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Sample records for dmd gene deletion

  1. Clinical features of patients with dystrophinopathy sharing the 45-55 exon deletion of DMD gene.

    PubMed

    Taglia, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; D'Ambrosio, Paola; Picillo, Esther; Torella, Annalaura; Orsini, Chiara; Ergoli, Manuela; Scutifero, Marianna; Passamano, Luigia; Palladino, Alberto; Nigro, Gerardo; Politano, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was first described in 1953 by Emile Becker as a benign variant of Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Compared with DMD, BMD is clinically more heterogeneous, with initial presentation in the teenage years and loss of ambulation beyond the age of 16 and a wide spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from only myalgias and muscle cramps to exercise intolerance and myoglobinuria, asymptomatic elevation of serum creatin-kinase, or mild limb-girdle weakness and quadriceps myopathy. About 50% of patients become symptomatic by the age of 10 and the most part by the age of 20 years. However few patients can be free of symptoms till their fifties and cases of late-onset Becker Muscular Dystrophy have also been described. In this report we describe the clinical features of patients with dystrophinopathy sharing a deletion of exons 45-55, occasionally or retrospectively diagnosed. These data are important for both the prognostic aspects of children presenting this dystrophin gene mutation, and for the genetic counseling in these families (reassuring them on the benign course of the disease), and last but not least to keep in mind a diagnosis of BMD in asymptomatic adults with mild hyperckemia. PMID:26155064

  2. Deletion of exons 3-9 encompassing a mutational hot spot in the DMD gene presents an asymptomatic phenotype, indicating a target region for multiexon skipping therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akinori; Fueki, Noboru; Shiba, Naoko; Motoki, Hirohiko; Miyazaki, Daigo; Nishizawa, Hitomi; Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2016-07-01

    Few cases of dystrophinopathy show an asymptomatic phenotype with mutations in the 5' (exons 3-7) hot spot in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene. Our patient showed increased serum creatine kinase levels at 12 years of age. A muscle biopsy at 15 years of age led to a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. The patient showed a slight decrease in cardiac function at the age of 21 years and was administered a β-blocker, but there was no muscle involvement even at the age of 27 years. A deletion of exons 3-9 encompassing a mutational hot spot in the DMD gene was detected, and dystrophin protein expression was ∼15% that of control level. We propose that in-frame deletion of exons 3-9 may produce a functional protein, and that multiexon skipping therapy targeting these exons may be feasible for severe dystrophic patients with a mutation in the 5' hot spot of the DMD gene. PMID:27009627

  3. Efficient Restoration of the Dystrophin Gene Reading Frame and Protein Structure in DMD Myoblasts Using the CinDel Method.

    PubMed

    Iyombe-Engembe, Jean-Paul; Ouellet, Dominique L; Barbeau, Xavier; Rousseau, Joël; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Lagüe, Patrick; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a great revolution in biology. This technology allows the modification of genes in vitro and in vivo in a wide variety of living organisms. In most Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, expression of dystrophin (DYS) protein is disrupted because exon deletions result in a frame shift. We present here the CRISPR-induced deletion (CinDel), a new promising genome-editing technology to correct the DMD gene. This strategy is based on the use of two gRNAs targeting specifically exons that precede and follow the patient deletion in the DMD gene. This pair of gRNAs induced a precise large additional deletion leading to fusion of the targeted exons. Using an adequate pair of gRNAs, the deletion of parts of these exons and the intron separating them restored the DMD reading frame in 62% of the hybrid exons in vitro in DMD myoblasts and in vivo in electroporated hDMD/mdx mice. Moreover, adequate pairs of gRNAs also restored the normal spectrin-like repeat of the dystrophin rod domain; such restoration is not obtained by exon skipping or deletion of complete exons. The expression of an internally deleted DYS protein was detected following the formation of myotubes by the unselected, treated DMD myoblasts. Given that CinDel induces permanent reparation of the DMD gene, this treatment would not have to be repeated as it is the case for exon skipping induced by oligonucleotides. PMID:26812655

  4. Pitfalls in prenatal diagnosis of DMD due to placental mosaicism of the X-chromosomes: prenatal and postnatal findings in a fetus with a deletion of exons 67-71 of the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Vondran, S; Edelmann, J; Holland, H; Wolf, C; Strenge, S; Thamm, B; Thiele, H; Froster, U G

    1999-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD) is performed as a routine procedure in many laboratories. The major potential problem is an incorrect diagnosis that could be obtained due to contamination with maternal tissue. We report a case of mosaicism of the X-chromosomes confined to the placenta as a possible source of confusing results in prenatal diagnosis of DMD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of this problem in a prenatal DMD diagnosis. PMID:10073911

  5. Are there ethnic differences in deletions in the dystrophin gene?

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.; Verma, I.C.

    1997-01-20

    We studied 160 cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) drawn from all parts of India, using multiplex PCR of 27 exons. Of these, 103 (64.4%) showed intragenic deletions. Most (69.7%) of the deletions involved exons 45-51. The phenotype of cases with deletion of single exons did not differ significantly from those with deletion of multiple exons. The distribution of deletions in studies from different countries was variable, but this was accounted for either by the small number of cases studied, or by fewer exons analyzed. It is concluded that there is likely to be no ethnic difference with respect to deletions in the DMD gene. 38 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-02-18

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  7. The emerging role of viral vectors as vehicles for DMD gene editing.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Ignazio; Chen, Xiaoyu; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The DMD gene, spanning over 2.4 megabases along the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp21.2), is the largest genetic locus known in the human genome. The size of DMD, combined with the complexity of the DMD phenotype and the extent of the affected tissues, begs for the development of novel, ideally complementary, therapeutic approaches. Genome editing based on the delivery of sequence-specific programmable nucleases into dystrophin-defective cells has recently enriched the portfolio of potential therapies under investigation. Experiments involving different programmable nuclease platforms and target cell types have established that the application of genome-editing principles to the targeted manipulation of defective DMD loci can result in the rescue of dystrophin protein synthesis in gene-edited cells. Looking towards translation into the clinic, these proof-of-principle experiments have been swiftly followed by the conversion of well-established viral vector systems into delivery agents for DMD editing. These gene-editing tools consist of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered homing endoculeases (HEs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) based on clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 systems. Here, we succinctly review these fast-paced developments and technologies, highlighting their relative merits and potential bottlenecks, when used as part of in vivo and ex vivo gene-editing strategies. PMID:27215286

  8. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  9. Relatively low proportion of dystrophin gene deletions in Israeli Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Shomrat, R; Gluck, E; Legum, C; Shiloh, Y

    1994-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene. The most common mutations in western populations are deletions that are spread non-randomly throughout the gene. Molecular analysis of the dystrophin gene structure by hybridization of the full length cDNA to Southern blots and by PCR in 62 unrelated Israeli male DMD/BMD patients showed deletions in 23 (37%). This proportion is significantly lower than that found in European and North American populations (55-65%). Seventy-eight percent of the deletions were confined to exons 44-52, half of these to exons 44-45, and the remaining 22% to exons 1 and 19. There was no correlation between the size of the deletion and the severity of the disease. All the deletions causing frameshift resulted in the DMD phenotypes. PMID:8160727

  10. Relatively low proportion of dystrophin gene deletions in Israeili Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shomrat, R.; Gluck, E.; Legum, C.; Shiloh, Y.

    1994-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene. The most common mutations in western populations are deletions that are spread non-randomly throughout the gene. Molecular analysis of the dystrophin gene structure by hybridization of the full length cDNA to Southern blots and by PCR in 62 unrelated Israeli male DMD/BMD patients showed deletions in 23 (37%). This proportion is significantly lower than that found in European and North American populations (55-65%). Seventy-eight percent of the deletions were confined to exons 44-52, half of these exons 44-45, and the remaining 22% to exons 1 and 19. There was no correlation between the size of the deletion and the severity of the disease. All the deletions causing frameshift resulted in the DMD phenotypes. 43 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. FUBP1: a new protagonist in splicing regulation of the DMD gene

    PubMed Central

    Miro, Julie; Laaref, Abdelhamid Mahdi; Rofidal, Valérie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Hem, Sonia; Thorel, Delphine; Méchin, Déborah; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms for in-frame skipping of DMD exon 39 caused by the nonsense c.5480T>A mutation in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. RNase-assisted pull down assay coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that the mutant RNA probe specifically recruits hnRNPA1, hnRNPA2/B1 and DAZAP1. Functional studies in a human myoblast cell line transfected with DMD minigenes confirmed the splicing inhibitory activity of hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1, and showed that DAZAP1, also known to activate splicing, acts negatively in the context of the mutated exon 39. Furthermore, we uncovered that recognition of endogenous DMD exon 39 in muscle cells is promoted by FUSE binding protein 1 (FUBP1), a multifunctional DNA- and RNA-binding protein whose role in splicing is largely unknown. By serial deletion and mutagenesis studies in minigenes, we delineated a functional intronic splicing enhancer (ISE) in intron 38. FUBP1 recruitment to the RNA sequence containing the ISE was established by RNA pull down and RNA EMSA, and further confirmed by RNA-ChIP on endogenous DMD pre-mRNA. This study provides new insights about the splicing regulation of DMD exon 39, highlighting the emerging role of FUBP1 in splicing and describing the first ISE for constitutive exon inclusion in the mature DMD transcript. PMID:25662218

  12. Molecular analysis of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in Spanish individuals: Deletion detection and familial diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Patino, A.; Garcia-Delgado, M.; Narbona, J.

    1995-11-06

    Deletion studies were performed in 26 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients through amplification of nine different exons by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA from paraffin-embedded muscle biopsies was analyzed in 12 of the 26 patients studied. Optimization of this technique is of great utility because it enables analysis of material stored in pathology archives. PCR deletion detection, useful in DMD-affected boys, is problematic in determining the carrier state in female relatives. For this reason, to perform familial linkage diagnosis, we made use of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (STRP, or short tandem repeat polymorphism) located in intron 49 of the gene. We designed a new pair of primers that enabled the detection of 22 different alleles in relatives in the 14 DMD families studied. The use of this marker allowed familial diagnosis in 11 of the 14 DMD families and detection of de novo deletions in 3 of the probands. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  14. MLPA analysis of an Argentine cohort of patients with dystrophinopathy: Association of intron breakpoints hot spots with STR abundance in DMD gene.

    PubMed

    Luce, Leonela N; Dalamon, Viviana; Ferrer, Marcela; Parma, Diana; Szijan, Irene; Giliberto, Florencia

    2016-06-15

    Dystrophinopathies are X-linked recessive diseases caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Our objective was to identify mutations in this gene by Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA), to confirm the clinical diagnosis and determine the carrier status of at-risk relatives. Also, we aimed to characterize the Dystrophinopathies argentine population and the DMD gene. We analyzed a cohort of 121 individuals (70 affected boys, 11 symptomatic women, 37 at-risk women and 3 male villus samples). The MLPA technique identified 56 mutations (45 deletions, 9 duplications and 2 point mutations). These results allowed confirming the clinical diagnosis in 63% (51/81) of patients and symptomatic females. We established the carrier status of 54% (20/37) of females at-risk and 3 male villus samples. We could establish an association between the most frequent deletion intron breakpoints and the abundance of dinucleotide microsatellites loci, despite the underlying mutational molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. The MLPA demonstrate, again, to be the appropriate first mutation screening methodology for molecular diagnosis of Dystrophinopathies. The reported results permitted to characterize the Dystrophinopathies argentine population and lead to better understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of rearrangements in the DMD gene, useful information for the gene therapies being developed. PMID:27206868

  15. Screening for mutations in the muscle promoter region and for exonic deletions in a series of 115 DMD and BMD patients.

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, L; Mostacciuolo, M L; Oliviero, S; Schiavon, F; Nicoletti, L; Angelini, C; Danieli, G A

    1992-01-01

    Mutations in the muscle promoter region and exonic deletions were screened in a series of 115 unrelated DMD and BMD patients from north-east Italy. No gross mutations of the promoter region were found. In three cases in which dystrophin of normal size was expressed at low levels, the analysis of DNA sequences of the promoter region failed to detect abnormalities. The majority of deletions in coding sequences, detected by cDNA probes, occur in the deletion hot spot identified by the probe P20. Intrafamilial variability in the severity of the disease is reported and discussed. Images PMID:1613762

  16. Screening of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Mutations and Investigating Its Mutational Mechanism in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Ma, Hongwei; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Lu; Xing, Xuesha; Wang, Shusen; Zhang, Xue; Luo, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common X-linked recessive disease of muscle degeneration and death. In order to provide accurate and reliable genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis, we screened DMD mutations in a cohort of 119 Chinese patients using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) followed by Sanger sequencing. In these unrelated DMD patients, we identified 11 patients with DMD small mutations (9.2%) and 81 patients with DMD deletions/duplications (del/dup) (68.1%), of which 64 (79.0%) were deletions, 16 (19.8%) were duplications, and one (1.2%) was both deletion and duplication. Furthermore, we analyzed the frequency of DMD breakpoint in the 64 deletion cases by calculating exon-deletion events of certain exon interval that revealed a novel mutation hotspot boundary. To explore why DMD rearrangement breakpoints were predisposed to specific regions (hotspot), we precisely characterized junction sequences of breakpoints at the nucleotide level in 21 patients with exon deleted/duplicated in DMD with a high-resolution SNP microarray assay. There were no exactly recurrent breakpoints and there was also no significant difference between single-exon del/dup and multiple-exon del/dup cases. The data from the current study provided a comprehensive strategy to detect DMD mutations for clinical practice, and identified two deletion hotspots at exon 43–55 and exon 10–23 by calculating exon-deletion events of certain exon interval. Furthermore, this is the first study to characterize DMD breakpoint at the nucleotide level in a Chinese population. Our observations provide better understanding of the mechanism for DMD gene rearrangements. PMID:25244321

  17. Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes: Deletion quantitation with bivariate flow karyotyping allows mapping of patient breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, E.R.B.; Towbin, J.A. ); Engh, G. van den; Trask, B.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Bivariate flow karyotyping was used to estimate the deletion sizes for a series of patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes. The deletion estimates were used to develop an approximate scale for the genomic map in Xp21. The bivariate flow karyotype results were compared with clinical and molecular genetic information on the extent of the patients' deletions, and these various types of data were consistent. The resulting map spans >15 Mb, from the telomeric interval between DXS41 (99-6) and DXS68 (1-4) to a position centromeric to the ornithine transcarbamylase locus. The deletion sizing was considered to be accurate to [plus minus]1 Mb. The map provides information on the relative localization of genes and markers within this region. For example, the map suggests that the adrenal hypoplasia congenita and glycerol kinase genes are physically close to each other, are within 1-2 Mb of the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, and are nearer to the DMD locus than to the more distal marker DXS28 (C7). Information of this type is useful in developing genomic strategies for positional cloning in Xp21. These investigations demonstrate that the DNA from patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes can be valuable reagents, not only for ordering loci and markers but also for providing an approximate scale to the map of the Xp21 region surrounding DMD. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Pattern of deletions of the dystrophin gene in Mexican Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy patients: the use of new designed primers for the analysis of the major deletion "hot spot" region.

    PubMed

    Coral-Vazquez, R; Arenas, D; Cisneros, B; Peñaloza, L; Salamanca, F; Kofman, S; Mercado, R; Montañez, C

    1997-06-13

    We have analyzed 59 unrelated Mexican Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy patients (DMD/BMD) using PCR analysis of the 2 prone deletion regions in the DMD gene. Thirty one (52%) of the patients had a deletion of one or several of the exons. Most of the alterations (87%) were clustered in exons 44-52, this being the highest percentage reported until now. In order to improve the molecular diagnosis in the Mexican population, we designed a new multiplex assay to PCR amplify exons 44-52. This assay allowed for the identification of a greater number of deletions in this region compared with the 9 and 5-plex assays previously described and to determine most of the deletion end boundaries. This is a reliable alternative for the initial screening of the DMD patients in the Mexican population. PMID:9188659

  19. Contrasting evolutionary histories of two introns of the duchenne muscular dystrophy gene, Dmd, in humans.

    PubMed

    Nachman, M W; Crowell, S L

    2000-08-01

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Dmd) locus lies in a region of the X chromosome that experiences a high rate of recombination and is thus expected to be relatively unaffected by the effects of selection on nearby genes. To provide a picture of nucleotide variability at a high-recombination locus in humans, we sequenced 5. 4 kb from two introns of Dmd in a worldwide sample of 41 alleles from Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. These same regions were also sequenced in one common chimpanzee and one orangutan. Dramatically different patterns of genetic variation were observed at these two introns, which are separated by >500 kb of DNA. Nucleotide diversity at intron 44 pi = 0.141% was more than four times higher than nucleotide diversity at intron 7 pi = 0.034% despite similar levels of divergence for these two regions. Intron 7 exhibited significant linkage disequilibrium extending over 10 kb and also showed a significant excess of rare polymorphisms. In contrast, intron 44 exhibited little linkage disequilibrium and no skew in the frequency distribution of segregating sites. Intron 7 was much more variable in Africa than in other continents, while intron 44 displayed similar levels of variability in different geographic regions. Comparison of intraspecific polymorphism to interspecific divergence using the HKA test revealed a significant reduction in variability at intron 7 relative to intron 44, and this effect was most pronounced in the non-African samples. These results are best explained by positive directional selection acting at or near intron 7 and demonstrate that even genes in regions of high recombination may be influenced by selection at linked sites. PMID:10924480

  20. Contrasting evolutionary histories of two introns of the duchenne muscular dystrophy gene, Dmd, in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, M W; Crowell, S L

    2000-01-01

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Dmd) locus lies in a region of the X chromosome that experiences a high rate of recombination and is thus expected to be relatively unaffected by the effects of selection on nearby genes. To provide a picture of nucleotide variability at a high-recombination locus in humans, we sequenced 5. 4 kb from two introns of Dmd in a worldwide sample of 41 alleles from Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. These same regions were also sequenced in one common chimpanzee and one orangutan. Dramatically different patterns of genetic variation were observed at these two introns, which are separated by >500 kb of DNA. Nucleotide diversity at intron 44 pi = 0.141% was more than four times higher than nucleotide diversity at intron 7 pi = 0.034% despite similar levels of divergence for these two regions. Intron 7 exhibited significant linkage disequilibrium extending over 10 kb and also showed a significant excess of rare polymorphisms. In contrast, intron 44 exhibited little linkage disequilibrium and no skew in the frequency distribution of segregating sites. Intron 7 was much more variable in Africa than in other continents, while intron 44 displayed similar levels of variability in different geographic regions. Comparison of intraspecific polymorphism to interspecific divergence using the HKA test revealed a significant reduction in variability at intron 7 relative to intron 44, and this effect was most pronounced in the non-African samples. These results are best explained by positive directional selection acting at or near intron 7 and demonstrate that even genes in regions of high recombination may be influenced by selection at linked sites. PMID:10924480

  1. Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Mediated Dystrophin Gene Transfer Studies and Exon Skipping Strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Kawecka, Klaudia; Theodoulides, Michael; Hasoglu, Yalin; Jarmin, Susan; Kymalainen, Hanna; Le-Heron, Anita; Popplewell, Linda; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George; Athanasopoulos, Takis

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an X-linked inherited musclewasting disease primarily affecting young boys with prevalence of between1:3,500- 1:5,000, is a rare genetic disease caused by defects in the gene for dystrophin. Dystrophin protein is critical to the stability of myofibers in skeletal and cardiac muscle. There is currently no cure available to ameliorate DMD and/or its patho-physiology. A number of therapeutic strategies including molecular-based therapeutics that replace or correct the missing or nonfunctional dystrophin protein have been devised to correct the patho-physiological consequences induced by dystrophin absence. We will review the current in vivo experimentation status (including preclinical models and clinical trials) for two of these approaches, namely: 1) Adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated (micro) dystrophin gene augmentation/ supplementation and 2) Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping strategies. PMID:26159373

  2. Sequence characterisation of deletion breakpoints in the dystrophin gene by PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Abbs, S.; Sandhu, S.; Bobrow, M.

    1994-09-01

    Partial deletions of the dystrophin gene account for 65% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A high proportion of these structural changes are generated by new mutational events, and lie predominantly within two `hotspot` regions, yet the underlying reasons for this are not known. We are characterizing and sequencing the regions surrounding deletion breakpoints in order to: (i) investigate the mechanisms of deletion mutation, and (ii) enable the design of PCR assays to specifically amplify mutant and normal sequences, allowing us to search for the presence of somatic mosaicism in appropriate family members. Using this approach we have been able to demonstrate the presence of somatic mosaicism in a maternal grandfather of a DMD-affected male, deleted for exons 49-50. Three deletions, namely of exons 48-49, 49-50, and 50, have been characterized using a PCR approach that avoids any cloning procedures. Breakpoints were initially localized to within regions of a few kilobases using Southern blot restriction analyses with exon-specific probes and PCR amplification of exonic and intronic loci. Sequencing was performed directly on PCR products: (i) mutant sequences were obtained from long-range or inverse-PCR across the deletion junction fragments, and (ii) normal sequences were obtained from the products of standard PCR, vectorette PCR, or inverse-PCR performed on YACs. Further characterization of intronic sequences will allow us to amplify and sequence across other deletion breakpoints and increase our knowledge of the mechanisms of mutation in the dystophin gene.

  3. IAP gene deletion and conditional knockout models.

    PubMed

    Silke, John; Vaux, David L

    2015-03-01

    Gene deletion studies have helped reveal the unique and overlapping roles played by IAP proteins. Crossing IAP mutant mice has helped unravel the complex feed-back regulatory circuits in which cIAP1, cIAP2 and XIAP allow innate defensive responses to microbial pathogens, without the development of auto-inflammatory syndromes. Deletion of genes for Survivin and its homologs in yeasts, invertebrates and mammals has shown that it functions differently, as it is not a regulator of innate immunity or apoptosis, but acts together with INCENP, aurora kinase B and Borealin to allow chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:25545814

  4. Electroretinographic genotype-phenotype correlations for mouse and man at the dmd/DMD locus

    SciTech Connect

    Millers, D.M.; Weleber, R.G.; Woodward, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    Reduced or absent b-waves in the dark-adapted electroretinogram (ERG) of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) patients led to the identification of dystrophin in human retina and the proposal that it plays a role in retinal electrophysiology. Study of a large group of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy males to determine their ocular characteristics indicated that there were position-specific effects of deletions, with 3{prime} defects associated with severe electroretinographic changes, whereas some 5{prime} patients demonstrated less severe, or even normal, ERGs. We studied the mdx mouse, a model with X-linked muscular dystrophy and defective full-length dystrophin, which failed to show any ERG abnormalities. Given the presence of alternate isoforms of dystrophin in retina, and the 5{prime} deletion DMD/BMD patients with normal ERGs, we studied mouse models with differing dystrophin mutations (mdx{sup Cv3}, mdx{sup Cv5}) to determine the usefulness of alternate strains as models for the visual effects of dystropin. Abnormal ERGs similar to those seen in DMD/BMS patients exist in the mdx{sup Cv3} strain of muscular dystrophy mice. Normal ERGs were found the mdx{sup Cv5} strain. The mutations in the mdx and mdx{sup Cv5} mice have been mapped to the 5{prime} end of the dmd gene, while the mutation in the mdx{sup Cv3} mouse is in the 3{prime} end. Thus, there are position effects of the gene defect on the ERG phenotype that are conserved in the mouse. Such genotype-phenotype correlations may reflect differential expression of shorter isoforms of dystrophin.

  5. Dystrophin expression in muscle following gene transfer with a fully deleted ("gutted") adenovirus is markedly improved by trans-acting adenoviral gene products.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, R; Nalbantoglu, J; Howell, J M; Davies, L; Fletcher, S; Amalfitano, A; Petrof, B J; Kamen, A; Massie, B; Karpati, G

    2001-09-20

    Helper-dependent adenoviruses (HDAd) are Ad vectors lacking all or most viral genes. They hold great promise for gene therapy of diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), because they are less immunogenic than E1/E3-deleted Ad (first-generation Ad or FGAd) and can carry the full-length (Fl) dystrophin (dys) cDNA (12 kb). We have compared the transgene expression of a HDAd (HDAdCMVDysFl) and a FGAd (FGAdCMV-dys) in cell culture (HeLa, C2C12 myotubes) and in the muscle of mdx mice (the mouse model for DMD). Both vectors encoded dystrophin regulated by the same cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. We demonstrate that the amount of dystrophin expressed was significantly higher after gene transfer with FGAdCMV-dys compared to HDAdCMVDysFl both in vitro and in vivo. However, gene transfer with HDAdCMVDysFl in the presence of a FGAd resulted in a significant increase of dystrophin expression indicating that gene products synthesized by the FGAd increase, in trans, the amount of dystrophin produced. This enhancement occurred in cell culture and after gene transfer in the muscle of mdx mice and dystrophic golden retriever (GRMD) dogs, another animal model for DMD. The E4 region of Ad is required for the enhancement, because no increase of dystrophin expression from HDAdCMVDysFl was observed in the presence of an E1/E4-deleted Ad in vitro and in vivo. The characterization of these enhancing gene products followed by their inclusion into an HDAd may be required to produce sufficient dystrophin to mitigate the pathology of DMD by HDAd-mediated gene transfer. PMID:11560768

  6. Detection of somatic mosaicism in DMD using computer-assisted laser densitometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.E.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; MacKenzie, J.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately two-thirds of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients have a deletion in the dystrophin gene located at Xp21.1. Two PCR-based multiplex systems have been developed which detect 98% of deletions in affected males. Diagnosis of carrier females requires densitometry of PCR products following gel electrophoresis to calculate dosage of specific exons. We have developed a system in which fluorescently labelled PCR products are analysed using a GENESCANNER automated fragment analyser (ABI). Dosage is determined using computer-assisted laser densitometry (CALD). Recently, we diagnosed somatic mosaicism in the mother of an affected boy using this method. PCR analysis showed that the patient had a deletion that included exons 47-51 of his dystrophin gene. CALD analysis on the patient`s 36-year-old mother revealed a 29-34% reduction in the intensity of the bands corresponding to the deleted region of the gene rather than the 50% reduction normally seen in carrier females. A skin biopsy was obtain and monoclonal fibroblast colonies were tested by CALD for the deletion. Four of the twenty colonies screened were found to be deleted while the remaining colonies had two intact copies of the gene. We conclude that this patient is a somatic mosaic for DMD and that the mutation was the result of a post-zygotic event. This is the only case of somatic mosaicism detected among 800 women from 400 DMD families tested using CALD in our laboratory. At least one other case of possible somatic mosaicism has been reported but not confirmed. Germinal mosaicism is thought to occur in approximately 10% of mothers of sporadic DMD patients. Our findings indicate that somatic mosaicism is a much rarer condition among DMD carriers, thus suggesting that mitotic mutations in the dystrophin gene are more likely to occur later in embryogenesis after differentiation of the germline.

  7. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy. PMID:26911353

  8. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy. PMID:26911353

  9. DMD Mutations in 576 Dystrophinopathy Families: A Step Forward in Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Maria Jose; Baena, Manel; Verdura, Edgard; Nascimento, Andres; Ortez, Carlos; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) require precise genetic diagnosis because most therapeutic strategies are mutation-specific. To understand more about the genotype-phenotype correlations of the DMD gene we performed a comprehensive analysis of the DMD mutational spectrum in a large series of families. Here we provide the clinical, pathological and genetic features of 576 dystrophinopathy patients. DMD gene analysis was performed using the MLPA technique and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. The impact of the DNA variants on mRNA splicing and protein functionality was evaluated by in silico analysis using computational algorithms. DMD mutations were detected in 576 unrelated dystrophinopathy families by combining the analysis of exonic copies and the analysis of small mutations. We found that 471 of these mutations were large intragenic rearrangements. Of these, 406 (70.5%) were exonic deletions, 64 (11.1%) were exonic duplications, and one was a deletion/duplication complex rearrangement (0.2%). Small mutations were identified in 105 cases (18.2%), most being nonsense/frameshift types (75.2%). Mutations in splice sites, however, were relatively frequent (20%). In total, 276 mutations were identified, 85 of which have not been previously described. The diagnostic algorithm used proved to be accurate for the molecular diagnosis of dystrophinopathies. The reading frame rule was fulfilled in 90.4% of DMD patients and in 82.4% of Becker muscular dystrophy patients (BMD), with significant differences between the mutation types. We found that 58% of DMD patients would be included in single exon-exon skipping trials, 63% from strategies directed against multiexon-skipping exons 45 to 55, and 14% from PTC therapy. A detailed analysis of missense mutations provided valuable information about their impact on the protein structure. PMID:26284620

  10. DMD Mutations in 576 Dystrophinopathy Families: A Step Forward in Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    PubMed

    Juan-Mateu, Jonas; Gonzalez-Quereda, Lidia; Rodriguez, Maria Jose; Baena, Manel; Verdura, Edgard; Nascimento, Andres; Ortez, Carlos; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) require precise genetic diagnosis because most therapeutic strategies are mutation-specific. To understand more about the genotype-phenotype correlations of the DMD gene we performed a comprehensive analysis of the DMD mutational spectrum in a large series of families. Here we provide the clinical, pathological and genetic features of 576 dystrophinopathy patients. DMD gene analysis was performed using the MLPA technique and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. The impact of the DNA variants on mRNA splicing and protein functionality was evaluated by in silico analysis using computational algorithms. DMD mutations were detected in 576 unrelated dystrophinopathy families by combining the analysis of exonic copies and the analysis of small mutations. We found that 471 of these mutations were large intragenic rearrangements. Of these, 406 (70.5%) were exonic deletions, 64 (11.1%) were exonic duplications, and one was a deletion/duplication complex rearrangement (0.2%). Small mutations were identified in 105 cases (18.2%), most being nonsense/frameshift types (75.2%). Mutations in splice sites, however, were relatively frequent (20%). In total, 276 mutations were identified, 85 of which have not been previously described. The diagnostic algorithm used proved to be accurate for the molecular diagnosis of dystrophinopathies. The reading frame rule was fulfilled in 90.4% of DMD patients and in 82.4% of Becker muscular dystrophy patients (BMD), with significant differences between the mutation types. We found that 58% of DMD patients would be included in single exon-exon skipping trials, 63% from strategies directed against multiexon-skipping exons 45 to 55, and 14% from PTC therapy. A detailed analysis of missense mutations provided valuable information about their impact on the protein structure. PMID:26284620

  11. Muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz: an inversion disrupts the DMD and RPGR genes.

    PubMed

    Atencia-Fernandez, Sabela; Shiel, Robert E; Mooney, Carmel T; Nolan, Catherine M

    2015-04-01

    An X-linked muscular dystrophy, with deficiency of full-length dystrophin and expression of a low molecular weight dystrophin-related protein, has been described in Japanese Spitz dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutation and develop a specific test to identify affected cases and carrier animals. Gene expression studies in skeletal muscle of an affected animal indicated aberrant expression of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (dystrophin) gene and an anomaly in intron 19 of the gene. Genome-walking experiments revealed an inversion that interrupts two genes on the X chromosome, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene and the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene. All clinically affected dogs and obligate carriers that were tested had the mutant chromosome, and it is concluded that the inversion is the causative mutation for X-linked muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz breed. A PCR assay that amplifies mutant and wild-type alleles was developed and proved capable of identifying affected and carrier individuals. Unexpectedly, a 7-year-old male animal, which had not previously come to clinical attention, was shown to possess the mutant allele and to have a relatively mild form of the disease. This observation indicates phenotypic heterogeneity in Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, a feature described previously in humans and Golden Retrievers. With the availability of a simple, fast and accurate test for Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, detection of carrier animals and selected breeding should help eliminate the mutation from the breed. PMID:25644216

  12. Group II Intron-Anchored Gene Deletion in Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Kaizhi; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium plays an important role in commercial and medical use, for which targeted gene deletion is difficult. We proposed an intron-anchored gene deletion approach for Clostridium, which combines the advantage of the group II intron “ClosTron” system and homologous recombination. In this approach, an intron carrying a fragment homologous to upstream or downstream of the target site was first inserted into the genome by retrotransposition, followed by homologous recombination, resulting in gene deletion. A functional unknown operon CAC1493–1494 located in the chromosome, and an operon ctfAB located in the megaplasmid of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731 were successfully deleted by using this approach, without leaving antibiotic marker in the genome. We therefore propose this approach can be used for targeted gene deletion in Clostridium. This approach might also be applicable for gene deletion in other bacterial species if group II intron retrotransposition system is established. PMID:21304965

  13. Characterization of five partial deletions of the factor VIII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Youssoufian, H.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Aronis, S.; Tsiftis, G.; Phillips, D.G.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.

    1987-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked disorder of coagulation caused by a deficiency of factor VIII. By using cloned DNA probes, the authors have characterized the following five different partial deletions of the factor VIII gene from a panel of 83 patients with hemophilia A: (i) a 7-kilobase (kb) deletion that eliminates exon 6; (ii) a 2.5-kb deletion that eliminates 5' sequences of exon 14; (iii) a deletion of at least 7 kb that eliminates exons 24 and 25; (iv) a deletion of at least 16 kb that eliminates exons 23-25; and (v) a 5.5-kb deletion that eliminates exon 22. The first four deletions are associated with severe hemophilia A. By contrast, the last deletion is associated with moderate disease, possibly because of in-frame splicing from adjacent exons. None of those patients with partial gene deletions had circulating inhibitors to factor VIII. One deletion occurred de novo in a germ cell of the maternal grandmother, while a second deletion occurred in a germ cell of the maternal grandfather. These observations demonstrate that de novo deletions of X-linked genes can occur in either male or female gametes.

  14. Pregnancy after preimplantation diagnosis for a deletion in the dystrophin gene by polymerase chain reaction in embryos obtained after intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    SciTech Connect

    Lissens, W.; Liu, J.; Van Broeckhoven, C.

    1994-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common X-linked recessive diseases. In order to be able to perform a DMD-specific preimplantation diagnosis (PID) in a female carrier of a deletion of exons 3 to 18 in the dystrophin gene, we have developed a PCR assay to detect the deletion based on sequences of exon 17. The efficiency of this PCR was evaluated on 50 single blastomeres from 12 normal control embryos and on 41 blastomeres for 9 male and 3 female embryos from the female DMD carrier, obtained after a first preimplantation diagnosis by sexing. The exon 17 region was amplified with 100% efficiency, except in all 21 blastomeres from 6 male embryos from the carrier where no PCR signals were observed. The negative results in these blastomeres were interpreted as being found only in male embryos carrying the deletion. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection was carried out on the carrier`s metaphase II oocytes retrieved after ovarian stimulation. Embryos were analyzed for the presence of exon 17 and 2 male embryos were found to be deleted, while 4 embryos showed normal amplification signals. Three of the latter embryos were replaced, resulting in a singleton pregnancy. Amniotic cell analysis showed a normal female karyotype and DNA analysis indicated a non-carrier.

  15. Deletions of the elastin gene in Williams Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, F.; Nickerson, E.; McCaskill, C.

    1994-09-01

    To investigate deletions in the elastin gene in patients with Williams Syndrome (WS), we screened 37 patients and their parents for deletions in the elastin gene by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using cosmid cELN272 containing the 5{prime} end of the elastin gene and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer pair which amplifies intron 17 in the elastin gene, producing a polymorphic amplification product. Thirty-two patients have been investigated by both the FISH and PCR techniques, one patient was studied only by PCR, and 4 patients were studied only by FISH. Overall, 34 of 37 patients (92%) were deleted for the elastin gene. Using the PCR marker, 14 patients were informative and 12 were shown to be deleted [maternal (n=5) and paternal (n=7)]. Using cosmid cELN272, 33 of 36 patients demonstrated a deletion of chromosome 7q11.23. In one family, both the mother and daughter were deleted due to an apparently de novo deletion arising in the mother. Three patients were not deleted using the elastin cosmid; 2 of these patients have classic WS. Another non-deleted patient has the typical facial features and hypercalcemia but normal intelligence. These three patients will be important in delineating the critical region(s) responsible for the facial features, hypercalcemia, mental retardation and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). There was not an absolute correlation between deletions in elastin and SVAS, although these individuals may be at risk for other cardiovascular complications such as hypertention. Since the majority of WS patients are deleted for a portion of the elastin gene, most likely this marker will be an important diagnostic tool, although more patients will need to be studied. Those patients who are not deleted but clinically have WS will be missed using only this one marker. Expansion of the critical region to other loci and identification of additional markers will be essential for identifying all patients with WS.

  16. A strong deletion bias in nonallelic gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Assis, Raquel; Kondrashov, Alexey S

    2012-01-01

    Gene conversion is the unidirectional transfer of genetic information between orthologous (allelic) or paralogous (nonallelic) genomic segments. Though a number of studies have examined nucleotide replacements, little is known about length difference mutations produced by gene conversion. Here, we investigate insertions and deletions produced by nonallelic gene conversion in 338 Drosophila and 10,149 primate paralogs. Using a direct phylogenetic approach, we identify 179 insertions and 614 deletions in Drosophila paralogs, and 132 insertions and 455 deletions in primate paralogs. Thus, nonallelic gene conversion is strongly deletion-biased in both lineages, with almost 3.5 times as many conversion-induced deletions as insertions. In primates, the deletion bias is considerably stronger for long indels and, in both lineages, the per-site rate of gene conversion is orders of magnitudes higher than that of ordinary mutation. Due to this high rate, deletion-biased nonallelic gene conversion plays a key role in genome size evolution, leading to the cooperative shrinkage and eventual disappearance of selectively neutral paralogs. PMID:22359514

  17. Exon Deletion Pattern in Duchene Muscular Dystrophy in North West of Iran

    PubMed Central

    BARZEGAR, Mohammad; HABIBI, Parinaz; BONYADY, Mortaza; TOPCHIZADEH, Vahideh; SHIVA, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Duchene and Becker Muscular Dystrophy (DMD/ BMD) are x-linked disorders that both are the result of heterogeneous mutations in the dystrophin gene. The frequency and distribution of dystrophin gene deletions in DMD/ BMD patients show different patterns among different populations. This study investigates the deletion rate, type, and distribution of this gene in the Azeri Turk population of North West Iran. Materials &Methods In this study, 110 patients with DMD/ BMD were studied for intragenic deletions in 24 exons and promoter regions of dystrophin genes by using multiplex PCR. Results Deletions were detected in 63 (57.3%) patients, and around 83% localized in the mid-distal hotspot of the gene (on exons 44–52), 21 cases (33.3 %) with single-exon deletions, and 42 cases (66.6%) with multi-exonic deletions. The most frequent deleted exons were exon 50 (15 %) and exon 49 (14%). No deletion was detected in exon 3. Conclusion This study suggests that the frequency and pattern of dystrophin gene deletions in DMD/ BMD in the Azeri Turk population of North West Iran occur in the same pattern when compared with other ethnic groups. PMID:25767538

  18. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Chromosomal deletions and tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dong, J T

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal deletion appears to be the earliest as well as the most frequent somatic genetic alteration during carcinogenesis. It inactivates a tumor suppressor gene in three ways, that is, revealing a gene mutation through loss of heterozygosity as proposed in the two-hit theory, inducing haploinsufficiency through quantitative hemizygous deletion and associated loss of expression, and truncating a genome by homozygous deletion. Whereas the two-hit theory has guided the isolation of many tumor suppressor genes, the haploinsufficiency hypothesis seems to be also useful in identifying target genes of chromosomal deletions, especially for the deletions detected by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). At present, a number of chromosomal regions have been identified for their frequent deletions in prostate cancer, including 2q13-q33, 5q14-q23, 6q16-q22, 7q22-q32, 8p21-p22, 9p21-p22, 10q23-q24, 12p12-13, 13q14-q21, 16q22-24, and 18q21-q24. Strong candidate genes have been identified for some of these regions, including NKX3.1 from 8p21, PTEN from 10q23, p27/Kip1 from 12p13, and KLF5 from 13q21. In addition to their location in a region with frequent deletion, there are functional and/or genetic evidence supporting the candidacy of these genes. Thus far PTEN is the most frequently mutated gene in prostate cancer, and KLF5 showed the most frequent hemizygous deletion and loss of expression. A tumor suppressor role has been demonstrated for NKX3.1, PTEN, and p27/Kip1 in knockout mice models. Such genes are important targets of investigation for the development of biomarkers and therapeutic regimens. PMID:12085961

  20. Identification and characterization of three large deletions and a deletion/polymorphism in the CFTR gene.

    PubMed

    Chevalier-Porst, F; Souche, G; Bozon, D

    2005-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is mainly caused by small molecular lesions of the CFTR gene; mutation detection methods based on conventional PCR do not allow the identification of all CF alleles in a population and large deletions may account for a number of these unidentified molecular lesions. It is only recently that the availability of quantitative PCR methodologies made the search for large gene rearrangements easier in autosomal diseases. Using a combination of different methods, nine of the 37 unidentified CF alleles (24%) were found to harbor large deletions in our cohort of 1600 CF alleles. Three are new deletions, and we report the breakpoints of the previously described EX4_EX10del40kb deletion. An intronic deletion polymorphism affecting intron 17b was also found on almost 1% of "normal" chromosomes. Examination of the breakpoint sequences confirmed that intron 17b is indeed a hot spot for deletions, and that most of these rearrangements are caused by non-homologous recombination. PMID:15841482

  1. Screening Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients for deletions in 30 exons of the dystrophin gene by three-multiplex PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Risch, N. )

    1992-09-01

    Deletion mutations of the dystrophin gene may cause either the severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or the milder, allelic Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and are clustered in two high-frequency-deletion regions (HFDRs) located, respectively, 500 kb and 1,200 kb downstream from the 5[prime] end of the gene. Three PCR reactions described allowed the analysis of a total of 30 exons and led, to the identification of three additional deletions involving the following exons: (a) 42 only, (b) 28-42, and (c) 16 only, none of which were detected with the two original multiplex reactions. Therefore, the three modified multiplexes detected 95 of the 96 deletions identified among the 152 patients studied so far by using Southern analysis and cDNA probes. The only deletion that remained undetected with this system involves exons 22-25 and generates the junction fragment described elsewhere. The percentage of deletion mutations among DMS/BMD patients amounts to 63%, which is in agreement with similar estimates from other laboratories. When field-inversion gel electrophoresis is coupled to Southern analysis, the detection rate of deletion and duplication mutations reaches 65%.

  2. Interstitial 22q13 deletions not involving SHANK3 gene: a new contiguous gene syndrome.

    PubMed

    Disciglio, Vittoria; Lo Rizzo, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Mucciolo, Mafalda; Marozza, Annabella; Di Marco, Chiara; Massarelli, Antonio; Canocchi, Valentina; Baldassarri, Margherita; Ndoni, Enea; Frullanti, Elisa; Amabile, Sonia; Anderlid, Britt Marie; Metcalfe, Kay; Le Caignec, Cédric; David, Albert; Fryer, Alan; Boute, Odile; Joris, Andrieux; Greco, Donatella; Pecile, Vanna; Battini, Roberta; Novelli, Antonio; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra

    2014-07-01

    Phelan-McDermid syndrome (22q13.3 deletion syndrome) is a contiguous gene disorder resulting from the deletion of the distal long arm of chromosome 22. SHANK3, a gene within the minimal critical region, is a candidate gene for the major neurological features of this syndrome. We report clinical and molecular data from a study of nine patients with overlapping interstitial deletions in 22q13 not involving SHANK3. All of these deletions overlap with the largest, but not with the smallest deletion associated with Phelan-McDermid syndrome. The deletion sizes and breakpoints varied considerably among our patients, with the largest deletion spanning 6.9 Mb and the smallest deletion spanning 2.7 Mb. Eight out of nine patients had a de novo deletion, while in one patient the origin of deletion was unknown. These patients shared clinical features common to Phelan-McDermid syndrome: developmental delay (11/12), speech delay (11/12), hypotonia (9/12), and feeding difficulties (7/12). Moreover, the majority of patients (8/12) exhibited macrocephaly. In the minimal deleted region, we identified two candidate genes, SULT4A1 and PARVB (associated with the PTEN pathway), which could be associated in our cohort with neurological features and macrocephaly/hypotonia, respectively. This study suggests that the haploinsufficiency of genes in the 22q13 region beside SHANK3 contributes to cognitive and speech development, and that these genes are involved in the phenotype associated with the larger Phelan-McDermid syndrome 22q13 deletions. Moreover, because the deletions in our patients do not involve the SHANK3 gene, we posit the existence of a new contiguous gene syndrome proximal to the smallest terminal deletions in the 22q13 region. PMID:24700646

  3. Targeted next-generation sequencing as a comprehensive test for patients with and female carriers of DMD/BMD: a multi-population diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Dai, Yi; Yu, Ping; Qu, Ning; Lan, Zhangzhang; Hong, Xiafei; Sun, Yan; Yang, Guanghui; Xie, Shuqi; Shi, Quan; Zhou, Hanlin; Zhu, Qian; Chu, Yuxing; Yao, Fengxia; Wang, Jinming; He, Jingni; Yang, Yun; Liang, Yu; Yang, Yi; Qi, Ming; Yang, Ling; Wang, Wei; Wu, Haitao; Duan, Jing; Shen, Cheng; Wang, Jun; Cui, Liying; Yi, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most commonly inherited neuromuscular disease. However, accurate and convenient molecular diagnosis cannot be achieved easily because of the enormous size of the dystrophin gene and complex causative mutation spectrum. Such traditional methods as multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification plus Sanger sequencing require multiple steps to fulfill the diagnosis of DMD/BMD. Here, we introduce a new single-step method for the genetic analysis of DMD patients and female carriers in real clinical settings and demonstrate the validation of its accuracy. A total of 89 patients, 18 female carriers and 245 non-DMD patients were evaluated using our targeted NGS approaches. Compared with traditional methods, our new method yielded 99.99% specificity and 98.96% sensitivity for copy number variations detection and 100% accuracy for the identification of single-nucleotide variation mutations. Additionally, this method is able to detect partial deletions/duplications, thus offering precise personal DMD gene information for gene therapy. We detected novel partial deletions of exons in nine samples for which the breakpoints were located within exonic regions. The results proved that our new method is suitable for routine clinical practice, with shorter turnaround time, higher accuracy, and better insight into comprehensive genetic information (detailed breakpoints) for ensuing gene therapy. PMID:23756440

  4. Deletion mapping of Aland Island eye disease to Xp21 between DXS67 (B24) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pillers, D A; Towbin, J A; Chamberlain, J S; Wu, D; Ranier, J; Powell, B R; McCabe, E R

    1990-11-01

    Aland Island Eye Disease (AIED) is an X-linked form of ocular hypopigmentation--also known as Forsius-Eriksson, or type 2, ocular albinism--in which affected males demonstrate subnormal visual acuity, protanomalous red-green colorblindness, axial myopia, astigmatism, hypoplasia of the fovea, and hypopigmentation of the fundus. A patient has previously been described who, in addition to AIED, manifested a contiguous gene syndrome which included congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC), glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD), and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In the present paper report we report the molecular genetic analysis of his deletion. Initially, multiplex polymerase-chain-reaction amplification was used to screen for a DMD-locus deletion which was then further characterized, using DMD cDNA and genomic probes, via Southern blot analysis. The deletion includes the region encompassed by probes C7 (DXS28) and DMD cDNA 8. Probes B24 (DXS67) and DMD cDNA 5b-7 show normal hybridization patterns and appear to flank the deletion, while the DMD cDNA 8 detects a junction fragment. Molecular genetic techniques have mapped the deletion in this patient to the subbands Xp21.3-21.2, between DXS67 and DMD. PMID:2220819

  5. Deletion mapping of Aland Island eye disease to Xp21 between DXS67 (B24) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Pillers, D A; Towbin, J A; Chamberlain, J S; Wu, D; Ranier, J; Powell, B R; McCabe, E R

    1990-01-01

    Aland Island Eye Disease (AIED) is an X-linked form of ocular hypopigmentation--also known as Forsius-Eriksson, or type 2, ocular albinism--in which affected males demonstrate subnormal visual acuity, protanomalous red-green colorblindness, axial myopia, astigmatism, hypoplasia of the fovea, and hypopigmentation of the fundus. A patient has previously been described who, in addition to AIED, manifested a contiguous gene syndrome which included congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC), glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD), and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In the present paper report we report the molecular genetic analysis of his deletion. Initially, multiplex polymerase-chain-reaction amplification was used to screen for a DMD-locus deletion which was then further characterized, using DMD cDNA and genomic probes, via Southern blot analysis. The deletion includes the region encompassed by probes C7 (DXS28) and DMD cDNA 8. Probes B24 (DXS67) and DMD cDNA 5b-7 show normal hybridization patterns and appear to flank the deletion, while the DMD cDNA 8 detects a junction fragment. Molecular genetic techniques have mapped the deletion in this patient to the subbands Xp21.3-21.2, between DXS67 and DMD. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2220819

  6. Megabase deletions of gene deserts result in viable mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Zhu, Yiwen; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Afzal,Veena; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-05-01

    The functional importance of the approximately 98 percent of mammalian genomes not corresponding to protein coding sequences remain largely un-scrutinized 1. To test experimentally whether some extensive regions of non-coding DNA, referred to as gene deserts 2-4, contain critical functions essential for the viability of the organism, we deleted two large non-coding intervals, 1,511 kb and 845 kb in length, from the mouse genome. Viable mice homozygous for the deletions were generated and were indistinguishable from wild-type litter mates with regards to morphology, reproductive fitness, growth, longevity and a variety of parameters assaying general homeostasis. Further in-depth analysis of the expression of genes bracketing the deletions revealed similar expression characteristics in homozygous deletion and wild-type mice. Together, the two deleted segments harbour 1,243 non-coding sequences conserved between humans and rodents (>100bp, 70 percent identity). These studies demonstrate that some large-scale deletions of non-coding DNA can be well tolerated by an organism, bringing into question the role of many human-mouse conserved sequences 5,6, and further supports the existence of potentially ''disposable DNAi'' in the genomes of mammals.

