condition and were dependent on right/left differences in hand strength as shown by the constant error (CE). For this RH population, right-hand overshoot of the left-hand reference and left-hand undershoot of the right-hand reference were significant when the right hand was stronger than the left. Asymmetry remained significant when CE was normalized (%MVC). Asymmetry was reduced when the strength of each hand was equivalent or when the left hand was stronger than the right. These findings suggest that effort perception is asymmetric in RH but not in LH individuals. The hand x strength interaction indicates that asymmetry in force matching is a consequence of both a difference in the respective cortical representations and motor components, which confer a different "gain" (input-output relationship) to each system. The similarity with position sense asymmetry suggests that the gain concept may be generalized to describe some functional/performance differences between the two hand/hemisphere systems. The more symmetrical performance of the LH than RH group

  12. Validity of gait asymmetry estimation by using an accelerometer in individuals with hemiparetic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Oyake, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Sugasawa, Masafumi; Oda, Chihiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Otaka, Yohei; Momose, Kimito

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of estimating step time and length asymmetries, using an accelerometer against force plate measurements in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four individuals who previously had experienced a stroke were asked to walk without using a cane or manual assistance on a 16-m walkway. Step time and length were measured using force plates, which is the gold standard for assessing gait asymmetry. In addition to ground reaction forces, trunk acceleration was simultaneously measured using an accelerometer. To estimate step time asymmetry using accelerometer data, the time intervals between forward acceleration peaks for each leg were calculated. To estimate step length asymmetry using accelerometer data, the integration of the positive vertical accelerations following initial contact of each leg was calculated. Asymmetry was considered the affected side value divided by the unaffected side value. [Results] Significant correlations were found between the accelerometer and the force plates for step time and length asymmetries (rho=0.83 and rho=0.64, respectively). [Conclusion] An accelerometer might be useful for assessing step time and length asymmetries in individuals with hemiparetic stroke, although improvements are needed for estimating the accuracy of step length asymmetry. PMID:28265163

  13. Validity of gait asymmetry estimation by using an accelerometer in individuals with hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Oyake, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Sugasawa, Masafumi; Oda, Chihiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Otaka, Yohei; Momose, Kimito

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of estimating step time and length asymmetries, using an accelerometer against force plate measurements in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four individuals who previously had experienced a stroke were asked to walk without using a cane or manual assistance on a 16-m walkway. Step time and length were measured using force plates, which is the gold standard for assessing gait asymmetry. In addition to ground reaction forces, trunk acceleration was simultaneously measured using an accelerometer. To estimate step time asymmetry using accelerometer data, the time intervals between forward acceleration peaks for each leg were calculated. To estimate step length asymmetry using accelerometer data, the integration of the positive vertical accelerations following initial contact of each leg was calculated. Asymmetry was considered the affected side value divided by the unaffected side value. [Results] Significant correlations were found between the accelerometer and the force plates for step time and length asymmetries (rho=0.83 and rho=0.64, respectively). [Conclusion] An accelerometer might be useful for assessing step time and length asymmetries in individuals with hemiparetic stroke, although improvements are needed for estimating the accuracy of step length asymmetry.

  14. Asymmetry of lexico-semantic processing in schizophrenia changes with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Lam, M; Collinson, S L; Sim, K; Mackay, C E; James, A C D; Crow, T J

    2012-02-01

    Are anomalies of cerebral asymmetry integral to the disease process? Here, we examined the influence of age, chronicity and age of onset of illness in 34 patients with early onset schizophrenia and 20 controls in relation to structural asymmetries of the temporal lobe and performance asymmetries on a semantic language lexical decision task. Volumetric MRI and a novel divided visual field probe of lateralised lexico-semantic language were assessed in patients with early onset schizophrenia (EOS) and controls. Novel ratios of age-illness overlap and directional asymmetry were developed in order to examine the association of chronicity factors to asymmetry. Loss of laterality on the lexical decision task and discordant structural asymmetry were correlated with duration of illness but were not seen in younger, less chronic patients. Reduced lateral processing speed, and discordant structural asymmetry were associated with greater proportion of lifetime schizophrenia. Although the conclusions are limited by the cross sectional nature of the study, anomalies of cerebral asymmetry in early onset patients may be an index of disease progression, and reflect directly on the disease process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase noise performance of analog frequency dividers.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, M M

    1990-01-01

    The phase noise performance obtainable using silicon and GaAs-based TTL (transistor-transistor logic) and ECL (emitter-coupled logic) logic level digital frequency dividers is discussed. Measurement of the spectral performance of two types of analog dividers is reported: a parametric divider using varactor diodes and a regenerative-type divider incorporating a double-balanced mixer in the oscillator feedback circuit. Both dividers were configured for divide-by-two operation at VHF. Evaluation indicates the regenerative divider is capable of providing much lower phase noise than conventional digital logic level devices. The regenerative divider can be successfully operated over bandwidths in excess of an octave, and the design lends itself to small (i.e. TO-8) modular package implementation. Operating frequencies are bounded only by the range of the mixer and RF amplifier utilized and, as such, should extend from HF through microwave.

  16. 40 CFR 1065.248 - Gas divider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gas divider. 1065.248 Section 1065.248 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING... testing. You may use critical-flow gas dividers, capillary-tube gas dividers, or thermal-mass-meter...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.248 - Gas divider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas divider. 1065.248 Section 1065.248 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING... testing. You may use critical-flow gas dividers, capillary-tube gas dividers, or thermal-mass-meter...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.248 - Gas divider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas divider. 1065.248 Section 1065.248 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING... testing. You may use critical-flow gas dividers, capillary-tube gas dividers, or thermal-mass-meter...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.248 - Gas divider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas divider. 1065.248 Section 1065.248 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING... testing. You may use critical-flow gas dividers, capillary-tube gas dividers, or thermal-mass-meter...

  20. Power Divider for Waveforms Rich in Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III

    2005-01-01

    A method for dividing the power of an electronic signal rich in harmonics involves the use of an improved divider topology. A divider designed with this topology could be used, for example, to propagate a square-wave signal in an amplifier designed with a push-pull configuration to enable the generation of more power than could be generated in another configuration.

  1. Diversity, Disability, and Geographic Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumari, Melati; Carr, Erika; Ndebe-Ngovo, Manjerngie

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon called digital divide was the focus of this paper. Diversity, disability, and geographical digital divide were relevant to this collaborative project. An extensive review of the literature was conducted for the completion of this project. The evidence for the digital divide in terms of race, level of education, and gender in the…

  2. The Myth about the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Brian L.; Oblinge, Diana G.

    2006-01-01

    Although computer ownership is not 100 percent, progress has been made on closing the digital divide. However, defining the digital divide according to the haves and have-nots of computer ownership is only a starting point. Beyond computer ownership, colleges and universities should explore the "second-level digital divide," which can be…

  3. Tech, Teachers & Teens: Bridging the Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuht, Amy Colcord; Colcord, Cean

    2011-01-01

    In past decades, the "digital divide" referred to the gap between those who could afford access to technology and those who could not. The divide has shifted in recent years to reflect the growing technological chasm between teachers and their students: today's schools and teenagers' worlds. The digital divide is widening and deepening…

  4. Expected dipole asymmetry in CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Namjoo, M.H.; Abolhasani, A.A.; Baghram, S.; Assadullahi, H.; Wands, D.; Firouzjahi, H. E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: shant.baghramian@gmail.com E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2015-05-01

    We explore the hemispherical asymmetry predicted in cosmic microwave background polarization when there is an asymmetry in temperature anisotropies due to primordial perturbations. We consider the cases of asymmetries due to adiabatic and isocurvature modes, and tensor perturbations. We show that the asymmetry in the TE, EE and/or BB correlations can be substantially larger than those in the TT power spectrum in certain cases. The relative asymmetry in the different cross-correlations, as well as the angular scale dependence, can in principle distinguish between different origins for the asymmetry.

  5. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-07

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a "coconut" micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.

  6. Rift asymmetry and continental uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Carminati, Eugenio; Bonatti, Enrico

    2003-06-01

    The topography of ocean ridges and rifts show a distinct asymmetry. The eastern sides of the East Pacific Rise, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the NW Indian Ridge are, on average, 100-300 m more elevated than the conjugate flank to the west. The asymmetry is maintained when bathymetry is plotted versus the square root of crustal age. A comparable topographic asymmetry occurs in the Red Sea and Baikal rifts where the "eastern" continental shoulders are more elevated. We suggest that depleted and lighter asthenosphere generated below the ocean ridge was shifted "eastward" relative to the lithosphere, determining a density deficit below the eastern flank. The eastward migration of the lighter Atlantic asthenosphere below the African continent could eventually have contributed to the anomalous postrift uplift of Africa. This model suggests that the "westward" drift of the lithosphere relative to the underlying mantle might be a global phenomenon.

  7. Magnetic asymmetries of unmagnetized planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecht, Stephen H.

    1990-01-01

    This letter discusses the results produced by three-dimensional hybrid particle code simulations of the solar wind interaction with unmagnetized planets such as Venus and Mars. The solar wind velocity is perpendicular to the IMF in the cases studied. It is found that there are asymmetries in both the magnetic structure and shock location for spherical obstacles ranging in radius from 1000 km to 6000 km. The asymmetries found are due to differences in the electron and ion current paths (diamagnetic behavior). Mass loading of 0(+) was not included in these simulations.

  8. Information asymmetry and deception

    PubMed Central

    Clots-Figueras, Irma; Hernán-González, Roberto; Kujal, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Situations such as an entrepreneur overstating a project's value, or a superior choosing to under or overstate the gains from a project to a subordinate are common and may result in acts of deception. In this paper we modify the standard investment game in the economics literature to study the nature of deception. In this game a trustor (investor) can send a given amount of money to a trustee (or investee). The amount received is multiplied by a certain amount, k, and the investee then decides on how to divide the total amount received. In our modified game the information on the multiplier, k, is known only to the investee and she can send a non-binding message to the investor regarding its value. We find that 66% of the investees send false messages with both under and over, statement being observed. Investors are naive and almost half of them believe the message received. We find greater lying when the distribution of the multiplier is unknown by the investors than when they know the distribution. Further, messages make beliefs about the multiplier more pessimistic when the investors know the distribution of the multiplier, while the opposite is true when they do not know the distribution. PMID:26257615

  9. Information asymmetry and deception.

    PubMed

    Clots-Figueras, Irma; Hernán-González, Roberto; Kujal, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Situations such as an entrepreneur overstating a project's value, or a superior choosing to under or overstate the gains from a project to a subordinate are common and may result in acts of deception. In this paper we modify the standard investment game in the economics literature to study the nature of deception. In this game a trustor (investor) can send a given amount of money to a trustee (or investee). The amount received is multiplied by a certain amount, k, and the investee then decides on how to divide the total amount received. In our modified game the information on the multiplier, k, is known only to the investee and she can send a non-binding message to the investor regarding its value. We find that 66% of the investees send false messages with both under and over, statement being observed. Investors are naive and almost half of them believe the message received. We find greater lying when the distribution of the multiplier is unknown by the investors than when they know the distribution. Further, messages make beliefs about the multiplier more pessimistic when the investors know the distribution of the multiplier, while the opposite is true when they do not know the distribution.

  10. NRZ Data Asymmetry Corrector and Convolutional Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfiffner, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    Circuit compensates for timing, amplitude and symmetry perturbations. Data asymmetry corrector and convolutional encoder regenerate data and clock signals in spite of signal variations such as data or clock asymmetry, phase errors, and amplitude variations, then encode data for transmission.

  11. Perspectives on asymmetry: the Erickson Lecture.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M Michael

    2012-12-01

    Topics discussed include asymmetry of the brain; prosopagnosia with asymmetric involvement; the blaspheming brain; effects of the numbers of X chromosomes on brain asymmetry; normal facial asymmetry; kissing asymmetry; left- and right-handedness; left-sided baby cradling; Nodal signaling and left/right asymmetry; primary cilium and left/right asymmetry in zebrafish; right/left asymmetry in snails; species differences in Shh and Fgf8; primary cilium in vertebrate asymmetry; Hedgehog signaling on the cilium; Wnt signaling on the cilium; situs solitus, situs inversus, and situs ambiguus (heterotaxy); ciliopathies; right-sided injuries in trilobites; unilateral ocular use in the octopus; fiddler crabs; scale-eating cichlids; narwhals; left-footed parrots; asymmetric whisker use in rats; and right-sided fatigue fractures in greyhounds.

  12. Hemispheric Asymmetries and Cognitive Attributes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    Visual, auditory, and bimodal event-related potentials were recorded from 50 males, and lateral asymmetry indices were derived. Eleven psychometric tests of different cognitive attributes were also administered to them. This area of research has been labeled aptitude-treatment-interaction (ATI). The emphasis of ATI research is on identification of…

  13. How asymmetry in animals starts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güntürkün, Onur

    2005-10-01

    This review aims to present a speculation about mechanisms that shape the brains of humans and other animals into an asymmetrical organization. To this end, I will proceed in two steps: first, I want to recapitulate evidence from various experiments that show that some but not all asymmetries of the avian brain result from a prehatch light stimulation asymmetry. This should make it clear that avian embryos have a genetic predisposition to turn their head to the right. This results in a higher level of prehatch light stimulation of their right eye. The concomitant left-right difference in sensory input alters the brain circuits of the animal for the entire lifespan in a lateralized way. In the second part of the paper I will present evidence that some of the asymmetries of the human brain take a similar ontogenetic path as those observed in birds. This review provides the evidence that critical ontogenetic processes discovered in animal models could also be involved in the ontogeny of human cerebral asymmetries.

  14. Evaluating Metrics of Drainage Divide Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Whipple, K. X.; DiBiase, R.; Gasparini, N. M.; Ouimet, W. B.

    2016-12-01

    Watersheds are the fundamental organizing units in landscapes and thus the controls on drainage divide location and mobility are an essential facet of landscape evolution. Additionally, many common topographic analyses fundamentally assume that river network topology and divide locations are largely static, allowing channel profile form to be interpreted in terms of spatio-temporal patterns of rock uplift rate relative to baselevel, climate, or rock properties. Recently however, it has been suggested that drainage divides are more mobile than previously thought and that divide mobility, and resulting changes in drainage area, can potentially induce changes to fluvial topography comparable to spatio-temporal variation in rock uplift, climate, or rock properties. Ultimately, reliable metrics are needed to diagnose the mobility of divides. One such recently proposed metric is cross-divide contrasts in `chi', a measure of the current topology of the drainage network, but cross-divide contrasts in a number of topographic metrics show promise. Here we use a series of landscape evolution modeling scenarios in which we induce divide mobility under different conditions to test the utility of a suite of plausible topographic metrics of divide mobility and compare these to natural examples. Specifically, we test cross-divide contrasts in mean slope, mean local relief, channel bed elevation at a reference drainage area, and chi. Our results highlight that cross-divide contrasts in chi can only be accurately interpreted in terms of divide mobility when uplift, rock erodibility, climate, and base-level are uniform across both river networks on either side of the divide. This is problematic for application of this metric to natural landscapes as (1) uniformity of all of these parameters is exceedingly unlikely and (2) quantifying the spatial patterns of these parameters is difficult. Consequently, as shown here for both simulated and natural landscapes, simple measures of cross-divide

  15. Fast frequency divider circuit using combinational logic

    DOEpatents

    Helinski, Ryan

    2017-05-30

    The various technologies presented herein relate to performing on-chip frequency division of an operating frequency of a ring oscillator (RO). Per the various embodiments herein, a conflict between RO size versus operational frequency can be addressed by dividing the output frequency of the RO to a frequency that can be measured on-chip. A frequency divider circuit (comprising NOR gates and latches, for example) can be utilized in conjunction with the RO on the chip. In an embodiment, the frequency divider circuit can include a pair of latches coupled to the RO to facilitate dividing the oscillating frequency of the RO by 2. In another embodiment, the frequency divider circuit can include four latches (operating in pairs) coupled to the RO to facilitate dividing the oscillating frequency of the RO by 4. A plurality of ROs can be MUXed to the plurality of ROs by a single oscillation-counting circuit.

  16. W asymmetries at CDF and D0

    SciTech Connect

    Schellman, H.

    2010-08-01

    We present recent W and charged lepton asymmetry measurements from the CDF and D0 experiments. Theoretical predictions agree with the CDF W asymmetry, measured using a new matrix element technique. These theoretical predictions are less consistent with the latest lepton asymmetry measurements from D0 and CDF, especially for high charged lepton transverse momentum.

  17. Power Divider for Harmonically Rich Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A power divider divides an RF signal into two output signals having a phase difference of 180 deg. or a multiple thereof. When the RF signal is a square wave or another harmonically rich signal. the phases of the fundamental and the harmonics have the proper relationship. The divider can be implemented in the form of microstrips on a board, with one of the output microstrips having several bends to provide a different electrical length from the other.

  18. Karyotype asymmetry in Cynodon Rich. (Poaceae) accessions.

    PubMed

    Chiavegatto, R B; Paula, C M P; Souza Sobrinho, F; Benites, F R G; Techio, V H

    2016-12-02

    Cynodon is a genus of plants with forage potential that has attracted the interest of breeders. These species have high morphological variability in a large number of varieties and cytotypes, hampering identification. This study aimed to determine the karyotype asymmetry index among accessions of Cynodon to discriminate between them. Karyotype symmetry was based on three estimates, which were compared. The basic number for the genus is x = 9. The results of the chromosome count and DNA quantification, respectively, were as follows: two diploid accessions (2n = 2x = 18 and 1.08 ± 0.094 to 1.17 ± 0.036 pg DNA and ± standard deviation), one triploid accession (2n = 3x = 27 and 1.63 ± 0.017 pg DNA), four tetraploid accessions (2n = 4x = 36 and 1.88 ± 0.069 to 2.10 ± 0.07 pg DNA), and one pentaploid accession (2n = 5x = 45 and 2.55 ± 0.098 pg DNA). C. incompletus var. hirsutus had the longest total length of the haploid lot (29.05 µm), with chromosomes that ranged from 1.7 to 6.2 µm in length. On the basis of the karyotype asymmetry indices, the accessions were divided into two groups: 1) C. dactylon var. dactylon, C. transvaalensis, C. dactylon var. polevansii, three accessions of Cynodon sp, and C. nlemfuensis; and 2) C. incompletus var. hirsutus. This is the first description of tetraploidy in C. transvaalensis. The karyotypic data facilitated a determination of the degree of proximity between the accessions.

  19. Inductive voltage divider modeling in Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, S. A.; Kim, V. L.

    2017-01-01

    Inductive voltage dividers have the most appropriate metrological characteristics on alternative current and are widely used for converting physical signals. The model of a double-decade inductive voltage divider was designed with the help of Matlab/Simulink. The first decade is an inductive voltage divider with balanced winding, the second decade is a single-stage inductive voltage divider. In the paper, a new transfer function algorithm was given. The study shows errors and differences that appeared between the third degree reduced model and a twenty degree unreduced model. The obtained results of amplitude error differ no more than by 7 % between the reduced and unreduced model.

  20. Upper airway asymmetry in skeletal Class III malocclusions with mandibular deviation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, De-Hua; Wang, Xu-Xia; Ma, Dan; Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Jun

    2017-09-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between bilateral differences of upper airway and mandibular morphologic patterns in subjects with skeletal Class III mandibular deviation. 47 skeletal Class III (ANB < 0°) adult patients with and without mandibular deviation were divided into 2 groups. Bilateral differences of minimum cross-sectional area, mean cross-sectional area, volume of subdivisions (nasopharynx, palatopharynx, glossopharynx, hypopharynx) were assessed paired t test. Stepwise linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation coefficients were computed between a significant pair of upper airway variables and a pair of mandibular deviation variables to examine the quantitative relationship between the upper airway asymmetry and mandibular deviation. The mean cross-sectional area and the volume of palatopharynx on the deviated side in mandibular deviated group was significantly smaller than non-deviated side. The asymmetry index of the palatopharyngeal volume showed significant correlations with CRA asymmetry (r = 0.49) and Ramus asymmetry (r = 0.54). However, in the glossopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal segment, the mandibular deviated group showed significant asymmetry, characterized by larger mean cross-sectional area and volume in deviated side. The asymmetry index of the glossopharyngeal volume and hypopharyngeal volume showed significant correlations with CRA asymmetry (r = 0.42), Me-s (r = 0.72) and Me-s (r = 0.67) respectively.

  1. A Better Estimate of the Internal Consistency Reliability of Frontal EEG Asymmetry Scores

    PubMed Central

    Towers, David N.; Allen, John J.B.

    2009-01-01

    Frontal alpha asymmetry is typically computed using alpha power averaged across many overlapping epochs. Previous reports have estimated the internal consistency reliability of asymmetry by dividing resting EEG sessions into segments of equal duration (e.g. 1 min) and treating asymmetry scores for each segment as “items” to estimate internal consistency reliability using Cronbach's alpha. Cronbach's alpha partly depends on the number of items, such that this approach may underestimate reliability by using less than the number of distinct items available. Reliability estimates for resting EEG data in the present study (204 subjects, 8 sessions) were obtained using mean split-half correlations with epoch alpha power as treated as separate items. Estimates at all scalp sites and reference schemes approached 0.90 with as few as 100 epochs, suggesting the internal consistency of frontal asymmetry is greater than that previously reported. PMID:19055503

  2. Volumetric assessment of cerebral asymmetries in dogs.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Franchini, Delia; Pepe, Anna M; Sasso, Raffaella; Dimatteo, Salvatore; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Quaranta, Angelo

    2011-09-01

    In the present study we quantified volumetric brain asymmetries from computed tomography (CT) scans in 12 healthy dogs, using a semi-automated technique for assessing in vivo structure asymmetry. Volumetric assessment of asymmetrical cerebral lateral ventricle (ALV) was also investigated. Our results showed that seven dogs exhibited a right hemisphere significantly greater than the left, two dogs had a left-greater-than-right hemisphere asymmetry, and finally two dogs displayed no significant brain volumetric asymmetry. This right-biased hemispheric asymmetry supports data reported previously using post-mortem morphological studies in both dogs and other mammalian species.

  3. Parochial Geographies: Growing up in Divided Belfast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Madeleine

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which teenagers occupy and manage space in one divided community in Northern Ireland. Drawing on stories, maps and focus group discussions with 80 teenagers, from an interface area in Belfast, the article reveals their perceptions and experiences of divided cities, as risky landscapes. Teenagers respond to these…

  4. PIONEER POLAR STRUCTURES, JAMESWAY BUILDING DIVIDER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A building divider was developed for the Jamesway polar shelter to separate two facilities located in the same building. The divider is constructed...near McMurdo, Antarctica. It was concluded that it satisfies the requirements for separating spaces in a Jamesway and should be used as a standard accessory for the Jamesway .

  5. Social Welfare Implications of the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eunjin; Lee, Byungtae; Menon, Nirup M.

    2009-01-01

    The Internet plays a critical role in informing individuals about society, politics, business, and the environment. So much so that it has been said that the digital divide makes the segment of society on the ''right side'' of the divide (the digitally endowed group) better off and that on the ''wrong side'' (the digitally challenged group) worse…

  6. Bridge the Digital Divide for Educational Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Christine Y.; Dodds, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Students' technological savvy has challenged schools to make greater use of computers and the Internet in their curricula, but unfortunately, not every student has the same access to it, and the inability to keep pace has created a digital divide that continues to widen. The digital divide particularly affects students who are black, Hispanic,…

  7. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, data analysis, Videos S

  8. Planum temporale asymmetry in people who stutter.

    PubMed

    Gough, Patricia M; Connally, Emily L; Howell, Peter; Ward, David; Chesters, Jennifer; Watkins, Kate E

    2017-06-16

    Previous studies have reported that the planum temporale - a language-related structure that normally shows a leftward asymmetry - had reduced asymmetry in people who stutter (PWS) and reversed asymmetry in those with severe stuttering. These findings are consistent with the theory that altered language lateralization may be a cause or consequence of stuttering. Here, we re-examined these findings in a larger sample of PWS. We evaluated planum temporale asymmetry in structural MRI scans obtained from 67 PWS and 63 age-matched controls using: 1) manual measurements of the surface area; 2) voxel-based morphometry to automatically calculate grey matter density. We examined the influences of gender, age, and stuttering severity on planum temporale asymmetry. The size of the planum temporale and its asymmetry were not different in PWS compared with Controls using either the manual or the automated method. Both groups showed a significant leftwards asymmetry on average (about one-third of PWS and Controls showed rightward asymmetry). Importantly, and contrary to previous reports, the degree of asymmetry was not related to stuttering severity. In the manual measurements, women who stutter had a tendency towards rightwards asymmetry but men who stutter showed the same degree of leftwards asymmetry as male Controls. In the automated measurements, Controls showed a significant increase in leftwards asymmetry with age but this relationship was not observed in PWS. We conclude that reduced planum temporale asymmetry is not a prominent feature of the brain in PWS and that the asymmetry is unrelated to stuttering severity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Motor asymmetry in elite fencers.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Selcuk; Sainburg, Robert L; Kirazci, Sadettin; Przybyla, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The authors previously reported that asymmetrical patterns of hand preference are updated and modified by present sensorimotor conditions. They examined whether participation in long-term training in the upper extremity sport fencing might modify arm selection and performance asymmetries. Eight fencers and eight nonfencers performed reaching movements under 3 experimental conditions: (a) nonchoice right, (b) nonchoice left, and (c) choice, either right or left arm as selected by subject. The nonchoice conditions allowed assessment of potential interlimb differences in movement performance, while the choice condition allowed assessment of the frequency and pattern of arm selection across subject groups. Our findings showed that the athlete group showed substantially greater symmetry in the performance and selection measures. These findings suggest that arm selection and performance asymmetries can be altered by intense long-term practice.

  10. Systematic Mapping and Statistical Analyses of Valley Landform and Vegetation Asymmetries Across Hydroclimatic Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, M. J.; Pierce, J. L.; McNamara, J. P.; Flores, A. N.; Benner, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Terrain aspect alters the spatial distribution of insolation across topography, driving eco-pedo-hydro-geomorphic feedbacks that can alter landform evolution and result in valley asymmetries for a suite of land surface characteristics (e.g. slope length and steepness, vegetation, soil properties, and drainage development). Asymmetric valleys serve as natural laboratories for studying how landscapes respond to climate perturbation. In the semi-arid montane granodioritic terrain of the Idaho batholith, Northern Rocky Mountains, USA, prior works indicate that reduced insolation on northern (pole-facing) aspects prolongs snow pack persistence, and is associated with thicker, finer-grained soils, that retain more water, prolong the growing season, support coniferous forest rather than sagebrush steppe ecosystems, stabilize slopes at steeper angles, and produce sparser drainage networks. We hypothesize that the primary drivers of valley asymmetry development are changes in the pedon-scale water-balance that coalesce to alter catchment-scale runoff and drainage development, and ultimately cause the divide between north and south-facing land surfaces to migrate northward. We explore this conceptual framework by coupling land surface analyses with statistical modeling to assess relationships and the relative importance of land surface characteristics. Throughout the Idaho batholith, we systematically mapped and tabulated various statistical measures of landforms, land cover, and hydroclimate within discrete valley segments (n=~10,000). We developed a random forest based statistical model to predict valley slope asymmetry based upon numerous measures (n>300) of landscape asymmetries. Preliminary results suggest that drainages are tightly coupled with hillslopes throughout the region, with drainage-network slope being one of the strongest predictors of land-surface-averaged slope asymmetry. When slope-related statistics are excluded, due to possible autocorrelation, valley

  11. Preparation of Artificial Plasma Membrane Mimicking Vesicles with Lipid Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Lipid asymmetry, the difference in lipid distribution across the lipid bilayer, is one of the most important features of eukaryotic cellular membranes. However, commonly used model membrane vesicles cannot provide control of lipid distribution between inner and outer leaflets. We recently developed methods to prepare asymmetric model membrane vesicles, but facile incorporation of a highly controlled level of cholesterol was not possible. In this study, using hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin based lipid exchange, a simple method was devised to prepare large unilamellar model membrane vesicles that closely resemble mammalian plasma membranes in terms of their lipid composition and asymmetry (sphingomyelin (SM) and/or phosphatidylcholine (PC) outside/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) inside), and in which cholesterol content can be readily varied between 0 and 50 mol%. We call these model membranes “artificial plasma membrane mimicking” (“PMm”) vesicles. Asymmetry was confirmed by both chemical labeling and measurement of the amount of externally-exposed anionic lipid. These vesicles should be superior and more realistic model membranes for studies of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles that of mammalian plasma membranes. PMID:24489974

  12. Preparation of artificial plasma membrane mimicking vesicles with lipid asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Lipid asymmetry, the difference in lipid distribution across the lipid bilayer, is one of the most important features of eukaryotic cellular membranes. However, commonly used model membrane vesicles cannot provide control of lipid distribution between inner and outer leaflets. We recently developed methods to prepare asymmetric model membrane vesicles, but facile incorporation of a highly controlled level of cholesterol was not possible. In this study, using hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin based lipid exchange, a simple method was devised to prepare large unilamellar model membrane vesicles that closely resemble mammalian plasma membranes in terms of their lipid composition and asymmetry (sphingomyelin (SM) and/or phosphatidylcholine (PC) outside/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) inside), and in which cholesterol content can be readily varied between 0 and 50 mol%. We call these model membranes "artificial plasma membrane mimicking" ("PMm") vesicles. Asymmetry was confirmed by both chemical labeling and measurement of the amount of externally-exposed anionic lipid. These vesicles should be superior and more realistic model membranes for studies of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles that of mammalian plasma membranes.

  13. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins.

    PubMed

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-Macarthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-04-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry.

  14. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacArthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry. PMID:23487316

  15. Condylar-mandibular asymmetry, a reality.

    PubMed

    Boratto, R; Gambardella, U; Micheletti, P; Pagliani, L; Preda, L; Hansson, T L

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the possibility to recognize a condylar-mandibular asymmetry through a panoramic radiograph. Results from a previous work, in which 100 skulls from the Museum of the Institute of Anatomy of the University of Pavia were studied and measured, showed the presence of asymmetry. Using the same skulls we examined the possible correlation between morphological and radiological data. We did not find out correlation's between the condylar asymmetry evaluated at the anatomical level and the radiological asymmetry which was indeed found. This is probably due to the different positioning of the jaws during the two different measuring processes. Nevertheless our results confirm the daily experience of dentistry: asymmetry of mandibular condyle can be one of the mayor causes for the asymmetry of the stomatognatic apparatus.

  16. Write field asymmetry in perpendicular magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanjie; Bai, Daniel Z.; Lin, Ed; Mao, Sining

    2012-04-01

    We present a systematic study of write field asymmetry by using micromagnetic modeling for a perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) writer structure. Parameters investigated include initial magnetization condition, write current amplitude, write current frequency, and initial write current polarity. It is found that the write current amplitude and frequency (data rate) are the dominant factors that impact the field asymmetry. Lower write current amplitude and higher write current frequency will deteriorate the write field asymmetry, causing recording performance (such as bit error rate) degradation.

  17. Plantar loading asymmetry in American Indians with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, with diabetes only, and without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kernozek, Thomas W; Greany, John F; Heizler, Cassandra

    2013-01-01

    We investigated plantar loading asymmetry during gait in American Indians with and without diabetes and with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. A convenience sample of 96 American Indians with and without diabetes was divided into three groups: 20 with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, 16 with diabetes without peripheral neuropathy, and 60 with no history of diabetes (control group). Plantar loading was measured during barefoot walking across a pressure platform. Five trials were collected per foot during level walking at a self-selected speed using the two-step method. Asymmetry in peak pressure-time integral and peak plantar pressure were calculated from ten plantar regions and compared among groups. Significant pressure-time integral asymmetry occurred across the forefoot regions in American Indians with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy compared with the other two groups. Significant peak plantar pressure asymmetry occurred in the third metatarsal region in both groups with diabetes (with and without peripheral neuropathy) compared with the control group. Overall, American Indians with diabetes seemed to show greater asymmetry in plantar loading variables across the forefoot region compared with those in the control group. Specifically, individuals with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy had the greatest amount of forefoot pressure-time integral asymmetry. Significant peak plantar pressure asymmetry occurred in the third metatarsal region of the forefoot in those with diabetes with and without peripheral neuropathy. Loading asymmetry may play a role in the development of foot ulcers in the forefoot region of American Indians with peripheral neuropathy and diabetes.

  18. Peripheral neuropathy reduces asymmetries in inter-limb transfer in a visuo-motor task.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhujun; Van Gemmert, Arend W A

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetry of inter-limb transfer has been associated with the specialization of the dominant and non-dominant motor system. Reductions of asymmetry have been interpreted as behavioural evidence showing a decline of hemispheric lateralization. A previous study showed that ageing did not qualitatively change the inter-limb transfer asymmetry of a visuo-motor task. The current study elaborates on these findings; it examines whether diminished somatosensory information as a result of peripheral neuropathy (PN) adversely affects inter-limb transfer asymmetry. Twenty individuals affected by PN and 20 older controls were recruited and divided equally across two groups. One group trained a visuo-motor task with the right hand while the other group trained it with the left hand. Performance (initial direction error) of the untrained hand before and after training was collected to determine learning effects from inter-limb transfer. Similar to previous studies, the current study showed asymmetric inter-limb transfer in older controls. In contrast, PN showed inter-limb transfer in both directions indicating that PN reduces inter-limb transfer asymmetry. Increased bilateral hemispheric recruitment is suggested to be responsible for this reduced asymmetry which may compensate for deteriorated tactile and/or proprioceptive inputs in PN. Two possible hypotheses are discussed explaining the relationship between declined somatosensory information and increases in bilateral hemispheric recruitment.

  19. Temporal dynamics of divided spatial attention.

    PubMed

    Itthipuripat, Sirawaj; Garcia, Javier O; Serences, John T

    2013-05-01

    In naturalistic settings, observers often have to monitor multiple objects dispersed throughout the visual scene. However, the degree to which spatial attention can be divided across spatially noncontiguous objects has long been debated, particularly when those objects are in close proximity. Moreover, the temporal dynamics of divided attention are unclear: is the process of dividing spatial attention gradual and continuous, or does it onset in a discrete manner? To address these issues, we recorded steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) as subjects covertly monitored two flickering targets while ignoring an intervening distractor that flickered at a different frequency. All three stimuli were clustered within either the lower left or the lower right quadrant, and our dependent measure was SSVEP power at the target and distractor frequencies measured over time. In two experiments, we observed a temporally discrete increase in power for target- vs. distractor-evoked SSVEPs extending from ∼350 to 150 ms prior to correct (but not incorrect) responses. The divergence in SSVEP power immediately prior to a correct response suggests that spatial attention can be divided across noncontiguous locations, even when the targets are closely spaced within a single quadrant. In addition, the division of spatial attention appears to be relatively discrete, as opposed to slow and continuous. Finally, the predictive relationship between SSVEP power and behavior demonstrates that these neurophysiological measures of divided attention are meaningfully related to cognitive function.

  20. Discharge Asymmetry in Delta Bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, G.; Paola, C.; Voller, V. R.

    2015-12-01

    Distributary networks are formed by channels which bifurcate downstream in a river delta. Sediment and water fluxes are often split unequally in delta bifurcations. Understanding flux asymmetry in distributary networks is important for predicting how a delta will respond to sea-level rise. We present results of a quasi-1D model of a delta bifurcation. Consistent with previous results, in the absence of deposition, stable bifurcations may be either symmetric or asymmetric, depending on flow conditions. However, in a depositional setting, a stable asymmetric flow partitioning is no longer possible, as the dominant branch becomes less and less steep relative to the other branch. This feedback eventually causes the second branch to become favored. For the depositional case, we identify three regimes of bifurcation behavior: 1) stable symmetric bifurcation, 2) "soft" avulsions where the dominant branch switches without complete abandonment of the previous channel, and 3) complete avulsions where one branch is completely abandoned. In each case, the bifurcation is symmetric in the long-term average, but the latter two allow for short-term asymmetry. We find that keeping upstream sediment and water discharges fixed, as downstream channel length increases the regime shifts from symmetric to soft avulsions to complete avulsions. In the two avulsion regimes we examine the effect of upstream sediment and water discharges and downstream channel length on avulsion period and maximum discharge ratio. Finally, we compare numerical modeling results to a fixed-wall bifurcation experiment. As in the numerical model, the presence or absence of a downstream sink exerts a strong control on system behavior. If a sink is present, a bifurcation may be asymmetric indefinitely. Conversely, without a sink the system is depositional, and the feedback between sediment discharge asymmetry and slope causes the bifurcation to remain symmetric in the long-term average.

  1. On perturbative azimuthal asymmetry at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaeian, A. H.

    2008-10-13

    We investigate the azimuthal asymmetry of partons and photons produced at the initial stage of nuclear collisions at the RHIC energy originating from quark-nucleus collisions. In our approach, the azimuthal asymmetry results from the correlation between color dipole orientation and impact parameter of the collision. The asymmetry is sensitive to the rapid variation of the nuclear density at the nuclear periphery. We either introduce the color-dipole orientation into the improved Born approximation, or model the dipole partial amplitude which satisfies available DIS data. We conclude that the azimuthal asymmetry coming from these mechanisms can be sizable.

  2. Atypical alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Hale, T Sigi; Smalley, Susan L; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T; McGough, James J; Loo, Sandra K

    2009-08-01

    A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha asymmetry has been associated with ADHD-like traits such as reduced reward responsiveness, a lack of inhibition toward aversive experience, and increased approach behaviors, and previous work has indicated increased rightward alpha asymmetry in children with ADHD. The current study explores whether increased rightward alpha asymmetry is also evident in adults with ADHD. We assessed low (8-10 Hz) and high (10-12 Hz) alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD (n=29) versus controls (n=62) during baseline and cognitive activation conditions for nine homologous electrode pairs along the anterior-posterior axis. Seven results emerged (p<.05) showing increased rightward alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD. This occurred in three specific electrode pairs across two testing conditions, and five of six results occurred in the lower alpha band. Finally, post hoc analysis indicated that increased rightward alpha asymmetry was generally associated with greater numbers of ADHD symptoms--with a possible parietal association for inattentive and a fronto-temporal association for hyperactivity symptoms. Increased rightward alpha asymmetry previously observed in children with ADHD appears to be a developmentally persistent feature of ADHD.

  3. Measuring Asymmetry in Time-Stamped Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Dearlove, Bethany L; Frost, Simon D W

    2015-07-01

    Previous work has shown that asymmetry in viral phylogenies may be indicative of heterogeneity in transmission, for example due to acute HIV infection or the presence of 'core groups' with higher contact rates. Hence, evidence of asymmetry may provide clues to underlying population structure, even when direct information on, for example, stage of infection or contact rates, are missing. However, current tests of phylogenetic asymmetry (a) suffer from false positives when the tips of the phylogeny are sampled at different times and (b) only test for global asymmetry, and hence suffer from false negatives when asymmetry is localised to part of a phylogeny. We present a simple permutation-based approach for testing for asymmetry in a phylogeny, where we compare the observed phylogeny with random phylogenies with the same sampling and coalescence times, to reduce the false positive rate. We also demonstrate how profiles of measures of asymmetry calculated over a range of evolutionary times in the phylogeny can be used to identify local asymmetry. In combination with different metrics of asymmetry, this combined approach offers detailed insights of how phylogenies reconstructed from real viral datasets may deviate from the simplistic assumptions of commonly used coalescent and birth-death process models.

  4. Quantum speed limits, coherence, and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Iman; Spekkens, Robert W.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    The resource theory of asymmetry is a framework for classifying and quantifying the symmetry-breaking properties of both states and operations relative to a given symmetry. In the special case where the symmetry is the set of translations generated by a fixed observable, asymmetry can be interpreted as coherence relative to the observable eigenbasis, and the resource theory of asymmetry provides a framework to study this notion of coherence. We here show that this notion of coherence naturally arises in the context of quantum speed limits. Indeed, the very concept of speed of evolution, i.e., the inverse of the minimum time it takes the system to evolve to another (partially) distinguishable state, is a measure of asymmetry relative to the time translations generated by the system Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the celebrated Mandelstam-Tamm and Margolus-Levitin speed limits can be interpreted as upper bounds on this measure of asymmetry by functions which are themselves measures of asymmetry in the special case of pure states. Using measures of asymmetry that are not restricted to pure states, such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information, we obtain extensions of the Mandelstam-Tamm bound which are significantly tighter in the case of mixed states. We also clarify some confusions in the literature about coherence and asymmetry, and show that measures of coherence are a proper subset of measures of asymmetry.