  7. Characterization of large deletions in the DHCR7 gene.

    PubMed

    Lanthaler, B; Hinderhofer, K; Maas, B; Haas, D; Sawyer, H; Burton-Jones, S; Carter, K; Suri, M; Witsch-Baumgartner, M

    2015-08-01

    Pathogenic variants in the DHCR7 gene cause Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), a defect of cholesterol biosynthesis resulting in an autosomal recessive congenital metabolic malformation disorder. In approximately 4% of patients, the second mutation remains unidentified. In this study, 12 SLOS patients diagnosed clinically and/or by elevated 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) have been investigated by customized multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis, because only one DHCR7 sequence variant has been detected. Two unrelated patients of this cohort carry different large deletions in the DHCR7 gene. One patient showed a deletion of exons 3-6. The second patient has a deletion of exons 1 and 2 (non-coding) and lacks the major part of the promoter. These two patients show typical clinical and biochemical phenotypes of SLOS. Second disease-causing mutations are p.(Arg352Trp) and p.(Thr93Met), respectively. Deletion breakpoints were characterized successfully in both cases. Such large deletions are rare in the DHCR7 gene but will resolve some of the patients in whom a second mutation has not been detected. PMID:25040602

  8. A HindIII polymorphism detected by cDMD 4-5a at the DMD locus in a family with Becker muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Gibb, M.F.; Greenberg, C.R.; Carson, N.L.

    1994-09-01

    Deletions within the dystrophin gene can be detected by hybridizing a series of cDNA probes to HindIII-digested DNA, with the absence of one or more fragments indicating the presence of a deletion. However, incorrect interpretations can be made if the absence of a fragment is due to a polymorphism rather than a deletion. Otto and Rothbery reported that the 5.2 kb fragment detected by cM 4-5a could be resolved, with extended electrophoresis, into two fragments estimated to be 5.2 and 5.15 kb in size. They concluded that the extra fragment of this doublet appears to be polymorphic, inherited in a Mendelian dominant fashion. The mother, who is an obligate carrier of BMD, does not have the upper fragment as is the case for her normal and affected sons. The father, who clinically has no evidence of neuromuscular disease, does have the upper fragment as do all their daughters. Given a dominant pattern of inheritance, the daughters should be heterozygous. Analysis of one grandson, who was predicted to have inherited the grandpaternal dystrophin gene, showed that he did have the upper fragment, consistent with our conclusions. To date, we have been unable to analyze a grandson that has inherited the grandmaternal allele; however, presuably he would not have the upper fragment of this doublet. We conclude that there likely is a dominant HindIII polymorphism detected with the cDMD 4-5a probe at the DMD locus. Population studies will be required to determine the frequency of this polymorphism; however, it should be noted that absence of the upper fragment of this doublet in a male with BMD/DMD does not necessarily correspond to the presence of a deletion.

  9. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most promising methods for restoration of dystrophin expression. This approach has been tested extensively targeting different exons in numerous models both in vitro and in vivo. During the past 10 years, there has been a considerable progress by using DMD animal models involving three types of antisense oligonucleotides (2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2OME-PS), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA). PMID:21686247

  10. Efficient sequential repetitive gene deletions in Neurospora crassa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite its long-standing history as a model organism, Neurospora crassa has limited tools for repetitive gene deletions utilizing recyclable self-excising marker systems. Here we describe, for the first time, the functionality of a bacterial recombination system employing ß-recombinase acting on si...

  11. Iron-regulatory proteins DmdR1 and DmdR2 of Streptomyces coelicolor form two different DNA-protein complexes with iron boxes.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Francisco J; Martín, Juan F

    2004-01-01

    In high G+C Gram-positive bacteria, the control of expression of genes involved in iron metabolism is exerted by a DmdR [divalent (bivalent) metal-dependent regulatory protein] in the presence of Fe2+ or other bivalent ions. The dmdR1 and dmdR2 genes of Streptomyces coelicolor were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the DmdR1 and DmdR2 proteins were purified to homogeneity. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed that both DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the 19-nt tox and desA iron boxes forming two different complexes in each case. Increasing the concentrations of DmdR1 or DmdR2 protein shifted these complexes from their low-molecular-mass form to the high-molecular-mass complexes. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was prevented by the bivalent metal chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl and by antibodies specific against the DmdR proteins. Cross-linking with glutaraldehyde of pure DmdR1 or DmdR2 proteins showed that DmdR1 forms dimers, whereas DmdR2 is capable of forming dimers and probably tetramers. Ten different iron boxes were found in a search for iron boxes in the genome of S. coelicolor. Most of them correspond to putative genes involved in siderophore biosynthesis. Since the nucleotide sequence of these ten boxes is identical (or slightly different) with the synthetic DNA fragment containing the desA box used in the present study, it is proposed that DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the iron boxes upstream of at least ten different genes in S. coelicolor. PMID:14960152

  12. Molecular basis of human growth hormone gene deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Vnencak-Jones, C L; Phillips, J A; Chen, E Y; Seeburg, P H

    1988-01-01

    Crossover sites resulting from unequal recombination within the human growth hormone (GH) gene cluster that cause GH1 gene deletions and isolated GH deficiency type 1A were localized in nine patients. In eight unrelated subjects homozygous for 6.7-kilobase (kb) deletions, the breakpoints are within two blocks of highly homologous DNA sequences that lie 5' and 3' to the GH1 gene. In seven of these eight cases, the breakpoints map within a 1250-base-pair (bp) region composed of 300-bp Alu sequences of 86% homology and flanking non-Alu sequences that are 600 and 300 bp in length and are of 96% and 88% homology, respectively. In the eighth patient, the breakpoints are 5' to these Alu repeats and are most likely within a 700-bp region of 96% homologous DNA sequences. In the ninth patient homozygous for a 7.6-kb deletion, the breakpoints are contained within a 29-bp perfect repeat lying 5' to GH1 and the human chorionic somatomammotropin pseudogene (CSHP1). Together, these results indicate that the presence of highly homologous DNA sequences flanking GH1 predispose to recurrent unequal recombinational events presumably through chromosomal misalignment. Images PMID:2840669

  13. Different mosaicism frequencies for proximal and distal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mutations indicate difference in etiology and recurrence risk.

    PubMed Central

    Passos-Bueno, M R; Bakker, E; Kneppers, A L; Takata, R I; Rapaport, D; den Dunnen, J T; Zatz, M; van Ommen, G J

    1992-01-01

    In about 65% of the cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) a partial gene deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene can be detected. These mutations are clustered at two hot spots: 30% at the hot spot in the proximal part of the gene and about 70% at a more distal hot spot. Unexpectedly we observed a higher frequency of proximal gene rearrangements among proved "germ line" mosaic cases. Of the 24 mosaic cases we are aware of, 19 (79%) have a proximal mutation, while only 5 (21%) have a distal mutation. This finding indicates that the mutations at the two hot spots in the dystrophin gene differ in origin. Independent support for the different mosaicism frequency was found by comparing the mutation spectra observed in isolated cases of DMD and familial cases of DMD. In a large two-center study of 473 patients from Brazil and the Netherlands, we detected a significant difference in the deletion distribution of isolated (proximal:distal ratio 1:3) and familial cases (ratio 1:1). We conclude from these data that proximal deletions most likely occur early in embryonic development, causing them to have a higher chance of becoming familial, while distal deletions occur later and have a higher chance of causing only isolated cases. Finally, our findings have important consequences for the calculation of recurrence-risk estimates according to the site of the deletion: a "proximal" new mutant has an increased recurrence risk of approximately 30%, and a "distal" new mutant has a decreased recurrence risk of approximately 4%. PMID:1415256

  14. Different mosaicism frequencies for proximal and distal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mutations indicate difference in etiology and recurrence risk

    SciTech Connect

    Passos-Bueno, M.R.; Takata, R.I.; Rapaport, D.; Bakker, E.; Kneppers, A.L.J.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Ommen, J.B. van

    1992-11-01

    In about 65% of the cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) a partial gene deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene can be detected. These mutations are clustered at two hot spots: 30% at the hot spot in the proximal part of the gene and about 70% at a more distal hot spot. Unexpectedly the authors observed a higher frequency of proximal gene rearrangements among proved germ line' mosaic cases. Of the 24 mosaic cases they are aware of, 19 (79%) have a proximal mutation, while only 5 (21%) have a distal mutation. This finding indicates that the mutations at the two hot spots in the dystrophin gene differ in origin. Independent support for the different mosaicism frequency was found by comparing the mutation spectra observed in isolated cases of DMD and familial cases (ratio 1:1). The authors conclude from these data that proximal deletions most likely occur early in embryonic development, causing them to have a higher chance of becoming familial, while distal deletions occur later and have a higher chance of causing only isolated cases. Finally, the findings have important consequences for the calculation of recurrence-risk estimates according to the site of the deletion: a [open quote]proximal[close quote] new mutant has an increased recurrence risk of approximately 30%, and a [open quote]distal[close quote] new mutant has a decreased recurrence risk of approximately 4%. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Deletion of the entire NF1 gene detected by FISH: Four deletion patients associated with severe manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Wi, Bai-Lin; Austin, M.A.; Schneider, G.H.; Boles, R.G.; Korf, B.R.

    1995-12-04

    Genetic analysis of NF1 has indicated a wide diversity of mutations, including chromosome rearrangements, deletions, insertions, duplications, and point mutations. Recently, five severely affected individuals have been found by Kayes et al. to have deletions encompassing the entire gene. These deletions were detected by quantitative Southern analysis. To simplify deletion detection, we have employed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using intragenic probes. Thirteen unrelated individuals with NF1 have been studied. Among six with severe manifestations, four have been found to have deletions detected by probes cFF13, cFB5D, cP5, yA43A9, yA113D7 and yD8F4. All four deletion patients have severe developmental delay, minor and major anomalies (including one with bilateral iris colobomas), and multiple cutaneous neurofibromas or plexiform neurofibromas which were present before age 5 years. FISH provides a simple and rapid means of identification of NF1 gene deletions and will allow more rigorous testing of the hypothesis that such deletions are associated with severe manifestations. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. DMD and BMD in the same family due to two distinct mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, L.; Mora, M.; Di Blasi, C.; Brugnoni, R.

    1995-12-04

    We report on a family with a boy affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and an asymptomatic cousin with a Becker-type dystrophin abnormality, diagnosed by chance. Dystrophin gene analysis showed that these conditions were caused by two distinct deletions with breakpoints in different exons. In Xp21 families, DNA analysis and dystrophin testing of asymptomatic males with high CK plasma levels might detect different dystrophin mutations in separate haplotypes as in our family, although we stress there should be clear clinical or familial indications for such testing. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Norrie disease gene: Characterization of deletions and possible function

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.Y.; Battinelli, E.M.; Hendriks, R.W.; Craig, I.W.; Powell, J.F.; Middleton-Price, H.; Sims, K.B.; Breakefield, X.O.

    1993-05-01

    Positional cloning experiments have resulted recently in the isolation of a candidate gene for Norrie disease (pseudoglioma; NDP), a severe X-linked neuro-developmental disorder. Here the authors report the isolation and analysis of human genomic DNA clones encompassing the NDP gene. The gene spans 28 kb and consists of 3 exons, the first of which is entirely contained within the 5{prime} untranslated region. Detailed analysis of genomic deletions in Norrie patients shows that they are heterogeneous, both in size and in position. By PCR analysis, they found that expression of the NDP gene was not confined to the eye or to the brain. An extensive DNA and protein sequence comparison between the human NDP gene and related genes from the database revealed homology with cysteine-rich protein-binding domains of immediate--early genes implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation. They propose that NDP is a molecule related in function to these genes and may be involved in a pathway that regulates neural cell differentiation and proliferation. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Effects of G-gene Deletion and Replacement on Rabies Virus Vector Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Sho; Ohara, Shinya; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Iijima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The glycoprotein-gene (G gene) -deleted rabies virus (RV) vector is a powerful tool to examine the function and structure of neural circuits. We previously reported that the deletion of the G gene enhances the transgene expression level of the RV vector. However, the mechanism of this enhancement remains to be clarified. We presume that there are two possible factors for this enhancement. The first factor is the glycoprotein of RV, which shows cytotoxicity; thus, may cause a dysfunction in the translation process of infected cells. The second possible factor is the enhanced expression of the L gene, which encodes viral RNA polymerase. In the RV, it is known that the gene expression level is altered depending on the position of the gene. Since G-gene deletion displaces the L gene in the genome, the expression of the L gene and viral transcription may be enhanced. In this study, we compared the transgene expression level and viral transcription of three recombinant RV vectors. The effect of glycoprotein was examined by comparing the viral gene expression of G-gene-intact RV and G-gene-replaced RV. Despite the fact that the L-gene transcription level of these two RV vectors was similar, the G-gene-replaced RV vector showed higher viral transcription and transgene expression level than the G-gene-intact RV vector. To examine the effect of the position of the L gene, we compared the viral gene expression of the G-gene-deleted RV and G-gene-replaced RV. The G-gene-deleted RV vector showed higher L-gene transcription, viral transcription, and transgene expression level than the G-gene-replaced RV vector. These results indicate that G-gene deletion enhances the transgene expression level through at least two factors, the absence of glycoprotein and enhancement of L-gene expression. These findings enable investigators to design a useful viral vector that shows a controlled desirable transgene expression level in applications. PMID:26023771

  19. Lactobacillus plantarum ldhL gene: overexpression and deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Ferain, T; Garmyn, D; Bernard, N; Hols, P; Delcour, J

    1994-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium that converts pyruvate to L-(+)- and D-(-)-lactate with stereospecific enzymes designated L-(+)- and D-(-)-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), respectively. A gene (designated ldhL) that encodes L-(+)-lactate dehydrogenase from L. plantarum DG301 was cloned by complementation in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequence of the ldhL gene predicted a protein of 320 amino acids closely related to that of Lactobacillus pentosus. A multicopy plasmid bearing the ldhL gene without modification of its expression signals was introduced in L. plantarum. L-LDH activity was increased up to 13-fold through this gene dosage effect. However, this change had hardly any effect on the production of L-(+)- and D-(-)-lactate. A stable chromosomal deletion in the ldhL gene was then constructed in L. plantarum by a two-step homologous recombination process. Inactivation of the gene resulted in the absence of L-LDH activity and in exclusive production of the D isomer of lactate. However, the global concentration of lactate in the culture supernatant remained unchanged. PMID:8300514

  20. Deletion and deletion/insertion mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Kristin K.; Smonskey, Matthew T.; DeFedericis, HanChun; Deeb, George; Sait, Sheila N.J.; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S.; Starostik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to FLT3 ITD mutations, in-frame deletions in the FLT3 gene have rarely been described in adult acute leukemia. We report two cases of AML with uncommon in-frame mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene: a 3-bp (c.1770_1774delCTACGinsGT; p.F590_V592delinsLF) deletion/insertion and a 12-bp (c.1780_1791delTTCAGAGAATAT; p.F594_Y597del) deletion. We verified by sequencing that the reading frame of the FLT3 gene was preserved and by cDNA analysis that the mRNA of the mutant allele was expressed in both cases. Given the recent development of FLT3 inhibitors, our findings may be of therapeutic value for AML patients harboring similar FLT3 mutations. PMID:25379410

  1. Efficient and simple generation of multiple unmarked gene deletions in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xu-Jian; Yan, Mei-Yi; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Research on mycobacterial genetics relies heavily on techniques for directed gene mutation, but genetic studies are often hampered by the difficulty of generating gene deletions in mycobacteria. We developed an efficient and improved deletion system, described here in detail, which can be used to construct multiple unmarked recombinants in mycobacteria. We tested this system by using it to sequentially delete four pairs of toxin-antitoxin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis. PMID:26972108

  2. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  3. Short, direct repeats at the breakpoints of deletions of the retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Canning, S.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1989-07-01

    The authors found deletions involving the retinoblastoma gene in 12 of 49 tumors from patients with retinoblastoma or osteosarcoma. After mapping the deletion breakpoints, they found that no two breakpoints coincided. Thus, the data do not support the conclusions of others regarding the existence of a hotspot for deletion breakpoints in this gene. In 4 of the tumors, they sequenced 200 base pairs surrounding each deletion breakpoint. Three deletions had termini within pairs of short, direct repeats ranging in size from 4 to 7 base pairs. These results indicate that the slipped mispairing mechanism may predominate in the generation of deletions at this locus. The review of deletion breakpoints at other genetic loci reveals that the nature of the sequences present at deletion breakpoints (short, direct repeats versus middle repetitive elements) varies according to the genetic locus under study.

  4. More deletions in the 5{prime} region than in the central region of the dystrophin gene were identified among Filipino Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-06

    This report describes mutations in the dystrophin gene and the frequency of these mutations in Filipino pedigrees with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD). The findings suggest the presence of genetic variability among DMD/BMD patients in different populations. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Genome-wide gene deletions in Streptococcus sanguinis by high throughput PCR.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiuchun; Xu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis and single-gene deletion are two methods applied in genome-wide gene knockout in bacteria (1,2). Although transposon mutagenesis is less time consuming, less costly, and does not require completed genome information, there are two weaknesses in this method: (1) the possibility of a disparate mutants in the mixed mutant library that counter-selects mutants with decreased competition; and (2) the possibility of partial gene inactivation whereby genes do not entirely lose their function following the insertion of a transposon. Single-gene deletion analysis may compensate for the drawbacks associated with transposon mutagenesis. To improve the efficiency of genome-wide single gene deletion, we attempt to establish a high-throughput technique for genome-wide single gene deletion using Streptococcus sanguinis as a model organism. Each gene deletion construct in S. sanguinis genome is designed to comprise 1-kb upstream of the targeted gene, the aphA-3 gene, encoding kanamycin resistance protein, and 1-kb downstream of the targeted gene. Three sets of primers F1/R1, F2/R2, and F3/R3, respectively, are designed and synthesized in a 96-well plate format for PCR-amplifications of those three components of each deletion construct. Primers R1 and F3 contain 25-bp sequences that are complementary to regions of the aphA-3 gene at their 5' end. A large scale PCR amplification of the aphA-3 gene is performed once for creating all single-gene deletion constructs. The promoter of aphA-3 gene is initially excluded to minimize the potential polar effect of kanamycin cassette. To create the gene deletion constructs, high-throughput PCR amplification and purification are performed in a 96-well plate format. A linear recombinant PCR amplicon for each gene deletion will be made up through four PCR reactions using high-fidelity DNA polymerase. The initial exponential growth phase of S. sanguinis cultured in Todd Hewitt broth supplemented with 2.5% inactivated horse

  6. Lysis Delay and Burst Shrinkage of Coliphage T7 by Deletion of Terminator Tφ Reversed by Deletion of Early Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huong Minh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophage T7 terminator Tφ is a class I intrinsic terminator coding for an RNA hairpin structure immediately followed by oligo(U), which has been extensively studied in terms of its transcription termination mechanism, but little is known about its physiological or regulatory functions. In this study, using a T7 mutant phage, where a 31-bp segment of Tφ was deleted from the genome, we discovered that deletion of Tφ from T7 reduces the phage burst size but delays lysis timing, both of which are disadvantageous for the phage. The burst downsizing could directly result from Tφ deletion-caused upregulation of gene 17.5, coding for holin, among other Tφ downstream genes, because infection of gp17.5-overproducing Escherichia coli by wild-type T7 phage showed similar burst downsizing. However, the lysis delay was not associated with cellular levels of holin or lysozyme or with rates of phage adsorption. Instead, when allowed to evolve spontaneously in five independent adaptation experiments, the Tφ-lacking mutant phage, after 27 or 29 passages, recovered both burst size and lysis time reproducibly by deleting early genes 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7 of class I, among other mutations. Deletion of genes 0.5 to 0.7 from the Tφ-lacking mutant phage decreased expression of several Tφ downstream genes to levels similar to that of the wild-type phage. Accordingly, phage T7 lysis timing is associated with cellular levels of Tφ downstream gene products. This suggests the involvement of unknown factor(s) besides the known lysis proteins, lysozyme and holin, and that Tφ plays a role of optimizing burst size and lysis time during T7 infection. IMPORTANCE E. coli PMID:24335287

  7. The evolution of an intron: Analysis of a long, deletion-prone intron in the human dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    McNaughton, J.C.; Hughes, G.; Jones, W.A.

    1997-03-01

    The sequence of a 112-kb region of the human dystrophin (DMD/BMD) gene encompassing the deletion prone intron 7 (110 kb) and the much shorter intron 8 (1.1 kb) has been determined. Recognizable insertion sequences account for approximately 40% of intron 7. LINE-1 and THE-1/LTR sequences occur in intron 7 with significantly higher frequency than would be expected statistically while Alu sequences are underrepresented. Intron 7 also contains numerous mammalian-wide interspersed repeats, a diverse range of medium reiteration repeats of unknown origin, and a sequence derived from a mariner transposon. By contrast, the shorter intron 8 contains no detectable insertion sequences. Dating of the L1 and Alu sequences suggests that intron 7 has approximately doubled in size within the past 130 million years, and comparison with the corresponding intron from the pufferfish (Fugu rubripes) suggests that the intron has expanded some 44-fold over a period of 400 million years. The possible contribution of the insertion elements to the instability of intron 7 is discussed. 66 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The rates and patterns of deletions in the human factor IX gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.L.; Lind, T.J.; Thorland, E.C.; Sommer S.S. )

    1994-02-01

    Deletions are commonly observed in genes with either segments of highly homologous sequences or excessive gene length. However, in the factor IX gene and in most genes, deletions (of [ge]21 bp) are uncommon. The authors have analyzed DNA from 290 families with hemophilia B (203 independent mutations) and have found 12 deletions >20 bp. Eleven of these are >2 kb (range >3-163 kb), and one is 1.1 kb. The junctions of the four deletions that are completely contained within the factor IX gene have been determined. A novel mutation occurred in patient HB128: the data suggest that a 26.8-kb deletion occurred between two segments of alternating purines and pyrimidines and that a 2.3-kb sense strand segment derived from the deleted region was inserted. For a sample of 203 independent mutations, the authors estimate the [open quotes]baseline[close quotes] rates of deletional mutation per base pair per generation as a function of size. The rate for large (>2 kb)I deletions is exceedingly low. For every mutational event in which a given base is at the junction of a large deletion, there are an estimated 58 microdeletions (<20 bp) and 985 single-base substitutions at that base. Analysis of the nine reported deletion junctions in the factor IX gene literature reveals that (i) five are associated with inversion, orphan sequences, or sense strand insertions; (ii) four are simple deletions that display an excess of short direct repeats at their junctions; (iii) there is no dramatic clustering of junctions within the gene; and (iv) with the exception of alternating purines and pyrimidines, deletion junctions are not preferentially associated with repetitive DNA. 58 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA: Common double deletion in the N-Acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase gene (GALNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Toshinori; Tomatsu, Shunji; Fukuda, Seiji

    1995-04-10

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS). We found two separate deletions of nearly 8.0 and 6.0 kb in the GALNS gene, including some exons. There are Alu repetitive elements near the breakpoints of the 8.0-kb deletion, and this deletion resulted from an Alu-Alu recombination. The other 6.0-kb deletion involved illegitimate recombinational events between incomplete short direct repeats of 8 bp at deletion breakpoints. The same rearrangement has been observed in a heteroallelic state in four unrelated patients. This is the first documentation of a common double deletion a gene that is not a member of a gene cluster. 39 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Deletion analysis of the avermectin biosynthetic genes of Streptomyces avermitilis by gene cluster displacement.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, T; Gewain, K M; MacNeil, D J

    1993-01-01

    Streptomyces avermitilis produces a group of glycosylated, methylated macrocyclic lactones, the avermectins, which have potent anthelmintic activity. A homologous recombination strategy termed gene cluster displacement was used to construct Neor deletion strains with defined endpoints and to clone the corresponding complementary DNA encoding functions for avermectin biosynthesis (avr). Thirty-five unique deletions of 0.5 to > 100 kb over a continuous 150-kb region were introduced into S. avermitilis. Analysis of the avermectin phenotypes of the deletion-containing strains defined the extent and ends of the 95-kb avr gene cluster, identified a regulatory region, and mapped several avr functions. A 60-kb region in the central portion determines the synthesis of the macrolide ring. A 13-kb region at one end of the cluster is responsible for synthesis and attachment of oleandrose disaccharide. A 10-kb region at the other end has functions for positive regulation and C-5 O methylation. Physical analysis of the deletions and of in vivo-cloned fragments refined a 130-kb physical map of the avr gene cluster region. Images PMID:8478321

  11. Conditional IL-2 Gene Deletion: Consequences for T Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Popmihajlov, Zoran; Xu, Dong; Morgan, Heather; Milligan, Zoie; Smith, Kendall A.

    2012-01-01

    To explore the role of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in T cell proliferation, and to circumvent the IL-2 deficiency autoimmune syndrome of conventional il2 gene deletion, mice were created to allow conditional il2 gene deletion when treated with the estrogen analog, tamoxifen (TAM) as adults. Splenocytes from four different mouse strains, C57Bl/6 wild type (WT), conventional IL-2(−/−), TAM-treated Cre recombinase-negative (Cre−)/IL2fl/fl, and Cre recombinase-positive (Cre+)/IL2fl/fl, were activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and monitored for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lymphocyte blastogenesis, aerobic glycolysis, BrdU incorporation into newly synthesized DNA, and CFSE dye dilution to monitor cell division. IL-2 production was monitored by quantitative ELISA and multiple additional cytokines were monitored by quantitative protein-bead arrays. Splenocytes from conventional IL-2(−/−) and TAM-treated Cre+ mice resulted in undetectable IL-2 production by ELISA, so that both strains were IL-2-deficient. As monitored by flow cytometry, activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from WT, Cre+, and Cre− mice all underwent blastogenesis, whereas far fewer cells from conventional IL-2(−/−) mice did so. By comparison, only cells from IL-2 sufficient WT and Cre− mice switched to aerobic glycolysis as evidenced by a drop in media pH. Blastogenesis was mirrored by BrdU incorporation and CFSE dye dilution by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from WT, Cre+, and Cre− mice, which were all equivalent, while proliferation of cells from conventional IL-2(−/−) mice was compromised. Splenocytes from IL-2 deficient conventional IL-2(−/−) mice produced low or undetectable other γc-chain cytokines (IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-13, IL-15, and IL-21), whereas production of these γc-chain cytokines from IL-2-deficient conditional IL-2(−/−) Cre+ mice were comparable with WT and Cre− mice. These results indicate that CD4+ and CD8+ T cell blastogenesis cannot be attributable to IL-2 alone, but a switch

  12. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  13. Tetranectin gene deletion induces Parkinson's disease by enhancing neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhifeng; Wang, Ersong; Hu, Rong; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Jue; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Hong

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). We previously identified tetranectin (TET) as a potential biomarker for PD whose expression is downregulated in the cerebrospinal fluid of PD patients. In the present study, we investigate the role of TET in neurodegeneration in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that siRNA knockdown of TET decreased cell viability and the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells, whereas it increased caspase-3 activity and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in cultured primary dopaminergic neurons. Overexpression of TET protected dopaminergic neurons against neuronal apoptosis in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium cell culture model in vitro. In TET knockdown mouse model of PD, TET gene deletion decreased the number of TH positive cells in the SNpc, induced apoptosis via the p53/Bax pathway, and significantly impaired the motor behavior of transgenic mice. The findings suggest that TET plays a neuroprotective role via reducing neuron apoptosis and could be a valuable biomarker or potential therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with PD. PMID:26597345

  14. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS) cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1), mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement. PMID:22260333

  15. Deletions spanning the neurofibromatosis 1 gene: identification and phenotype of five patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kayes, L. M.; Burke, W.; Riccardi, V. M.; Bennett, R.; Ehrlich, P.; Rubenstein, A.; Stephens, K.

    1994-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by marked variation in clinical severity. To investigate the contribution to variability by genes either contiguous to or contained within the NF1 gene, we screened six NF1 patients with mild facial dysmorphology, mental retardation, and/or learning disabilities, for DNA rearrangement of the NF1 region. Five of the six patients had NF1 gene deletions on the basis of quantitative densitometry, locus hemizygosity, and analysis of somatic cell hybrid lines. Analyses of hybrid lines carrying each of the patient's chromosomes 17, with 15 regional DNA markers, demonstrated that each of the five patients carried a deletion > 700 kb in size. Minimally, each of the deletions involved the entire 350-kb NF1 gene; the three genes--EVI2A, EVI2B, and OMG--that are contained within an NF1 intron; and considerable flanking DNA. For four of the patients, the deletions mapped to the same interval; the deletion in the fifth patient was larger, extending farther in both directions. The remaining NF1 allele presumably produced functional neurofibromin; no gene rearrangements were detected, and RNA-PCR demonstrated that it was transcribed. These data provide compelling evidence that the NF1 disorder results from haploid insufficiency of neurofibromin. Of the three documented de novo deletion cases, two involved the paternal NF1 allele and one the maternal allele. The parental origin of the single remaining expressed NF1 allele had no dramatic effect on patient phenotype. The deletion patients exhibited a variable number of physical anomalies that were not correlated with the extent of their deletion. All five patients with deletions were remarkable for exhibiting a large number of neurofibromas for their age, suggesting that deletion of an unknown gene in the NF1 region may affect tumor initiation or development. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8116612

  16. The Green Monster Process for the Generation of Yeast Strains Carrying Multiple Gene Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yo; Stam, Jason; Novotny, Mark; Yachie, Nozomu; Lasken, Roger S.; Roth, Frederick P.

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypes for a gene deletion are often revealed only when the mutation is tested in a particular genetic background or environmental condition1,2. There are examples where many genes need to be deleted to unmask hidden gene functions3,4. Despite the potential for important discoveries, genetic interactions involving three or more genes are largely unexplored. Exhaustive searches of multi-mutant interactions would be impractical due to the sheer number of possible combinations of deletions. However, studies of selected sets of genes, such as sets of paralogs with a greater a priori chance of sharing a common function, would be informative. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gene knockout is accomplished by replacing a gene with a selectable marker via homologous recombination. Because the number of markers is limited, methods have been developed for removing and reusing the same marker5,6,7,8,9,10. However, sequentially engineering multiple mutations using these methods is time-consuming because the time required scales linearly with the number of deletions to be generated. Here we describe the Green Monster method for routinely engineering multiple deletions in yeast11. In this method, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter integrated into deletions is used to quantitatively label strains according to the number of deletions contained in each strain (Figure 1). Repeated rounds of assortment of GFP-marked deletions via yeast mating and meiosis coupled with flow-cytometric enrichment of strains carrying more of these deletions lead to the accumulation of deletions in strains (Figure 2). Performing multiple processes in parallel, with each process incorporating one or more deletions per round, reduces the time required for strain construction. The first step is to prepare haploid single-mutants termed 'ProMonsters,' each of which carries a GFP reporter in a deleted locus and one of the 'toolkit' loci—either Green Monster GMToolkit-a or GMToolkit-α at the

  17. The green monster process for the generation of yeast strains carrying multiple gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yo; Stam, Jason; Novotny, Mark; Yachie, Nozomu; Lasken, Roger S; Roth, Frederick P

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypes for a gene deletion are often revealed only when the mutation is tested in a particular genetic background or environmental condition(1,2). There are examples where many genes need to be deleted to unmask hidden gene functions(3,4). Despite the potential for important discoveries, genetic interactions involving three or more genes are largely unexplored. Exhaustive searches of multi-mutant interactions would be impractical due to the sheer number of possible combinations of deletions. However, studies of selected sets of genes, such as sets of paralogs with a greater a priori chance of sharing a common function, would be informative. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gene knockout is accomplished by replacing a gene with a selectable marker via homologous recombination. Because the number of markers is limited, methods have been developed for removing and reusing the same marker(5,6,7,8,9,10). However, sequentially engineering multiple mutations using these methods is time-consuming because the time required scales linearly with the number of deletions to be generated. Here we describe the Green Monster method for routinely engineering multiple deletions in yeast(11). In this method, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter integrated into deletions is used to quantitatively label strains according to the number of deletions contained in each strain (Figure 1). Repeated rounds of assortment of GFP-marked deletions via yeast mating and meiosis coupled with flow-cytometric enrichment of strains carrying more of these deletions lead to the accumulation of deletions in strains (Figure 2). Performing multiple processes in parallel, with each process incorporating one or more deletions per round, reduces the time required for strain construction. The first step is to prepare haploid single-mutants termed 'ProMonsters,' each of which carries a GFP reporter in a deleted locus and one of the 'toolkit' loci-either Green Monster GMToolkit-a or GMToolkit

  18. Virus Attenuation after Deletion of the Cytomegalovirus Fc Receptor Gene Is Not due to Antibody Control

    PubMed Central

    Crnković-Mertens, Irena; Messerle, Martin; Milotić, Irena; Szepan, Uwe; Kučić, Natalija; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    1998-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) fcr-1 gene codes for a glycoprotein located at the surface of infected cells which strongly binds the Fc fragment of murine immunoglobulin G. To determine the biological significance of the fcr-1 gene during viral infection, we constructed MCMV fcr-1 deletion mutants and revertants. The fcr-1 gene was disrupted by insertion of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene. In another mutant, the marker gene was also deleted, by recombinase cre. As expected for its hypothetical role in immunoevasion, the infection of mice with fcr-1 deletion mutants resulted in significantly restricted replication in comparison with wild-type MCMV and revertant virus. In mutant mice lacking antibodies, however, the fcr-1 deletion mutants also replicated poorly. This demonstrated that the cell surface-expressed viral glycoprotein with FcR activity strongly modulates the virus-host interaction but that this biological function is not caused by the immunoglobulin binding property. PMID:9445038

  19. Lysis delay and burst shrinkage of coliphage T7 by deletion of terminator Tφ reversed by deletion of early genes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huong Minh; Kang, Changwon

    2014-02-01

    Bacteriophage T7 terminator Tϕ is a class I intrinsic terminator coding for an RNA hairpin structure immediately followed by oligo(U), which has been extensively studied in terms of its transcription termination mechanism, but little is known about its physiological or regulatory functions. In this study, using a T7 mutant phage, where a 31-bp segment of Tϕ was deleted from the genome, we discovered that deletion of Tϕ from T7 reduces the phage burst size but delays lysis timing, both of which are disadvantageous for the phage. The burst downsizing could directly result from Tϕ deletion-caused upregulation of gene 17.5, coding for holin, among other Tϕ downstream genes, because infection of gp17.5-overproducing Escherichia coli by wild-type T7 phage showed similar burst downsizing. However, the lysis delay was not associated with cellular levels of holin or lysozyme or with rates of phage adsorption. Instead, when allowed to evolve spontaneously in five independent adaptation experiments, the Tϕ-lacking mutant phage, after 27 or 29 passages, recovered both burst size and lysis time reproducibly by deleting early genes 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7 of class I, among other mutations. Deletion of genes 0.5 to 0.7 from the Tϕ-lacking mutant phage decreased expression of several Tϕ downstream genes to levels similar to that of the wild-type phage. Accordingly, phage T7 lysis timing is associated with cellular levels of Tϕ downstream gene products. This suggests the involvement of unknown factor(s) besides the known lysis proteins, lysozyme and holin, and that Tϕ plays a role of optimizing burst size and lysis time during T7 infection. IMPORTANCE Bacteriophages are bacterium-infecting viruses. After producing numerous progenies inside bacteria, phages lyse bacteria using their lysis protein(s) to get out and start a new infection cycle. Normally, lysis is tightly controlled to ensure phage progenies are maximally produced and released at an optimal time. Here, we have

  20. Interstitial deletion of 11(p11.2p12): A newly described contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving the gene for hereditary multiple exostoses

    SciTech Connect

    Potocki, L.; Shaffer, L.G.

    1996-03-29

    Individuals with deletions of the proximal portion of the short arm of chromosome 11 share many manifestations including mental retardation, biparietal foramina, minor facial anomalies, and multiple cartilaginous exostoses. The finding of multiple exostoses in these patients is remarkable as the disorder hereditary multiple exostoses, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, has recently been mapped by linkage to three regions, including proximal 11p. We report the clinical and molecular findings in an additional patient with an 11(p11.2p12) deletion. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis demonstrated a de novo, paternally derived deletion for markers which have been shown to be tightly linked to the 11p locus (EXT2). These data support the location of EXT2 within this region and also provide information regarding the ordering of polymorphic markers on 11p. Deletion 11(p11.2p12) is a rare, yet specific, deletion syndrome involving the EXT2 locus, a gene for parietal foramina, and a mental retardation locus, and therefore can be classified as a contiguous gene deletion syndrome. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Construction and application of an efficient multiple-gene-deletion system in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinyu; Tan, Yanzhen; Li, Yanyan; Hu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Daqing; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-11-01

    Gene deletion techniques are important for modifying Corynebacterium glutamicum, the bacterium for industrial production of amino acids. In this study, a novel multiple-gene-deletion system for C. glutamicum was developed. The system is composed of three plasmids pDTW109, pDTW201 and pDTW202. pDTW109 is a temperature-sensitive vector which harbors a cat gene under the tacM promoter, a cre gene under the tac promoter, an origin oriE for replicating in Escherichia coli, and another origin rep(TS) for replicating in C. glutamicum only at low temperatures; it has high transformation efficiency in C. glutamicum and can be easily eliminated by growing at 37°C. pDTW201 and pDTW202 carry loxp-flanked or mutant lox-flanked kan, respectively. This deletion system combines homologous recombination and Cre/lox site-specific recombination, could efficiently delete the aceE gene from the chromosome of C. glutamicum ATCC13032, ATCC13869 or ATCC14067, respectively, and could also delete both genes of aceE and ilvA from the chromosome of C. glutamicum ATCC14067. The system is simple and efficient, and can be easily implemented for multiple-gene-deletion in C. glutamicum. PMID:23856168

  2. An efficient gene replacement and deletion system for an extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Tamakoshi, M; Yaoi, T; Oshima, T; Yamagishi, A

    1999-04-15

    A Thermus thermophilus host strain of which the leuB gene was totally deleted was constructed from a delta pyrE strain by a two step method. First, the leuB gene was replaced with the pyrE gene. Second, the inserted pyrE gene was deleted by using 5-fluoroorotic acid. A plasmid vector with the leuB marker was constructed and the plasmid complemented the leuB deficiency of the host. When the leuB gene from Escherichia coli and its derivative encoding a stabilized enzyme were expressed with the host-vector system, their growth temperature reflected the stability of the enzyme. These results suggest that the gene replacement deletion method using the pyrE gene is useful for the construction of a reliable plasmid vector system and it can be applied to the selection of stabilized enzymes. PMID:10227171

  3. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-06-16

    The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27333265

  4. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27560363

  5. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-01-01

    The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27560363

  6. Dissecting the phenotypes of Dravet syndrome by gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Moran; Han, Sung; Tai, Chao; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Hunker, Avery; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2015-08-01

    Neurological and psychiatric syndromes often have multiple disease traits, yet it is unknown how such multi-faceted deficits arise from single mutations. Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable childhood-onset epilepsy with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, autistic-like behaviours, and premature death. Deletion of Nav1.1 channels selectively impairs excitability of GABAergic interneurons. We studied mice having selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In brain slices, these deletions cause increased threshold for action potential generation, impaired action potential firing in trains, and reduced amplification of postsynaptic potentials in those interneurons. Selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons increases susceptibility to thermally-induced seizures, which are strikingly prolonged when Nav1.1 is deleted in both interneuron types. Mice with global haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 display autistic-like behaviours, hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. Haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons causes autistic-like behaviours, but not hyperactivity, whereas haploinsufficiency in somatostatin-expressing interneurons causes hyperactivity without autistic-like behaviours. Heterozygous deletion in both interneuron types is required to impair long-term spatial memory in context-dependent fear conditioning, without affecting short-term spatial learning or memory. Thus, the multi-faceted phenotypes of Dravet syndrome can be genetically dissected, revealing synergy in causing epilepsy, premature death and deficits in long-term spatial memory, but interneuron-specific effects on hyperactivity and autistic-like behaviours. These results show that multiple disease traits can arise from similar functional deficits in specific interneuron types. PMID:26017580

  7. Dissecting the phenotypes of Dravet syndrome by gene deletion

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Moran; Han, Sung; Tai, Chao; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Hunker, Avery; Scheuer, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric syndromes often have multiple disease traits, yet it is unknown how such multi-faceted deficits arise from single mutations. Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable childhood-onset epilepsy with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, autistic-like behaviours, and premature death. Deletion of Nav1.1 channels selectively impairs excitability of GABAergic interneurons. We studied mice having selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In brain slices, these deletions cause increased threshold for action potential generation, impaired action potential firing in trains, and reduced amplification of postsynaptic potentials in those interneurons. Selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons increases susceptibility to thermally-induced seizures, which are strikingly prolonged when Nav1.1 is deleted in both interneuron types. Mice with global haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 display autistic-like behaviours, hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. Haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons causes autistic-like behaviours, but not hyperactivity, whereas haploinsufficiency in somatostatin-expressing interneurons causes hyperactivity without autistic-like behaviours. Heterozygous deletion in both interneuron types is required to impair long-term spatial memory in context-dependent fear conditioning, without affecting short-term spatial learning or memory. Thus, the multi-faceted phenotypes of Dravet syndrome can be genetically dissected, revealing synergy in causing epilepsy, premature death and deficits in long-term spatial memory, but interneuron-specific effects on hyperactivity and autistic-like behaviours. These results show that multiple disease traits can arise from similar functional deficits in specific interneuron types. PMID:26017580

  8. Deletion of the "OPHN1" Gene Detected by aCGH

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrigal, I.; Rodriguez-Revenga, L.; Badenas, C.; Sanchez, A.; Mila, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The oligophrenin 1 gene ("OPHN1") is an Rho-GTPase-activating protein involved in the regulation of the G-protein cycle required for dendritic spine morphogenesis. Mutations in this gene are implicated in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Methods: We report a deletion spanning exons 21 and 22 of the "OPHN1" gene identified by a…

  9. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells#

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason K.W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Yan, Winston X.; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y.; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Church, George M.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated but still functional protein. In this study, we develop and test a direct gene editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored Dystrophin reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes and muscle stem cells following local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR-treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  10. Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia with Myelodysplasia-related Changes Associated with ATM Gene Deletion.

    PubMed

    Ureshino, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Momoka; Kurogi, Kazuya; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a tumor suppressor gene, and its somatic inactivation plays a role in the pathogenesis of lymphoid malignancies. However, the role of ATM in patients with myeloid malignancies is still unknown. We herein report a case of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) with ATM gene deletion. An 84-year-old Japanese woman presenting with a pale face and pancytopenia was admitted to our institution and diagnosed to have AMKL with ATM gene deletion. She was treated with intravenous azacitidine. The azacitidine treatment was effective for approximately 1 year. Somatic inactivation of the ATM gene may therefore be involved in the pathogenesis of AMKL. PMID:27301517

  11. Angelman syndrome associated with oculocutaneous albinism due to an intragenic deletion of the P gene.

    PubMed

    Fridman, C; Hosomi, N; Varela, M C; Souza, A H; Fukai, K; Koiffmann, C P

    2003-06-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, speech impairment, ataxia, and happy disposition with frequent smiling. AS results from the loss of expression of a maternal imprinted gene, UBE3A, mapped within 15q11-q13 region, due to different mechanisms: maternal deletion, paternal UPD, imprinting center mutation, and UBE3A mutation. Deletion AS patients may exhibit hypopigmentation of skin, eye, and hair correlating with deletion of P gene localized in the distal part of Prader-Willi (PWS)/AS region. Our patient presented developmental delay, severe mental retardation, absence of speech, outbursts of laughter, microcephaly, ataxia, hyperactivity, seizures, white skin, no retinal pigmentation, and gold yellow hair. His parents were of African ancestry. The SNURF-SNRPN methylation analysis confirmed AS diagnosis and microsatellite studies disclosed deletion with breakpoints in BP2 and BP3. All of the 25 exons and flanking introns of the P gene of the patient, his father, and mother were investigated. The patient is hemizygous for the deleted exon 7 of the P gene derived from his father who is a carrier of the deleted allele. Our patient manifests OCA2 associated with AS due to the loss of the maternal chromosome 15 with the normal P allele, and the paternal deletion in the P gene. As various degrees of hypopigmentation are associated with PWS and AS patients, the study of the P gene in a hemizygous state could contribute to the understanding of its effect on human pigmentation during development and to disclose the presence of modifier pigmentation gene(s) in the PWS/AS region. PMID:12749060

  12. A novel large deletion mutation of FERMT1 gene in a Chinese patient with Kindler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    GAO, Ying; BAI, Jin-li; LIU, Xiao-yan; QU, Yu-jin; CAO, Yan-yan; WANG, Jian-cai; JIN, Yu-wei; WANG, Hong; SONG, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Kindler syndrome (KS; OMIM 173650) is a rare autosomal recessive skin disorder, which results in symptoms including blistering, epidermal atrophy, increased risk of cancer, and poor wound healing. The majority of mutations of the disease-determining gene (FERMT1 gene) are single nucleotide substitutions, including missense mutations, nonsense mutations, etc. Large deletion mutations are seldom reported. To determine the mutation in the FERMT1 gene associated with a 7-year-old Chinese patient who presented clinical manifestation of KS, we performed direct sequencing of all the exons of FERMT1 gene. For the exons 2–6 without amplicons, we analyzed the copy numbers using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with specific primers. The deletion breakpoints were sublocalized and the range of deletion was confirmed by PCR and direct sequencing. In this study, we identified a new 17-kb deletion mutation spanning the introns 1–6 of FERMT1 gene in a Chinese patient with severe KS phenotypes. Her parents were carriers of the same mutation. Our study reported a newly identified large deletion mutation of FERMT1 gene involved in KS, which further enriched the mutation spectrum of the FERMT1 gene. PMID:26537214

  13. Deletion patterns of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies in Greece.

    PubMed Central

    Florentin, L; Mavrou, A; Kekou, K; Metaxotou, C

    1995-01-01

    We present molecular data from 90 Greek boys with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy using cDNA analysis or multiplex PCR or both. Deletions were detected in 63.3% of patients and were mainly clustered in two areas of the gene, one in the 3' and one in the 5' end of the gene (exons 3-19 and 44-53). Almost 17% of deletion breakpoints lay in intron 44 while 29% of deletions have a breakpoint in intron 50. Thus the distribution of deletions in our DMD/BMD patients differs from that previously reported. Furthermore a 1:4.35 proximal:distal ratio was observed in familial cases and a 1:2.45 ratio in isolated ones. PMID:7897627

  14. An atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes FMRI gene

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, F.; Zonana, J.; Gunter, K.; Peterson, K.L.; Magenis, R.E., Popovich, B.W.

    1995-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation and results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR1 gene. In the vast majority of cases, this is caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG repeat in the first exon of the FMR1 gene. We describe here a phenotypically atypical case of fragile X syndrome, caused by a deletion that includes the entire FMR1 gene and {ge}9.0 Mb of flanking DNA. The proband, RK, was a 6-year-old mentally retarded male with obesity and anal atresia. A diagnosis of fragile X syndrome was established by the failure of RK`s DNA to hybridize to a 558-bp PstI-XhoI fragment (pfxa3) specific for the 5{prime}-end of the FMR1 gene. The analysis of flanking markers in the interval from Xq26.3-q28 indicated a deletion extending from between 160-500 kb distal and 9.0 Mb proximal to the FMR1 gene. High-resolution chromosome banding confirmed a deletion with breakpoints in Xq26.3 and Xq27.3. This deletion was maternally transmitted and arose as a new mutation on the grandpaternal X chromosome. The maternal transmission of the deletion was confirmed by FISH using a 34-kb cosmid (c31.4) containing most of the FMR1 gene. These results indicated that RK carried a deletion of the FMR1 region with the most proximal breakpoint described to date. This patient`s unusual clinical presentation may indicate the presence of genes located in the deleted interval proximal to the FMR1 locus that are able to modify the fragile X syndrome phenotype. 36 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Third case of 8q23.3-q24.13 deletion in a patient with Langer-Giedion syndrome phenotype without TRPS1 gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2012-03-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) is a contiguous gene syndrome caused by a hemizygous deletion on chromosome 8q23.3-q24.11 involving TRPS1 and EXT1 genes. We report on a girl with LGS phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 8q23.3-q24.13. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) revealed a deletion encompassing only the EXT1 and not the TRPS1 gene. Even though the deletion of TRPS1 and EXT1 genes is responsible for craniofacial and skeletal features of LGS, there have been previous reports of patients with LGS phenotype and 8q24 deletions leaving the TRPS1 gene intact. To our knowledge, this is the third such case. Our patient differs from previously reported LGS patients without TRPS1 gene deletion in that she has the typical LGS facial dysmorphism and skeletal abnormalities. However, the girl is of normal height and has only a mild developmental delay. Additionally, she has dyslalia and premature adrenarche classified as Tanner stage 3 premature pubarche which have not yet been described as features of LGS. We examine the molecular breakpoints and phenotypes of our patient and previously reported cases. PMID:22315192

  16. DMD-enabled confocal microendoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre M.; Dlugan, Andrew L. P.; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2001-05-01

    Conventional endoscopy is limited to imaging macroscopic views of tissue. The British Columbia Cancer Research Center, in collaboration with Digital Optical Imaging Corp., is developing a fiber-bundle based microendoscopy system to enable in vivo confocal imaging of cells and tissue structure through the biopsy channel of an endoscope, hypodermic needle, or catheter. The feasibility of imaging individual cells and tissue architecture will be presented using both reflectance and tissue auto-fluorescence modes of imaging. The system consists of a coherent fiber bundle, low-magnification high-NA objective lens, Digital Micromirror DeviceTM(DMD), light source, and CCD camera. The novel approach is the precise control and manipulation of light flow into and out of individual optical fibers. This control is achieved by employing a DMD to illuminate and detect light from selected fibers such that only the core of each fiber is illuminated or detected. The objective of the research is to develop a low-cost, clinically viable microendoscopy system for a range of detection, diagnostic, localization and differentiation uses associated with cancer and pre-cancerous conditions. Currently, multi-wavelength reflectance confocal images with 1 micrometers lateral resolution and 1.6 micrometers axial resolution have been achieved using a 0.95 mm bundle with 30,000 fibers.

  17. T cell receptor gene deletion circles identify recent thymic emigrants in the peripheral T cell pool

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fan-kun; Chen, Chen-lo H.; Six, Adrien; Hockett, Richard D.; Cooper, Max D.

    1999-01-01

    Progenitor cells undergo T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements during their intrathymic differentiation to become T cells. Rearrangements of the variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments of the TCR genes result in deletion of the intervening chromosomal DNA and the formation of circular episomes as a byproduct. Detection of these extrachromosomal excision circles in T cells located in the peripheral lymphoid tissues has been viewed as evidence for the existence of extrathymic T cell generation. Because all of the T cells in chickens apparently are generated in the thymus, we have employed this avian model to determine the fate of the V(D)J deletion circles. In normal animals we identified TCR Vγ-Jγ and Vβ-Dβ deletion circles in the blood, spleen, and intestines, as well as in the thymus. Thymectomy resulted in the gradual loss of these DNA deletion circles in all of the peripheral lymphoid tissues. A quantitative PCR analysis of Vγ1-Jγ1 and Vβ1-Dβ deletion circles in splenic γδ and Vβ1+ αβ T cells indicated that their numbers progressively decline after thymectomy with a half-life of approximately 2 weeks. Although TCR deletion circles therefore cannot be regarded as reliable indicators of in situ V(D)J rearrangement, measuring their levels in peripheral T cell samples can provide a valuable index of newly generated T cells entering the T cell pool. PMID:9990059

  18. Constitutional and mosaic large NF1 gene deletions in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, S A; Colman, S D; Ho, V T; Abernathy, C R; Arn, P H; Weiss, L; Schwartz, C; Saul, R A; Wallace, M R

    1998-01-01

    A set of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients was screened for large NF1 gene deletions by comparing patient and parent genotypes at 10 intragenic polymorphic loci. Of 67 patient/parent sets (47 new mutation patients and 20 familial cases), five (7.5%) showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH), indicative of NF1 gene deletion. These five patients did not have severe NF1 manifestations, mental retardation, or dysmorphic features, in contrast to previous reports of large NF1 deletions. All five deletions were de novo and occurred on the maternal chromosome. However, two patients showed partial LOH, consistent with somatic mosaicism for the deletion, suggesting that mosaicism may be more frequent in NF1 than previously recognised (and may have bearing on clinical severity). We suggest that large NF1 deletions (1) are not always associated with unusual clinical features, (2) tend to occur more frequently on maternal alleles, and (3) are an important mechanism for constitutional and somatic mutations in NF1 patients. Images PMID:9643287

  19. Recombinations between Alu repeat sequences that result in partial deletions within the C1 inhibitor gene.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Carter, P E; Davis, A E

    1990-12-01

    Genomic DNA sequence analysis was used to define the extent of deletions within the C1 inhibitor gene in two families with type I hereditary angioneurotic edema. Southern blot analysis initially indicated the presence of the partial deletions. One deletion was approximately 2 kb and included exon VII, whereas the other was approximately 8.5 kb and included exons IV-VI. Genomic libraries from an affected member of each family were constructed and clones containing the deletions were analyzed. Sequence analysis of the deletion joints of the mutants and corresponding regions of the normal gene in the two families demonstrated that both deletion joints resulted from recombination of two Alu repetitive DNA elements. Alu repeat sequences from introns VI and VII combined to make a novel Alu in family A, and Alu sequences in introns III and VI were spliced to make a new Alu in family B. The splice sites in the Alu sequences of both mutants were located in the left arm of the Alu element, and both recombination joints overlapped one of the RNA polymerase III promoter sequences. Because the involved Alu sequences, in both instances, were oriented in the same direction, unequal crossingover is the most likely mechanism to account for these mutations. PMID:2276734

  20. Recurring exon deletions in the HP (haptoglobin) gene contribute to lower blood cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Boettger, Linda M; Salem, Rany M; Handsaker, Robert E; Peloso, Gina M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel N; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    One of the first protein polymorphisms identified in humans involves the abundant blood protein haptoglobin. Two exons of the HP gene (encoding haptoglobin) exhibit copy number variation that affects HP protein structure and multimerization. The evolutionary origins and medical relevance of this polymorphism have been uncertain. Here we show that this variation has likely arisen from many recurring deletions, more specifically, reversions of an ancient hominin-specific duplication of these exons. Although this polymorphism has been largely invisible to genome-wide genetic studies thus far, we describe a way to analyze it by imputation from SNP haplotypes and find among 22,288 individuals that these HP exonic deletions associate with reduced LDL and total cholesterol levels. We further show that these deletions, and a SNP that affects HP expression, appear to drive the strong association of cholesterol levels with SNPs near HP. Recurring exonic deletions in HP likely enhance human health by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. PMID:26901066

  1. A Catalog of Genes Homozygously Deleted in Human Lung Cancer and the Candidacy of PTPRD as a Tumor Suppressor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Takashi; Otsuka, Ayaka; Girard, Luc; Sato, Masanori; Iwakawa, Reika; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Minna, John D.; Yokota, Jun

    2010-01-01

    A total of 176 genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer were identified by DNA array-based whole genome scanning of 52 lung cancer cell lines and subsequent genomic PCR in 74 cell lines, including the 52 cell lines scanned. One or more exons of these genes were homozygously deleted in one (1%) to 20 (27%) cell lines. These genes included known tumor suppressor genes, e.g., CDKN2A/p16, RB1, and SMAD4, and candidate tumor suppressor genes whose hemizygous or homozygous deletions were reported in several types of human cancers, such as FHIT, KEAP1, and LRP1B/LRP-DIP. CDKN2A/p16 and p14ARF located in 9p21 were most frequently deleted (20/74, 27%). The PTPRD gene was most frequently deleted (8/74, 11%) among genes mapping to regions other than 9p21. Somatic mutations, including a nonsense mutation, of the PTPRD gene were detected in 8/74 (11%) of cell lines and 4/95 (4%) of surgical specimens of lung cancer. Reduced PTPRD expression was observed in the majority (>80%) of cell lines and surgical specimens of lung cancer. Therefore, PTPRD is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. Microarray-based expression profiling of 19 lung cancer cell lines also indicated that some of the 176 genes, such as KANK and ADAMTS1, are preferentially inactivated by epigenetic alterations. Genetic/epigenetic as well as functional studies of these 176 genes will increase our understanding of molecular mechanisms behind lung carcinogenesis. PMID:20073072

  2. Deletion in the gene BruAb2_0168 of Brucella abortus strains: diagnostic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dean, A S; Schelling, E; Bonfoh, B; Kulo, A E; Boukaya, G A; Pilo, P; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    Three Brucella abortus strains were isolated from joint hygromas from cows in northern Togo. Two deletions in the 5′ side of the gene BruAb2_0168 were identified. As this gene is used for species identification, these deletions have consequences for diagnostic procedures. Multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis was therefore performed for species identification. The strains showed unique VNTR profiles, providing some of the first genotypic data from West Africa. More molecular and epidemiological data are needed from the region, in order to better understand transmission patterns and develop suitable diagnostic assays. PMID:24450581

  3. CHARACTERIZING FUMONISIN BIOSYNTHESIS THROUGH ANALYSIS OF FUM GENE DELETION MUTANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are produced by Gibberella moniliformis, a causal agent of maize ear and stalk rot, and pose a health risk to humans and livestock alike. Recently, a fumonisin biosynthetic gene cluster was described in G. moniliformis. The cluster consists of 15 co-regulated genes (FUM1 and FUM6 throug...

  4. Prevalence of the Prefoldin Subunit 5 Gene Deletion in Canine Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bornemann-Kolatzki, Kirsten; Neumann, Stephan; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Nolte, Ingo; Hammer, Susanne Conradine; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Junginger, Johannes; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2015-01-01

    Background A somatic deletion at the proximal end of canine chromosome 27 (CFA27) was recently reported in 50% of malignant mammary tumors. This region harbours the tumor suppressor gene prefoldin subunit 5 (PFDN5) and the deletion correlated with a higher Ki-67 score. PFDN5 has been described to repress c-MYC and is, therefore, a candidate tumor-suppressor and cancer-driver gene in canine mammary cancer. Aim of this study was to confirm the recurrent deletion in a larger number of tumors. Methods Droplet digital PCR for PFDN5 was performed in DNA from 102 malignant, 40 benign mammary tumors/dysplasias, 11 non-neoplastic mammary tissues and each corresponding genomic DNA from leukocytes. The copy number of PFDN5 was normalized to a reference amplicon on canine chromosome 32 (CFA32). Z-scores were calculated, based on Gaussian distributed normalized PFDN5 copy numbers of the leukocyte DNA. Z-scores ≤ -3.0 in tissue were considered as being indicative of the PFDN5 deletion and called as such. The Ki-67 proliferation index was assessed in a subset of 79 tissue samples by immunohistochemistry. Results The deletion was confirmed in 24% of all malignant tumors, detected in only 7.5% of the benign tumors and was not present in any normal mammary tissue sample. The subgroup of solid carcinomas (n = 9) showed the highest frequency of the deletion (67%) and those malignomas without microscopical high fraction of benign tissue (n = 71) had a 32% frequency (p<0.01 vs. benign samples). The Ki-67 score was found to be significantly higher (p<0.05) in the PFDN5-deleted group compared to malignant tumors without the deletion. Conclusions A somatic deletion of the PFDN5 gene is recurrently present in canine mammary cancer, supporting a potential role in carcinogenesis. The association of this deletion with higher Ki-67 indicates an increased proliferation rate and thus a link to tumor aggressiveness can be hypothesized. The confirmation of earlier results warrants further studies

  5. Investigation of TBX1 gene deletion in Iranian children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: correlation with conotruncal heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Hamid; Salehi, Mansoor; Sedghi, Maryam; Abdali, Hossein; Nouri, Nayereh; Sadri, Leyli; Hosseinzadeh, Majid; Vakili, Bahareh; Lotfi, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Background DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the result of a microdeletion in chromosome 22q11.2 in over 90% of cases. DGS is the second most frequent syndrome after Down syndrome and has an incidence of 1/4000 births. Unequal crossover between low-copy repeats, on the proximal part of the long arm of chromosome 22, usually results in a 3 Mb deletion in one of the chromosome 22 and a reciprocal and similarly sized duplication on the other one. Several studies have indicated that TBX1 (T-box 1) haploinsufficiency is responsible for many of the phenotypic traits of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Conotruncal heart defects (CTDs) are present in 75–85% of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in Western countries. Methods Among 78 patients fulfilling the criteria for DGS diagnosed by the fluorescence in situ hybridisation test, 24 had 22q11.2 deletion. Screening for TBX1 gene deletion was performed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Results Our results revealed that of 24 patients with TBX1 gene deletion, 12 had CTDs while 12 did not show any heart defects. Conclusions Our findings indicate that other genes or gene interactions may play a role in penetrance or the severity of heart disease among patients with DGS. PMID:27326128

  6. Rb and p53 gene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted on mouse lung adenocarcinoma tissues that were formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago to investigate the large gene deletions of mRb and p53 in B6CF{sub 1} male mice. A total of 80 lung tissue samples from irradiated mice and 40 lung samples from nonirradiated controls were randomly selected and examined in the mRb portion of this study. The results showed a significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of mRb deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to 60 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses than those from mice receiving 24 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses at low doses and low dose rates; however, the percentage was not significantly different (P > 0.05) from that for spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas or lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to single-dose {gamma} irradiation at a similar total dose. mRb fragments 3 (71%) and 5 (67%), the parts of the gene that encoded the pocket binding region of Rb protein to adenovirus E1A and SV40 T-antigen, were the most frequently deleted fragments. p53 gene deletion analysis was carried out on normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found to bear mRb deletions. Exons 1,4,5,6, and 9 were chosen to be analyzed.

  7. A 50 kb L1-type deletion mutation of the HEXB gene in Sandhoff disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.X.; Wakamatsu, N.; Akerman, B.R.

    1994-09-01

    Sandhoff disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting from mutations of the HEXB gene encoding the {beta}-subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A. A 16 kb deletion spanning the promoter region to intron 5 of the HEXB gene, occurring in {approximately}25% of mutant alleles, is the most common mutation known. We have identified a second large deletion in a patient with the severe, infantile form of Sandhoff disease. Single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis revealed that the proband, a carrier sister and their mother had one dose of the HEXB gene. This was distinguished through the identification of several polymorphic sites between the promoter and exon 5 (father heterozygous at all sites, others {open_quotes}hemizygous{close_quotes}). Using a combination of pulse field electrophoresis and fine mapping by Southern blot analysis, we found that the deletion begins {approximately}25 kb 5{prime} of the HEXB promoter and ends within a BamHI/MscI fragment in intron 6. Sequence analysis of the region abutting the site of the deletion in intron 6 suggests that the deletion arose from recombination between L1-type sequence repeats. The second mutation, inherited from the father, was found by SSCP analysis and direct sequencing of exon 1 PCR products to be C{sub 185}{yields}T (S62T) and was not present in 60 control chromosomes.

  8. Type I oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1) associated with a large deletion of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Wick, P.A.; Holmes, S.A.; Schnur, R.E. |

    1994-09-01

    OCA1 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin is reduced or absent in skin, hair, and eyes, due to deficient enzymatic activity of tyrosinase. TYR consists of 5 exons spanning over 65 kb at 11q14-q21. Analyses of TYR in >400 unrelated patients with OCA1 have identified more than 50 different point mutations; however, no large deletions have been detected. Here we report a large deletion of TYR in a Caucasian boy with OCA1B. Simultaneous SSCP/heteroduplex screening and DNA sequence analysis indicated that the patient was apparently homozygous for a previously described TYR mutation, adjacent to the 3` splice site of IVS2 (-7, t{r_arrow}a). To distinguish between possible gene deletion vs. maternal uniparental isodisomy, we characterized several chromosome 11 polymorphisms. Maternal uniparental isodisomy was excluded by the patient`s heterozygosity for alleles at D11S35 (11q21-122) and HBG2 (11p15.5). In addition, the patient failed to inherit paternal alleles at an MboI RFLP in exon 1 of TYR and at a TaqI RFLP in the promoter region of the gene. To detect a possible submicroscopic deletion, we performed quantitative Southern blot hybridization using a full length TYR cDNA. Compared with controls, both the patient and his father appeared deleted for two or three TYR-derived PstI fragments; the two TYRL-derived fragments appeared normal. These data indicate that the patient and his father have a partial TYR deletion, including at least exons 1, 2, and IVS2. Based on the organization of the gene, this deletion is at least 50 kb in size. The patient is thus hemizygous for the maternally-inherited mutation in IVS2, accounting for his OCA1B phenotype.

  9. A cluster of cooperating tumor-suppressor gene candidates in chromosomal deletions

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Kitzing, Thomas; Roessler, Stephanie; Zuber, Johannes; Krasnitz, Alexander; Schultz, Nikolaus; Revill, Kate; Weissmueller, Susann; Rappaport, Amy R.; Simon, Janelle; Zhang, Jack; Luo, Weijun; Hicks, James; Zender, Lars; Wang, Xin Wei; Powers, Scott; Wigler, Michael; Lowe, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    The large chromosomal deletions frequently observed in cancer genomes are often thought to arise as a “two-hit” mechanism in the process of tumor-suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation. Using a murine model system of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and in vivo RNAi, we test an alternative hypothesis, that such deletions can arise from selective pressure to attenuate the activity of multiple genes. By targeting the mouse orthologs of genes frequently deleted on human 8p22 and adjacent regions, which are lost in approximately half of several other major epithelial cancers, we provide evidence suggesting that multiple genes on chromosome 8p can cooperatively inhibit tumorigenesis in mice, and that their cosuppression can synergistically promote tumor growth. In addition, in human HCC patients, the combined down-regulation of functionally validated 8p TSGs is associated with poor survival, in contrast to the down-regulation of any individual gene. Our data imply that large cancer-associated deletions can produce phenotypes distinct from those arising through loss of a single TSG, and as such should be considered and studied as distinct mutational events. PMID:22566646

  10. Targeted gene deletion in Candida parapsilosis demonstrates the role of secreted lipase in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gácser, Attila; Trofa, David; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2007-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a major cause of human disease, yet little is known about the pathogen’s virulence. We have developed an efficient gene deletion system for C. parapsilosis based on the repeated use of the dominant nourseothricin resistance marker (caSAT1) and its subsequent deletion by FLP-mediated, site-specific recombination. Using this technique, we deleted the lipase locus in the C. parapsilosis genome consisting of adjacent genes CpLIP1 and CpLIP2. Additionally we reconstructed the CpLIP2 gene, which restored lipase activity. Lipolytic activity was absent in the null mutants, whereas the WT, heterozygous, and reconstructed mutants showed similar lipase production. Biofilm formation was inhibited with lipase-negative mutants and their growth was significantly reduced in lipid-rich media. The knockout mutants were more efficiently ingested and killed by J774.16 and RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. Additionally, the lipase-negative mutants were significantly less virulent in infection models that involve inoculation of reconstituted human oral epithelium or murine intraperitoneal challenge. These studies represent what we believe to be the first targeted disruption of a gene in C. parapsilosis and show that C. parapsilosis–secreted lipase is involved in disease pathogenesis. This efficient system for targeted gene deletion holds great promise for rapidly enhancing our knowledge of the biology and virulence of this increasingly common invasive fungal pathogen. PMID:17853941

  11. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin; Choi, Chul Hee; Han, Kyudong

    2015-05-15

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of recombinant bacteria harboring the desired chimeric plasmid are limited, making the construction of a chimeric plasmid more difficult. We describe a rapid and easy cloning method for markerless gene deletion in A. baumannii, which has no limitation in the availability of restriction sites and allows for easy selection of the clones carrying the desired chimeric plasmid. Notably, it is not necessary to construct new vectors in our method. This method utilizes direct cloning of blunt-end DNA fragments, in which upstream and downstream regions of the target gene are fused with an antibiotic resistance cassette via overlap extension PCR and are inserted into a blunt-end suicide vector developed for blunt-end cloning. Importantly, the antibiotic resistance cassette is placed outside the downstream region in order to enable easy selection of the recombinants carrying the desired plasmid, to eliminate the antibiotic resistance cassette via homologous recombination, and to avoid the necessity of constructing new vectors. This strategy was successfully applied to functional analysis of the genes associated with iron acquisition by A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and to ompA gene deletion in other A. baumannii strains. Consequently, the proposed method is invaluable for markerless gene deletion in multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:25746991

  12. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin

    2015-01-01

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of recombinant bacteria harboring the desired chimeric plasmid are limited, making the construction of a chimeric plasmid more difficult. We describe a rapid and easy cloning method for markerless gene deletion in A. baumannii, which has no limitation in the availability of restriction sites and allows for easy selection of the clones carrying the desired chimeric plasmid. Notably, it is not necessary to construct new vectors in our method. This method utilizes direct cloning of blunt-end DNA fragments, in which upstream and downstream regions of the target gene are fused with an antibiotic resistance cassette via overlap extension PCR and are inserted into a blunt-end suicide vector developed for blunt-end cloning. Importantly, the antibiotic resistance cassette is placed outside the downstream region in order to enable easy selection of the recombinants carrying the desired plasmid, to eliminate the antibiotic resistance cassette via homologous recombination, and to avoid the necessity of constructing new vectors. This strategy was successfully applied to functional analysis of the genes associated with iron acquisition by A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and to ompA gene deletion in other A. baumannii strains. Consequently, the proposed method is invaluable for markerless gene deletion in multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:25746991

  13. Deletion of the DNA Ligase IV Gene in Candida glabrata Significantly Increases Gene-Targeting Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Yuke; Fiori, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Candida glabrata is reported as the second most prevalent human opportunistic fungal pathogen in the United States. Over the last decades, its incidence increased, whereas that of Candida albicans decreased slightly. One of the main reasons for this shift is attributed to the inherent tolerance of C. glabrata toward the commonly used azole antifungal drugs. Despite a close phylogenetic distance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homologous recombination works with poor efficiency in C. glabrata compared to baker's yeast, in fact limiting targeted genetic alterations of the pathogen's genome. It has been shown that nonhomologous DNA end joining is dominant over specific gene targeting in C. glabrata. To improve the homologous recombination efficiency, we have generated a strain in which the LIG4 gene has been deleted, which resulted in a significant increase in correct gene targeting. The very specific function of Lig4 in mediating nonhomologous end joining is the reason for the absence of clear side effects, some of which affect the ku80 mutant, another mutant with reduced nonhomologous end joining. We also generated a LIG4 reintegration cassette. Our results show that the lig4 mutant strain may be a valuable tool for the C. glabrata research community. PMID:26048009

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis and gene deletion using reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Muhl, Daniela; Filloux, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Understanding gene function is far easier when tools are available to engineer a bacterial strain lacking a specific gene and phenotypically compare its behavior with the corresponding parental strain. Such mutants could be selected randomly, either by natural selection under particular stress conditions or by random mutagenesis using transposon delivery as described elsewhere in this book. However, with the advent of the genomic era there are now hundreds of bacterial genomes whose sequence is available, and thus, genes can be identified, chosen, and strategies designed to specifically inactivate them. This can be done by using suicide plasmids and is most convenient when the bacterium of interest is easily amenable to genetic manipulation. The method presented here will describe the use of a suicide vector, pKNG101, which allows the selection of a double-recombination event. The first event results in the integration of the pKNG101 derivative carrying the "mutator" fragment onto the chromosome, and could be selected on plates containing appropriate antibiotics. The pKNG101 carries the sacB gene, which induces death when cells are grown on sucrose. Growth on sucrose plates will thus select the second homologous recombination event, which results in removing the plasmid backbone and leaving behind the mutated target gene. This method has been widely used over the last 20 years to inactivate genes in a wide range of gram-negative bacteria and in particular in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24818930

  15. Hereditary deletion of the entire FAM20C gene in a patient with Raine syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ababneh, Farouq K; AlSwaid, Abdulrahman; Youssef, Talaat; Al Azzawi, Manaf; Crosby, Andrew; AlBalwi, Mohammed A

    2013-12-01

    Raine syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the FAM20C gene that is characterized by generalized osteosclerosis with periosteal new bone formation and distinctive craniofacial dysmorphism. We report on a child who is homozygous for a 487-kb deletion in 7p22.3 that contains FAM20C. Both parents were heterozygous for the deletion. Our patient had the common craniofacial features as well as, uncommon features such as protruding tongue, short stature, and hypoplastic distal phalanges. In addition, he had wormian bones and pyriform aperture stenosis, features that are usually under diagnosed. It is clear that Raine syndrome has a wide range of expression and may not be lethal in the neonatal period. Furthermore, Raine cases due to whole gene deletion do not seem to have a major difference in the phenotype over those caused by various mutations. PMID:24039075

  16. Recurring exon deletions in the haptoglobin (HP) gene associate with lower blood cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Boettger, Linda M.; Salem, Rany M.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Peloso, Gina; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Two exons of the human haptoglobin (HP) gene exhibit copy number variation that affects HP multimerization and underlies one of the first protein polymorphisms identified in humans. The evolutionary origins and medical significance of this polymorphism have been uncertain. Here we show that this variation has likely arisen from the recurring reversion of an ancient hominin-specific duplication of these exons. Though this polymorphism has been largely invisible to genome-wide genetic studies to date, we describe a way to analyze it by imputation from SNP haplotypes and find among 22,288 individuals that these HP exonic deletions associate with reduced LDL and total cholesterol levels. We show that these deletions, and a SNP that affects HP expression, are the likely drivers of the strong but complex association of cholesterol levels to SNPs near HP. Recurring exonic deletions in the haptoglobin gene likely enhance human health by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. PMID:26901066

  17. Complex genomic rearrangements in the dystrophin gene due to replication-based mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Berivan; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Rebeiro, Paige A; Orr, Jennifer; Li, Martin; Steele, Leslie; Marshall, Christian R; Lemire, Edmond G; Boycott, Kym M; Gibson, William; Ray, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    Genomic rearrangements such as intragenic deletions and duplications are the most prevalent type of mutations in the dystrophin gene resulting in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (D/BMD). These copy number variations (CNVs) are nonrecurrent and can result from either nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) or microhomology-mediated replication-dependent recombination (MMRDR). We characterized five DMD patients with complex genomic rearrangements using a combination of MLPA/mRNA transcript analysis/custom array comparative hybridization arrays (CGH) and breakpoint sequence analysis to investigate the mechanisms for these rearrangements. Two patients had complex rearrangements that involved microhomologies at breakpoints. One patient had a noncontiguous insertion of 89.7 kb chromosome 4 into intron 43 of DMD involving three breakpoints with 2–5 bp microhomology at the junctions. A second patient had an inversion of exon 44 flanked by intronic deletions with two breakpoint junctions each showing 2 bp microhomology. The third patient was a female with an inherited deletion of exon 47 in DMD on the maternal allele and a de novo noncontiguous duplication of exons 45–49 in DMD and MID1 on the paternal allele. The other two patients harbored complex noncontiguous duplications within the dystrophin gene. We propose a replication-based mechanisms for all five complex DMD rearrangements. This study identifies additional underlying mechanisms in DMD, and provides insight into the molecular bases of these genomic rearrangements. PMID:25614876

  18. Self-deleting retrovirus vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Russ, A P; Friedel, C; Grez, M; von Melchner, H

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of retrovirus vectors for gene therapy has been developed. The vectors have the ability to excise themselves after inserting a gene into the genome, thereby avoiding problems encountered with conventional retrovirus vectors, such as recombination with helper viruses or transcriptional repression of transduced genes. The strategy exploited (i) the natural life cycle of retroviruses, involving duplication of terminal control regions U5 and U3 to generate long terminal repeats (LTRs) and (ii) the ability of the P1 phage site-specific recombinase (Cre) to excise any sequences positioned between two loxP target sequences from the mammalian genome. Thus, an independently expressed selectable marker gene flanked by a loxP target sequence was cloned into the U3 region of a Moloney murine leukemia virus vector. A separate cassette expressing the Cre recombinase was inserted between the LTRs into the body of the virus. LTR-mediated duplication placed vector sequences, including Cre, between loxP sites in the integrated provirus. This enabled Cre to excise from the provirus most of the viral and nonviral sequences unrelated to transcription of the U3 gene. PMID:8763996

  19. Direct cellobiose production from cellulose using sextuple beta-glucosidase gene deletion Neurospora crassa mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct cellobiose production from cellulose by a genetically modified fungus—Neurospora crassa, was explored in this study. A library of N. crassa sextuple beta-glucosidase (bgl) gene deletion strains was constructed. Various concentrations of cellobiose were detected in the culture broth of the N. ...

  20. Detailed gene dose analysis reveals recurrent focal gene deletions in pediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ivanov Öfverholm, Ingegerd; Tran, Anh Nhi; Olsson, Linda; Zachariadis, Vasilios; Heyman, Mats; Rudd, Eva; Syk Lundberg, Elisabeth; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Johansson, Bertil; Nordgren, Ann; Barbany, Gisela

    2016-09-01

    To identify copy number alterations (CNAs) in pediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP ALL), array comparative genomic hybridization was performed on 50 cases; detected CNAs were validated in a cohort of 191 cases analyzed by single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. Apart from CNAs involving leukemia-associated genes, recurrent deletions targeting genes not previously implicated in BCP ALL, e.g. INIP, IRF1 and PDE4B, were identified. Deletions of the DNA repair gene INIP were exclusively found in cases with t(12;21), and deletions of SH2B3 were associated with intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (p < 0.001). A majority of BTLA deletions (7/11; 64%) affected samples with gain of 21q chromosome material, suggesting that BTLA deletions are associated with both germline and somatic gain of chromosome 21. In cases without known risk-associated cytogenetic markers, CNAs associated with adverse prognosis were identified in 50% (10/20), indicating that a majority of these cases could be assigned to distinct genetic subtypes. PMID:27090575

  1. Soluble epoxide hydrolase: Gene structure, expression and deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Todd R.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts epoxides to their corresponding diols through the addition of a water molecule. sEH readily hydrolyzes lipid signaling molecules, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), epoxidized lipids produced from arachidonic acid by the action of cytochrome p450s. Through its metabolism of the EETs and other lipid mediators, sEH contributes to the regulation of vascular tone, nociception, angiogenesis and the inflammatory response. Because of its central physiological role in disease states such as cardiac hypertrophy, diabetes, hypertension, and pain sEH is being investigated as a therapeutic target. This review begins with a brief introduction to sEH protein structure and function. sEH evolution and gene structure are then discussed before human small nucleotide polymorphisms and mammalian gene expression are described in the context of several disease models. The review ends with an overview of studies that have employed the sEH knockout mouse model. PMID:23701967

  2. Deletion pattern of the STS gene in X-linked ichthyosis in a Mexican population.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Vaca, A. L.; Valdes-Flores, M. del R.; Rivera-Vega, M. R.; González-Huerta, L. M.; Kofman-Alfaro, S. H.; Cuevas-Covarrubias, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is an inherited disorder due to steroid sulfatase deficiency (STS). Most XLI patients (>90%) have complete deletion of the STS gene and flanking sequences. The presence of low copy number repeats (G1.3 and CRI-S232) on either side of the STS gene seems to play a role in the high frequency of these interstitial deletions. In the present study, we analyzed 80 Mexican patients with XLI and complete deletion of the STS gene. MATERIALS AND METHODS: STS activity was measured in the leukocytes using 7-[(3)H]-dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate as a substrate. Amplification of the regions telomeric-DXS89, DXS996, DXS1139, DXS1130, 5' STS, 3' STS, DXS1131, DXS1133, DXS237, DXS1132, DXF22S1, DXS278, DXS1134-centromeric was performed through PCR. RESULTS: No STS activity was detected in the XLI patients (0.00 pmoles/mg protein/h). We observed 3 different patterns of deletion. The first two groups included 25 and 32 patients, respectively, in which homologous sequences were involved. These subjects showed the 5' STS deletion at the sequence DXS1139, corresponding to the probe CRI-S232A2. The group of 32 patients presented the 3' STS rupture site at the sequence DXF22S1 (probe G1.3) and the remaining 25 patients had the 3' STS breakpoint at the sequence DXS278 (probe CRI-S232B2). The third group included 23 patients with the breakpoints at several regions on either side of the STS gene. No implication of the homologous sequences were observed in this group. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that more complex mechanisms, apart from homologous recombination, are occurring in the genesis of the breakpoints of the STS gene of XLI Mexican patients. PMID:11844872

  3. Emerging digital micromirror device (DMD) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Dana; Duncan, Walter M.; Slaughter, John

    2003-01-01

    For the past six years, Digital Light Processing technology from Texas Instruments has made significant inroads in the projection display market. With products enabling the world"s smallest data and video projectors, HDTVs, and digital cinema, DLP technology is extremely powerful and flexible. At the heart of these display solutions is Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device (DMD), a semiconductor-based "light switch" array of thousands of individually addressable, tiltable, mirror-pixels. With success of the DMD as a spatial light modulator for projector applications, dozens of new applications are now being enabled by general-use DMD products that are recently available to developers. The same light switching speed and "on-off" (contrast) ratio that have resulted in superior projector performance, along with the capability of operation outside the visible spectrum, make the DMD very attractive for many applications, including volumetric display, holographic data storage, lithography, scientific instrumentation, and medical imaging. This paper presents an overview of past and future DMD performance in the context of new DMD applications, cites several examples of emerging products, and describes the DMD components and tools now available to developers.

  4. FOXP2 gene deletion and infant feeding difficulties: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Emily; Maron, Jill L.

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P2 (FOXP2) is a well-studied gene known to play an essential role in normal speech development. Deletions in the gene have been shown to result in developmental speech disorders and regulatory disruption of downstream gene targets associated with common forms of language impairments. Despite similarities in motor planning and execution between speech development and oral feeding competence, there have been no reports to date linking deletions within the FOXP2 gene to oral feeding impairments in the newborn. The patient was a nondysmorphic, appropriately and symmetrically grown male infant born at 35-wk gestational age. He had a prolonged neonatal intensive care unit stay because of persistent oral feeding incoordination requiring gastrostomy tube placement. Cardiac and neurological imagings were within normal limits. A microarray analysis found an ∼9-kb loss within chromosome band 7q3.1 that contains exon 2 of FOXP2, demonstrating a single copy of this region instead of the normal two copies per diploid gene. This case study expands our current understanding of the role FOXP2 exerts on motor planning and coordination necessary for both oral feeding success and speech–language development. This case report has important consequences for future diagnosis and treatment for infants with FOXP2 deletions, mutations, and varying levels of gene expression. PMID:27148578

  5. FOXP2 gene deletion and infant feeding difficulties: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Emily; Maron, Jill L

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P2 (FOXP2) is a well-studied gene known to play an essential role in normal speech development. Deletions in the gene have been shown to result in developmental speech disorders and regulatory disruption of downstream gene targets associated with common forms of language impairments. Despite similarities in motor planning and execution between speech development and oral feeding competence, there have been no reports to date linking deletions within the FOXP2 gene to oral feeding impairments in the newborn. The patient was a nondysmorphic, appropriately and symmetrically grown male infant born at 35-wk gestational age. He had a prolonged neonatal intensive care unit stay because of persistent oral feeding incoordination requiring gastrostomy tube placement. Cardiac and neurological imagings were within normal limits. A microarray analysis found an ∼9-kb loss within chromosome band 7q3.1 that contains exon 2 of FOXP2, demonstrating a single copy of this region instead of the normal two copies per diploid gene. This case study expands our current understanding of the role FOXP2 exerts on motor planning and coordination necessary for both oral feeding success and speech-language development. This case report has important consequences for future diagnosis and treatment for infants with FOXP2 deletions, mutations, and varying levels of gene expression. PMID:27148578

  6. Deletion of Interstitial Genes between TMPRSS2 and ERG Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Linn, Douglas E; Penney, Kathryn L; Bronson, Roderick T; Mucci, Lorelei A; Li, Zhe

    2016-04-01

    TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions that occur frequently in human prostate cancers can be generated either through insertional chromosomal rearrangement or by intrachromosomal deletion. Genetically, a key difference between these two mechanisms is that the latter results in deletion of a ∼3-Mb interstitial region containing genes with unexplored roles in prostate cancer. In this study, we characterized two mouse models recapitulating TMPRSS2-ERG insertion or deletion events in the background of prostate-specific PTEN deficiency. We found that only the mice that lacked the interstitial region developed prostate adenocarcinomas marked by poor differentiation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Mechanistic investigations identified several interstitial genes, including Ets2 and Bace2, whose reduced expression correlated in the gene homologs in human prostate cancer with biochemical relapse and lethal disease. Accordingly, PTEN-deficient mice with prostate-specific knockout of Ets2 exhibited marked progression of prostate adenocarcinomas that was partly attributed to activation of MAPK signaling. Collectively, our findings established that Ets2 is a tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer, and its loss along with other genes within the TMPRSS2-ERG interstitial region contributes to disease progression. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1869-81. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26880803

  7. 5q14.3 deletion neurocutaneous syndrome: Contiguous gene syndrome caused by simultaneous deletion of RASA1 and MEF2C: A progressive disease.

    PubMed

    Ilari, Rita; Agosta, Guillermo; Bacino, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a young girl who was presented with complex clinical symptoms caused by the deletion of contiguous genes: RASA1 and MEF2C, located on chromosome 5q14.3. Specifically, the diagnosis of her skin disorder and vascular malformations involving central nervous system is consistent with a RASopathy. The child's neurological manifestations are observed in most patients suffering from 5q14.3 by deletion or mutation of the MEF2C gene. A review of the literature allowed us to conclude that the contiguous deletion of genes RASA1 and MEF2C fulfills the criteria for the diagnosis of a Neurocutaneous syndrome as proposed by Carr et al. [2011]. We also assessed the penetrance of RASA1 and clinical manifestations of MEF2C according to the type of deletion. This child described presents the complete symptomatology of both deleted genes. We would also like to highlight the progression of the disorder. PMID:26774077

  8. Seven gene deletions in seven days: Fast generation of Escherichia coli strains tolerant to acetate and osmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Sheila I.; Lennen, Rebecca M.; Herrgård, Markus J.; Nielsen, Alex T.

    2015-01-01

    Generation of multiple genomic alterations is currently a time consuming process. Here, a method was established that enables highly efficient and simultaneous deletion of multiple genes in Escherichia coli. A temperature sensitive plasmid containing arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and a rhamnose inducible flippase recombinase was constructed to facilitate fast marker-free deletions. To further speed up the procedure, we integrated the arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and the rhamnose inducible FLP into the genome of E. coli K-12 MG1655. This system enables growth at 37 °C, thereby facilitating removal of integrated antibiotic cassettes and deletion of additional genes in the same day. Phosphorothioated primers were demonstrated to enable simultaneous deletions during one round of electroporation. Utilizing these methods, we constructed strains in which four to seven genes were deleted in E. coli W and E. coli K-12. The growth rate of an E. coli K-12 quintuple deletion strain was significantly improved in the presence of high concentrations of acetate and NaCl. In conclusion, we have generated a method that enables efficient and simultaneous deletion of multiple genes in several E. coli variants. The method enables deletion of up to seven genes in as little as seven days. PMID:26643270

  9. Large exonic deletions in POLR3B gene cause POLR3-related leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mariana; Thiffault, Isabelle; Guerrero, Kether; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Tran, Luan T; Benko, William; van der Knaap, Marjo S; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Wolf, Nicole I; Bernard, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    POLR3-related (or 4H) leukodystrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in POLR3A or POLR3B and is characterized by neurological and non-neurological features. In a small proportion of patients, no mutation in either gene or only one mutation is found. Analysis of the POLR3B cDNA revealed a large deletion of exons 21-22 in one case and of exons 26-27 in another case. These are the first reports of long deletions causing POLR3-related leukodystrophy, suggesting that deletions and duplications in POLR3A or POLR3B should be investigated in patients with a compatible phenotype, especially if one pathogenic variant has been identified. PMID:26045207

  10. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Mi; Kim, Yoonjung; Lee, Sang Guk; Yang, Jin-Young

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis. PMID:25506001

  11. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun-Mi; Hong, Bo Young; Kim, Yoonjung; Lee, Sang Guk; Yang, Jin-Young; Kim, Juwon; Lee, Kyung-A

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis. PMID:25506001

  12. Deletion in the FMR1 gene in a fragile-X male

    SciTech Connect

    Mannermaa, A.; Pulkkinen, L.; Kajanoja, E.