  5. Dimensional and discrete dental trait asymmetry relationships.

    PubMed

    Mayhall, J T; Saunders, S R

    1986-03-01

    Inuit (Eskimos) from the Foxe Basin region of the Northwest Territories, Canada, were studied to ascertain the amount of dimensional and morphological asymmetry in their dentitions. The results indicate that dimensional asymmetry does not appear to be greater on either the maxillary or mandibular teeth. Both types of asymmetry show partial conformity to the model of tooth fields with an increasing amount of asymmetry as one goes distally in each tooth group. The morphological asymmetry exception, the mandibular incisors, follows Dahlberg's "Field Concept." Rank-order correlations between the amount of dimensional asymmetry and morphological asymmetry reveal no detectable patterns. There appear to be no associations between the presence or absence of morphological asymmetry and the size of the tooth. This lack of association might be explained by differences in developmental timing of tooth dimensions and morphological traits; however, such a hypothesis requires experimental testing. In this population and those for which published results are available, it is practically impossible to overcome the "noise" level and test recent hypotheses regarding random dental asymmetry.

  6. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  7. UV Observations of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Romeo, G.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetry in the auroral patterns can be an important diagnostic for understanding the dynamics of solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system (e.g., Newel and Meng, 1998; Fillingrim et al., 2005). Molecular nitrogen emission in the UV Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands can be used to determine energy flux and electron mean energy (Sotirelis, et al, 2013) and thereby Hall and Pederson integrated conductances (Gjerloev, et al., 2014). UV imagery provided by the 4 SSUSI instruments on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16-F19 spacecraft provide two dimensional maps of this emission at different local times. Often there are near simultaneous observations of both poles by some combination of the satellites. (see figure 1) The SSUSI auroral data products are well suited to this study, as they have the following features.: - dayglow has been subtracted on dayside aurora - electron energy flux and mean energy are pre-calculated - individual arcs have been identified through image processing. In order to intercompare data from multiple satellites, we must first ensure that the instrument calibrations are consistent. In this work we show that the instruments are consistently calibrated, and that results generated from the SSUSI data products can be trusted. Several examples of storm time asymmetries captured by the SSUSI instruments will be discussed. Fillingim, M. O., G. K. Parks, H. U. Frey, T. J. Immel, and S. B. Mende (2005), Hemispheric asymmetry of the afternoon electron aurora, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L03113, doi:10.1029/2004GL021635. Gjerloev, J., Schaefer, R., Paxton, L, and Zhang, Y. (2014), A comprehensive empirical model of the ionospheric conductivity derived from SSUSI/GUVI, SuperMAG and SuperDARN data, SM51G-4339, Fall 2014 AGU meeting, San Francisco. Newell, P. T., and C.-I. Meng (1988), Hemispherical asymmetry in cusp precipitation near solstices, J. Geophys. Res., 93(A4), 2643-2648, doi:10.1029/JA093iA04p02643

  8. Induction of asymmetry into homodimers.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, B; Cho, Y R; Westwell, M S; Williams, D H

    1998-01-01

    The self-regulation of biological signalling receptors via homodimerization is discussed in relation to the symmetry changes occurring when these receptors bind their target ligand. The idea of positive and negative cooperativity between dimerization and ligand binding, mediated by changes in the symmetry of the system as a source of signalling control is considered; an analogy made with the homodimerization of a glycopeptide antibiotic, ristocetin A, which displays negative cooperativity. Finally, the regulation of the bacterial aspartate receptor and the human growth hormone receptor is discussed as a function of ligand-induced asymmetry.

  9. Analogue Divider by Averaging a Triangular Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Krishnagiri Chinnathambi

    2017-03-01

    A new analogue divider circuit by averaging a triangular wave using operational amplifiers is explained in this paper. The triangle wave averaging analog divider using operational amplifiers is explained here. The reference triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level up towards positive power supply voltage level. Its positive portion is obtained by a positive rectifier and its average value is obtained by a low pass filter. The same triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level to down towards negative power supply voltage level. Its negative portion is obtained by a negative rectifier and its average value is obtained by another low pass filter. Both the averaged voltages are combined in a summing amplifier and the summed voltage is given to an op-amp as negative input. This op-amp is configured to work in a negative closed environment. The op-amp output is the divider output.

  10. Analogue Divider by Averaging a Triangular Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Krishnagiri Chinnathambi

    2017-08-01

    A new analogue divider circuit by averaging a triangular wave using operational amplifiers is explained in this paper. The triangle wave averaging analog divider using operational amplifiers is explained here. The reference triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level up towards positive power supply voltage level. Its positive portion is obtained by a positive rectifier and its average value is obtained by a low pass filter. The same triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level to down towards negative power supply voltage level. Its negative portion is obtained by a negative rectifier and its average value is obtained by another low pass filter. Both the averaged voltages are combined in a summing amplifier and the summed voltage is given to an op-amp as negative input. This op-amp is configured to work in a negative closed environment. The op-amp output is the divider output.

  11. Wideband unbalanced waveguide power dividers and combiners

    DOEpatents

    Halligan, Matthew; McDonald, Jacob Jeremiah; Strassner, II, Bernd H.

    2016-05-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to waveguide dividers and waveguide combiners for application in radar systems, wireless communications, etc. Waveguide dividers-combiners can be manufactured in accordance with custom dimensions, as well as in accordance with waveguide standards such that the input and output ports are of a defined dimension and have a common impedance. Various embodiments are presented which can incorporate one or more septum(s), one or more pairs of septums, an iris, an input matching region, a notch located on the input waveguide arm, waveguide arms having stepped transformer regions, etc. The various divider configurations presented herein can be utilized in high fractional bandwidth applications, e.g., a fractional bandwidth of about 30%, and RF applications in the Ka frequency band (e.g., 26.5-40 GHz).

  12. WIDE BAND REGENERATIVE FREQUENCY DIVIDER AND MULTIPLIER

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1959-11-17

    A regenerative frequency divider and multiplier having wide band input characteristics is presented. The circuit produces output oscillations having frequencies related by a fixed ratio to input oscillations over a wide band of frequencies. In accomplishing this end, the divider-multiplier includes a wide band input circuit coupled by mixer means to a wide band output circuit having a pass band related by a fixed ratio to that of the input circuit. A regenerative feedback circuit derives a fixed frequency ratio feedback signal from the output circuit and applies same to the mixer means in proper phase relation to sustain fixed frequency ratio oscillations in the output circuit.

  13. Fluctuating asymmetry and psychometric intelligence.

    PubMed Central

    Furlow, F B; Armijo-Prewitt, T; Gangestad, S W; Thornhill, R

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic nature of human psychometric intelligence (IQ), but it is widely assumed that IQ's heritability is at loci for intelligence per se. We present evidence consistent with a hypothesis that interindividual IQ differences are partly due to heritable vulnerabilities to environmental sources of developmental stress, an indirect genetic mechanism for the heritability of IQ. Using fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of the body (the asymmetry resulting from errors in the development of normally symmetrical bilateral traits under stressful conditions), we estimated the relative developmental instability of 112 undergraduates and administered to them Cattell's culture fair intelligence test (CFIT). A subsequent replication on 128 students was performed. In both samples, FA correlated negatively and significantly with CFIT scores. We propose two non-mutually exclusive physiological explanations for this correlation. First, external body FA may correlate negatively with the developmental integrity of the brain. Second, individual energy budget allocations and/or low metabolic efficiency in high-FA individuals may lower IQ scores. We review the data on IQ in light of our findings and conclude that improving developmental quality may increase average IQ in future generations. PMID:9265189

  14. Strangeness asymmetry in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Strangeness asymmetry in the proton may arise from fluctuations of the proton into meson-baryon pairs. The leading contributions to proton strangeness are from the KΛ , KΣ , K* Λ and K* Σ states. We use a Fock state expansion of the proton in terms of these pairs to represent the strange meson cloud. We determine the strangeness distributions of the proton in a hybrid convolution model, in which the fluctuations are represented either by light-cone wave functions or meson-baryon splitting functions. For the parton distributions of the s(s) quarks in the bare baryons(mesons) of the Fock states, we use light cone wave functions or our statistical model, which expands the bare hadrons in terms of quark-gluon states. The momentum distributions of the s and s quarks in each Fock state differ because they are constituents of different hadrons. We present our results for proton strangeness asymmetry, and compare them to NuTeV and to global parton distributions. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  15. Asymmetry in the epithalamus of vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    L. CONCHA, MIGUEL; W. WILSON, STEPHEN

    2001-01-01

    The epithalamus is a major subdivision of the diencephalon constituted by the habenular nuclei and pineal complex. Structural asymmetries in this region are widespread amongst vertebrates and involve differences in size, neuronal organisation, neurochemistry and connectivity. In species that possess a photoreceptive parapineal organ, this structure projects asymmetrically to the left habenula, and in teleosts it is also situated on the left side of the brain. Asymmetries in size between the left and right sides of the habenula are often associated with asymmetries in neuronal organisation, although these two types of asymmetry follow different evolutionary courses. While the former is more conspicuous in fishes (with the exception of teleosts), asymmetries in neuronal organisation are more robust in amphibia and reptiles. Connectivity of the parapineal organ with the left habenula is not always coupled with asymmetries in habenular size and/or neuronal organisation suggesting that, at least in some species, assignment of parapineal and habenular asymmetries may be independent events. The evolutionary origins of epithalamic structures are uncertain but asymmetry in this region is likely to have existed at the origin of the vertebrate, perhaps even the chordate, lineage. In at least some extant vertebrate species, epithalamic asymmetries are established early in development, suggesting a genetic regulation of asymmetry. In some cases, epigenetic factors such as hormones also influence the development of sexually dimorphic habenular asymmetries. Although the genetic and developmental mechanisms by which neuroanatomical asymmetries are established remain obscure, some clues regarding the mechanisms underlying laterality decisions have recently come from studies in zebrafish. The Nodal signalling pathway regulates laterality by biasing an otherwise stochastic laterality decision to the left side of the epithalamus. This genetic mechanism ensures a consistency of

  16. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  17. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TEACHING SPACE DIVIDER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BELLOMY, CLEON C.; CAUDILL, WILLIAM W.

    TYPES OF VERTICAL WORK SURFACES AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A MODEL TEACHING SPACE DIVIDER ARE DISCUSSED IN THIS REPORT. THIS DESIGN IS BASED ON THE EXPRESSED NEED FOR MORE TACKBOARD AND SHELVING SPACE, AND FOR MOVABLE PARTITIONS. THE MODEL PANELS WHICH SERVE DIRECTLY AS PARTITIONS RATHER THAN BEING OVERLAID ON A PLASTERED SURFACE, INCLUDE THE…

  18. Crossing Divides: The Legacy of Graham Nuthall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Graham Nuthall's work cuts across methodological and conceptual divides that have worked against the development of a theory of learning and teaching that is at once predictive and practical. The micro-genetic approach to research on learning in classrooms that he developed with Adrienne Alton-Lee successfully transcends the unhelpful dichotomy…

  19. A Nation Divided on Education in 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    To understand what is going on in American education, it might help to turn to a relatively neutral source, the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, and its released report, The 2004 Political Landscape: Evenly Divided and Increasingly Polarized. "Over the past four years, the American electorate has been dealt a series of body…

  20. From Digital Divide to Digital Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de los Santos, Gerardo E., Ed.; de los Santos, Alfredo G., Jr., Ed.; Milliron, Mark David, Ed.

    This publication is one of many efforts of the League for Innovation in the Community College to address the issue of societal technology access and learning needs. This work addresses the issue of the digital divide, which includes the often conflicting perspectives of information technology (IT) access and literacy needs held by government…

  1. Project DIVIDE Instrument Development. Technical Report # 0810

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne; Jung, Eunju; Geller, Josh; Yovanoff, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development of cognitive diagnostic test items that form the basis of the diagnostic system for Project DIVIDE (Dynamic Instruction Via Individually Designed Environments). The construct underlying the diagnostic test is division of fractions. We include a description of the process we used to identify the…

  2. The electronic health record: a digital divide?

    PubMed

    Glaser, John

    2007-10-01

    The gap between EHR adoption among larger providers versus adoption by smaller or rural providers has caused a "digital divide" that could threaten smaller providers' survival in the years ahead. Closing this gap will require the collective action of providers, payers, and government.

  3. Young People's Internet Use: Divided or Diversified?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonaert, Tom; Vettenburg, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    This article critically analyses research on young people's internet use. Based on a literature analysis, it examines which young people do what on the internet. These results invite a reflection on the dominant discourse on the digital divide. Within this discourse, there is a strong focus on the use of the internet for information purposes only,…

  4. Sensing phosphatidylserine in cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Kay, Jason G; Grinstein, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine, a phospholipid with a negatively charged head-group, is an important constituent of eukaryotic cellular membranes. On the plasma membrane, rather than being evenly distributed, phosphatidylserine is found preferentially in the inner leaflet. Disruption of this asymmetry, leading to the appearance of phosphatidylserine on the surface of the cell, is known to play a central role in both apoptosis and blood clotting. Despite its importance, comparatively little is known about phosphatidylserine in cells: its precise subcellular localization, transmembrane topology and intracellular dynamics are poorly characterized. The recent development of new, genetically-encoded probes able to detect phosphatidylserine within live cells, however, is leading to a more in-depth understanding of the biology of this phospholipid. This review aims to give an overview of the current methods for phosphatidylserine detection within cells, and some of the recent realizations derived from their use.

  5. Right-Left Asymmetries in the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaburda, Albert M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Reports on structural asymmetrics between the hemispheres which are found in the human brain. Auditory region and Sylvian Fissure asymmetry have also been observed in the fetus and in other primates. Describes research which has correlated asymmetries with hand preference, certain childhood learning disabilities and some dementing illnesses of…

  6. beta. -decay asymmetry of the free neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, P.; Dubbers, D.; Klemt, E.; Last, J.; Schuetze, H.; Weibler, W.; Freedman, S.J.; Schaerpf, O.

    1983-01-01

    The ..beta..-decay of polarized neutrons has been studied with the new superconducting spectrometer PERKEO at the ILL. The energy dependence of the ..beta..-decay asymmetry has been measured for the first time. From the measured ..beta..-asymmetry parameter we obtain a new value for the ratio of weak coupling constants g/sub A//g/sub V/. 11 references.

  7. The evolution and genetics of cerebral asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Corballis, Michael C

    2009-04-12

    Handedness and cerebral asymmetry are commonly assumed to be uniquely human, and even defining characteristics of our species. This is increasingly refuted by the evidence of behavioural asymmetries in non-human species. Although complex manual skill and language are indeed unique to our species and are represented asymmetrically in the brain, some non-human asymmetries appear to be precursors, and others are shared between humans and non-humans. In all behavioural and cerebral asymmetries so far investigated, a minority of individuals reverse or negate the dominant asymmetry, suggesting that such asymmetries are best understood in the context of the overriding bilateral symmetry of the brain and body, and a trade-off between the relative advantages and disadvantages of symmetry and asymmetry. Genetic models of handedness, for example, typically postulate a gene with two alleles, one disposing towards right-handedness and the other imposing no directional influence. There is as yet no convincing evidence as to the location of this putative gene, suggesting that several genes may be involved, or that the gene may be monomorphic with variations due to environmental or epigenetic influences. Nevertheless, it is suggested that, in behavioural, neurological and evolutionary terms, it may be more profitable to examine the degree rather than the direction of asymmetry.

  8. Asymmetries and Variations in Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, Krishan K.

    2003-01-01

    The investigation was carried out to infer the influence of solar wind on Jupiter's magnetosphere through studies of asymmetries and variations in the magnetosphere. We used the magnetic field observations from all of the pre-Galileo spacecraft and from the Galileo Prime and extended missions to understand asymmetries in magnetic field and various current systems in the magnetosphere.

  9. The evolution and genetics of cerebral asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Corballis, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Handedness and cerebral asymmetry are commonly assumed to be uniquely human, and even defining characteristics of our species. This is increasingly refuted by the evidence of behavioural asymmetries in non-human species. Although complex manual skill and language are indeed unique to our species and are represented asymmetrically in the brain, some non-human asymmetries appear to be precursors, and others are shared between humans and non-humans. In all behavioural and cerebral asymmetries so far investigated, a minority of individuals reverse or negate the dominant asymmetry, suggesting that such asymmetries are best understood in the context of the overriding bilateral symmetry of the brain and body, and a trade-off between the relative advantages and disadvantages of symmetry and asymmetry. Genetic models of handedness, for example, typically postulate a gene with two alleles, one disposing towards right-handedness and the other imposing no directional influence. There is as yet no convincing evidence as to the location of this putative gene, suggesting that several genes may be involved, or that the gene may be monomorphic with variations due to environmental or epigenetic influences. Nevertheless, it is suggested that, in behavioural, neurological and evolutionary terms, it may be more profitable to examine the degree rather than the direction of asymmetry. PMID:19064358

  10. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  11. Jet Asymmetry in High Energy Diffractive Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2000-09-15

    The authors propose the asymmetry in the fractional energy of charm versus anticharm jets produced in high energy diffractive photoproduction as a sensitive test of the interference of the Odderon (C = {minus}) and Pomeron (C = +) exchange amplitudes in QCD. If measured at HERA, this asymmetry could provide the first experimental evidence of the Odderon.

  12. Asymmetry and Performance: Toward a Neurodevelopmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, David B.; Barth, Joan M.; Merrill, Edward C.

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry implies the existence of developmental influences that affect one hemisphere more than the other. However, those influences are poorly understood. One simple view is that asymmetry may exist because of a relationship between a mental process' degree of lateralization and how well it functions. Data scaling issues have largely…

  13. Right-Left Asymmetries in the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaburda, Albert M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Reports on structural asymmetrics between the hemispheres which are found in the human brain. Auditory region and Sylvian Fissure asymmetry have also been observed in the fetus and in other primates. Describes research which has correlated asymmetries with hand preference, certain childhood learning disabilities and some dementing illnesses of…

  14. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  15. Asymmetry and Performance: Toward a Neurodevelopmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, David B.; Barth, Joan M.; Merrill, Edward C.

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry implies the existence of developmental influences that affect one hemisphere more than the other. However, those influences are poorly understood. One simple view is that asymmetry may exist because of a relationship between a mental process' degree of lateralization and how well it functions. Data scaling issues have largely…

  16. Anatomic Brain Asymmetry in Vervet Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Fears, Scott C.; Scheibel, Kevin; Abaryan, Zvart; Lee, Chris; Service, Susan K.; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Fairbanks, Lynn A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Woods, Roger P.

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetry is a prominent feature of human brains with important functional consequences. Many asymmetric traits show population bias, but little is known about the genetic and environmental sources contributing to inter-individual variance. Anatomic asymmetry has been observed in Old World monkeys, but the evidence for the direction and extent of asymmetry is equivocal and only one study has estimated the genetic contributions to inter-individual variance. In this study we characterize a range of qualitative and quantitative asymmetry measures in structural brain MRIs acquired from an extended pedigree of Old World vervet monkeys (n = 357), and implement variance component methods to estimate the proportion of trait variance attributable to genetic and environmental sources. Four of six asymmetry measures show pedigree-level bias and one of the traits has a significant heritability estimate of about 30%. We also found that environmental variables more significantly influence the width of the right compared to the left prefrontal lobe. PMID:22205941

  17. Anatomic brain asymmetry in vervet monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fears, Scott C; Scheibel, Kevin; Abaryan, Zvart; Lee, Chris; Service, Susan K; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Fairbanks, Lynn A; Cantor, Rita M; Freimer, Nelson B; Woods, Roger P

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetry is a prominent feature of human brains with important functional consequences. Many asymmetric traits show population bias, but little is known about the genetic and environmental sources contributing to inter-individual variance. Anatomic asymmetry has been observed in Old World monkeys, but the evidence for the direction and extent of asymmetry is equivocal and only one study has estimated the genetic contributions to inter-individual variance. In this study we characterize a range of qualitative and quantitative asymmetry measures in structural brain MRIs acquired from an extended pedigree of Old World vervet monkeys (n = 357), and implement variance component methods to estimate the proportion of trait variance attributable to genetic and environmental sources. Four of six asymmetry measures show pedigree-level bias and one of the traits has a significant heritability estimate of about 30%. We also found that environmental variables more significantly influence the width of the right compared to the left prefrontal lobe.

  18. Organelle segregation during mitosis: lessons from asymmetrically dividing cells.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Jimmy; Barral, Yves

    2012-02-06

    Studies on cell division traditionally focus on the mechanisms of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, yet we know comparatively little about how organelles segregate. Analysis of organelle partitioning in asymmetrically dividing cells has provided insights into the mechanisms through which cells control organelle distribution. Interestingly, these studies have revealed that segregation mechanisms frequently link organelle distribution to organelle growth and formation. Furthermore, in many cases, cells use organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum and P granules, as vectors for the segregation of information. Together, these emerging data suggest that the coordination between organelle growth, division, and segregation plays an important role in the control of cell fate inheritance, cellular aging, and rejuvenation, i.e., the resetting of age in immortal lineages. © 2012 Ouellet and Barral

  19. Fission yeast: in shape to divide.

    PubMed

    Hachet, Olivier; Bendezú, Felipe O; Martin, Sophie G

    2012-12-01

    How are cell morphogenesis and cell cycle coordinated? The fission yeast is a rod-shaped unicellular organism widely used to study how a cell self-organizes in space and time. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding how the cell acquires and maintains its regular rod shape and uses it to control cell division. The cellular body plan is established by microtubules, which mark antipodal growth zones and medial division. In turn, cellular dimensions are defined by the small GTPase Cdc42 and downstream regulators of vesicle trafficking. Yeast cells then repetitively use their simple rod shape to orchestrate the position and timing of cell division. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Low phase noise digital frequency divider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, G. F., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A low phase noise frequency divider composed of a grating arrangement is disclosed. The grating arrangement supplies selected portions of an input reference signal to be divided to a tuned circuit without any phase noise due to the grating action. The arrangement which in one embodiment consists of an FET is connected to the tuned circuit input to short out the input except when the input reference signal amplitude crosses ground level in a positive direction and a gate enabling signal is present at the gate electrode of the FET. The gate enabling signal alone does not decouple the tuned circuit input from ground, therefore phase noise, due to the leading and trailing edges of each gate-enabling signal, is substantially eliminated.

  1. Divided or kissing nevus of the penis.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Carolyn A; Tieu, Kathy D

    2013-10-16

    The divided or kissing nevus is an unusual congenital melanocytic nevus. By definition, these nevi appear on skin that separates during embryological development. These lesions have been reported on the eyelids, fingers, and rarely the penis. We describe an 18 year old uncircumcised male who presented with an asymptomatic darkly pigmented patch on the glans penis. He reported that the lesion had appeared recently and was enlarging. Physical examination revealed a second symmetric lesion on the adjacent foreskin. Punch biopsy of the lesion on the glans penis showed abundant intradermal melanocytes devoid of mitoses and atypia, consistent with an intradermal melanocytic nevus. Based on the benign histologic nature and clinical exam, the lesion was diagnosed as a divided or kissing nevus of the penis. Proposed treatments include excision and grafting as well as Nd:YAG laser therapy. However, these patients may be safely monitored with regular follow-up skin examinations because there is minimal risk of malignant transformation.

  2. Primary orbital melanoma combined with giant divided nevus of the eyelid.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yifeng; Ren, Xinjun; Zhu, Liming; Hao, Rui; Song, Wenjin; Liu, Xun; He, Yanjin

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of primary orbital melanoma (POM) combined with giant divided nevus of the eyelid. An 8-year-old Chinese girl is referred for evaluation of 2-month duration of exophthalmos with decreased vision, epiphora, and pain on her right eye. His presentation, imaging, biopsy, histopathology, and management are presented. The possible cellular origin of the POM and the relationship of POM and divided nevus are discussed. We presume that divided nevus may be one of rarely preexisting lesions of POM.

  3. Asymmetry in zeta Auriage chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, I. A.

    1988-01-01

    Asymmetry in the ultraviolet spectra of zeta-Aur, similar to that reported in optical observations, was studied using IUE data. A plot of the integrated flux of zeta Aurigae from 1625 to 1675 A as a function of absolute phase shows no significant difference between the ingress and egress phases. A plot of the integrated flux from 1625 to 1675 A for 22 Vul as a function of absolute phase for both ingress and egress confirms that the atmospheric eclipse is asymmetric in 22 Vul. The eclipse in 22 Vul begins symmetrically but departs from symmetry at a phase greater than 0.05. The pronounced dip at ingress suggests a feature in the chromosphere.

  4. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  5. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-06

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping At{sub otal} fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of {sup 197}Au+{sup 27}Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  6. Collins Asymmetry at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-01-17

    We study the Collins effect in the azimuthal asymmetricdistribution of hadrons inside a high energy jet in the single transversepolarized proton proton scattering. From the detailed analysis ofone-gluon and two-gluon exchange diagrams contributions, the Collinsfunction is found the same as that in the semi-inclusive deep inelasticscattering and e+e- annihilations. The eikonal propagators in thesediagrams do not contribute to the phase needed for the Collins-typesingle spin asymmetry, and the universality is derived as a result of theWard identity. We argue that this conclusion depends on the momentum flowof the exchanged gluon and the kinematic constraints in the fragmentationprocess, and is generic and model-independent.

  7. Can Attention be Divided Between Perceptual Groups?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCann, Robert S.; Foyle, David C.; Johnston, James C.; Hart, Sandra G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Previous work using Head-Up Displays (HUDs) suggests that the visual system parses the HUD and the outside world into distinct perceptual groups, with attention deployed sequentially to first one group and then the other. New experiments show that both groups can be processed in parallel in a divided attention search task, even though subjects have just processed a stimulus in one perceptual group or the other. Implications for models of visual attention will be discussed.

  8. Can Attention be Divided Between Perceptual Groups?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCann, Robert S.; Foyle, David C.; Johnston, James C.; Hart, Sandra G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Previous work using Head-Up Displays (HUDs) suggests that the visual system parses the HUD and the outside world into distinct perceptual groups, with attention deployed sequentially to first one group and then the other. New experiments show that both groups can be processed in parallel in a divided attention search task, even though subjects have just processed a stimulus in one perceptual group or the other. Implications for models of visual attention will be discussed.

  9. Lake Buchannan, Great Dividing Range, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Lake Buchannan, a small but blue and prominent in the center of the view, lies in the Great Dividing of Queensland, Australia (22.0S, 146.0E). The mountain range in this case is a low plateau of no more than 2,000 to 3,000 ft altitude. The interior is dry, mostly in pasture but the coastal zone in contrast, is wet tropical country where bananas and sugarcane are grown.

  10. Will the Nicaragua Canal connect or divide?

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael

    2014-11-03

    A century after the opening of the Panama Canal, a second inter-oceanic passage is set to be built in Central America, this time in Nicaragua. The ambitious and astronomically expensive project promises to bring economic opportunity to a poor country but it also carries risks to its tropical ecosystems. Will the new waterway ultimately link two oceans or divide a continent? Michael Gross investigates.

  11. Beyond apoptosis: The mechanism and function of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in the membrane of activating mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Rysavy, Noel M.; Shimoda, Lori M. N.; Dixon, Alyssa M.; Speck, Mark; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen; Umemoto, Eric Y.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry is a hallmark of apoptosis, but lipid bilayer asymmetry and loss of asymmetry can contribute to numerous cellular functions and responses that are independent of programmed cell death. Exofacial exposure of phosphatidylserine occurs in lymphocytes and mast cells after antigenic stimulation and in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that there is a functional requirement for phosphatidylserine exposure in immunocytes. In this review we examine current ideas as to the nature of this functional role in mast cell activation. Mechanistically, there is controversy as to the candidate proteins responsible for phosphatidylserine translocation from the internal to external leaflet, and here we review the candidacies of mast cell PLSCR1 and TMEM16F. Finally we examine the potential relationship between functionally important mast cell membrane perturbations and phosphatidylserine exposure during activation. PMID:25759911

  12. Beyond apoptosis: the mechanism and function of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in the membrane of activating mast cells.

    PubMed

    Rysavy, Noel M; Shimoda, Lori M N; Dixon, Alyssa M; Speck, Mark; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen; Umemoto, Eric Y

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry is a hallmark of apoptosis, but lipid bilayer asymmetry and loss of asymmetry can contribute to numerous cellular functions and responses that are independent of programmed cell death. Exofacial exposure of phosphatidylserine occurs in lymphocytes and mast cells after antigenic stimulation and in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that there is a functional requirement for phosphatidylserine exposure in immunocytes. In this review we examine current ideas as to the nature of this functional role in mast cell activation. Mechanistically, there is controversy as to the candidate proteins responsible for phosphatidylserine translocation from the internal to external leaflet, and here we review the candidacies of mast cell PLSCR1 and TMEM16F. Finally we examine the potential relationship between functionally important mast cell membrane perturbations and phosphatidylserine exposure during activation.

  13. Self-organization of divided hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagaki, Takashi; Kitada, Keigo; Omizo, Kenta; Fujie, Ryo

    2015-03-01

    There are two types of extreme form of hierarchy, one is the plutonomy where small fraction of winners and losers and many people in the middle class appear and the other a divided hierarchy where half of population become winners and the remaining half become losers. We study the emergence of the divided hierarchy in a model society which consists of bellicose individuals who always try to fight and fight with the strongest neighbor and pacific individuals who always try not to fight and when necessary fight with the weakest neighbor. In our model society, (1) individuals make random walk on a square lattice, (2) when two individuals encounter they fight each other and (3) the winner deprives wealth from the loser. By a Monte Carlo simulation, we show that there are two transitions when the population density is increased; one is a transition from the egalitarian society to a hierarchical society I where winners, losers and middle classes coexist and the other is a transition from the hierarchical society I to a hierarchical society II where winners and losers exist but no middle classes exist, that is the divided hierarchy. We also show that clusters consisting mostly of bellicose individuals appear in the hierarchical society I.

  14. Splicing the Divide: A Review of Research on the Evolving Digital Divide among K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    The digital divide has narrowed with regard to one definition of access to technology--the binary view of the "haves" and "have-nots." However, use of technology at home and in school is not equitable for all students. According to recent literature, a broader and more nuanced definition of the technological divide is necessary…

  15. Splicing the Divide: A Review of Research on the Evolving Digital Divide among K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    The digital divide has narrowed with regard to one definition of access to technology--the binary view of the "haves" and "have-nots." However, use of technology at home and in school is not equitable for all students. According to recent literature, a broader and more nuanced definition of the technological divide is necessary…

  16. Black–white asymmetry in visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhong-Lin; Sperling, George

    2012-01-01

    With eleven different types of stimuli that exercise a wide gamut of spatial and temporal visual processes, negative perturbations from mean luminance are found to be typically 25% more effective visually than positive perturbations of the same magnitude (range 8–67%). In Experiment 12, the magnitude of the black–white asymmetry is shown to be a saturating function of stimulus contrast. Experiment 13 shows black–white asymmetry primarily involves a nonlinearity in the visual representation of decrements. Black–white asymmetry in early visual processing produces even-harmonic distortion frequencies in all ordinary stimuli and in illusions such as the perceived asymmetry of optically perfect sine wave gratings. In stimuli intended to stimulate exclusively second-order processing in which motion or shape are defined not by luminance differences but by differences in texture contrast, the black–white asymmetry typically generates artifactual luminance (first-order) motion and shape components. Because black–white asymmetry pervades psychophysical and neurophysiological procedures that utilize spatial or temporal variations of luminance, it frequently needs to be considered in the design and evaluation of experiments that involve visual stimuli. Simple procedures to compensate for black–white asymmetry are proposed. PMID:22984221

  17. Abnormal asymmetry of brain connectivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ribolsi, Michele; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown a significant reduction of leftward asymmetry in some key white-matter tracts in SCZ. In this paper, we review the studies that investigated both structural brain asymmetry and asymmetry of functional connectivity in healthy subjects and SCZ. From an analysis of the existing literature on this topic, we can hypothesize an overall generally attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in SCZ compared to healthy controls. Such attenuated asymmetry increases with the duration of the disease and correlates with psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that structural deficits across the corpus callosum may contribute to the abnormal asymmetry of intra-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia.

  18. Management of Asymmetry After Breast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Onelio

    2016-04-01

    Breast reduction surgery has achieved one of the highest patient satisfaction rates among plastic surgery procedures. Most of the complications encountered are usually minor and related to wound healing. Revision surgery to address these problems is common and usually consists of scar revisions. Postoperative breast asymmetry of a mild degree is also common; however, postoperative asymmetry severe enough to warrant surgical revision is a rare event, occurring in less than 1% of cases. Postmammaplasty revision surgery needs to be individualized. The asymmetry could be the result of nipple malposition or it could consist of a volume or shape discrepancy between the breast mounds.

  19. Relic density of neutrinos with primordial asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Sergio; Pinto, Teguayco; Raffelt, Georg G

    2009-06-19

    We study flavor oscillations in the early Universe, assuming primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries. Including collisions and pair processes in the kinetic equations, we not only estimate the degree of flavor equilibration, but for the first time also kinetic equilibration among neutrinos and with the ambient plasma. Typically, the restrictive big-bang nucleosynthesis bound on the nu_{e}nu[over]_{e} asymmetry indeed applies to all flavors as claimed in the previous literature, but fine-tuned initial asymmetries always allow for a large surviving neutrino excess radiation that may show up in precision cosmological data.

  20. Relic Density of Neutrinos with Primordial Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, Sergio; Pinto, Teguayco; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2009-06-19

    We study flavor oscillations in the early Universe, assuming primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries. Including collisions and pair processes in the kinetic equations, we not only estimate the degree of flavor equilibration, but for the first time also kinetic equilibration among neutrinos and with the ambient plasma. Typically, the restrictive big-bang nucleosynthesis bound on the nu{sub e}nu{sub e} asymmetry indeed applies to all flavors as claimed in the previous literature, but fine-tuned initial asymmetries always allow for a large surviving neutrino excess radiation that may show up in precision cosmological data.

  1. SUSY CP phases and asymmetries at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Olaf

    2009-06-01

    In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, physical phases of complex parameters lead to CP violation. We show how triple products of particle momenta or spins can be used to construct asymmetries, that allow us to probe these CP phases. To give specific examples, we discuss the production of neutralinos at the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we discuss CP asymmetries in squark decays, and in the tri-lepton signal. We find that the CP asymmetries can be as large as 60%.

  2. Exploring the Underlying Biophysics of Eukaryotic Plasma Membrane Asymmetry by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conboy, John

    2010-03-01

    A central issue in molecular biology is the movement of lipids across the cellular membrane. The translocation of lipids is involved in cell apoptosis, the viral infection of living cells, the functioning of antibiotics, antiseptics and drugs, and the regulation and growth of cells. There have been a number of studies attempting to find the putative proteins responsive for lipid transbilayer movement in eukaryotic cells. This has led to a large number of theories about the mechanism of transbilayer movement of lipids in cellular systems and the physical process by which lipid compositional asymmetry in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is maintained. Using methods of classical surface chemistry coupled with nonlinear optical methods, we have developed a novel analytical approach, using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS), to selectively probe lipid compositional asymmetry in a planar supported lipid bilayer. This new method allows for the detection of lipid flip-flop kinetics and compositional asymmetry without the need for a fluorescent or spin-labeled lipid species. The effect of lipid composition, headgroup and fatty acid chemical structure, on the rate and thermodynamics of lipid transbilayer migration and the electrostatic induction of lipid asymmetry will be discussed.

  3. America's digital divide: 2000-2003 trends.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Kermit C

    2004-04-01

    Computer ownership and literacy, along with Internet access and its many applications, has become, for many, a trademark for the Americans' lifestyle. Research shows that computer ownership and literacy, along with Internet access and expertise, is rapidly changing how Americans go about their business. The technological industry is providing many opportunities for Americans to operate in markets, global and local, not previously available. These changes are apparent across all U.S. sociocultural and geographic boundaries. Yet, upon close analysis, there are individuals and communities less connected with many completely excluded from participation. Those individuals exist below a line called the Digital Divide. Growth in computer ownership and Internet use, while offering optimism that the Digital Divide is narrowing, also illustrates that, without focused intervention will for certain populations, continue. Public and private programs, focus groups, and pocks of community activism, each hope to correct the disparities among on- and-off line Americans. On many fronts, there is evidence that progress is being made by many. Income, race, age, and geographic location are often the determining factors.

  4. Meyer's loop asymmetry and language lateralisation in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Mark; Vos, Sjoerd B; Sidhu, Meneka; Wilcoxen, Kaitlin; Sargsyan, Narek; Ourselin, Sebastien; Duncan, John S

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have suggested an asymmetry in Meyer's loop in individuals, with the left loop anterior to the right. In this study we test the hypothesis that there is an association between Meyer's loop asymmetry (MLA) and language lateralisation. 57 patients with epilepsy were identified with language functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MRI acquisition. Language lateralisation indices from fMRI(LI) and optic radiation and arcuate fasciculus probabilistic tractography was performed for each subject. The subjects were divided into left language dominant (LI>0.4) and non-left language groups (LI<0.4) according to their LI. A negative linear correlation was identified between language lateralisation and MLA, with greater left lateralised language associated with more anteriorly placed left Meyer's loops (R value -0.34, p=0.01). There was a significant difference in mean MLA between the two groups, with the left loop being anterior to the right loop in the LI>0.4 group and posterior to the right loop in the LI<0.4 group (p=0.003). No correlation was found between language lateralisation and arcuate fasciculus volume. This study suggests an association between the extent of Meyer's loop asymmetry and the lateralisation of language determined by fMRI in patients with epilepsy. Further studies should be carried out to evaluate this association in control subjects and with other measures of language lateralisation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Role asymmetry and code transmission in signaling games: an experimental and computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Maggie; Baggio, Giosuè

    2015-07-01

    In signaling games, a sender has private access to a state of affairs and uses a signal to inform a receiver about that state. If no common association of signals and states is initially available, sender and receiver must coordinate to develop one. How do players divide coordination labor? We show experimentally that, if players switch roles at each communication round, coordination labor is shared. However, in games with fixed roles, coordination labor is divided: Receivers adjust their mappings more frequently, whereas senders maintain the initial code, which is transmitted to receivers and becomes the common code. In a series of computer simulations, player and role asymmetry as observed experimentally were accounted for by a model in which the receiver in the first signaling round has a higher chance of adjusting its code than its partner. From this basic division of labor among players, certain properties of role asymmetry, in particular correlations with game complexity, are seen to follow.

  6. Polarized view of the top asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, David; Liu Tao; Shelton, Jessie; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2011-10-01

    Recent experimental results from the CDF collaboration which study the top forward-backward asymmetry have strengthened the case that new physics is playing a role in tt production. Here, we propose a set of measurements, built from the charged lepton kinematics in semileptonic and fully leptonic tt events, designed to further probe the underlying causes of this asymmetry both at the Tevatron and at the LHC. Using a set of conservative reference models, we find that measurements of the charged lepton asymmetry, top polarization, and tt spin correlation can establish the existence of new physics and distinguish between competing models both at the Tevatron and the LHC. At the Tevatron, discrimination between models is possible at the 3{sigma} level. At the LHC, we demonstrate that a top forward-backward asymmetry can be established at > or approx. 3{sigma} in the first {approx}5 fb{sup -1} of data and show how competing explanations can be further disentangled.

  7. Detection of breast asymmetry using anatomical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Peter; Astley, Susan M.

    1993-07-01

    We present a new approach to the detection of breast asymmetry, an important radiological sign of cancer. The conventional approach to this problem is to search for brightness or texture differences between corresponding locations on left and right breast images. Due to the difficulty in accurately identifying corresponding locations, asymmetry cues generated in this way are insufficiently specific to be used as prompts for small and subtle abnormalities in a computer-aided diagnosis system. We have undertaken studies to discover more about the visual cues utilized by radiologists. We propose a new automatic method for detecting asymmetry based on the comparison of corresponding anatomical structures, which are identified by an automatic segmentation of breast tissue types. We describe a number of methods for comparing the shape and grey-level distribution of these regions, and we have achieved promising results by combining evidence for asymmetry.