    1996-08-09

    The pathogenesis of fragile-X syndrome is a consequence of absence of the FMR1 gene product associated with expansion of the CGG repeat and abnormal methylation of this and a CpG island 250 hp proximal to the CGG repeat located at exon 1 in the FMR1 gene. While this is usually the case, some suspected fragile-X syndrome patients have been described with a mutation other than CGG expansion. We describe here an affected fragile-X male, who was found to be mosaic of a full mutation of the CGG expansion and a deletion in the FMR1 gene. The patient`s phenotype is probably mainly due to the effect of the full mutation of the repeat sequence. Thus, the influence of the deletion is difficult to evaluate. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Inappropriate gene activation in FSHD: a repressor complex binds a chromosomal repeat deleted in dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Gabellini, Davide; Green, Michael R; Tupler, Rossella

    2002-08-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a common myopathy, is an autosomal dominant disease of unknown molecular mechanism. Almost all FSHD patients carry deletions of an integral number of tandem 3.3 kilobase repeats, termed D4Z4, located on chromosome 4q35. Here, we find that in FSHD muscle, 4q35 genes located upstream of D4Z4 are inappropriately overexpressed. We show that an element within D4Z4 specifically binds a multiprotein complex consisting of YY1, a known transcriptional repressor, HMGB2, an architectural protein, and nucleolin. We demonstrate that this multiprotein complex binds D4Z4 in vitro and in vivo and mediates transcriptional repression of 4q35 genes. Based upon these results, we propose that deletion of D4Z4 leads to the inappropriate transcriptional derepression of 4q35 genes resulting in disease. PMID:12176321

  14. A novel adipose-specific gene deletion model demonstrates potential pitfalls of existing methods.

    PubMed

    Mullican, Shannon E; Tomaru, Takuya; Gaddis, Christine A; Peed, Lindsey C; Sundaram, Anand; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-specific gene deletion in mice is crucial in determining gene function in adipocyte homeostasis and the development of obesity. We noted 100% mortality when the Hdac3 gene was conditionally deleted using Fabp4-Cre mice, the most commonly used model of adipose-targeted Cre recombinase. However, this surprising result was not reproduced using other models of adipose targeting of Cre, including a novel Retn-Cre mouse. These findings underscore the need for caution when interpreting data obtained using Fabp4-Cre mice and should encourage the use of additional or alternative adipose-targeting Cre mouse models before drawing conclusions about in vivo adipocyte-specific functions. PMID:23192980

  15. Three new isolates of porcine respiratory coronavirus with various pathogenicities and spike (S) gene deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, E M; Halbur, P G; Paul, P S

    1994-01-01

    Three new isolates of porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) were isolated and partially characterized. These PRCV isolates showed a selective tropism for respiratory tissue and were antigenically related to transmissible gastroenteritis virus. PCR amplification of the 5' half of the spike (S) genes of the three PRCV isolates indicated that a large deletion, characteristic of PRCV, was present. By using cDNA probes specific for the transmissible gastroenteritis virus S gene, the PCR products were shown to be specific in a Southern blot. The three new PRCV isolates were shown to vary in S gene deletion size. In a separate study, these isolates have also been shown to vary in pathogenicity. These new PRCV isolates should serve as important tools in gaining a better understanding of the pathogenesis of coronavirus infections. Images PMID:7929779

  16. [Treatment progress of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)].

    PubMed

    Smogorzewska, Elzbieta Monika; Weinberg, Kenneth I

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is currently available. There exists a mouse model of the disease in which the usefulness of gene therapy was established. However, no progress towards human application was made due to the lack of a proper method for gene delivery. During the past several years, researchers acquired data which led them to believe that bone marrow stem cells are capable of generating not only blood cells, but also liver, heart, skin, muscle, and other tissue. Although the term "stem cell plasticity" became very popular, other studies have suggested that bone marrow might contain different types of stem cells that can produce non-hematopoietic cells. For example, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in bone marrow give rise to osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle. Recently, researchers have been able to show that transplanted bone marrow cells can contribute to muscle cells in a human patient who was diagnosed with two genetic diseases: severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The odds of this happening is estimated at one in seven million. The results of studying this patient's medical history were reported by collaborating researchers at Children's Hospital, Los Angeles and Children's Hospital, Boston in an article titled "Long-term persistence of donor nuclei in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patient receiving bone marrow transplantation" published in the September 2002 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. This patient was transplanted 15 years ago at Children's Hospital Los Angeles with paternal HLA-haploidentical T cell-depleted bone marrow. He engrafted and became a hematopoietic chimera having T and NK lymphocytes of donor origin. Studies performed on the muscle biopsy from the patient 13 years after transplantation demonstrated that the muscle showed evidence of donor derived nuclei. In addition, analysis of his bone marrow

  17. A common deletion at D6S265 in the hemochromatosis gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Pyper, W.R.; Burt, M.J.; Powell, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    Positional cloning of the hemochromatosis (HC) gene on chromosome 6p has utilized a number of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. While the putative HC gene has been localized within 1 cM of HLA-A, definition of the genetic limits of the HC locus has been controversial. Isolation and characterization of additional markers within this region will enable construction of a physical map upon which the HC gene can located. D6S265 is one such microsatellite, physically mapped within 120 kb centromeric of HLA-A. Recombinant and linkage analysis of this dinucleotide repeat in 24 Australian families segregating for HC positioned D6S265 within 1 cM of the HC gene, while allele association analysis showed allele 1 to be significantly increased in HC patients ({chi}{sup 2}=41.4, p<0.001, RR=5.75). In 6 of the 24 HC families, a D6265 locus deletion was found to segregate with HLA-A25 and HLA-A26 alleles. The D6S265 locus deletion was not associated with expression of HC. This study enables us to exclude candidate HC genes from the deleted region involving D6S265, and gives further support for an area of instability in the HLA class I region.

  18. CaMK4 Gene Deletion Induces Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano; Cipolletta, Ersilia; Sorriento, Daniela; Del Giudice, Carmine; Anastasio, Antonio; Monaco, Sara; Maione, Angela Serena; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Puca, Annibale; Trimarco, Bruno; Illario, Maddalena; Iaccarino, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Background The expression of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV) was hitherto thought to be confined to the nervous system. However, a recent genome-wide analysis indicated an association between hypertension and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs10491334) of the human CaMKIV gene (CaMK4), which suggests a role for this kinase in the regulation of vascular tone. Methods and Results To directly assess the role of CaMKIV in hypertension, we characterized the cardiovascular phenotype of CaMK4−/− mice. They displayed a typical hypertensive phenotype, including high blood pressure levels, cardiac hypertrophy, vascular and kidney damage, and reduced tolerance to chronic ischemia and myocardial infarction compared with wild-type littermates. Interestingly, in vitro experiments showed the ability of this kinase to activate endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Eventually, in a population study, we found that the rs10491334 variant associates with a reduction in the expression levels of CaMKIV in lymphocytes from hypertensive patients. Conclusions Taken together, our results provide evidence that CaMKIV plays a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation through the control of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:e001081 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.112.001081.) PMID:23130158

  19. Insertion and Deletion Mismatches Distant from the Target Position Improve Gene Correction with a Tailed Duplex.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Nishigaki, Natsuki; Ikeda, Akihiro; Yukawa, Seiya; Morita, Yukiko; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-07-01

    A 5'-tailed duplex (TD) DNA corrects a base-substitution mutation. In this study, the effects of insertion and deletion (indel) mismatches distant from the target position on the gene correction were examined. Three target plasmid DNAs with and without indel mismatches ∼330 bases distant from the correction target position were prepared, and introduced into HeLa cells together with the TD. The indel mismatches improved the gene correction efficiency and specificity without sequence conversions at the indel mismatch site. These results suggested that the gene correction efficiency and specificity are increased when an appropriate second mismatch is introduced into the TD fragment. PMID:27253876

  20. Rabies Virus Vector Transgene Expression Level and Cytotoxicity Improvement Induced by Deletion of Glycoprotein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Shinya; Sato, Sho; Oyama, Kei; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Iijima, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is required for binding to neuronal receptors and for viral entry. G-deleted RV vector is a powerful tool for investigating the organization and function of the neural circuits. It gives the investigator the ability to genetically target initial infection to particular neurons and to control trans-synaptic propagation. In this study we have quantitatively evaluated the effect of G gene deletion on the cytotoxicity and transgene expression level of the RV vector. We compared the characteristics of the propagation-competent RV vector (rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP) and the G-deleted RV vector (rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP), both of which are based on the attenuated HEP-Flury strain and express monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) as a transgene. rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP showed lower cytotoxicity than rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP, and within 16 days of infection we found no change in the basic electrophysiological properties of neurons infected with the rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP. The mRFP expression level of rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP was much higher than that of rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP, and 3 days after infection the retrogradely infected neurons were clearly visualized by the expressed fluorescent protein without any staining. This may be due to the low cytotoxicity and/or the presumed change in the polymerase gene (L) expression level of the G-deleted RV vector. Although the mechanisms remains to be clarified, the results of this study indicate that deletion of the G gene greatly improves the usability of the RV vector for studying the organization and function of the neural circuits by decreasing the cytotoxicity and increasing the transgene expression level. PMID:24244660

  1. SHOX gene and conserved noncoding element deletions/duplications in Colombian patients with idiopathic short stature

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Gloria Tatiana Vinasco; Jaimes, Giovanna Carola; Barrios, Mauricio Coll; Cespedes, Camila; Velasco, Harvy Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    SHOX gene mutations or haploinsufficiency cause a wide range of phenotypes such as Leri Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD), Turner syndrome, and disproportionate short stature (DSS). However, this gene has also been found to be mutated in cases of idiopathic short stature (ISS) with a 3–15% frequency. In this study, the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique was employed to determine the frequency of SHOX gene mutations and their conserved noncoding elements (CNE) in Colombian patients with ISS. Patients were referred from different centers around the county. From a sample of 62 patients, 8.1% deletions and insertions in the intragenic regions and in the CNE were found. This result is similar to others published in other countries. Moreover, an isolated case of CNE 9 duplication and a new intron 6b deletion in another patient, associated with ISS, are described. This is one of the first studies of a Latin American population in which deletions/duplications of the SHOX gene and its CNE are examined in patients with ISS. PMID:24689071

  2. A novel whole exon deletion in WWOX gene causes early epilepsy, intellectual disability and optic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ben-Salem, Salma; Al-Shamsi, Aisha M; John, Anne; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have implicated the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase encoding gene (WWOX) in a severe form of autosomal recessive neurological disorder. This condition showed an overlapping spectrum of clinical features including spinocerebellar ataxia associated with generalized seizures and delayed psychomotor development to growth retardation, spasticity, and microcephaly. We evaluated a child from a consanguineous Emirati family that presented at birth with growth retardation, microcephaly, epileptic seizures, and later developed spasticity and delayed psychomotor development. Screening for deletions and duplications using whole-chromosomal microarray analysis identified a novel homozygous microdeletion encompassing exon 5 of the WWOX gene. Analysis of parental DNA indicated that this deletion was inherited from both parents and lies within a large region of homozygosity. Sanger sequencing of the cDNA showed that the deletion resulted in exon 5 skipping leading to a frame-shift and creating a premature stop codon at amino acid position 212. Quantification of mRNA revealed striking low level of WWOX expression in the child and moderate level of expression in the mother compared to a healthy control. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first homozygous germline structural variation in WWOX gene resulting in truncated transcripts that were presumably subject to NMD pathway. Our findings extend the clinical and genetic spectrum of WWOX mutations and support a crucial role of this gene in neurological development. PMID:25403906

  3. Gene Deletion by Fluorescence-Reported Allelic Exchange Mutagenesis in Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Konrad E.; Wolf, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although progress in Chlamydia genetics has been rapid, genomic modification has previously been limited to point mutations and group II intron insertions which truncate protein products. The bacterium has thus far been intractable to gene deletion or more-complex genomic integrations such as allelic exchange. Herein, we present a novel suicide vector dependent on inducible expression of a chlamydial gene that renders Chlamydia trachomatis fully genetically tractable and permits rapid reverse genetics by fluorescence-reported allelic exchange mutagenesis (FRAEM). We describe the first available system of targeting chlamydial genes for deletion or allelic exchange as well as curing plasmids from C. trachomatis serovar L2. Furthermore, this approach permits the monitoring of mutagenesis by fluorescence microscopy without disturbing bacterial growth, a significant asset when manipulating obligate intracellular organisms. As proof of principle, trpA was successfully deleted and replaced with a sequence encoding both green fluorescent protein (GFP) and β-lactamase. The trpA-deficient strain was unable to grow in indole-containing medium, and this phenotype was reversed by complementation with trpA expressed in trans. To assess reproducibility at alternate sites, FRAEM was repeated for genes encoding type III secretion effectors CTL0063, CTL0064, and CTL0065. In all four cases, stable mutants were recovered one passage after the observation of transformants, and allelic exchange was limited to the specific target gene, as confirmed by whole-genome sequencing. Deleted sequences were not detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) from isogenic mutant populations. We demonstrate that utilization of the chlamydial suicide vector with FRAEM renders C. trachomatis highly amenable to versatile and efficient genetic manipulation. PMID:26787828

  4. DMD reliability: a MEMS success story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) developed by Texas Instruments (TI) has made tremendous progress in both performance and reliability since it was first invented in 1987. From the first working concept of a bistable mirror, the DMD is now providing high-brightness, high-contrast, and high-reliability in over 1,500,000 projectors using Digital Light Processing technology. In early 2000, TI introduced the first DMD chip with a smaller mirror (14-micron pitch versus 17-micron pitch). This allowed a greater number of high-resolution DMD chips per wafer, thus providing an increased output capacity as well as the flexibility to use existing package designs. By using existing package designs, subsequent DMDs cost less as well as met our customers' demand for faster time to market. In recent years, the DMD achieved the status of being a commercially successful MEMS device. It reached this status by the efforts of hundreds of individuals working toward a common goal over many years. Neither textbooks nor design guidelines existed at the time. There was little infrastructure in place to support such a large endeavor. The knowledge we gained through our characterization and testing was all we had available to us through the first few years of development. Reliability was only a goal in 1992 when production development activity started; a goal that many throughout the industry and even within Texas Instruments doubted the DMD could achieve. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that we succeeded by exceeding the reliability goals.

  5. Clinical phenotypes as predictors of the outcome of skipping around DMD exon 45

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Andrew R.; Wein, Nicolas; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Taylor, Laura E.; Dunn, Diane M.; Mendell, Jerry R.; King, Wendy M.; Pestronk, Alan; Florence, Julaine M.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Finkel, Richard S.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Howard, Michael T.; Day, John W.; McDonald, Craig; Nicolas, Aurélie; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Weiss, Robert B.; Flanigan, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exon-skipping therapies aim to convert Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) into less severe Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) by altering pre-mRNA splicing to restore an open reading frame, allowing translation of an internally deleted and partially functional dystrophin protein. The most common single exon deletion – exon 45 (Δ45) – may theoretically be treated by skipping of either flanking exon (44 or 46). We sought to predict the impact of these by assessing the clinical severity in dystrophinopathy patients. Methods Phenotypic data including clinical diagnosis, age at wheelchair use, age at loss of ambulation, and presence of cardiomyopathy was analyzed from 41 dystrophinopathy patients containing equivalent in-frame deletions. Results As expected, deletions of either exons 45-47 (Δ45–47) or exons 45-48 (Δ45-48) result in BMD in 97% (36/37) of subjects. Unexpectedly, deletion of exons 45-46 (Δ45-46) is associated with the more severe DMD phenotype in 4/4 subjects despite an in-frame transcript. Notably, no patients with a deletion of exons 44-45 (Δ44-45) were found within the UDP database, and this mutation has only been reported twice before, which suggests an ascertainment bias attributable to a very mild phenotype. Interpretation The observation that Δ45-46 patients have typical DMD suggests that the conformation of the resultant protein may result in protein instability or altered binding of critical partners. We conclude that in DMD patients with Δ45, skipping of either exon 44 or multi-exon skipping of exons 46 and 47 (or exons 46-48) are better potential therapies than skipping of exon 46 alone. PMID:25612243

  6. On the origin of deletions and point mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: most deletions arise in oogenesis and most point mutations result from events in spermatogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, T; Meng, G; Liechti-Gallati, S; Bettecken, T; Müller, C R; Müller, B

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the rate and origin of mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Depending on the type of mutation (deletion/duplication or point mutation) present in the patient, there are widely varying ratios of male to female mutation rates. In deletions, the male mutation rate is only 30% of the female one. In non-deletional/non-duplicational mutations (presumably containing a high proportion of point mutations) the male mutation rate is at least 2.2 as high as the female one and probably much higher. Allowing for the presence of autosomal recessive phenocopies we find that k in non-deletional/non-duplicational mutations is 40.3. These findings mean that the vast majority of deletions arise in oogenesis, while most point mutations stem from spermatogenesis. Previous investigations have shown that in other diseases and genes, most notably haemophilia B and A, but also the ZFY and ZFX genes, the male mutation rate for point mutations tends to be higher than the female one. Our results can be seen as a confirmation of this for the special case of DMD. The influence on risk figures is considerable. As an example, the risk of the mother of an isolated case of DMD without an apparent structural anomaly of the gene of being a carrier increases from 67% to at least 76%. Given the estimate of 40.3 for k, allowing for the presence of autosomal recessive phenocopies mentioned above, it increases even further to 98%. However, as confidence intervals are still large, more data are needed to improve the estimates. Germinal mosaicism in this context is discussed. PMID:8014964

  7. PAX3 gene deletion detected by microarray analysis in a girl with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Drozniewska, Malgorzata; Haus, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Deletions of the PAX3 gene have been rarely reported in the literature. Mutations of this gene are a common cause of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and 3. We report a 16 year old female presenting hearing loss and normal intellectual development, without major features of Waardenburg syndrome type 1, and without family history of the syndrome. Her phenotype, however, overlaps with features of craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome. Microarray analysis showed ~862 kb de novo deletion at 2q36.1 including PAX3. The above findings suggest that the rearrangement found in our patient appeared de novo and with high probability is a cause of her phenotype. PMID:24839464

  8. Barosensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is Closely Associated with a Deletion of the COX1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazuki; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru

    2015-05-01

    High hydrostatic pressure causes physical stress to microorganisms; therefore, this technology may be applied to food pasteurization without introducing the unfavorable effects of thermal denaturation. However, its application is limited to high-value foods because the treatment requires a robust steel vessel and expensive pressurization equipment. To reduce these costs, we studied the pasteurization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using relatively moderate high-pressure levels. A mutant strain isolated by ultraviolet mutagenesis showed significant loss of viability under high-pressure conditions. Gene expression analysis of the mutant strain revealed that it incurred a deletion of the COX1 gene. Our results suggest that the pressure-sensitivity can readily be introduced into industrial/food microorganisms by complementing a COX1 deleted mitochondria. PMID:25881710

  9. Han Chinese patients with dopa-responsive dystonia exhibit a low frequency of exonic deletion in the GCH1 gene.

    PubMed

    Shi, W T; Cai, C Y; Li, M S; Ling, C; Li, W D

    2015-01-01

    We identified three novel mutations of the GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) gene in patients with familial dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD), but were unable to identify meaningful sporadic mutations in patients with no obvious family DRD background. To investigate whether GCH1 regional deletions account for the etiology of DRD, we screened for heterozygous exonic deletions in DRD families and in patients with sporadic DRD. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed in all members of our DRD cohort and in controls to detect exonic deletions in GCH1, tyrosine hydroxylase, and the epsilon-sarcoglycan-encoding (SGCE) genes. Using these techniques, we detected a GCH1 exon 1 heterozygous deletion in 1 of 10 patients with sporadic DRD. Therefore, we concluded that exonic deletion in the GCH1 gene only accounted for the etiology in a small percentage of patients with sporadic DRD in our Han Chinese cohort. PMID:26400349

  10. Deletion of the meq gene significantly decreases immunosuppression in chickens caused by pathogenic marek's disease virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Marek's disease virus (MDV) causes an acute lymphoproliferative disease in chickens, resulting in immunosuppression, which is considered to be an integral aspect of the pathogenesis of Marek's disease (MD). A recent study showed that deletion of the Meq gene resulted in loss of transformation of T-cells in chickens and a Meq-null virus, rMd5ΔMeq, could provide protection superior to CVI988/Rispens. Results In the present study, to investigate whether the Meq-null virus could be a safe vaccine candidate, we constructed a Meq deletion strain, GX0101ΔMeq, by deleting both copies of the Meq gene from a pathogenic MDV, GX0101 strain, which was isolated in China. Pathogenesis experiments showed that the GX0101ΔMeq virus was fully attenuated in specific pathogen-free chickens because none of the infected chickens developed Marek's disease-associated lymphomas. The study also evaluated the effects of GX0101ΔMeq on the immune system in chickens after infection with GX0101ΔMeq virus. Immune system variables, including relative lymphoid organ weight, blood lymphocytes and antibody production following vaccination against AIV and NDV were used to assess the immune status of chickens. Experimental infection with GX0101ΔMeq showed that deletion of the Meq gene significantly decreased immunosuppression in chickens caused by pathogenic MDV. Conclusion These findings suggested that the Meq gene played an important role not only in tumor formation but also in inducing immunosuppressive effects in MDV-infected chickens. PMID:21205328

  11. Mullerian Duct Cyst Causing Bladder Outlet Obstruction in a Patient with HNF-1β Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Honore, Matthew; Fowler, Ross; Kiosoglous, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male was referred to a tertiary hospital for a possible prostatic abscess. The patient went into acute urinary retention. Transurethral drainage was performed. MRI pelvis three days post-operatively identified the prostatic cystic structure as a müllerian duct cyst. Several other phenotypical features were noted on examination as well as findings on investigations. From these diagnosis of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF-1β) gene deletion was made. PMID:27390584

  12. Gene deletion strategy to examine the involvement of the two chondroitin lyases in Flavobacterium columnare virulence.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Qin, Ting; Zhang, Xiao Lin; Huang, Bei; Liu, Zhi Xin; Xie, Hai Xia; Zhang, Jin; McBride, Mark J; Nie, Pin

    2015-11-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is an important bacterial pathogen of freshwater fish that causes high mortality of infected fish and heavy economic losses in aquaculture. The pathogenesis of this bacterium is poorly understood, in part due to the lack of efficient methods for genetic manipulation. In this study, a gene deletion strategy was developed and used to determine the relationship between the production of chondroitin lyases and virulence. The F. johnsoniae ompA promoter (PompA) was fused to sacB to construct a counterselectable marker for F. columnare. F. columnare carrying PompA-sacB failed to grow on media containing 10% sucrose. A suicide vector carrying PompA-sacB was constructed, and a gene deletion strategy was developed. Using this approach, the chondroitin lyase-encoding genes, cslA and cslB, were deleted. The ΔcslA and ΔcslB mutants were both partially deficient in digestion of chondroitin sulfate A, whereas a double mutant (ΔcslA ΔcslB) was completely deficient in chondroitin lyase activity. Cells of F. columnare wild-type strain G4 and of the chondroitin lyase-deficient ΔcslA ΔcslB mutant exhibited similar levels of virulence toward grass carp in single-strain infections. Coinfections, however, revealed a competitive advantage for the wild type over the chondroitin lyase mutant. The results indicate that chondroitin lyases are not essential virulence factors of F. columnare but may contribute to the ability of the pathogen to compete and cause disease in natural infections. The gene deletion method developed in this study may be employed to investigate the virulence factors of this bacterium and may have wide application in many other members of the phylum Bacteroidetes. PMID:26253667

  13. DELETION MUTATIONS IN THE HPRT GENE OF T-LYMPHOCYTES AS A BIOMARKER FOR GENOMIC REARRANGEMENTS IMPORTANT IN HUMAN CANCERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA sequence of 11 in vivo-arising intragenic deletion breaksite junctions occurring in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene of human T-lymphocytes was determined and deletions ranged in size from 16 bp to 4057 bp. o extensive homology was found at the dele...

  14. Correlations between long inverted repeat (LIR) features, deletion size and distance from breakpoint in human gross gene deletions

    PubMed Central

    Aygun, Nevim

    2015-01-01

    Long inverted repeats (LIRs) have been shown to induce genomic deletions in yeast. In this study, LIRs were investigated within ±10 kb spanning each breakpoint from 109 human gross deletions, using Inverted Repeat Finder (IRF) software. LIR number was significantly higher at the breakpoint regions, than in control segments (P < 0.001). In addition, it was found that strong correlation between 5′ and 3′ LIR numbers, suggesting contribution to DNA sequence evolution (r = 0.85, P < 0.001). 138 LIR features at ±3 kb breakpoints in 89 (81%) of 109 gross deletions were evaluated. Significant correlations were found between distance from breakpoint and loop length (r = −0.18, P < 0.05) and stem length (r = −0.18, P < 0.05), suggesting DNA strands are potentially broken in locations closer to bigger LIRs. In addition, bigger loops cause larger deletions (r = 0.19, P < 0.05). Moreover, loop length (r = 0.29, P < 0.02) and identity between stem copies (r = 0.30, P < 0.05) of 3′ LIRs were more important in larger deletions. Consequently, DNA breaks may form via LIR-induced cruciform structure during replication. DNA ends may be later repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), with following deletion. PMID:25657065

  15. First Report of a Deletion Encompassing an Entire Exon in the Homogentisate 1,2-Dioxygenase Gene Causing Alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Habbal, Mohammad Zouheir; Bou-Assi, Tarek; Zhu, Jun; Owen, Renius; Chehab, Farid F.

    2014-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is often diagnosed clinically with episodes of dark urine, biochemically by the accumulation of peripheral homogentisic acid and molecularly by the presence of mutations in the homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase gene (HGD). Alkaptonuria is invariably associated with HGD mutations, which consist of single nucleotide variants and small insertions/deletions. Surprisingly, the presence of deletions beyond a few nucleotides among over 150 reported deleterious mutations has not been described, raising the suspicion that this gene might be protected against the detrimental mechanisms of gene rearrangements. The quest for an HGD mutation in a proband with AKU revealed with a SNP array five large regions of homozygosity (5–16 Mb), one of which includes the HGD gene. A homozygous deletion of 649 bp deletion that encompasses the 72 nucleotides of exon 2 and surrounding DNA sequences in flanking introns of the HGD gene was unveiled in a proband with AKU. The nature of this deletion suggests that this in-frame deletion could generate a protein without exon 2. Thus, we modeled the tertiary structure of the mutant protein structure to determine the effect of exon 2 deletion. While the two β-pleated sheets encoded by exon 2 were missing in the mutant structure, other β-pleated sheets are largely unaffected by the deletion. However, nine novel α-helical coils substituted the eight coils present in the native HGD crystal structure. Thus, this deletion results in a deleterious enzyme, which is consistent with the proband’s phenotype. Screening for mutations in the HGD gene, particularly in the Middle East, ought to include this exon 2 deletion in order to determine its frequency and uncover its origin. PMID:25233259

  16. Deletion of Indian hedgehog gene causes dominant semi-lethal Creeper trait in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sihua; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Yanyun; Yi, Guoqiang; Li, Junying; Lian, Ling; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Hou, Zhuocheng; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Creeper trait, a classical monogenic phenotype of chicken, is controlled by a dominant semi-lethal gene. This trait has been widely cited in the genetics and molecular biology textbooks for illustrating autosomal dominant semi-lethal inheritance over decades. However, the genetic basis of the Creeper trait remains unknown. Here we have utilized ultra-deep sequencing and extensive analysis for targeting causative mutation controlling the Creeper trait. Our results indicated that the deletion of Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene was only found in the whole-genome sequencing data of lethal embryos and Creeper chickens. Large scale segregation analysis demonstrated that the deletion of IHH was fully linked with early embryonic death and the Creeper trait. Expression analysis showed a much lower expression of IHH in Creeper than wild-type chickens. We therefore suggest the deletion of IHH to be the causative mutation for the Creeper trait in chicken. Our findings unravel the genetic basis of the longstanding Creeper phenotype mystery in chicken as the same gene also underlies bone dysplasia in human and mouse, and thus highlight the significance of IHH in animal development and human haploinsufficiency disorders. PMID:27439785

  17. Deletion of Indian hedgehog gene causes dominant semi-lethal Creeper trait in chicken.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sihua; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Yanyun; Yi, Guoqiang; Li, Junying; Lian, Ling; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Hou, Zhuocheng; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Creeper trait, a classical monogenic phenotype of chicken, is controlled by a dominant semi-lethal gene. This trait has been widely cited in the genetics and molecular biology textbooks for illustrating autosomal dominant semi-lethal inheritance over decades. However, the genetic basis of the Creeper trait remains unknown. Here we have utilized ultra-deep sequencing and extensive analysis for targeting causative mutation controlling the Creeper trait. Our results indicated that the deletion of Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene was only found in the whole-genome sequencing data of lethal embryos and Creeper chickens. Large scale segregation analysis demonstrated that the deletion of IHH was fully linked with early embryonic death and the Creeper trait. Expression analysis showed a much lower expression of IHH in Creeper than wild-type chickens. We therefore suggest the deletion of IHH to be the causative mutation for the Creeper trait in chicken. Our findings unravel the genetic basis of the longstanding Creeper phenotype mystery in chicken as the same gene also underlies bone dysplasia in human and mouse, and thus highlight the significance of IHH in animal development and human haploinsufficiency disorders. PMID:27439785

  18. Germline deletions in the tumour suppressor gene FOCAD are associated with polyposis and colorectal cancer development.

    PubMed

    Weren, Robbert D A; Venkatachalam, Ramprasath; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Farin, Henner F; Kets, C Marleen; de Voer, Richarda M; Vreede, Lilian; Verwiel, Eugène T P; van Asseldonk, Monique; Kamping, Eveline J; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Neveling, Kornelia; Aben, Katja K H; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Schackert, Hans K; Clevers, Hans; van de Wetering, Marc; Tomlinson, Ian P; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Geurts van Kessel, Ad; Kuiper, Roland P

    2015-06-01

    Heritable genetic variants can significantly affect the lifetime risk of developing cancer, including polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC). Variants in genes currently known to be associated with a high risk for polyposis or CRC, however, explain only a limited number of hereditary cases. The identification of additional genetic causes is, therefore, crucial to improve CRC prevention, detection and treatment. We have performed genome-wide and targeted DNA copy number profiling and resequencing in early-onset and familial polyposis/CRC patients, and show that deletions affecting the open reading frame of the tumour suppressor gene FOCAD are recurrent and significantly enriched in CRC patients compared with unaffected controls. All patients carrying FOCAD deletions exhibited a personal or family history of polyposis. RNA in situ hybridization revealed FOCAD expression in epithelial cells in the colonic crypt, the site of tumour initiation, as well as in colonic tumours and organoids. Our data suggest that monoallelic germline deletions in the tumour suppressor gene FOCAD underlie moderate genetic predisposition to the development of polyposis and CRC. PMID:25712196

  19. Exon skipping and translation in patients with frameshift deletions in the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sherratt, T.G.; Dubowitz, V.; Sewry, C.A.; Strong, P.N. ); Vulliamy, T. )

    1993-11-01

    Although many Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have a deletion in the dystrophin gene which disrupts the translational reading frame, they express dystrophin in a small proportion of skeletal muscle fibers ([open quotes]revertant fibers[close quotes]). Antibody studies have shown, indirectly, that dystrophin synthesis in revertant fibers is facilitated by a frame-restoring mechanism; in the present study, the feasibility of mRNA splicing was investigated. Dystrophin transcripts were analyzed in skeletal muscle from individuals possessing revertant fibers and a frameshift deletion in the dystrophin gene. In each case a minor in-frame transcript was detected, in which exons adjacent to those deleted from the genome had been skipped. There appeared to be some correlation between the levels of in-frame transcripts and the predicted translation products. Low levels of alternatively spliced transcripts were also present in normal muscle. The results provide further evidence of exon skipping in the dystrophin gene and indicate that this may be involved in the synthesis of dystrophin by revertant fibers. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, myopathy, and glycerol kinase deficiency: Molecular genetic evidence for deletions

    PubMed Central

    Francke, Uta; Harper, John F.; Darras, Basil T.; Cowan, Janet M.; McCabe, Edward R. B.; Kohlschütter, Alfried; Seltzer, William K.; Saito, Fumiko; Goto, Jun; Harpey, Jean-Paul; Wise, Joyce E.

    1987-01-01

    Glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) is an X-linked recessive trait that occurs in association with congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AH) and developmental delay with or without congenital dystrophic myopathy. Several such patients have recently been reported to have cytological deletions of chromosome region Xp21 and/or of DNA markers that map near the locus for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in band Xp21. We have examined the initial family reported in the literature and, using prometaphase chromosome studies and Southern blot analysis with 13 different DNA probes derived from band Xp21, have found no deletions within this region of the X chromosome. When DNA samples from six other unrelated affected males were analyzed, four of them were found to have different-size deletions within Xp21. Thus, the form of GKD associated with AH and dystrophic myopathy exhibits significant genetic heterogeneity at the DNA level. No deletions were detected in two patients with isolated GK deficiency. Comparison of our molecular studies of unrelated patients with deletions of DNA segments allows us to define the region of Xp21 (between probes J-Bir and L1.4) that most likely contains the genes for GKD and AH. This location is distal to the DMD locus. The patients with progressive muscular dystrophy tended to have larger deletions that include markers known to derive from the DMD locus, while GKD/AH/dystrophic-myopathy patients without current evidence of deletion seemed to have a milder, nonprogressive form of congenital myopathy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:2883886

  1. Possible deletion of a developmentally regulated heavy-chain variable region gene in autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Olee, Tsaiwei; Kozin, F.; Carson, D.A.; Chen, P.P. ); Olsen, N.J. ); Siminovitch, K.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Several autoantibody-associated variable region (V) genes are preferentially expressed during early ontogenic development, suggesting strongly that they are of developmental and physiological importance. As such, it is possible that polymorphisms in one or more of these genes may alter susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The authors have searched extensively for a probe related to a developmentally regulated V gene that has the power to differentiate among highly homologous V genes in human populations. Using such a probe (i.e., Humhv3005/P1) related to both anti-DNA and anti-IgG autoantibodies, they studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus and found an apparent heavy-chain V (V{sub H}) gene deletion that was nearly restricted to the autoimmune patients. These data suggest that deletions of physiologically important V{sub H} genes may increase the risk of autoimmunity through indirect effects on the development and homeostasis of the B-cell repertoire.

  2. A method for gene amplification and simultaneous deletion in Corynebacterium glutamicum genome without any genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianzhong; Xia, Xiuhua; Zhang, Junlan; Guo, Yanfeng; Qian, He; Zhang, Weiguo

    2014-03-01

    A method for the simultaneous replacement of a given gene by a target gene, leaving no genetic markers, has been developed. The method is based on insertional inactivation and double-crossover homologous recombination. With this method, the lysC(T311I), fbp and ddh genes were inserted into Corynebacterium glutamicum genome, and the pck, alaT and avtA genes were deleted. Mobilizable plasmids with lysC(T311I), fbp and ddh cassettes and two homologous arms on the ends of pck, alaT and avtA were constructed, and then transformed into C. glutamicum. The target-expression cassettes were inserted in the genome via the first homologous recombination, and the genetic markers were removed via the second recombination. The target-transformants were sequentially screened from kanamycin-resistance and sucrose-resistance plates. The enzyme activities of transformants were stably maintained for 30 generations under non-selective culture conditions, suggesting that the integrated cassettes in host were successfully expressed and maintained as stable chromosomal insertions in C. glutamicum. The target-transformants were used to optimize the l-lysine production, showing that the productions were strongly increased because the selected genes were closely linked to l-lysine production. In short, this method can be used to construct amino acid high-producing strains with unmarked gene amplification and simultaneous deletion in genome. PMID:24613758

  3. Molecular Engineering of the Autographa californica Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus Genome: Deletion Mutations Within the Polyhedrin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gale E.; Fraser, M. J.; Summers, Max D.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a method to introduce site-specific mutations into the genome of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Specifically, the A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus gene for polyhedrin, the major protein that forms viral occlusions in infected cells, was mutagenized by introducing deletions into the cloned DNA fragment containing the gene. The mutagenized polyhedrin gene was transferred to the intact viral DNA by mixing fragment and viral DNAs, cotransfecting Spodoptera frugiperda cells, and screening for viral recombinants that had undergone allelic exchange. Recombinant viruses with mutant polyhedrin genes were obtained by selecting the progeny virus that did not produce viral occlusions in infected cells (occlusion-negative mutants). Analyses of occlusion-negative mutants demonstrated that the polyhedrin gene was not essential for the production of infectious virus and that deletion of certain sequences within the gene did not alter the control, or decrease the level of expression, of polyhedrin. An early viral protein of 25,000 molecular weight was apparently not essential for virus replication in vitro, as the synthesis of this protein was not detected in cells infected with a mutant virus. Images PMID:16789242

  4. Conserved regions of the DMD 3’ UTR regulate translation and mRNA abundance in cultured myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, C. Aaron; Howard, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle-wasting disease, is caused by mutations in the DMD gene, which encodes for the protein dystrophin. Its regulation is of therapeutic interest as even small changes in expression of functional dystrophin can significantly impact the severity of DMD. While tissue-specific distribution and transcriptional regulation of several DMD mRNA isoforms has been well characterized, the post-transcriptional regulation of dystrophin synthesis is not well understood. Here, we utilize qRTPCR and a quantitative dual-luciferase reporter assay to examine the effects of isoform specific DMD 5’ UTRs and the highly conserved DMD 3’ UTR on mRNA abundance and translational control of gene expression in C2C12 cells. The 5’ UTRs were shown to initiate translation with low efficiency in both myoblasts and myotubes. Whereas, two large highly conserved elements in the 3’ UTR, which overlap the previously described Lemaire A and D regions, increase mRNA levels and enhance translation upon differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. The results presented here implicate an important role for DMD UTRs in dystrophin expression and delineate the cis-acting elements required for the myotube-specific regulation of steady-state mRNA levels and translational enhancer activity found in the DMD 3’ UTR. PMID:24928536

  5. Spontaneous deletion in the FMR-1 gene in a patient with fragile X syndrome and cherubism

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, B.W.; Anoe, K.S.; Johnson, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X mental retardation results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR-1 gene and is commonly caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG trinucleotide repeat located in the first exon of the FMR-1 gene. We describe here a two generation fragile X family in which expansion of the CGG repeat may have resulted in a deletion of a least portion of the FMR-1 gene. One member of this family, AB, carries an apparent deletion of the FMR-1 gene and presents with mental retardation and also cherubism, a feature not usually associated with fragile X syndrome. Cherubism is a condition characterized by a swelling of the lower face and is caused by giant cell lesions of the mandible and maxilla, and often the anterior ends of the ribs. The size of the CGG repeat region in this family was determined by Southern analysis of BglII, EcoRI, and PstI digested genomic DNA, isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes, using a 558 bp PstI-Xhol fragment specific for the 5{prime}-end of the FMR-1 gene. SB and TB, the mother and maternal half-brother of AB, respectively, were both found to carry an expanded FMR-1 allele with greater than 200 CGG repeats. Negligible hybridization was observed in the DNA of AB. In addition, no amplification was observed when the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed using primers flanking the CGG repeat region. These results are consistent with a deletion of at least the 5{prime} portion of the FMR-1 gene in the majority of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Further work is underway using FMR-1 cDNA probes and additional PCR primers to determine the nature of the molecular lesion in AB`s DNA and determine the relationship of this lesion to his cherubism.

  6. Candida albicans Gene Deletion with a Transient CRISPR-Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyunghun; Ichikawa, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated gene 9 (CRISPR-Cas9) systems are used for a wide array of genome-editing applications in organisms ranging from fungi to plants and animals. Recently, a CRISPR-Cas9 system has been developed for the diploid fungal pathogen Candida albicans; the system accelerates genetic manipulation dramatically [V. K. Vyas, M. I. Barrasa, and G. R. Fink, Sci Adv 1(3):e1500248, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1500248]. We show here that the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic elements can function transiently, without stable integration into the genome, to enable the introduction of a gene deletion construct. We describe a transient CRISPR-Cas9 system for efficient gene deletion in C. albicans. Our observations suggest that there are two mechanisms that lead to homozygous deletions: (i) independent recombination of transforming DNA into each allele and (ii) recombination of transforming DNA into one allele, followed by gene conversion of the second allele. Our approach will streamline gene function analysis in C. albicans, and our results indicate that DNA can function transiently after transformation of this organism. IMPORTANCE The fungus Candida albicans is a major pathogen. Genetic analysis of this organism has revealed determinants of pathogenicity, drug resistance, and other unique biological features, as well as the identities of prospective drug targets. The creation of targeted mutations has been greatly accelerated recently through the implementation of CRISPR genome-editing technology by Vyas et al. [Sci Adv 1(3):e1500248, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1500248]. In this study, we find that CRISPR elements can be expressed from genes that are present only transiently, and we develop a transient CRISPR system that further accelerates C. albicans genetic manipulation. PMID:27340698

  7. A single gene deletion on 4q28.3: PCDH18--a new candidate gene for intellectual disability?

    PubMed

    Kasnauskiene, Jurate; Ciuladaite, Zivile; Preiksaitiene, Egle; Matulevičienė, Aušra; Alexandrou, Angelos; Koumbaris, George; Sismani, Carolina; Pepalytė, Ingrida; Patsalis, Philippos C; Kučinskas, Vaidutis

    2012-04-01

    We report a boy with severe developmental delay, seizures, microcephaly, hypoplastic corpus callosum, internal hydrocephalus and dysmorphic features (narrow forehead, round face, deep-set eyes, blue sclerae, large and prominent ears, nose with anteverted nares, thin upper lip, small and wide-spaced teeth, hyperextensibility of the elbows, wrists, and fingers, fingertip pads, broad hallux, sacral dimple), carrying a 1.53 Mb interstitial deletion at 4q28.3. The deletion was detected by Agilent 105K oligo-array genome hybridization and involves the genomic region between 137,417,338 and 138,947,282 base pairs on chromosome 4 (NCBI build 36). The alteration was inherited from a healthy mother and contains a single gene, PCDH18 which encodes a cadherin-related neuronal receptor thought to play a role in the establishment and function of cell-cell connections in the brain. Thus, haploinsufficiency of this gene may contribute to altered brain development and associated malformations. We found that this deletion is a private inherited copy number variation that is associated with specific clinical findings in our patient and propose the PCDH18 gene as a possible candidate gene for intellectual disability. PMID:22450339

  8. Copy number variations in the NF1 gene region are infrequent and do not predispose to recurrent type-1 deletions.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Katharina; Kluwe, Lan; Cooper, David N; Brems, Hilde; De Raedt, Thomas; Legius, Eric; Mautner, Viktor-Felix; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2008-05-01

    Gross deletions of the NF1 gene at 17q11.2 belong to the group of 'genomic disorders' characterized by local sequence architecture that predisposes to genomic rearrangements. Segmental duplications within regions associated with genomic disorders are prone to non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR), which mediates gross rearrangements. Copy number variants (CNVs) without obvious phenotypic consequences also occur frequently in regions of genomic disorders. In the NF1 gene region, putative CNVs have been reportedly detected by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). These variants include duplications and deletions within the NF1 gene itself (CNV1) and a duplication that encompasses the SUZ12 gene, the distal NF1-REPc repeat and the RHOT1 gene (CNV2). To explore the possibility that these CNVs could have played a role in promoting deletion mutagenesis in type-1 deletions (the most common type of gross NF1 deletion), non-affected transmitting parents of patients with type-1 NF1 deletions were investigated by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). However, neither CNV1 nor CNV2 were detected. This would appear to exclude these variants as frequent mediators of NAHR giving rise to type-1 deletions. Using MLPA, we were also unable to confirm CNV1 in healthy controls as previously reported. We conclude that locus-specific techniques should be used to independently confirm putative CNVs, originally detected by array CGH, to avoid false-positive results. In one patient with an atypical deletion, a duplication in the region of CNV2 was noted. This duplication could have occurred concomitantly with the deletion as part of a complex rearrangement or may alternatively have preceded the deletion. PMID:18212816

  9. Partial gene deletion in LEC rat: An animal model for Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Forbes, J.R.; Cox, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease is an inherited disorder of copper transport in which incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin and excretion of copper into bile are greatly reduced. Copper accumulates to a toxic level in the liver and also in the brain and kidney, causing a spectrum of hepatic and neurological abnormalities. We have recently cloned the gene for Wilson disease (designated ATP7B), which encodes a putative copper-transporting P-type ATPase. The inbred mutant Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat strain shows similarity to Wilson disease in many clinical and biochemical features. We have cloned cDNAs for the rat homologue (Atp7b) of the human Wilson disease gene (ATP7B) and have shown that the two genes have {approximately}82% identity at the amino acid sequence level. Rat cDNA sequences were used to identify a partial deletion in the Atp7b gene in the LEC rat. The deletion removes at least 750 bp of the coding region at the 3{prime} end, which includes the crucial ATP binding domain and extends downstream of the gene. The proximal breakpoint has been precisely localized at the cDNA level. Our results provide convincing evidence that the LEC rat is an animal model for Wilson disease. This model will be important for studying liver pathophysiology, for developing therapy for Wilson disease, and for studying the pathway of copper transport and its possible interaction with other heavy metals.