  8. Symmetry and asymmetry in the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2005-10-01

    Structural and functional asymmetry in the human brain and nervous system is reviewed in a historical perspective, focusing on the pioneering work of Broca, Wernicke, Sperry, and Geschwind. Structural and functional asymmetry is exemplified from work done in our laboratory on auditory laterality using an empirical procedure called dichotic listening. This also involves different ways of validating the dichotic listening procedure against both invasive and non-invasive techniques, including PET and fMRI blood flow recordings. A major argument is that the human brain shows a substantial interaction between structurally, or "bottom-up" asymmetry and cognitively, or "top-down" modulation, through a focus of attention to the right or left side in auditory space. These results open up a more dynamic and interactive view of functional brain asymmetry than the traditional static view that the brain is lateralized, or asymmetric, only for specific stimuli and stimulus properties.

  9. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. I.; Shore, G. M.

    2017-03-01

    A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  10. Optimal Branching Asymmetry of Hydrodynamic Pulsatile Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florens, Magali; Sapoval, Bernard; Filoche, Marcel

    2011-04-01

    Most of the studies on optimal transport are done for steady state regime conditions. Yet, there exists numerous examples in living systems where supply tree networks have to deliver products in a limited time due to the pulsatile character of the flow, as it is the case for mammalian respiration. We report here that introducing a systematic branching asymmetry allows the tree to reduce the average delivery time of the products. It simultaneously increases its robustness against the inevitable variability of sizes related to morphogenesis. We then apply this approach to the human tracheobronchial tree. We show that in this case all extremities are supplied with fresh air, provided that the asymmetry is smaller than a critical threshold which happens to match the asymmetry measured in the human lung. This could indicate that the structure is tuned at the maximum asymmetry level that allows the lung to feed all terminal units with fresh air.

  11. Brain asymmetry: both sides of the story.

    PubMed

    Samara, Athina; Tsangaris, George T

    2011-12-01

    Biological systems demonstrate asymmetry, while lateralization has been observed from humans to lower animals structurally, functionally and behaviorally. This may be derived from evolutionary, genetic, developmental, epigenetic and pathologic factors. However, brain structure and function is complex, and macroscopic or microscopic asymmetries are hard to discern from random fluctuations. In this article, we discuss brain laterality and lateralization, beginning with a brief review of the literature on brain structural and functional asymmetries. We conclude with methods to detect and quantify asymmetry, focusing on neuroproteomics, for retrieval of protein-expression patterns, as a method of diagnosis and treatment monitoring. We suggest inter-hemispheric differential proteomics as a valid method to assess the experimental and biological variations in the healthy brain, and neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  12. Asymmetry in mechanical polarization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haidong; Liu, Shi; Ye, Ziyu; Yasui, Shintaro; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Rappe, Andrew M.; Gruverman, Alexei

    2017-05-01

    Recent demonstration of a mechanical 180° switching of ferroelectric polarization has enabled an alternative polarization control mechanism based on the flexoelectric coupling between polarization and strain gradient. Mechanical switching is a highly asymmetric phenomenon associated with the inhomogeneous strain induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip pressed against the ferroelectric surface. Here, we demonstrate the asymmetric domain switching behavior in the vicinity of the 180° domain wall in PbTiO3 thin films with respect to the AFM tip scanning direction. The writing-direction-dependent asymmetric domain response has been modeled by molecular dynamics simulation showing asymmetry in domain wall displacement due to the difference in the volume of mechanically switched domains. The obtained results show that the mechanically induced switching dynamics is very different from the conventional 180° switching realized by an external electric field and has to be exploited differently. In particular, nanoscale domain engineering via the tip-induced flexoelectric effect requires careful consideration of asymmetric interaction between the existing domain structures and the strain gradient.

  13. Actigraphic motor asymmetries during sleep.

    PubMed

    Violani, C; Testa, P; Casagrande, M

    1998-08-01

    Much evidence indicates that during sleep there is a repatterning of motor asymmetries with a relative advantage of the left hand (i.e., the left hand moves more than the right). This could be due to the ability of the right hemisphere in operating at levels of reduced arousal (arousal hypothesis) or to its superior spatial abilities (motor specificity hypothesis), or it could indicate a greater need for sleep in the left hemisphere (homeostatic hypothesis). Since only the latter hypothesis predicts that the repatterning should be present in the first part of sleep (i.e., when the homeostatic processes are more pronounced), the present study evaluated whether actigraphic data are consistent with this prediction. Sixteen right-handed college students wore actigraphs (AMI 16K) on both upper and lower limbs for about 56 hours. Factorial ANOVAS were carried out on side (left vs right) and part (first vs second) of the recording period during sleep and waking. During waking, the right hand showed more intense motor activity as compared to the left. During sleep, in the first part of the night, the right hand lost this advantage, while in the second part of the night it regained its superiority. Since this repatterning was specific for hand movements and no difference was found in overall motor activity and in arousal between the two parts of the sleep period, the results are interpreted as consistent with the homeostatic hypothesis.

  14. Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons.

    SciTech Connect

    Biheux, J. C.; Dunford, R. W.; Gemmell, D. S.; Hasegawa, S.; Kanter, E. P.; Krassig, B.; Southworth, S. H.; Young, L.

    1999-01-19

    When atomic photoionization is treated beyond the dipole approximation, photoelectron angular distributions are asymmetric forward and backward with respect to the direction of the photon beam. We have measured forward-backward asymmetries of Ar 1s and Kr 1s and 2s photoelectrons using 2-19 keV x-rays. The measured asymmetries compare well with calculations which include interference between electric-dipole and electric-quadrupole amplitudes within the nonrelativistic, independent-particle approximations.

  15. Bottom production asymmetries at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Norrbin, E.; Vogt, R.

    1999-01-01

    We present results on bottom hadron production asymmetries at the LHC within both the Lund string fragmentation model and the intrinsic bottom model. The main aspects of the models are summarized and specific predictions for pp collisions at 14 TeV are given. Asymmetries are found to be very small at central rapidities increasing to a few percent at forward rapidities. At very large rapidities intrinsic production could dominate but this region is probably out of reach of any experiment.

  16. Cryptic asymmetry: unreliable signals mask asymmetric performance of crayfish weapons

    PubMed Central

    Angilletta, Michael J.; Wilson, Robbie S.

    2012-01-01

    Animals commonly use their limbs as signals and weapons during territorial aggression. Asymmetries of limb performance that do not relate to asymmetries of limb size (cryptic asymmetry) could substantially affect disputes, but this phenomenon has not been considered beyond primates. We investigated cryptic asymmetry in male crayfish (Cherax dispar), which commonly use unreliable signals of strength during aggression. Although the strength of a chela can vary by an order of magnitude for a given size, we found repeatable asymmetries of strength that were only weakly related to asymmetries of size. Size-adjusted strength of chelae and the asymmetry of strength between chelae were highly repeatable between environmental conditions, suggesting that asymmetries of strength stemmed from variation in capacity rather than motivation. Cryptic asymmetry adds another dimension of uncertainty during conflict between animals, which could influence the evolution of unreliable signals and morphological asymmetry. PMID:22417793

  17. Cryptic asymmetry: unreliable signals mask asymmetric performance of crayfish weapons.

    PubMed

    Angilletta, Michael J; Wilson, Robbie S

    2012-08-23

    Animals commonly use their limbs as signals and weapons during territorial aggression. Asymmetries of limb performance that do not relate to asymmetries of limb size (cryptic asymmetry) could substantially affect disputes, but this phenomenon has not been considered beyond primates. We investigated cryptic asymmetry in male crayfish (Cherax dispar), which commonly use unreliable signals of strength during aggression. Although the strength of a chela can vary by an order of magnitude for a given size, we found repeatable asymmetries of strength that were only weakly related to asymmetries of size. Size-adjusted strength of chelae and the asymmetry of strength between chelae were highly repeatable between environmental conditions, suggesting that asymmetries of strength stemmed from variation in capacity rather than motivation. Cryptic asymmetry adds another dimension of uncertainty during conflict between animals, which could influence the evolution of unreliable signals and morphological asymmetry.

  18. Asymmetries observed in Saturn's magnetopause geometry.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, N M; Achilleos, N; Arridge, C S; Guio, P; Masters, A; Ray, L C; Sergis, N; Thomsen, M F; Coates, A J; Dougherty, M K

    2015-09-16

    For over 10 years, the Cassini spacecraft has patrolled Saturn's magnetosphere and observed its magnetopause boundary over a wide range of prevailing solar wind and interior plasma conditions. We now have data that enable us to resolve a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry and find that the magnetosphere extends farther from the planet on the dawnside of the planet by 7 ± 1%. In addition, an opposing dawn-dusk asymmetry in the suprathermal plasma pressure adjacent to the magnetopause has been observed. This probably acts to reduce the size asymmetry and may explain the discrepancy between the degree of asymmetry found here and a similar asymmetry found by Kivelson and Jia (2014) using MHD simulations. Finally, these observations sample a wide range of season, allowing the "intrinsic" polar flattening (14 ± 1%) caused by the magnetodisc to be separated from the seasonally induced north-south asymmetry in the magnetopause shape found theoretically (5 ± 1% when the planet's magnetic dipole is tilted away from the Sun by 10-17°).

  19. Asymmetries observed in Saturn's magnetopause geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkington, N. M.; Achilleos, N.; Arridge, C. S.; Guio, P.; Masters, A.; Ray, L. C.; Sergis, N.; Thomsen, M. F.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    For over 10 years, the Cassini spacecraft has patrolled Saturn's magnetosphere and observed its magnetopause boundary over a wide range of prevailing solar wind and interior plasma conditions. We now have data that enable us to resolve a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry and find that the magnetosphere extends farther from the planet on the dawnside of the planet by 7 ± 1%. In addition, an opposing dawn-dusk asymmetry in the suprathermal plasma pressure adjacent to the magnetopause has been observed. This probably acts to reduce the size asymmetry and may explain the discrepancy between the degree of asymmetry found here and a similar asymmetry found by Kivelson and Jia (2014) using MHD simulations. Finally, these observations sample a wide range of season, allowing the "intrinsic" polar flattening (14 ± 1%) caused by the magnetodisc to be separated from the seasonally induced north-south asymmetry in the magnetopause shape found theoretically (5 ± 1% when the planet's magnetic dipole is tilted away from the Sun by 10-17°).

  20. Poloidal asymmetries in edge transport barriersa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, R. M.; Theiler, C.; Lipschultz, B.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Hughes, J. W.; Catto, P.; Landreman, M.; Ernst, D.; Chang, C. S.; Hager, R.; Hubbard, A.; Ennever, P.; Walk, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of impurities in Alcator C-Mod indicate that in the pedestal region, significant poloidal asymmetries can exist in the impurity density, ion temperature, and main ion density. In light of the observation that ion temperature and electrostatic potential are not constant on a flux surface [Theiler et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 083017 (2014)], a technique based on total pressure conservation to align profiles measured at separate poloidal locations is presented and applied. Gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations with XGCa support the observed large poloidal variations in ion temperature and density, and that the total pressure is approximately constant on a flux surface. With the updated alignment technique, the observed in-out asymmetry in impurity density is reduced from previous publishing [Churchill et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 122002 (2013)], but remains substantial ( n z , H / n z , L ˜ 6 ). Candidate asymmetry drivers are explored, showing that neither non-uniform impurity sources nor localized fluctuation-driven transport are able to explain satisfactorily the impurity density asymmetry. Since impurity density asymmetries are only present in plasmas with strong electron density gradients, and radial transport timescales become comparable to parallel transport timescales in the pedestal region, it is suggested that global transport effects relating to the strong electron density gradients in the pedestal are the main driver for the pedestal in-out impurity density asymmetry.

  1. Attenuated hemispheric asymmetry in metaphor processing among adults with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dorit; Shalev, Lilach; Mashal, Nira

    2017-09-01

    To characterize the hemispheric processing of metaphors in adults with ADHD compared to controls. We investigated the hemispheric processing of metaphors in 24 adult participants diagnosed with ADHD and 24 control participants. The hemispheric processing was examined using a divided visual field paradigm, in which different kinds of metaphors as well as literal word pairs and unrelated word pairs were presented either to the right visual field/left hemisphere (RVF/LH) or to the left visual field/right hemisphere (LVF/RH). Control participants processed metaphors more efficiently when presented in the LVF/RH than when presented in the RVF/LH, whereas participants with ADHD demonstrated attenuated asymmetry of hemispheric processing. Furthermore, asymmetry of hemispheric processing, together with sustained attention, contributed significantly to the prediction of self-report of ADHD symptoms. Our results suggest that the hemispheric processing of adults with ADHD is less lateralized than the hemispheric processing of control participants. Moreover, the diminished lateralization of metaphor processing along with deficient sustained attention may reflect distinct cognitive mechanisms underlying ADHD and as such our results support multiple pathway models of ADHD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Asymmetry in body composition in female hockey players.

    PubMed

    Krzykała, M; Leszczyński, P

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if a sport in which one side of the body is dominant, like field hockey, influences regional body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) distribution in particular body segments, and whether the sporting level is a determining factor. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method (Lunar Prodigy Advance; General Electric, Madison, USA) with the whole body scan was used to measure bone mineral density, fat mass and lean mass in 31 female field hockey players divided according to their sporting level. The morphological asymmetry level was assessed between two body sides and body segments in athletes from the National Team (n=17) and from the Youth Team (n=14) separately and between groups. Bone mineral density in the lower extremity and of the trunk was significantly asymmetric in favor of the left side in the National Team. In the case of the Youth Team, only the trunk BMD indicated clear left-right difference with left side dominance. Both the lean mass and fat mass values were relatively higher on the left side of all body segments and it related to both analyzed groups of athletes. The present study shows that playing field hockey contributes to laterality in body composition and BMD and that the sporting level is a determining factor. In most cases the left side dominated. A greater asymmetry level was observed in more experienced female field hockey players.

  3. DNA asymmetry and cell fate regulation in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yennek, Siham; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2013-01-01

    The semi-conservative nature of DNA replication has suggested that identical DNA molecules within chromatids are inherited by daughter cells after cell division. Numerous reports of non-random DNA segregation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes suggest that this is not always the case, and that epigenetic marks on chromatids, if not the individual DNA strands themselves, could have distinct signatures. Their selective distribution to daughter cells provides a novel mechanism for gene and cell fate regulation by segregating chromatids asymmetrically. Here we highlight some examples and potential mechanisms that can regulate this process. We propose that cellular asymmetry is inherently present during each cell division, and that it provides an opportunity during each cell cycle for moderating cell fates.

  4. Bridging the Digital Divide: Reaching Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Betty L.; Bakken, Suzanne; Brown, S. Scott; Houston, Thomas K.; Kreps, Gary L.; Kukafka, Rita; Safran, Charles; Stavri, P. Zoe

    2004-01-01

    The AMIA 2003 Spring Congress entitled “Bridging the Digital Divide: Informatics and Vulnerable Populations” convened 178 experts including medical informaticians, health care professionals, government leaders, policy makers, researchers, health care industry leaders, consumer advocates, and others specializing in health care provision to underserved populations. The primary objective of this working congress was to develop a framework for a national agenda in information and communication technology to enhance the health and health care of underserved populations. Discussions during four tracks addressed issues and trends in information and communication technologies for underserved populations, strategies learned from successful programs, evaluation methodologies for measuring the impact of informatics, and dissemination of information for replication of successful programs. Each track addressed current status, ideal state, barriers, strategies, and recommendations. Recommendations of the breakout sessions were summarized under the overarching themes of Policy, Funding, Research, and Education and Training. The general recommendations emphasized four key themes: revision in payment and reimbursement policies, integration of health care standards, partnerships as the key to success, and broad dissemination of findings including specific feedback to target populations and other key stakeholders. PMID:15299002

  5. The Digital Divide and urban older adults.

    PubMed

    Cresci, M Kay; Yarandi, Hossein N; Morrell, Roger W

    2010-01-01

    Computers and the Internet offer older adults opportunities and resources for independent living. However, many urban older adults do not use computers. This study examined the demographic, health, and social activities of urban older adults to determine variables that might predict the use and nonuse of computers in this population. A secondary data analysis was performed using the 2001 Detroit City-Wide Needs Assessment of Older Adults (n = 1410) data set. Logistic regression was used to explore potential differences in predictor variables between computer users and nonusers. Overall, computer users were younger (27%), had a higher level of education, were more likely to be employed, had an annual income greater than $20,000, and were healthier and more active than nonusers. They also were more likely to have memberships in community organizations and do volunteer work. Preferred computer activities included conducting Internet searches, playing games, writing, and communicating with family members and friends. The results suggest significant differences in demographic and health-related characteristics between computer users and nonusers among urban older adults. Although about a quarter of participants in this study used computers, the Digital Divide continues to exist in urban settings for scores of others.

  6. Bridging the digital divide: reaching vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Betty L; Bakken, Suzanne; Brown, S Scott; Houston, Thomas K; Kreps, Gary L; Kukafka, Rita; Safran, Charles; Stavri, P Zoe

    2004-01-01

    The AMIA 2003 Spring Congress entitled "Bridging the Digital Divide: Informatics and Vulnerable Populations" convened 178 experts including medical informaticians, health care professionals, government leaders, policy makers, researchers, health care industry leaders, consumer advocates, and others specializing in health care provision to underserved populations. The primary objective of this working congress was to develop a framework for a national agenda in information and communication technology to enhance the health and health care of underserved populations. Discussions during four tracks addressed issues and trends in information and communication technologies for underserved populations, strategies learned from successful programs, evaluation methodologies for measuring the impact of informatics, and dissemination of information for replication of successful programs. Each track addressed current status, ideal state, barriers, strategies, and recommendations. Recommendations of the breakout sessions were summarized under the overarching themes of Policy, Funding, Research, and Education and Training. The general recommendations emphasized four key themes: revision in payment and reimbursement policies, integration of health care standards, partnerships as the key to success, and broad dissemination of findings including specific feedback to target populations and other key stakeholders.

  7. Bridging the Divide between Science and Journalism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    There are countless reasons nearly every scientist should learn how to communicate effectively with the media, including increased understanding of critical research findings to attract or sustain funding and build new professional partnerships that will further propel forward research. But where do scientists begin? Bridging the Divide between Science and Journalism offers practical tips for any scientist looking to work with the media. Given the traditional and internet-based sources for medical research and healthcare-related news now available, it is imperative that scientists know how to communicate their latest findings through the appropriate channels. The credible media channels are managed by working journalists, so learning how to package vast, technical research in a form that is appetizing and "bite-sized" in order to get their attention, is an art. Reducing years of research into a headline can be extremely difficult and certainly doesn't come naturally to every scientist, so this article provides suggestions on how to work with the media to communicate your findings. PMID:20219123

  8. Bridging the divide between science and journalism.

    PubMed

    Van Eperen, Laura; Marincola, Francesco M; Strohm, Jennifer

    2010-03-10

    There are countless reasons nearly every scientist should learn how to communicate effectively with the media, including increased understanding of critical research findings to attract or sustain funding and build new professional partnerships that will further propel forward research. But where do scientists begin? Bridging the Divide between Science and Journalism offers practical tips for any scientist looking to work with the media.Given the traditional and internet-based sources for medical research and healthcare-related news now available, it is imperative that scientists know how to communicate their latest findings through the appropriate channels. The credible media channels are managed by working journalists, so learning how to package vast, technical research in a form that is appetizing and "bite-sized" in order to get their attention, is an art. Reducing years of research into a headline can be extremely difficult and certainly doesn't come naturally to every scientist, so this article provides suggestions on how to work with the media to communicate your findings.

  9. Cerebellar asymmetry and its relation to cerebral asymmetry estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danhong; Buckner, Randy L.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the human cerebellum was investigated using intrinsic functional connectivity. Regions of functional asymmetry within the cerebellum were identified during resting-state functional MRI (n = 500 subjects) and replicated in an independent cohort (n = 500 subjects). The most strongly right lateralized cerebellar regions fell within the posterior lobe, including crus I and crus II, in regions estimated to link to the cerebral association cortex. The most strongly left lateralized cerebellar regions were located in lobules VI and VIII in regions linked to distinct cerebral association networks. Comparison of cerebellar asymmetry with independently estimated cerebral asymmetry revealed that the lateralized regions of the cerebellum belong to the same networks that are strongly lateralized in the cerebrum. The degree of functional asymmetry of the cerebellum across individuals was significantly correlated with cerebral asymmetry and varied with handedness. In addition, cerebellar asymmetry estimated at rest predicted cerebral lateralization during an active language task. These results demonstrate that functional lateralization is likely a unitary feature of large-scale cerebrocerebellar networks, consistent with the hypothesis that the cerebellum possesses a roughly homotopic map of the cerebral cortex including the prominent asymmetries of the association cortex. PMID:23076113

  10. Movement asymmetry in working polo horses.

    PubMed

    Pfau, T; Parkes, R S; Burden, E R; Bell, N; Fairhurst, H; Witte, T H

    2016-07-01

    The high, repetitive demands imposed on polo horses in training and competition may predispose them to musculoskeletal injuries and lameness. To quantify movement symmetry and lameness in a population of polo horses, and to investigate the existence of a relationship with age. Convenience sampled cross-sectional study. Sixty polo horses were equipped with inertial measurement units (IMUs) attached to the poll, and between the tubera sacrale. Six movement symmetry measures were calculated for vertical head and pelvic displacement during in-hand trot and compared with values for perfect symmetry, compared between left and right limb lame horses, and compared with published thresholds for lameness. Regression lines were calculated as a function of age of horse. Based on 2 different sets of published asymmetry thresholds 52-53% of the horses were quantified with head movement asymmetry and 27-50% with pelvic movement asymmetry resulting in 60-67% of horses being classified with movement asymmetry outside published guideline values for either the forelimbs, hindlimbs or both. Neither forelimb nor hindlimb asymmetries were preferentially left or right sided, with directional asymmetry values across all horses not different from perfect symmetry and absolute values not different between left and right lame horses (P values >0.6 for all forelimb symmetry measures and >0.2 for all hindlimb symmetry measures). None of the symmetry parameters increased or decreased significantly with age. A large proportion of polo horses show gait asymmetries consistent with previously defined thresholds for lameness. These do not appear to be lateralised or associated with age. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide induced loss of heterozygosity correlates with replicative lifespan and mitotic asymmetry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Güven, Emine; Parnell, Lindsay A; Jackson, Erin D; Parker, Meighan C; Gupta, Nilin; Rodrigues, Jenny; Qin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Cellular aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can lead to genomic instability and impaired mitotic asymmetry. To investigate the role of oxidative stress in cellular aging, we examined the effect of exogenous hydrogen peroxide on genomic instability and mitotic asymmetry in a collection of yeast strains with diverse backgrounds. We treated yeast cells with hydrogen peroxide and monitored the changes of viability and the frequencies of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in response to hydrogen peroxide doses. The mid-transition points of viability and LOH were quantified using sigmoid mathematical functions. We found that the increase of hydrogen peroxide dependent genomic instability often occurs before a drop in viability. We previously observed that elevation of genomic instability generally lags behind the drop in viability during chronological aging. Hence, onset of genomic instability induced by exogenous hydrogen peroxide treatment is opposite to that induced by endogenous oxidative stress during chronological aging, with regards to the midpoint of viability. This contrast argues that the effect of endogenous oxidative stress on genome integrity is well suppressed up to the dying-off phase during chronological aging. We found that the leadoff of exogenous hydrogen peroxide induced genomic instability to viability significantly correlated with replicative lifespan (RLS), indicating that yeast cells' ability to counter oxidative stress contributes to their replicative longevity. Surprisingly, this leadoff is positively correlated with an inverse measure of endogenous mitotic asymmetry, indicating a trade-off between mitotic asymmetry and cell's ability to fend off hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress. Overall, our results demonstrate strong associations of oxidative stress to genomic instability and mitotic asymmetry at the population level of budding yeast.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide induced loss of heterozygosity correlates with replicative lifespan and mitotic asymmetry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Erin D.; Parker, Meighan C.; Gupta, Nilin; Rodrigues, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Cellular aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can lead to genomic instability and impaired mitotic asymmetry. To investigate the role of oxidative stress in cellular aging, we examined the effect of exogenous hydrogen peroxide on genomic instability and mitotic asymmetry in a collection of yeast strains with diverse backgrounds. We treated yeast cells with hydrogen peroxide and monitored the changes of viability and the frequencies of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in response to hydrogen peroxide doses. The mid-transition points of viability and LOH were quantified using sigmoid mathematical functions. We found that the increase of hydrogen peroxide dependent genomic instability often occurs before a drop in viability. We previously observed that elevation of genomic instability generally lags behind the drop in viability during chronological aging. Hence, onset of genomic instability induced by exogenous hydrogen peroxide treatment is opposite to that induced by endogenous oxidative stress during chronological aging, with regards to the midpoint of viability. This contrast argues that the effect of endogenous oxidative stress on genome integrity is well suppressed up to the dying-off phase during chronological aging. We found that the leadoff of exogenous hydrogen peroxide induced genomic instability to viability significantly correlated with replicative lifespan (RLS), indicating that yeast cells’ ability to counter oxidative stress contributes to their replicative longevity. Surprisingly, this leadoff is positively correlated with an inverse measure of endogenous mitotic asymmetry, indicating a trade-off between mitotic asymmetry and cell’s ability to fend off hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress. Overall, our results demonstrate strong associations of oxidative stress to genomic instability and mitotic asymmetry at the population level of budding yeast. PMID:27833823

  13. Analytical formulation of lunar cratering asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2016-10-01

    Context. The cratering asymmetry of a bombarded satellite is related to both its orbit and impactors. The inner solar system impactor populations, that is, the main-belt asteroids (MBAs) and the near-Earth objects (NEOs), have dominated during the late heavy bombardment (LHB) and ever since, respectively. Aims: We formulate the lunar cratering distribution and verify the cratering asymmetries generated by the MBAs as well as the NEOs. Methods: Based on a planar model that excludes the terrestrial and lunar gravitations on the impactors and assuming the impactor encounter speed with Earth venc is higher than the lunar orbital speed vM, we rigorously integrated the lunar cratering distribution, and derived its approximation to the first order of vM/venc. Numerical simulations of lunar bombardment by the MBAs during the LHB were performed with an Earth-Moon distance aM = 20-60 Earth radii in five cases. Results: The analytical model directly proves the existence of a leading/trailing asymmetry and the absence of near/far asymmetry. The approximate form of the leading/trailing asymmetry is (1 + A1cosβ), which decreases as the apex distance β increases. The numerical simulations show evidence of a pole/equator asymmetry as well as the leading/trailing asymmetry, and the former is empirically described as (1 + A2cos2ϕ), which decreases as the latitude modulus | ϕ | increases. The amplitudes A1,2 are reliable measurements of asymmetries. Our analysis explicitly indicates the quantitative relations between cratering distribution and bombardment conditions (impactor properties and the lunar orbital status) like A1 ∝ vM/venc, resulting in a method for reproducing the bombardment conditions through measuring the asymmetry. Mutual confirmation between analytical model and numerical simulations is found in terms of the cratering distribution and its variation with aM. Estimates of A1 for crater density distributions generated by the MBAs and the NEOs are 0.101-0.159 and 0

  14. The Inherent Asymmetry of DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Snedeker, Jonathan; Wooten, Matthew; Chen, Xin

    2017-08-11

    Semiconservative DNA replication has provided an elegant solution to the fundamental problem of how life is able to proliferate in a way that allows cells, organisms, and populations to survive and replicate many times over. Somewhat lost, however, in our admiration for this elegant mechanism is an appreciation for the asymmetries that occur in the process of DNA replication. As we discuss in this review, these asymmetries arise as a consequence of the structure of the DNA molecule and the enzymatic mechanism of DNA synthesis. Increasing evidence suggests that asymmetries inDNAreplication are able to play a central role in the processes of adaptation and evolution by shaping the mutagenic landscape of cells. Additionally, in eukaryotes, recent work has demonstrated that the inherent asymmetries in DNA replication may play an important role in the process of chromatin replication. As chromatin plays an essential role in defining cell identity, asymmetries generated during the process of DNA replication may play critical roles in cell fate dicisions related to patterning and development. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology Volume 33 is October 6, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  15. Quantum asymmetry between time and space.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Joan A

    2016-01-01

    An asymmetry exists between time and space in the sense that physical systems inevitably evolve over time, whereas there is no corresponding ubiquitous translation over space. The asymmetry, which is presumed to be elemental, is represented by equations of motion and conservation laws that operate differently over time and space. If, however, the asymmetry was found to be due to deeper causes, this conventional view of time evolution would need reworking. Here we show, using a sum-over-paths formalism, that a violation of time reversal (T) symmetry might be such a cause. If T symmetry is obeyed, then the formalism treats time and space symmetrically such that states of matter are localized both in space and in time. In this case, equations of motion and conservation laws are undefined or inapplicable. However, if T symmetry is violated, then the same sum over paths formalism yields states that are localized in space and distributed without bound over time, creating an asymmetry between time and space. Moreover, the states satisfy an equation of motion (the Schrödinger equation) and conservation laws apply. This suggests that the time-space asymmetry is not elemental as currently presumed, and that T violation may have a deep connection with time evolution.

  16. Hemispheric asymmetries in cortical and subcortical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojian; Herron, Timothy J; Ettlinger, Marc; Woods, David L

    2015-01-01

    Previous research studies have reported many hemispherical asymmetries in cortical and subcortical anatomy, but only a subset of findings is consistent across studies. Here, we used improved Freesurfer-based automated methods to analyse the properties of the cortex and seven subcortical structures in 138 young adult subjects. Male and female subjects showed similar hemispheric asymmetries in gyral and sulcal structures, with many areas associated with language processing enlarged in the left hemisphere (LH) and a number of areas associated with visuospatial processing enlarged in the right hemisphere (RH). In addition, we found greater (non-directional) cortical asymmetries in subjects with larger brains. Asymmetries in subcortical structures included larger LH volumes of thalamus, putamen and globus pallidus and larger RH volumes of the cerebellum and the amygdala. We also found significant correlations between the subcortical structural volumes, particularly of the thalamus and cerebellum, with cortical area. These results help to resolve some of the inconsistencies in previous studies of hemispheric asymmetries in brain anatomy.

  17. Quantum asymmetry between time and space

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An asymmetry exists between time and space in the sense that physical systems inevitably evolve over time, whereas there is no corresponding ubiquitous translation over space. The asymmetry, which is presumed to be elemental, is represented by equations of motion and conservation laws that operate differently over time and space. If, however, the asymmetry was found to be due to deeper causes, this conventional view of time evolution would need reworking. Here we show, using a sum-over-paths formalism, that a violation of time reversal (T) symmetry might be such a cause. If T symmetry is obeyed, then the formalism treats time and space symmetrically such that states of matter are localized both in space and in time. In this case, equations of motion and conservation laws are undefined or inapplicable. However, if T symmetry is violated, then the same sum over paths formalism yields states that are localized in space and distributed without bound over time, creating an asymmetry between time and space. Moreover, the states satisfy an equation of motion (the Schrödinger equation) and conservation laws apply. This suggests that the time–space asymmetry is not elemental as currently presumed, and that T violation may have a deep connection with time evolution. PMID:26997899

  18. Predicting combinations of left and right asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Annett, M

    2000-09-01

    This paper explains how combinations of asymmetries for pairs of laterality variables may be predicted. It shows that many pairs combine as expected by chance, plus the influence of the RS+ gene hypothesised by Annett (1978, 1985). These include: eye dominance with writing hand, with throwing hand, and with foot for kicking; nonright handedness with planum temporale asymmetry, with asymmetry of the parietal operculum, and the association between these two anatomical asymmetries. Handedness for writing and throwing, and hand and foot preferences are more strongly associated, suggesting the presence of an additional influence. The reliability of the present analyses was supported by replication, especially in findings for hand preferences for writing and throwing described by Gilbert and Wysocki (1992). The relative frequencies of discordant patterns of preference, LR (writing, throwing) versus RL, are a function of the frequencies of the two variables in the population. These differ between age groups and also with the classification of 'either' hand preferences. Patterns of preference for writing, throwing and eye-dominance (RRR, RRL etc) are related in an orderly manner to differences between the hands for peg moving time. The success of the present application of the RS theory strengthens the argument that individual differences for hand preference depend on a continuous distribution of asymmetry, not on the 'types' commonly assumed in the literature.

  19. Corrections to quark asymmetries at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, A.; Monig, K.; /DESY, Zeuthen

    2004-11-01

    The most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} at LEP is from the forward-backward asymmetry e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} b{bar b} at the Z-pole. In this note the QED and electroweak radiative corrections to obtain the pole asymmetry from the measured asymmetry for b- and c-quarks have been calculated using ZFITTER, which has been amended to allow a consistent treatment of partial two-loop corrections for the b-quark final asymmetries. A total correction of {delta}A{sub FB}{sup b} = 0.0019 {+-} 0.0002 and {delta}A{sub FB}{sup c} = 0.0064 {+-} 0.0001 has been found, where the remaining theoretical uncertainty is much too small to explain the apparent discrepancy between sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} obtained from A{sub FB}{sup b} and from the left-right asymmetry at SLD.

  20. Toroidal current asymmetry in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-10-15

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current I{sub ϕ}. It was found that the toroidal current asymmetry was proportional to the vertical current moment asymmetry with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was observed that greater displacement leads to greater measured I{sub ϕ} asymmetry. Here, it is shown that this is essentially a kinematic effect produced by a VDE interacting with three dimensional MHD perturbations. The relation of toroidal current asymmetry and vertical current moment is calculated analytically and is verified by numerical simulations. It is shown analytically that the toroidal variation of the toroidal plasma current is accompanied by an equal and opposite variation of the toroidal current flowing in a thin wall surrounding the plasma. These currents are connected by 3D halo current, which is π/2 radians out of phase with the n = 1 toroidal current variations.

  1. Asymmetry of the Brain: Development and Implications.

    PubMed

    Duboc, Véronique; Dufourcq, Pascale; Blader, Patrick; Roussigné, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Although the left and right hemispheres of our brains develop with a high degree of symmetry at both the anatomical and functional levels, it has become clear that subtle structural differences exist between the two sides and that each is dominant in processing specific cognitive tasks. As the result of evolutionary conservation or convergence, lateralization of the brain is found in both vertebrates and invertebrates, suggesting that it provides significant fitness for animal life. This widespread feature of hemispheric specialization has allowed the emergence of model systems to study its development and, in some cases, to link anatomical asymmetries to brain function and behavior. Here, we present some of what is known about brain asymmetry in humans and model organisms as well as what is known about the impact of environmental and genetic factors on brain asymmetry development. We specifically highlight the progress made in understanding the development of epithalamic asymmetries in zebrafish and how this model provides an exciting opportunity to address brain asymmetry at different levels of complexity.

  2. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  3. Superheavy thermal dark matter and primordial asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Unwin, James

    2017-02-01

    The early universe could feature multiple reheating events, leading to jumps in the visible sector entropy density that dilute both particle asymmetries and the number density of frozen-out states. In fact, late time entropy jumps are usually required in models of Affleck-Dine baryogenesis, which typically produces an initial particle-antiparticle asymmetry that is much too large. An important consequence of late time dilution, is that a smaller dark matter annihilation cross section is needed to obtain the observed dark matter relic density. For cosmologies with high scale baryogenesis, followed by radiation-dominated dark matter freeze-out, we show that the perturbative unitarity mass bound on thermal relic dark matter is relaxed to 1010 GeV. We proceed to study superheavy asym-metric dark matter models, made possible by a sizable entropy injection after dark matter freeze-out, and identify how the Affleck-Dine mechanism would generate the baryon and dark asymmetries.

  4. Preliminary Proton Spin Asymmetry Results from SANE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, James

    2010-11-01

    The Spin Asymetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) is a measurement of parallel and near-perpendicular double spin asymmetries in an inclusive electron scattering experiment, with the aim of calculating the spin asymmetry of the proton A^1p and spin structure function g^2p. Using Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's polarized electron beam and the University of Virginia's polarized frozen ammonia (^14NH3) target in Hall C, the experiment ran in 2009, collecting data in a Q^2 region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV^2 in a Bjorken x region of 0.3 to 0.8. Particle detection was accomplished using the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a novel non-magnetic detector array with a 194 msr acceptance. This talk will address the progress of the analysis toward the calculation of the proton spin asymmetry and structure functions, including calibration of the BETA detectors, event selection, and preliminary results.

  5. CP asymmetries in semiinclusive B0 decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, I.

    1999-02-01

    It was recently pointed out that inclusive B^0(t) decays could show CP violation. The totally inclusive asymmetry is expected to be tiny [O(10^{-3})] because of large cancellations among the asymmetries in the charmless, single charm and double charm final states. Enriching particular final state configurations could significantly increase the CP-asymmetry and observability. Such studies can extract fundamental CKM (Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa) parameters, and (perhaps) even Delta m(B_s). A superb vertex detector could see CP violation with 10^5 (10^6) flavor-tagged B_s (B_d) mesons within the CKM model. Because the effects could be significantly larger due to new physics, they should be searched for in existing or soon available data samples.

  6. Gain loss asymmetry for emerging stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpio, Krzysztof; Załuska–Kotur, Magdalena A.; Orłowski, Arkadiusz

    2007-03-01

    Stock indexes for some European emerging markets are analyzed using an investment-horizon approach. Austrian ATX index and Dow Jones have been studied and compared with several emerging European markets. The optimal investment horizons are plotted as a function of an absolute return value. Gain-loss asymmetry, originally found for American DJIA index, is observed for all analyzed data. It is shown, that this asymmetry has different character for emerging and for established markets. For established markets, gain curve lies typically above loss curve, whereas in the case of emerging markets the situation is just the opposite. We propose a measure quantifying the gain-loss asymmetry that clearly exhibits a difference between emerging and established markets.

  7. Effect of stress on structural brain asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Zach, Petr; Vales, Karel; Stuchlik, Ales; Cermakova, Pavla; Mrzilkova, Jana; Koutela, Antonella; Kutova, Martina

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that stressful events may affect the brain not only as a whole, but also in multiple laterality aspects. The present review is aimed at discussing the effect of stress and stress hormones on structural brain asymmetry. Differences and crossroads of functional and structural asymmetry are briefly mentioned throughout the document. The first part of this review summarizes major findings in the field of structural brain asymmetries in animals and humans from the evolutionary perspective. Additionally, effect of stress on animals is discussed generally. The second part then explores asymmetrical effects of stress on structural changes of principal brain areas - amygdala, hippocampus, neocortex, diencephalon, basal forebrain and basal ganglia from the point of normal lateralization, steroids, trauma and genetic factors. At the end we present hypothesis why stress appears to have asymmetrical effects on lateralized brain structures.

  8. Frontal alpha asymmetry and sexually motivated states.

    PubMed

    Prause, Nicole; Staley, Cameron; Roberts, Verena

    2014-03-01

    Anterior alpha asymmetry of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals has been suggested to index state approach (or avoidance) motivation. This model has not yet been extended to high approach-motivation sexual stimuli, which may represent an important model of reward system function. Sixty-five participants viewed a neutral and a sexually motivating film while their EEG was recorded, and reported their sexual feelings after each film. Greater alpha power in the left hemisphere during sexually motivated states was evident. A positive relationship between self-reported mental sexual arousal and alpha asymmetry was identified, where coherence between these indicators was higher in women. Notably, coherence was stronger when mental versus physical sexual arousal was rated. Alpha asymmetry appears to offer a new method for further examining this novel coherence pattern across men and women.

  9. Asymmetry dependence of the nuclear caloric curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-02-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. The caloric curve extracted with the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry N-Z/A. An increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  10. Asymmetry Dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-03-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. Two independent thermometers, the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer and the Albergo yield ratio thermometer, are used to extract the caloric curve. For both methods, the caloric curve extracted shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry For the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer, an increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  11. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running

    PubMed Central

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A.; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback. PMID:26488484

  12. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running.

    PubMed

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback.