  10. Cardiomyocyte-Specific Deletion of the Vitamin D Receptor Gene Results in Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcang; Law, Christopher S.; Grigsby, Christopher L.; Olsen, Keith; Hong, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Yan; Yeghiazarians, Yerem; Gardner, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Background A variety of studies carried out using either human subjects or laboratory animals suggest that vitamin D and its analogues possess important beneficial activity in the cardiovascular system. Using Cre-Lox technology we have selectively deleted the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene in the cardiac myocyte in an effort to better understand the role of vitamin D in regulating myocyte structure and function. Methods and Results Targeted deletion of exon 4 coding sequence in the VDR gene resulted in an increase in myocyte size and left ventricular weight/body weight versus controls both at baseline and following a 7-day infusion of isoproterenol. There was no increase in interstitial fibrosis. These knockout mice demonstrated a reduction in end diastolic and end systolic volume by echocardiography, activation of the fetal gene program (i.e. increased atrial natriuretic peptide and alpha skeletal actin gene expression) and increased expression of MCIP 1, a direct downstream target of calcineurin/NFAT signaling. Treatment of neonatal cardiomyocytes with 1,25- dihydroxyvitamin D partially reduced isoproterenol-induced MCIP 1 mRNA and protein levels and MCIP 1 gene promoter activity. Conclusions Collectively, these studies demonstrate that the vitamin D-VDR signaling system possesses direct, anti-hypertrophic activity in the heart. This appears to involve, at least in part, suppression of the pro-hypertrophic calcineurin/NFAT/MCIP 1 pathway. These studies identify a potential mechanism to account for the reported beneficial effects of vitamin D in the cardiovascular system. PMID:21947295

  11. A complete collection of single-gene deletion mutants of Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1

    PubMed Central

    de Berardinis, Véronique; Vallenet, David; Castelli, Vanina; Besnard, Marielle; Pinet, Agnès; Cruaud, Corinne; Samair, Sumitta; Lechaplais, Christophe; Gyapay, Gabor; Richez, Céline; Durot, Maxime; Kreimeyer, Annett; Le Fèvre, François; Schächter, Vincent; Pezo, Valérie; Döring, Volker; Scarpelli, Claude; Médigue, Claudine; Cohen, Georges N; Marlière, Philippe; Salanoubat, Marcel; Weissenbach, Jean

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed a collection of single-gene deletion mutants for all dispensable genes of the soil bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. A total of 2594 deletion mutants were obtained, whereas 499 (16%) were not, and are therefore candidate essential genes for life on minimal medium. This essentiality data set is 88% consistent with the Escherichia coli data set inferred from the Keio mutant collection profiled for growth on minimal medium, while 80% of the orthologous genes described as essential in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are also essential in ADP1. Several strategies were undertaken to investigate ADP1 metabolism by (1) searching for discrepancies between our essentiality data and current metabolic knowledge, (2) comparing this essentiality data set to those from other organisms, (3) systematic phenotyping of the mutant collection on a variety of carbon sources (quinate, 2-3 butanediol, glucose, etc.). This collection provides a new resource for the study of gene function by forward and reverse genetic approaches and constitutes a robust experimental data source for systems biology approaches. PMID:18319726

  12. Histone Modifier Genes Alter Conotruncal Heart Phenotypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingwei; Chung, Jonathan H.; Wang, Tao; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Kates, Wendy R.; Hawuła, Wanda; Coleman, Karlene; Zackai, Elaine; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2015-01-01

    We performed whole exome sequence (WES) to identify genetic modifiers on 184 individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), of whom 89 case subjects had severe congenital heart disease (CHD) and 95 control subjects had normal hearts. Three genes including JMJD1C (jumonji domain containing 1C), RREB1 (Ras responsive element binding protein 1), and SEC24C (SEC24 family member C) had rare (MAF < 0.001) predicted deleterious single-nucleotide variations (rdSNVs) in seven case subjects and no control subjects (p = 0.005; Fisher exact and permutation tests). Because JMJD1C and RREB1 are involved in chromatin modification, we investigated other histone modification genes. Eighteen case subjects (20%) had rdSNVs in four genes (JMJD1C, RREB1, MINA, KDM7A) all involved in demethylation of histones (H3K9, H3K27). Overall, rdSNVs were enriched in histone modifier genes that activate transcription (Fisher exact p = 0.0004, permutations, p = 0.0003, OR = 5.16); however, rdSNVs in control subjects were not enriched. This implicates histone modification genes as influencing risk for CHD in presence of the deletion. PMID:26608785

  13. Systematic Phenotyping of a Large-Scale Candida glabrata Deletion Collection Reveals Novel Antifungal Tolerance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Ekkehard; Istel, Fabian; Tscherner, Michael; Brunke, Sascha; Ames, Lauren; Firon, Arnaud; Green, Brian; Cabral, Vitor; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Quintin, Jessica; Seider, Katja; Frohner, Ingrid; Glaser, Walter; Jungwirth, Helmut; Bachellier-Bassi, Sophie; Chauvel, Murielle; Zeidler, Ute; Ferrandon, Dominique; Gabaldón, Toni; Hube, Bernhard; d'Enfert, Christophe; Rupp, Steffen; Cormack, Brendan; Haynes, Ken; Kuchler, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is a frequent cause of candidiasis, causing infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated disease. The inherent tolerance of C. glabrata to azole drugs makes this pathogen a serious clinical threat. To identify novel genes implicated in antifungal drug tolerance, we have constructed a large-scale C. glabrata deletion library consisting of 619 unique, individually bar-coded mutant strains, each lacking one specific gene, all together representing almost 12% of the genome. Functional analysis of this library in a series of phenotypic and fitness assays identified numerous genes required for growth of C. glabrata under normal or specific stress conditions, as well as a number of novel genes involved in tolerance to clinically important antifungal drugs such as azoles and echinocandins. We identified 38 deletion strains displaying strongly increased susceptibility to caspofungin, 28 of which encoding proteins that have not previously been linked to echinocandin tolerance. Our results demonstrate the potential of the C. glabrata mutant collection as a valuable resource in functional genomics studies of this important fungal pathogen of humans, and to facilitate the identification of putative novel antifungal drug target and virulence genes. PMID:24945925

  14. The TREAT-NMD DMD Global Database: Analysis of More than 7,000 Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bladen, Catherine L; Salgado, David; Monges, Soledad; Foncuberta, Maria E; Kekou, Kyriaki; Kosma, Konstantina; Dawkins, Hugh; Lamont, Leanne; Roy, Anna J; Chamova, Teodora; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Chan, Sophelia; Korngut, Lawrence; Campbell, Craig; Dai, Yi; Wang, Jen; Barišić, Nina; Brabec, Petr; Lahdetie, Jaana; Walter, Maggie C; Schreiber-Katz, Olivia; Karcagi, Veronika; Garami, Marta; Viswanathan, Venkatarman; Bayat, Farhad; Buccella, Filippo; Kimura, En; Koeks, Zaïda; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Rodrigues, Miriam; Roxburgh, Richard; Lusakowska, Anna; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Zimowski, Janusz; Santos, Rosário; Neagu, Elena; Artemieva, Svetlana; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Vojinovic, Dina; Posada, Manuel; Bloetzer, Clemens; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves; Joncourt, Franziska; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Gallardo, Eduard; Karaduman, A Ayşe; Topaloğlu, Haluk; El Sherif, Rasha; Stringer, Angela; Shatillo, Andriy V; Martin, Ann S; Peay, Holly L; Bellgard, Matthew I; Kirschner, Jan; Flanigan, Kevin M; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Verschuuren, Jan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Béroud, Christophe; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing the type and frequency of patient-specific mutations that give rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an invaluable tool for diagnostics, basic scientific research, trial planning, and improved clinical care. Locus-specific databases allow for the collection, organization, storage, and analysis of genetic variants of disease. Here, we describe the development and analysis of the TREAT-NMD DMD Global database (http://umd.be/TREAT_DMD/). We analyzed genetic data for 7,149 DMD mutations held within the database. A total of 5,682 large mutations were observed (80% of total mutations), of which 4,894 (86%) were deletions (1 exon or larger) and 784 (14%) were duplications (1 exon or larger). There were 1,445 small mutations (smaller than 1 exon, 20% of all mutations), of which 358 (25%) were small deletions and 132 (9%) small insertions and 199 (14%) affected the splice sites. Point mutations totalled 756 (52% of small mutations) with 726 (50%) nonsense mutations and 30 (2%) missense mutations. Finally, 22 (0.3%) mid-intronic mutations were observed. In addition, mutations were identified within the database that would potentially benefit from novel genetic therapies for DMD including stop codon read-through therapies (10% of total mutations) and exon skipping therapy (80% of deletions and 55% of total mutations). PMID:25604253

  15. The TREAT-NMD DMD Global Database: analysis of more than 7,000 Duchenne muscular dystrophy mutations.

    PubMed

    Bladen, Catherine L; Salgado, David; Monges, Soledad; Foncuberta, Maria E; Kekou, Kyriaki; Kosma, Konstantina; Dawkins, Hugh; Lamont, Leanne; Roy, Anna J; Chamova, Teodora; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Chan, Sophelia; Korngut, Lawrence; Campbell, Craig; Dai, Yi; Wang, Jen; Barišić, Nina; Brabec, Petr; Lahdetie, Jaana; Walter, Maggie C; Schreiber-Katz, Olivia; Karcagi, Veronika; Garami, Marta; Viswanathan, Venkatarman; Bayat, Farhad; Buccella, Filippo; Kimura, En; Koeks, Zaïda; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Rodrigues, Miriam; Roxburgh, Richard; Lusakowska, Anna; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Zimowski, Janusz; Santos, Rosário; Neagu, Elena; Artemieva, Svetlana; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Vojinovic, Dina; Posada, Manuel; Bloetzer, Clemens; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves; Joncourt, Franziska; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Gallardo, Eduard; Karaduman, A Ayşe; Topaloğlu, Haluk; El Sherif, Rasha; Stringer, Angela; Shatillo, Andriy V; Martin, Ann S; Peay, Holly L; Bellgard, Matthew I; Kirschner, Jan; Flanigan, Kevin M; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Verschuuren, Jan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Béroud, Christophe; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2015-04-01

    Analyzing the type and frequency of patient-specific mutations that give rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an invaluable tool for diagnostics, basic scientific research, trial planning, and improved clinical care. Locus-specific databases allow for the collection, organization, storage, and analysis of genetic variants of disease. Here, we describe the development and analysis of the TREAT-NMD DMD Global database (http://umd.be/TREAT_DMD/). We analyzed genetic data for 7,149 DMD mutations held within the database. A total of 5,682 large mutations were observed (80% of total mutations), of which 4,894 (86%) were deletions (1 exon or larger) and 784 (14%) were duplications (1 exon or larger). There were 1,445 small mutations (smaller than 1 exon, 20% of all mutations), of which 358 (25%) were small deletions and 132 (9%) small insertions and 199 (14%) affected the splice sites. Point mutations totalled 756 (52% of small mutations) with 726 (50%) nonsense mutations and 30 (2%) missense mutations. Finally, 22 (0.3%) mid-intronic mutations were observed. In addition, mutations were identified within the database that would potentially benefit from novel genetic therapies for DMD including stop codon read-through therapies (10% of total mutations) and exon skipping therapy (80% of deletions and 55% of total mutations). PMID:25604253

  16. Deletions in the VPS13B (COH1) gene as a cause of Cohen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Balikova, I; Lehesjoki, A-E; de Ravel, T J L; Thienpont, B; Chandler, K E; Clayton-Smith, J; Träskelin, A-L; Fryns, J-P; Vermeesch, J R

    2009-09-01

    Cohen syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by mental retardation, facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, retinal dystrophy, truncal obesity, joint laxity and intermittent neutropenia. Mutations in the VPS13B (COH1) gene underlie Cohen syndrome. In approximately 70% of the patients mutations in the gene are identified on both alleles, while in about 30% only a mutation in a single allele or no mutant allele is detected. The VPS13B locus was recently added to the growing list of benign copy number variants. We hypothesized that patients with unexplained Cohen syndrome would harbour deletions affecting the VPS13B locus. We screened 35 patients from 26 families with targeted array CGH and identified 7 copy number alterations: 2 homozygous and 5 heterozygous deletions. Our results show that deletions are an important cause of Cohen syndrome and screening for copy number alterations of VPS13B should be an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of these patients. These findings have important consequences for the diagnosis of patients with genetic disorders in general since, as we highlight, rare benign copy number variants can underly autosomal recessive disorders and lead to disease in homozygous state or in compound heterozygosity with another mutation. PMID:19533689

  17. Molecular diagnosis of PMP22 gene duplications and deletions: comparison of different methods.

    PubMed

    Stangler Herodez, Spela; Zagradisnik, B; Erjavec Skerget, A; Zagorac, A; Kokalj Vokac, N

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques can be used to diagnose Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) and hereditary neuro pathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), but no technique combines simplicity with high sensitivity. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was applied to develop an efficient and sensitive test for the detection of duplication/deletion of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. The study sample included 70 probands that had each been previously analysed by fluorescence in situ hibridization (FISH) and the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) assay, both of which detect a unique recombination fragment uniquely present in most patients with the duplication. A total of nine duplications and 19 deletions were detected in the 70 probands using MLPA, and there was 100% concordance between MPLA and FISH. A single duplication was missed by the RFLP-PCR assay, which accords with the lower sensitivity of this method. It is concluded that the MLPA allows accurate detection of PMP22 gene duplications/deletions and could be used for the molecular diagnosis of these two neuropathies. PMID:19930872

  18. Novel deletions involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Gema; Jaijo, Teresa; Aparisi, Maria J.; Larrieu, Lise; Faugère, Valérie; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Millán, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present work was to identify and characterize large rearrangements involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. Methods The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique combined with a customized array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was applied to 40 unrelated patients previously screened for point mutations in the USH2A gene in which none or only one pathologic mutation was identified. Results We detected six large deletions involving USH2A in six out of the 40 cases studied. Three of the patients were homozygous for the deletion, and the remaining three were compound heterozygous with a previously identified USH2A point mutation. In five of these cases, the patients displayed Usher type 2, and the remaining case displayed nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. The exact breakpoint junctions of the deletions found in USH2A in four of these cases were characterized. Conclusions Our study highlights the need to develop improved efficient strategies of mutation screening based upon next generation sequencing (NGS) that reduce cost, time, and complexity and allow simultaneous identification of all types of disease-causing mutations in diagnostic procedures. PMID:25352746

  19. Immunogenic response induced by wzm and wzt gene deletion mutants from Brucella abortus S19.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Ran; Yan, Guang-Mou; Zhang, Rui; Lang, Xu-Long; Yang, Yan-Ling; Li, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Si; Qian, Jing; Wang, Xing-Long

    2014-02-01

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease affecting humans and animals worldwide. Effective methods of control include inducing immunity in animals by vaccination and elimination. Brucella abortus S19 is one of the popular vaccines for control of cattle brucellosis, as it has low virulence. In this paper, allelic exchange plasmids of wzm and wzt genes were constructed and partially knocked out to evaluate the effects on the induction of immunity to Brucella abortus S19 mutants. Cytokine secretion in vitro, INF-γ induction in vivo and antibody dynamics were evaluated. These data suggested that the immunity-eliciting ability of the wzm and wzt gene deletion mutants was similar, although reduced compared with the S19 strain. The results demonstrated that the wzt gene may be more important in the regulation of the induction of immunity than the wzm gene. PMID:24247358

  20. Deletion and aberrant CpG island methylation of Caspase 8 gene in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Pilar; Bello, M Josefa; Inda, M Mar; Alonso, M Eva; Arjona, Dolores; Amiñoso, Cinthia; Lopez-Marin, Isabel; de Campos, Jose M; Sarasa, Jose L; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2004-09-01

    Aberrant methylation of promoter CpG islands in human genes is an alternative genetic inactivation mechanism that contributes to the development of human tumors. Nevertheless, few studies have analyzed methylation in medulloblastomas. We determined the frequency of aberrant CpG island methylation for Caspase 8 (CASP8) in a group of 24 medulloblastomas arising in 8 adult and 16 pediatric patients. Complete methylation of CASP8 was found in 15 tumors (62%) and one case displayed hemimethylation. Three samples amplified neither of the two primer sets for methylated or unmethylated alleles, suggesting that genomic deletion occurred in the 5' flanking region of CASP8. Our findings suggest that methylation commonly contributes to CASP8 silencing in medulloblastomas and that homozygous deletion or severe sequence changes involving the promoter region may be another mechanism leading to CASP8 inactivation in this neoplasm. PMID:15289853

  1. BMP antagonists enhance myogenic differentiation and ameliorate the dystrophic phenotype in a DMD mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shi, SongTing; Hoogaars, Willem M H; de Gorter, David J J; van Heiningen, Sandra H; Lin, Herbert Y; Hong, Charles C; Kemaladewi, Dwi U; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; ten Dijke, Peter; 't Hoen, Peter A C

    2011-02-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle wasting disease characterized by muscle fiber degeneration and necrosis. The progressive pathology of DMD can be explained by an insufficient regenerative response resulting in fibrosis and adipose tissue formation. BMPs are known to inhibit myogenic differentiation and in a previous study we found an increased expression of a BMP family member BMP4 in DMD myoblasts. The aim of the current study was therefore to investigate whether inhibition of BMP signaling could be beneficial for myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration processes in a DMD context. All tested BMP inhibitors, Noggin, dorsomorphin and LDN-193189, were able to accelerate and enhance myogenic differentiation. However, dorsomorphin repressed both BMP and TGFβ signaling and was found to be toxic to primary myoblast cell cultures. In contrast, Noggin was found to be a potent and selective BMP inhibitor and was therefore tested in vivo in a DMD mouse model. Local adenoviral-mediated overexpression of Noggin in muscle resulted in an increased expression of the myogenic regulatory genes Myog and Myod1 and improved muscle histology. In conclusion, our results suggest that repression of BMP signaling may constitute an attractive adjunctive therapy for DMD patients. PMID:20940052

  2. Interleukin 3 gene is located on human chromosome 5 and is deleted in myeloid leukemias with a deletion of 5q

    SciTech Connect

    Le Beau, M.M.; Epstein, N.D.; O'Brien, S.J.; Nienhuis, A.W.; Yang, Y.C.; Clark, S.C.; Rowley, J.D.

    1987-08-01

    The gene IL-3 encodes interleukin 3, a hematopoietic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) that is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types. By using somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, the authors localized this gene to human chromosome 5 at bands q23-31, a chromosomal region that is frequently deleted (del(5q)) in patients with myeloid disorders. By in situ hybridization, IL-3 was found to be deleted in the 5q-chromosome of one patient with refractory anemia who had a del(5)(q15q33.3), of three patients with refractory anemia (two patients) or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) de novo who had a similar distal breakpoint (del(5)(q13q33.3)), and of a fifth patient, with therapy-related ANLL, who had a similar distal breakpoint in band q33(del(5)(q14q33.3)). Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the normal or the deleted chromosome 5 from two patients with the refractory anemia 5q- syndrome indicated that IL-3 sequences were absent from the hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 5 but not from hybrids that had a cytologically normal chromosome 5. Thus, a small segment of chromosome 5 contains IL-3, GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS. The findings and earlier results indicating that GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS were deleted in the 5q- chromosome, suggest that loss of IL-3 or of other CSF genes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders associated with a del(5q).

  3. Mapping the chromosome 16 cadherin gene cluster to a minimal deleted region in ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, I J; Aubele, M; Hartmann, E; Braungart, E; Werner, M; Höfler, H; Atkinson, M J

    2001-04-01

    The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules has been implicated in tumor metastasis and progression. Eight family members have been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 16. Using radiation hybrid mapping, we have located six of these genes within a cluster at 16q21-q22.1. In invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast frequent LOH and accompanying mutation affect the CDH1 gene, which is a member of this chromosome 16 gene cluster. CDH1 LOH also occurs in invasive ductal carcinoma, but in the absence of gene mutation. The proximity of other cadherin genes to 16q22.1 suggests that they may be affected by LOH in invasive ductal carcinomas. Using the mapping data, microsatellite markers were selected which span regions of chromosome 16 containing the cadherin genes. In breast cancer tissues, a high rate of allelic loss was found over the gene cluster region, with CDH1 being the most frequently lost marker. In invasive ductal carcinoma a minimal deleted region was identified within part of the chromosome 16 cadherin gene cluster. This provides strong evidence for the existence of a second 16q22 suppressor gene locus within the cadherin cluster. PMID:11343777

  4. Molecular characterization and SNPs analysis of the porcine Deleted in AZoospermia Like (pDAZL) gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y H; Mei, S Q; Peng, X W; Niu, B Y; Ren, Z Q; Zuo, B; Xu, D Q; Lei, M G; Zheng, R; Jiang, S W; Deng, C Y; Xiong, Y Z; Li, F E

    2009-06-01

    The Deleted in AZoospermia Like (DAZL) gene is expressed in prenatal and postnatal germ cells. In this study, we cloned and characterized the porcine Deleted in AZoospermia Like (pDAZL) gene. We found the full-length coding sequence of the pDAZL encoded a protein of 295 amino acids with a RNA recognition motif (amino acids 41-111) and a DAZ repeat (amino acids 167-120). The deduced protein sequence of pDAZL is 92.5% and 91.5% similar to those of human and bovine, respectively. PCR-MspI-RFLP and PCR-TaqI-RFLP were established to detect an A/G mutation in intron 7 and a C/A mutation in intron 9, respectively. Associations of two SNPs with litter size traits were assessed in Large White (n=275) and DIV (n=128) pig populations, and the statistical analysis demonstrated that CC produced 0.716 more (P<0.05) piglets born alive than CD genotypes in Large White pigs at TaqI locus (C/A mutation in intron 9), and the dominance effect was 0.304 pig per litter (P<0.05). This result suggests that the pDAZL gene might be a good candidate gene of litter size trait and provides some marker information for marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:18620821

  5. A mouse model for adult cardiac-specific gene deletion with CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Kelli J; Makarewich, Catherine A; McAnally, John; Anderson, Douglas M; Zentilin, Lorena; Liu, Ning; Giacca, Mauro; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2016-01-12

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas)9 genomic editing has revolutionized the generation of mutant animals by simplifying the creation of null alleles in virtually any organism. However, most current approaches with this method require zygote injection, making it difficult to assess the adult, tissue-specific functions of genes that are widely expressed or which cause embryonic lethality when mutated. Here, we describe the generation of cardiac-specific Cas9 transgenic mice, which express high levels of Cas9 in the heart, but display no overt defects. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used Adeno-Associated Virus 9 (AAV9) to deliver single-guide RNA (sgRNA) that targets the Myh6 locus exclusively in cardiomyocytes. Intraperitoneal injection of postnatal cardiac-Cas9 transgenic mice with AAV9 encoding sgRNA against Myh6 resulted in robust editing of the Myh6 locus. These mice displayed severe cardiomyopathy and loss of cardiac function, with elevation of several markers of heart failure, confirming the effectiveness of this method of adult cardiac gene deletion. Mice with cardiac-specific expression of Cas9 provide a tool that will allow rapid and accurate deletion of genes following a single injection of AAV9-sgRNAs, thereby circumventing embryonic lethality. This method will be useful for disease modeling and provides a means of rapidly editing genes of interest in the heart. PMID:26719419

  6. The RB1 gene is the target of chromosome 13 deletions in malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Chibon, F; Mairal, A; Fréneaux, P; Terrier, P; Coindre, J M; Sastre, X; Aurias, A

    2000-11-15

    Forty-four malignant fibrous histiocytomas (MFHs) were studied by comparative genomic hybridization. Among the observed imbalances, losses of the 13q14-q21 region were observed in almost all tumors (78%), suggesting that a gene localized in this region could act as a tumor suppressor gene and that its inactivation could be relevant for MFH oncogenesis and/or progression. We determined by CA repeat analyses a consensus region of deletion focusing on the RB1 region. The RB1 gene was then analyzed by protein truncation test, direct sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization, Southern blotting, and immunohistochemistry. RB1 mutations and/or homozygous deletions were found in 7 of the 34 tumors analyzed (20%). Among the 35 tumors with comparative genomic hybridization imbalances analyzed by immunohistochemistry, 30 (86%) did not exhibit significant nuclear labeling. The high correlation between chromosome 13 losses and absence of RB1 protein expression and the mutations detected strongly suggest that RB1 gene inactivation is a pivotal event in MFH oncogenesis. Moreover, the observation of a high incidence of MFH in patients previously treated for hereditary retinoblastoma fits well this hypothesis. PMID:11103795

  7. Rare large homozygous CFTR gene deletion in an Iranian patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Shirin; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Zuntini, Roberta; Ferrari, Simona

    2014-08-16

    Cystic fibrosis, a common autosomal recessive genetic disorder among Caucasians, is caused by defects in the transmembrane conductance regulatory (CFTR) gene. The analysis of CFTR gene mutations is useful to better characterize the disease, and for preconceptional screening, prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Here we report the results of a genetic analysis in a 16-year-old boy from southwestern Iran diagnosed as having cystic fibrosis in infancy based on gastrointestinal and pulmonary manifestations, with positive sweat chloride tests. He lacked both normal and mutant forms of the fragment corresponding to the ∆F508 allele in initial genetic studies. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification-based testing revealed a homozygous deletion spanning exons 4 to 10 of the CFTR gene. We predict an in-frame deletion removing 373 amino acids based on our sequencing results. Determining CFTR gene mutations in patients and their family members would be helpful to prevent the occurrence of new cases, especially in populations in which consanguinity is common. PMID:25133155

  8. Chassis organism from Corynebacterium glutamicum--a top-down approach to identify and delete irrelevant gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Unthan, Simon; Baumgart, Meike; Radek, Andreas; Herbst, Marius; Siebert, Daniel; Brühl, Natalie; Bartsch, Anna; Bott, Michael; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Marin, Kay; Hans, Stephan; Krämer, Reinhard; Seibold, Gerd; Frunzke, Julia; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian; Wendisch, Volker F; Noack, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    For synthetic biology applications, a robust structural basis is required, which can be constructed either from scratch or in a top-down approach starting from any existing organism. In this study, we initiated the top-down construction of a chassis organism from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032, aiming for the relevant gene set to maintain its fast growth on defined medium. We evaluated each native gene for its essentiality considering expression levels, phylogenetic conservation, and knockout data. Based on this classification, we determined 41 gene clusters ranging from 3.7 to 49.7 kbp as target sites for deletion. 36 deletions were successful and 10 genome-reduced strains showed impaired growth rates, indicating that genes were hit, which are relevant to maintain biological fitness at wild-type level. In contrast, 26 deleted clusters were found to include exclusively irrelevant genes for growth on defined medium. A combinatory deletion of all irrelevant gene clusters would, in a prophage-free strain, decrease the size of the native genome by about 722 kbp (22%) to 2561 kbp. Finally, five combinatory deletions of irrelevant gene clusters were investigated. The study introduces the novel concept of relevant genes and demonstrates general strategies to construct a chassis suitable for biotechnological application. PMID:25139579

  9. Chassis organism from Corynebacterium glutamicum – a top-down approach to identify and delete irrelevant gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Unthan, Simon; Baumgart, Meike; Radek, Andreas; Herbst, Marius; Siebert, Daniel; Brühl, Natalie; Bartsch, Anna; Bott, Michael; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Marin, Kay; Hans, Stephan; Krämer, Reinhard; Seibold, Gerd; Frunzke, Julia; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian; Wendisch, Volker F; Noack, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    For synthetic biology applications, a robust structural basis is required, which can be constructed either from scratch or in a top-down approach starting from any existing organism. In this study, we initiated the top-down construction of a chassis organism from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032, aiming for the relevant gene set to maintain its fast growth on defined medium. We evaluated each native gene for its essentiality considering expression levels, phylogenetic conservation, and knockout data. Based on this classification, we determined 41 gene clusters ranging from 3.7 to 49.7 kbp as target sites for deletion. 36 deletions were successful and 10 genome-reduced strains showed impaired growth rates, indicating that genes were hit, which are relevant to maintain biological fitness at wild-type level. In contrast, 26 deleted clusters were found to include exclusively irrelevant genes for growth on defined medium. A combinatory deletion of all irrelevant gene clusters would, in a prophage-free strain, decrease the size of the native genome by about 722 kbp (22%) to 2561 kbp. Finally, five combinatory deletions of irrelevant gene clusters were investigated. The study introduces the novel concept of relevant genes and demonstrates general strategies to construct a chassis suitable for biotechnological application. PMID:25139579

  10. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Zhi Yon Charles; Thandar Aung-Htut, May; Pinniger, Gavin; Adams, Abbie M.; Krishnaswarmy, Sudarsan; Wong, Brenda L.; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels) manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes. PMID:26745801

  11. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies.

    PubMed

    Toh, Zhi Yon Charles; Thandar Aung-Htut, May; Pinniger, Gavin; Adams, Abbie M; Krishnaswarmy, Sudarsan; Wong, Brenda L; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels) manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes. PMID:26745801

  12. Assessment of the Toxicity of CuO Nanoparticles by Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutants with Multiple Genes Deleted

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Shaopan; Lu, Qicong; Dai, Heping; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    To develop applicable and susceptible models to evaluate the toxicity of nanoparticles, the antimicrobial effects of CuO nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) on various Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) strains (wild type, single-gene-deleted mutants, and multiple-gene-deleted mutants) were determined and compared. Further experiments were also conducted to analyze the mechanisms associated with toxicity using copper salt, bulk CuO (bCuO), carbon-shelled copper nanoparticles (C/Cu-NPs), and carbon nanoparticles (C-NPs) for comparisons. The results indicated that the growth inhibition rates of CuO-NPs for the wild-type and the single-gene-deleted strains were comparable, while for the multiple-gene deletion mutant, significantly higher toxicity was observed (P < 0.05). When the toxicity of the CuO-NPs to yeast cells was compared with the toxicities of copper salt and bCuO, we concluded that the toxicity of CuO-NPs should be attributed to soluble copper rather than to the nanoparticles. The striking difference in adverse effects of C-NPs and C/Cu-NPs with equivalent surface areas also proved this. A toxicity assay revealed that the multiple-gene-deleted mutant was significantly more sensitive to CuO-NPs than the wild type. Specifically, compared with the wild-type strain, copper was readily taken up by mutant strains when cell permeability genes were knocked out, and the mutants with deletions of genes regulated under oxidative stress (OS) were likely producing more reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hence, as mechanism-based gene inactivation could increase the susceptibility of yeast, the multiple-gene-deleted mutants should be improved model organisms to investigate the toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:26386067

  13. Assessment of the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with multiple genes deleted.

    PubMed

    Bao, Shaopan; Lu, Qicong; Fang, Tao; Dai, Heping; Zhang, Chao

    2015-12-01

    To develop applicable and susceptible models to evaluate the toxicity of nanoparticles, the antimicrobial effects of CuO nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) on various Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) strains (wild type, single-gene-deleted mutants, and multiple-gene-deleted mutants) were determined and compared. Further experiments were also conducted to analyze the mechanisms associated with toxicity using copper salt, bulk CuO (bCuO), carbon-shelled copper nanoparticles (C/Cu-NPs), and carbon nanoparticles (C-NPs) for comparisons. The results indicated that the growth inhibition rates of CuO-NPs for the wild-type and the single-gene-deleted strains were comparable, while for the multiple-gene deletion mutant, significantly higher toxicity was observed (P < 0.05). When the toxicity of the CuO-NPs to yeast cells was compared with the toxicities of copper salt and bCuO, we concluded that the toxicity of CuO-NPs should be attributed to soluble copper rather than to the nanoparticles. The striking difference in adverse effects of C-NPs and C/Cu-NPs with equivalent surface areas also proved this. A toxicity assay revealed that the multiple-gene-deleted mutant was significantly more sensitive to CuO-NPs than the wild type. Specifically, compared with the wild-type strain, copper was readily taken up by mutant strains when cell permeability genes were knocked out, and the mutants with deletions of genes regulated under oxidative stress (OS) were likely producing more reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hence, as mechanism-based gene inactivation could increase the susceptibility of yeast, the multiple-gene-deleted mutants should be improved model organisms to investigate the toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:26386067

  14. Compensatory evolution for a gene deletion is not limited to its immediate functional network

    PubMed Central

    Harcombe, WR; Springman, R; Bull, JJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic disruption of an important phenotype should favor compensatory mutations that restore the phenotype. If the genetic basis of the phenotype is modular, with a network of interacting genes whose functions are specific to that phenotype, compensatory mutations are expected among the genes of the affected network. This perspective was tested in the bacteriophage T3 using a genome deleted of its DNA ligase gene, disrupting DNA metabolism. Results In two replicate, long-term adaptations, phage compensatory evolution accommodated the low ligase level provided by the host without reinventing its own ligase. In both lines, fitness increased substantially but remained well below that of the intact genome. Each line accumulated over a dozen compensating mutations during long-term adaptation, and as expected, many of the compensatory changes were within the DNA metabolism network. However, several compensatory changes were outside the network and defy any role in DNA metabolism or biochemical connection to the disruption. In one line, these extra-network changes were essential to the recovery. The genes experiencing compensatory changes were moderately conserved between T3 and its relative T7 (25% diverged), but the involvement of extra-network changes was greater in T3. Conclusion Compensatory evolution was only partly limited to the known functionally interacting partners of the deleted gene. Thus gene interactions contributing to fitness were more extensive than suggested by the functional properties currently ascribed to the genes. Compensatory evolution offers an easy method of discovering genome interactions among specific elements that does not rest on an a priori knowledge of those elements or their interactions. PMID:19445716

  15. Molecular deletion patterns in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients from KwaZulu Natal.

    PubMed

    Hallwirth Pillay, K D; Bill, P L A; Madurai, S; Mubaiwa, L; Rapiti, P

    2007-01-15

    There exists much phenotypic heterogeneity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its allelic variant, Becker muscular dystrophy. The molecular findings on 53 patients with Duchenne and 15 patients with Becker type muscular dystrophy in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa are reported. Multiplex PCR was performed using primers targeting 18 hot-spot exons throughout the dystrophin gene. Analysis of the multiplex PCR data revealed that 39/68 (57.0%) patients included in the study showed a deletion (33 DMD and 6 BMD patients). Twenty-five patients were Black, 4 were White and 10 were Indian. Using the Chamberlain and Beggs multiplex PCR assays, the region of the genome most frequently affected by a deletion includes exons 47-51. The distal region of the dystrophin gene was most frequently affected by the deletion in both Black and Indian patients. There were too few White patients for conclusions to be drawn concerning the most frequently affected part of the gene. Although the numbers are insufficient to determine whether ethnic differences are present, the Chamberlain and Beggs multiplex PCR assays detect deletions with the same frequency in South African DMD/BMD patients as that reported in the literature. PMID:17141273

  16. Periventricular heterotopia in 6q terminal deletion syndrome: role of the C6orf70 gene.

    PubMed

    Conti, Valerio; Carabalona, Aurelie; Pallesi-Pocachard, Emilie; Parrini, Elena; Leventer, Richard J; Buhler, Emmanuelle; McGillivray, George; Michel, François J; Striano, Pasquale; Mei, Davide; Watrin, Françoise; Lise, Stefano; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Taylor, Jenny C; Kini, Usha; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Novara, Francesca; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Dobyns, William B; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Robertson, Stephen P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Represa, Alfonso; Keays, David A; Cardoso, Carlos; Guerrini, Renzo

    2013-11-01

    Periventricular nodular heterotopia is caused by defective neuronal migration that results in heterotopic neuronal nodules lining the lateral ventricles. Mutations in filamin A (FLNA) or ADP-ribosylation factor guanine nucleotide-exchange factor 2 (ARFGEF2) cause periventricular nodular heterotopia, but most patients with this malformation do not have a known aetiology. Using comparative genomic hybridization, we identified 12 patients with developmental brain abnormalities, variably combining periventricular nodular heterotopia, corpus callosum dysgenesis, colpocephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia and polymicrogyria, harbouring a common 1.2 Mb minimal critical deletion in 6q27. These anatomic features were mainly associated with epilepsy, ataxia and cognitive impairment. Using whole exome sequencing in 14 patients with isolated periventricular nodular heterotopia but no copy number variants, we identified one patient with periventricular nodular heterotopia, developmental delay and epilepsy and a de novo missense mutation in the chromosome 6 open reading frame 70 (C6orf70) gene, mapping in the minimal critical deleted region. Using immunohistochemistry and western blots, we demonstrated that in human cell lines, C6orf70 shows primarily a cytoplasmic vesicular puncta-like distribution and that the mutation affects its stability and subcellular distribution. We also performed in utero silencing of C6orf70 and of Phf10 and Dll1, the two additional genes mapping in the 6q27 minimal critical deleted region that are expressed in human and rodent brain. Silencing of C6orf70 in the developing rat neocortex produced periventricular nodular heterotopia that was rescued by concomitant expression of wild-type human C6orf70 protein. Silencing of the contiguous Phf10 or Dll1 genes only produced slightly delayed migration but not periventricular nodular heterotopia. The complex brain phenotype observed in the 6q terminal deletion syndrome likely results from the combined

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of Syntenic Gene Deletion in the Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Schnable, James C.; Freeling, Michael; Lyons, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The grasses, Poaceae, are one of the largest and most successful angiosperm families. Like many radiations of flowering plants, the divergence of the major grass lineages was preceded by a whole-genome duplication (WGD), although these events are not rare for flowering plants. By combining identification of syntenic gene blocks with measures of gene pair divergence and different frequencies of ancient gene loss, we have separated the two subgenomes present in modern grasses. Reciprocal loss of duplicated genes or genomic regions has been hypothesized to reproductively isolate populations and, thus, speciation. However, in contrast to previous studies in yeast and teleost fishes, we found very little evidence of reciprocal loss of homeologous genes between the grasses, suggesting that post-WGD gene loss may not be the cause of the grass radiation. The sets of homeologous and orthologous genes and predicted locations of deleted genes identified in this study, as well as links to the CoGe comparative genomics web platform for analyzing pan-grass syntenic regions, are provided along with this paper as a resource for the grass genetics community. PMID:22275519

  18. R3-R4 deletion in the PRNP gene is associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)

    SciTech Connect

    Cervenakova, L.; Brown, P.; Nagle, J.

    1994-09-01

    There are conflicting reports on the association of deletions in the PRNP gene on chromosome 20 with CJD, a rapidly progressive fatal spongiform encephalopathy. We accumulated data suggesting that a deletion of R3-R4 type (parts of the third and fourth repeats are deleted from the area of four repeating 24 bp sequences in the 5{prime} region of the gene) is causing CJD. Screening of 129 unaffected control individuals demonstrated presence of a deletion of R2 type in four (1.55% of the studied chromosomes), but none of them had the R3-R4 type. Of 181 screened patients with spongiform encephalopathies, two had a deletion of R3-R4 type with no other mutations in the coding sequence. Both patients had a classical rapidly progressive dementing disease and diffuse spongiform degeneration, and both cases were apparently sporadic. The same R3-R4 type of deletion was detected in three additional neuropathologically confirmed spongiform encephalopathy patients, of which two had other known pathogenic mutations in the PRNP gene: at codon 178 on the methionine allele exhibiting the phenotype of fatal familial insomnia, and codon 200 causing CJD with severe dementia; the third was a patient with iatrogenic CJD who developed the disease after treatment with growth hormone extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. In all cases the deletion coincided with a variant sequence at position 129 coding for methionine.

  19. The Contribution of Whole Gene Deletions and Large Rearrangements to the Mutation Spectrum in Inherited Tumor Predisposing Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Miriam J; Urquhart, Jill E; Harkness, Elaine F; Miles, Emma K; Bowers, Naomi L; Byers, Helen J; Bulman, Michael; Gokhale, Carolyn; Wallace, Andrew J; Newman, William G; Evans, D Gareth

    2016-03-01

    Heterozygous whole gene deletions (WGDs), and intragenic microdeletions, account for a significant proportion of mutations underlying cancer predisposition syndromes. We analyzed the frequency and genotype-phenotype correlations of microdeletions in 12 genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2, NF1, NF2, APC, PTCH1, and VHL) representing seven tumor predisposition syndromes in 5,897 individuals (2,611 families) from our center. Overall, microdeletions accounted for 14% of identified mutations. As expected, smaller deletions or duplications were more common (12%) than WGDs (2.2%). Where a WGD was identified in the germline in NF2, the mechanism of somatic second hit was not deletion, as previously described for NF1. For neurofibromatosis type 1 and 2, we compared the mechanism of germline deletion. Unlike NF1, where three specific deletion sizes account for most germline WGDs, NF2 deletion breakpoints were different across seven samples tested. One of these deletions was 3.93 Mb and conferred a severe phenotype, thus refining the region for a potential NF2 modifier gene to a 2.04-Mb region on chromosome 22. The milder phenotype of NF2 WGDs may be due to the apparent absence of chromosome 22 loss as the second hit. These observations of WGD phenotypes will be helpful for interpreting incidental findings from microarray analysis and next-generation sequencing. PMID:26615784

  20. Discordant phenotype of two overlapping deletions involving the PAX3 gene in chromosome 2q35.

    PubMed

    Pasteris, N G; Trask, B J; Sheldon, S; Gorski, J L

    1993-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS), the most common form of inherited congenital deafness, is a pleiotropic, autosomal dominant condition with variable penetrance and expressivity. WS is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The basis for the phenotypic variability observed among and between WS families is unknown. However, mutations within the paired-box gene, PAX3, have been associated with a subset of WS patients. In this report we use cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques to study a patient with WS type 3, a form of WS consisting of typical WS type 1 features plus mental retardation, microcephaly, and severe skeletal anomalies. Our results show that the WS3 patient has a de novo paternally derived deletion, del (2)(q35q36), that spans the genetic loci PAX3 and COL4A3. A molecular analysis of a chromosome 2 deletional mapping panel maps the PAX3 locus to 2q35 and suggests the locus order: centromere-(INHA, DES)-PAX3-COL4A3-(ALPI, CHRND)-telomere. Our analyses also show that a patient with a cleft palate and lip pits, but lacking diagnostic WS features, has a deletion, del (2)(q33q35), involving the PAX3 locus. This result suggests that not all PAX3 mutations are associated with a WS phenotype and that additional regional loci may modify or regulate the PAX3 locus and/or the development of a WS phenotype. PMID:8103404

  1. An S receptor kinase gene in self-compatible Brassica napus has a 1-bp deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Goring, D R; Glavin, T L; Schafer, U; Rothstein, S J

    1993-01-01

    S locus glycoprotein (SLG) and S locus receptor kinase (SRK) cDNAs were isolated from an S allele present in a number of self-compatible Brassica napus lines. This A10 allele did not segregate with self-incompatibility in crosses involving other self-incompatible B. napus lines. The SLG-A10 cDNA was found to contain an intact open reading frame and was predicted to encode an SLG protein with sequence similarities to those previously associated with phenotypically strong self-incompatibility reactions. SLG-A10 transcripts were detected in the developing stigma at steady state levels even higher than those detected for SLG alleles linked with self-incompatibility. Analysis of the corresponding SRK-A10 cDNA showed that it was very similar to other S locus receptor kinase genes and was expressed predominantly in the stigma. However, a 1-bp deletion was detected in the SRK gene toward the 3' end of the SLG homology domain. This deletion would lead to premature termination of translation and the production of a truncated SRK protein. The A10 allele was determined to represent a B. oleracea S allele based on its segregation pattern with the B. oleracea S24 allele when both these alleles were present in the same B. napus background. These results suggest that a functional SRK gene is required for Brassica self-incompatibility. PMID:8518554

  2. A 57-bp deletion in the ovine KAP6-1 gene affects wool fibre diameter.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H; Gong, H; Li, S; Luo, Y; Hickford, J G H

    2015-08-01

    High glycine-tyrosine keratin-associated proteins (HGT-KAPs) are predominantly present in the orthocortex of wool fibres. They vary in abundance in different wools and have been implicated in regulating wool fibre properties, but little is known about the functional roles of these proteins in the fibre matrix. In this study, we used polymerase chain reaction--single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis to screen for variation in a gene encoding the ovine HGT-KAP6-1 protein. We identified three gene variants (A, B and C). Variants A and B were similar to each other, with only three nucleotide differences occurring downstream of the coding sequence. However, variant C had a 57-bp deletion that would notionally result in a loss of 19 amino acids in the protein. The presence of C was found to be associated with an increase in mean fibre diameter (MFD), fibre diameter standard deviation (FDSD), coefficient of variation of fibre diameter (CVFD) and prickle factor (percentage of fibres over 30 microns; PF). Sheep of genotype BC produced wool of greater MFD, FDSD and PF than sheep of genotypes AA, AB and BB. The CVFD was greater in the BC sheep than the AB sheep. The results suggest that variation in ovine KRTAP6-1 affects wool fibre diameter-associated traits and that the 57-bp deletion in this gene would lead to coarser wool with greater FDSD, CVFD and PF. PMID:25782086

  3. Microevolution of Duplications and Deletions and Their Impact on Gene Expression in the Nematode Pristionchus pacificus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of diversity across the animal kingdom has been accompanied by tremendous gene loss and gain. While comparative genomics has been fruitful to characterize differences in gene content across highly diverged species, little is known about the microevolution of structural variations that cause these differences in the first place. In order to investigate the genomic impact of structural variations, we made use of genomic and transcriptomic data from the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, which has been established as a satellite model to Caenorhabditis elegans for comparative biology. We exploit the fact that P. pacificus is a highly diverse species for which various genomic data including the draft genome of a sister species P. exspectatus is available. Based on resequencing coverage data for two natural isolates we identified large (> 2kb) deletions and duplications relative to the reference strain. By restriction to completely syntenic regions between P. pacificus and P. exspectatus, we were able to polarize the comparison and to assess the impact of structural variations on expression levels. We found that while loss of genes correlates with lack of expression, duplication of genes has virtually no effect on gene expression. Further investigating expression of individual copies at sites that segregate between the duplicates, we found in the majority of cases only one of the copies to be expressed. Nevertheless, we still find that certain gene classes are strongly depleted in deletions as well as duplications, suggesting evolutionary constraint acting on synteny. In summary, our results are consistent with a model, where most structural variations are either deleterious or neutral and provide first insights into the microevolution of structural variations in the P. pacificus genome. PMID:26125626

  4. DIA1R Is an X-Linked Gene Related to Deleted In Autism-1

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Azhari; Harrop, Sean P.; Bishop, Naomi E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are frequently occurring disorders diagnosed by deficits in three core functional areas: social skills, communication, and behaviours and/or interests. Mental retardation frequently accompanies the most severe forms of ASDs, while overall ASDs are more commonly diagnosed in males. Most ASDs have a genetic origin and one gene recently implicated in the etiology of autism is the Deleted-In-Autism-1 (DIA1) gene. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a bioinformatics-based approach, we have identified a human gene closely related to DIA1, we term DIA1R (DIA1-Related). While DIA1 is autosomal (chromosome 3, position 3q24), DIA1R localizes to the X chromosome at position Xp11.3 and is known to escape X-inactivation. The gene products are of similar size, with DIA1 encoding 430, and DIA1R 433, residues. At the amino acid level, DIA1 and DIA1R are 62% similar overall (28% identical), and both encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. Both genes are ubiquitously expressed, including in fetal and adult brain tissue. Conclusions/Significance Examination of published literature revealed point mutations in DIA1R are associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) and DIA1R deletion is associated with syndromes with ASD-like traits and/or XLMR. Together, these results support a model where the DIA1 and DIA1R gene products regulate molecular traffic through the cellular secretory pathway or affect the function of secreted factors, and functional deficits cause disorders with ASD-like symptoms and/or mental retardation. PMID:21264219

  5. Model-guided identification of gene deletion targets for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2014-01-01

    Identification of metabolic engineering strategies for rerouting intracellular fluxes towards a desired product is often a challenging task owing to the topological and regulatory complexity of metabolic networks. Genome-scale metabolic models help tackling this complexity through systematic consideration of mass balance and reaction directionality constraints over the entire network. Here, we describe how genome-scale metabolic models can be used for identifying gene deletion targets leading to increased production of the desired product. Vanillin production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a case study throughout this chapter. PMID:24744040

  6. Total beta-globin gene deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, N.; Miyakawa, F.; Hunt, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    The distribution of {beta}-thalassemia [{beta}{sup Th}] mutations is unique to each ethnic group. Most mutations affect one or a few bases; large deletions have been rare. Among families screened in Hawaii, [{beta}{sup Th}] heterozygotes were diagnosed by microcytosis, absence of abnormal hemoglobins on isoelectric focusing, and raised Hb A{sub 2} by chromatography. Gene frequency for {beta}{sup Th} was 0.02 in Filipinos. In Filipinos, polymerase chain reaction [PCR] with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for {beta}{sup Th} mutations detected a mutation in only 6 of 42 {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes; an IVS2-666 C/T polymorphism showed non-heterozygosity in 37 and heterozygosity in only 5 of these {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes. One {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} major patient and his mother had no mutation detected by allele-specific oligomer hybridization; PCR failed to amplify any DNA from his {beta}-globin gene. After a total {beta}-globin gene deletion [{beta}{sup Del}] was found in a Filipino family in Ontario, specific PCR amplification for {beta}{sup Del} detected this in 43 of 53 {beta}{sup Th} Filipino samples tested; the above {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} patient was a ({beta}{sup Del}/{beta}{sup Del}) homozygote. The {beta}{sup Del} may account for over 60% of all {beta}{sup Th} alleles in Filipinos; this is the highest proportion of a deletion {beta}{sup Th} mutation reported from any population. Most but not all {beta}{sup Del} heterozygotes had high Hb F [5.13 {plus_minus} 3.94 mean {plus_minus} 1 s.d.] compared to the codon 41/42 four base deletion common in Chinese [2.30 {plus_minus} 0.86], or to {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes with normal {alpha}-globin genes [2.23 {plus_minus} 0.80].