  13. Single hadron transverse spin asymmetries from COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Bradamante, Franco

    2007-06-13

    Transverse spin physics is an important part of the scientific programme of the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The analysis of the data taken with the target polarized orthogonally to the 160 GeV/c muon beam momentum has allowed to measure for the first time the Collins and Sivers asymmetries of the deuteron. Both for the positive and the negative hadrons produced in semi-inclusive DIS the measured asymmetries are small and, within errors, compatible with zero. New results for {pi}{+-} ans K{+-} are presented here.

  14. Neutron single target spin asymmetries in SIDIS

    SciTech Connect

    Cisbani, Evaristo

    2010-04-01

    The experiment E06-010 in Hall A at Jefferson Lab took data between November 2008 and February 2009 to directly measure, for the first time, the pion (and kaon) single "neutron" target-spin asymmetry (SSA) in semi-inclusive DIS from a polarized 3He target. Collins, Sivers (and Pretzelosity) neutron asymmetries are going to be extracted from the measured SSA. Details of the experiment are described together with the preliminary results of the ongoing analysis. Near future Hall A experiments on transverse nucleon spin structure are shorty reviewed.

  15. Association between condylar asymmetry and temporo- mandibular disorders using 3D-CT

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez-Vico, Rosa M.; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Using reconstructed three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) models, the purpose of this study was to analyze and compare mandibular condyle morphology in patients with and without temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Study Design: Thirty-two patients were divided into two groups: the first comprised those with TMD (n=18), and the second those who did not have TMD (n=14). A CT of each patient was obtained and reconstructed as a 3D model. The 64 resulting 3D condylar models were evaluated for possible TMD-associated length, width and height asymmetries of the condylar process. Descriptive statistics were used to assess the results and student’s t tests applied to compare the two groups. Results: Statistically significant (p<0.05) vertical, mediolateral and sagittal asymmetries of the condylar process were observed between TMD and non-TMD groups. TMD patients showed less condylar height (p<0.05) in comparison with their asymptomatic counterparts. Conclusions: Using 3D-CT, it was shown that condylar width, height and length asymmetries were a common feature of TMD. Key words:Condilar asymmetry, 3D-computed tomography, X-ray diagnosis , maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics. PMID:22322511

  16. Asymmetry and non-random orientation of the inflight effective beam pattern in the WMAP data

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Lung-Yih

    2014-04-20

    Tentative evidence for statistical anisotropy in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data was alleged to be due to 'insufficient handling of beam asymmetries'. In this paper, we investigate this issue and develop a method to estimate the shape of the inflight effective beam, particularly the asymmetry and azimuthal orientation. We divide the whole map into square patches and exploit the information in the Fourier space. For patches containing bright extragalactic point sources, we can directly estimate their shapes, from which the inflight effective beam can be estimated. For those without, we estimate the pattern from iso-power contours in two-dimensional Fourier space. We show that the inflight effective beam convolving the signal is indeed non-symmetric for most of the sky, and it is not randomly oriented. Around the ecliptic poles, however, the asymmetry is smaller due to the averaging effect from different orientations of the beam from the scan strategy. The orientations of the effective beam with significant asymmetry are parallel to the lines of ecliptic longitude. In the foreground-cleaned Internal Linear Combination map, however, the systematics caused by beam effect is significantly lessened.

  17. Plantar pressure asymmetry and risk of stress injuries in the foot of young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Renato R; da Rocha, Emmanuel S; Franco, Pedro S; Carpes, Felipe P

    2017-03-01

    Asymmetries in the magnitude of plantar pressure are considered a risk factor for stress fracture of the fifth metatarsal in soccer athletes. To investigate the presence of plantar pressure asymmetries among young soccer athletes. Observational. Laboratory. Thirty young adolescents divided into a soccer player group (n = 15) or a matched control group (n = 15). Mean plantar pressure was determined for seven different regions of the foot. Data were compared between the preferred and non-preferred foot, and between the groups, during barefoot standing on a pressure mat system. Higher pressure was found in the hallux, 5th metatarsal and medial rearfoot of the non-preferred foot in the young soccer players. These asymmetries were not observed in the control group. Magnitudes of plantar pressure did not differ between the groups. Young soccer players present asymmetries in plantar pressure in the hallux, 5th metatarsal and medial rearfoot, with higher pressure observed in the non-preferred foot. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Polarization asymmetries in the 9Be(γ ,n0) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, J. M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Davis, B. J.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Myers, L. S.; Spraker, M. C.; Stave, S.; Tompkins, J. R.; Weller, H. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of the 9Be (γ ,n0 ) reaction were performed using nearly 100% linearly polarized, high-intensity, and nearly monoenergetic γ -ray beams having energies between 5.5 and 15.5 MeV at the High Intensity γ -ray Source located at Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Eighteen liquid scintillator detectors were used to measure neutron yields parallel and perpendicular to the plane of beam polarization. Polarization asymmetries, which are the differences between yields observed in detectors located in-plane and out-of-plane divided by their sums, were measured for the neutrons which left the residual nucleus (8Be ) in its ground state, termed the n0 group. Asymmetries between 0.4 to 0.7 were discovered over this energy region in addition to a clear trend of increasing asymmetries with increasing beam energy. A prediction of the polarization asymmetry based on a pure E 1 direct capture model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements. These data and the prediction could be of interest for methods that rely on neutron measurements following photofission to identify the presence of special nuclear material.

  19. Divide and differentiate: CDK/Cyclins and the art of development.

    PubMed

    Ishidate, Takao; Elewa, Ahmed; Kim, Soyoung; Mello, Craig C; Shirayama, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    The elegant choreography of metazoan development demands exquisite regulation of cell-division timing, orientation, and asymmetry. In this review, we discuss studies in Drosophila and C. elegans that reveal how the cell cycle machinery, comprised of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and cyclins functions as a master regulator of development. We provide examples of how CDK/cyclins: (1) regulate the asymmetric localization and timely destruction of cell fate determinants; (2) couple signaling to the control of cell division orientation; and (3) maintain mitotic zones for stem cell proliferation. These studies illustrate how the core cell cycle machinery should be viewed not merely as an engine that drives the cell cycle forward, but rather as a dynamic regulator that integrates the cell-division cycle with cellular differentiation, ensuring the coherent and faithful execution of developmental programs.

  20. Bilayer Asymmetry Influences Integrin Sequestering in Raft-Mimicking Lipid Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Noor F.; Siegel, Amanda P.; Ge, Yifan; Jordan, Rainer; Naumann, Christoph A.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing recognition that lipid heterogeneities in cellular membranes play an important role in the distribution and functionality of membrane proteins. However, the detection and characterization of such heterogeneities at the cellular level remains challenging. Here we report on the poorly understood relationship between lipid bilayer asymmetry and membrane protein sequestering in raft-mimicking model membrane mixtures using a powerful experimental platform comprised of confocal spectroscopy XY-scan and photon-counting histogram analyses. This experimental approach is utilized to probe the domain-specific sequestering and oligomerization state of αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins in bilayers, which contain coexisting liquid-disordered/liquid-ordered (ld/lo) phase regions exclusively in the top leaflet of the bilayer (bottom leaflet contains ld phase). Comparison with previously reported integrin sequestering data in bilayer-spanning lo-ld phase separations demonstrates that bilayer asymmetry has a profound influence on αvβ3 and α5β1 sequestering behavior. For example, both integrins sequester preferentially to the lo phase in asymmetric bilayers, but to the ld phase in their symmetric counterparts. Furthermore, our data show that bilayer asymmetry significantly influences the role of native ligands in integrin sequestering. PMID:23708361

  1. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  2. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  3. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  4. The Energy of Substituted Ethanes. Asymmetry Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Lionel; Hoffmann, Roald; Otto, Peter

    1973-01-01

    The leading terms in the energy of a general substituted ethane are derived in explicit form as a function of the torsional angle θ, the substituent electronegativities, and their mutual overlaps. The energy is found to be the sum of all four overlaps between pairs of asymmetry orbitals, and satisfies the requisite symmetry properties. PMID:16592060

  5. CP and charge asymmetries at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2007-11-01

    We present CDF results on the branching fractions and time-integrated direct CP asymmetries for B0 and B0s decay modes into pairs of charmless charged hadrons (pions or kaons). We report also the first observation of B0s->DsK mode and the measurement of its branching fraction.

  6. Phonological and Phonetic Asymmetries of Cw Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Yunju

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the relationship between the phonological distribution of Cw combinations, and the acoustic/perceptual distinctiveness between syllables with plain C onsets and with Cw combination onsets. Distributional asymmetries of Cw combinations discussed in this thesis include the avoidance of Cw combinations in the labial consonant…

  7. Search Asymmetry, Sustained Attention, and Response Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Hugh; Russell, Paul N.; Helton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In the present experiment, we used search asymmetry to test whether the sustained attention to response task is a better measure of response inhibition or sustained attention. Participants performed feature present and feature absent target detection tasks using either a sustained attention to response task (SART; high Go low No-Go) or a…

  8. Lateral Asymmetries in Infant Melody Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balaban, Marie T.; Anderson, Linda M.; Wisniewski, Amy B.

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments investigated lateral asymmetries in eight-month-olds' perception of contour-altered and contour-preserved melody changes. Found that infants who heard a contour-altered change showed a left-ear advantage, whereas infants who heard a contour-preserved change showed a right-ear advantage. The pattern of lateralization for melody…

  9. Motor asymmetry reduction in older adults.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Andrzej; Haaland, Kathleen Y; Bagesteiro, Leia B; Sainburg, Robert L

    2011-02-04

    While cerebral lateralization has previously been well documented for many neurobehavioral functions, recent research has shown that as people age, formerly lateralized processes recruit more symmetric patterns of neural activity. Such findings provide the foundation for the model of hemispheric asymmetry reduction in older adults, or "HAROLD"[4]. Previous studies that have measured reaction time and movement time have suggested that aging does not affect manual asymmetries. However, whether these findings can be extended to kinematic variables associated with motor coordination remains largely unknown. The purpose of the current study is to determine whether asymmetries in intralimb coordination are also reduced during the aging process. We examined multidirectional reaching in two different right handed age groups, a younger group from 20 to 40 years of age, and an older group, from 60 to 80 years of age. Measures of final position accuracy, precision, and trajectory linearity showed robust asymmetries between the left and right arm groups of young adults. However, the trajectories and accuracies of the older subjects were symmetric, such that our dependent measures were not significantly different between the right and left arm groups. Our findings extend the HAROLD model to motor behavior, suggesting that aging results in decrements in motor lateralization.

  10. The Cost of Action Miscues: Hemispheric Asymmetries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenal, Brian V.; Hinze, Stephan; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behaviors require preparation and when necessary inhibition or alteration of actions. The right hemisphere has been posited to be dominant for preparatory motor activation. This experiment was designed to learn if there are hemispheric asymmetries in the control of altered plans of actions. Cues, both valid and invalid, which indicate the…

  11. Mandibular asymmetry and the fourth dimension.

    PubMed

    Kaban, Leonard B

    2009-03-01

    This paper represents more than 30 years of discussion and collaboration with Drs Joseph Murray and John Mulliken in an attempt to understand growth patterns over time (ie, fourth dimension) in patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM). This is essential for the development of rational treatment protocols for children and adults with jaw asymmetry. Traditionally, HFM was thought of as a unilateral deformity, but it was recognized that 20% to 30% of patients had bilateral abnormalities. However, early descriptions of skeletal correction addressed almost exclusively lengthening of the short (affected) side of the face. Based on longitudinal clinical observations of unoperated HFM patients, we hypothesized that abnormal mandibular growth is the earliest skeletal manifestation and that restricted growth of the mandible plays a pivotal role in progressive distortion of both the ipsilateral and contralateral facial skeleton. This hypothesis explains the progressive nature of the asymmetry in patients with HFM and provides the rationale for surgical lengthening of the mandible in children to prevent end-stage deformity. During the past 30 years, we have learned that this phenomenon of progressive distortion of the adjacent and contralateral facial skeleton occurs with other asymmetric mandibular undergrowth (tumor resection, radiation therapy, or posttraumatic defects) and overgrowth (mandibular condylar hyperplasia) conditions. In this paper, I describe the progression of deformity with time in patients with mandibular asymmetry as a result of undergrowth and overgrowth. Understanding these concepts is critical for the development of rational treatment protocols for adults with end-stage asymmetry and for children to minimize secondary deformity.

  12. Measuring Asymmetry in Insect-Plant Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Cláudia P. T.; de Almeida, Adriana M.; Corso, Gilberto

    2011-03-01

    In this work we focus on interaction networks between insects and plants and in the characterization of insect plant asymmetry, an important issue in coevolution and evolutionary biology. We analyze in particular the asymmetry in the interaction matrix of animals (herbivorous insects) and plants (food resource for the insects). Instead of driving our attention to the interaction matrix itself we derive two networks associated to the bipartite network: the animal network, D1, and the plant network, D2. These networks are constructed according to the following recipe: two animal species are linked once if they interact with the same plant. In a similar way, in the plant network, two plants are linked if they interact with the same animal. To explore the asymmetry between D2 and D1 we test for a set of 23 networks from the ecologic literature networks: the difference in size, ΔL, clustering coefficient difference, ΔC, and mean connectivity difference, Δ. We used a nonparametric statistical test to check the differences in ΔL, ΔC and Δ. Our results indicate that ΔL and Δ show a significative asymmetry.

  13. Neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2008-01-22

    Using a simple model for nuclear GPDs, we study the role of the neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS observables. As an example, we use the beam-spin asymmetry $A_{LU}^A$ measured in coherent and incoherent DVCS on a wide range of nuclear targets in the HERMES and JLab kinematics. We find that at small values of the momentum transfer $t$, $A_{LU}^A$ is dominated by the coherent-enriched contribution, which enhances $A_{LU}^A$ compared to the free proton asymmetry $A_{LU}^p$, $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=1.8-2.2$. At large values of $t$, the nuclear asymmetry is dominated by the incoherent contribution and $A_{LU}^A/(\\phi)A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=0.66-0.74$. The deviation of $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)$ from unity at large $t$ is a result of the neutron contribution, which gives a possibility to constain neutron GPDs in incoherent nuclear DVCS. A similar trend is expected for other DVCS asymmetries.

  14. Infant Frontal Asymmetry Predicts Child Emotional Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Maria; Paulus, Markus; Kühn-Popp, Nina; Meinhardt, Jorg; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    While factors influencing maternal emotional availability (EA) have been well investigated, little is known about the development of child EA. The present longitudinal study investigated the role of frontal brain asymmetry in young children with regard to child EA (child responsiveness and involvement) in mother-child interaction in a sample of 28…

  15. Search Asymmetry, Sustained Attention, and Response Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Hugh; Russell, Paul N.; Helton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In the present experiment, we used search asymmetry to test whether the sustained attention to response task is a better measure of response inhibition or sustained attention. Participants performed feature present and feature absent target detection tasks using either a sustained attention to response task (SART; high Go low No-Go) or a…

  16. Infant Frontal Asymmetry Predicts Child Emotional Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Maria; Paulus, Markus; Kühn-Popp, Nina; Meinhardt, Jorg; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    While factors influencing maternal emotional availability (EA) have been well investigated, little is known about the development of child EA. The present longitudinal study investigated the role of frontal brain asymmetry in young children with regard to child EA (child responsiveness and involvement) in mother-child interaction in a sample of 28…

  17. Task selection cost asymmetry without task switching.

    PubMed

    Bryck, Richard L; Mayr, Ulrch

    2008-02-01

    The switch cost asymmetry (i.e., larger costs when switching from a nondominant into a dominant task than vice versa) has been explained in terms of the trial-to-trial carryover of activation levels required for the dominant versus the nondominant task. However, there is an open question about whether an actual switch in task is in fact necessary to obtain a "selection" cost asymmetry. In Experiments 1 and 2, we modified an alternating-runs paradigm to include either long or short response-to-stimulus intervals (RSIs) after each pair of trials (i.e., AA-AA-BB-BB), thereby inducing selection costs not only at the point of a task switch (i.e., AA-BB), but also between same-task pairs (i.e., AA-AA). Using spatially compatible versus incompatible response rules (Experiment 1) and Stroop word versus color naming (Experiment 2), we found asymmetric effects not only at task-change transitions, but also at task-repeat transitions when the RSI was long (presumably inducing frequent losses of set). In Experiments 3A and 3B, a cost asymmetry for long RSIs was obtained even when competing tasks were separated into alternating single task blocks, but not when the tasks were compared in a between-subjects design. This general pattern cannot be explained by activation carryover models, but is consistent with the idea that the asymmetry arises as a result of interference from long-term memory traces.

  18. Instrumental Asymmetry Reduction in Polarized Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, M. I.; Trantham, K. W.; Gay, T. J.

    2008-05-01

    We report progress in the reduction of instrumental asymmetries (IAs) related to the photoemission of polarized electrons from GaAs caused by circularly-polarized diode laser beams [1]. Such asymmetries can mask true helicity-dependent interactions between the emitted electrons and chiral targets. Minimization of laser intensity IAs is achieved by chopping two spatially separated light beams with orthogonal polarizations which are recombined and passed through a quarter-wave plate to yield a single beam with rapidly flipping helicity. We have demonstrated the ability to reduce intensity IAs of the laser beam itself to less than 2 x 10-6 [2]. We have also investigated the IAs of the photemission current from the GaAs. At present, we are able to reduce the photoemission asymmetry to values that are comparable to the laser intensity asymmetry. Implications for experiments measuring effects due to electron circular dichroism [3] will be discussed. [1]Trantham K.W. et al J. Phys. B. 28 L543 (1995) [2] Fabrikant M.I. et al submitted to Appl. Opt. [3] Mayer S., Kessler J. Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4803 (1995) Funding for this project was provided by Undergraduate Creative Activities and Research Experiences (UCARE) and the National Science Foundation (PHY-0653379).

  19. Neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2008-01-22

    Using a simple model for nuclear GPDs, we study the role of the neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS observables. As an example, we use the beam-spin asymmetry $A_{LU}^A$ measured in coherent and incoherent DVCS on a wide range of nuclear targets in the HERMES and JLab kinematics. We find that at small values of the momentum transfer $t$, $A_{LU}^A$ is dominated by the coherent-enriched contribution, which enhances $A_{LU}^A$ compared to the free proton asymmetry $A_{LU}^p$, $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=1.8-2.2$. At large values of $t$, the nuclear asymmetry is dominated by the incoherent contribution and $A_{LU}^A/(\\phi)A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=0.66-0.74$. The deviation of $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)$ from unity at large $t$ is a result of the neutron contribution, which gives a possibility to constain neutron GPDs in incoherent nuclear DVCS. A similar trend is expected for other DVCS asymmetries.

  20. Phonological and Phonetic Asymmetries of Cw Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Yunju

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the relationship between the phonological distribution of Cw combinations, and the acoustic/perceptual distinctiveness between syllables with plain C onsets and with Cw combination onsets. Distributional asymmetries of Cw combinations discussed in this thesis include the avoidance of Cw combinations in the labial consonant…

  1. Auxin asymmetry during gravitropism by tomato hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. A.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropic asymmetry of auxin was observed in hypocotyls of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) soon after horizontal placement: the ratio of apically supplied [3H]IAA collected from the lower sides to that from the upper sides was about 1.4 between 5 and 10 minutes. This was adequately early to account for the beginning of curvature. The auxin asymmetry ratio rose to about 2.5 between 20 and 25 minutes, and to 3.5 during the main phase of curvature. This compares reasonably well with the roughly 3.9 ratio for elongation on the lower side to elongation on the upper side that is the basis for the curvature. These data extend evidence that the Went-Cholodny theory for the mediation of tropisms is valid for dicot stems. Also consistent with the theory, an auxin asymmetry ratio of 2.5 was observed when wrong-way gravitropic curvature developed following application of a high level of auxin. In addition to reversing the asymmetry of elongation, the large supplement of auxin resulted in lower net elongation. Previous data established that ethylene is not involved in this decrease of growth as a function of increasing level of auxin.

  2. On the nature of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Whether the baryon asymmetry in the universe is a locally varying or universally fixed number is examined with focus on the existence of a possible matter antimatter domain structure in the universe arising from a GUT with spontaneous CP symmetry breaking. Theoretical considerations and observational data and astrophysical tests relating to this fundamental question are reviewed.

  3. The Cost of Action Miscues: Hemispheric Asymmetries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenal, Brian V.; Hinze, Stephan; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behaviors require preparation and when necessary inhibition or alteration of actions. The right hemisphere has been posited to be dominant for preparatory motor activation. This experiment was designed to learn if there are hemispheric asymmetries in the control of altered plans of actions. Cues, both valid and invalid, which indicate the…

  4. Auxin asymmetry during gravitropism by tomato hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. A.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropic asymmetry of auxin was observed in hypocotyls of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) soon after horizontal placement: the ratio of apically supplied [3H]IAA collected from the lower sides to that from the upper sides was about 1.4 between 5 and 10 minutes. This was adequately early to account for the beginning of curvature. The auxin asymmetry ratio rose to about 2.5 between 20 and 25 minutes, and to 3.5 during the main phase of curvature. This compares reasonably well with the roughly 3.9 ratio for elongation on the lower side to elongation on the upper side that is the basis for the curvature. These data extend evidence that the Went-Cholodny theory for the mediation of tropisms is valid for dicot stems. Also consistent with the theory, an auxin asymmetry ratio of 2.5 was observed when wrong-way gravitropic curvature developed following application of a high level of auxin. In addition to reversing the asymmetry of elongation, the large supplement of auxin resulted in lower net elongation. Previous data established that ethylene is not involved in this decrease of growth as a function of increasing level of auxin.

  5. Cellular senescence in aging and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Toh, Wei Seong; Brittberg, Mats; Farr, Jack; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Gomoll, Andreas H; Hui, James Hoi Po; Richardson, James B; Roberts, Sally; Spector, Myron

    2016-12-01

    - It is well accepted that age is an important contributing factor to poor cartilage repair following injury, and to the development of osteoarthritis. Cellular senescence, the loss of the ability of cells to divide, has been noted as the major factor contributing to age-related changes in cartilage homeostasis, function, and response to injury. The underlying mechanisms of cellular senescence, while not fully understood, have been associated with telomere erosion, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of cellular senescence, and the associated biological challenges in cartilage repair. In addition, we present novel strategies for modulation of cellular senescence that may help to improve cartilage regeneration in an aging population.

  6. Facial asymmetry in head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma survivors.

    PubMed

    Schoot, Reineke A; Hol, Marinka L F; Merks, Johannes H M; Suttie, Michael; Slater, Olga; van Lennep, Marinde; Hopman, Saskia M J; Dunaway, David; Syme-Grant, Jonathan; Smeele, Ludi E; Zwinderman, Koos H; Caron, Huib N; Hammond, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy is essential for achieving and maintaining local control in head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma (HNRMS) patients. However, radiotherapy may cause outgrowth disturbances of facial bone and soft tissue, resulting in facial asymmetry. The aim of this study was to develop a method to visualize and measure facial asymmetry in HNRMS survivors using three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques. Facial deformity was evaluated in a multidisciplinary clinical assessment of 75 HNRMS survivors, treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT, n = 26) or Ablative surgery, MOulage brachytherapy, and REconstruction (AMORE, n = 49). Individual facial asymmetry was measured using 3D photogrammetry and expressed in a raw asymmetry index and a normalized sex-age-ethnicity-matched asymmetry signature weight. Facial asymmetry was also compared between British and Dutch controls and between survivors and their matched controls. Facial asymmetry was more pronounced with increasing age (P < 0.01) in British controls compared with Dutch controls (P = 0.04). Survivors developed more facial asymmetry than matched controls (P < 0.001). The clinical assessment of facial deformity correlated with the raw asymmetry index (r = 0.60, P < 0.001). 3D imaging can be used for objective measurement of facial asymmetry in HNRMS survivors. The raw asymmetry index correlated with a clinical assessment of facial deformity. Comparisons between treatment groups seemed inappropriate given the differences in facial asymmetry between British and Dutch controls. In future studies, pretreatment images could act as matched controls for posttreatment evaluation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Biological predictors of mandibular asymmetries in children with mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Sop, Ivana; Mady Maricic, Barbara; Pavlic, Andrej; Legovic, Mario; Spalj, Stjepan

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to investigate the severity of skeletal mandibular asymmetry in children with mixed dentition and other factors associated with asymmetry. The study was cross sectional, with stratified sampling according to malocclusion type consisting of 205 subjects with mixed dentition (median 10, interquartile range 9-11 years). There were 59 subjects presenting Class II/1, 77 Class II/2, and 69 Class III. The mandibular asymmetry has been estimated from orthopantomograms using the Habets' method and the dental maturation by Demirjian's method. The sagittal skeletal relationship and facial growth pattern were assessed from lateral cephalograms. Asymmetries in general, were not rare and were more present in the condylar height rather than in the height of the ramus. The highest severity of condylar asymmetry was in Class II/2 subjects (median of asymmetry index 7.3; 64% subjects exhibiting moderate and severe asymmetry), while the Class III subjects exhibited the highest severity of both ramus and total height asymmetry (2.1; 13% and 2.0; 15%, respectively). Multiple logistic regression unveiled male gender as the only predictor of moderate or significant overall asymmetry. Dental age, the difference between dental and chronological age, and facial growth pattern were not significant predictors of asymmetries. Overall, asymmetries in mixed dentition cannot be considered rare; however, no strong relationships between asymmetry and observed biological factors were found.

  8. Regional differences in cerebral asymmetries of human cortical white matter.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Sarina J; Häberling, Isabelle S; Badzakova-Trajkov, Gjurgjica; Patston, Lucy L M; Waldie, Karen E; Tippett, Lynette J; Corballis, Michael C; Kirk, Ian J

    2011-11-01

    The form of the structural asymmetries across the cerebral hemispheres, that support well-established functional asymmetries, are not well understood. Although, many previous studies have investigated structural differences in areas associated with strong functional asymmetries, such as language processes, regions of the brain with less well established functional laterality have received less attention. The current study aims to address this by exploring global white matter asymmetries of the healthy human brain using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography. DTI was conducted on twenty-nine healthy right-handed males, and pathways from the four major lobes were reconstructed using probabilistic tractography. Mean FA, parallel and perpendicular diffusion values were calculated and compared across hemispheres for each pathway generated. Significant asymmetries in the parietal (rightward asymmetry) and occipital (leftward asymmetry) pathways were found in FA measures. However, asymmetric patterns in parallel and/or perpendicular diffusion were observed in all four lobes, even in pathways with symmetrical FA. For instance, significant rightward asymmetry in parallel diffusion was found in the parietal and frontal lobes, whereas significant leftward asymmetry was found in the temporal and occipital lobes. We suggest that these different patterns of diffusion asymmetry reflect differences in microanatomy that support the known patterns of differential functional asymmetry. The different directions of anatomical asymmetry support the notion that there may be a number of different lateralising influences operating in the brain.

  9. Mass predicts web asymmetry in Nephila spiders.

    PubMed

    Kuntner, Matjaz; Gregoric, Matjaz; Li, Daiqin

    2010-12-01

    The architecture of vertical aerial orb webs may be affected by spider size and gravity or by the available web space, in addition to phylogenetic and/or developmental factors. Vertical orb web asymmetry measured by hub displacement has been shown to increase in bigger and heavier spiders; however, previous studies have mostly focused on adult and subadult spiders or on several size classes with measured size parameters but no mass. Both estimations are suboptimal because (1) adult orb web spiders may not invest heavily in optimal web construction, whereas juveniles do; (2) size class/developmental stage is difficult to estimate in the field and is thus subjective, and (3) mass scales differently to size and is therefore more important in predicting aerial foraging success due to gravity. We studied vertical web asymmetry in a giant orb web spider, Nephila pilipes, across a wide range of size classes/developmental stages and tested the hypothesis that vertical web asymmetry (measured as hub displacement) is affected by gravity. On a sample of 100 webs, we found that hubs were more displaced in heavier and larger juveniles and that spider mass explained vertical web asymmetry better than other measures of spider size (carapace and leg lengths, developmental stage). Quantifying web shape via the ladder index suggested that, unlike in other nephilid taxa, growing Nephila orbs do not become vertically elongated. We conclude that the ontogenetic pattern of progressive vertical web asymmetry in Nephila can be explained by optimal foraging due to gravity, to which the opposing selective force may be high web-building costs in the lower orb. Recent literature finds little support for alternative explanations of ontogenetic orb web allometry such as the size limitation hypothesis and the biogenetic law.

  10. Mass predicts web asymmetry in Nephila spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntner, Matjaž; Gregorič, Matjaž; Li, Daiqin

    2010-12-01

    The architecture of vertical aerial orb webs may be affected by spider size and gravity or by the available web space, in addition to phylogenetic and/or developmental factors. Vertical orb web asymmetry measured by hub displacement has been shown to increase in bigger and heavier spiders; however, previous studies have mostly focused on adult and subadult spiders or on several size classes with measured size parameters but no mass. Both estimations are suboptimal because (1) adult orb web spiders may not invest heavily in optimal web construction, whereas juveniles do; (2) size class/developmental stage is difficult to estimate in the field and is thus subjective, and (3) mass scales differently to size and is therefore more important in predicting aerial foraging success due to gravity. We studied vertical web asymmetry in a giant orb web spider, Nephila pilipes, across a wide range of size classes/developmental stages and tested the hypothesis that vertical web asymmetry (measured as hub displacement) is affected by gravity. On a sample of 100 webs, we found that hubs were more displaced in heavier and larger juveniles and that spider mass explained vertical web asymmetry better than other measures of spider size (carapace and leg lengths, developmental stage). Quantifying web shape via the ladder index suggested that, unlike in other nephilid taxa, growing Nephila orbs do not become vertically elongated. We conclude that the ontogenetic pattern of progressive vertical web asymmetry in Nephila can be explained by optimal foraging due to gravity, to which the opposing selective force may be high web-building costs in the lower orb. Recent literature finds little support for alternative explanations of ontogenetic orb web allometry such as the size limitation hypothesis and the biogenetic law.

  11. Asymmetry and inequity in the inheritance of a bacterial adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Benjamin J.; Dellos-Nolan, Sheri; Dhamani, Numa; Todd, Ross; Waller, William; Wozniak, Daniel; Gordon, Vernita D.

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that forms biofilm infections in a wide variety of contexts. Biofilms initiate when bacteria attach to a surface, which triggers changes in gene expression leading to the biofilm phenotype. We have previously shown, for the P. aeruginosa lab strain PAO1, that the self-produced polymer Psl is the most dominant adhesive for attachment to the surface but that another self-produced polymer, Pel, controls the geometry of attachment of these rod-shaped bacteria—strains that make Psl but not Pel are permanently attached to the surface but adhere at only one end (tilting up off the surface), whereas wild-type bacteria that make both Psl and Pel are permanently attached and lie down flat with very little or no tilting (Cooley et al 2013 Soft Matter 9 3871-6). Here we show that the change in attachment geometry reflects a change in the distribution of Psl on the bacterial cell surface. Bacteria that make Psl and Pel have Psl evenly coating the surface, whereas bacteria that make only Psl have Psl concentrated at only one end. We show that Psl can act as an inheritable, epigenetic factor. Rod-shaped P. aeruginosa grows lengthwise and divides across the middle. We find that asymmetry in the distribution of Psl on a parent cell is reflected in asymmetry between siblings in their attachment to the surface. Thus, Pel not only promotes P. aeruginosa lying down flat on the surface, it also helps to homogenize the distribution of Psl within a bacterial population.

  12. Divided Attention Abilities in Young and Old Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somberg, Benjamin L.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    1982-01-01

    Two experiments on divided attention and adult aging are reported that take into account age differences in single-task performance and that measure divided attention independently of resource allocation strategies. No significant age difference in divided attention ability independent of single-task performance level was found in either…

  13. 20 CFR 404.1207 - Divided retirement system coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Divided retirement system coverage groups... of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1207 Divided retirement system coverage groups. (a) General. Under... instrumentalities may divide a retirement system based on whether the employees in positions under that system...

  14. 20 CFR 404.1207 - Divided retirement system coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Divided retirement system coverage groups... of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1207 Divided retirement system coverage groups. (a) General. Under... instrumentalities may divide a retirement system based on whether the employees in positions under that system...

  15. 20 CFR 404.1207 - Divided retirement system coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Divided retirement system coverage groups... of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1207 Divided retirement system coverage groups. (a) General. Under... instrumentalities may divide a retirement system based on whether the employees in positions under that system...

  16. 20 CFR 404.1207 - Divided retirement system coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Divided retirement system coverage groups... of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1207 Divided retirement system coverage groups. (a) General. Under... instrumentalities may divide a retirement system based on whether the employees in positions under that system...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1207 - Divided retirement system coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Divided retirement system coverage groups... of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1207 Divided retirement system coverage groups. (a) General. Under... instrumentalities may divide a retirement system based on whether the employees in positions under that system...

  18. Exploring a new bilateral focal density asymmetry based image marker to predict breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Mirniaharikandehei, Seyedehnafiseh; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Wang, Yunzhi; Qiu, Yuchen; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Although breast density has been widely considered an important breast cancer risk factor, it is not very effective to predict risk of developing breast cancer in a short-term or harboring cancer in mammograms. Based on our recent studies to build short-term breast cancer risk stratification models based on bilateral mammographic density asymmetry, we in this study explored a new quantitative image marker based on bilateral focal density asymmetry to predict the risk of harboring cancers in mammograms. For this purpose, we assembled a testing dataset involving 100 positive and 100 negative cases. In each of positive case, no any solid masses are visible on mammograms. We developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to automatically detect focal dense regions depicting on two bilateral mammograms of left and right breasts. CAD selects one focal dense region with the maximum size on each image and computes its asymmetrical ratio. We used this focal density asymmetry as a new imaging marker to divide testing cases into two groups of higher and lower focal density asymmetry. The first group included 70 cases in which 62.9% are positive, while the second group included 130 cases in which 43.1% are positive. The odds ratio is 2.24. As a result, this preliminary study supported the feasibility of applying a new focal density asymmetry based imaging marker to predict the risk of having mammography-occult cancers. The goal is to assist radiologists more effectively and accurately detect early subtle cancers using mammography and/or other adjunctive imaging modalities in the future.

  19. Three-dimensional assessment of facial asymmetry: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Akhil, Gopi; Senthil Kumar, Kullampalayam Palanisamy; Raja, Subramani; Janardhanan, Kumaresan

    2015-01-01

    For patients with facial asymmetry, complete and precise diagnosis, and surgical treatments to correct the underlying cause of the asymmetry are significant. Conventional diagnostic radiographs (submento-vertex projections, posteroanterior radiography) have limitations in asymmetry diagnosis due to two-dimensional assessments of three-dimensional (3D) images. The advent of 3D images has greatly reduced the magnification and projection errors that are common in conventional radiographs making it as a precise diagnostic aid for assessment of facial asymmetry. Thus, this article attempts to review the newly introduced 3D tools in the diagnosis of more complex facial asymmetries. PMID:26538893

  20. Anomalous CMB north-south asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernui, Armando

    2008-09-15

    Several accurate analyses have revealed a statistically significant north-south ecliptic asymmetry in the large-angle correlations strength of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation temperature field data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). This asymmetry is inconsistent with the statistical isotropy expected in the concordance cosmological model {lambda}CDM. It has been suggested that a possible cause-effect relationship exists between this large-angle anisotropy and the anomalous CMB quadrupole-octopole planes alignment. In turn, this later phenomenon (or both) would be a consequence of one or more of the following undesired effects in CMB data: a systematic error in the data processing or in the instrument characterization, residual foregrounds, and large-angle correlations induced by the incomplete sky CMB data (cut-sky masks are needed to reject galactic foregrounds). Here, it is proved that the north-south asymmetry is unrelated to the quadrupole (l=2) and the octopole (l=3) properties because we find, at high confidence levels, such large-angle anisotropy in three- and five-year WMAP CMB maps containing only the multipole components 4{<=}l{<=}10. The statistical significance depends on both, the CMB map analyzed as well as the cut-sky mask applied to exclude foregrounds. In general, we obtain that the significance level of the north-south asymmetry is less in five-year WMAP data with KQ75 (> or approx. 90% CL) than it is in three-year data with Kp0 (> or approx. 96% CL). For instance, in the WMAP internal linear combination (ILC)-five-year map with the KQ75 mask (a sky cut of 28.4%) this phenomenon is observed at 92.7% CL, whereas for the WMAP ILC-three-year map with the Kp0 mask (a sky cut of 23.5%) this phenomenon appears at 96.5% CL. Moreover, it is also shown that this hemispherical asymmetry is unlikely due to systematics or foreground contaminants, because it is present in single-frequency, multifrequency, and cleaned ILC

  1. Sagittal otolith morphogenesis asymmetry in marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Mille, T; Mahe, K; Villanueva, M C; De Pontual, H; Ernande, B

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated and compared asymmetry in sagittal otolith shape and length between left and right inner ears in four roundfish and four flatfish species of commercial interest. For each species, the effects of ontogenetic changes (individual age and total body length), sexual dimorphism (individual sex) and the otolith's location on the right or left side of the head, on the shape and length of paired otoliths (between 143 and 702 pairs according to species) were evaluated. Ontogenetic changes in otolith shape and length were observed for all species. Sexual dimorphism, either in otolith shape and length or in their ontogenetic changes, was detected for half of the species, be they round or flat. Significant directional asymmetry in otolith shape and length was detected in one roundfish species each, but its inconsistency across species and its small average amplitude (6·17% for shape and 1·99% for length) suggested that it has barely any biological relevance. Significant directional asymmetry in otolith shape and length was found for all flatfish species except otolith length for one species. Its average amplitude varied between 2·06 and 17·50% for shape and between 0·00 and 11·83% for length and increased significantly throughout ontogeny for two species, one dextral and one sinistral. The longer (length) and rounder otolith (shape) appeared to be always on the blind side whatever the species. These results suggest differential biomineralization between the blind and ocular inner ears in flatfish species that could result from perturbations of the proximal-distal gradient of otolith precursors in the endolymph and the otolith position relative to the geometry of the saccular epithelium due to body morphology asymmetry and lateralized behaviour. The fact that asymmetry never exceeded 18% even at the individual level suggests an evolutionary canalization of otolith shape symmetry to avoid negative effects on fish hearing and balance. Technically

  2. Is there an association between skeletal asymmetry and tooth absence?

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Pereira, Keila Cristina Rausch; Freitas, Maria Perpetua Mota

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Facial skeletal asymmetry is commonly found in humans and its main characteristic is menton deviation. The literature suggests that occlusal and masticatory problems arising from tooth absence could be related to the development of such asymmetries. Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of mandibular skeletal asymmetries and to investigate its association with posterior tooth absences. Methods: Tomographic images of 952 individuals aged from 18 to 75 years old were used. Asymmetry was the analyzed outcome, and it was categorized into three groups according to gnathion displacement in relation to the midsagittal plane (relative symmetry, moderate asymmetry, and severe asymmetry). Patients were sorted by the presence of all posterior teeth, unilateral posterior tooth absence, or bilateral posterior tooth absence. Chi-square test with a significance level of 5% was used to verify the association between posterior tooth absence and asymmetry. Results: Results show relative symmetry present in 55.3% of the sample, as well as the prevalence of 27.3% for moderate mandibular asymmetry and 17.4% for severe asymmetry. Moderate and severe mandibular asymmetries occurred in a higher proportion in patients with unilateral posterior tooth absence. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the analyzed groups (p = 0.691). Conclusions: In this study, mandibular asymmetries did not present any association with the absence of teeth on the posterior area of the arch. PMID:27653267

  3. Categories of manual asymmetry and their variation with advancing age.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Luis A

    2008-06-01

    Manual asymmetries were analyzed in 18- to 63-year-old right-handers in different motor tasks. This analysis aimed at describing the asymmetry profile for each task and assessing their stability across ages. For this purpose, performance of the right and left hands were analyzed in the following aspects: simple reaction time, rate of sequential finger movements, maximum grip force, accuracy in anticipatory timing, rate of repetitive tapping, and rate of drawing movements. In addition, stability of manual preference across ages was assessed through the Edinburgh inventory (Oldfield, 1971). The results indicated different profiles of manual asymmetry, with identification of three categories across tasks: symmetric performance (asymmetry indices close to zero), inconsistent asymmetry (asymmetry indices variable in magnitude and direction), and consistent asymmetry (asymmetry indices favoring a single hand). The different profiles observed in the young adults were stable across ages with two exceptions: decreased lateral asymmetry for maximum grip force and increased asymmetry for sequential drawing in older individuals. These results indicate that manual asymmetries are task specific. Such task specificity is interpreted to be the result of different sensorimotor requirements imposed by each motor task in association with motor experiences accumulated over the lifetime. Analysis of manual preference showed that strength of preference for the right hand was greater in older individuals.