  7. Deletion mutation as a means of isolating avirulence genes in flax rust.

    PubMed

    Timmis, J N; Whisson, D L; Binns, A M; Mayo, M J; Mayo, G M

    1990-05-01

    The interaction between flax rust,Melampsora lini, and its host, flax,Linum usitatissimum, has been extensively studied, and certain genetic features make the system an appropriate choice to utilize in isolating genes conferring avirulence in rust. A mutant that was selected for virulence on Lx plants was isolated, after treatment with gamma rays, from a strain that is genotypicallyA-L5,A-L6,A-L7,A-Lx/A-L5,A-L6,a-L7,a-Lx. These four specificities are tightly linked. Breeding tests showed that this mutant was genotypicallyA-L5,A-L6,a-L7,a-Lx/a-L5,a-L6,a-L7,a-Lx and, when made homozygous for the mutant chromosome, was virulent onL5,L6,L7, andLx. This result excludes somatic recombination as a source of the mutation and indicates deletion as a likely cause. A 250 bp genomic sequence from a strain of rust homozygous for these four linked avirulence genes (A-L5,A-L6,A-L7,A-Lx) was isolated, using a method that allows the differential cloning of the specific DNA sequences located within a deletion in the mutant genome. This clone hybridized to two EcoRI bands in genomic DNA from the strain homozygous for the four linked avirulence genes and from the strain homozygousA-L5 andA-L6 and heterozygousA-L7 andA-Lx, but showed no homology to DNA from the strain carrying the putative chromosomal deletion. The correlation between the genetically characterized deletion mutation and the isolation of a sequence from within a region of chromosome missing from this strain of rust suggests that this 250 bp tract may be part of, or closely linked to, the defined set of avirulence genes. PMID:24226362

  8. An intronic deletion in the PROM1 gene leads to autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Eidinger, Osnat; Leibu, Rina; Newman, Hadas; Rizel, Leah; Perlman, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic basis for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) in a consanguineous Israeli Jewish family. Methods Patients underwent a detailed ophthalmic evaluation, including eye examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and electrophysiological tests, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed to identify homozygous regions shared among two of the affected individuals. Mutation screening of the underlying gene was performed with direct sequencing. In silico and in vitro analyses were used to predict the effect of the identified mutation on splicing. Results The affected family members are three siblings who have various degrees of progressive visual deterioration, glare, color vision abnormalities, and night vision difficulties. Visual field tests revealed central scotomas of different extension. Cone and rod ERG responses were reduced, with cones more severely affected. Homozygosity mapping revealed several homozygous intervals shared among two of the affected individuals. One included the PROM1 gene. Sequence analysis of the 26 coding exons of PROM1 in one affected individual revealed no mutations in the coding sequence or in intronic splice sites. However, in intron 21, proximate to the intron–exon junction, we observed a homozygous 10 bp deletion between positions −26 and −17 (c.2281–26_-17del). The deletion was linked to a known SNP, c.2281–6C>G. The deletion cosegregated with the disease in the family, and was not detected in public databases or in 101 ethnically-matched control individuals. In silico analysis predicted that this deletion would lead to altered intron 21 splicing. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that a recognition site for the SRSF2 splicing factor is located within the deleted sequence. The in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that c.2281–26_-17del leads to

  9. Forebrain glucocorticoid receptor gene deletion attenuates behavioral changes and antidepressant responsiveness during chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-10-01

    Stress is an important risk factor for mood disorders. Stress also stimulates the secretion of glucocorticoids, which have been found to influence mood. To determine the role of forebrain glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in behavioral responses to chronic stress, the present experiments compared behavioral effects of repeated social defeat in mice with forebrain GR deletion and in floxed GR littermate controls. Repeated defeat produced alterations in forced swim and tail suspension immobility in floxed GR mice that did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion. Defeat-induced changes in immobility in floxed GR mice were prevented by chronic antidepressant treatment, indicating that these behaviors were dysphoria-related. In contrast, although mice with forebrain GR deletion exhibited antidepressant-induced decreases in tail suspension immobility in the absence of stress, this response did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion after defeat. There were no marked differences in plasma corticosterone between genotypes, suggesting that behavioral differences depended on forebrain GR rather than on abnormal glucocorticoid secretion. Defeat-induced gene expression of the neuronal activity marker c-fos in the ventral hippocampus, paraventricular thalamus and lateral septum correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral effects of defeat, whereas c-fos induction in the nucleus accumbens and central and basolateral amygdala correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral responses to antidepressant treatment. The dependence of both negative (dysphoria-related) and positive (antidepressant-induced) behaviors on forebrain GR is consistent with the contradictory effects of glucocorticoids on mood, and implicates these or other forebrain regions in these effects. PMID:25168761

  10. Forebrain glucocorticoid receptor gene deletion attenuates behavioral changes and antidepressant responsiveness during chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Stress is an important risk factor for mood disorders. Stress also stimulates the secretion of glucocorticoids, which have been found to influence mood. To determine the role of forebrain glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in behavioral responses to chronic stress, the present experiments compared behavioral effects of repeated social defeat in mice with forebrain GR deletion and in floxed GR littermate controls. Repeated defeat produced alterations in forced swim and tail suspension immobility in floxed GR mice that did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion. Defeat-induced changes in immobility in floxed GR mice were prevented by chronic antidepressant treatment, indicating that these behaviors were dysphoria-related. In contrast, although mice with forebrain GR deletion exhibited antidepressant-induced decreases in tail suspension immobility in the absence of stress, this response did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion after defeat. There were no marked differences in plasma corticosterone between genotypes, suggesting that behavioral differences depended on forebrain GR rather than on abnormal glucocorticoid secretion. Defeat-induced gene expression of the neuronal activity marker c-fos in the ventral hippocampus, paraventricular thalamus and lateral septum correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral effects of defeat, whereas c-fos induction in the nucleus accumbens and central and basolateral amygdala correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral responses to antidepressant treatment. The dependence of both negative (dysphoria-related) and positive (antidepressant-induced) behaviors on forebrain GR is consistent with the contradictory effects of glucocorticoids on mood, and implicates these or other forebrain regions in these effects. PMID:25168761

  11. Improving freeze-tolerance of baker's yeast through seamless gene deletion of NTH1 and PUT1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian; Chen, Didi; Wang, Guanglu; Zhang, Cuiying; Du, Liping; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-06-01

    Baker's yeast strains with freeze-tolerance are highly desirable to maintain high leavening ability after freezing. Enhanced intracellular concentration of trehalose and proline in yeast is linked with freeze-tolerance. In this study, we constructed baker's yeast with enhanced freeze-tolerance by simultaneous deletion of the neutral trehalase-encoded gene NTH1 and the proline oxidase-encoded gene PUT1. We first used the two-step integration-based seamless gene deletion method to separately delete NTH1 and PUT1 in haploid yeast. Subsequently, through two rounds of hybridization and sporulation-based allelic exchange and colony PCR-mediated tetrad analysis, we obtained strains with restored URA3 and deletion of NTH1 and/or PUT1. The resulting strain showed higher cell survival and dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to the wild-type strain due to enhanced accumulation of trehalose and/or proline. Moreover, mutant with simultaneous deletion of NTH1 and PUT1 exhibits the highest relative dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to mutants with single-gene deletion perhaps due to elevated levels of both trehalose and proline. These results verified that it is applicable to construct frozen dough baker's yeast using the method proposed in this paper. PMID:26965428

  12. Overview on DMD exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2012-01-01

    Antisense-mediated exon skipping to restore the disrupted dystrophin reading frame is currently in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This chapter describes the rationale of this approach and gives an overview of in vitro and in vivo experiments with antisense oligonucleotides and antisense genes. Finally, an overview of clinical trials is given and outstanding questions and hurdles are discussed. PMID:22454057

  13. Deletion of AS87_03730 gene changed the bacterial virulence and gene expression of Riemerella anatipestifer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Yue, Jiaping; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Beibei; Tian, Mingxing; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer is an important pathogen of waterfowl, which causes septicemia anserum exsudativa in ducks. In this study, an AS87_03730 gene deletion R. anatipestifer mutant Yb2ΔAS87_03730 was constructed to investigate the role of AS87_03730 on R. anatipestifer virulence and gene regulation. By deleting a 708-bp fragment from AS87_03730, the mutant Yb2ΔAS87_03730 showed a significant decreased growth rate in TSB and invasion capacity in Vero cells, compared to wild-type strain Yb2. Moreover, the median lethal dose (LD50) of Yb2ΔAS87_03730 was 1.24 × 107 colony forming units (CFU), which is about 80-fold attenuated than that of Yb2 (LD50 = 1.53 × 105 CFU). Furthermore, RNA-Seq analysis and Real-time PCR indicated 19 up-regulated and two down-regulated genes in Yb2ΔAS87_03730. Functional analysis revealed that 12 up-regulated genes were related to “Translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis”, two were classified into “Cell envelope biogenesis, outer membrane”, one was involved in “Amino acid transport and metabolism”, and the other four had unknown functions. Polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis indicated that the AS87_03730 gene is highly conserved among R. anatipestifer strains, as the percent sequence identity was over 93.5%. This study presents evidence that AS87_03730 gene is involved in bacterial virulence and gene regulation of R. anatipestifer. PMID:26928424

  14. Clinical implications of cytosine deletion of exon 5 of P53 gene in non small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Rashid; Masroor, Mirza; Javid, Jamsheed; Ahamad, Imtiyaz; Farooq, Shazia; Yadav, Prasant; Zuberi, Mariyam; Lone, Maqbool; Ray, P. C; Saxena, Alpana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Lung cancer is considered to be the most common cancer in the world. In humans, about 50% or more cancers have a mutated tumor suppressor p53 gene thereby resulting in accumulation of p53 protein and losing its function to activate the target genes that regulate the cell cycle and apoptosis. Extensive research conducted in murine cancer models with activated p53, loss of p53, or p53 missense mutations have facilitated researchers to understand the role of this key protein. Our study was aimed to evaluate the frequency of cytosine deletion in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods: One hundred NSCLC patients were genotyped for P53 (exon5, codon168) cytosine deletion leading to loss of its function and activate the target genes by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. The P53 cytosine deletion was correlated with all the clinicopathological parameters of the patients. Results and Analysis: 59% cases were carrying P53 cytosine deletion. Similarly, the significantly higher incidence of cytosine deletion was reported in current smokers (75%) in comparison to exsmoker and nonsmoker. Significantly higher frequency of cytosine deletion was reported in adenocarcinoma (68.08%) than squamous cell carcinoma (52.83%). Also, a significant difference was reported between p53 cytosine deletion and metastasis (64.28%). Further, the majority of the cases assessed for response carrying P53 cytosine deletion were found to show faster disease progression. Conclusion: The data suggests that there is a significant association of the P53 exon 5 deletion of cytosine in codon 168 with metastasis and staging of the disease. PMID:27169122

  15. Severe haemophilia A in a female resulting from an inherited gross deletion and a de novo codon deletion in the F8 gene.

    PubMed

    Venceslá, A; Fuentes-Prior, P; Baena, M; Quintana, M; Baiget, M; Tizzano, E F

    2008-09-01

    Haemophillia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by mutations in the F8 gene. While the disease affects 1 in 5000 males, phenotypic expression of haemophilia A is rare in females, similar to other X-linked recessive disorders. We describe a 5-year-old female with severe haemophilia A. We determined the underlying molecular defect in the F8 genes of the proband and her closest family members by direct DNA sequencing, marker analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The patient showed two different mutations in the F8 gene: the paternal copy of the F8 gene had a de novo p.Phe652/653 deletion in exon 13 while the maternally inherited gene showed a large deletion encompassing exons 1 to 22. The structural analysis of residues Phe652/Phe653 based on a three-dimensional model of activated factor VIII provides evidence of the impact of the mutant factor VIII protein in the clinical manifestations of the patient. This unusual finding highlights the need to perform a thorough molecular analysis including sequencing, marker and quantitative analyses to identify compound heterozygous females with HA. PMID:18665854

  16. A glycoprotein E gene-deleted bovine herpesvirus 1 as a candidate vaccine strain

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, M.; Brum, M.C.S.; Anziliero, D.; Weiblen, R.; Flores, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    A bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) defective in glycoprotein E (gE) was constructed from a Brazilian genital BoHV-1 isolate, by replacing the full gE coding region with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene for selection. Upon co-transfection of MDBK cells with genomic viral DNA plus the GFP-bearing gE-deletion plasmid, three fluorescent recombinant clones were obtained out of approximately 5000 viral plaques. Deletion of the gE gene and the presence of the GFP marker in the genome of recombinant viruses were confirmed by PCR. Despite forming smaller plaques, the BoHV-1△gE recombinants replicated in MDBK cells with similar kinetics and to similar titers to that of the parental virus (SV56/90), demonstrating that the gE deletion had no deleterious effects on replication efficacy in vitro. Thirteen calves inoculated intramuscularly with BoHV-1△gE developed virus neutralizing antibodies at day 42 post-infection (titers from 2 to 16), demonstrating the ability of the recombinant to replicate and to induce a serological response in vivo. Furthermore, the serological response induced by recombinant BoHV-1△gE could be differentiated from that induced by wild-type BoHV-1 by the use of an anti-gE antibody ELISA kit. Taken together, these results indicated the potential application of recombinant BoHV-1 △gE in vaccine formulations to prevent the losses caused by BoHV-1 infections while allowing for differentiation of vaccinated from naturally infected animals. PMID:26200229

  17. Deletion of a Chitin Synthase Gene in a Citric Acid Producing Strain of Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, Torri E.; Baker, Scott E.

    2007-01-29

    Citric acid production by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is carried out in a process that causes the organism to drastically alter its morphology. This altered morphology includes hyphal swelling and highly limited polar growth resulting in clumps of swollen cells that eventually aggregate into pellets of approximately 100 microns in diameter. In this pelleted form, A. niger has increased citric acid production as compared to growth in filamentous form. Chitin is a crucial component of the cell wall of filamentous fungi. Alterations in the deposition or production of chitin may have profound effects on the morphology of the organism. In order to study the role of chitin synthesis in pellet formation we have deleted a chitin synthase gene (csmA) in Aspergillus niger strain ATCC 11414 using a PCR based deletion construct. This class of chitin synthases is only found in filamentous fungi and is not present in yeasts. The csmA genes contain a myosin motor domain at the N-terminus and a chitin synthesis domain at the C-terminus. They are believed to contribute to the specialized polar growth observed in filamentous fungi that is lacking in yeasts. The csmA deletion strain (csmAΔ) was subjected to minimal media with and without osmotic stabilizers as well as tested in citric acid production media. Without osmotic stabilizers, the mutant germlings were abnormally swollen, primarily in the subapical regions, and contained large vacuoles. However, this swelling is ultimately not inhibitory to growth as the germlings are able to recover and undergo polar growth. Colony formation was largely unaffected in the absence of osmotic stabilizers. In citric acid production media csmAΔ was observed to have a 2.5 fold increase in citric acid production. The controlled expression of this class of chitin synthases may be useful for improving production of organic acids in filamentous fungi.

  18. ACE gene insertion/deletion polymorphism modulates capillary permeability in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dell'omo, Giulia; Penno, Giuseppe; Pucci, Laura; Lucchesi, Daniela; Fotino, Carmen; Del Prato, Stefano; Pedrinelli, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    A D/D (deletion/deletion) polymorphism within the ACE (angiotensin 1-converting enzyme) gene increases the risk of microalbuminuria, a predictor of atherosclerotic vascular disease, in essential hypertension. It is unknown, however, whether this genetic profile is accompanied by disturbed macromolecular permeability of systemic capillary endothelium, possibly in the context of generalized endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, the ACE gene polymorphism was determined by PCR in 79 never-treated uncomplicated hypertensive men and 16 normotensive men as controls. Evaluation variables were TERalb (transcapillary escape rate of albumin; the 1-h decline rate of intravenous (125)I-albumin, a measure of integrity of systemic capillary endothelium), albuminuria and forearm vasodilation to intra-arterial acetylcholine, an index of NO (nitric oxide)-mediated vasomotion, in addition to a series of sensitive parameters of albumin permeation (blood pressure, metabolic status and smoking habits). Analyses were done by comparing D/D homozygotes with grouped I/D (insertion/deletion) and I/I (insertion/insertion) subjects. TERalb was higher in D/D hypertensives, who had higher albuminuria, more frequent microalbuminuria and comparable forearm responsiveness to intra-arterial acetylcholine. Fasting glucose and insulin, insulin sensitivity, 24-h blood pressure, smoking habits and metabolic parameters did not differ between the two groups. TERalb and urine albumin values were positively associated in the hypertensive subjects. In conclusion, ACE D/D homozygosis, independently of several confounding factors, associates with higher TERalb in men with essential hypertension. This may reflect noxious genetic influences on systemic vascular permeability, a critical control mechanism for atherogenesis in the absence of grossly impaired NO-mediated arteriolar responsiveness. The parallel behaviour of TERalb and albuminuria suggests some shared genetically mediated determinant of renal

  19. Adenovirus-mediated Cre deletion of floxed sequences in primary mouse cells is an efficient alternative for studies of gene deletion

    PubMed Central

    Prost, Sandrine; Sheahan, Sharon; Rannie, Dominic; Harrison, David J.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluates the utility of Cre-expressing adenovirus for deletion of floxed genes in primary cells using primary murine hepatocytes. Adenovirus infection was very efficient, even at very low MOI (>95% infection at a MOI of 6) and did not reduce viability. High level LacZ expression was cytotoxic to hepatocytes but Cre expression had no effect on viability. Cre-mediated recombination was completed within a timespan that permits experimentation during primary culture (>95% recombination after 24 h), independently of the number of floxed alleles per cell. Recombination did not induce p53 or produce cytological nuclear abnormalities (even in polyploid cells). Contrary to expectation, deletion of DNA ligase 1 did not alter cell cycle progression, although Cre expression hastens entry to S phase from G1, independently of the presence of floxed sequences. We conclude that adenovirus-mediated deletion of floxed alleles in primary cells is a straightforward and highly efficient tool for conducting preliminary studies of conditional gene targeting. Primary cells have advantages of differentiation, relative purity and ease of experimentation within controlled conditions, while avoiding confounding problems encountered in vivo (i.e. target cell specificity, kinetics and level of recombination, and elicitation of inflammatory and immune responses). This system could help identify important phenotypic effects and design and interpret in vivo studies. PMID:11504888

  20. Deletion Mapping of the Genes Coding for HPr and Enzyme I of the Phosphoenolpyruvate: Sugar Phosphotransferase System in Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Cordaro, J. Christopher; Roseman, Saul

    1972-01-01

    Sugars transported by a bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) require two soluble proteins: HPr, a low-molecular-weight phosphate-carrier protein, and enzyme I. The structural genes coding for HPr (ptsH) and Enzyme I (ptsI) are shown to be cotransducible in Salmonella typhimurium. The gene order of this region of the Salmonella chromosome is cysA-trzA-ptsH-ptsI...(crr). A method for the isolation of trzA-pts deletion is described. One class of pts deletions extends through ptsH and into ptsI; a second class includes both ptsH and ptsI and extends into or through the crr gene. The crr gene either codes for or regulates the synthesis of a third PTS protein (factor III) which is sugar-specific. A hypothesis is presented for a mechanism of deletion formation. PMID:4562394

  1. Typical Renal-coloboma Syndrome Phenotype in a Patient with a Submicroscopic Deletion of the PAX2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Laimutis, Kucinskas; Jackson, Craig; Xu, Xinjie; Warman, Berta; Sarunas, Rudaitis; Birute, Pundziene; Schimmenti, Lisa A.; Raca, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    We present a patient with optic nerve hypoplasia, secondary strabismus, mild deafness, abnormal external ear helices and renal hypoplasia. The clinical phenotype was consistent with renal-coloboma syndrome, but no point mutation in the PAX2 gene could be identified. High resolution array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) analysis showed that this patient has a submicroscopic deletion on chromosome 10, affecting the entire coding region of the PAX2 gene. This finding provided the molecular confirmation of the patient’s clinical diagnosis and showed that, in addition to point mutations, deletions of the PAX2 gene contribute to the etiology of the renal-coloboma syndrome. PMID:22581475

  2. Revelation of molecular basis for chromium toxicity by phenotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adam J; Veljanoski, Filip; O'Doherty, Patrick J; Zaman, Mohammad S; Petersingham, Gayani; Bailey, Trevor D; Münch, Gerald; Kersaitis, Cindy; Wu, Ming J

    2016-05-01

    Chromium toxicity is increasingly relevant to living organisms such as humans, due to the environmental contamination of chromium and the application of stainless steel-based medical devices like hip prostheses. Despite the investigations in past years, the molecular details for chromium toxicity remain to be delineated. In this study, we seek to gain insights into the molecular aspects of chromium toxicity by screening a genome-wide deletion set of individual genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae against hexavalent chromium [Cr(vi)] using chromium trioxide. From the primary data collected in this study, two lists of deletion mutants in response to Cr(vi) exposure were obtained, one for the sensitive phenotype and the other for the resistant phenotype. The functional analysis of the genes corresponding to the sensitive mutants reveals the key features of Cr(vi) toxicity, which include genotoxicity, protein damage, disruption of energy and sulfur metabolisms. DNA repair, ubiquitination-mediated protein degradation, iron homeostasis and growth attenuation are the intrinsic facets of the cell's detoxification mechanisms. Protein kinase CK2 is, for the first time, found to be involved in regulating chromium toxicity by reducing the uptake of Cr(vi). Taken together, the findings provide meaningful details into the basic understanding of chromium toxicity in terms of its uptake, modes of action, cellular detoxification and molecular regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27146641

  3. Construction and evaluation of live attenuated myxoma virus vaccines with targeted virulence gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mathew M; van Leeuwen, Barbara H; Kerr, Peter J

    2008-10-29

    Three deletion mutant viruses were constructed as potential vaccines against myxomatosis using the naturally attenuated Uriarra strain of myxoma virus. The viruses had the M007 (encodes a secreted gamma-interferon receptor homologue), M010 (encodes an epidermal growth factor homologue) and M011 (encodes an inhibitor of apoptosis in T lymphocytes) genes insertionally inactivated as either DeltaM007, DeltaM010/M011 or DeltaM007/M010/M011. All three viruses induced high serum antibody titres. Rabbits immunized with these deletion mutants were protected from lethal challenge. However, immunization of adult rabbits with DeltaM007 or DeltaM010/M011 was associated with mild clinical signs that would make these viruses unacceptable as vaccines. The triple gene knock-out virus (DeltaM007/M010/M011) termed Ur-TKO was very well tolerated by adult and juvenile rabbits. The low pathogenicity of Ur-TKO was confirmed by pathogenesis studies in domestic and wild rabbits. PMID:18789367

  4. Distribution of a 27-bp deletion in the band 3 gene in South Pacific islanders.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masako; Tamam, Moedrik; Soemantri, Augustinus; Nakazawa, Minato; Ataka, Yuji; Ohtsuka, Ryutaro; Ishida, Takafumi

    2003-01-01

    Distribution of a 27-bp deletion in the band 3 gene (B3Delta27) that causes Southeast Asian/Melanesian ovalocytosis has scarcely been studied in remote insular Southeast Asia and New Guinea. Here the presence of the B3Delta27 was surveyed among a total of 756 subjects from the indigenous populations inhabiting New Guinean islands and remote insular Southeast Asia by using a polymerase chain reaction method. In remote insular Southeast Asia where Austronesian-speaking peoples inhabit, the B3Delta27 frequency ranged between 0.04 and 0.15. In New Guinea Island, hinterland or Papuan groups showed the absence of the B3Delta27 or a very low gene frequency (0.01 in the Gidra) of the B3Delta27. However, groups of the coastal regions (Asmat, Sorong, and others) and of the nearby islands (Biak and Manus) where Austronesian infiltration had occurred showed substantial frequencies of the deletion (0.02-0.09). It is likely that the B3Delta27 was introduced into this region about 3,500 years ago with the arrival of Austronesian-speaking peoples. Once being introduced, the B3Delta27 may have been selected because of its resistance against malaria, while founder effect and genetic drift might have occurred in the New Guinean tribes with small population size, which helped to generate a variety of the B3Delta27 frequencies. PMID:14618418

  5. A new single gene deletion on 2q34: ERBB4 is associated with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Kasnauskiene, Jurate; Ciuladaite, Zivile; Preiksaitiene, Egle; Utkus, Algirdas; Peciulyte, Agnė; Kučinskas, Vaidutis

    2013-06-01

    We report on a 15-year-old patient with hyperactivity, intellectual disability and severe speech developmental delay. An array CGH analysis revealed de novo 2q34 deletion, 958 kb in size, involving a single protein coding gene ERBB4 (position 212,505,294-213,463,152; NCBI build 36). The ERBB4 gene is important in numerous neurobiological processes in both the developing and the adult brain. The NRG1-ERBB4 signaling pathway has been recently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and epilepsy. Many risk haplotypes were identified in several studies across different populations. The severe clinical consequences in our patient demonstrate that the haploinsufficiency of ERBB4 is crucial for intellectual and cognitive function. These observations are compatible with previously reported results. PMID:23633123

  6. Haemophilia A: database of nucleotide substitutions, deletions, insertions and rearrangements of the factor VIII gene, second edition.

    PubMed Central

    Tuddenham, E G; Schwaab, R; Seehafer, J; Millar, D S; Gitschier, J; Higuchi, M; Bidichandani, S; Connor, J M; Hoyer, L W; Yoshioka, A

    1994-01-01

    A large number of different mutations in the factor VIII (F8) gene have been identified as a cause of haemophilia A. This compilation lists known single base-pair substitutions, deletions and insertions in the F8 gene and reviews the status of the inversional events which account for a substantial proportion of mutations causing severe haemophilia A. PMID:7937051

  7. Efficient PRNP deletion in bovine genome using gene-editing technologies in bovine cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, WooJae; Kim, Eunji; Yum, Soo-Young; Lee, ChoongIl; Lee, JiHyun; Moon, JoonHo; Ramachandra, Sisitha; Malaweera, Buddika Oshadi; Cho, JongKi; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, SeokJoong; Jang, Goo

    2015-01-01

    abstract Even though prion (encoded by the PRNP gene) diseases like bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are fatal neurodegenerative diseases in cattle, their study via gene deletion has been limited due to the absence of cell lines or mutant models. In this study, we aim to develop an immortalized fibroblast cell line in which genome-engineering technology can be readily applied to create gene-modified clones for studies. To this end, this study is designed to 1) investigate the induction of primary fibroblasts to immortalization by introducing Bmi-1 and hTert genes; 2) investigate the disruption of the PRNP in those cells; and 3) evaluate the gene expression and embryonic development using knockout (KO) cell lines. Primary cells from a male neonate were immortalized with Bmi-1and hTert. Immortalized cells were cultured for more than 180 days without any changes in their doubling time and morphology. Furthermore, to knockout the PRNP gene, plasmids that encode transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) pairs were transfected into the cells, and transfected single cells were propagated. Mutated clonal cell lines were confirmed by T7 endonuclease I assay and sequencing. Four knockout cell lines were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and the resulting embryos were developed to the blastocyst stage. The genes (CSNK2A1, FAM64A, MPG and PRND) were affected after PRNP disruption in immortalized cells. In conclusion, we established immortalized cattle fibroblasts using Bmi-1 and hTert genes, and used TALENs to knockout the PRNP gene in these immortalized cells. The efficient PRNP KO is expected to be a useful technology to develop our understanding of in vitro prion protein functions in cattle. PMID:26217959

  8. Oncogenic activation of the Notch1 gene by deletion of its promoter in Ikaros-deficient T-ALL

    PubMed Central

    Jeannet, Robin; Mastio, Jérôme; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Oravecz, Attila; Ashworth, Todd; Geimer Le Lay, Anne-Solen; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Ghysdael, Jacques; Gridley, Thomas; Honjo, Tasuku; Radtke, Freddy; Aster, Jon C.; Kastner, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The Notch pathway is frequently activated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs). Of the Notch receptors, Notch1 is a recurrent target of gain-of-function mutations and Notch3 is expressed in all T-ALLs, but it is currently unclear how these receptors contribute to T-cell transformation in vivo. We investigated the role of Notch1 and Notch3 in T-ALL progression by a genetic approach, in mice bearing a knockdown mutation in the Ikaros gene that spontaneously develop Notch-dependent T-ALL. While deletion of Notch3 has little effect, T cell–specific deletion of floxed Notch1 promoter/exon 1 sequences significantly accelerates leukemogenesis. Notch1-deleted tumors lack surface Notch1 but express γ-secretase–cleaved intracellular Notch1 proteins. In addition, these tumors accumulate high levels of truncated Notch1 transcripts that are caused by aberrant transcription from cryptic initiation sites in the 3′ part of the gene. Deletion of the floxed sequences directly reprograms the Notch1 locus to begin transcription from these 3′ promoters and is accompanied by an epigenetic reorganization of the Notch1 locus that is consistent with transcriptional activation. Further, spontaneous deletion of 5′ Notch1 sequences occurs in approximately 75% of Ikaros-deficient T-ALLs. These results reveal a novel mechanism for the oncogenic activation of the Notch1 gene after deletion of its main promoter. PMID:20829372

  9. A Population of Deletion Mutants and an Integrated Mapping and Exome-seq Pipeline for Gene Discovery in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shangang; Li, Aixia; Morton, Kyla; Avoles-Kianian, Penny; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David

    2016-01-01

    To better understand maize endosperm filling and maturation, we used γ-irradiation of the B73 maize reference line to generate mutants with opaque endosperm and reduced kernel fill phenotypes, and created a population of 1788 lines including 39 Mo17 × F2s showing stable, segregating, and viable kernel phenotypes. For molecular characterization of the mutants, we developed a novel functional genomics platform that combined bulked segregant RNA and exome sequencing (BSREx-seq) to map causative mutations and identify candidate genes within mapping intervals. To exemplify the utility of the mutants and provide proof-of-concept for the bioinformatics platform, we present detailed characterization of line 937, an opaque mutant harboring a 6203 bp in-frame deletion covering six exons within the Opaque-1 gene. In addition, we describe mutant line 146 which contains a 4.8 kb intragene deletion within the Sugary-1 gene and line 916 in which an 8.6 kb deletion knocks out a Cyclin A2 gene. The publically available algorithm developed in this work improves the identification of causative deletions and its corresponding gaps within mapping peaks. This study demonstrates the utility of γ-irradiation for forward genetics in large nondense genomes such as maize since deletions often affect single genes. Furthermore, we show how this classical mutagenesis method becomes applicable for functional genomics when combined with state-of-the-art genomics tools. PMID:27261000

  10. DNA methylation and gene deletion analysis of brain metastases in melanoma patients identifies mutually exclusive molecular alterations

    PubMed Central

    Marzese, Diego M.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Roqué, Maria; Vargas-Roig, Laura M.; Huynh, Jamie L.; Wilmott, James S.; Murali, Rajmohan; Buckland, Michael E.; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Thompson, John F.; Morton, Donald L.; Kelly, Daniel F.; Hoon, Dave S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The brain is a common target of metastases for melanoma patients. Little is known about the genetic and epigenetic alterations in melanoma brain metastases (MBMs). Unraveling these molecular alterations is a key step in understanding their aggressive nature and identifying novel therapeutic targets. Methods Genome-wide DNA methylation analyses of MBMs (n = 15) and normal brain tissues (n = 91) and simultaneous multigene DNA methylation and gene deletion analyses of metastatic melanoma tissues (99 MBMs and 43 extracranial metastases) were performed. BRAF and NRAS mutations were evaluated in MBMs by targeted sequencing. Results MBMs showed significant epigenetic heterogeneity. RARB, RASSF1, ESR1, APC, PTEN, and CDH13 genes were frequently hypermethylated. Deletions were frequently detected in the CDKN2A/B locus. Of MBMs, 46.1% and 28.8% had BRAF and NRAS missense mutations, respectively. Compared with lung and liver metastases, MBMs exhibited higher frequency of CDH13 hypermethylation and CDKN2A/B locus deletion. Mutual exclusivity between hypermethylated genes and CDKN2A/B locus deletion identified 2 clinically relevant molecular subtypes of MBMs. CDKN2A/B deletions were associated with multiple MBMs and frequently hypermethylated genes with shorter time to brain metastasis. Conclusions Melanoma cells that colonize the brain harbor numerous genetically and epigenetically altered genes. This study presents an integrated genomic and epigenomic analysis that reveals MBM-specific molecular alterations and mutually exclusive molecular subtypes. PMID:24968695

  11. De novo deletion of HOXB gene cluster in a patient with failure to thrive, developmental delay, gastroesophageal reflux and bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Pajusalu, Sander; Reimand, Tiia; Uibo, Oivi; Vasar, Maire; Talvik, Inga; Zilina, Olga; Tammur, Pille; Õunap, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    We report a female patient with a complex phenotype consisting of failure to thrive, developmental delay, congenital bronchiectasis, gastroesophageal reflux and bilateral inguinal hernias. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed a 230 kilobase deletion in chromosomal region 17q21.32 (arr[hg19] 17q21.32(46 550 362-46 784 039)×1) encompassing only 9 genes - HOXB1 to HOXB9. The deletion was not found in her mother or father. This is the first report of a patient with a HOXB gene cluster deletion involving only HOXB1 to HOXB9 genes. By comparing our case to previously reported five patients with larger chromosomal aberrations involving the HOXB gene cluster, we can suppose that HOXB gene cluster deletions are responsible for growth retardation, developmental delay, and specific facial dysmorphic features. Also, we suppose that bilateral inguinal hernias, tracheo-esophageal abnormalities, and lung malformations represent features with incomplete penetrance. Interestingly, previously published knock-out mice with targeted heterozygous deletion comparable to our patient did not show phenotypic alterations. PMID:25907420

  12. Deletion of the Bacillus subtilis isocitrate dehydrogenase gene causes a block at stage I of sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S; Levin, P A; Matsuno, K; Grossman, A D; Sonenshein, A L

    1997-01-01

    A Bacillus subtilis mutant with a deletion of citC, the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase, the third enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid branch of the Krebs cycle, had a greatly reduced ability to sporulate. Analysis of expression of lacZ fusions to various sporulation gene promoters revealed that in the citC mutant development is probably blocked between stage 0 and stage II. That is, genes expressed very early in sporulation, under the direct control of the Spo0A transcription factor, were induced normally in the citC mutant. However, genes expressed after asymmetric septation (stage II) in wild-type cells were not induced in the citC mutant. Analysis of cell morphology by thin-section electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the mutant formed axial chromosomal filaments and accumulated rings of FtsZ protein at potential polar division sites but failed to form asymmetric division septa, indicating that sporulation is blocked at stage I. The growth and sporulation defects of the B. subtilis citC mutant were fully overcome by introduction and expression of the Escherichia coli icd gene, encoding an isocitrate dehydrogenase similar to the enzyme from B. subtilis. PMID:9244258

  13. Positional expression profiling indicates candidate genes in deletion hotspots of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kathy Y-Y; Lai, Paul B-S; Squire, Jeremy A; Beheshti, Ben; Wong, Navy L-Y; Sy, Shirley M-H; Wong, Nathalie

    2006-12-01

    Molecular characterizations of hepatocellular carcinoma have indicated frequent allelic losses on chromosomes 4q, 8p, 16q and 17p, where the minimal deleted regions have been further defined on 4q12-q23, 4q31-q35, 8p21-p22, 16q12.1-q23.1 and 17p13. Despite these regions are now well-recognized in early liver carcinogenesis, few underlying candidate genes have been identified. In an effort to define affected genes within common deleted loci of hepatocellular carcinoma, we conducted transcriptional mapping by high-resolution cDNA microarray analysis. In 20 hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines and 20 primary tumors studied, consistent downregulations of novel transcripts were highlighted throughout the entire genome and within sites of frequent losses. The array-derived candidates including fibrinogen gamma peptide (FGG, at 4q31.3), vitamin D binding protein (at 4q13.3), fibrinogen-like 1 (FGL1, at 8p22), metallothionein 1G (MT1G, at 16q12.2) and alpha-2-plasmin inhibitor (SERPINF2, at 17p13) were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, which also indicated a more profound downregulation of FGL1, MT1G and SERPINF2 relative to reported tumor-suppressor genes, such as DLC1 (8p22), E-cadherin (16q22.1) and TP53 (17p13.1). In primary hepatocellular carcinoma examined, a significant repression of MT1G by more than 100-fold was indicated in 63% of tumors compared to the adjacent nonmalignant liver (P = 0.0001). Significant downregulations of FGG, FGL1 and SERPINF2 were also suggested in 30, 23 and 33% of cases, respectively, compared to their nonmalignant counterparts (P < 0.016). In summary, transcriptional mapping by microarray indicated a number of previously undescribed downregulated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma, and highlighted potential candidates within common deleted regions. PMID:16980951

  14. Familial glucocorticoid resistance caused by a splice site deletion in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Encio, I.J.; Stratakis, C.A.; Hurley, D.M.; Accili, D.; Chrousos, G.P. Erasmus Univ. of Rotterdam )

    1993-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of generalized, compensated glucocorticoid resistance is characterized by increased cortisol secretion without clinical evidence of hyper- or hypocortisolism, and manifestations of androgen and/or mineralocorticoid excess. This condition results from partial failure of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to modulate transcription of its target genes. The authors studied the molecular mechanisms of this syndrome in a Dutch kindred, whose affected members had hypercortisolism and approximately half of normal GRs, and whose proband was a young woman with manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify and sequence each of the nine exons of the GR gene [alpha], along with their 5[prime]- and 3[prime]-flanking regions, the authors identified a 4-base deletion at the 3[prime]-boundary of exon 6 in one GR allele ([Delta][sub 4]), which removed a donor splice site in all three affected members studied. In contrast, the sequence of exon 6 in the two unaffected siblings was normal. A single nucleotide substitution causing an amino acid substitution in the amino terminal domain of the GR (asparagine to serine, codon 363) was also discovered in exon 2 of the other allele (G[sub 1220]) in the proband, in one of her affected brothers and in her unaffected sister. This deletion in the glucocorticoid receptor gene was associated with the expression of only one allele and a decrease of GR protein by 50% in affected members of this glucocorticoid resistant family. The mutation identified in exon 2 did not segregate with the disease and appears to be of no functional significance. The presence of the null allele was apparently compensated for by increased cortisol production at the expense of concurrent hyperandrogenism. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Optical concept for an active headlamp with a DMD array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, A.

    2008-04-01

    Present car-headlamps can adapt their light distribution to the traffic situation only in a predefined way. The next generation of headlamps will offer a more flexible adaptation of their light distribution like an adaptive Cut-Off-Line in "Advanced Frontlighting Systems" (AFS). Addressable light sources in future active headlamps enable functions like glare free high beam or marking light. There are several possibilities to design such an addressable light source. In this contribution one solution using a digital micro mirror device (DMD) is presented. With this device an adaptive light distribution can be generated by modulating every pixel of the DMD individually. For the design of an optical system for a DMD headlamp a DMD-Projector was analyzed. The procedure of generating a light distribution can be divided into two processes: a.) illumination of DMD b.) projecting the image of the DMD on the street. In a DMD projector the illumination of a DMD is a very complex optical system with many optical elements. Some of these optical elements are not necessary for a car headlamp because of different requirements for car headlamps and DMD projectors. The illumination system can be simplified if these elements are eliminated. Also the aspect ratio of the imaging system for the DMD has to change 4:3 (DMD) to 7:2 (light distribution on the street).

  16. Deletion of a Malaria Invasion Gene Reduces Death and Anemia, in Model Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Noé D.; Safeukui, Innocent; Adelani, Aanuoluwa A.; Tewari, Rita; Reddy, Janardan K.; Rao, Sam; Holder, Anthony; Buffet, Pierre; Mohandas, Narla; Haldar, Kasturi

    2011-01-01

    Malaria parasites induce complex cellular and clinical phenotypes, including anemia, cerebral malaria and death in a wide range of mammalian hosts. Host genes and parasite ‘toxins’ have been implicated in malarial disease, but the contribution of parasite genes remains to be fully defined. Here we assess disease in BALB/c mice and Wistar rats infected by the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei with a gene knock out for merozoite surface protein (MSP) 7. MSP7 is not essential for infection but in P. falciparum, it enhances erythrocyte invasion by 20%. In vivo, as compared to wild type, the P. berghei Δmsp7 mutant is associated with an abrogation of death and a decrease from 3% to 2% in peak, circulating parasitemia. The Δmsp7 mutant is also associated with less anemia and modest increase in the size of follicles in the spleen. Together these data show that deletion of a single parasite invasion ligand modulates blood stage disease, as measured by death and anemia. This work is the first to assess the contribution of a gene present in all plasmodial species in severe disease. PMID:21980474

  17. Deletion mutation in BSCL2 gene underlies congenital generalized lipodystrophy in a Pakistani family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) also known as Berardinelli-Seip Congenital Lipodystrophy (BSCL) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by loss of adipose tissues, Acanthosis nigricans, diabetes mellitus, muscular hypertrophy, hepatomegaly and hypertriglyceridemia. There are four subclinical phenotypes of CGL (CGL1-4) and mutations in four genes AGPAT2, BSCL2, CAV1 and PTRF have been assigned to each type. Methods The study included clinical and molecular investigations of CGL disease in a consanguineous Pakistani family. For mutation screening all the coding exons including splice junctions of AGPAT2, BSCL2, CAV1 and PTRF genes were PCR amplified and sequenced directly using an automated DNA sequencer ABI3730. Results Sequence analysis revealed a single base pair deletion mutation (c.636delC; p.Tyr213ThrfsX20) in exon 5 of BSCL2 gene causing a frame shift and premature termination codon. Conclusion Mutation identified here in BSCL2 gene causing congenital generalized lipodystrophy is the first report in Pakistani population. The patients exhibited characteristic features of generalized lipodystrophy, Acanthosis nigricans, diabetes mellitus and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1913913076864247. PMID:23659685

  18. Increased bone mass is an unexpected phenotype associated with deletion of the calcitonin gene.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Ana O; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Thomas, Pamela M; Priemel, Matthias; Rueger, Johannes M; Nasonkin, Igor; Bradley, Allan; Hughes, Mark R; Ordonez, Nelson; Cote, Gilbert J; Amling, Michael; Gagel, Robert F

    2002-12-01

    Calcitonin (CT) is a known inhibitor of bone resorption. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-alpha (CGRPalpha), produced by alternative RNA processing of the CT/CGRP gene, has no clearly defined role in bone. To better understand the physiologic role of the CT/CGRP gene we created a mouse in which the coding sequences for both CT and CGRPalpha were deleted by homologous recombination. The CT/CGRP(-/-) knockout (KO) mice procreated normally, there were no identifiable developmental defects at birth, and they had normal baseline calcium-related chemistry values. However, KO animals were more responsive to exogenous human parathyroid hormone as evidenced by a greater increase of the serum calcium concentration and urine deoxypyridinoline crosslinks, an effect reversed by CT and mediated by a greater increase in bone resorption than in controls. Surprisingly, KO mice have significantly greater trabecular bone volume and a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in bone formation at 1 and 3 months of age. This effect appears to be mediated by increased bone formation. In addition, KO mice maintain bone mass following ovariectomy, whereas wild-type mice lose approximately one-third of their bone mass over 2 months. These findings argue for dual roles for CT/CGRP gene products: prevention of bone resorption in hypercalcemic states and a regulatory role in bone formation. PMID:12488435

  19. Deletion of Rictor in brain and fat alters peripheral clock gene expression and increases blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Drägert, Katja; Bhattacharya, Indranil; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Seebeck, Petra; Azzi, Abdelhalim; Brown, Steven A; Georgiopoulou, Stavroula; Held, Ulrike; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Arras, Margarete; Humar, Rok; Hall, Michael N; Battegay, Edouard; Haas, Elvira

    2015-08-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) contains the essential protein RICTOR and is activated by growth factors. mTORC2 in adipose tissue contributes to the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. In the perivascular adipose tissue, mTORC2 ensures normal vascular reactivity by controlling expression of inflammatory molecules. To assess whether RICTOR/mTORC2 contributes to blood pressure regulation, we applied a radiotelemetry approach in control and Rictor knockout (Rictor(aP2KO)) mice generated using adipocyte protein-2 gene promoter-driven CRE recombinase expression to delete Rictor. The 24-hour mean arterial pressure was increased in Rictor(aP2KO) mice, and the physiological decline in mean arterial pressure during the dark period was impaired. In parallel, heart rate and locomotor activity were elevated during the dark period with a pattern similar to blood pressure changes. This phenotype was associated with mild cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, decreased cardiac natriuretic peptides, and their receptor expression in adipocytes. Moreover, clock gene expression was reduced or phase-shifted in perivascular adipose tissue. No differences in clock gene expression were observed in the master clock suprachiasmatic nucleus, although Rictor gene expression was also lower in brain of Rictor(aP2KO) mice. Thus, this study highlights the importance of RICTOR/mTORC2 for interactions between vasculature, adipocytes, and brain to tune physiological outcomes, such as blood pressure and locomotor activity. PMID:26101345

  20. Soluble epoxide hydrolase gene deletion improves blood flow and reduces infarct size after cerebral ischemia in reproductively senescent female mice

    PubMed Central

    Zuloaga, Kristen L.; Zhang, Wenri; Roese, Natalie E.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a key enzyme in the metabolism of vasodilatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), is sexually dimorphic, suppressed by estrogen, and contributes to underlying sex differences in cerebral blood flow and injury after cerebral ischemia. We tested the hypothesis that sEH inhibition or gene deletion in reproductively senescent (RS) female mice would increase cerebral perfusion and decrease infarct size following stroke. RS (15–18 month old) and young (3–4 month old) female sEH knockout (sEHKO) mice and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to 45 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with laser Doppler perfusion monitoring. WT mice were treated with vehicle or a sEH inhibitor t-AUCB at the time of reperfusion and every 24 h thereafter for 3 days. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow were measured in vivo using optical microangiography (OMAG). Infarct size was measured 3 days after reperfusion. Infarct size and cerebral perfusion 24 h after MCAO were not altered by age. Both sEH gene deletion and sEH inhibition increased cortical perfusion 24 h after MCAO. Neither sEH gene deletion nor sEH inhibition reduced infarct size in young mice. However, sEH gene deletion, but not sEH inhibition of the hydrolase domain of the enzyme, decreased infarct size in RS mice. Results of these studies show that sEH gene deletion and sEH inhibition enhance cortical perfusion following MCAO and sEH gene deletion reduces damage after ischemia in RS female mice; however this neuroprotection in absent is young mice. PMID:25642188

  1. Overlapping submicroscopic deletions in Xq28 in two unrelated boys with developmental disorders: Identification of a gene near FRAXE

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Sutherland, G.R. |; Ades, L.C.; Gecz, J.; Baker, E.; Mulley, J.C.; Keinaenen, M.; Kaeaeriaeinen, H.

    1995-04-01

    Two unrelated boys are described with delay in development and submicroscopic deletions in Xq28, near FRAXE. Molecular diagnosis to exclude the fragile X (FRAXA) syndrome used the direct probe pfxa3, together with a control probe pS8 (DXS296), against PstI restriction digests of DNA. Deletions were detected initially by the control probe pS8, which is an anonymous fragment subcloned from YAC 539, within 1 Mb distal to FRAXA. Further molecular analyses determined that the maximum size of the deletion is <100 kb in one boy (MK) and is wholly overlapped by the deletion of up to {approximately}200 kb in the other (CB). These deletions lie between the sequences detected by the probe VK21C (DXS296) and a dinucleotide repeat VK18AC (DXS295). The patient MK had only speech delay with otherwise normal development, while patient CB had global developmental delay that included speech delay. Detection of overlapping deletions in these two cases led to speculation that coding sequences of a gene(s) important in language development may be affected. Hybridization of the pS8 and VK21A probes to zooblots revealed cross-species homology. This conservation during evolution suggested that this region contains sequences with functional significance in normal development. The VK21A probe detected a 9.5-kb transcript in placenta and brain and a smaller, 2.5-kb, transcript in other tissues analyzed. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Cap disease caused by heterozygous deletion of the beta-tropomyosin gene TPM2.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; de Jonghe, Peter; Marttila, Minttu; Laing, Nigel G; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2007-06-01

    "Cap myopathy" or "cap disease" is a congenital myopathy characterised by cap-like structures at the periphery of muscle fibres, consisting of disarranged thin filaments with enlarged Z discs. Here we report a deletion in the beta-tropomyosin (TPM2) gene causing cap disease in a 36-year-old male patient with congenital muscle weakness, myopathic facies and respiratory insufficiency. The mutation identified in this patient is an in-frame deletion (c.415_417delGAG) of one codon in exon 4 of TPM2 removing a single glutamate residue (p.Glu139del) from the beta-tropomyosin protein. This is expected to disrupt the seven-amino acid repeat essential for making a coiled coil, and thus to impair tropomyosin-actin interaction. Missense mutations in TPM2 have previously been found to cause rare cases of nemaline myopathy and distal arthrogryposis. This mutation is one not previously described and the first genetic cause identified for cap disease. PMID:17434307

  3. Deletion and Gene Expression Analyses Define the Paxilline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Penicillium paxilli

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Barry; Young, Carolyn A.; Saikia, Sanjay; McMillan, Lisa K.; Monahan, Brendon J.; Koulman, Albert; Astin, Jonathan; Eaton, Carla J.; Bryant, Andrea; Wrenn, Ruth E.; Finch, Sarah C.; Tapper, Brian A.; Parker, Emily J.; Jameson, Geoffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    The indole-diterpene paxilline is an abundant secondary metabolite synthesized by Penicillium paxilli. In total, 21 genes have been identified at the PAX locus of which six have been previously confirmed to have a functional role in paxilline biosynthesis. A combination of bioinformatics, gene expression and targeted gene replacement analyses were used to define the boundaries of the PAX gene cluster. Targeted gene replacement identified seven genes, paxG, paxA, paxM, paxB, paxC, paxP and paxQ that were all required for paxilline production, with one additional gene, paxD, required for regular prenylation of the indole ring post paxilline synthesis. The two putative transcription factors, PP104 and PP105, were not co-regulated with the pax genes and based on targeted gene replacement, including the double knockout, did not have a role in paxilline production. The relationship of indole dimethylallyl transferases involved in prenylation of indole-diterpenes such as paxilline or lolitrem B, can be found as two disparate clades, not supported by prenylation type (e.g., regular or reverse). This paper provides insight into the P. paxilli indole-diterpene locus and reviews the recent advances identified in paxilline biosynthesis. PMID:23949005

  4. A Deletion in the Canine POMC Gene Is Associated with Weight and Appetite in Obesity-Prone Labrador Retriever Dogs.

    PubMed

    Raffan, Eleanor; Dennis, Rowena J; O'Donovan, Conor J; Becker, Julia M; Scott, Robert A; Smith, Stephen P; Withers, David J; Wood, Claire J; Conci, Elena; Clements, Dylan N; Summers, Kim M; German, Alexander J; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Arendt, Maja L; Iyemere, Valentine P; Withers, Elaine; Söder, Josefin; Wernersson, Sara; Andersson, Göran; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Yeo, Giles S H; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2016-05-10

    Sequencing of candidate genes for obesity in Labrador retriever dogs identified a 14 bp deletion in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) with an allele frequency of 12%. The deletion disrupts the β-MSH and β-endorphin coding sequences and is associated with body weight (per allele effect of 0.33 SD), adiposity, and greater food motivation. Among other dog breeds, the deletion was only found in the closely related flat-coat retriever (FCR), where it is similarly associated with body weight and food motivation. The mutation is significantly more common in Labrador retrievers selected to become assistance dogs than pets. In conclusion, the deletion in POMC is a significant modifier of weight and appetite in Labrador retrievers and FCRs and may influence other behavioral traits. PMID:27157046

  5. The exon 55 deletion in the nebulin gene--one single founder mutation with world-wide occurrence.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Greenleaf, Rebecca S; DeChene, Elizabeth T; Kellinsalmi, Mutsumi; Pelin, Katarina; Laing, Nigel G; Beggs, Alan H; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2009-03-01

    In 2004, Anderson et al. reported a homozygous 2502 bp deletion including exon 55 of the nebulin gene in five Ashkenazi Jewish probands with nemaline myopathy. We determined the occurrence of this deletion in a world-wide series of 355 nemaline myopathy probands with no previously known mutation in other genes and found the mutation in 14 probands, two of whom represented families previously ascertained by Anderson et al. Two of the families were not of known Ashkenazi Jewish descent but they had the haplotype known to segregate with this mutation. In all but two of eight homozygous patients, the clinical picture was more severe than in typical nemaline myopathy. PMID:19232495

  6. Impact of UGT2B17 gene deletion on the steroid profile of an athlete.

    PubMed

    Martín-Escudero, Pilar; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesús; Del Prado, Nayade; Galindo Canales, Mercedes; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel; Vargas, Soledad; Soldevilla, Ana B; Serrano-Garde, Ester; Miguel-Tobal, Francisco; Maestro de Las Casas, Marisa; Fernandez-Pérez, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of the testosterone to epitestosterone ratio (T/E ratio) in urine is often used as a marker for testosterone administration in the doping control field. This study examines the frequencies of the different expression forms of the UGT2B17 gene, and assesses their effects on this marker in volunteer subjects. The sample for this descriptive study was composed of male and female athletes aged between 16 and 55 years old who practiced different sports disciplines. All participants underwent a sports-medical physical examination, and subsequently provided 10 urine samples consecutively over a period of 48 h. The dependent variable examined was T/E and the main independent variable was the UGT2B17 gene polymorphism. During 1 year, 1410 urine samples were obtained from 141 athletes. The frequencies of the three genotypes were as follows: wt homozygotes (ins/ins) 48.2% (n = 68), mutant homozygotes (del/del) 12.1% (n = 17), and heterozygotes (ins/del) 39.7% (n = 56). Genotype distributions varied significantly (P < 0.001) according to ethnicity, 80% of Asian subjects being homozygous for the gene deletion (del/del) compared to 6.9% of Caucasian subjects. A multivariate analysis adjusted for genotype, age, sex, and sports discipline revealed that athletes with the del/del polymorphism showed a significantly lower mean T/E than heterozygotes (ins/del). In contrast, homozygous athletes for the gene insertion (ins/ins) showed higher mean T/E ratios than heterozygotes (ins/del). UGT2B17 gene deletion has a strong influence on the T/E ratio in urine, which is the most efficient indicator of testosterone prohormone misuse. Others factors studied seem not to have such an impact. The genotyping of UGT2B17 is an important source of information for understanding steroid profiling in the doping control field; therefore it is suggested that it be included in the Athletes Biological Passport. PMID:26668303

  7. Characterisation of two deletions involving NPC1 and flanking genes in Niemann-Pick type C disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pascau, Laura; Toma, Claudio; Macías-Vidal, Judit; Cozar, Mónica; Cormand, Bru; Lykopoulou, Lilia; Coll, Maria Josep; Grinberg, Daniel; Vilageliu, Lluïsa

    2012-12-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder characterised by the accumulation of a complex pattern of lipids in the lysosomal-late endosomal system. More than 300 disease-causing mutations have been identified so far in the NPC1 and NPC2 genes, including indel, missense, nonsense and splicing mutations. Only one genomic deletion, of more than 23 kb, has been previously reported. We describe two larger structural variants, encompassing NPC1 and flanking genes, as a cause of the disease. QMPSF, SNP inheritance and CytoScan® HD Array were used to confirm and further characterise the presence of hemizygous deletions in two patients. One of the patients (NPC-57) bore a previously described missense mutation (p.T1066N) and an inherited deletion that included NPC1, C18orf8 and part of ANKRD29 gene. The second patient (NPC-G1) had a 1-bp deletion (c.852delT; p.F284Lfs*26) and a deletion encompassing the promoter region and exons 1-10 of NPC1 and the adjacent ANKRD29 and LAMA3. This study characterised two novel chromosomal microdeletions at 18q11-q12 that cause NPC disease and provide insight into missing NPC1 mutant alleles. PMID:23142039

  8. GJB1/Connexin 32 whole gene deletions in patients with X-linked Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Zhang, Feng; Towne, Charles F.; Batish, Sat Dev

    2014-01-01

    The X-linked form of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMTX) is the second most common form of this genetically heterogeneous inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT1X is caused by mutations in the GJB1 gene. Most of the mutations causative for CMT1X are missense mutations. In addition, a few disease causative nonsense mutations and frameshift deletions that lead to truncated forms of the protein have also been reported to be associated with CMT1X. Previously, there have been reports of patients with deletions of the coding sequence of GJB1; however, the size and breakpoints of these deletions were not assessed. Here, we report five patients with deletions that range in size from 12.2 to 48.3 kb and that completely eliminate the entire coding sequence of the GJB1 gene, resulting in a null allele for this locus. Analyses of the breakpoints of these deletions showed that they are nonrecurrent and that they can be generated by different mechanisms. In addition to PMP22, GJB1 is the second CMT gene for which both point mutations and genomic rearrangements can cause a neuropathy phenotype, stressing the importance of CMT as a genomic disorder. PMID:20532933

  9. P-element-induced interallelic gene conversion of insertions and deletions in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Schlitz, D M; Engels, W R

    1993-11-01

    We studied the process by which whd, a P-element insertion allele of the Drosophila melanogaster white locus, is replaced by its homolog in the presence of transposase. These events are interpreted as the result of double-strand gap repair following excision of the P transposon in whd. We used a series of alleles derived from whd through P-element mobility as templates for this repair. One group of alleles, referred to collectively as whd-F, carried fragments of the P element that had lost some of the sequences needed in cis for mobility. The other group, whd-D, had lost all of the P insert and had some of the flanking DNA from white deleted. The average replacement frequencies were 43% for whd-F alleles and 7% for the whd-D alleles. Some of the former were converted at frequencies exceeding 50%. Our data suggest that the high conversion frequencies for the whd-F templates can be attributed at least in part to an elevated efficiency of repair of unexpanded gaps that is possibly caused by the closer match between whd-F sequences and the unexpanded gap endpoints. In addition, we found that the gene substitutions were almost exclusively in the direction of whd being replaced by the whd-F or whd-D allele rather than the reverse. The template alleles were usually unaltered in the process. This asymmetry implies that the conversion process is unidirectional and that the P fragments are not good substrates for P-element transposase. Our results help elucidate a highly efficient double-strand gap repair mechanism in D. melanogaster that can also be used for gene replacement procedures involving insertions and deletions. They also help explain the rapid spread of P elements in populations. PMID:8413290

  10. Intellectual Ability in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Dystrophin Gene Mutation Location

    PubMed Central

    Milic Rasic, V; Vojinovic, D; Pesovic, J; Mijalkovic, G; Lukic, V; Mladenovic, J; Kosac, A; Novakovic, I; Maksimovic, N; Romac, S; Todorovic, S; Savic Pavicevic, D

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy during childhood. Mutations in dystrophin (DMD) gene are also recognized as a cause of cognitive impairment. We aimed to determine the association between intelligence level and mutation location in DMD genes in Serbian patients with DMD. Forty-one male patients with DMD, aged 3 to 16 years, were recruited at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in Belgrade, Serbia. All patients had defined DMD gene deletions or duplications [multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR)] and cognitive status assessment (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Brunet-Lezine scale, Vineland-Doll scale). In 37 patients with an estimated full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ), six (16.22%) had borderline intelligence (70DMD and characterizing the genotype can define necessity of early cognitive interventions in DMD patients. PMID:25937795

  11. Intellectual ability in the duchenne muscular dystrophy and dystrophin gene mutation location.

    PubMed

    Milic Rasic, V; Vojinovic, D; Pesovic, J; Mijalkovic, G; Lukic, V; Mladenovic, J; Kosac, A; Novakovic, I; Maksimovic, N; Romac, S; Todorovic, S; Savic Pavicevic, D

    2014-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy during childhood. Mutations in dystrophin (DMD) gene are also recognized as a cause of cognitive impairment. We aimed to determine the association between intelligence level and mutation location in DMD genes in Serbian patients with DMD. Forty-one male patients with DMD, aged 3 to 16 years, were recruited at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in Belgrade, Serbia. All patients had defined DMD gene deletions or duplications [multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR)] and cognitive status assessment (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Brunet-Lezine scale, Vineland-Doll scale). In 37 patients with an estimated full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ), six (16.22%) had borderline intelligence (70DMD and characterizing the genotype can define necessity of early cognitive interventions in DMD patients. PMID:25937795

  12. Increased bone mass is an unexpected phenotype associated with deletion of the calcitonin gene

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Ana O.; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Thomas, Pamela M.; Priemel, Matthias; Rueger, Johannes M.; Nasonkin, Igor; Bradley, Allan; Hughes, Mark R.; Ordonez, Nelson; Cote, Gilbert J.; Amling, Michael; Gagel, Robert F.

    2002-01-01

    Calcitonin (CT) is a known inhibitor of bone resorption. Calcitonin gene–related peptide-α (CGRPα), produced by alternative RNA processing of the CT/CGRP gene, has no clearly defined role in bone. To better understand the physiologic role of the CT/CGRP gene we created a mouse in which the coding sequences for both CT and CGRPα were deleted by homologous recombination. The CT/CGRP–/– knockout (KO) mice procreated normally, there were no identifiable developmental defects at birth, and they had normal baseline calcium-related chemistry values. However, KO animals were more responsive to exogenous human parathyroid hormone as evidenced by a greater increase of the serum calcium concentration and urine deoxypyridinoline crosslinks, an effect reversed by CT and mediated by a greater increase in bone resorption than in controls. Surprisingly, KO mice have significantly greater trabecular bone volume and a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in bone formation at 1 and 3 months of age. This effect appears to be mediated by increased bone formation. In addition, KO mice maintain bone mass following ovariectomy, whereas wild-type mice lose approximately one-third of their bone mass over 2 months. These findings argue for dual roles for CT/CGRP gene products: prevention of bone resorption in hypercalcemic states and a regulatory role in bone formation. PMID:12488435

  13. Deletions of multidrug resistance gene loci in breast cancer leads to the down-regulation of its expression and predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Litviakov, Nikolai V.; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V.; Tsyganov, Matvey M.; Slonimskaya, Elena M.; Ibragimova, Marina K.; Kazantseva, Polina V.; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Choinzonov, Eugeniy L.

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is intensively used for the treatment of primary breast cancer. In our previous studies, we reported that clinical tumor response to NAC is associated with the change of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expression in tumors after chemotherapy. In this study we performed a combined analysis of MDR gene locus deletions in tumor DNA, MDR gene expression and clinical response to NAC in 73 BC patients. Copy number variations (CNVs) in biopsy specimens were tested using high-density microarray platform CytoScanTM HD Array (Affymetrix, USA). 75%–100% persons having deletions of MDR gene loci demonstrated the down-regulation of MDR gene expression. Expression of MDR genes was 2–8 times lower in patients with deletion than in patients having no deletion only in post-NAC tumors samples but not in tumor tissue before chemotherapy. All patients with deletions of ABCB1 ABCB 3 ABCC5 gene loci – 7q21.1, 6p21.32, 3q27 correspondingly, and most patients having deletions in ABCC1 (16p13.1), ABCC2 (10q24), ABCG1 (21q22.3), ABCG2 (4q22.1), responded favorably to NAC. The analysis of all CNVs, including both amplification and deletion showed that the frequency of 13q14.2 deletion was 85% among patients bearing tumor with the deletion at least in one MDR gene locus versus 9% in patients with no deletions. Differences in the frequency of 13q14.2 deletions between the two groups were statistically significant (p = 2.03 ×10−11, Fisher test, Bonferroni-adjusted p = 1.73 × 10−8). In conclusion, our study for the first time demonstrates that deletion MDR gene loci can be used as predictive marker for tumor response to NAC. PMID:26799285

  14. Chronic hypoxia impairs muscle function in the Drosophila model of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, Matias; Willmann, Gabriel; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe progressive myopathy caused by mutations in the DMD gene leading to a deficiency of the dystrophin protein. Due to ongoing muscle necrosis in respiratory muscles late-stage DMD is associated with respiratory insufficiency and chronic hypoxia (CH). To understand the effects of CH on dystrophin-deficient muscle in vivo, we exposed the Drosophila model for DMD (dmDys) to CH during a 16-day ascent to the summit of Mount Denali/McKinley (6194 meters above sea level). Additionally, dmDys and wild type (WT) flies were also exposed to CH in laboratory simulations of high altitude hypoxia. Expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix GeneChips® and validated using qPCR. Hypoxic dmDys differentially expressed 1281 genes, whereas the hypoxic WT flies differentially expressed 56 genes. Interestingly, a number of genes (e.g. heat shock proteins) were discordantly regulated in response to CH between dmDys and WT. We tested the possibility that the disparate molecular responses of dystrophin-deficient tissues to CH could adversely affect muscle by performing functional assays in vivo. Normoxic and CH WT and dmDys flies were challenged with acute hypoxia and time-to-recover determined as well as subjected to climbing tests. Impaired performance was noted for CH-dmDys compared to normoxic dmDys or WT flies (rank order: Normoxic-WT ≈ CH-WT> Normoxic-dmDys> CH-dmDys). These data suggest that dystrophin-deficiency is associated with a disparate, pathological hypoxic stress response(s) and is more sensitive to hypoxia induced muscle dysfunction in vivo. We hypothesize that targeting/correcting the disparate molecular response(s) to hypoxia may offer a novel therapeutic strategy in DMD. PMID:20975992

  15. Chronic Hypoxia Impairs Muscle Function in the Drosophila Model of Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueira, Matias; Willmann, Gabriel; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe progressive myopathy caused by mutations in the DMD gene leading to a deficiency of the dystrophin protein. Due to ongoing muscle necrosis in respiratory muscles late-stage DMD is associated with respiratory insufficiency and chronic hypoxia (CH). To understand the effects of CH on dystrophin-deficient muscle in vivo, we exposed the Drosophila model for DMD (dmDys) to CH during a 16-day ascent to the summit of Mount Denali/McKinley (6194 meters above sea level). Additionally, dmDys and wild type (WT) flies were also exposed to CH in laboratory simulations of high altitude hypoxia. Expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix GeneChips® and validated using qPCR. Hypoxic dmDys differentially expressed 1281 genes, whereas the hypoxic WT flies differentially expressed 56 genes. Interestingly, a number of genes (e.g. heat shock proteins) were discordantly regulated in response to CH between dmDys and WT. We tested the possibility that the disparate molecular responses of dystrophin-deficient tissues to CH could adversely affect muscle by performing functional assays in vivo. Normoxic and CH WT and dmDys flies were challenged with acute hypoxia and time-to-recover determined as well as subjected to climbing tests. Impaired performance was noted for CH-dmDys compared to normoxic dmDys or WT flies (rank order: Normoxic-WT ≈ CH-WT> Normoxic-dmDys> CH-dmDys). These data suggest that dystrophin-deficiency is associated with a disparate, pathological hypoxic stress response(s) and is more sensitive to hypoxia induced muscle dysfunction in vivo. We hypothesize that targeting/correcting the disparate molecular response(s) to hypoxia may offer a novel therapeutic strategy in DMD. PMID:20975992

  16. Sub-optimal phenotypes of double-knockout mutants of Escherichia coli depend on the order of gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Gawand, Pratish; Said Abukar, Fatumina; Venayak, Naveen; Partow, Siavash; Motter, Adilson E; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic networks are characterized by multiple redundant reactions that do not have a clear biological function. The redundancies in the metabolic networks are implicated in adaptation to random mutations and survival under different environmental conditions. Reactions that are not active under wild-type growth conditions, but get transiently activated after a mutation event such as gene deletion are known as latent reactions. Characterization of multiple-gene knockout mutants can identify the physiological roles of latent reactions. In this study, we characterized double-gene deletion mutants of E. coli with the aim of investigating the sub-optimal physiology of the mutants and the possible roles of latent reactions. Specifically, we investigated the effects of the deletion of the glyoxylate-shunt gene aceA (encoding a latent reaction enzyme, isocitrate lyase) on the growth characteristics of the mutant E. coli Δpgi. The deletion of aceA reduced the growth rate of E. coli Δpgi, indicating that the activation of the glyoxylate shunt plays an important role in adaptation of the mutant E. coli Δpgi when no other latent reactions are concurrently inactivated. We also investigated the effect of the order of the gene deletions on the growth rates and substrate uptake rates of the double-gene deletion mutants. The results indicate that the order in which genes are deleted determines the phenotype of the mutants during the sub-optimal growth phase. To elucidate the mechanism behind the difference between the observed phenotypes, we carried out transcriptomic analysis and constraint-based modeling of the mutants. Transcriptomic analysis showed differential expression of the gene aceK (encoding the protein isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase) involved in controlling the isocitrate flux through the TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt. Higher acetate production in the E. coli ΔaceA1 Δpgi2 mutant was consistent with the increased aceK expression, which limits the TCA cycle

  17. Murine cytomegalovirus with a deletion of genes spanning HindIII-J and -I displays altered cell and tissue tropism.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, V J; Stenberg, R M; Staley, T L; Virgin, H W; MacDonald, M R; Paetzold, S; Farrell, H E; Rawlinson, W D; Campbell, A E

    1996-03-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) gene products dispensable for growth in cell culture are likely to have important functions within the infected host, influencing tissue tropism, dissemination, or immunological responses against the virus. To identify such genes, our strategy was to delete large regions of the MCMV genome likely to contain genes nonessential for virus replication in NIH 3T3 cells. Mutant virus RV7 contained a deletion of 7.7 kb spanning portions of MCMV HindIII-J and -I. This virus grew comparably to wild-type (WT) virus in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, primary embryo fibroblasts, and bone marrow macrophages. However, RV7 failed to replicate in target organs of immunocompetent BALB/c mice and severe combined immunodeficient mice, which are exquisitely sensitive to MCMV infection. This defect in vivo growth may be related to the observation that RV7 grew poorly in the peritoneal macrophage cell line IC-21, which is highly permissive for growth of WT MCMV. Two other mutant viruses with an insertion or smaller deletion in the region common to the RV7 deletion grew comparably to WT virus in the macrophage cell line and replicated in salivary gland tissue. The poor growth of RV7 in IC-21 cells was due to a block in immediate-early gene expression, as levels of RNA from immediate-early gene IE1 were reduced eightfold compared with levels for WT virus in macrophages infected with RV7. Consequently, levels of RNA from early and late genes were also reduced. The lower expression of IE1 in RV7-infected IC-21 macrophages was not due to defective entry of virus into the cells, as equal amounts of viral DNA were present in cells 3 h after infection with RV7 or WT MCMV. These studies demonstrate that deletion of sequences in HindIII-J and -I confer altered cell and tissue tropism. PMID:8627652

  18. Murine cytomegalovirus with a deletion of genes spanning HindIII-J and -I displays altered cell and tissue tropism.

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, V J; Stenberg, R M; Staley, T L; Virgin, H W; MacDonald, M R; Paetzold, S; Farrell, H E; Rawlinson, W D; Campbell, A E

    1996-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) gene products dispensable for growth in cell culture are likely to have important functions within the infected host, influencing tissue tropism, dissemination, or immunological responses against the virus. To identify such genes, our strategy was to delete large regions of the MCMV genome likely to contain genes nonessential for virus replication in NIH 3T3 cells. Mutant virus RV7 contained a deletion of 7.7 kb spanning portions of MCMV HindIII-J and -I. This virus grew comparably to wild-type (WT) virus in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, primary embryo fibroblasts, and bone marrow macrophages. However, RV7 failed to replicate in target organs of immunocompetent BALB/c mice and severe combined immunodeficient mice, which are exquisitely sensitive to MCMV infection. This defect in vivo growth may be related to the observation that RV7 grew poorly in the peritoneal macrophage cell line IC-21, which is highly permissive for growth of WT MCMV. Two other mutant viruses with an insertion or smaller deletion in the region common to the RV7 deletion grew comparably to WT virus in the macrophage cell line and replicated in salivary gland tissue. The poor growth of RV7 in IC-21 cells was due to a block in immediate-early gene expression, as levels of RNA from immediate-early gene IE1 were reduced eightfold compared with levels for WT virus in macrophages infected with RV7. Consequently, levels of RNA from early and late genes were also reduced. The lower expression of IE1 in RV7-infected IC-21 macrophages was not due to defective entry of virus into the cells, as equal amounts of viral DNA were present in cells 3 h after infection with RV7 or WT MCMV. These studies demonstrate that deletion of sequences in HindIII-J and -I confer altered cell and tissue tropism. PMID:8627652

  19. Deletion of the Pichia pastoris KU70 homologue facilitates platform strain generation for gene expression and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Näätsaari, Laura; Mistlberger, Beate; Ruth, Claudia; Hajek, Tanja; Hartner, Franz S; Glieder, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Targeted gene replacement to generate knock-outs and knock-ins is a commonly used method to study the function of unknown genes. In the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, the importance of specific gene targeting has increased since the genome sequencing projects of the most commonly used strains have been accomplished, but rapid progress in the field has been impeded by inefficient mechanisms for accurate integration. To improve gene targeting efficiency in P. pastoris, we identified and deleted the P. pastoris KU70 homologue. We observed a substantial increase in the targeting efficiency using the two commonly known and used integration loci HIS4 and ADE1, reaching over 90% targeting efficiencies with only 250-bp flanking homologous DNA. Although the ku70 deletion strain was noted to be more sensitive to UV rays than the corresponding wild-type strain, no lethality, severe growth retardation or loss of gene copy numbers could be detected during repetitive rounds of cultivation and induction of heterologous protein production. Furthermore, we demonstrated the use of the ku70 deletion strain for fast and simple screening of genes in the search of new auxotrophic markers by targeting dihydroxyacetone synthase and glycerol kinase genes. Precise knock-out strains for the well-known P. pastoris AOX1, ARG4 and HIS4 genes and a whole series of expression vectors were generated based on the wild-type platform strain, providing a broad spectrum of precise tools for both intracellular and secreted production of heterologous proteins utilizing various selection markers and integration strategies for targeted or random integration of single and multiple genes. The simplicity of targeted integration in the ku70 deletion strain will further support protein production strain generation and synthetic biology using P. pastoris strains as platform hosts. PMID:22768112

  20. Gene expression profiling of a nisin-sensitive Listeria monocytogenes Scott A ctsR deletion mutant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhong; Morgan, Shannon; Ream, Amy; Huang, Lihan

    2013-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of significant threat to public health. Nisin is the only bacteriocin that can be used as a food preservative. Due to its antimicrobial activity, it can be used to control L. monocytogenes in food; however, the antimicrobial mechanism of nisin activity against L. monocytogenes is not fully understood. The CtsR (class III stress gene repressor) protein negatively regulates the expression of class III heat shock genes. A spontaneous pressure-tolerant ctsR deletion mutant that showed increased sensitivity to nisin has been identified. Microarray technology was used to monitor the gene expression profiles of the ctsR mutant under treatments with nisin. Compared to the nisin-treated wild type, 113 genes were up-regulated (>2-fold increase) in the ctsR deletion mutant whereas four genes were down-regulated (<-2-fold decrease). The up-regulated genes included genes that encode for ribosomal proteins, membrane proteins, cold-shock domain proteins, translation initiation and elongation factors, cell division, an ATP-dependent ClpC protease, a putative accessory gene regulator protein D, transport and binding proteins, a beta-glucoside-specific phosphotransferase system IIABC component, as well as hypothetical proteins. The down-regulated genes consisted of genes that encode for virulence, a transcriptional regulator, a stress protein, and a hypothetical protein. The gene expression changes determined by microarray assays were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analyses. Moreover, an in-frame deletion mutant for one of the induced genes (LMOf2365_1877) was constructed in the wild-type L. monocytogenes F2365 background. ΔLMOf2365_1877 had increased nisin sensitivity compared to the wild-type strain. This study enhances our understanding of how nisin interacts with the ctsR gene product in L. monocytogenes and may contribute to the understanding of the antibacterial mechanisms of nisin. PMID:23494707

  1. Impact of UGT2B17 Gene Deletion on the Pharmacokinetics of 17-Hydroexemestane in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanly M; Atchley, Daniel H; Murphy, Michael A; Gurley, Bill J; Kamdem, Landry K

    2016-07-01

    Exemestane is an aromatase inhibitor drug used for the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer. 17-Hydroexemestane, the major and biologically active metabolite of exemestane in humans, is eliminated via glucuronidation by the polymorphic UGT2B17 phase II drug-metabolizing enzyme. Previous microsomal studies have shown that UGT2B17 gene deletion affects the intrinsic hepatic clearances of 17-hydroexemestane in vitro. In this open-label study we set out to assess the effect of UGT2B17 gene deletion on the pharmacokinetics of 17-hydroexemestane in healthy female volunteers with and without UGT2B17. To achieve this goal, 14 healthy postmenopausal women (8 carriers of the homozygous UGT2B17 wild-type allele and 6 carriers of the homozygous UGT2B17 gene-deletion allele) were enrolled and invited to receive a single 25-mg oral dose of exemestane. Pharmacokinetics was assessed over 72 hours postdosing. Our results showed that there were statistically significant differences in plasma 17-hydroexemestane AUC0-∞ (P = .0007) and urine 17-hydroexemestane C24h (P = .001) between UGT2B17 genotype groups. Our data suggest that UGT2B17 gene deletion influences 17-hydroexemestane pharmacokinetics in humans. PMID:26608382

  2. A self-excising beta-recombinase/six cassette for repetitive gene deletion and homokaryon purification in Neurospora crassa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study we developed a cassette employing a bacterial beta-recombinase acting on six recognition sequences (beta-rec/six), which allowed repetitive site-specific gene deletion and marker recycling in Neurospora crassa. However, only one positive selection marker was used in the cassette...

  3. MULTIPLEX PCR ANALYSIS OF IN VIVO-ARISING DELETION MUTATIONS IN THE HPRT GENE OF HUMAN T-LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure was adapted for the rapid and efficient evaluation of the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene in human T-lymphocytes for deletions. he hprt clonal assay was used to isolate in-vivo-arising hprt-deficient...

  4. Robust Parameter Identification to Perform the Modeling of pta and poxB Genes Deletion Effect on Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Torres, V; Rios-Lozano, M; Badillo-Corona, J A; Chairez, I; Garibay-Orijel, C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to design a robust parameter identification algorithm to characterize the effect of gene deletion on Escherichia coli (E. coli) MG1655. Two genes (pta and poxB) in the competitive pathways were deleted from this microorganism to inhibit pyruvate consumption. This condition deviated the E. coli metabolism toward the Krebs cycle. As a consequence, the biomass, substrate (glucose), lactic, and acetate acids as well as ethanol concentrations were modified. A hybrid model was proposed to consider the effect of gene deletion on the metabolism of E. coli. The model parameters were estimated by the application of a least mean square method based on the instrument variable technique. To evaluate the parametric identifier method, a set of robust exact differentiators, based on the super-twisting algorithm, was implemented. The hybrid model was successfully characterized by the parameters obtained from experimental information of E. coli MG1655. The significant difference between parameters obtained with wild-type strain and the modified (with deleted genes) justifies the application of the parametric identification algorithm. This characterization can be used to optimize the production of different byproducts of commercial interest. PMID:27093969

  5. DDX3Y gene rescue of a Y chromosome AZFa deletion restores germ cell formation and transcriptional programs

    PubMed Central

    Ramathal, Cyril; Angulo, Benjamin; Sukhwani, Meena; Cui, Jun; Durruthy-Durruthy, Jens; Fang, Fang; Schanes, Paula; Turek, Paul J.; Orwig, Kyle E.; Reijo Pera, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of the AZFa region (AZoospermia Factor-a) region of the human Y chromosome cause irreversible spermatogenic failure that presents clinically in men as Sertoli-cell only (SCO) pathology of the testis. Deletions of the AZFa region typically encompass two genes: DDX3Y and USP9Y. However, human genetic evidence indicates that SCO is most tightly linked to deletion of DDX3Y and that deletions/mutations of USP9Y can be transmitted from one generation to the next. Here, we generated stable iPSC lines with AZFa deletions, tested complementation via introduction of DDX3Y, and assessed ability to form germ cells in vivo in a xenotransplantation model. We observed a quantifiable improvement in formation of germ cell like cells (GCLCs) from complemented donor iPSCs. Moreover, expression of UTF1, a prospermatogonial protein, was restored in cells complemented by introduction of DDX3Y on the AZFa background. Whole-genome RNA sequencing of purified GCLCs revealed an enrichment of genes involved in translational suppression and transcriptional control in DDX3Y-rescued GCLCs over mutant GCLCs, which maintained a molecular phenotype more similar to undifferentiated iPSCs. This study demonstrates the ability to probe fundamental genetics of human germ cell formation by complementation and indicates that DDX3Y functions in the earliest stages of human germ cell development. PMID:26456624

  6. Characterization of a large deletion in the {beta}-globin gene cluster in a newborn with hemoglobin FE

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, E.; Dietz, L.; Shafer, F.

    1994-09-01

    A sample on a newborn with hemoglobin FE screen results was obtained to investigate whether E/E or B/{beta}{degrees} thalassemia was present using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methodology. The newborn appeared homozygous for the hemoglobin E mutation in our initial study, but the parents` genotypes did not support this diagnosis. The father is homozygous for the absence of the hemoglobin E mutation (non E/non E) and the mother is heterozygous (E/non E) for this mutation. The limitation of PCR analysis is an assumption that the amplification of the two {beta}-globin alleles is equivalent. A large deletion on one {beta}-globin gene, which would produce E/{beta}{degrees} thalassemia, would be missed if it included part or the entire region subjected to amplification. The family results were consistent with either non-paternity, sample mix-up or such a deletion of the {beta}-globin gene in the father and child. To rule out the possibility of non-paternity, two polymorphic loci (HLA on chromosome 6 and a VNTR system of chromosome 17) that are outside of the {beta}-globin gene were analyzed and show that inheritance is consistent and the likelihood of a sample mix-up is then reduced. We therefore believe there is a gene deletion in this family. At the present time, analyses of the RFLPs that are 5{prime} of the {beta}-globin gene cluster show that the polymorphisms most distal from the 5{prime} {beta}-globin gene are not being inherited as expected. These results support our interpretation that a deletion exists in the father and was inherited by the child. The father`s clinical picture of possible HPFH (the father has 12% hemoglobin F) also supports the interpretation of a deletion in this family. Deletions of the {beta}-globin gene within this ethnic group are rare. Currently, Southern blots on the family are being probed to determine the extent of the putative deletion.

  7. Demonstration of the presence of the "deleted" MIR122 gene in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Ibrahim A Y; Fei, Yue; Kalea, Anastasia Z; Yin, Dan; Smith, Andrew J P; Palmen, Jutta; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J; Walker, Ann P

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA 122 (miR-122) is highly expressed in the liver where it influences diverse biological processes and pathways, including hepatitis C virus replication and metabolism of iron and cholesterol. It is processed from a long non-coding primary transcript (~7.5 kb) and the gene has two evolutionarily-conserved regions containing the pri-mir-122 promoter and pre-mir-122 hairpin region. Several groups reported that the widely-used hepatocytic cell line HepG2 had deficient expression of miR-122, previously ascribed to deletion of the pre-mir-122 stem-loop region. We aimed to characterise this deletion by direct sequencing of 6078 bp containing the pri-mir-122 promoter and pre-mir-122 stem-loop region in HepG2 and Huh-7, a control hepatocytic cell line reported to express miR-122, supported by sequence analysis of cloned genomic DNA. In contrast to previous findings, the entire sequence was present in both cell lines. Ten SNPs were heterozygous in HepG2 indicating that DNA was present in two copies. Three validation isolates of HepG2 were sequenced, showing identical genotype to the original in two, whereas the third was different. Investigation of promoter chromatin status by FAIRE showed that Huh-7 cells had 6.2 ± 0.19- and 2.7 ± 0.01- fold more accessible chromatin at the proximal (HNF4α-binding) and distal DR1 transcription factor sites, compared to HepG2 cells (p=0.03 and 0.001, respectively). This was substantiated by ENCODE genome annotations, which showed a DNAse I hypersensitive site in the pri-mir-122 promoter in Huh-7 that was absent in HepG2 cells. While the origin of the reported deletion is unclear, cell lines should be obtained from a reputable source and used at low passage number to avoid discrepant results. Deficiency of miR-122 expression in HepG2 cells may be related to a relative deficiency of accessible promoter chromatin in HepG2 versus Huh-7 cells. PMID:25811611

  8. Genomic organization and evolution of immunoglobulin kappa gene enhancers and kappa deleting element in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sabyasachi; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Nei, Masatoshi

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the genomic structure and evolutionary pattern of immunoglobulin kappa deleting element (KDE) and three kappa enhancers (KE5′, KE3′P, and KE3′D) in eleven mammalian genomic sequences. Our results show that the relative positions and the genomic organization of the KDE and the kappa enhancers are conserved in all mammals studied and have not been affected by the local rearrangements in the immunoglobulin kappa (IGK) light chain locus over a long evolutionary time (∼120 million years of mammalian evolution). Our observations suggest that the sequence motifs in these regulatory elements have been conserved by purifying selection to achieve proper regulation of the expression of the IGK light chain genes. The conservation of the three enhancers in all mammals indicates that these species may use similar mechanisms to regulate IGK gene expression. However, some activities of the IGK enhancers might have evolved in the eutherian lineage. The presence of the three IGK enhancers, KDE, and other recombining elements (REs) in all mammals (including platypus) suggest that these genomic elements were in place before the mammalian radiation. PMID:19560204

  9. 60 YEARS OF POMC: The proopiomelanocortin gene: discovery, deletion and disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian J L

    2016-05-01

    The cloning of the bovine proopiomelanocortin (POMC) cDNA in 1978 by Nakanishi and colleagues was the result of a remarkable series of exacting and ingenious experiments. With this work, they instantly confirmed the single precursor hypothesis for adrenocorticotrophic hormone-β-lipotropin, as it was then known, and in so doing revealed the existence of additional, largely unpredicted, N-terminal peptides that together formed the POMC precursor peptide. This work paved the way for a host of additional studies into the physiology of these peptides and their regulation. Furthermore, the cloning of the murine Pomc gene was essential for subsequent studies, in which Pomc was intentionally deleted in the mouse illuminating its substantial role in body weight regulation and adrenal function. Contemporaneously with this work, naturally occurring mutations in human POMC came to light underlining the vital role of this gene in appetite regulation. This article reviews each of these aspects of POMC with the benefit of several decades of hindsight and informed by more recent genomic and transcriptomic data. PMID:26643913

  10. Deletion in the EVC2 Gene Causes Chondrodysplastic Dwarfism in Tyrolean Grey Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Benazzi, Cinzia; Bolcato, Marilena; Brunetti, Barbara; Muscatello, Luisa Vera; Dittmer, Keren; Piffer, Christian; Gentile, Arcangelo; Drögemüller, Cord

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2013 seven Italian Tyrolean Grey calves were born with abnormally short limbs. Detailed clinical and pathological examination revealed similarities to chondrodysplastic dwarfism. Pedigree analysis showed a common founder, assuming autosomal monogenic recessive transmission of the defective allele. A positional cloning approach combining genome wide association and homozygosity mapping identified a single 1.6 Mb genomic region on BTA 6 that was associated with the disease. Whole genome re-sequencing of an affected calf revealed a single candidate causal mutation in the Ellis van Creveld syndrome 2 (EVC2) gene. This gene is known to be associated with chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Japanese Brown cattle, and dwarfism, abnormal nails and teeth, and dysostosis in humans with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of a 2 bp deletion in exon 19 (c.2993_2994ACdel) that led to a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of bovine EVC2, and was concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier animals. This loss of function mutation confirms the important role of EVC2 in bone development. Genetic testing can now be used to eliminate this form of chondrodysplastic dwarfism from Tyrolean Grey cattle. PMID:24733244

  11. Deletion of hxk1 gene results in derepression of xylose utilization in Scheffersomyces stipitis.

    PubMed

    Dashtban, Mehdi; Wen, Xin; Bajwa, Paramjit K; Ho, Chi-Yip; Lee, Hung

    2015-06-01

    A major problem in fermenting xylose in lignocellulosic substrates is the presence of glucose and mannose which inhibit xylose utilization. Previous studies showed that catabolite repression in some yeasts is associated with hexokinases and that deletion of one of these gene(s) could result in derepressed mutant strain(s). In this study, the hxk1 encoding hexokinase 1 in Scheffersomyces stipitis was disrupted. The ∆hxk1 SS6 strain retained the ability to utilize the main hexoses and pentoses commonly found in lignocellulosic hydrolysates as efficiently as the wild-type (WT) strain. SS6 also fermented the dominant sugars to ethanol; however, on xylose, the ∆hxk1 strain produced more xylitol and less ethanol than the WT. On mixed sugars, as expected the WT utilized glucose ahead of xylose and xylose utilization did not commence until all the glucose was consumed. In contrast, the ∆hxk1 mutant showed derepression in that it started to utilize xylose even when considerable glucose (about 1.72%, w/v) remained in the medium. Similarly, mannose did not repress xylose utilization by the ∆hxk1 mutant and xylose and mannose were simultaneously utilized. The results are of interest in efforts to engineer yeast strains capable of efficiently utilizing glucose and xylose simultaneously for lignocellulosic biomass conversion. PMID:25845305

  12. Color Printing with Digital Micromirror Devices (DMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, William E.

    1997-03-01

    This paper examines broadly extant mainstream digital color printing technologies from both user and technology perspectives: pros and cons, relative performance and competitive advantages. Special emphasis is given to future directions of the prevalent color systems, including a discussion of fundamental physical barriers. The paper will also describe the architecture and physical features of the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD), a class of optical Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) which has been under development at Texas Instruments for almost two decades. At the conclusion is a discussion of the potential of

  13. Precise null deletion mutations of the mycothiol synthesis genes reveal their role in isoniazid and ethionamide resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xia; Vilchèze, Catherine; Av-Gay, Yossef; Gómez-Velasco, Anaximandro; Jacobs, William R

    2011-07-01

    Mycothiol (MSH; AcCys-GlcN-Ins) is the glutathione analogue for mycobacteria. Mutations in MSH biosynthetic genes have been associated with resistance to isoniazid (INH) and ethionamide (ETH) in mycobacteria, but rigorous genetic studies are lacking, and those that have been conducted have yielded different results. In this study, we constructed independent null deletion mutants for all four genes involved in the MSH biosynthesis pathway (mshA, mshB, mshC, and mshD) in Mycobacterium smegmatis and made complementing constructs in integrating plasmids. The resulting set of strains was analyzed for levels of MSH, INH resistance, and ETH resistance. The mshA and mshC single deletion mutants were devoid of MSH production and resistant to INH, whereas the mshB deletion mutant produced decreased levels of MSH yet was sensitive to INH, suggesting that MSH biosynthesis is essential for INH susceptibility in M. smegmatis. Further evidence supporting this conclusion was generated by deleting the gene encoding the MSH S-conjugate amidase (mca) from the ΔmshB null mutant. This double mutant, ΔmshB Δmca, completely abolished MSH production and was resistant to INH. The mshA, mshC, and mshB single deletion mutants were also resistant to ETH, indicating that ETH resistance is modulated by the level of MSH in M. smegmatis. Surprisingly, the mshD deletion mutant lacked MSH production but was sensitive to both INH and ETH. The drug sensitivity was likely mediated by the compensated synthesis of N-formyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins, previously demonstrated to substitute for MSH in an mshD mutant of M. smegmatis. We conclude that MSH or N-formyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins is required for susceptibility to INH or ETH in M. smegmatis. PMID:21502624

  14. Mapping of the spontaneous deletion in the Ap3d1 gene of mocha mice: fast and reliable genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Drasbek, Kim Ryun; Holm, Mai Marie; Delenclos, Marion; Jensen, Kimmo

    2008-01-01

    Background The mocha mouse carries a spontaneous deletion in the Ap3d1 gene, encoding the delta 1 subunit of the adaptor related protein complex 3, (Ap3d1), and subsequently lack the expression of functional AP-3. This leads to a deficiency in vesicle transport and storage, which affects neurotransmitter vesicle turnover and release in the central nervous system. Since the genomic sequence of the Ap3d1 gene of mocha mouse is not known, precise mapping of the deletion as well as reliable genotyping protocols are lacking. Findings We sequenced the Ap3d1 gene (HGNC GeneID: 8943) around the deletion site in the mocha mouse and revealed a 10639 bp deletion covering exon 2 to 6. Subsequently, new PCR primers were designed yielding a reliable genotyping protocol of both newborn and adult tissue. To examine the genotypes further, hippocampal neurons were cultured from mocha and control mice. Patch-clamp recordings showed that mocha neurons had a higher input resistance, and that autaptic EPSC in mocha cultures depressed faster and stronger as compared with control cultures. Conclusion Our study reports the sequence of the deleted part of the Ap3d1 gene in mocha mice, as well as a reliable PCR-based genotyping protocol. We cultured hippocampal neurons from control and mocha mice, and found a difference in input resistance of the neurons, and in the synaptic short-term plasticity of glutamatergic autapses showing a larger synaptic depression than controls. The described procedures may be useful for the future utilization of the mocha mouse as a model of defective vesicle biogenesis. Importantly, as genotyping by eye color is complicated in newborn mice, the designed protocol is so fast and reliable that newborn mice could rapidly be genotyped and hippocampal neurons dissociated and cultured, which is normally best done at P0-P2. PMID:19032734

  15. Analysis of the CYP21A2 gene with intergenic recombination and multiple gene deletions in the RCCX module.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shwu-Fen; Lee, Hsien-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent bimodular RCCX module of the RP1-C4A-CYP21A1P-TNXA-RP2-C4B-CYP21A2-TNXB gene sequence is located on chromosome 6p21.3. To determine RCCX alterations, we used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product containing the tenascin B (TNXB) and CYP21A2 genes with TaqI digestion and Southern blot analysis with AseI and NdeI endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA from congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients with common mutations resulting from an intergenic conversion of CYP21A1P, such as an I2 splice, I172N, V281L, F306-L307insT, Q318X, and R356W, and dual mutations of I236N/V237E in the CYP21A2 gene. The results showed that a 3.7-kb fragment of the CYP21A2 gene was detected in each case, and 21.6- and 11.3-kb DNA fragments were found in the RCCX region by a Southern blot analysis with these corresponding mutations. However, the IVS2-12A/C- > G (I2 splice) haplotype in combination with the 707-714delGAGACTAC (without the P30L mutation) mutation produced a 3.2-kb TaqI fragment in the PCR product analysis and a specific 9.3-kb fragment by the Southern blot method. Therefore, we concluded that the rearrangement in the RCCX region resulting from processing of either an intergenic recombination or multiple gene deletions can be identified by the PCR analysis and Southern blot method based on a fragment-distinguishing configuration without a family study. PMID:21117955

  16. A large deletion causes apparent homozygosity for the D1152H mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene.