  4. Mandibular asymmetry in patients with the crouzon or apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elmi, P; Reitsma, J H; Buschang, P H; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe directional and fluctuating mandibular asymmetry over time in children with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Mandibular asymmetry of children between 7.5 and 14 years of age with Crouzon syndrome (n = 35) and Apert syndrome (n = 24) were compared with controls (n = 327). From panoramic radiographs, mandibular directional and fluctuating asymmetry was determined for the three groups. Multilevel statistical techniques were used to describe mandibular asymmetry changes over time. Patients with Crouzon and Apert syndromes showed statistically significant more fluctuating asymmetry for mandibular measures than did controls. Between the Crouzon and Apert syndromes groups, no statistical differences were found in directional and fluctuating asymmetry. The control group showed statistically significantly more directional asymmetry than did patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. The controls showed no change over time for the directional asymmetry of condylar-ramal height; however, the directional asymmetry of the gonial angle increased. Patients with Crouzon syndrome showed side dominance for only condylar-ramal height; whereas, patients with Apert syndrome did not show dominance for any of the measurements. Apert and Crouzon syndromes showed developmental instability, in contrast to the controls. No statistically significant longitudinal differences were found for either the directional or the fluctuating asymmetry between Crouzon and Apert syndromes. Findings for fluctuating and directional asymmetry for both syndromes may indicate an inability to cope with genetic and environmental stress during development and treatment, compared with untreated nonsyndromic individuals.

  5. Handedness and cerebral anatomical asymmetries in young adult males.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Pierre-Yves; Crivello, Fabrice; Perchey, Guy; Mazoyer, Bernard; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie

    2006-02-15

    Using voxel-based morphometry, we measured the cerebral anatomical asymmetries in a sample of 56 young right-handed males and then compared voxelwise asymmetry indices of these subjects to those of 56 young left-handed males. In the right-handed, the clusters of grey matter asymmetry corresponding to the leftward occipital petalia and planum temporale asymmetries were retrieved. Strong rightward temporo-parietal asymmetries were also observed, but the rightward grey matter asymmetry in the frontal lobe was less massive than previously described. Group comparisons of left- and right-handed subjects' asymmetry maps, performed at a statistical threshold not corrected for multiple comparisons, revealed significant effects of handedness on this pattern of anatomical asymmetry in frontal regions, notably in the lower central and precentral sulci, and also in the planum temporale, with right-handed subjects being more leftward asymmetric. Concerning white matter, although almost no focal differences between left- and right-handed subjects were detected, volumetric analyses at the hemispheric level revealed a leftward asymmetry, which happened to be significantly less marked in the left-handed. This latter result, together with the pattern of leftward white matter asymmetries, suggested that anatomical correlates of the left hemispheric specialization for language would exist in white matter. In the population we studied, differences in anatomical asymmetry between left- and right-handed subjects provided structural arguments for a greater functional ambilaterality in left-handed subjects.

  6. Predictions of the poloidal asymmetries and transport frequencies in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, C. Lee, S. G.; Terzolo, L.; Stacey, W. M.

    2014-01-15

    The extended neoclassical rotation theory formulated in Miller flux surface geometry enables unprecedented neoclassical calculations of the poloidal asymmetries in density, rotation velocities, electrostatic potential along the flux surfaces, and of the inertial (Reynolds stress) and gyroviscous transport frequencies, which are strong functions of these asymmetries. This paper presents such calculations of the poloidal asymmetries and non-negligible inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies in two KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 094006 (2011)] Neutral Beam Injection H-mode discharges. The in-out asymmetries in the velocities are an order of magnitude larger than their up-down asymmetries. The magnitudes of the predicted inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies depend on the magnitudes of the density and velocity asymmetries. The neoclassically predicted density asymmetries are shown to correspond with the reported measurements in tokamaks and the predicted carbon toroidal velocities agree very well with the measurements in KSTAR.

  7. Observing the top energy asymmetry at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, S.; Westhoff, S.

    2017-01-01

    The top-antitop energy asymmetry is a promising observable of the charge asymmetry in jet-associated top-quark pair production at the LHC. We present new predictions of the energy asymmetry in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV, including QCD corrections at the next-to-leading perturbative order. The effect of QCD corrections on the observable is moderate. With suitable phase-space cuts, the asymmetry can be enhanced at the cost of reducing the cross section. For instance, for a cross section of 1 pb after cuts, we predict an energy asymmetry of -6. 5-0.2+0.1% at the next-to-leading order in QCD. We also investigate scale uncertainties and parton-shower effects, which partially cancel in the normalized asymmetry. Our results provide a sound basis for a measurement of the energy asymmetry at the LHC during run II.

  8. Collider-Independent tt¯ Forward-Backward Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Juste, A.

    2012-11-01

    We introduce the forward-backward asymmetries Au, Ad corresponding to uu¯, dd¯→tt¯ production, respectively, at hadron colliders. These are collider and center-of-mass independent observables, directly related to the forward-backward and charge asymmetries measured at the Tevatron and the LHC, respectively. We discuss how to extract these asymmetries from data. Because these asymmetries are collider independent, their measurement at these two colliders could elucidate the nature of the anomalous forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron. Our framework also shows in a model independent fashion that a positive Tevatron asymmetry exceeding the standard model expectation is compatible with the small asymmetry measured at the LHC.

  9. Stochastic left-right neuronal asymmetry in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Alqadah, Amel; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Xiong, Rui; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-12-19

    Left-right asymmetry in the nervous system is observed across species. Defects in left-right cerebral asymmetry are linked to several neurological diseases, but the molecular mechanisms underlying brain asymmetry in vertebrates are still not very well understood. The Caenorhabditis elegans left and right amphid wing 'C' (AWC) olfactory neurons communicate through intercellular calcium signalling in a transient embryonic gap junction neural network to specify two asymmetric subtypes, AWC(OFF) (default) and AWC(ON) (induced), in a stochastic manner. Here, we highlight the molecular mechanisms that establish and maintain stochastic AWC asymmetry. As the components of the AWC asymmetry pathway are highly conserved, insights from the model organism C. elegans may provide a window onto how brain asymmetry develops in humans.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'.

  10. Bridging the Organizational Divide: Toward a Comprehensive Approach to the Digital Divide. A PolicyLink Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschenbaum, Josh; Kunamneni, Radhika

    This report discusses innovative uses of information technology by community based organizations, examining how to develop a comprehensive policy agenda for bridging the digital divide. It begins by presenting background information on the digital divide as context for understanding the organizational divide. Next, it discusses challenges facing…

  11. A Cellular Biophysics Textbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, Alan Joseph

    2011-12-01

    In the past two decades, great advances have been made in understanding of the biophysical mechanisms of the protein machines that carry out the fundamental processes of the cell. It is now known that all major eukaryotic cellular processes require a complicated assemblage of proteins acting via a series of concerted motions. In order to grasp current understanding of cellular mechanisms, the new generation of cell biologists needs to be trained in the general characteristics of these cellular properties and the methods with which to study them. This cellular biophysics textbook, to be used in conjunction with the cellular biophysics course (MCB143) at UC-Davis, provides a great tool in the instruction of the new generation of cellular biologists. It provides a hierarchical view of the cell, from atoms to protein machines and explains in depth the mechanisms of cytoskeletal force generators as an example of these principles.

  12. GDH Integral on the Proton from Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena

    2004-05-01

    Inclusive double spin electron asymmetries have been measured by scattering polarized electrons off the solid polarized 15NH3 target in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2000-2001. The virtual photon asymmetry A1 (x), the longitudinal spin structure function, g1 (x, Q2), and the first moment, γ1p, have been evaluated for a kinematic range of 0.05 ≥ Q2 ≥ 4.5 GeV2. The extracted results complement the existing data in the resonance region, extending it to lower and higher Q2 regions. The results are important in the study of Q2 evolution of nucleon structure from the hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom.

  13. Local time asymmetries in the Venus thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Solomon, S. C.; Bougher, S. W.

    1993-06-01

    A comparison is presented of the 130-m images taken in the Venus thermosphere by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (PVOUVS) to predictions by a model which incorporates current understanding of the global structure of the thermosphere, the mechanisms which excite the 130-nm transition in O, and the radiative transport of the 130-nm triplet in the thermosphere. The features identified in the data/model comparison appear as a local time asymmetry in B(130) and O at altitudes poleward of 30 deg. Oxygen densities at the evening terminator are typically a factor of 2 higher than those at the morning terminator. This asymmetry in O has never before been observed or predicted in the global thermospheric models.

  14. Beam-Spin Asymmetry Measurements at CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasyan, M.

    2008-10-01

    The single-spin asymmetries (SSA) that have been reported recently in semi-inclusive DIS by HERMES, COMPASS and CLAS, have emerged as a powerful tool to access the orbital motion of partons. SSAs could arise in the fragmentation of polarized quarks (Collins effect) and from the interference of wavefunctions with different orbital angular momentum (Sivers effect). The two mechanisms produce different kinematical dependences and their contributions could be separated in measurements of different beam and target single-spin asymmetries. This contribution presents recent results from Jefferson Lab's CLAS detector on beam SSAs in single neutral pion electroproduction off an unpolarized hydrogen targets in the DIS regime (Q^2>1GeV^2,W^2>4GeV^2). The measured kinematical dependences are compared with model predictions.

  15. Behavioral evidence for inter-hemispheric cooperation during a lexical decision task: a divided visual field experiment

    PubMed Central

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Lemonnier, Sophie; Baciu, Monica

    2013-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS The redundant bilateral visual presentation of verbal stimuli decreases asymmetry and increases the cooperation between the two hemispheres.The increased cooperation between the hemispheres is related to semantic information during lexical processing.The inter-hemispheric interaction is represented by both inhibition and cooperation. This study explores inter-hemispheric interaction (IHI) during a lexical decision task by using a behavioral approach, the bilateral presentation of stimuli within a divided visual field experiment. Previous studies have shown that compared to unilateral presentation, the bilateral redundant (BR) presentation decreases the inter-hemispheric asymmetry and facilitates the cooperation between hemispheres. However, it is still poorly understood which type of information facilitates this cooperation. In the present study, verbal stimuli were presented unilaterally (left or right visual hemi-field successively) and bilaterally (left and right visual hemi-field simultaneously). Moreover, during the bilateral presentation of stimuli, we manipulated the relationship between target and distractors in order to specify the type of information which modulates the IHI. Thus, three types of information were manipulated: perceptual, semantic, and decisional, respectively named pre-lexical, lexical and post-lexical processing. Our results revealed left hemisphere (LH) lateralization during the lexical decision task. In terms of inter-hemisphere interaction, the perceptual and decision-making information increased the inter-hemispheric asymmetry, suggesting the inhibition of one hemisphere upon the other. In contrast, semantic information decreased the inter-hemispheric asymmetry, suggesting cooperation between the hemispheres. We discussed our results according to current models of IHI and concluded that cerebral hemispheres interact and communicate according to various excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, all which depend on specific

  16. Behavioral evidence for inter-hemispheric cooperation during a lexical decision task: a divided visual field experiment.

    PubMed

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Lemonnier, Sophie; Baciu, Monica

    2013-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTSThe redundant bilateral visual presentation of verbal stimuli decreases asymmetry and increases the cooperation between the two hemispheres.The increased cooperation between the hemispheres is related to semantic information during lexical processing.The inter-hemispheric interaction is represented by both inhibition and cooperation. This study explores inter-hemispheric interaction (IHI) during a lexical decision task by using a behavioral approach, the bilateral presentation of stimuli within a divided visual field experiment. Previous studies have shown that compared to unilateral presentation, the bilateral redundant (BR) presentation decreases the inter-hemispheric asymmetry and facilitates the cooperation between hemispheres. However, it is still poorly understood which type of information facilitates this cooperation. In the present study, verbal stimuli were presented unilaterally (left or right visual hemi-field successively) and bilaterally (left and right visual hemi-field simultaneously). Moreover, during the bilateral presentation of stimuli, we manipulated the relationship between target and distractors in order to specify the type of information which modulates the IHI. Thus, three types of information were manipulated: perceptual, semantic, and decisional, respectively named pre-lexical, lexical and post-lexical processing. Our results revealed left hemisphere (LH) lateralization during the lexical decision task. In terms of inter-hemisphere interaction, the perceptual and decision-making information increased the inter-hemispheric asymmetry, suggesting the inhibition of one hemisphere upon the other. In contrast, semantic information decreased the inter-hemispheric asymmetry, suggesting cooperation between the hemispheres. We discussed our results according to current models of IHI and concluded that cerebral hemispheres interact and communicate according to various excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, all which depend on specific

  17. Interhemispheric Asymmetries in Visual Evoked Potential Amplitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-12

    developed using many experimental techniques. Behavioral tasks have included dichotic listening (Kimura, 1961, 1967), reaction time, and other...channel was digitized by the ARll A-D converter- Fifty epochs of 512 msec were averaged for each brain site in each brain hemisphere for each stimulus...perception of verbal stimuli. Can. J. Psychol. 15: 166-171, 1961. Kimuri, D. Functional asymmetry of the brain in dichotic listening. Cortex 3, 163

  18. LETTER: Synchronization model for stock market asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donangelo, Raul; Jensen, Mogens H.; Simonsen, Ingve; Sneppen, Kim

    2006-11-01

    The waiting time needed for a stock market index to undergo a given percentage change in its value is found to have an up down asymmetry, which, surprisingly, is not observed for the individual stocks composing that index. To explain this, we introduce a market model consisting of randomly fluctuating stocks that occasionally synchronize their short term draw-downs. These synchronous events are parametrized by a 'fear factor', that reflects the occurrence of dramatic external events which affect the financial market.

  19. W mass and W asymmetry at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa )

    1991-05-01

    The lepton charge asymmetry from W decaying into a lepton and a neutrino is discussed (preliminary result). This measurement gives information on parton distribution functions at low x values. The derivation of the recently published W mass value of 79.91 {plus minus} 0.39 GeV/c{sup 2} is also presented. M{sub W} is used to set an upper limit on the top quark mass. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Female and male orbit asymmetry: Digital analysis.

    PubMed

    Lepich, Tomasz; Dąbek, Józefa; Witkowska, Małgorzata; Jura-Szołtys, Edyta; Bajor, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Standard anthropometric methods applied to measurements of the skull differentials are laden with mistakes stemming from the way the measuring devices are built and from a lack of experience on the part of the researchers. To increase objectivity, digital imaging measurements via computer systems were introduced. The aim of this research was to assess the asymmetry of the male and female orbit with the application of the new graphic methods: raster graphics and vector graphics. The examination was conducted on 184 well-preserved skulls. The photos were taken by a digital camera with high definition. Orbit asymmetry was examined by determining the distance between the centers of gravity of both orbits and the frontal median line d1 and d2. Then angles α and β were appointed. They are defined as angles between the line that runs through craniometrical points mf and ek on the right side (angle α) and on the left side (angle β), and the frontal median line at their crossing point. Distances r2 and r1, which are allocated points between the frontal median lines (LPP), were also set. Angles α and β were also analyzed while comparing the skulls of both genders. Statistically significant differences were only observed in male skulls. However, differences for both genders were noted in parameters d1 and d2. No statistically significant differences were discovered between men and women for parameters r1 and r2. The groups of women and men were merged, being treated as a population; which resulted in the conclusion that there are no statistically significant differences between these parameters. The skull's asymmetry connected to gender and the asymmetry of the right and left sides of examined craniums can be used in criminal examinations as well as in facial reconstructive surgeries.

  1. Hemispheric asymmetry: contributions from brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2011-09-01

    A series of studies using functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion tensor imaging measures also, to elucidate the aspects of hemispheric asymmetry are reviewed. It is suggested that laterality evolved as a response to the demands of language and the need for air-based communication which may have necessitated a division of labor between the hemispheres in order to avoid having duplicate copies in both the hemispheres that would increase processing redundancy. This would have put pressure on brain structures related to the evolution of language and speech, such as the left peri-Sylvian region. MRI data are provided showing structural and functional asymmetry in this region of the brain and how fibers connecting the right and left peri-Sylvian regions pass through the corpus callosum. It is further suggested that the so-called Yakelovian-torque, i.e., the twisting of the brain along the longitudinal axis, with the right frontal and left occipital poles protruding beyond the corresponding left and right sides, was necessary for the expansion of the left peri-Sylvian region and the right occipito-parietal regions subserving the processing of spatial relations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data related to sex differences for visuo-spatial processing are presented showing enhanced right-sided activation in posterior parts of the brain in both sexes, and frontal activation including Broca's area in the female group only, suggesting that males and females use different strategies when solving a cognitive task. The paper ends with a discussion of the role of the corpus callosum in laterality and the role played by structural asymmetry in understanding corresponding functional asymmetry. WIREs Cogni Sci 2011 2 461-478 DOI: 10.1002/wcs.122 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  2. Nodal signalling determines biradial asymmetry in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Schmidt, Heiko A; Kuhn, Anne; Höger, Stefanie K; Kocagöz, Yigit; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Ozbek, Suat; Holstein, Thomas W

    2014-11-06

    In bilaterians, three orthogonal body axes define the animal form, with distinct anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and left-right asymmetries. The key signalling factors are Wnt family proteins for the anterior-posterior axis, Bmp family proteins for the dorsal-ventral axis and Nodal for the left-right axis. Cnidarians, the sister group to bilaterians, are characterized by one oral-aboral body axis, which exhibits a distinct biradiality of unknown molecular nature. Here we analysed the biradial growth pattern in the radially symmetrical cnidarian polyp Hydra, and we report evidence of Nodal in a pre-bilaterian clade. We identified a Nodal-related gene (Ndr) in Hydra magnipapillata, and this gene is essential for setting up an axial asymmetry along the main body axis. This asymmetry defines a lateral signalling centre, inducing a new body axis of a budding polyp orthogonal to the mother polyp's axis. Ndr is expressed exclusively in the lateral bud anlage and induces Pitx, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor that functions downstream of Nodal. Reminiscent of its function in vertebrates, Nodal acts downstream of β-Catenin signalling. Our data support an evolutionary scenario in which a 'core-signalling cassette' consisting of β-Catenin, Nodal and Pitx pre-dated the cnidarian-bilaterian split. We presume that this cassette was co-opted for various modes of axial patterning: for example, for lateral branching in cnidarians and left-right patterning in bilaterians.

  3. Structural Connectivity Asymmetry in the Neonatal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V.; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D.; Meaney, Michael J.; Qiu, Anqi

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  4. Functional Asymmetry in Kinesin and Dynein Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Rank, Katherine C.; Rayment, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Active transport along the microtubule lattice is a complex process that involves both the Kinesin and Dynein superfamily of motors. Transportation requires sophisticated regulation much of which occurs through the motor’s tail domain. However, a significant portion of this regulation also occurs through structural changes that arise in the motor and the microtubule upon binding. The most obvious structural change being the manifestation of asymmetry. To a first approximation in solution, kinesin dimers exhibit two-fold symmetry, and microtubules, helical symmetry. The higher symmetries of both the kinesin dimers and microtubule lattice are lost on formation of the kinesin-microtubule complex. Loss of symmetry has functional consequences such as an asymmetric hand-over-hand mechanism in plus-end directed kinesins, asymmetric microtubule binding in the Kinesin-14 family, spatially biased stepping in dynein, and cooperative binding of additional motors to the microtubule. This review focuses on how the consequences of asymmetry affect regulation of motor heads within a dimer, dimers within an ensemble of motors, and suggests how these asymmetries may affect regulation of active transport within the cell. PMID:23066835

  5. Functional gait asymmetry of unilateral transfemoral amputees.

    PubMed

    Schaarschmidt, Margrit; Lipfert, Susanne W; Meier-Gratz, Christine; Scholle, Hans-Christoph; Seyfarth, Andre

    2012-08-01

    The aim of prosthetic devices is to mimic the function of biological systems. Numerous investigations have demonstrated significant asymmetries in unilateral amputee gait. The underlying interactions of prosthetic and intact leg are not widely discussed, so far. To get more insight into the functionality of asymmetries, we investigated temporal and kinetic parameters of walking transfemoral amputees wearing the computerized C-Leg and the non-computerized 3R80. Experiments were conducted on an instrumented treadmill at four different walking speeds (0.5, 0.8, 1.1, 1.4m/s) measuring vertical and horizontal ground reaction forces. Single support, double support and contact times, vertical and horizontal impulses as well as their asymmetry factors were calculated. Gait patterns were similar for both prosthetic knee joints, manifesting in (i) reduced stance times of the prosthetic leg, (ii) prolonged load transfer during double support from intact to prosthetic leg at lower speeds, (iii) reduced vertical and horizontal impulses of the prosthetic leg, (iv) net accelerating horizontal impulses during contact of the prosthetic leg, (v) missing impacts at touch-down of the prosthetic leg. Our results suggest that deficits of the prosthetic leg like missing active knee extension and ankle push-off are compensated by the intact leg. The altered touch-down configuration for the prosthetic leg enables it to provide forward propulsion while load bearing is largely shifted to the intact leg. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy.

  7. The Cellular Structure of Carbon Detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryxell, B.; Timmes, F. X.; Zingale, M.; Dursi, L. J.; Ricker, P.; Olson, K.; Calder, A. C.; Tufo, H.; MacNeice, P.; Truran, J. W.; Rosner, R.

    2000-05-01

    We compare two and three-dimensional simulations of the cellular structure of carbon detonations. The initial density of the carbon is taken to be 107 g cm-3. This value has been suggested as the density at which a deflagration to detonation transition may occur in Type Ia supernovae. An initial planar detonation front becomes unstable and develops a complex structure due to the generation of transverse waves. Differences in the amount of asymmetry between the 2D and 3D cases, as well as the relative sizes of individual cells will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the Department of Energy Grant No. B341495 to the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago under the ASCI Strategic Alliances Program.

  8. Possible mechanisms for initiating macroscopic left-right asymmetry in developing organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Christopher L.

    2009-05-14

    How might systematic left-right (L/R) asymmetry of the body plan originate in multicellular animals (and plants)? Somehow, the microscopic handedness of biological molecules must be brought up to macroscopic scales. Basic symmetry principles suggest that the usual 'biological' mechanisms - diffusion and gene regulation - are insufficient to implement the 'right-hand rule' defining a third body axis from the other two. Instead, on the cellular level, 'physical' mechanisms (forces and collective dynamic states) are needed involving the long stiff fibers of the cytoskeleton. I discuss some possible scenarios; only in the case of vertebrate internal organs is the answer currently known (and even that is in dispute)

  9. An Empirical Analysis of the Determinants of International Digital Divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Liu

    International Digital Divide is an imbalance state of ICT penetration between countries. This paper analyzes the current status and trends of international digital divide, adopts Gompertz technology diffusion model to verify the determinants of ICT penetration level and diffusion rate separately. Finally, China should use "policy levers" to strengthen international trade cooperation, improve the capability of independent innovation, and achieve Chinese goal of bridging digital divide.

  10. Asymmetry of Raman scattering by structure variation in space.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ridong; Yuan, Pengyu; Han, Meng; Xu, Shen; Wang, Tianyu; Wang, Xinwei

    2017-07-24

    We report on the discovery of asymmetries of Raman scattering along one scanning direction, between two scanning directions, and by structure variation of the sample in space. Asymmetry of Raman shift along the x direction, and the asymmetry of Raman shift and linewidth between the two scanning directions (x and y) are found for a 1210 nm diameter silica particle. The observed asymmetries are confirmed by further 2D Raman scanning of the same particle. To further explore the asymmetry of Raman scattering, glass fibers of three diameters (0.53, 1.00, and 3.20 μm) are scanned along two directions. The asymmetry of Raman shift along each direction, the asymmetry of linewidth along the y direction, and the asymmetry of Raman shift and linewidth between the two scanning directions are discovered. Additionally, 11 nm-thick MoSe2 nanosheets on silicon are used to discover whether an asymmetry of Raman scattering exists at the edge of the nanosheets. One edge of the nanosheet is scanned in four directions and the asymmetry of Raman scattering caused by the step variation is also detected. All the observed Raman scattering asymmetries are explained soundly by the Raman signal diffraction and image shift on the CCD detector arrays of the Raman spectrometer. In practice, to use scanning Raman for surface structure study, great measure has to be taken to consider the structure-induced asymmetries to uncover the real Raman wave number variation by intrinsic material structure. We propose a signal processing method by averaging the scanning points along four directions to eliminate the interference of the edge. This method works well to significantly suppress the asymmetries of Raman properties and uncover the real Raman signal change by structure variation.

  11. Modelling cellular behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  12. Validity and sensitivity of the longitudinal asymmetry index to detect gait asymmetry using Microsoft Kinect data.

    PubMed

    Auvinet, E; Multon, F; Manning, V; Meunier, J; Cobb, J P

    2017-01-01

    Gait asymmetry information is a key point in disease screening and follow-up. Constant Relative Phase (CRP) has been used to quantify within-stride asymmetry index, which requires noise-free and accurate motion capture, which is difficult to obtain in clinical settings. This study explores a new index, the Longitudinal Asymmetry Index (ILong) which is derived using data from a low-cost depth camera (Kinect). ILong is based on depth images averaged over several gait cycles, rather than derived joint positions or angles. This study aims to evaluate (1) the validity of CRP computed with Kinect, (2) the validity and sensitivity of ILong for measuring gait asymmetry based solely on data provided by a depth camera, (3) the clinical applicability of a posteriorly mounted camera system to avoid occlusion caused by the standard front-fitted treadmill consoles and (4) the number of strides needed to reliably calculate ILong. The gait of 15 subjects was recorded concurrently with a marker-based system (MBS) and Kinect, and asymmetry was artificially reproduced by introducing a 5cm sole attached to one foot. CRP computed with Kinect was not reliable. ILong detected this disturbed gait reliably and could be computed from a posteriorly placed Kinect without loss of validity. A minimum of five strides was needed to achieve a correlation coefficient of 0.9 between standard MBS and low-cost depth camera based ILong. ILong provides a clinically pragmatic method for measuring gait asymmetry, with application for improved patient care through enhanced disease, screening, diagnosis and monitoring. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Asymmetry-induced electric current rectification in permselective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Yoav; Edri, Yaron; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-09-01

    For a symmetric ion permselective system, in terms of geometry and bulk concentrations, the system response is also symmetric under opposite electric field polarity. In this work we derive an analytical solution for the concentration distribution, electric potential, and current-voltage response for a four-layered system comprised of two microchambers connected by two permselective regions of varying properties. It is shown that any additional asymmetry in the system, in terms of the geometry, bulk concentration, or surface charge property of the permselective regions, results in current rectification. Our work is divided into two parts: when both permselective regions have the same surface charge sign and the case of opposite signs. For the same sign case we are able to show that the system behaves as a dialytic battery while accounting for field-focusing effects. For the case of opposite signs (i.e., bipolar membrane), our system exhibits the behavior of a bipolar diode where the magnitude of the rectification can be of order 102-103 .

  14. Hemispheric asymmetries for simple visual judgments in the split brain.

    PubMed

    Corballis, Paul M; Funnell, Margaret G; Gazzaniga, Michael S

    2002-01-01

    While it is commonly noted that the right cerebral hemisphere is specialized for visuospatial processing, the scope and nature of this specialization remain somewhat ill defined. Our previous research with callosotomy ('split-brain') patients has suggested that the asymmetry may be limited to conditions that have an explicit spatial component. To investigate this we compared the performance of the divided hemispheres of two callosotomy patients on four simple visual-matching tasks. These tasks were orientation discrimination, vernier offset discrimination, size discrimination, and luminance discrimination. In each task, two stimuli were presented briefly to one visual hemifield and the patient was asked to discriminate whether they were the same or different. The first three tasks (orientation, vernier, and size) were all spatial in nature and were performed better by the right hemisphere. The luminance discrimination task, which is non-spatial, was performed equivalently by the two hemispheres. These results support the view that the fundamental difference in visual function between the hemispheres is in the ability to perform spatial discriminations.

  15. ASYMMETRY IN SEXUAL PHEROMONES IS NOT REQUIRED FOR ASCOMYCETE MATING

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Murray, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background We investigated the determinants of sexual identity in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The higher fungi are divided into the Ascomycetes and the Basidiomycetes. Most Ascomycetes have two mating types: one (called α in yeasts and MAT1-1 in filamentous fungi) produces a small, unmodified, peptide pheromone, and the other (a in yeasts and MAT1-2 in filamentous fungi) produces a peptide pheromone conjugated to a C terminal farnesyl group that makes it very hydrophobic. In the Basidiomycetes, all pheromones are lipid-modified, and this difference is a distinguishing feature between the phyla. We asked whether the asymmetry in pheromone modification is required for successful mating in Ascomycetes. Results We cloned receptor and pheromone genes from a filamentous Ascomycete and a Basidiomycete and expressed these in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to generate novel, alternative mating pairs. We find that two yeast cells can mate even when both cells secrete a-like or α-like peptides. Importantly, this is true regardless of whether the cells express the a- or α-mating type loci, which control the expression of other, sex-specific genes, in addition to the pheromones and pheromone receptors. Conclusions We demonstrate that the asymmetric pheromone modification is not required for successful mating of ascomycete fungi and confirm that, in budding yeast, the primary determinants of mating are the specificity of the receptors and their corresponding pheromones. PMID:21835624

  16. Asymmetry in sexual pheromones is not required for ascomycete mating.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Murray, Andrew

    2011-08-23

    We investigated the determinants of sexual identity in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The higher fungi are divided into the ascomycetes and the basidiomycetes. Most ascomycetes have two mating types: one (called α in yeasts and MAT1-1 in filamentous fungi) produces a small, unmodified, peptide pheromone, and the other (a in yeasts and MAT1-2 in filamentous fungi) produces a peptide pheromone conjugated to a C-terminal farnesyl group that makes it very hydrophobic. In the basidiomycetes, all pheromones are lipid-modified, and this difference is a distinguishing feature between the phyla. We asked whether the asymmetry in pheromone modification is required for successful mating in ascomycetes. We cloned receptor and pheromone genes from a filamentous ascomycete and a basidiomycete and expressed these in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to generate novel, alternative mating pairs. We find that two yeast cells can mate even when both cells secrete a-like or α-like peptides. Importantly, this is true regardless of whether the cells express the a- or α-mating-type loci, which control the expression of other, sex-specific genes, in addition to the pheromones and pheromone receptors. We demonstrate that the asymmetric pheromone modification is not required for successful mating of ascomycete fungi and confirm that, in budding yeast, the primary determinants of mating are the specificity of the receptors and their corresponding pheromones. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcriptome asymmetry within mouse zygotes but not between early embryonic sister blastomeres

    PubMed Central

    VerMilyea, Matthew D; Maneck, Matthias; Yoshida, Naoko; Blochberger, Isabell; Suzuki, Emi; Suzuki, Toru; Spang, Rainer; Klein, Christoph A; Perry, Anthony C F

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptome regionalization is an essential polarity determinant among metazoans, directing embryonic axis formation during normal development. Although conservation of this principle in mammals is assumed, recent evidence is conflicting and it is not known whether transcriptome asymmetries exist within unfertilized mammalian eggs or between the respective cleavage products of early embryonic divisions. We here address this by comparing transcriptome profiles of paired single cells and sub-cellular structures obtained microsurgically from mouse oocytes and totipotent embryos. Paired microsurgical spindle and remnant samples from unfertilized metaphase II oocytes possessed distinguishable profiles. Fertilization produces a totipotent 1-cell embryo (zygote) and associated spindle-enriched second polar body whose paired profiles also differed, reflecting spindle transcript enrichment. However, there was no programmed transcriptome asymmetry between sister cells within 2- or 3-cell embryos. Accordingly, there is transcriptome asymmetry within mouse oocytes, but not between the sister blastomeres of early embryos. This work places constraints on pre-patterning in mammals and provides documentation correlating potency changes and transcriptome partitioning at the single-cell level. PMID:21468028

  18. A study on asymmetry in infants with congenital muscular torticollis according to head rotation.

    PubMed

    Lee, KyeongSoo; Chung, EunJung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to research asymmetry in infants with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) according to head rotation. [Subjects and Methods] 70 infants with CMT were divided into grade I, grade II, and grade III according to the asymmetry of cervical rotation. Patients received ultrasound and massage therapy for 30 minutes, in conjunction with passive stretching exercises, 3 times a week. Repeated measurement results from interventions were presented from baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Asymmetry was evaluated by head tilt (HT) and the torticollis overall assessment (TOA). [Results] The TOA measured at 3 months and 6 months showed a significant difference in inter group scores and an intra group interaction with grade and rating scale was observed. In contrast, HT was significantly different in intra group comparison, but no significant difference in inter and intra group interaction was observed in the angle and grade. [Conclusion] Conservative physical therapy showed lasting effects according to the intervention period over 3 months and 6 months of repeated measurements over time in TOA and HT. Especially, TOA showed significant differences in asymmetric changes according to the cervical rotation.

  19. A study on asymmetry in infants with congenital muscular torticollis according to head rotation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, KyeongSoo; Chung, EunJung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to research asymmetry in infants with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) according to head rotation. [Subjects and Methods] 70 infants with CMT were divided into grade I, grade II, and grade III according to the asymmetry of cervical rotation. Patients received ultrasound and massage therapy for 30 minutes, in conjunction with passive stretching exercises, 3 times a week. Repeated measurement results from interventions were presented from baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Asymmetry was evaluated by head tilt (HT) and the torticollis overall assessment (TOA). [Results] The TOA measured at 3 months and 6 months showed a significant difference in inter group scores and an intra group interaction with grade and rating scale was observed. In contrast, HT was significantly different in intra group comparison, but no significant difference in inter and intra group interaction was observed in the angle and grade. [Conclusion] Conservative physical therapy showed lasting effects according to the intervention period over 3 months and 6 months of repeated measurements over time in TOA and HT. Especially, TOA showed significant differences in asymmetric changes according to the cervical rotation. PMID:28210037

  20. Regulation of mitotic spindle asymmetry by SUMO and the spindle-assembly checkpoint in yeast.

    PubMed

    Leisner, Christian; Kammerer, Daniel; Denoth, Annina; Britschi, Mirjam; Barral, Yves; Liakopoulos, Dimitris

    2008-08-26

    During mitosis, the kinetochore microtubules capture and segregate chromosomes, and the astral microtubules position the spindle within the cell. Although the spindle is symmetric, proper positioning of the spindle in asymmetrically dividing cells generally correlates with the formation of morphologically and structurally distinct asters [1]. In budding yeast, the spindle-orientation proteins Kar9 and dynein decorate only one aster of the metaphase spindle and direct it toward the bud [2, 3]. The mechanisms controlling the distribution of Kar9 and dynein remain unclear. Here, we show that SUMO regulates astral-microtubule function in at least two ways. First, Kar9 was sumoylated in vivo. Sumoylation and Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation of Kar9 independently promoted Kar9 asymmetry on the spindle. Second, proper regulation of kinetochore function by SUMO was also required for Kar9 asymmetry. Indeed, activation of the spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) due to SUMO and kinetochore defects promoted symmetric redistribution of Kar9 in a Mad2-dependent manner. The control of Kar9 distribution by the SAC was independent of Kar9 sumoylation and phosphorylation. Together, our data reveal that three independent mechanisms contribute to Kar9 asymmetry: Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation, sumoylation, and SAC signaling. Hence, the two seemingly independent spindle domains, kinetochores and astral microtubules, function in a tightly coordinated fashion.

  1. Timescales of landscape response to divide migration and drainage capture: Implications for the role of divide mobility in landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipple, K. X.; Forte, A. M.; DiBiase, R. A.; Gasparini, N. M.; Ouimet, W. B.

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to extract information about climate and tectonics from topography commonly assume that river networks are static. Drainage divides can migrate through time, however, and recent work has shown that divide mobility can potentially induce changes in river profiles comparable to changes caused by variation in rock uplift, climate, or rock properties. We use 1-D river profile and 2-D landscape evolution simulations to evaluate how mobile divides influence the interpretation of river profiles in tectonically active settings. We define a nondimensional divide migration number, NDm, as the ratio of the timescale of channel profile response to a change in drainage area (TdA) to the timescale of divide migration (TDm). In simulations of headward divide migration, NDm is much less than unity with no measurable perturbation of channel profiles. Only in simulations configured to induce rapid lateral divide migration are there occasional large stream capture events and zones where localized drainage area loss is fast enough to support NDm values near unity. The rapid response of channel profiles to changes in drainage area ensures that under most conditions profiles maintain quasi-equilibrium forms and thus generally reflect spatiotemporal variation in rock uplift, climate, or rock properties even during active divide migration. This implies that channel profile form may not reliably record divide mobility, so we evaluate alternate metrics of divide mobility. In our simulations and an example in Taiwan, we find that simple measures of cross-divide contrasts in topography are more robust metrics of divide mobility than measures of drainage network topology.

  2. Bridging the Digital Divide--An Australian Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Robyn; Papadopoulos, Theo

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the lack of access to information and communication technology (ICT) or the "digital divide" severely limits education, employment and economic prospects. This paper reports on the evaluation of a project that aims to bridge the digital divide. In particular, the case study data has been used to bring to…

  3. Technology and the Cultural Divide: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Allen C.

    The recent proliferation of technology in educational settings is giving teachers new and innovative methods of teaching an inquiry-based curriculum within a constructivist framework. One problem within the nation's schools is the growing cultural divide. The cultural divide is the extent of the cultural barrier that exists between educators and…

  4. A Divided Attention Experiment with Pervasively Hyperactive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Meere, Jaap; Sergeant, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Task performance of 12 pervasive hyperactives and controls (ages 8-13) was studied in a divided attention reaction time experiment. Hyperactives were slower than controls, had more variable reaction times, and made more frequent errors. Task inefficiency in hyperactives could not be explained by a divided attention deficiency or impulsive…

  5. Digital Natives and Digital Divide: Analysing Perspective for Emerging Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onye, Uriel U.; Du, Yunfei

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the concepts of digital natives and digital divide from the perspective of the digital outsiders (part of digital natives). It takes a critical look at the implications of available ICT in both developed and underdeveloped countries in the fight against digital divide. The major contribution to literature is by drawing…

  6. 5 CFR 838.303 - Expressly dividing employee annuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Requirements for Court Orders Affecting Employee Annuities § 838.303 Expressly dividing employee annuity. (a) A court order directed at employee annuity is not a court order acceptable for processing unless it expressly divides the employee annuity as...

  7. 5 CFR 838.303 - Expressly dividing employee annuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Requirements for Court Orders Affecting Employee Annuities § 838.303 Expressly dividing employee annuity. (a) A court order directed at employee annuity is not a court order acceptable for processing unless it expressly divides the employee annuity as...

  8. 5 CFR 838.303 - Expressly dividing employee annuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Requirements for Court Orders Affecting Employee Annuities § 838.303 Expressly dividing employee annuity. (a) A court order directed at employee annuity is not a court order acceptable for processing unless it expressly divides the employee annuity as...

  9. Confronting the Digital Divide: Debunking Brave New World Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowsell, Jennifer; Morrell, Ernest; Alvermann, Donna E.

    There is far more to the digital divide than meets the eye. In this article, the authors consolidate existing research on the digital divide to offer some tangible ways for educators to bridge the gap between the haves and have-nots, or the cans and cannots. Drawing on Aldous Huxley's notion of a "brave new world," some digital divide…

  10. The Digital Divide and Health Outcomes: A Teleretinal Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Kathleen Kihmm

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to understand, explore and describe the digital divide and the relationship between technology utilization and health outcomes. Diabetes and diabetic eye disease was used as the real-life context for understanding change and exploring the digital divide. As an investigational framework, a telemedicine…

  11. Distance Education and the Digital Divide: An Academic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This paper will address how the digital divide affects distance education. Lack of access for some students does raise concerns. Access to technology is often defined by what students don't have: what is called a digital divide. Access also is defined by the speed of Internet connections. Access in the future will be even greater as more computers…

  12. Negotiating Digital Divides: Perspectives from the New Zealand Schooling System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkey, Louise; Sylvester, Allan; Johnstone, David

    2017-01-01

    This article explores digital divides identified in research literature and considers educational policy directions that may mitigate or enhance future inequities. A review of literature identified three categories of digital divides in society; access, capability, and participation. To explore the strategic focus in schooling, data were gathered…

  13. 37 CFR 2.87 - Dividing an application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dividing an application. 2.87 Section 2.87 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Classification § 2.87 Dividing an application. (a...

  14. The Digital Divide and Health Outcomes: A Teleretinal Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Kathleen Kihmm

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to understand, explore and describe the digital divide and the relationship between technology utilization and health outcomes. Diabetes and diabetic eye disease was used as the real-life context for understanding change and exploring the digital divide. As an investigational framework, a telemedicine…

  15. Rethinking the Digital Divide: Impacts on Student-Tutor Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Jean D. M.

    2007-01-01

    This article emerged from a series of debates and workshops on the impact of the Digital Divide on educational practice at the "Futures of Learning: New Learning Paradigms Conference" in Paris. The conceptualisation of the Digital Divide into the "haves" and the "have-nots", with a perception of the economically…

  16. Distance Education and the Digital Divide: An Academic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This paper will address how the digital divide affects distance education. Lack of access for some students does raise concerns. Access to technology is often defined by what students don't have: what is called a digital divide. Access also is defined by the speed of Internet connections. Access in the future will be even greater as more computers…

  17. Bridging the Digital Divide--An Australian Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Robyn; Papadopoulos, Theo

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the lack of access to information and communication technology (ICT) or the "digital divide" severely limits education, employment and economic prospects. This paper reports on the evaluation of a project that aims to bridge the digital divide. In particular, the case study data has been used to bring to…

  18. 37 CFR 2.87 - Dividing an application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... application. (c) Time for filing. (1) A request to divide an application may be filed at any time between the... Trademark Trial and Appeal Board. (2) In an application under section 1(b) of the Act, a request to divide may also be filed with a statement of use under § 2.88 or at any time between the filing of a...

  19. X-Band Strip-Line Power Divider/Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B. L.

    1985-01-01

    Strip-line circuit for X-band signals both divides and combines microwave power for distributed amplifier. Strip-line pattern (foil pattern over insulating layer over ground plane) laid out so all eight distributed ports lie at electrical distances of odd integral multiples of half wavelength from main input/output port. Strip line used as power divider and as power combiner.

  20. Evaluation of Fatih Project in the Frame of Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabacak, Kerim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research realized at the general survey model is to evaluate "FATIH Project" in the frame of digital divide by determining the effects of the distributed tablets to the students being educated at K-12 schools on digital divide. Sample is taking from the 9th grade students in Sakarya city in the 2013-2014 academic session.…

  1. The Digital Divide in Health Education: Myth or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellefson, Michael; Chaney, Beth; Chaney, Don

    2008-01-01

    Although e-health interventions provide new opportunities for health education, there has been cause for concern regarding the purported information technology gap between those who have access to digital applications and those who do not--termed the "digital divide." The literature suggests, however, that this divide may now be illusory, driven…

  2. Three-dimensional analysis of upper airway morphology in skeletal Class III patients with and without mandibular asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xi; Wang, Xiyu; Qin, Shuqi; Franchi, Lorenzo; Gu, Yan

    2017-07-01

    To compare the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the upper airway in skeletal Class III patients with and without mandibular asymmetry and to investigate the possible underlying correlations between the morphology of the upper airway and mandibular deviation. Cone-beam computed tomography images of 54 subjects with skeletal Class III malocclusion (ANB angle ≤ 0.4°, Wits ≤ -5.5°) were taken and 3D upper airway models were reconstructed using Dolphin 3D software. According to the distance (d) from symphysis menti to the sagittal plane, all subjects were divided into a symmetry group (d ≤ 2 mm) and an asymmetry group (d ≥ 4 mm). Based on the severity of mandibular deviation, the asymmetry group was divided into subgroup I (4 mm ≤d <10 mm) and subgroup II (d ≥ 10 mm). Cross-sectional linear distances, areas, and volumetric variables of the upper airway were measured in the 3D airway model. Width of the inferior limit of the glossopharynx (P3W), cross-sectional area of the anterior limit of the nasal airway (P5S), and height of the glossopharynx (GPH) in the asymmetry group were significantly larger than in the symmetry group. As for subjects with severe mandibular deviation in subgroup II (d ≥ 10 mm), volume of the glossopharynx (GPV), total volume of the pharynx (TPV), length of the inferior limit of the velopharynx (P2L), and ratio of length to width of the inferior limit of the velopharynx (P2L/P2W) showed significantly negative correlations with mandibular deviation (r > 0.7, P < .05). In Class III subjects with severe mandibular asymmetry, the pharyngeal airway showed a tendency toward constriction and presented a more elliptical shape as mandibular deviation became more severe (P < .01).

  3. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  4. Rare decays and CP asymmetries in charged B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of loop induced rare decays and the rate asymmetry due to CP violation in charged B Decays in reviewed. After considering b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} se{sup +}e{sup {minus}} decays, the asymmetries for pure penguin process are estimated first. A larger asymmetry can result in those modes where a tree diagram and a penguin diagram interfere, however these estimates are necessarily model dependent. Estimates of Cabbibo suppressed penguins are also considered.

  5. Asymmetry dependence of the caloric curve for mononuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoel, C.; Sobotka, L. G.; Charity, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    The asymmetry dependence of the caloric curve, for mononuclear configurations, is studied as a function of neutron-to-proton asymmetry with a model that allows for independent variation of the neutron and proton surface diffusenesses. The evolution of the effective mass with density and excitation is included in a schematic fashion and the entropies are extracted in a local density approximation. The plateau in the caloric curve displays only a slight sensitivity to the asymmetry.

  6. Anomalies and asymmetries in quark-gluon matter

    SciTech Connect

    Teryaev, O. V.

    2012-06-15

    The manifestations of axial anomaly and related effects in heavy-ion collisions are considered. Special role is played by various asymmetries. The azimuthal correlational asymmetries of neutron pairs at NICA/FAIR energy range may probe the global rotation of strongly interacting matter. The conductivity is related to the angular asymmetries of dilepton pairs. The strong magnetic field generated in heavy-ion collisions leads to the excess of soft dileptons flying predominantly in the scattering plane.

  7. Prospective memory: effects of divided attention on spontaneous retrieval.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tyler L; Mullet, Hillary G; Whiffen, Katie N; Ousterhout, Hunter; Einstein, Gilles O

    2014-02-01

    We examined the effects of divided attention on the spontaneous retrieval of a prospective memory intention. Participants performed an ongoing lexical decision task with an embedded prospective memory demand, and also performed a divided-attention task during some segments of lexical decision trials. In all experiments, monitoring was highly discouraged, and we observed no evidence that participants engaged monitoring processes. In Experiment 1, performing a moderately demanding divided-attention task (a digit detection task) did not affect prospective memory performance. In Experiment 2, performing a more challenging divided-attention task (random number generation) impaired prospective memory. Experiment 3 showed that this impairment was eliminated when the prospective memory cue was perceptually salient. Taken together, the results indicate that spontaneous retrieval is not automatic and that challenging divided-attention tasks interfere with spontaneous retrieval and not with the execution of a retrieved intention.

  8. Technique for extending the frequency range of digital dividers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, W. C.; Middleton, J. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A technique for extending the frequency range of a presettable digital divider is described. The conventional digital divider consists of several counter stages with the count of each stage compared to a preselected number. When the counts for all stages are equal to the preselected numbers, an output pulse is generated and all stages are reset. For high input frequencies, the least significant stage of the divider has to be reset in a very short time. This limits the frequency that can be handled by the conventional digital divider. This invention provides a technique in which the second least significant and higher stages are reset and the least significant stage is permitted to free-run. Hence, the time in which the reset operation can be performed is increased thereby extending the frequency range of the divider.

  9. [Design of broadband power divider in microwave hyperthermia system].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Jiang, Guotai; Lu, Xiaofeng; Cao, Yi

    2010-10-01

    In clinical application of microwave hyperthermia, multi-applicators are often simultaneously required to irradiate the tumor because of its large volume or its deep location. Power divider separates the input microwave energy into equal, or unequal, energy to each applicator. In this paper, the design procedure for the three-section transmission-line transformer based one-to-two equal-split Wilkinson power divider is introduced. By impedance analysis on equivalent scheme, the design parameter of power divider is provided, and by simulation and optimization on Ansoft HFSS, a microstrip structure Wilkinson power divider operating frequency 2. 45 GHz is given. Measurement test results from network analyzer show that it has 25% bandwidth and good isolation in output with this structure. Besides, it is characterized by small size and easy processing. This power divider suits microwave hyperthermia.

  10. Dividing attention lowers children's but increases adults' false memories.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Peters, Maarten; Howe, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of divided attention on children's and adults' neutral and negative true and false memories in a standard Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm. Children (7- and 11-year-olds; n = 126) and adults (n = 52) received 5 neutral and 5 negative Deese/Roediger-McDermott word lists; half of each group also received a divided attention task. The results showed that divided attention affected children's and adults' false memory levels differently but did not alter true memory differently. Our results revealed a developmental shift in that divided attention lowered children's false memory rates but increased adults' false memory rates, regardless of the nature of the material (i.e., neutral or negative). Our study indicates that manipulations that target conscious processing (e.g., divided attention) result in marked qualitative and quantitative differences between children's and adults' false memories but not true memories.

  11. Three-dimensional multiway power dividers based on transformation optics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong-Le; Zhuang, Zheng; Deng, Li; Liu, Yuan-An

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) multiway power dividers based on transformation optical theory are proposed in this paper. It comprises of several nonisotropic mediums and one isotropic medium without any lumped and distributed elements. By using finite embedded coordinate transformations, the incident beam can be split and bent arbitrarily in order to achieve effective power division and transmission. In addition, the location of the split point can be employed to obtain unequal power dividers. Finally, several typical examples of the generalized power divider without limitation in 3D space are performed, which shows that the proposed power divider can implement required functions with arbitrary power division and arbitrary transmission paths. The excellent simulated results verify the novel design method for power dividers. PMID:27091541

  12. Cell-cycle regulation in green algae dividing by multiple fission.

    PubMed

    Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém

    2014-06-01

    Green algae dividing by multiple fission comprise unrelated genera but are connected by one common feature: under optimal growth conditions, they can divide into more than two daughter cells. The number of daughter cells, also known as the division number, is relatively stable for most species and usually ranges from 4 to 16. The number of daughter cells is dictated by growth rate and is modulated by light and temperature. Green algae dividing by multiple fission can thus be used to study coordination of growth and progression of the cell cycle. Algal cultures can be synchronized naturally by alternating light/dark periods so that growth occurs in the light and DNA replication(s) and nuclear and cellular division(s) occur in the dark; synchrony in such cultures is almost 100% and can be maintained indefinitely. Moreover, the pattern of cell-cycle progression can be easily altered by differing growth conditions, allowing for detailed studies of coordination between individual cell-cycle events. Since the 1950s, green algae dividing by multiple fission have been studied as a unique model for cell-cycle regulation. Future sequencing of algal genomes will provide additional, high precision tools for physiological, taxonomic, structural, and molecular studies in these organisms.

  13. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  14. Relationship between unilateral jumping ability and asymmetry on multidirectional speed in team-sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Callaghan, Samuel J; Berry, Simon P; Cooke, Erin R A; Jordan, Corrin A; Luczo, Tawni M; Jeffriess, Matthew D

    2014-12-01

    Relationship between unilateral jumping ability and asymmetry on multidirectional speed in team-sport athletes. J Strength Cond Res 28(12): 3557-3566, 2014-The influence of unilateral jump performance, and between-leg asymmetries, on multidirectional speed has not been widely researched. This study analyzed how speed was related to unilateral jumping. Multidirectional speed was measured by 20-m sprint (0-5, 0-10, 0-20-m intervals), left- and right-leg turn 505, and modified T-test performance. Unilateral jump performance, and between-leg asymmetries, was measured by vertical (VJ), standing broad (SBJ), and lateral (LJ) jumping. Thirty male team-sport athletes (age = 22.60 ± 3.86 years; height = 1.80 ± 0.07 m; mass = 79.03 ± 12.26 kilograms) were recruited. Pearson's correlations (r) determined speed and jump performance relationships; stepwise regression ascertained jump predictors of speed (p ≤ 0.05). Subjects were divided into lesser and greater asymmetry groups from each jump condition. A 1-way analysis of variance found between-group differences (p ≤ 0.05). Left-leg VJ correlated with the 0-10 and 0-20-m intervals (r = -0.437 to -0.486). Right-leg VJ correlated with all sprint intervals and the T-test (r = -0.380 to -0.512). Left-leg SBJ and LJ correlated with all tests (r = -0.370 to -0.729). Right-leg SBJ and LJ related to all except the left-leg turn 505 (r = -0.415 to -0.650). Left-leg SBJ predicted the 20-m sprint. Left-leg LJ predicted the 505 and T-test. Regardless of the asymmetry used to form groups, no differences in speed were established. Horizontal and LJ performance related to multidirectional speed. Athletes with asymmetries similar to this study (VJ = ∼10%; SBJ = ∼3%; LJ = ∼5%) should not experience speed detriments.

  15. Cell asymmetry correction for temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikiriyama, K.; Wunderlich, B. |

    1996-12-31

    The quality of measurement of heat capacity by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is based on strict symmetry of the twin calorimeter, which is important for temperature-modulated DSC. Heat capacities for sapphire-filled and empty aluminium calorimeters (pans) under designed cell imbalance caused by different pan-masses were measured. In addition, positive and negative signs of asymmetry were explored by analyzing the phase-shift between temperature and heat flow for sapphire and empty runs. The phase shifts change by more than 18{degree} depending on asymmetry sign. Once the asymmetry sign is determined, the asymmetry correction for modulated DSC can be made.

  16. Visual search asymmetries in heavy clutter: implications for display design.

    PubMed

    Yamani, Yusuke; McCarley, Jason S

    2011-06-01

    An experiment aimed to test whether design of symbology to produce visual search asymmetries might facilitate target detection in cluttered displays. A visual search asymmetry exists between two stimuli when a target of one type is found efficiently among distractors of the second type but a target of the second type is found with difficulty among distractors of the first type. Asymmetries have generally been studied within relatively sparse displays. In the present study, the authors tested whether an asymmetry driven by stimulus familiarity persists within heavily cluttered imagery. In this study, 10 participants performed a visual search task using stimuli (canonical vs. reversed Ns) known to produce a search asymmetry. Search stimuli were embedded within geospatial images containing either low or high levels of clutter. A decision theoretic index of sensitivity served as the dependent measure. The search asymmetry was robust against the presence of heavy display clutter. Specifically, sensitivity was greater when the target was a reversed N rather than an N, and this pattern remained within cluttered displays. Time-accuracy analysis revealed that the search asymmetry increased the rate of information accumulation roughly equally within low- and high- clutter images. Search asymmetries are robust against heavy, spatially continuous visual clutter. Design of display symbology to produce visual search asymmetries can offset the costs of visual clutter, maximizing detectability of task-critical information in complex displays.

  17. What determines direction of asymmetry: genes, environment or chance?

    PubMed

    Palmer, A Richard

    2016-12-19

    Conspicuous asymmetries seen in many animals and plants offer diverse opportunities to test how the development of a similar morphological feature has evolved in wildly different types of organisms. One key question is: do common rules govern how direction of asymmetry is determined (symmetry is broken) during ontogeny to yield an asymmetrical individual? Examples from numerous organisms illustrate how diverse this process is. These examples also provide some surprising answers to related questions. Is direction of asymmetry in an individual determined by genes, environment or chance? Is direction of asymmetry determined locally (structure by structure) or globally (at the level of the whole body)? Does direction of asymmetry persist when an asymmetrical structure regenerates following autotomy? The answers vary greatly for asymmetries as diverse as gastropod coiling direction, flatfish eye side, crossbill finch bill crossing, asymmetrical claws in shrimp, lobsters and crabs, katydid sound-producing structures, earwig penises and various plant asymmetries. Several examples also reveal how stochastic asymmetry in mollusc and crustacean early cleavage, in Drosophila oogenesis, and in Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal blast cell movement, is a normal component of deterministic development. Collectively, these examples shed light on the role of genes as leaders or followers in evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. [Asymmetry of antennal grooming in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana)].

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the key features of antennal grooming of male American cockroaches in neutral circumstances. It was shown for the first time that the right antenna was cleaned significantly more often than the left one, which indicates the presence of functional asymmetry of antennal grooming in this insect species. At the same time, no statistically significant asymmetry was found for grooming of antennal bases and legs. Morphological asymmetries of antennae and legs and/or brain lateralization are the plausible sources of observed behavioral asymmetry in antennal grooming.

  19. Poloidal Asymmetries in Edge Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Investigations of the poloidal structure within edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod using novel impurity measurements are presented, revealing large poloidal variations of parameters within a flux surface in the H-mode pedestal region, and significantly reduced poloidal variation in L-mode or I-mode pedestals. These measurements provide complete sets of impurity density, temperature, flow velocity, and electrostatic potential at both the low- and high-field side midplane, utilizing the Gas Puff-CXRS technique. Uncertainties in magnetic equilibrium reconstructions require assumptions to be made in order to properly align the LFS/HFS profiles. In H-mode plasmas, if profiles are aligned assuming impurity temperature is constant on a flux surface, large potential asymmetries would result (eΔΦ /Te ~ 0 . 6). If instead total pressure is assumed constant on a flux-surface, then the measured potential asymmetry is significantly reduced, but large in-out asymmetries result in the impurity temperature (>1.7x). This shows that impurity temperature and potential can not both be flux functions in the pedestal region. In both alignment cases, large asymmetries in impurity density (>6x) are present in H-mode plasmas. In I-mode plasmas, which lack an electron density pedestal but do have a temperature pedestal, the poloidal variation of impurity temperature is weaker (~1.3x) and the impurity density nearly symmetric between the LFS and HFS. These measurements indicate that the sharp gradients in the pedestal region, particularly of main ion density, have a significant effect on the poloidal and radial distribution of impurities, which could have important implications for the prediction of impurity contamination in future fusion reactors such as ITER. Estimates of particle and heat transport timescales suggest that the radial and parallel transport timescales are of the same order in the pedestal region of C-Mod, supporting the idea that two-dimensional transport effects

  20. Asymmetries in gamma scattering by Fe-57.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. Y.; Goodman, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with a setup in which a Co-57 single-line source was driven by a constant-acceleration motor. The 14.4-keV gamma rays emitted from the iron foil scatterer were detected by a proportional counter filled with krypton and carbon dioxide. The interference for individual Zeeman hyperfine transitions in a magnetic field was calculated. It was found that beside the cos phi angular dependence of line shape asymmetry, there exists a sin phi intensity dependence for some of the hyperfine transitions.

  1. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE PAGES

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; ...

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  2. Centriole asymmetry determines algal cell geometry

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms that determine the shape and organization of cells remain largely unknown. Green algae such as Chlamydomonas provide excellent model systems for studying cell geometry due to their highly reproducible cell organization. Structural and genetic studies suggest that asymmetry of the centriole (basal body) plays a critical determining role in organizing the internal organization of algal cells, through the attachment of microtubule rootlets and other large fiber systems to specific sets of microtubule triplets on the centriole. Thus to understand cell organization, it will be critical to understand how the different triplets of the centriole come to have distinct molecular identities. PMID:23026116

  3. Membrane phospholipid asymmetry in human thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, F A; Yuan, J; Lewis, R A; Snyder, L M; Kiefer, C R; Bunyaratvej, A; Fucharoen, S; Ma, L; Styles, L; de Jong, K; Schrier, S L

    1998-04-15

    Phospholipid asymmetry in the red blood cell (RBC) lipid bilayer is well maintained during the life of the cell, with phosphatidylserine (PS) virtually exclusively located in the inner monolayer. Loss of phospholipid asymmetry, and consequently exposure of PS, is thought to play an important role in red cell pathology. The anemia in the human thalassemias is caused by a combination of ineffective erythropoiesis (intramedullary hemolysis) and a decreased survival of adult RBCs in the peripheral blood. This premature destruction of the thalassemic RBC could in part be due to a loss of phospholipid asymmetry, because cells that expose PS are recognized and removed by macrophages. In addition, PS exposure can play a role in the hypercoagulable state reported to exist in severe beta-thalassemia intermedia. We describe PS exposure in RBCs of 56 comparably anemic patients with different genetic backgrounds of the alpha- or beta-thalassemia phenotype. The use of fluorescently labeled annexin V allowed us to determine loss of phospholipid asymmetry in individual cells. Our data indicate that in a number of thalassemic patients, subpopulations of red cells circulate that expose PS on their outer surface. The number of such cells can vary dramatically from patient to patient, from as low as that found in normal controls (less than 0.2%) up to 20%. Analysis by fluorescent microscopy of beta-thalassemic RBCs indicates that PS on the outer leaflet is distributed either over the entire membrane or localized in areas possibly related to regions rich in membrane-bound alpha-globin chains. We hypothesize that these membrane sites in which iron carrying globin chains accumulate and cause oxidative damage, could be important in the loss of membrane lipid organization. In conclusion, we report the presence of PS-exposing subpopulations of thalassemic RBC that are most likely physiologically important, because they could provide a surface for enhancing hemostasis as recently reported

  4. Developmental asymmetries between horizontal and vertical tracking.

    PubMed

    Grönqvist, Helena; Gredebäck, Gustaf; Hofsten, Claes von

    2006-05-01

    The development of the asymmetry between horizontal and vertical eye tracking was investigated longitudinally at 5, 7, and 9 months of age. The target moved either on a 2D circular trajectory or on a vertical or horizontal 1D sinusoidal trajectory. Saccades, smooth pursuit, and head movements were measured. Vertical tracking was found to be inferior to horizontal tracking at all age levels. The results also show that the mechanisms responsible for horizontal and vertical tracking mutually influence one another in the production of 2D visual pursuit. Learning effects were observed within-trials but no transfer between trials was found.

  5. Semantic Asymmetries Are Modulated by Phonological Asymmetries: Evidence from the Disambiguation of Homophonic versus Heterophonic Homographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peleg, Orna; Eviatar, Zohar

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated cerebral asymmetries in accessing multiple meanings of two types of homographs: homophonic homographs (e.g., "bank") and heterophonic homographs (e.g., "tear"). Participants read homographs preceded by either a biasing or a non-biasing sentential context and performed a lexical decision on lateralized targets…

  6. Semantic Asymmetries Are Modulated by Phonological Asymmetries: Evidence from the Disambiguation of Homophonic versus Heterophonic Homographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peleg, Orna; Eviatar, Zohar

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated cerebral asymmetries in accessing multiple meanings of two types of homographs: homophonic homographs (e.g., "bank") and heterophonic homographs (e.g., "tear"). Participants read homographs preceded by either a biasing or a non-biasing sentential context and performed a lexical decision on lateralized targets…

  7. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging) of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Clark, Michelle W; Yie, Anna M; Eder, Elizabeth K; Dennis, Richard G; Basting, Preston J; Martinez, Keith A; Jones, Brian D; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2015-01-01

    Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH), no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5) the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2-7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress.

  8. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging) of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Michelle W.; Yie, Anna M.; Eder, Elizabeth K.; Dennis, Richard G.; Basting, Preston J.; Martinez, Keith A.; Jones, Brian D.; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2015-01-01

    Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH), no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5) the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2–7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress. PMID:26713733

  9. Variation of ice crystal size, shape, and asymmetry parameter in tops of tropical deep convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Cairns, Brian; Ackerman, Andrew S.

    2014-10-01

    The variation of ice crystal properties in the tops of deep convective clouds off the north coast of Australia is analyzed. Cloud optical thickness, ice effective radius, aspect ratio of ice crystal components, crystal distortion parameter and asymmetry parameter are simultaneously retrieved from combined measurements of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) satellite instruments. The data are divided into periods with alternating weak and strong convection. Mostly plate-like particle components with aspect ratios closer to unity and lower asymmetry parameters characterize strongly convective periods, while weakly convective periods generally show lower aspect ratios, relatively more column-like shapes and somewhat greater asymmetry parameters. Results for strongly convective periods show that, with increasing cloud top temperature, the distortion parameter generally decreases, while the asymmetry parameter and effective radius increase. For one of the strongly convective periods, the rate at which effective radii increase with cloud top temperature is more than double that of the other periods, while the temperature dependence of the other microphysical quantities for this period is substantially weaker. Atmospheric state analysis indicates that these differences are concurrent with differences in middle-to-upper tropospheric zonal wind shear. The observed variation of microphysical properties may have significant effects on the shortwave radiative fluxes and cloud absorption associated with deep convection. Additionally, MODIS collection 5 effective radii are estimated to be biased small with an artificially narrow range. Collection 6 products are expected to have less severe biases that depend on cloud top temperature and atmospheric conditions.

  10. Electromagnetic cellular interactions.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, Jeremy Z; Farhadi, Ashkan

    2011-05-01

    Chemical and electrical interaction within and between cells is well established. Just the opposite is true about cellular interactions via other physical fields. The most probable candidate for an other form of cellular interaction is the electromagnetic field. We review theories and experiments on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields generally, and if the cell-generated electromagnetic field can mediate cellular interactions. We do not limit here ourselves to specialized electro-excitable cells. Rather we describe physical processes that are of a more general nature and probably present in almost every type of living cell. The spectral range included is broad; from kHz to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. We show that there is a rather large number of theories on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields and discuss experimental evidence on electromagnetic cellular interactions in the modern scientific literature. Although small, it is continuously accumulating.

  11. Automatic analysis of cerebral asymmetry: an exploratory study of the relationship between brain torque and planum temporale asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Barrick, Thomas R; Mackay, Clare E; Prima, Sylvain; Maes, Frederik; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Crow, Timothy J; Roberts, Neil

    2005-02-01

    Leftward occipital and rightward frontal lobe asymmetry (brain torque) and leftward planum temporale asymmetry have been consistently reported in postmortem and in vivo neuroimaging studies of the human brain. Here automatic image analysis techniques are applied to quantify global and local asymmetries, and investigate the relationship between brain torque and planum temporale asymmetries on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of 30 right-handed young healthy subjects (15 male, 15 female). Previously described automatic cerebral hemisphere extraction and 3D interhemispheric reflection-based methods for studying brain asymmetry are applied with a new technique, LowD (Low Dimension), which enables automatic quantification of brain torque. LowD integrates extracted left and right cerebral hemispheres in columns orthogonal to the midsagittal plane (2D column maps), and subsequently integrates slices along the brain's anterior-posterior axis (1D slice profiles). A torque index defined as the magnitude of occipital and frontal lobe asymmetry is computed allowing exploratory investigation of relationships between this global asymmetry and local asymmetries found in the planum temporale. LowD detected significant torque in the 30 subjects with occipital and frontal components found to be highly correlated (P<0.02). Significant leftward planum temporale asymmetry was detected (P<0.05), and the torque index correlated with planum temporale asymmetry (P<0.001). However, torque and total brain volume were not correlated. Therefore, although components of cerebral asymmetry may be related, their magnitude is not influenced by total hemisphere volume. LowD provides increased sensitivity for detection and quantification of brain torque on an individual subject basis, and future studies will apply these techniques to investigate the relationship between cerebral asymmetry and functional laterality.

  12. Cellular aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is manifest in a variety of changes over time, including changes at the cellular level. Cellular aging acts primarily as a tumor suppressor mechanism, but also may enhance cancer development under certain circumstances. One important process of cellular aging is oncogene-induced senescence, which acts as an important anti-cancer mechanism. Cellular senescence resulting from damage caused by activated oncogenes prevents the growth or potentially neoplastic cells. Moreover, cells that have entered senescence appear to be targets for elimination by the innnate immune system. In another aspect of cellular aging, the absence of telomerase activity in normal tissues results in such cells lacking a telomere maintenance mechanism. One consequence is that in aging there is an increase in cells with shortened telomeres. In the presence of active oncogenes that cause expansion of a neoplastic clone, shortening of telomeres leading to telomere dysfunction prevents the indefinite expansion of the clone because the cells enter crisis. Crisis results from fusions and other defects caused by dysfunctional telomeres and is a terminal state of the neoplastic clone. In this way the absence of telomerase in human cells, while one cause of cellular aging, also acts as an anti-cancer mechanism. PMID:20705476

  13. Cationic amphiphiles with fatty acyl chain asymmetry of coconut oil deliver genes selectively to mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekhar, Voshavar; Srujan, Marepally; Prabhakar, Rairala; Reddy, Rakesh C; Sreedhar, Bojja; Rentam, Kiran K R; Kanjilal, Sanjit; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2011-03-16

    Recent structure-activity studies have revealed a dramatic influence of hydrophobic chain asymmetry in enhancing gene delivery efficacies of synthetic cationic amphiphiles (Nantz, M. H. et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics2010, 7, 786-794; Koynova, R. et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics2009, 6, 951-958). The present findings demonstrate for the first time that such a transfection enhancing influence of asymmetric hydrocarbon chains observed in pure synthetic cationic amphiphiles also works for cationic amphiphiles designed with natural, asymmetric fatty acyl chains of a food-grade oil. Herein, we demonstrate that cationic amphiphiles designed with the natural fatty acyl chain asymmetry of food-grade coconut oil are less cytotoxic and deliver genes selectively to mouse lung. Despite lauroyl chains being the major fatty acyl chains of coconut oil, both the in vitro and In vivo gene transfer efficiencies of such cationic amphiphiles were found to be remarkably superior (>4-fold) to those of their pure dilauroyl analogue. Mechanistic studies involving the technique of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) revealed higher biomembrane fusibility of the cationic liposomes of the coconut amphiphiles than that of the symmetric dilauroyl analogue. AFM study revealed pronounced fusogenic nonlamellar structures of the liposomes of coconut amphiphiles. Findings in the FRET and cellular uptake study, taken together, support the notion that the higher cellular uptake resulting from the more fusogenic nature of the liposomes of coconut amphiphiles 1 are likely to play a dominant role in making the coconut amphiphiles transfection competent.

  14. The evolutionary origin of flatfish asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Matt

    2008-07-10

    All adult flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes), including the gastronomically familiar plaice, sole, turbot and halibut, have highly asymmetrical skulls, with both eyes placed on one side of the head. This arrangement, one of the most extraordinary anatomical specializations among vertebrates, arises through migration of one eye during late larval development. Although the transformation of symmetrical larvae into asymmetrical juveniles is well documented, the evolutionary origins of flatfish asymmetry are uncertain because there are no transitional forms linking flatfishes with their symmetrical relatives. The supposed inviability of such intermediates gave pleuronectiforms a prominent role in evolutionary debates, leading to attacks on natural selection and arguments for saltatory change. Here I show that Amphistium and the new genus Heteronectes, both extinct spiny-finned fishes from the Eocene epoch of Europe, are the most primitive pleuronectiforms known. The orbital region of the skull in both taxa is strongly asymmetrical, as in living flatfishes, but these genera retain many primitive characters unknown in extant forms. Most remarkably, orbital migration was incomplete in Amphistium and Heteronectes, with eyes remaining on opposite sides of the head in post-metamorphic individuals. This condition is intermediate between that in living pleuronectiforms and the arrangement found in other fishes. Amphistium and Heteronectes indicate that the evolution of the profound cranial asymmetry of extant flatfishes was gradual in nature.

  15. Line profile asymmetries in chromospherically active stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Robert C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Granados, Arno F.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1992-01-01

    A powerful, new probe of chromospheric activity, cross-correlation, has been developed and applied to a variety of stars. In this particular application, an entire CCD spectrum of an active star is correlated with the spectrum of a narrow-line, inactive star of similar spectral type and luminosity class. Using a number of strong lines in this manner enables the detection of absorption profile asymmetries at moderate resolution (lambda/Delta lambda about 40,000) and S/N 150:1. This technique has been applied to 14 systems mostly RS CVn's, with 10 not greater than nu sin i not greater than 50 km/s and P not less than 7 d. Distortions were detected for the first time in five systems: Sigma Gem, IM Peg, GX Lib, UV Crb, and Zeta And. Detailed modeling, incorporating both spectral line profiles and broad-band photometry, is applied to Sigma Gem. Profile asymmetries for this star are fitted by two high-latitude spots covering 5 percent of the stellar surface. The derived spot temperature of 3400 K is lower than found in previous studies. In addition, two well-known systems have been studied: HD 199178 and V711 Tau. Polar spots are found on both.

  16. Configurational asymmetry in vernier offset detection.

    PubMed

    Karim, A K M Rezaul; Kojima, Haruyuki

    2010-10-06

    Two psychophysical experiments were conducted at the horizontal and vertical orientations respectively, demonstrating substantial main effect of configuration, but no effect of offset direction on vernier acuity. In Experiment 1, a pair of horizontal bars were arranged side by side with a large gap between them. The observers were, on average, significantly better at discriminating a vertical offset if the right-hand bar was below the left-hand bar than vice versa, regardless of which bar they experienced as displaced and which as constant. A similar asymmetry was evident in Experiment 2 where observers judged horizontal offset for a pair of vertically oriented bars, where one was placed above the other. In this case average performance was better if the upper bar was on the right of the lower bar rather than on its left. There were large individual variations in the asymmetrical trend, but the effect could not be explained by subjective response bias. Furthermore, vernier acuity improved significantly and the asymmetry decreased more or less as a function of training. The average asymmetrical trend was consistent across training days and across two orientations, which indicates that the processing of line vernier stimuli is possibly configuration-specific in the cardinal orientation.

  17. Configurational asymmetry in vernier offset detection

    PubMed Central

    Karim, A. K. M. Rezaul; Kojima, Haruyuki

    2010-01-01

    Two psychophysical experiments were conducted at the horizontal and vertical orientations respectively, demonstrating substantial main effect of configuration, but no effect of offset direction on vernier acuity. In Experiment 1, a pair of horizontal bars were arranged side by side with a large gap between them. The observers were, on average, significantly better at discriminating a vertical offset if the right-hand bar was below the left-hand bar than vice versa, regardless of which bar they experienced as displaced and which as constant. A similar asymmetry was evident in Experiment 2 where observers judged horizontal offset for a pair of vertically oriented bars, where one was placed above the other. In this case average performance was better if the upper bar was on the right of the lower bar rather than on its left. There were large individual variations in the asymmetrical trend, but the effect could not be explained by subjective response bias. Furthermore, vernier acuity improved significantly and the asymmetry decreased more or less as a function of training. The average asymmetrical trend was consistent across training days and across two orientations, which indicates that the processing of line vernier stimuli is possibly configuration-specific in the cardinal orientation. PMID:20930953

  18. Westward drift, rift asymmetry and continental uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Bonatti, E.

    2003-04-01

    Although not predicted by classic plate tectonics theory, the topography of ocean ridges and rifts show a distinct asymmetry, when depth is plotted both vs. distance from the ridge and square root of the age of the oceanic crust. The eastern sides of the East Pacific Rise, of the mid Atlantic ridge, of the NW Indian ridge are in average more elevated than the conjugate flank to the west and eastern sides show slower subsidence rates. A similar asymmetry can be observed across the Red Sea and Baikal rifts. We suggest that depleted and lighter asthenosphere generated by partial melting below the ocean ridges shifts 'eastward' relative to the lithosphere, determining a density deficit below the eastern flank. The 'eastward' migration of the lighter Atlantic asthenosphere under the African continent, could eventually have contributed to the anomalous post-rift uplift of Africa and explain the anomalously higher topography of Africa with respect to other continents. This model suggests that the 'westward' drift of the lithosphere relative to the underlying mantle might be a global phenomenon and not just a mean delay.

  19. Cholesterol Asymmetry in Synaptic Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, W. Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Müller, Walter E.; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2010-01-01

    Lipids are essential for the structural and functional integrity of membranes. Membrane lipids are not randomly distributed but are localized in different domains. A common characteristic of these membrane domains is their association with cholesterol. Lipid rafts and caveolae are examples of cholesterol enriched domains, which have attracted keen interest. However, two other important cholesterol domains are the exofacial and cytofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane. The two leaflets that make up the bilayer differ in their fluidity, electrical charge, lipid distribution, and active sites of certain proteins. The synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) cytofacial leaflet contains over 85% of the total SPM cholesterol as compared with the exofacial leaflet. This asymmetric distribution of cholesterol is not fixed or immobile but can be modified by different conditions in vivo: 1) chronic ethanol consumption; 2) statins; 3) aging; and 4) apoE isoform. Several potential candidates have been proposed as mechanisms involved in regulation of SPM cholesterol asymmetry: apoE, low-density-lipoprotein receptor, sterol carrier protein-2, fatty acid binding proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, p-glycoprotein and caveolin-1. This review examines cholesterol asymmetry in SPM, potential mechanisms of regulation and impact on membrane structure and function. PMID:21214553

  20. Does urban poverty increase body fluctuating asymmetry?

    PubMed

    Ozener, Bariş

    2011-12-01

    Perturbations during development leave enduring signs on the adult body. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is a good bio-indicator of stress during ontogeny. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of urban poverty on the fluctuating asymmetry of young Turkish males. Young males from a lower socioeconomic group (N = 140, Mean age = 18.17 +/- 0.61) were selected from slum areas of Ankara, the capital of Turkey, where urban poverty is intense. An upper socioeconomic group, on the other hand, consisted of students from two private colleges and included children from some of the richest families in Turkey (N = 120, Mean age = 18.08 +/- 0.54). Eight anthropometric traits of all subjects were measured. Considering the seven measurements demonstrate ideal FA, the individuals living in poor areas of the city displayed higher FA. The discrepancy between the two groups was even greater for a measure of composite FA. In conclusion, poor living conditions in Ankara, where urban poverty is intense, adversely impact the developmental stability of young Turkish males.

  1. Effects of Vent Asymmetry on Explosive Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, S.; Ogden, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Current computer models of volcanic eruptions are typically based on symmetric vent and conduit geometries. However, in natural settings, these features are rarely perfectly symmetric. For example, the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St Helens (MSH) took place through a highly asymmetrical crater due to the preceding landslide and subsequent vent erosion. In supersonic, high pressure eruptions, such as what may have occurred at MSH, vent and crater asymmetry can strongly affect the directionality of the gas-thrust region. These effects on eruption direction may have implications for the formation of lateral blasts and pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Here, we present preliminary results from numerical simulations using CartaBlanca, a Java based simulation tool for non-linear physics as developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using 2D time-dependent simulations of explosive volcanic eruptions, we study the effects of vent asymmetry on a variety of eruptive conditions. Preliminary results suggest that asymmetric vent shape may provide an additional mechanism for the formation of lateral blasts and PDCs.

  2. Quantum Correlations Evolution Asymmetry in Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Huang, Yun-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-03-01

    It was demonstrated that the entanglement evolution of a specially designed quantum state in the bistochastic channel is asymmetric. In this work, we generalize the study of the quantum correlations, including entanglement and quantum discord, evolution asymmetry to various quantum channels. We found that the asymmetry of entanglement and quantum discord only occurs in some special quantum channels, and the behavior of the entanglement evolution may be quite different from the behavior of the quantum discord evolution. To quantum entanglement, in some channels it decreases monotonously with the increase of the quantum channel intensity. In some other channels, when we increase the intensity of the quantum channel, it decreases at first, then keeps zero for some time, and then rises up. To quantum discord, the evolution becomes more complex and you may find that it evolutes unsmoothly at some points. These results illustrate the strong dependence of the quantum correlations evolution on the property of the quantum channels. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61327901, 61490711, 61225025, 11474268, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant No. WK2470000018

  3. A Search for Hemispheric Asymmetry on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, C. M.; Storrs, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    We will present reconstructed images of Neptune's largest satellite Triton as part of an investigation of hemispheric asymmetry. The images we observed from the Hubble Space Telescope in July of 1997, using the Wide Field/Planetary Camera. The images were taken in several filters: F439W, F555W, and F791W. Image restoration was performed using the MISTRAL program (Mugnier, Fusco, and Conan 2003). We present the ratio between the filters to determine if there is any hemispheric color asymmetry at this time. The photometry of Triton appears normal in this data although Hicks and Buratti (2004) observe Triton to be anomalously red in August of 1997. References: Hicks, M.D., and Buratti, B.J. (2004): "The Spectral Variability of Triton from 1997-2000", Icarus 171 pp. 210-218 Mugnier, L.M., T. Fusco, and J.-M. Conan, 2003. "MISTRAL: a Myopic Edge-Preserving Image Restoration Method. Applicaton to Astronomical Adaptive Optics Corrected Long-Exposure Images." JOSA A (submitted)

  4. Breast asymmetry: presentation of a giant fibroadenoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Christopher A; David, Lisa R; Argenta, Louis C

    2006-01-01

    Patients often present to plastic surgeons with breast asymmetry of unknown etiology. Many patients are females in late adolescence and present complaining of a hypoplastic breast on the smaller side. However, full evaluation may reveal that the larger breast contains the abnormality. Fibroadenomas typically present as firm, mobile, painless, easily palpable breast nodules. However, giant fibroadenomas can present as unilateral macromastia without definable borders or texture differences. Diagnosis is essential since fibroadenomas tend to persist and grow. However, physical examination and standard radiographic evaluations (mammograms and ultrasounds) fail to clarify the diagnosis in many cases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has improved preoperative diagnosis, but tissue diagnosis is frequently necessary and resection of giant fibroadenomas is essential as they enlarge to the point of causing psychological detriment or mass effects, including venous congestion, glandular distortion, pressure necrosis, and occasionally ulceration. In this article we review nine patients presenting with unilateral macromastia to a tertiary breast care center with a review of the pertinent literature. The differential diagnosis, evaluation modalities, and treatment options of breast asymmetry and unilateral breast masses are presented. Postexcision breast reconstruction is discussed.

  5. Perceptual asymmetries and handedness: a neglected link?

    PubMed Central

    Marzoli, Daniele; Prete, Giulia; Tommasi, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Healthy individuals tend to weigh in more the left than the right side of visual space in a variety of contexts, ranging from pseudoneglect to perceptual asymmetries for faces. Among the common explanations proposed for the attentional and perceptual advantages of the left visual field, a link with the prevalence of right-handedness in humans has never been suggested, although some evidence seems to converge in favor of a bias of spatial attention toward the region most likely coincident with another person’s right hand during a face-to-face interaction. Such a bias might imply an increased efficiency in monitoring both communicative and aggressive acts, the right limb being more used than the left in both types of behavior. Although attentional and perceptual asymmetries could be linked to right-handedness at the level of phylogeny because of the evolutionarily advantage of directing attention toward the region where others’ dominant hand usually operates, it is also legitimate to question whether, at the ontogenetic level, frequent exposure to right-handed individuals may foster leftward biases. These views are discussed in the light of extant literature, and a number of tests are proposed in order to assess our hypotheses. PMID:24592250

  6. Underlying Asymmetry with Particle-Size Segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajjar, Parmesh; van der Vaart, Kasper; Epely-Chauvin, Gael; Andreini, Nicolas; Gray, Nico; Ancey, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Granular media have a natural tendency to self-organise when sheared, with different sized constituents counter-intuitively separating from each other. Not only does the segregation produce a rich diversity of beautiful patterns, but it can also have serious implications in both industrial and geophysical environments. Despite the universal importance, the individual particle dynamics during segregation are still poorly understand, with such an analysis proving to be difficult with conventional techniques such as binning and sidewall observation. This talk will present results of recent experiments that studied particle scale segregation dynamics during oscillatory shear. Refractive index matched scanning allowed examination of the interior of the flow, where it was observed that large and small particles have an underlying asymmetry that is dependant on the local particle concentration. Small particles were seen to segregate faster through regions of many large particles, whilst large particles rise slower through regions of many small particles. The asymmetry is quantified on both bulk and particle length scales, and is shown to have good agreement with a continuum model that uses a cubic segregation flux.

  7. Two sources of asymmetry-induced transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2010-11-01

    We have added collisional effects to our single-particle codeootnotetextD. L. Eggleston, Phys. Plasmas 14, 012302 (2007). by applying random velocity steps along with a drag force in the particle equation of motion. By following the time variation of the mean square change in radial position we can obtain a diffusion coefficient D which can be compared with analytical theory and experiment. For asymmetries of the form φ1(r)(kz)(φt - lθ) and low collision frequency, there are two contributions to the transport. The first is that given by resonant particle transport theoryootnotetextD. L. Eggleston and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2699 (1999). and is produced by particles with velocity near ±(lφR- φ)/k, where φR is the azimuthal rotation frequency. The second is produced by the low velocity particles identified in Ref. 2 that are axially trapped in the asymmetry potential. These produce a stronger variation of D with φ with a peak near φ=lφR. The width of the peak δφ increases with center wire bias and decreases with radius, while the height shows the opposite behavior. Diffusion due to axially trapped particles is typically comparable to or larger than that from resonant particles. This may explain the discrepancies between experiments and resonant particle theory.ootnotetextD. L. Eggleston and B. Carrillo, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1308 (2003).

  8. Strangeness asymmetry in the proton sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Meson cloud models describe the proton sea in terms of fluctuations of the proton into meson-baryon pairs. The leading contributions to proton strangeness are from states which contain a kaon and a Lambda or Sigma hyperon. We use a Fock state expansion of the proton in terms of these states to determine the strangeness distributions of the proton in a convolution model, in which the fluctuations are represented by meson-baryon splitting functions, which determine the total strangeness of the proton. Strangeness asymmetry, the difference between momentum distributions of the s and sbar quarks in the proton, arises because the quarks are constituents of different hadrons. For the parton distributions of the s(sbar) quarks in the bare baryons(mesons) of the Fock states, we use light cone wave functions or our statistical model, which expands the bare hadrons in terms of quark-gluon states. We show that strangeness asymmetry depends strongly on the parton distributions used for the hadrons in the cloud. We compare our results to NuTeV and to global parton distributions. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  9. Fish otolith mass asymmetry: morphometry and influence on acoustic functionality.

    PubMed

    Lychakov, D V; Rebane, Y T

    2005-03-01

    The role of the fish otolith mass asymmetry in acoustic functionality is studied. The saccular, lagenar and utricular otoliths are weighted in two species of the Black Sea rays, 15 species of the Black Sea teleost fish and guppy fish. The dimensionless otolith mass asymmetry chi is calculated as ratio of the difference between masses of the right and left paired otoliths to average otolith mass. In the most fish studied the otolith mass asymmetry is within the range of -0.2 < chi < +0.2 (< 20%). We do not find specific fish species with extremely large or extremely small otolith asymmetry. The large otoliths do not belong solely to any particular side, left or right. The heavier otoliths of different otolithic organs can be located in different labyrinths. No relationship has been found between the magnitude of the otolith mass asymmetry and the length (mass, age) of the animal. The suggested fluctuation model of the otolith growth can interpret these results. The model supposes that the otolith growth rate varies slightly hither and thither during lifetime of the individual fish. Therefore, the sign of the relative otolith mass asymmetry can change several times in the process of the individual fish growth but within the range outlined above. Mathematical modeling shows that acoustic functionality (sensitivity, temporal processing, sound localization) of the fish can be disturbed by the otolith mass asymmetry. But this is valid only for the fish with largest otolith masses, characteristic of the bottom and littoral fish, and with highest otolith asymmetry. For most fish the values of otolith mass asymmetry is well below critical values. Thus, the most fish get around the troubles related to the otolith mass asymmetry. We suggest that a specific physicochemical mechanism of the paired otolith growth that maintains the otolith mass asymmetry at the lowest possible level should exist. However, the principle and details of this mechanism are still far from being

  10. Anaphase asymmetry and dynamic repositioning of the division plane during maize meiosis.

    PubMed

    Nannas, Natalie J; Higgins, David M; Dawe, R Kelly

    2016-11-01

    The success of an organism is contingent upon its ability to transmit genetic material through meiotic cell division. In plant meiosis I, the process begins in a large spherical cell without physical cues to guide the process. Yet, two microtubule-based structures, the spindle and phragmoplast, divide the chromosomes and the cell with extraordinary accuracy. Using a live-cell system and fluorescently labeled spindles and chromosomes, we found that the process self- corrects as meiosis proceeds. Metaphase spindles frequently initiate division off-center, and in these cases anaphase progression is asymmetric with the two masses of chromosomes traveling unequal distances on the spindle. The asymmetry is compensatory, such that the chromosomes on the side of the spindle that is farthest from the cell cortex travel a longer distance at a faster rate. The phragmoplast forms at an equidistant point between the telophase nuclei rather than at the original spindle mid-zone. This asymmetry in chromosome movement implies a structural difference between the two halves of a bipolar spindle and could allow meiotic cells to dynamically adapt to errors in metaphase and accurately divide the cell volume. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Creation and Relaxation of Phospholipid Compositional Asymmetry in Lipid Bilayers Examined by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglin, Timothy C.; Brown, Krystal; Conboy, John C.

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in the two leaflets of the lipid bilayer which is known to contribute to cellular function. In the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, the aminophospholipids with phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) headgroups are predominately located on the cytosolic leaflet while sphingolipids with phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroups and sphingomeylin are on the extra-cellular leaflet. There have been a number of theories about the mechanism of transbilayer movement of lipids in cellular systems and the physical process by which lipid compositional asymmetry in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is maintained. It is generally accepted that a significant barrier to native lipid translocation (movement between leaflets of the bilayer) exists which is related to the energetic penalty of moving the hydrophilic headgroup of a phospholipid through the hydrophobic core of the membrane. Overcoming this energetic barrier represents the rate limiting step in the spontaneous flip-flop of phospholipids in biological membranes, yet, while numerous kinetic studies of phospholipid flip-flop have been conducted, few researchers have reported thermodynamic parameters for the process. Using methods of classical surface chemistry coupled with nonlinear optical methods, we have developed a novel analytical approach, using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS), to selectively probe lipid compositional asymmetry in a planar supported lipid bilayer. This new method allows for the detection of lipid flip-flop kinetics and compositional asymmetry without the need for a fluorescent or spin-labeled lipid species by exploiting the coherent nature of SFVS. The SFVS intensity arising from the terminal methyl groups of the lipid fatty acid chains is used as an internal probe to directly monitor the compositional asymmetry in planar supported lipid bilayers (PSLBs(. By selectively deuterating a sub

  12. Geology of photo linear elements, Great Divide Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackstone, D. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground examination of photo linear elements in the Great Divide Basin, Wyoming indicates little if any tectonic control. Aeolian aspects are more widespread and pervasive than previously considered.

  13. Evaluation of the divided attention condition during functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Fahmie, Tara A; Iwata, Brian A; Harper, Jill M; Querim, Angie C

    2013-01-01

    A common condition included in most functional analyses (FAs) is the attention condition, in which the therapist ignores the client by engaging in a solitary activity (antecedent event) but delivers attention to the client contingent on problem behavior (consequent event). The divided attention condition is similar, except that the antecedent event consists of the therapist conversing with an adult confederate. We compared the typical and divided attention conditions to determine whether behavior in general (Study 1) and problem behavior in particular (Study 2) were more sensitive to one of the test conditions. Results showed that the divided attention condition resulted in faster acquisition or more efficient FA results for 2 of 9 subjects, suggesting that the divided attention condition could be considered a preferred condition when resources are available.

  14. Divided attention: an undesirable difficulty in memory retention.

    PubMed

    Gaspelin, Nicholas; Ruthruff, Eric; Pashler, Harold

    2013-10-01

    How can we improve memory retention? A large body of research has suggested that difficulty encountered during learning, such as when practice sessions are distributed rather than massed, can enhance later memory performance (see R. A. Bjork & E. L. Bjork, 1992). Here, we investigated whether divided attention during retrieval practice can also constitute a desirable difficulty. Following two initial study phases and one test phase with Swahili-English word pairs (e.g., vuvi-snake), we manipulated whether items were tested again under full or divided attention. Two days later, participants were brought back for a final cued-recall test (e.g., vuvi-?). Across three experiments (combined N = 122), we found no evidence that dividing attention while practicing retrieval enhances memory retention. This finding raises the question of why many types of difficulty during practice do improve long-term retention, but dividing attention does not.

  15. A 83 GHz InP DHBT static frequency divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youtao, Zhang; Xiaopeng, Li; Min, Zhang; Wei, Cheng; Xinyu, Chen

    2014-04-01

    A static frequency divider is presented using 0.7 μm InP DHBTs with 280 GHz ft/fmax. The divider is based on ECL master-slave D-flip-flop topology with 30 HBTs and 20 resistors with a chip size 0.62 × 0.65 mm2. The circuits use peaking inductance as a part of the loads to maximize the highest clock rate. Momentum simulation is used to accurately characterize the effect of the clock feedback lines at the W band. Test results show that the divider can operate from 1 GHz up to 83 GHz. Its phase noise is 139 dBc/Hz with 100 kHz offset. The power dissipation of divider core is 350 mW.

  16. 222. NORTH END OF DIVIDING STRIP LOCATED NEAR LITTLE HUNTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    222. NORTH END OF DIVIDING STRIP LOCATED NEAR LITTLE HUNTING CREEK ON GWMP LOOKING SOUTH, 1946. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  17. An improved fractional divider for fractional-N frequency synthesizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yongqi

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents an improved fractional divider used in 1.8~2GHz fractional-N frequency synthesizers. A new clock setting for delta-sigma modulator (DSM) is proposed to prevent the potential problems of traditional fractional dividers: the DSM output would be wrongly loaded and the action of DSM circuit may affect the phase-detection of phase-frequency-detector (PFD). Simulation result shows the effectiveness of this improvement.

  18. The contribution of working memory to divided attention.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Valerio; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that increasing working memory (WM) load can affect the attentional selection of signals originating from one object/location. Here we assessed whether WM load affects also the selection of multiple objects/locations (divided attention). Participants monitored either two object-categories (vs. one category; object-based divided attention) or two locations (vs. one location; space-based divided attention) while maintaining in WM either a variable number of objects (object-based WM load) or locations (space-based WM load). Behavioural results showed that WM load affected attentional performance irrespective of divided or focused attention. However, fMRI results showed that the activity associated with object-based divided attention increased linearly with increasing object-based WM load in the left and right intraparietal sulcus (IPS); while, in the same areas, activity associated with space-based divided attention was not affected by any type of WM load. These findings support the hypothesis that WM contributes to the maintenance of resource-demanding attentional sets in a domain-specific manner. Moreover, the dissociable impact of WM load on performance and brain activity suggests that increased IPS activation reflects a recruitment of additional, domain-specific processing resources that enable dual-task performance under conditions of high WM load and high attentional demand.

  19. Comprehensive Analysis of Mandibular Residual Asymmetry after Bilateral Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy Correction of Menton Point Deviation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiuping; Huang, Xiaoqiong; Xu, Yue; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Facial asymmetry often persists even after mandibular deviation corrected by the bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO) operation, since the reference facial sagittal plane for the asymmetry analysis is usually set up before the mandibular menton (Me) point correction. Our aim is to develop a predictive and quantitative method to assess the true asymmetry of the mandible after a midline correction performed by a virtual BSSRO, and to verify its availability by evaluation of the post-surgical improvement. Patients and Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted at the Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University (China) of patients with pure hemi-mandibular elongation (HE) from September 2010 through May 2014. Mandibular models were reconstructed from CBCT images of patients with pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. After mandibular de-rotation and midline alignment with virtual BSSRO, the elongation hemi-mandible was virtually mirrored along the facial sagittal plane. The residual asymmetry, defined as the superimposition and boolean operation of the mirrored elongation side on the normal side, was calculated, including the volumetric differences and the length of transversal and vertical asymmetry discrepancy. For more specific evaluation, both sides of the hemi-mandible were divided into the symphysis and parasymphysis (SP), mandibular body (MB), and mandibular angle (MA) regions. Other clinical variables include deviation of Me point, dental midline and molar relationship. The measurement of volumetric discrepancy between the two sides of post-surgical hemi-mandible were also calculated to verify the availability of virtual surgery. Paired t-tests were computed and the P value was set at .05. Results This study included 45 patients. The volume differences were 407.8±64.8 mm3, 2139.1±72.5 mm3, and 422.5±36.9 mm3; residual average transversal discrepancy, 1.9 mm, 1.0 mm, and 2.2 mm; average vertical discrepancy, 1.1 mm, 2.2 mm, and 2

  20. Using asymmetry analysis to reduce normal variability of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) macular thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alluwimi, Muhammed Saad

    Purpose: To investigate the use of asymmetry analysis to reduce normal between-subject variability of macular thickness measurements using SD-OCT. Methods: 63 volunteers free of eye disease were recruited: 33 young subjects (ages 21 to 35 years with mean and SD of 25 +/- 1.7), and 30 older subjects (ages 45 to 85 years with mean and SD of 66.7 +/- 9.0). All participants passed a comprehensive ophthalmic examination within the past two years. Macular images were gathered with the Spectralis OCT (V 5.4, Heidelberg Engineering, GmbH). The overlay 8x8 grid was manually centered on the fovea and aligned with the foveal-disc axis, then divided into five zones per hemifield following the method of Um et al (2012 IOVS 53:1139); asymmetry was computed as the difference between superior and inferior zone thicknesses. We assumed that the lowest variation and the highest density of ganglion cells will be found ~3° to 6° from the foveal center, corresponding to zones 1 and 2. For each zone and age group, between-subject standard deviations (SDs) were compared for retinal thickness (RT) versus asymmetry using an F-test. To account for repeated measures, a probability of p < 0.0125 was required for statistical significance. Axial length (AL) and corneal curvature (CC) were measured with an IOLMaster by the same operator and during the same imaging session. Results: For OD, asymmetry analysis reduced between-subject variability in zones 1 and 2 in both groups (F > 3.2, p < 0.001). SD for zone 1 dropped from 12.0 to 3.0 mum in the young group and from 11.7 to 2.6 mum in the older group. SD for zone 2 dropped from 13.6 to 5.3 mum (young) and from 11.1 to 5.8 mum (older). Combining all subjects, neither RT nor asymmetry showed a strong correlation with AL or CC (R2 < 0.01). Analysis for OS yielded the same pattern of results, as did asymmetry analyses between eyes (F > 3.8, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Asymmetry analysis reduced between-subject variability. These findings demonstrate

  1. Unvail the Mysterious of the Single Spin Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2010-01-05

    Single transverse-spin asymmetry in high energy hadronic reaction has been greatly investigated from both experiment and theory sides in the last few years. In this talk, I will summarize some recent theoretical developments, which, in my opinion, help to unvail the mysterious of the single spin asymmetry.

  2. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-08-18

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual's quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies.

  3. Asymmetries for the Visual Expression and Perception of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Michael E. R.; Searle, Dara A.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored asymmetries for movement, expression and perception of visual speech. Sixteen dextral models were videoed as they articulated: "bat," "cat," "fat," and "sat." Measurements revealed that the right side of the mouth was opened wider and for a longer period than the left. The asymmetry was accentuated at the beginning and ends of…

  4. Asymmetries of Knowledge and Epistemic Change in Social Gaming Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piirainen-Marsh, Arja; Tainio, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    While a growing number of studies investigate the role of knowledge and interactional management of knowledge asymmetries in conversation analysis, the epistemic organization of multilingual and second language interactions is still largely unexplored. This article addresses this issue by investigating how knowledge asymmetries and changing…

  5. Information Asymmetries as Trade Barriers: ISO 9000 Increases International Commerce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potoski, Matthew; Prakash, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Spatial, cultural, and linguistic barriers create information asymmetries between buyers and sellers that impede international trade. The International Organization for Standardization's ISO 9000 program is designed to reduce these information asymmetries by providing assurance about the product quality of firms that receive its certification.…

  6. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual’s quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies. PMID:26295239

  7. Fluctuating Asymmetry and General Intelligence: No Genetic or Phenotypic Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Segal, Nancy L.; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is the non-pathological left-right asymmetry of body traits that are usually left-right symmetrical, such as eye breadths and elbow to wrist lengths in humans, but which can be affected by developmental stressors. It is generally considered throughout biology to be an indicator of developmental instability and thus of…

  8. Information Asymmetries as Trade Barriers: ISO 9000 Increases International Commerce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potoski, Matthew; Prakash, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Spatial, cultural, and linguistic barriers create information asymmetries between buyers and sellers that impede international trade. The International Organization for Standardization's ISO 9000 program is designed to reduce these information asymmetries by providing assurance about the product quality of firms that receive its certification.…

  9. Jet Asymmetry and the Detection of Odderon Exchange in DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    1999-10-08

    We show that the asymmetry in the fractional energy of charm versus anticharm jets produced in high energy diffractive photoproduction is sensitive to the interference of the Odderon (C = -) and Pomeron (C = +) exchange amplitudes in QCD. Measurements of this asymmetry at HERA could provide the first evidence for the presence of Odderon exchange in the high energy limit of strong interactions.

  10. Fluctuating asymmetry in waterbirds in relation to mercury exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Josh

    2016-01-01

    The dataset includes the bird species, sex, mercury concentration in breast feathers and whole blood, and the composite measure of fluctuating asymmetry. Statistical models were developed for each species to analyze the relationship between mercury exposure in either breast feathers or whole blood and the composite measure of fluctuating asymmetry, while accounting for the sex of each bird.

  11. Fluctuating asymmetry as a predictor for rowing ergometer performance.

    PubMed

    Longman, D; Stock, J T; Wells, J C K

    2011-08-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) can be defined as an organism's deviation from perfect bilateral symmetry. FA has been of interest to evolutionary biologists as it may be indicative of the ability of an individual to express its genotype in a stable manner. Asymmetry has been shown to correlate with success in both intra- and inter-sexual selection in various species, including humans. A growing body of knowledge is emerging concerning the relationship between asymmetry and sporting ability. This study seeks to expand upon understanding of developmental stability and athletics by investigating the association between asymmetry and performance in rowers. Both male and female competitors from a range of abilities were tested (76 males and 70 females), with asymmetry being determined through bilateral digit measurements and performance through personal best time over 2000 m on the Concept 2 indoor rowing ergometer. Significant negative correlations were observed between asymmetry and 2000 m ergometer performance in both males and females. The relationship remained significant after adjustment for rowing experience and height. These results suggest that asymmetry may serve as a predictor of potential ability in the sport of rowing. The cause for the association between asymmetry and sporting performance has yet to be identified. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Stabilizing factors of phospholipid asymmetry in the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Dressler, V; Haest, C W; Plasa, G; Deuticke, B; Erusalimsky, J D

    1984-08-22

    Transbilayer reorientation (flip) of exogenous lysophospholipids and changes of the transbilayer distribution of endogenous phospholipids were studied in human erythrocytes and membrane vesicles. (1) Exogenous lysophosphatidylserine irreversibly accumulates in the inner membrane layer of resealed ghosts of human erythrocytes. (2) This accumulation even occurs after complete loss of asymmetric distribution of endogenous phosphatidylethanolamine and partial loss of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in diamide-treated cells. (3) Formation of inside-out and right-side-out vesicles from erythrocyte membranes results in a loss of endogenous phospholipid asymmetry as well as of the ability to establish asymmetry of exogenous lysophosphatidylserine. Rates of transbilayer reorientation of lysophospholipids for the vesicles, however, are comparable to those for intact cells. (4) Loss of endogenous asymmetry of phosphatidylserine is also observed in vesicles isolated from erythrocytes after heat denaturation of spectrin. The asymmetry in the residual cells is maintained. (5) In contrast to the loss of asymmetry of phosphatidylethanolamine and of phosphatidylserine, the asymmetry of sphingomyelin is completely maintained in the vesicles. (6) The stability of phospholipid asymmetry in the native cell is discussed in terms of a limitation of access of phospholipids to hypothetical reorientation sites. Such a limitation may either be the result of interaction of phospholipids with the membrane skeleton as in case of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, or the result of lipid-lipid interactions as in case of sphingomyelin.

  13. Asymmetries for the Visual Expression and Perception of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Michael E. R.; Searle, Dara A.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored asymmetries for movement, expression and perception of visual speech. Sixteen dextral models were videoed as they articulated: "bat," "cat," "fat," and "sat." Measurements revealed that the right side of the mouth was opened wider and for a longer period than the left. The asymmetry was accentuated at the beginning and ends of…

  14. Disentangling the Relationship between Hemispheric Asymmetry and Cognitive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirnstein, Marco; Leask, Stuart; Rose, Jonas; Hausmann, Markus

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that advantages of hemispheric asymmetries originated in better cognitive processing, hence it is often implied that the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry and cognitive performance is linearly positive: the higher the degree of lateralization in a specific cognitive domain, the better the performance in a…

  15. Nodal signalling and asymmetry of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Signore, Iskra A; Palma, Karina; Concha, Miguel L

    2016-12-19

    The role of Nodal signalling in nervous system asymmetry is still poorly understood. Here, we review and discuss how asymmetric Nodal signalling controls the ontogeny of nervous system asymmetry using a comparative developmental perspective. A detailed analysis of asymmetry in ascidians and fishes reveals a critical context-dependency of Nodal function and emphasizes that bilaterally paired and midline-unpaired structures/organs behave as different entities. We propose a conceptual framework to dissect the developmental function of Nodal as asymmetry inducer and laterality modulator in the nervous system, which can be used to study other types of body and visceral organ asymmetries. Using insights from developmental biology, we also present novel evolutionary hypotheses on how Nodal led the evolution of directional asymmetry in the brain, with a particular focus on the epithalamus. We intend this paper to provide a synthesis on how Nodal signalling controls left-right asymmetry of the nervous system.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'.

  16. Hemispheric Asymmetry in the Efficiency of Attentional Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asanowicz, Dariusz; Marzecova, Anna; Jaskowski, Piotr; Wolski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that hemispheric asymmetry of attention has been widely studied, a clear picture of this complex phenomenon is still lacking. The aim of the present study was to provide an efficient and reliable measurement of potential hemispheric asymmetries of three attentional networks, i.e. alerting, orienting and executive attention.…

  17. Asymmetry of White Matter Pathways in Developing Human Brains.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae W; Mitchell, Paul D; Kolasinski, James; Ellen Grant, P; Galaburda, Albert M; Takahashi, Emi

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the emergence of structural asymmetry of white matter tracts during early brain development. We examined whether and when asymmetry in diffusion parameters of limbic and association white matter pathways emerged in humans in 23 brains ranging from 15 gestational weeks (GW) up to 3 years of age (11 ex vivo and 12 in vivo cases) using high-angular resolution diffusion imaging tractography. Age-related development of laterality was not observed in a limbic connectional pathway (cingulum bundle or fornix). Among the studied cortico-cortical association pathways (inferior longitudinal fasciculus [ILF], inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and arcuate fasciculus), only the ILF showed development of age-related laterality emerging as early as the second trimester. Comparisons of ages older and younger than 40 GW revealed a leftward asymmetry in the cingulum bundle volume and a rightward asymmetry in apparent diffusion coefficient and leftward asymmetry in fractional anisotropy in the ILF in ages older than 40 GW. These results suggest that morphometric asymmetry in cortical areas precedes the emergence of white matter pathway asymmetry. Future correlative studies will investigate whether such asymmetry is anatomically/genetically driven or associated with functional stimulation.

  18. Interactions between white matter asymmetry and language during neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Dean, Douglas C; Dirks, Holly; Waskiewicz, Nicole; Lehman, Katie; Jerskey, Beth A; Deoni, Sean C L

    2013-10-09

    The human brain is asymmetric in gross structure as well as functional organization. However, the developmental basis and trajectory of this asymmetry is unclear, and its relationship(s) to functional and cognitive development, especially language, remain to be fully elucidated. During infancy and early childhood, in concert with cortical gray matter growth, underlying axonal bundles become progressively myelinated. This myelination is critical for efficient and coherent interneuronal communication and, as revealed in animal studies, the degree of myelination changes in response to environment and neuronal activity. Using a novel quantitative magnetic resonance imaging method to investigate myelin content in vivo in human infants and young children, we investigated gross asymmetry of myelin in a large cohort of 108 typically developing children between 1 and 6 years of age, hypothesizing that asymmetry would predict language abilities in this cohort. While asymmetry of myelin content was evident in multiple cortical and subcortical regions, language ability was predicted only by leftward asymmetry of caudate and frontal cortex myelin content and rightward asymmetry in the extreme capsule. Importantly, the influence of this asymmetry was found to change with age, suggesting an age-specific influence of structure and myelin on language function. The relationship between language ability and asymmetry of myelin stabilized at ∼4 years, indicating anatomical evidence for a critical time during development before which environmental influence on cognition may be greatest.

  19. Asymmetries of Knowledge and Epistemic Change in Social Gaming Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piirainen-Marsh, Arja; Tainio, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    While a growing number of studies investigate the role of knowledge and interactional management of knowledge asymmetries in conversation analysis, the epistemic organization of multilingual and second language interactions is still largely unexplored. This article addresses this issue by investigating how knowledge asymmetries and changing…

  20. Fluctuating Asymmetry and General Intelligence: No Genetic or Phenotypic Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Segal, Nancy L.; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is the non-pathological left-right asymmetry of body traits that are usually left-right symmetrical, such as eye breadths and elbow to wrist lengths in humans, but which can be affected by developmental stressors. It is generally considered throughout biology to be an indicator of developmental instability and thus of…

  1. Mapping hemispheric symmetries, relative asymmetries, and absolute asymmetries underlying the auditory laterality effect.

    PubMed

    Westerhausen, René; Kompus, Kristiina; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Functional hemispheric differences for speech and language processing have been traditionally studied by using verbal dichotic-listening paradigms. The commonly observed right-ear preference for the report of dichotically presented syllables is taken to reflect the left hemispheric dominance for speech processing. However, the results of recent functional imaging studies also show that both hemispheres - not only the left - are engaged by dichotic listening, suggesting a more complex relationship between behavioral laterality and functional hemispheric activation asymmetries. In order to more closely examine the hemispheric differences underlying dichotic-listening performance, we report an analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of 104 right-handed subjects, for the first time combining an interhemispheric difference and conjunction analysis. This approach allowed for a distinction of homotopic brain regions which showed symmetrical (i.e., brain region significantly activated in both hemispheres and no activation difference between the hemispheres), relative asymmetrical (i.e., activated in both hemispheres but significantly stronger in one than the other hemisphere), and absolute asymmetrical activation patterns (i.e., activated only in one hemisphere and this activation is significantly stronger than in the other hemisphere). Symmetrical activation was found in large clusters encompassing temporal, parietal, inferior frontal, and medial superior frontal regions. Relative and absolute left-ward asymmetries were found in the posterior superior temporal gyrus, located adjacent to symmetrically activated areas, and creating a lateral-medial gradient from symmetrical towards absolute asymmetrical activation within the peri-Sylvian region. Absolute leftward asymmetry was also found in the post-central and medial superior frontal gyri, while rightward asymmetries were found in middle temporal and middle frontal gyri. We conclude that dichotic

  2. Rightward dominance in temporal high-frequency electrical asymmetry corresponds to higher resting heart rate and lower baroreflex sensitivity in a heterogeneous population.

    PubMed

    Tegeler, Charles H; Shaltout, Hossam A; Tegeler, Catherine L; Gerdes, Lee; Lee, Sung W

    2015-06-01

    Explore potential use of a temporal lobe electrical asymmetry score to discriminate between sympathetic and parasympathetic tendencies in autonomic cardiovascular regulation. 131 individuals (82 women, mean age 43.1, range 13-83) with diverse clinical conditions completed inventories for depressive (CES-D or BDI-II) and insomnia-related (ISI) symptomatology, and underwent five-minute recordings of heart rate and blood pressure, allowing calculation of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), followed by one-minute, two-channel, eyes-closed scalp recordings of brain electrical activity. A temporal lobe high-frequency (23-36 Hz) electrical asymmetry score was calculated for each subject by subtracting the average amplitude in the left temporal region from amplitude in the right temporal region, and dividing by the lesser of the two. Depressive and insomnia-related symptomatology exceeding clinical threshold levels were reported by 48% and 50% of subjects, respectively. Using a cutoff value of 5% or greater to define temporal high-frequency asymmetry, subjects with leftward compared to rightward asymmetry were more likely to report use of a sedative-hypnotic medication (42% vs. 22%, P = 0.02). Among subjects with asymmetry of 5% or greater to 30% or greater, those with rightward compared to leftward temporal high-frequency asymmetry had higher resting heart rate (≥5% asymmetry, 72.3 vs. 63.8, P = 0.004; ≥10%, 71.5 vs. 63.0, P = 0.01; ≥20%, 72.2 vs. 64.2, P = 0.05; ≥30%, 71.4 vs. 64.6, P = 0.05). Subjects with larger degrees of rightward compared to leftward temporal high-frequency asymmetry had lower baroreflex sensitivity (≥40% asymmetry, 10.6 vs. 16.4, P = 0.03; ≥50% asymmetry, 10.4 vs. 16.7, P = 0.05). In a heterogeneous population, individuals with rightward compared to leftward temporal high-frequency electrical asymmetry had higher resting heart rate and lower BRS. Two-channel recording of brain electrical activity from

  3. Actomyosin-generated tension on cadherin is similar between dividing and non-dividing epithelial cells in early Xenopus laevis embryos

    PubMed Central

    Herbomel, Gaëtan; Hatte, Guillaume; Roul, Julien; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Tassan, Jean-Pierre; Tramier, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Epithelia represent a unique situation where polarized cells must maintain sufficiently strong cell-cell contacts to guarantee the epithelial integrity indispensable for barrier functions. Nevertheless, epithelia must also keep sufficient plasticity which is crucial during development and morphogenesis. Adherens junctions and mechanical forces produced by the actomyosin cytoskeleton are major players for epithelial integrity maintenance and plasticity regulations. To understand how the epithelium is able to meet such a challenge, it is indispensable to determine how cellular junctions and mechanical forces acting at adherens junctions are regulated. Here, we investigate the tensile forces acting on adherens junctions via cadherin during cell division in the Xenopus embryos epithelium. Using the recently developed E-cadherin FRET tension sensor and a fastFLIM prototype microscope, we were able to measure mechanical forces applied on cadherin at cell-cell junctions. We have shown that the Xenopus epithelium is under tension, approximately 3 pN which remains stable, indicating that tensile forces acting on cadherin at the adherens junction are at equilibrium. Unexpectedly, mechanical tension across cadherin was similar between dividing and non-dividing epithelial cells. PMID:28327558

  4. Observation of the limit cycle in asymmetric plasma divided by a magnetic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohi, Kazuo; Naitou, Hiroshi; Tauchi, Yasushi; Fukumasa, Osamu

    2001-01-01

    An asymmetric plasma divided by a magnetic filter is numerically simulated by the one-dimensional particle-in-cell code VSIM1D [Koga et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 68, 1578 (1999)]. Depending on the asymmetry, the system behavior is static or dynamic. In the static state, the potentials of the main plasma and the subplasma are given by the sheath potentials, φM˜3TMe/e and φS˜3TSe/e, respectively, with e being an electron charge and TMe and TSe being electron temperatures (TMe>TSe). In the dynamic state, while φM˜3TMe/e, φS oscillates periodically between φS,min˜3TSe/e and φS,max˜3TMe/e. The ions accelerated by the time varying potential gap get into the subplasma and excite the laminar shock waves. The period of the limit cycle is determined by the transit time of the shock wave structure.

  5. Transverse single-spin asymmetries: Challenges and recent progress

    DOE PAGES

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schafer, Andreas; ...

    2014-11-25

    In this study, transverse single-spin asymmetries are among the most intriguing observables in hadronic physics. Though such asymmetries were already measured for the first time about four decades ago, their origin is still under debate. Here we consider transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering, in nucleon–nucleon scattering, and in inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering. It is argued that, according to recent work, the single-spin asymmetries for those three processes may be simultaneously described in perturbative QCD, where the re-scattering of the active partons plays a crucial role. A comparison of single-spin asymmetries in different reactions can also shed light on themore » universality of transverse momentum dependent parton correlation functions. In particular, we discuss what existing data may tell us about the predicted process dependence of the Sivers function.« less

  6. Fluctuating odontometric asymmetry in the Lengua Indians of Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Kieser, J A; Groeneveld, H T; Preston, C B

    1986-01-01

    Fluctuating dental asymmetry was evaluated as an indicator of environmental stress in a group of 202 living Lengua Indians from the Paraguayan Chaco area. Older, less accultured individuals were shown to be significantly more asymmetric than younger individuals who had been increasingly exposed to western foodstuffs and medicine. Lengua Indians demonstrated similar levels of asymmetry to another preliterate group, the Ticuna Indians of Columbia, but were found to be significantly more asymmetric than contemporary caucasoids. Similar patterns of asymmetry in both arcades for males and females were confirmed by analyses of variance and by Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficients. Partitioning variation in the degree of asymmetry by arcade, dimension and tooth revealed significant differences in the effects of tooth and arcade only: asymmetry was greater in the maxilla and greater in the more distal teeth within each morphogenic class.

  7. Transverse single-spin asymmetries: Challenges and recent progress

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schafer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    2014-11-25

    In this study, transverse single-spin asymmetries are among the most intriguing observables in hadronic physics. Though such asymmetries were already measured for the first time about four decades ago, their origin is still under debate. Here we consider transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering, in nucleon–nucleon scattering, and in inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering. It is argued that, according to recent work, the single-spin asymmetries for those three processes may be simultaneously described in perturbative QCD, where the re-scattering of the active partons plays a crucial role. A comparison of single-spin asymmetries in different reactions can also shed light on the universality of transverse momentum dependent parton correlation functions. In particular, we discuss what existing data may tell us about the predicted process dependence of the Sivers function.

  8. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 {+-} 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 {+-} 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 {+-} 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  9. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; Backusmayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; Devaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strom, D.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Taylor, W.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Zelitch, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2011-12-01

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4fb-1, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the tt¯ forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2±3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6±6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2±4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  10. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  11. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found.

  12. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  13. Fatigue of cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Lin, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The fatigue of cellular materials is analyzed using dimensional arguments. When the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip fails after some cycles of loading, the macrocrack advances one cell diameter, giving the macrocrack growth rate of cellular materials. Paris law for microcrack propagation, Basquin law for high cycle fatigue and Coffin-Manson law for low cycle fatigue are employed in calculating the number of cycles to failure of the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip. It is found that fatigue of cellular materials depends on cyclic stress intensity range, cell size, relative density and the fatigue parameters of the solid from which they are made. Theoretical modelling of fatigue of foams is compared to data in polymer foams; agreement is good.

  14. Neural Correlates of Divided Attention in Natural Scenes.

    PubMed

    Fagioli, Sabrina; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2016-09-01

    Individuals are able to split attention between separate locations, but divided spatial attention incurs the additional requirement of monitoring multiple streams of information. Here, we investigated divided attention using photos of natural scenes, where the rapid categorization of familiar objects and prior knowledge about the likely positions of objects in the real world might affect the interplay between these spatial and nonspatial factors. Sixteen participants underwent fMRI during an object detection task. They were presented with scenes containing either a person or a car, located on the left or right side of the photo. Participants monitored either one or both object categories, in one or both visual hemifields. First, we investigated the interplay between spatial and nonspatial attention by comparing conditions of divided attention between categories and/or locations. We then assessed the contribution of top-down processes versus stimulus-driven signals by separately testing the effects of divided attention in target and nontarget trials. The results revealed activation of a bilateral frontoparietal network when dividing attention between the two object categories versus attending to a single category but no main effect of dividing attention between spatial locations. Within this network, the left dorsal premotor cortex and the left intraparietal sulcus were found to combine task- and stimulus-related signals. These regions showed maximal activation when participants monitored two categories at spatially separate locations and the scene included a nontarget object. We conclude that the dorsal frontoparietal cortex integrates top-down and bottom-up signals in the presence of distractors during divided attention in real-world scenes.

  15. Cellular and Nuclear Alignment Analysis for Determining Epithelial Cell Chirality.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Michael J; Ray, Poulomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Singh, Ajay V; Wan, Leo Q

    2016-05-01

    Left-right (LR) asymmetry is a biologically conserved property in living organisms that can be observed in the asymmetrical arrangement of organs and tissues and in tissue morphogenesis, such as the directional looping of the gastrointestinal tract and heart. The expression of LR asymmetry in embryonic tissues can be appreciated in biased cell alignment. Previously an in vitro chirality assay was reported by patterning multiple cells on microscale defined geometries and quantified the cell phenotype-dependent LR asymmetry, or cell chirality. However, morphology and chirality of individual cells on micropatterned surfaces has not been well characterized. Here, a Python-based algorithm was developed to identify and quantify immunofluorescence stained individual epithelial cells on multicellular patterns. This approach not only produces results similar to the image intensity gradient-based method reported previously, but also can capture properties of single cells such as area and aspect ratio. We also found that cell nuclei exhibited biased alignment. Around 35% cells were misaligned and were typically smaller and less elongated. This new imaging analysis approach is an effective tool for measuring single cell chirality inside multicellular structures and can potentially help unveil biophysical mechanisms underlying cellular chiral bias both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Cellular and Nuclear Alignment Analysis for Determining Epithelial Cell Chirality

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Michael J.; Ray, Poulomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Singh, Ajay V.; Wan, Leo Q.

    2015-01-01

    Left-right (LR) asymmetry is a biologically conserved property in living organisms that can be observed in the asymmetrical arrangement of organs and tissues and in tissue morphogenesis, such as the directional looping of the gastrointestinal tract and heart. The expression of LR asymmetry in embryonic tissues can be appreciated in biased cell alignment. Previously an in vitro chirality assay was reported by patterning multiple cells on microscale defined geometries and quantified the cell phenotype–dependent LR asymmetry, or cell chirality. However, morphology and chirality of individual cells on micropatterned surfaces has not been well characterized. Here, a Python-based algorithm was developed to identify and quantify immunofluorescence stained individual epithelial cells on multicellular patterns. This approach not only produces results similar to the image intensity gradient-based method reported previously, but also can capture properties of single cells such as area and aspect ratio. We also found that cell nuclei exhibited biased alignment. Around 35% cells were misaligned and were typically smaller and less elongated. This new imaging analysis approach is an effective tool for measuring single cell chirality inside multicellular structures and can potentially help unveil biophysical mechanisms underlying cellular chiral bias both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26294010

  17. Dark atoms: asymmetry and direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M. E-mail: gordan@pha.jhu.edu E-mail: christopher.wells@houghton.edu

    2011-10-01

    We present a simple UV completion of Atomic Dark Matter (aDM) in which heavy right-handed neutrinos decay to induce both dark and lepton number densities. This model addresses several outstanding cosmological problems: the matter/anti-matter asymmetry, the dark matter abundance, the number of light degrees of freedom in the early universe, and the smoothing of small-scale structure. Additionally, this realization of aDM may reconcile the CoGeNT excess with recently published null results and predicts a signal in the CRESST Oxygen band. We also find that, due to unscreened long-range interactions, the residual unrecombined dark ions settle into a diffuse isothermal halo.

  18. Dark Atoms: Asymmetry and Direct Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a simple UV completion of Atomic Dark Matter (aDM) in which heavy right-handed neutrinos decay to induce both dark and lepton number densities. This model addresses several outstanding cosmological problems: the matter/anti-matter asymmetry, the dark matter abundance, the number of light degrees of freedom in the early universe, and the smoothing of small-scale structure. Additionally, this realization of aDM may reconcile the CoGeNT excess with recently published null results and predicts a signal in the CRESST Oxygen band. We also find that, due to unscreened long-range interactions, the residual un recombined dark ions settle into a diffuse isothermal halo.

  19. Lepton asymmetry and neutrino oscillations interplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, Daniela

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the interplay between lepton asymmetry L and ν oscillations in the early Universe. Neutrino oscillations may suppress or enhance previously existing L. On the other hand L is capable to suppress or enhance neutrino oscillations. The mechanism of L enhancement in MSW resonant ν oscillations in the early Universe is numerically analyzed. L cosmological effects through ν oscillations are discussed. We discuss how L may change the cosmological BBN constraints on neutrino and show that BBN model with ν_e leftrightarrow ν_s oscillations is extremely sensitive to L - it allows to obtain the most stringent constraints on L value. We discuss also the cosmological role of active-sterile ν mixing and L in connection with the indications about additional relativistic density in the early Universe, pointed out by BBN, CMB and LSS data and the analysis of global ν data.

  20. Inter-hemispheric asymmetries in Saturn's aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badman, Sarah; Lamy, Laurent; Bunce, Emma; Cecconi, Baptiste; Clarke, John; Crary, Frank; Dougherty, Michele; Dyudina, Ulyana; Kinrade, Joe; Kurth, Bill; Melin, Henrik; Mitchell, Don; Nichols, Jonathan; Prange, Renee; Pryor, Wayne; Radioti, Katerina; Schippers, Patricia; Zarka, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    During two intervals in 2016 Saturn's UV aurorae were observed simultaneously in the northern, summer hemisphere by the Hubble Space Telescope and the southern, winter hemisphere by Cassini. For the first time the full auroral region was visible in both hemispheres allowing the nightside auroral morphology to be examined as well as the dayside. We find significant differences in the relative auroral intensities between the two hemispheres, particularly in the most poleward arcs observed under more active magnetospheric conditions. We propose that these asymmetries could be driven by inter-hemispheric field-aligned currents, or, considering the high latitude extent of some features, in association with enhanced auroral precipitation on newly-reconnected field lines. In the latter scenario, the lifetime of the high latitude auroral feature suggests that enhanced precipitation persists for at least 4 hours, longer than previously estimated, as the arc rotates to the nightside.

  1. Asymmetry-induced synchronization in oscillator networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2017-06-01

    A scenario has recently been reported in which in order to stabilize complete synchronization of an oscillator network—a symmetric state—the symmetry of the system itself has to be broken by making the oscillators nonidentical. But how often does such behavior—which we term asymmetry-induced synchronization (AISync)—occur in oscillator networks? Here we present the first general scheme for constructing AISync systems and demonstrate that this behavior is the norm rather than the exception in a wide class of physical systems that can be seen as multilayer networks. Since a symmetric network in complete synchrony is the basic building block of cluster synchronization in more general networks, AISync should be common also in facilitating cluster synchronization by breaking the symmetry of the cluster subnetworks.

  2. Single-Spin Asymmetries at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harutyun

    2003-05-01

    Single spin asymmetries (SSA) are crucial tools in the study of the spin structure of hadrons in pion electroproduction, since they are directly related to some hot topics,including transverse polarization distribution functions, fragmentation of polarized quarks and generalized parton distribution functions. At low beam energies, when the virtual photon has a relatively large angle with respect to the initial spin direction, the measured single-target spin-dependent sin φ moment in the cross section for the longitudinally polarized target contain contributions from the target spin components, both longitudinal and transverse with respect to the photon direction.This contribution presents preliminary results from Jefferson Lab's CLAS detector on beam and target SSA in pion azimuthal distributions in one particle inclusive electroproduction in the DIS regime (Q2 > 1GeV 2,W > 2GeV ) off a polarized NH3 target.

  3. On the matter-antimatter asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, W. A.

    2015-08-01

    Although the big bang should have produced equal amounts of matter and antimatter, there is evidence that the universe does not contain significant amounts of antimatter. The usual explanations for this matter-antimatter asymmetry involve finding causes for Sakharov’s three conditions to be satisfied. However, if the composite photon theory is correct, antimatter galaxies should appear to us as dark matter, neither emitting light (that we can detect) or reflecting ordinary light. Thus the presence of antimatter galaxies may be harder to detect than previously thought. The large clumps of dark matter that have been observed by weak gravitation lensing could be clusters of antimatter galaxies. “Dark photons,” that are hypothesized to cause self-interactions between dark matter particles, are identified as antiphotons in the composite photon theory. The possibility of a patchwork universe, that had been previously excluded, is also re-examined.

  4. Leptophilic Dark Matter from the Lepton Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2010-03-01

    We present a model of weak scale dark matter (DM) where the thermal DM density is set by the lepton asymmetry due to the presence of higher dimension lepton violating operators. In these models there is generically a separation between the annihilation cross section responsible for the relic abundance (through lepton violating operators) and the annihilation cross section that is relevant for the indirect detection of DM (through lepton preserving operators). This implies a perceived boost in the annihilation cross section in the Galaxy today relative to that derived for canonical thermal freeze-out, giving a natural explanation for the observed cosmic ray electron and positron excesses, without resorting to a Sommerfeld enhancement. These models motivate continued searches for DM with apparently nonthermal annihilation cross sections. The DM may also play a role in radiatively generating Majorana neutrino masses.

  5. Z Boson Asymmetry Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, B.

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (A_fb) in dilepton pair decays of Z bosons produced in ppbar collisions using the full Tevatron dataset. The CDF experiment extracts a value for the effective weak mixing angle parameter sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} of 0.2315 +/- 0.0010 from the A_fb distribution of dimuon events in 9.2 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity. From dielectron events in 9.7 fb^{-1} of data, the D0 experiment finds sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} = 0.23106 +/- 0.00053, the world's most precise measurement of sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} from hadron colliders and with light quark couplings.

  6. Giver-receiver asymmetries in gift preferences.

    PubMed

    Teigen, Karl Halvor; Olsen, Marina V G; Solås, Odd Egil

    2005-03-01

    When people are asked to choose between gift items, givers and receivers sometimes show different patterns of preferences. The article reports four experimental studies exploring these giver-receiver asymmetries. Whereas givers tend to prefer exclusive, but smaller gift items, receivers appear to prefer less luxurious, and more useful gifts (Experiment 1). Givers prefer gift vouchers to cash, and are concerned about timing, whereas more receivers accept cash gifts, and claim that it does not matter if the gift arrives late (Experiment 2). One interpretation of the results could be that givers conform more strongly to gift conventions (cultural norms for gift exchange). It is further argued that these differences are not due to a perceived difference between self and others (Experiment 3), but rather because of situational differences. When receivers perform separate evaluations of gifts rather than joint evaluations (pairwise comparisons), they tend to change their preference pattern towards a higher rating of exclusive gift items (Experiment 4).

  7. Cellular immunotherapies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Berraondo, Pedro; Labiano, Sara; Minute, Luna; Etxeberria, Iñaki; Vasquez, Marcos; Sanchez-Arraez, Alvaro; Teijeira, Alvaro; Melero, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Lessons learned over decades on the use of gene and cell therapies have found clinical applicability in the field of cancer immunotherapy. On December 16(th), 2016 a symposium was held in Pamplona (Spain) to analyze and discuss the critical points for the clinical success of adoptive cell transfer strategies in cancer immunotherapy. Cellular immunotherapy is being currently exploited for the development of new cancer vaccines using ex vivo manipulated dendritic cells or to enhance the number of effector cells, transferring reinvigorated NK cells or T cells. In this meeting report, we summarize the main topics covered and provide an overview of the field of cellular immunotherapy.

  8. Cellular structural biology.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yutaka; Selenko, Philipp

    2010-10-01

    While we appreciate the complexity of the intracellular environment as a general property of every living organism, we collectively lack the appropriate tools to analyze protein structures in a cellular context. In-cell NMR spectroscopy represents a novel biophysical tool to investigate the conformational and functional characteristics of biomolecules at the atomic level inside live cells. Here, we review recent in-cell NMR developments and provide an outlook towards future applications in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. We hope to thereby emphasize the usefulness of in-cell NMR techniques for cellular studies of complex biological processes and for structural analyses in native environments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An aging-independent replicative lifespan in a symmetrically dividing eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Spivey, Eric C; Jones, Stephen K; Rybarski, James R; Saifuddin, Fatema A; Finkelstein, Ilya J

    2017-01-01

    The replicative lifespan (RLS) of a cell—defined as the number of cell divisions before death—has informed our understanding of the mechanisms of cellular aging. However, little is known about aging and longevity in symmetrically dividing eukaryotic cells because most prior studies have used budding yeast for RLS studies. Here, we describe a multiplexed fission yeast lifespan micro-dissector (multFYLM) and an associated image processing pipeline for performing high-throughput and automated single-cell micro-dissection. Using the multFYLM, we observe continuous replication of hundreds of individual fission yeast cells for over seventy-five generations. Surprisingly, cells die without the classic hallmarks of cellular aging, such as progressive changes in size, doubling time, or sibling health. Genetic perturbations and drugs can extend the RLS via an aging-independent mechanism. Using a quantitative model to analyze these results, we conclude that fission yeast does not age and that cellular aging and replicative lifespan can be uncoupled in a eukaryotic cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20340.001 PMID:28139976

  10. Why Cortical Neurons Cannot Divide, and Why Do They Usually Die in the Attempt?

    PubMed

    Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando; Dent, Myrna A R

    2017-04-01

    Cortical neurons are prime examples of terminally differentiated, postmitotic cells. However, under experimental or pathological conditions, they can re-enter the cell cycle and replicate DNA but are unable to divide, dying by apoptosis or becoming either polyploid or aneuploid. Any cellular state that depends on the action of genes and their products can be reverted or bypassed by spontaneous or induced mutations, yet there are currently no reports of dividing cortical neurons. Thus, it seems unlikely that the remarkably stable postmitotic condition of cortical neurons depends on specific gene functions. This Review summarizes evidence that the postmitotic state of cortical neurons depends on the high stability of its underlying nuclear structure that results from an entropy-driven process aimed at dissipating the intrinsic structural stress present in chromosomal DNA in such a way that the structural stability of the neuronal nucleus becomes an insurmountable energy barrier for karyokinesis and mitosis. From this perspective, the integral properties of the nuclear higher order structure in neurons provide an explanation not only for why cortical neurons cannot divide but also for why they usually die if they happen to replicate their DNA. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Promoting nursing competitiveness: introduction to the digital divide].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Hsu; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2010-02-01

    Increasingly sophisticated information technology (IT) has widened the gap (the so-called "digital divide") between those with effective access to IT resources and those without. Problems related to the digital divide exist in every country. In addition to level of familiarity with technology, the divide can also be influenced by factors of race, gender, age, education, economic status and area of residence. The digital divide may be ameliorated through technology innovations in terms of access to information, information application and information literacy. As IT is an increasingly significant component of modern healthcare, it may be expected that the "width" of the potential gap widens as IT applications increase in sophistication. Nursing professionals must keep abreast of advancing technologies in order to narrow the digital divide. To cope with this challenge, nursing professionals should enhance their understanding of new technologies beyond what is taught in formal education curricula. This knowledge enhancement may be attained through self learning or on-the-job training in nursing informatics. Content could cover hospital information system (IS) usage, security, applications and web access. This will improve the ability of nursing staff to face the current IT challenge.

  12. Reduced auditory M100 asymmetry in schizophrenia and dyslexia: applying a developmental instability approach to assess atypical brain asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Edgar, J Christopher; Yeo, Ron A; Gangestad, Steven W; Blake, Melissa B; Davis, John T; Lewine, Jeffrey D; Cañive, José M

    2006-01-01

    Although atypical structural and functional superior temporal gyrus (STG) asymmetries are frequently observed in patients with schizophrenia and individuals with dyslexia, their significance is unclear. One possibility is that atypical asymmetries reflect a general risk factor that can be seen across multiple neurodevelopmental conditions--a risk factor whose origins are best understood in the context of Developmental Instability (DI) theory. DI measures (minor physical anomalies (MPAs) and fluctuating asymmetries (FAs)) reflect perturbation of the genetic plan. The present study sought to assess whether the presence of peripheral indices of DI predicts anomalous functional auditory cortex asymmetry in schizophrenia patients and dyslexia subjects. The location of the auditory M100 response was used as a measure of functional STG asymmetry, as it has been reported that in controls (but not in subjects with schizophrenia or dyslexia) the M100 source location in the right hemisphere is shifted anterior to that seen for the left hemisphere. Whole-brain auditory evoked magnetic field data were successfully recorded from 14 male schizophrenia patients, 21 male subjects with dyslexia, and 16 normal male control subjects. MPA and FA measures were also obtained. Replicating previous studies, both schizophrenia and dyslexia groups showed less M100 asymmetry than did controls. Schizophrenia and dyslexia subjects also had higher MPA scores than normal controls. Although neither total MPA nor FA measures predicted M100 asymmetry, analyses on individual MPA items revealed a relationship between high palate and M100 asymmetry. Findings suggest that M100 positional asymmetry is not a diagnostically specific feature in several neurodevelopmental conditions. Continued research examining DI and brain asymmetry relationships is warranted.

  13. Preferential processing of tactile events under conditions of divided attention.

    PubMed

    Hanson, James V M; Whitaker, David; Heron, James

    2009-10-07

    Differences in transduction and transmission latencies of visual, auditory and tactile events cause corresponding differences in simple reaction time. As reaction time is usually measured in unimodal blocks, it is unclear whether such latency differences also apply when observers monitor multiple sensory channels. We investigate this by comparing reaction time when attention is focused on a single modality, and when attention is divided between multiple modalities. Results show that tactile reaction time is unaffected by dividing attention, whereas visual and auditory reaction times are significantly and asymmetrically increased. These findings show that tactile information is processed preferentially by the nervous system under conditions of divided attention, and suggest that tactile events may be processed preattentively.

  14. Selectively Distracted: Divided Attention and Memory for Important Information.

    PubMed

    Middlebrooks, Catherine D; Kerr, Tyson; Castel, Alan D

    2017-08-01

    Distractions and multitasking are generally detrimental to learning and memory. Nevertheless, people often study while listening to music, sitting in noisy coffee shops, or intermittently checking their e-mail. The current experiments examined how distractions and divided attention influence one's ability to selectively remember valuable information. Participants studied lists of words that ranged in value from 1 to 10 points while completing a digit-detection task, while listening to music, or without distractions. Though participants recalled fewer words following digit detection than in the other conditions, there were no significant differences between conditions in terms of selectively remembering the most valuable words. Similar results were obtained across a variety of divided-attention tasks that stressed attention and working memory to different degrees, which suggests that people may compensate for divided-attention costs by selectively attending to the most valuable items and that factors that worsen memory do not necessarily impair the ability to selectively remember important information.

  15. Dividing Cells Regulate Their Lipid Composition and Localization

    PubMed Central

    Atilla-Gokcumen, G. Ekin; Muro, Eleonora; Relat-Goberna, Josep; Sasse, Sofia; Bedigian, Anne; Coughlin, Margaret L.; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Eggert, Ulrike S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although massive membrane rearrangements occur during cell division, little is known about specific roles that lipids might play in this process. We report that the lipidome changes with the cell cycle. LC-MS-based lipid profiling shows that 11 lipids with specific chemical structures accumulate in dividing cells. Using AFM, we demonstrate differences in the mechanical properties of live dividing cells and their isolated lipids relative to nondividing cells. In parallel, systematic RNAi knockdown of lipid biosynthetic enzymes identified enzymes required for division, which highly correlated with lipids accumulated in dividing cells. We show that cells specifically regulate the localization of lipids to midbodies, membrane-based structures where cleavage occurs. We conclude that cells actively regulate and modulate their lipid composition and localization during division, with both signaling and structural roles likely. This work has broader implications for the active and sustained participation of lipids in basic biology. PMID:24462247

  16. Ouroboros: A Tool for Building Generic, Hybrid, Divide& Conquer Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J R; Foster, I

    2003-05-01

    A hybrid divide and conquer algorithm is one that switches from a divide and conquer to an iterative strategy at a specified problem size. Such algorithms can provide significant performance improvements relative to alternatives that use a single strategy. However, the identification of the optimal problem size at which to switch for a particular algorithm and platform can be challenging. We describe an automated approach to this problem that first conducts experiments to explore the performance space on a particular platform and then uses the resulting performance data to construct an optimal hybrid algorithm on that platform. We implement this technique in a tool, ''Ouroboros'', that automatically constructs a high-performance hybrid algorithm from a set of registered algorithms. We present results obtained with this tool for several classical divide and conquer algorithms, including matrix multiply and sorting, and report speedups of up to six times achieved over non-hybrid algorithms.

  17. Bridging the Digital Divide for urban seniors: community partnership.

    PubMed

    Cresci, M Kay; Jarosz, Patricia A

    2010-01-01

    Computers and the Internet offer older adults resources for improving health. For many older adults, the "Digital Divide" (the social, economic, and demographic factors that exist between individuals who use computers and those who do not) is a barrier to taking advantage of these resources. Bridging the Digital Divide by making computers and the Internet more accessible and making online health information more usable for older adults has the potential to improve health of older adults. This article describes a strategy for closing the Digital Divide for urban seniors through the formation of a community- university partnership with the goal of improving health and well-being through the use of online health information.

  18. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  19. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  20. Cellular genetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, F; Filareto, A; Spitalieri, P; Sangiuolo, F; Novelli, G

    2005-01-01

    Cellular genetic therapy is the ultimate frontier for those pathologies that are consequent to a specific nonfunctional cellular type. A viable cure for there kinds of diseases is the replacement of sick cells with healthy ones, which can be obtained from the same patient or a different donor. In fact, structures can be corrected and strengthened with the introduction of undifferentiated cells within specific target tissues, where they will specialize into the desired cellular types. Furthermore, consequent to the recent results obtained with the transdifferentiation experiments, a process that allows the in vitro differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells, it has also became clear that many advantages may be obtained from the use of stem cells to produce drugs, vaccines, and therapeutic molecules. Since stem cells can sustain lineage potentials, the capacity for differentiation, and better tolerance for the introduction of exogenous genes, they are also considered as feasible therapeutic vehicles for gene therapy. In fact, it is strongly believed that the combination of cellular genetic and gene therapy approaches will definitely allow the development of new therapeutic strategies as well as the production of totipotent cell lines to be used as experimental models for the cure of genetic disorders.

  1. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  2. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  3. On the neural basis of focused and divided attention.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Katharina; Wiese, Holger; Stude, Philipp; de Greiff, Armin; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Keidel, Matthias

    2005-12-01

    Concepts of higher attention functions distinguish focused and divided attention. The present study investigated whether these mental abilities are mediated by common or distinct neural substrates. In a first experiment, 19 healthy subjects were examined with functional brain imaging (fMRI) while they attended to either one or both of two simultaneously presented visual information streams and responded to repetitive stimuli. This experiment resembled a typical examination of these mental functions with the single task demanding focused and the dual task conditions requiring divided attention. Both conditions activated a widespread, mainly right-sided network including dorso- and ventrolateral prefrontal structures, superior and inferior parietal cortex, and anterior cingulate gyrus. Under higher cognitive demands of divided attention, activity in these structures was enhanced and left-sided homologues were recruited. In a second experiment investigating another 17 subjects with almost the same paradigm, it was accounted for that in most dual task investigations of focused and divided attention the single tasks are easier to process than their combined presentation. Therefore, the task difficulty of focused attention tasks was increased. Almost the same activity pattern observed during division of attention was now found during focusing attention. Comparing both attentional states matched for task difficulty, differences were found in visual but not in prefrontal or parietal cortex areas. Our results suggest that focused and divided attention depend on largely overlapping neuronal substrates. Differences in activation patterns, especially in prefrontal and parietal areas, may result from unequal demands on executive control due to disparate processing requirements in typical tasks of focused and divided attention: Easier conditions begin with mainly right-sided activity within the attention network. As conditions become more difficult, left-lateralized homologue

  4. Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P.

    1987-01-01

    A waveguide power divider (10) for splitting electromagnetic microwave power and directionally coupling the divided power includes an input waveguide (21) and reduced height output waveguides (23) interconnected by axial slots (22) and matched loads (25) and (26) positioned at the unused ends of input and output guides (21) and (23) respectively. The axial slots are of a length such that the wave in the input waveguide (21) is directionally coupled to the output waveguides (23). The widths of input guide (21) and output guides (23) are equal and the width of axial slots (22) is one half of the width of the input guide (21).

  5. Bilateral asymmetry of the humerus during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Amanda

    2011-08-01

    The development of handedness throughout growth can be investigated by using bilateral asymmetry of the humerus as a proxy for this trait. A large skeletal sample of nonadults from English archaeological sites was examined using standard metric techniques to assess when right-sided asymmetry first appears in the human skeleton. Results of this work indicate a change in directional asymmetry during growth and development, with infants and young children exhibiting no significant asymmetry and older children and adolescents demonstrating right-sidedness. This trend is consistent with what has been observed in previous studies of upper limb asymmetry in skeletal material and behaviorally in living children, adding further strength to the premise that biomechanical forces strongly influence bilateral asymmetry in the upper limb bones. Variability in the magnitude of asymmetry between different features of the humerus was also noted. This characteristic can be explained by differing degrees of genetic canalization, with length and articular dimensions being more strongly canalized than diaphyseal properties. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Cortical asymmetries in normal, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hun; Lee, Jong Weon; Kim, Geon Ha; Roh, Jee Hoon; Kim, Min-Jeong; Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeon, Seun; Lee, Jong-Min; Heilman, Kenneth M; Na, Duk L

    2012-09-01

    There are functional and structural neocortical hemispheric asymmetries in people with normal cognition. These asymmetries may be altered in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) because there is a loss of neuronal connectivity in the heteromodal cortex. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), mild AD, and moderate to severe AD have progressive reductions in thickness asymmetries of the heteromodal neocortex. Right-handed elderly volunteers including normal cognition (NC), aMCI, and AD underwent 3-D volume imaging for cortical thickness. Although the cortical asymmetry pattern observed in normal cognition brains was generally maintained in aMCI and AD, there was a progressive decrease in the degree of asymmetry, especially in the inferior parietal lobule. A reduction of neocortical asymmetries may be a characteristic sign that occurs in patients with AD. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether this loss is specific to AD and if measurements of asymmetry can be used as diagnostic markers and for monitoring disease progression.

  7. Magnetic fields and chiral asymmetry in the early hot universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydorenko, Maksym; Tomalak, Oleksandr; Shtanov, Yuri

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study analytically the process of external generation and subsequent free evolution of the lepton chiral asymmetry and helical magnetic fields in the early hot universe. This process is known to be affected by the Abelian anomaly of the electroweak gauge interactions. As a consequence, chiral asymmetry in the fermion distribution generates magnetic fields of non-zero helicity, and vice versa. We take into account the presence of thermal bath, which serves as a seed for the development of instability in magnetic field in the presence of externally generated lepton chiral asymmetry. The developed helical magnetic field and lepton chiral asymmetry support each other, considerably prolonging their mutual existence, in the process of `inverse cascade' transferring magnetic-field power from small to large spatial scales. For cosmologically interesting initial conditions, the chiral asymmetry and the energy density of helical magnetic field are shown to evolve by scaling laws, effectively depending on a single combined variable. In this case, the late-time asymptotics of the conformal chiral chemical potential reproduces the universal scaling law previously found in the literature for the system under consideration. This regime is terminated at lower temperatures because of scattering of electrons with chirality change, which exponentially washes out chiral asymmetry. We derive an expression for the termination temperature as a function of the chiral asymmetry and energy density of helical magnetic field.

  8. Analyses of the Variability Asymmetry of Kepler AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Yang; Wang, Jun-Xian

    2015-05-01

    The high-quality light curves from the Kepler space telescope make it possible to analyze the optical variability of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with unprecedented time resolution. Studying the asymmetry in variations could provide independent constraints on physical models for AGN variability. In this paper, we use Kepler observations of 19 sources to perform analyses of the variability asymmetry of AGNs. We apply smoothing correction to light curves to deduct their bias toward high-frequency variability asymmetry caused by long-term variations that have been poorly sampled due to the limited length of light curves. A parameter β based on structure functions is introduced to quantitively describe the asymmetry and its uncertainty is measured using extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Individual sources show no evidence of asymmetry at timescales of 1˜ 20 days and there is no general trend toward positive or negative asymmetry over the whole sample. Stacking the data from all 19 AGNs, we derive an averaged \\bar{β } of 0.00 ± 0.03 and -0.02 ± 0.04 over timescales of 1 ˜ 5 days and 5 ˜ 20 days, respectively, which are statistically consistent with zero. Quasars and Seyfert galaxies show similar asymmetry parameters. Our results indicate that short-term optical variations in AGNs are highly symmetric.

  9. Evaluation of limb load asymmetry using two new mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Senthil N S; Omar, Baharudin; Joseph, Leonard H; Htwe, Ohnmar; Jagannathan, K; Hamdan, Nor M Y; Rajalakshmi, D

    2014-09-25

    Quantitative measurement of limb loading is important in orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation. In current practice, mathematical models such as Symmetry index (SI), Symmetry ratio (SR), and Symmetry angle (SA) are used to quantify limb loading asymmetry. Literatures have identified certain limitations with the above mathematical models. Hence this study presents two new mathematical models Modified symmetry index (MSI) and Limb loading error (LLE) that would address these limitations. Furthermore, the current mathematical models were compared against the new model with the goal of achieving a better model. This study uses hypothetical data to simulate an algorithmic preliminary computational measure to perform with all numerical possibilities of even and uneven limb loading that can occur in human legs. Descriptive statistics are used to interpret the limb loading patterns: symmetry, asymmetry and maximum asymmetry. The five mathematical models were similar in analyzing symmetry between limbs. However, for asymmetry and maximum asymmetry data, the SA and SR values do not give any meaningful interpretation, and SI gives an inflated value. The MSI and LLE are direct, easy to interpret and identify the loading patterns with the side of asymmetry. The new models are notable as they quantify the amount and side of asymmetry under different loading patterns.

  10. Testis asymmetry and sperm length in Rhacophorus omeimontis.

    PubMed

    Mi, Zhi Ping; Liao, Wen Bo; Jin, Long; Lou, Shang Ling; Cheng, Jian; Wu, Hua

    2012-06-01

    Theory predicts that the degree of testes asymmetry should be positively correlated with male body condition in species with directional testis asymmetry. We tested this prediction in Rhacophorus omeimontis, a species in which females mate with more than one male. Our results showed that the treefrogs did not exhibit the absence of directional asymmetry in testis size, but rather the occurrence of fluctuating asymmetry. Moreover, we also tested differences in body size, body mass, testis mass, testis asymmetry, and sperm size among initially paired, jointly paired, and unpaired males. We found that body size and mass, testis mass, testis asymmetry and sperm length did not differ among the three male types. Testis mass showed a positive relationship with soma mass, but the correlations between the extent of fluctuating testis asymmetry and sperm length, and between testis mass and sperm length were not significant. Our data suggest that testes size and sperm length do not play an important role in determining male mating success in the presence of sperm competition.

  11. Hα LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES AND THE CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE VELOCITY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kennedy, M.; Keenan, F. P.; Simões, P. J. A.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Fletcher, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Graham, D.

    2015-11-10

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  12. Fluctuating asymmetry, sexual selection and canine teeth in primates.

    PubMed

    Manning, J T; Chamberlain, A T

    1993-02-22

    Fluctuating asymmetry arises as small deviations from symmetry which can be expressed on either side of the body. Increases in fluctuating asymmetry can suggest genomic stress such as results from directional selection. It has been argued that epigamic structures and weapons should show high levels of fluctuating asymmetry because sexual selection is essentially directional in nature. We tested this prediction by examining the expression of fluctuating asymmetry in the upper canines of 21 species of Old World primates. We found, for males but not for females, that asymmetry was correlated with measures of sexual selection including canine dimorphism, canine size, mass dimorphism, and intra-male competition. However, there was no significant correlation with diet type and body mass, which are only weakly associated with sexual selection. Phylogenetic inertia did not account for the association between fluctuating asymmetry and sexual selection. We also found that species with high values of canine dimorphism and intra-male competition tended to have a negative correlation between asymmetry and mean canine height, and this latter effect was present in both males and females. The implications of these findings for sexual selection theory are discussed.

  13. Replenishment success linked to fluctuating asymmetry in larval fish.

    PubMed

    Lemberget, Tove; McCormick, Mark I

    2009-02-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA), defined as random deviations from perfect symmetry, has become a popular tool with which to examine the effects of stress during the development of bilaterally symmetrical organisms. Recent studies have suggested that FA in otoliths may serve as an indicator of stress in fish larvae. We examined the relationship between otolith asymmetry and temporal patterns in the occurrence of late-stage larvae to a tropical reef (i.e. replenishment) for the Caribbean lizardfish, Saurida suspicio (family Synodontidae). Late-stage larvae were collected in light traps over a period of 18 consecutive lunar months in the San Blas Archipelago, Panama. Asymmetry within otolith pairs was calculated from 24 variables: area, perimeter, longest and shortest axis of the otolith and 20 shape descriptors (Fourier harmonics). Otolith asymmetry was correlated strongly with fluctuations in lunar light trap catches. Two measured variables, otolith area and one of the 20 shape descriptors, accounted for 60% of the variability in lunar replenishment of S. suspicio. Individuals from small replenishment pulses exhibited higher levels of asymmetry compared to larvae from large pulses. When dry and wet seasons were analysed separately, otolith asymmetry explained a surprising 70 and 97% of the variation, respectively. Although the generality of these results remain to be tested among other populations and species, otolith asymmetry may be an important indicator, and potentially a predictor, of larval quality and replenishment success.

  14. The heritability of chimpanzee and human brain asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D; Schapiro, Steven J; Sherwood, Chet C

    2016-12-28

    Human brains are markedly asymmetric in structure and lateralized in function, which suggests a relationship between these two properties. The brains of other closely related primates, such as chimpanzees, show similar patterns of asymmetry, but to a lesser degree, indicating an increase in anatomical and functional asymmetry during hominin evolution. We analysed the heritability of cerebral asymmetry in chimpanzees and humans using classic morphometrics, geometric morphometrics, and quantitative genetic techniques. In our analyses, we separated directional asymmetry and fluctuating asymmetry (FA), which is indicative of environmental influences during development. We show that directional patterns of asymmetry, those that are consistently present in most individuals in a population, do not have significant heritability when measured through simple linear metrics, but they have marginally significant heritability in humans when assessed through three-dimensional configurations of landmarks that reflect variation in the size, position, and orientation of different cortical regions with respect to each other. Furthermore, genetic correlations between left and right hemispheres are substantially lower in humans than in chimpanzees, which points to a relatively stronger environmental influence on left-right differences in humans. We also show that the level of FA has significant heritability in both species in some regions of the cerebral cortex. This suggests that brain responsiveness to environmental influences, which may reflect neural plasticity, has genetic bases in both species. These results have implications for the evolvability of brain asymmetry and plasticity among humans and our close relatives.

  15. Shifting brain asymmetry: the link between meditation and structural lateralization.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Florian; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan; Toga, Arthur W; Luders, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed an increased fractional anisotropy and greater thickness in the anterior parts of the corpus callosum in meditation practitioners compared with control subjects. Altered callosal features may be associated with an altered inter-hemispheric integration and the degree of brain asymmetry may also be shifted in meditation practitioners. Therefore, we investigated differences in gray matter asymmetry as well as correlations between gray matter asymmetry and years of meditation practice in 50 long-term meditators and 50 controls. We detected a decreased rightward asymmetry in the precuneus in meditators compared with controls. In addition, we observed that a stronger leftward asymmetry near the posterior intraparietal sulcus was positively associated with the number of meditation practice years. In a further exploratory analysis, we observed that a stronger rightward asymmetry in the pregenual cingulate cortex was negatively associated with the number of practice years. The group difference within the precuneus, as well as the positive correlations with meditation years in the pregenual cingulate cortex, suggests an adaptation of the default mode network in meditators. The positive correlation between meditation practice years and asymmetry near the posterior intraparietal sulcus may suggest that meditation is accompanied by changes in attention processing.

  16. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Developmental Instability in Sagittal Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Valerie Burke; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether premature sagittal craniosynostosis is associated with developmental instability in the skull by analyzing fluctuating asymmetry in skull shape. Design: Cranial shape was quantified by collecting coordinate data from landmarks located on three-dimensional reconstructions of preoperative computed tomography (CT) images of 22 children with sagittal craniosynostosis and 22 age-matched controls. A fluctuating asymmetry application of Euclidean distance matrix analysis (EDMA) was used to quantify and compare asymmetry in cranial shape using these landmark data. Results: In contrast to expectations, the sagittal craniosynostosis group did not show a statistically significant increase in the overall level of fluctuating asymmetry relative to the control group. However, we discerned statistically significant localized increases in fluctuating asymmetry in the sagittal craniosynostosis group at pterion and the anterior clinoid processes (α = .05). We also determined a significant correlation of fluctuating asymmetry values between the two groups (r = .71). Conclusions: We conclude that there is no evidence of a role for system-wide developmental instability in the etiology of nonsyndromic sagittal craniosynostosis. However, the localized evidence of asymmetry at the anterior clinoid processes in the sagittal synostosis group suggests an association with the tracts of dura mater that attach there. PMID:19254065

  17. NODAL PATHWAY GENES ARE DOWNREGULATED IN FACIAL ASYMMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Romain; Hottenstein, Molly; Raoul, Gwenael; Ferri, Joel; Horton, Michael; Tobias, John W.; Barton, Elisabeth; Gelé, Patrick; Sciote, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Facial asymmetry is a common comorbid condition in patients with jaw deformation malocclusion. Heritability of malocclusion is advancing rapidly, but very little is known regarding genetic contributions to asymmetry. This study identifies differences in expression of key asymmetry-producing genes which are down regulated in facial asymmetry patients. Material and Methods Masseter muscle samples were collected during BSSO orthognathic surgery to correct skeletal-based malocclusion. Patients were classified as Class II or III and open or deep bite malocclusion with or without facial asymmetry. Muscle samples were analyzed for gene expression differences on Affymetrix HT2.0 microarray global expression chips. Results Overall gene expression was different for asymmetric patients compared to other malocclusion classifications by principal component analysis (P<0.05). We identified differences in the nodal signaling pathway (NSP) which promotes development of mesoderm and endoderm and left-right patterning during embryogenesis. Nodal and Lefty expression was 1.39–1.84 fold greater (P<3.41×10−5) whereas integral membrane Nodal-modulators Nomo1,2,3 were −5.63 to −5.81 (P<3.05×10−4) less in asymmetry subjects. Fold differences among intracellular pathway members were negative in the range of −7.02 to −2.47 (P<0.003). Finally Pitx2, a upstream effector of Nodal known to influence the size of type II skeletal muscle fibers was also significantly decreased in facial asymmetry (P<0.05). Conclusions When facial asymmetry is part of skeletal malocclusion there are decreases of NSP genes in masseter muscle. This data suggests that the NSP is down regulated to help promote development of asymmetry. Pitx2 expression differences also contributed to both skeletal and muscle development in this condition. PMID:25364968

  18. Lepton asymmetry in the primordial gravitational wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'Ichi

    2007-04-15

    Effects of neutrino free streaming are evaluated on the primordial spectrum of gravitational radiation taking both neutrino chemical potential and masses into account. The former or the lepton asymmetry induces two competitive effects, namely, to increase anisotropic stress, which damps the gravitational wave more, and to delay the matter-radiation equality time, which reduces the damping. The latter effect is more prominent and a large lepton asymmetry would reduce the damping. We may thereby be able to measure the magnitude of lepton asymmetry from the primordial gravitational wave spectrum.

  19. Using magnetoresistance to probe reversal asymmetry in exchange biased bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Leighton, C.; Song, M.; Nogues, J.; Cyrille, M. C.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2000-07-01

    We have measured the anisotropic magnetoresistance of Fe films exchange coupled to antiferromagnetic MnF{sub 2} layers. Exchange bias and coercivity obtained from magnetoresistance are in close agreement with superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry data. In addition the magnetoresistance reveals an asymmetry in the magnetization reversal process, despite the fact that the magnetization hysteresis loops show little shape asymmetry. These results correlate well with an earlier study of magnetization reversal asymmetry by polarized neutron reflectometry. The data imply that the magnetization reverses by coherent rotation on one side of the loop and by nucleation and propagation of domain walls on the other. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Functional asymmetry of posture and body system regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boloban, V. N.; Otsupok, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    The manifestation of functional asymmetry during the regulation of an athlete's posture and a system of bodies and its effect on the execution of individual and group acrobatic exercises were studied. Functional asymmetry of posture regulation was recorded in acrobats during the execution of individual and group exercises. It was shown that stability is maintained at the expense of bending and twisting motions. It is important to consider whether the functional asymmetry of posture regulation is left or right sided in making up pairs and groups of acrobats.