    PubMed

    Diana, Anna; Tesse, Riccardina; Polizzi, Angela M; Santostasi, Teresa; Manca, Antonio; Leonetti, Giuseppina; Seia, Manuela; Porcaro, Luigi; Cavallo, Luciano

    2012-04-10

    We report the case of a patient with an apparent homozygosity for the D1152H mutation located in exon 18 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The parents had no personal history of cystic fibrosis (CF) and referred to our laboratory after the diagnosis of fetal bowel hyperechogenicity. The proband presented with meconium ileus and normal sweat chloride test. Sequencing of the CFTR exon 18 together with quantitative genomic assays, such as real-time PCR and the multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) techniques, were performed and revealed that the father was heterozygous for the D1152H mutation and the mother carried a large deletion of the CFTR gene encompassing the genomic sequence including the same mutation. The child inherited D1152H from his father and the large deletion of the CFTR gene from his mother. We suggest that D1152H likely acts as a mild mutation with a dominant effect on the severe deletion of exon 18, considering that after 3 years of clinical examinations the child shows no classical signs and symptoms of CF. Not testing for large deletions in subjects with apparent homozygosity for a mutated CFTR allele could lead to the misidentification of CFTR mutation carrier status. PMID:22310382

  17. In ovo vaccination of commercial broilers with a glycoprotein J gene-deleted strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Anna; Riblet, Sylva M; Zavala, Guillermo; García, Maricarmen

    2013-06-01

    Conventional live attenuated vaccines have been used as the main tool worldwide for the control of infectious laryngotracheitis. However, their suboptimal attenuation combined with poor mass administration practices allowed chicken embryo origin vaccine-derived isolates to circulate in the field, regain virulence, and be the cause of continuous outbreaks of the disease. Previous studies indicated that stable attenuation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) can be achieved by the deletion of individual viral genes that are not essential for viral replication in vitro. One of these genes is the glycoprotein J (gJ) gene. Its deletion provided significant attenuation to virulent ILTV strains from Europe and the United States. The objective of this study was to construct an attenuated gJ-deleted ILTV strain and evaluate its safety and efficacy for in ovo (IO) administration of commercial broilers. A novel gJ-deleted virus (N(delta)gJ) was constructed, and a 10(3) median tissue culture infective dose administered at 18 days of embryo age was considered safe because it did not affect hatchability or survivability of chickens during the first week posthatch. Broilers vaccinated IO and IO + eye drop at 14 days of age presented a significant reduction in clinical signs and reduction of virus loads after challenge, as compared with the nonvaccinated challenged group of chickens. Therefore, this study presents initial proof that the N(delta)gJ strain is a potential ILTV live-attenuated vaccine candidate suitable for IO vaccination of commercial broilers. PMID:23901771

  18. Efficient dual sgRNA-directed large gene deletion in rabbit with CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuning; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Yong; Chen, Mao; Deng, Jichao; Lv, Qingyan; Sui, Tingting; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2016-08-01

    The CRISPR RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease gene-targeting system has been extensively used to edit the genome of several organisms. However, most mutations reported to date have been are indels, resulting in multiple mutations and numerous alleles in targeted genes. In the present study, a large deletion of 105 kb in the TYR (tyrosinase) gene was generated in rabbit via a dual sgRNA-directed CRISPR/Cas9 system. The typical symptoms of albinism accompanied significantly decreased expression of TYR in the TYR knockout rabbits. Furthermore, the same genotype and albinism phenotype were found in the F1 generation, suggesting that large-fragment deletions can be efficiently transmitted to the germline and stably inherited in offspring. Taken together, our data demonstrate that mono and biallelic large deletions can be achieved using the dual sgRNA-directed CRISPR/Cas9 system. This system produces no mosaic mutations or off-target effects, making it an efficient tool for large-fragment deletions in rabbit and other organisms. PMID:26817461

  19. Impact of rli87 gene deletion on response of Listeria monocytogenes to environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Kun, Xie; Qingling, Meng; Qiao, Jun; Yelong, Peng; Tianli, Liu; Cheng, Chen; Yu, Ma; Zhengxiang, Hu; Xuepeng, Cai; Chuangfu, Chen

    2014-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a zoonotic pathogen that widely adapts to various environments. Recent studies have found that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) play regulatory roles in LM responses to environmental stress. To understand the role of ncRNA rli87 in the response regulation, a rli87 deletion strain LM-Δrli87 was constructed by homologous recombination and tested for stress responses to high temperature, low temperature, high osmotic pressure, alcohol, acidity, alkaline and oxidative environments, along with LM EGD-e strain (control). The results showed that compared with LM EGD-e, LM-Δrli87 grew faster (P < 0.05) at low temperature (30 °C), high temperature (42 °C), and in alkaline condition (pH = 9), similarly (P > 0.05) in acidic and high osmatic pressure (10% NaCl) conditions. When cultured in medium containing 3.8% ethanol, the growth was not significantly different between the two strains (P > 0.05). When cultured at pH 9, they had similar growth rates in the first 5 h (P > 0.05), but the rates were significantly different after 6 h (P < 0.05). The expression of rsbV, rsbW, hpt, clpP, and ctsR was upregulated in LM-∆rli87 compared with LM EGD-e at pH 9, indicating that the rli87 gene regulated the expression of the five genes in alkaline environment. Our results suggest that the rli87 gene has an important regulatory role in LM's response to temperature (30 and 42 °C), alkaline stresses. PMID:25091276

  20. A partial gene deletion of SLC45A2 causes oculocutaneous albinism in Doberman pinscher dogs.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Paige A; Gornik, Kara R; Ramsey, David T; Dubielzig, Richard R; Venta, Patrick J; Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Bartoe, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP) dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1) produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2) objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3) determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs); cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (<5 years of age: 4/12; >5 years of age: 8/8) and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001). Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968-77,067,051). This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model. PMID:24647637

  1. A Partial Gene Deletion of SLC45A2 Causes Oculocutaneous Albinism in Doberman Pinscher Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Paige A.; Gornik, Kara R.; Ramsey, David T.; Dubielzig, Richard R.; Venta, Patrick J.; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.; Bartoe, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP) dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1) produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2) objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3) determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs); cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (<5 years of age: 4/12; >5 years of age: 8/8) and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001). Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968–77,067,051). This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model. PMID:24647637

  2. A new variable phenotype in spinocerebellar ataxia 27 (SCA 27) caused by a deletion in the FGF14 gene.

    PubMed

    Coebergh, J A; Fransen van de Putte, D E; Snoeck, I N; Ruivenkamp, C; van Haeringen, A; Smit, L M

    2014-05-01

    We present a young boy whose mild ataxia and abnormal eye movements repeatedly deteriorated with fever, making him unable to sit or walk during fever episodes. SNP-array analysis identified a 202 kb deletion in chromosome 13q33.1 containing the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)14 gene, which is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) 27. This 13q deletion was also present in the proband's mother and grandmother. The mother was unable to perform tandem gait walking and had abnormal eye movements but had never sought medical attention. The grandmother predominantly had a postural tremor. FGF14 regulates brain sodium channels, especially in the cerebellum. Sodium channels can be fever sensitive. This family demonstrates phenotypic variability of FGF14 deletions (SCA 27), fever sensitivity of ataxia and the added value of SNP-array analysis in making a diagnosis. PMID:24252256

  3. Partial deletion of the AGXT gene (EX1_EX7del): A new genotype in hyperoxaluria type 1.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, P K; Vuong, T S; Bouton, O; Maillard, A; Marchand, M; Rolland, M O; Cochat, P; Bozon, D

    2000-04-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare autosomal (2q37.3) recessive metabolic disease caused by a deficiency of the hepatic peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate amino transferase. Molecular heterogeneity is important in PH1 as most of the patients (if the parents are unrelated) are compound heterozygotes for rare mutations. We describe the first large deletion in the AGXT gene, removing exons 1 to 7 (EX1_EX7del) that was responsible for one case of severe PH1. This 10 kb deletion was identified by Southern blotting of genomic DNA digested by Xba I and hybridized with different exonic probes. Both parents (from Turkey) are first cousin and carry the deletion. It is of note that the presently reported patient did not exhibit any AGT catalytic activity and even so, he progressed towards end-stage renal disease only at 19 years old. PMID:10737993

  4. Introduction of a human-specific deletion in mouse Cmah increases disease severity in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Yoon, Jung Hae; Xu, Ying; deVries, Sarah; Camboni, Marybeth; Janssen, Paulus M.L.; Varki, Ajit; Martin, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of humans included introduction of an inactivating deletion in the CMAH gene, which eliminated biosynthesis of N-glycolylneuraminic acid from all human cells. Here we show that this human-specific sialylation change contributes to the marked discrepancy in phenotype between the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the human disease. Despite lacking dystrophin protein in almost all muscle cells, mdx mice show slower development, relative to overall lifespan, or reduced severity of a number of clinically relevant disease phenotypes compared to DMD patients. This is especially true for loss of ambulation, cardiac and respiratory muscle weakness, and loss of lifespan, all major phenotypes contributing to DMD morbidity and mortality. All these phenotypes occur at an earlier age or to a greater degree in mdx mice bearing a human-like mutation in the mouse Cmah gene. Altered phenotypes correlate with changes in two mechanisms; reduced strength and expression of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex and increased activation of complement. Activation of complement may be driven by the increased expression of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in Cmah−/−mdx animals and ultimately by uptake of N-glycolylneuraminic acid, a foreign glycan in humans and Cmah-deficient mice, from dietary sources. Cmah-deficient mdx mice represent a new small animal model for DMD that better approximates the human glycome and its contributions to muscular dystrophy. PMID:20668298

  5. Partial deletion of the LAMA3 gene is responsible for hereditary junctional epidermolysis bullosa in the American Saddlebred Horse.

    PubMed

    Graves, K T; Henney, P J; Ennis, R B

    2009-02-01

    Laminin 5 is a heterotrimeric basement membrane protein integral to the structure and function of the dermal-epidermal junction. It consists of three glycoprotein subunits: the alpha3, beta3 and gamma2 chains, which are encoded by the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes respectively. A mutation in any of these genes results in the condition known as hereditary junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). A 6589-bp deletion spanning exons 24-27 was found in the LAMA3 gene in American Saddlebred foals born with the skin-blistering condition epitheliogenesis imperfecta. The deletion confirms that this autosomal recessive condition in the American Saddlebred Horse can indeed be classified as JEB and corresponds to Herlitz JEB in humans. A diagnostic test was developed and nine of 175 randomly selected American Saddlebred foals from the 2007 foal crop were found to be carriers of the mutation (frequency of 0.026). PMID:19016681

  6. Intrachromosomal Amplification, Locus Deletion and Point Mutation in the Aquaglyceroporin AQP1 Gene in Antimony Resistant Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis

    PubMed Central

    Monte-Neto, Rubens; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Leprohon, Philippe; Reis, Priscila; Frézard, Frédéric; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Antimony resistance complicates the treatment of infections caused by the parasite Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings Using next generation sequencing, we sequenced the genome of four independent Leishmania guyanensis antimony-resistant (SbR) mutants and found different chromosomal alterations including aneuploidy, intrachromosomal gene amplification and gene deletion. A segment covering 30 genes on chromosome 19 was amplified intrachromosomally in three of the four mutants. The gene coding for the multidrug resistance associated protein A involved in antimony resistance was also amplified in the four mutants, most likely through chromosomal translocation. All mutants also displayed a reduced accumulation of antimony mainly due to genomic alterations at the level of the subtelomeric region of chromosome 31 harboring the gene coding for the aquaglyceroporin 1 (LgAQP1). Resistance involved the loss of LgAQP1 through subtelomeric deletions in three mutants. Interestingly, the fourth mutant harbored a single G133D point mutation in LgAQP1 whose role in resistance was functionality confirmed through drug sensitivity and antimony accumulation assays. In contrast to the Leishmania subspecies that resort to extrachromosomal amplification, the Viannia strains studied here used intrachromosomal amplification and locus deletion. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of a naturally occurred point mutation in AQP1 in antimony resistant parasites. PMID:25679388

  7. Determination of gene dosage by a quantitative adaptation of the polymerase chain reaction (gd-PCR): Rapid detection of deletions and duplications of gene sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Celi, F.S.; Roth, J.; Schuldiner, A.R. Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD ); Cohen, M.M. ); Antonarakis, S.E. ); Wertheimer, E. )

    1994-05-15

    Screening methods based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, single-stranded conformational polymorphism, and heteroduplex analysis, are powerful tools for the detection of point mutations as well as small deletions and insertions, but are unable to detect heterozygous deletions or duplications of exons, genes, or chromosomes. The authors now report a PCR-based approach, designated gene dosage-PCR (gd-PCR), that allows rapid screening for heterozygous deletions and duplications of genes or exons. Gene dosage-PCR is a quantitative method in which two in vitro-synthesized DNA internal standards are coamplified with the genomic DNA sample, one corresponding to the gene of interest (test sequence) and the other to a reference (disomic) gene (reference sequence). Both internal standards are designed to be amplified with the same primer pairs and with efficiencies similar to those of their genomic DNA counterparts, yielding PCR products slightly smaller than those derived from genomic DNA. Amplification of approximately equimolar amounts of the two internal standards and genomic DNA, in the presence of [[sup 32]P]dCTP, results in four radiolabeled PCR products; after electrophoresis and quantification of the products, gene dosage is easily calculated. For validation, genomic DNA from 56 subjects, 28 with cytogenetically documented Down syndrome (trisomy 21) and 28 controls that were disomic for chromosome 21, was assayed. Using the [beta]-amyloid precursor protein gene (APP: Chromosome 21q21) as the test sequence, control subjects had an adjusted mean gene dose of 2.00 [+-] 0.29, while subjects with Down syndrome had a mean gene dose of 3.05 [+-] 0.27. There was a clear separation of all of the samples between the two groups. The authors also successfully used gd-PCR to detect allelic deletions by screening pertinent regions of the insulin receptor gene. 48 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. A novel deletion/insertion caused by a replication error in the β-globin gene locus control region.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Meley, Roland; Pondarré, Corinne; Francina, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Deletions in the β-globin locus control region (β-LCR) lead to (εγδβ)(0)-thalassemia [(εγδβ)(0)-thal]. In patients suffering from these rare deletions, a normal hemoglobin (Hb), phenotype is found, contrasting with a hematological thalassemic phenotype. Multiplex-ligation probe amplification (MLPA) is an efficient tool to detect β-LCR deletions combined with long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing to pinpoint deletion breakpoints. We present here a novel 11,155 bp β-LCR deletion found in a French Caucasian patient which removes DNase I hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) to HS4 of the β-LCR. Interestingly, a 197 bp insertion of two inverted sequences issued from the HS2-HS3 inter-region is present and suggests a complex rearrangement during replication. Carriers of this type of thalassemia can be misdiagnosed as an α-thal trait. Consequently, a complete α- and β-globin gene cluster analysis is required to prevent a potentially damaging misdiagnosis in genetic counselling. PMID:21797698

  9. Rearrangements and deletions of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the double-producing B cell lymphoma I.29.

    PubMed Central

    Stavnezer, J; Marcu, K B; Sirlin, S; Alhadeff, B; Hammerling, U

    1982-01-01

    The B cell lymphoma I.29 consists of a mixture of cells expressing membrane-bound immunoglobulin M (IgM) (lambda) and IgA (lambda) of identical idiotypes. Whereas most of the cells express either IgM or IgA alone, 1 to 5% of the cells in this tumor express IgM and IgA simultaneously within the cytoplasm and on the cell membrane (R. Sitia et al., J. Immunol. 127:1388-1394, 1981; R. Sitia, unpublished data). When IgM+ cells are purified from the lymphoma and passaged in mice or cultured, a portion of the cells convert to IgA+. These properties suggest that some cells of the I.29 lymphoma may undergo immunoglobulin heavy chain switching, although it is also possible that the mixed population was derived by a prior switching event in a clone of cells. We performed Southern blotting experiments on genomic DNAs isolated from populations of I.29 cells containing variable proportions of IgM+ and IgA+ cells and on a number of cell lines derived from the lymphoma. The results were consistent with the deletion model for heavy chain switching, as the IgM+ cells contained rearranged mu genes and alpha genes in the germ line configuration on both the expressed and nonexpressed heavy chain chromosomes, whereas the IgA+ cells had deleted both mu genes and contained one rearranged and one germ line alpha gene. In addition, segments of DNA located within the intervening sequence 5' to the mu gene, near the site of switch recombination, were deleted from both the expressed and the nonexpressed chromosomes. Although mu genes were deleted from both chromosomes in the IgA+ cells, the sites of DNA recombination differed on the two chromosomes. On the expressed chromosome, Smu sequences were recombined with S alpha sequences, whereas on the nonexpressed chromosome, Smu sequences were recombined with S gamma 3 sequences. Images PMID:6290869

  10. Sequencing of rhesus macaque Y chromosome clarifies origins and evolution of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) genes

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jennifer F.; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of Y chromosome evolution often emphasize gene loss, but this loss has been counterbalanced by addition of new genes. The DAZ genes, which are critical to human spermatogenesis, were acquired by the Y chromosome in the ancestor of Old World monkeys and apes. We and our colleagues recently sequenced the rhesus macaque Y chromosome, and comparison of this sequence to human and chimpanzee enables us to reconstruct much of the evolutionary history of DAZ. We report that DAZ arrived on the Y chromosome about 36 million years ago via the transposition of at least 1.1 megabases of autosomal DNA. This transposition also brought five additional genes to the Y chromosome, but all five genes were subsequently lost through mutation or deletion. As the only surviving gene, DAZ experienced extensive restructuring, including intragenic amplification and gene duplication, and has been the target of positive selection in the chimpanzee lineage. PMID:23055411

  11. Immunoglobulin Gene Insertions and Deletions in the Affinity Maturation of HIV-1 Broadly Reactive Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S. Munir; Bhaskarabhatla, Rekha; Zhang, Ruijun; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Kelsoe, Garnett; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Stolarchuk, Christina; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Cohen, Myron S.; Walter, Emmanuel; Moody, M. Anthony; Wu, Xueling; Altae-Tran, Han R.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Boyd, Scott D.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Mascola, John R.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Induction of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development but has remained challenging partially due to unusual traits of bnAbs, including high somatic hypermutation (SHM) frequencies and in-frame insertions and deletions (indels). Here we examined the propensity and functional requirement for indels within HIV-1 bnAbs. High-throughput sequencing of the immunoglobulin (Ig) VHDJH genes in HIV-1 infected and uninfected individuals revealed that the indel frequency was elevated among HIV-1-infected subjects, with no unique properties attributable to bnAb-producing individuals. This increased indel occurrence depended only on the frequency of SHM point-mutations. Indel-encoded regions were generally proximal to antigen binding sites. Additionally, reconstruction of a HIV-1 CD4-binding site bnAb clonal lineage revealed that a large compound VHDJH indel was required for bnAb activity. Thus, vaccine development should focus on designing regimens targeted at sustained activation of bnAb lineages to achieve the required SHM and indel events. PMID:25211073

  12. Protective effect of myostatin gene deletion on aging-related muscle metabolic decline.

    PubMed

    Chabi, B; Pauly, M; Carillon, J; Carnac, G; Favier, F B; Fouret, G; Bonafos, B; Vanterpool, F; Vernus, B; Coudray, C; Feillet-Coudray, C; Bonnieu, A; Lacan, D; Koechlin-Ramonatxo, C

    2016-06-01

    While myostatin gene deletion is a promising therapy to fight muscle loss during aging, this approach induces also skeletal muscle metabolic changes such as mitochondrial deficits, redox alteration and increased fatigability. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of aging on these features in aged wild-type (WT) and mstn knockout (KO) mice. Moreover, to determine whether an enriched-antioxidant diet may be useful to prevent age-related disorders, we orally administered to the two genotypes a melon concentrate rich in superoxide dismutase for 12 weeks. We reported that mitochondrial functional abnormalities persisted (decreased state 3 and 4 of respiration; p<0.05) in skeletal muscle from aged KO mice; however, differences with WT mice were attenuated at old age in line with reduced difference on running endurance between the two genotypes. Interestingly, we showed an increase in glutathione levels, associated with lower lipid peroxidation levels in KO muscle. Enriched antioxidant diet reduced the aging-related negative effects on maximal aerobic velocity and running limit time (p<0.05) in both groups, with systemic adaptations on body weight. The redox status and the hypertrophic phenotype appeared to be beneficial to KO mice, mitigating the effect of aging on the skeletal muscle metabolic remodeling. PMID:26944368

  13. Gene Deletions Resulting in Increased Nitrogen Release by Azotobacter vinelandii: Application of a Novel Nitrogen Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Eberhart, Lauren J.; Ohlert, Janet M.; Knutson, Carolann M.; Plunkett, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a widely studied model diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) bacterium and also an obligate aerobe, differentiating it from many other diazotrophs that require environments low in oxygen for the function of the nitrogenase. As a free-living bacterium, A. vinelandii has evolved enzymes and transporters to minimize the loss of fixed nitrogen to the surrounding environment. In this study, we pursued efforts to target specific enzymes and further developed screens to identify individual colonies of A. vinelandii producing elevated levels of extracellular nitrogen. Targeted deletions were done to convert urea into a terminal product by disrupting the urease genes that influence the ability of A. vinelandii to recycle the urea nitrogen within the cell. Construction of a nitrogen biosensor strain was done to rapidly screen several thousand colonies disrupted by transposon insertional mutagenesis to identify strains with increased extracellular nitrogen production. Several disruptions were identified in the ammonium transporter gene amtB that resulted in the production of sufficient levels of extracellular nitrogen to support the growth of the biosensor strain. Further studies substituting the biosensor strain with the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed that levels of nitrogen produced were sufficient to support the growth of this organism when the medium was supplemented with sufficient sucrose to support the growth of the A. vinelandii in coculture. The nature and quantities of nitrogen released by urease and amtB disruptions were further compared to strains reported in previous efforts that altered the nifLA regulatory system to produce elevated levels of ammonium. These results reveal alternative approaches that can be used in various combinations to yield new strains that might have further application in biofertilizer schemes. PMID:25888177

  14. Gene Deletions Resulting in Increased Nitrogen Release by Azotobacter vinelandii: Application of a Novel Nitrogen Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Barney, Brett M; Eberhart, Lauren J; Ohlert, Janet M; Knutson, Carolann M; Plunkett, Mary H

    2015-07-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a widely studied model diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) bacterium and also an obligate aerobe, differentiating it from many other diazotrophs that require environments low in oxygen for the function of the nitrogenase. As a free-living bacterium, A. vinelandii has evolved enzymes and transporters to minimize the loss of fixed nitrogen to the surrounding environment. In this study, we pursued efforts to target specific enzymes and further developed screens to identify individual colonies of A. vinelandii producing elevated levels of extracellular nitrogen. Targeted deletions were done to convert urea into a terminal product by disrupting the urease genes that influence the ability of A. vinelandii to recycle the urea nitrogen within the cell. Construction of a nitrogen biosensor strain was done to rapidly screen several thousand colonies disrupted by transposon insertional mutagenesis to identify strains with increased extracellular nitrogen production. Several disruptions were identified in the ammonium transporter gene amtB that resulted in the production of sufficient levels of extracellular nitrogen to support the growth of the biosensor strain. Further studies substituting the biosensor strain with the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed that levels of nitrogen produced were sufficient to support the growth of this organism when the medium was supplemented with sufficient sucrose to support the growth of the A. vinelandii in coculture. The nature and quantities of nitrogen released by urease and amtB disruptions were further compared to strains reported in previous efforts that altered the nifLA regulatory system to produce elevated levels of ammonium. These results reveal alternative approaches that can be used in various combinations to yield new strains that might have further application in biofertilizer schemes. PMID:25888177

  15. Screening the dystrophin gene suggests a high rate of polymorphism in general but no exonic deletions in schizophrenics

    SciTech Connect

    Lindor, N.M.; Sobell, J.L.; Thibodeau, S.N.

    1994-03-15

    The dystrophin gene, located at chromosome Xp21, was evaluated as a candidate gene in chronic schizophrenia in response to the report of a large family in which schizophrenia cosegregated with Becker muscular dystrophy. Genomic DNA from 94 men with chronic schizophrenia was evaluated by Southern blot analysis using cDNA probes that span exons 1-59. No exonic deletions were identified. An unexpectedly high rate of polymorphism was calculated in this study and two novel polymorphisms were found, demonstrating the usefulness of the candidate gene approach even when results of the original study are negative. 41 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Characterization of a de novo 43-bp deletion of the Gs[alpha] gene (GNAS1) in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Luttikhuis, M.E.M.O.; Trembath, R.C. ); Wilson, L.C. Institute of Child Health, London ); Leonard, J.V. )

    1994-05-15

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, obesity, mental retardation, subcutaneous calcification, and brachy-metaphalangia. Two distinct forms of AHO exist; pseudohypoparathyroidism type I (PHPI) and pseudopseudohypoparathyrodism (PPHP). The classification is dependent upon the presence or absence, respectively, of resistance to parathyroid and other hormones that bind to Gs-protein-coupled membrane receptors stimulating adenylyl cyclase. Gs is a heterotrimeric protein comprising [alpha], [beta], and [gamma]-subunits encoded by separate genes. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral leukocytes from 13 unrelated AHO patients. Exon 4 and flanking intronic sequence of GNAS1 were PCR amplified. A single PCR product corresponding to the expected 159-bp fragment was identified in 12 affected individuals with either PHPIa or PPHP. In patient 10285 an additional smaller fragment was detected but was not present in either of the unaffected parents. These two fragments were isolated from a 2% agarose gel. Direct sequencing of the smaller fragment revealed a 43-bp deletion comprising at least 35 hp of the 3[prime] end of exon 4 and the donor splice site of intron 4 and extending into the following intro. The 43-bp deletion would lead to a premature stop codon, 62 codons downstream of the deletion. The de novo mutation reported here is the largest deletion in the Gs[alpha] gene described so far for AHO patients.

  17. Ventilatory chemosensory drive is blunted in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, Matias; Baby, Santhosh M; Lahiri, Sukhamay; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the DMD gene resulting in an absence of dystrophin in neurons and muscle. Respiratory failure is the most common cause of mortality and previous studies have largely concentrated on diaphragmatic muscle necrosis and respiratory failure component. Here, we investigated the integrity of respiratory control mechanisms in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Whole body plethysmograph in parallel with phrenic nerve activity recordings revealed a lower respiratory rate and minute ventilation during normoxia and a blunting of the hypoxic ventilatory reflex in response to mild levels of hypoxia together with a poor performance on a hypoxic stress test in mdx mice. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed low PaO2 and pH and high PaCO2 in mdx mice. To investigate chemosensory respiratory drive, we analyzed the carotid body by molecular and functional means. Dystrophin mRNA and protein was expressed in normal mice carotid bodies however, they are absent in mdx mice. Functional analysis revealed abnormalities in Dejours test and the early component of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex in mdx mice. Together, these results demonstrate a malfunction in the peripheral chemosensory drive that would be predicted to contribute to the respiratory failure in mdx mice. These data suggest that investigating and monitoring peripheral chemosensory drive function may be useful for improving the management of DMD patients with respiratory failure. PMID:23922741

  18. Ventilatory Chemosensory Drive Is Blunted in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueira, Matias; Baby, Santhosh M.; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the DMD gene resulting in an absence of dystrophin in neurons and muscle. Respiratory failure is the most common cause of mortality and previous studies have largely concentrated on diaphragmatic muscle necrosis and respiratory failure component. Here, we investigated the integrity of respiratory control mechanisms in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Whole body plethysmograph in parallel with phrenic nerve activity recordings revealed a lower respiratory rate and minute ventilation during normoxia and a blunting of the hypoxic ventilatory reflex in response to mild levels of hypoxia together with a poor performance on a hypoxic stress test in mdx mice. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed low PaO2 and pH and high PaCO2 in mdx mice. To investigate chemosensory respiratory drive, we analyzed the carotid body by molecular and functional means. Dystrophin mRNA and protein was expressed in normal mice carotid bodies however, they are absent in mdx mice. Functional analysis revealed abnormalities in Dejours test and the early component of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex in mdx mice. Together, these results demonstrate a malfunction in the peripheral chemosensory drive that would be predicted to contribute to the respiratory failure in mdx mice. These data suggest that investigating and monitoring peripheral chemosensory drive function may be useful for improving the management of DMD patients with respiratory failure. PMID:23922741

  19. Mutational Spectrum of DMD Mutations in Dystrophinopathy Patients: Application of Modern Diagnostic Techniques to a Large Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, Kevin M.; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Gappmaier, Eduard; Howard, Michael T.; Sampson, Jacinda; Mendell, Jerry; Wall, Cheryl; King, Wendy; Pestronk, Alan; Florence, Julaine; Connolly, Anne; Mathews, Katherine D.; Stephan, Carrie; Laubenthal, Karla; Wong, Brenda; Morehart, Paula; Meyer, Amy; Finkel, Richard; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Medne, Livija; Day, John W.; Dalton, Joline C.; Margolis, Marcia; Hinton, Veronica; Weiss, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the DMD gene, encoding the dystrophin protein, are responsible for the dystrophinopathies Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD), and X-linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy (XLDC). Mutation analysis has traditionally been challenging, due to the large gene size (79 exons over 2.2 Mb of genomic DNA). We report a very large aggregate data set comprised of DMD mutations detected in samples from patients enrolled in the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a multicenter research consortium, and in referral samples submitted for mutation analysis with a diagnosis of dystrophinopathy. We report 1111 mutations in the DMD gene, including 891 mutations with associated phenotypes. These results encompass 506 point mutations (including 294 nonsense mutations) and significantly expand the number of mutations associated with the dystrophinopathies, highlighting the utility of modern diagnostic techniques. Our data supports the uniform hypermutability of CGA>TGA mutations, establishes the frequency of polymorphic muscle (Dp427m) protein isoforms and reveals unique genomic haplotypes associated with `private' mutations. We note that 60% of these patients would be predicted to benefit from skipping of a single DMD exon using antisense oligonucleotide therapy, and 62% would be predicted to benefit from an inclusive multi-exon skipping approach directed toward exons 45 through 55. PMID:19937601

  20. Marker and real-time quantitative analyses to confirm hemophilia B carrier diagnosis of a complete deletion of the F9 gene.

    PubMed

    Venceslá, Adoración; Barceló, María Jesús; Baena, Manel; Quintana, Manuel; Baiget, Montserrat; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2007-11-01

    Approximately 3% of hemophilia B patients have major deletions in the F9 gene, half of which are complete. Marker and quantitative PCR analyses were employed for carrier diagnosis in a family of a mentally retarded hemophilia B patient with a total deletion of the F9 gene and neighbor genes. Both methodologies allowed the confirmation of carrier or non-carrier status. PMID:18024414

  1. A novel AAT-deletion mutation in the coding sequence of the BCO2 gene in yellow-fat rabbits.

    PubMed

    Strychalski, Janusz; Brym, Paweł; Czarnik, Urszula; Gugołek, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    The carcasses of yellow-fat rabbits may be attractive to modern consumers, because they have a relatively high content of biologically active compounds. One of the main candidate genes associated with the yellow-fat trait is β-carotene 9',10'-oxygenase (BCO2). This study is the first report of the novel AAT-deletion mutation at codon 248 of the BCO2 gene, which has been found in homozygous yellow-fat rabbits. The deletion mutation, located at the beginning of exon 6, results in the absence of asparagine in protein. We also developed a PCR-RFLP test that supports intravital genotyping of indel polymorphism based on genomic DNA. PMID:26002694

  2. Increase of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus caused by deletion of a gene whose product is homologous to lytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, T; Murakami, K

    1997-01-01

    A spontaneous high-level methicillin-resistant mutant, SRM1648, for which the MIC of methicillin is 1,600 microg/ml, was isolated on a plate containing 400 microg of the antibiotic/ml on which had been cultured the low-level methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus SR17238, for which the MIC is 6.3 microg/ml. Analysis of the chromosomal DNAs of the mutant and the parental strains by the restriction landmark genomic scanning method with two-dimensional electrophoresis of restriction fragments revealed a 1.6-kb deletion in the chromosome of the mutant. The HindIII fragment of 2.5 kb containing this deleted region was cloned into a plasmid vector and introduced into the parental strain. A deletion mutant reconstructed in the presence of a low concentration of methicillin by integration and excision of the recombinant plasmid exhibited a high level of resistance (methicillin MIC, 1,600 microg/ml), confirming that the deletion had caused the elevation of the resistance level. Sequence analysis indicated that the deletion occurred in three consecutive open reading frames (ORFs). The predicted amino acid sequence of the first ORF showed high homology with both RelA and SpoT of Escherichia coli, which are involved in the synthesis and hydrolysis of guanosine 5',3'-polyphosphate, and that of the third ORF showed a relatively high homology to the lytic enzyme encoded by the lytC gene of Bacillus subtilis. We also isolated another high-level resistant mutant with a deletion within the third ORF, which suggested that inactivation of some lytic enzyme resulted in the increased resistance. PMID:9335275

  3. Identification of genes encoding putative nucleoporins and transport factors in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a deletion analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue Qin; Du, Xianming; Liu, Jianhua; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Balasundaram, David

    2004-04-30

    In a systematic approach to study genes that are related to nucleocytoplasmic trafficking in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the open reading frames (ORFs) of 26 putative nucleoporins and transport factors were deleted. Here we report the initial characterization of these deletion mutants. Of the 26 putative genes deleted, 14 were found to be essential for viability. Null mutations of essential genes resulted in failure to either complete one round or to sustain cell division. Four of the 14 essential genes, SPBC582.11c, SPBC17G9.04c, SPBC3B9.16c and SPCC162.08c, encode putative nucleoporins and a myosin-like protein with homologues NUP84, NUP85, NUP120 and MLP1, respectively, that are not required for viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that their gene products perform critical functions in Sz. pombe. On the basis of combined drug sensitivity assays and genetic analysis we have identified five non-essential null mutants that were hypersensitive to the microtubule depolymerizing drug thiabendazole (TBZ) and exhibited a cut phenotype upon TBZ treatment, suggesting possible involvement in microtubule function. Three of the corresponding ORFs, SPCC18B5.07c, nup40 and SPAC1805.04, encode putative nucleoporins with low similarity to the S. cerevisiae nucleoporins NUP2p, NUP53p and NUP133p, respectively. Further genetic analysis revealed that one of the nucleoporin genes, nup40, and another gene, SPCC1322.06, encoding a putative importin-beta/Cse1p superfamily protein may have a spindle checkpoint function. PMID:15116432

  4. Recurrent Deletions of Puroindoline Genes at the Grain Hardness Locus in Four Independent Lineages of Polyploid Wheat1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanlong; Huang, Li; Gill, Bikram S.

    2008-01-01

    Polyploidy is known to induce numerous genetic and epigenetic changes but little is known about their physiological bases. In wheat, grain texture is mainly determined by the Hardness (Ha) locus consisting of genes Puroindoline a (Pina) and b (Pinb). These genes are conserved in diploid progenitors but were deleted from the A and B genomes of tetraploid Triticum turgidum (AB). We now report the recurrent deletions of Pina-Pinb in other lineages of polyploid wheat. We analyzed the Ha haplotype structure in 90 diploid and 300 polyploid accessions of Triticum and Aegilops spp. Pin genes were conserved in all diploid species and deletion haplotypes were detected in all polyploid Triticum and most of the polyploid Aegilops spp. Two Pina-Pinb deletion haplotypes were found in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum; ABD). Pina and Pinb were eliminated from the G genome, but maintained in the A genome of tetraploid Triticum timopheevii (AG). Subsequently, Pina and Pinb were deleted from the A genome but retained in the Am genome of hexaploid Triticum zhukovskyi (AmAG). Comparison of deletion breakpoints demonstrated that the Pina-Pinb deletion occurred independently and recurrently in the four polyploid wheat species. The implications of Pina-Pinb deletions for polyploid-driven evolution of gene and genome and its possible physiological significance are discussed. PMID:18024553

  5. Linkage Disequilibrium between Two High-Frequency Deletion Polymorphisms: Implications for Association Studies Involving the glutathione-S transferase (GST) Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Marotta, Michael; Eichler, Evan E.; Eng, Charis; Tanaka, Hisashi

    2009-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) represent a large source of genetic variation in humans and have been increasingly studied for disease association. A deletion polymorphism of the gene encoding the cytosolic detoxification enzyme glutathione S-transferase theta 1 (GSTT1) has been extensively studied for cancer susceptibility (919 studies, from HuGE navigator, http://www.hugenavigator.net/). However, clear conclusions have not been reached. Since the GSTT1 gene is located within a genomic region of segmental duplications (SD), there may be a confounding effect from another, yet-uncharacterized CNV at the same locus. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized 38-kilo-base (kb) long deletion polymorphism of GSTT2B located within a 61-kb DNA inverted repeat. GSTT2B is a duplicated copy of GSTT2, the only paralogue of GSTT1 in humans. A newly developed PCR assay revealed that a microhomology-mediated breakpoint appears to be shared among individuals at high frequency. The GSTT2B deletion polymorphism was in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) (D′ = 0.841) with the neighboring GSTT1 deletion polymorphism in the Caucasian population. Alleles harboring a single deletion were significantly overrepresented (p = 2.22×10−16), suggesting a selection against alleles with both deletions. The deletion alleles are almost certainly the derived ones, because the GSTT2B-GSTT2-GSTT1 genes were strictly retained in chimpanzees. Extremely low GSTT2 mRNA expression was associated with the GSTT2B deletion, suggesting an influence of the deletion on the flanking region and loss of GSTT2 function. Genome-wide LD analysis between deletion polymorphisms further points to the uniqueness of two deletions, because strong LD between deletion polymorphisms might be very rare in humans. These results show a complex genomic organization and unexpected biological functions of CNVs within segmental duplications and emphasize the importance of detailed structural characterization for disease

  6. Analysis of sporadic tuberous sclerosis patients with the TSC2 cDNA reveals several gene rearrangements and deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.J.; Short, M.P.; Bove, C.

    1994-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hamartomas and hamartias in many organs including brain, skin, heart and kidneys. Two TSC genes have been localized through linkage analysis, TSC1 to 9q34 and TSC2 to 16p13.3. TSC2 was recently cloned. The distribution of sporadic TSC patients between TSC1 and TSC2 is at present unknown, but tests of genetic heterogeneity in families suggest that each is equally represented. Genetic heterogeneity may account for some of the variation in clinical expression; however, there is no evidence at present to support differences in clinical phenotypes between the 2 genetic loci. With the isolation of the TSC2 gene we have commenced mutation studies of our familial and sporadic TSC patients. Thus far six chromosome 16-linked families have been screened with the TSC2 cDNA and no detectable changes were observed using Southern analysis. In addition, 85 sporadic TSC patients were analyzed by Southern analysis. Using multiple restriction digests, nine patients revealed altered patterns, including three patients that appeared to have complete deletions. RT-PCR was performed on these patients confirming that the TSC2 gene was deleted. However, the remaining patients showed normal patterns, indicating that they either have TSC1 mutations or they possess more subtle small deletions or point mutations. At present we are designing an SSCP-based approach to determine the nature of the mutations in our 16 linked TSC families.

  7. Familial 46,XY sex reversal without campomelic dysplasia caused by a deletion upstream of the SOX9 gene

    PubMed Central

    Layman, Lawrence C.; Ullmann, Reinhard; Shen, Yiping; Ha, Kyungsoo; Rehman, Khurram; Looney, Stephen; McDonough, Paul G.; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Carr, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Background 46,XY sex reversal is a rare disorder and familial cases are even more rare. The purpose of the present study was to determine the molecular basis for a family with three affected siblings who had 46,XY sex reversal. Methods DNA was extracted from three females with 46,XY sex reversal, two normal sisters, and both unaffected parents. All protein coding exons of the SRY and NR5A1 genes were subjected to PCR-based DNA sequencing. In addition, array comparative genomic hybridization was performed on DNA from all seven family members. A deletion was confirmed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Expression of SOX9 gene was quantified using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results A 349kb heterozygous deletion located 353kb upstream of the SOX9 gene on the long arm of chromosome 17 was discovered in the father and three affected siblings, but not in the mother. The expression of SOX9 was significantly decreased in the affected siblings. Two of three affected sisters had gonadoblastomas. Conclusion This is the first report of 46,XY sex reversal in three siblings who have a paternally inherited deletion upstream of SOX9 associated with reduced SOX9 mRNA expression. PMID:24907458

  8. Intragenic Deletion in the LIFR Gene in a Long-Term Survivor with Stüve-Wiedemann Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hatagami Marques, Júlia; Lopes Yamamoto, Guilherme; de Cássia Testai, Larissa; da Costa Pereira, Alexandre; Kim, Chong Ae; Passos-Bueno, Maria R.; Romeo Bertola, Débora

    2015-01-01

    Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome (SWS, OMIM 601559) is a rare autosomal recessive bent-bone dysplasia, caused by loss-of-function mutations in the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) gene, which usually leads to early death. Only few patients with long-term survival have been described in the literature. We report on a 5-year-old boy from a consanguineous marriage with molecular analysis for the LIFR gene. Sanger and next-generation sequencing (NGS) of LIFR were performed. Copy number variation analysis with NGS showed a novel mutation as the cause for the syndrome: an intragenic homozygous deletion in LIFR, involving exons 15-20. Bridging PCR was carried out to confirm the intragenic deletion. This is the first description of a large deletion in LIFR, broadening the spectrum of mutations in SWS. Besides the reported allelic heterogeneity, further studies such as exome sequencing are required to identify a novel gene in order to confirm the locus heterogeneity in SWS. PMID:26279654

  9. TRPV1 gene deletion exacerbates inflammation and atypical cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Rubinstein, Jack; Prieto, Alejandro R.; Thang, Loc Vinh; Wang, Donna H.

    2009-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) channels expressed in sensory afferent fibers innervating the heart may be activated by proton or endovanilloids released during myocardial ischemia (MI), leading to angina. Although our previous in vitro data indicate that TRPV1 activation may preserve cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. To test the hypothesis that TRPV1 modulates inflammatory and early remodeling processes to prevent cardiac functional deterioration after myocardial infarction, TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to left anterior descending coronary ligation or sham operation. The infarct size was greater in TRPV1-/- than in WT mice (P < 0.001) 3 days after MI, and the mortality rate was higher in TRPV1-/- than in WT mice (P < 0.05) 7 days after MI. The levels of plasma cardiac troponin I; cytokines including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6; chemokines including MCP-1 and MIP-2; infiltration of inflammatory cells including neutrophil, macrophage, and myofibroblast; as well as collagen contents were greater in TRPV1-/- than in WT mice (P < 0.05) in the infarct area on day 3 and 7 after MI. Changes in left ventricular (LV) geometry led to increased end-systolic and -diastolic diameters and reduced contractile function in TRPV1-/- compared to WT mice. These data show that TRPV1 gene deletion results in excessive inflammation, disproportional LV remodeling, and deteriorated cardiac function after MI, indicating that TRPV1 may prevent infarct expansion and cardiac injury by inhibiting inflammation and abnormal tissue remodeling. PMID:19114647

  10. Gene Deletion of nos2 Protects Against Manganese-Induced Neurological Dysfunction in Juvenile Mice

    PubMed Central

    Streifel, Karin M.; Moreno, Julie A.; Hanneman, William H.; Legare, Marie E.; Tjalkens, Ronald B.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying cognitive and neurobehavioral abnormalities associated with childhood exposure to manganese (Mn) are not well understood but may be influenced by neuroinflammatory activation of microglia and astrocytes that results in nitrosative stress due to expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2). We therefore postulated that gene deletion of NOS2 would protect against the neurotoxic effects of Mn in vivo and in vitro. Juvenile NOS2 knockout (NOS2−/−) mice were orally exposed to 50 mg/kg of MnCl2 by intragastric gavage from days 21 to 34 postnatal. Results indicate that NOS2−/− mice exposed to Mn were protected against neurobehavioral alterations, despite histopathological activation of astrocytes and microglia in Mn-treated mice in both genotypes. NOS2−/− mice had decreased Mn-induced formation of 3-nitrotyrosine protein adducts within neurons in the basal ganglia that correlated with protection against Mn-induced neurobehavioral defects. Primary striatal astrocytes from wildtype mice caused apoptosis in cocultured striatal neurons following treatment with MnCl2 and tumor necrosis factor-α, whereas NOS2−/− astrocytes failed to cause any increase in markers of apoptosis in striatal neurons. Additionally, scavenging nitric oxide (NO) with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) prevented the ability of Mn- and cytokine-treated wildtype astrocytes to cause apoptosis in cocultured striatal neurons. These data demonstrate that NO plays a crucial role in Mn-induced neurological dysfunction in juvenile mice and that NOS2 expression in activated glia is an important mediator of neuroinflammatory injury during Mn exposure. PMID:22174044

  11. Large-scale gene expression profiling reveals physiological response to deletion of chaperone dnaKJ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dongjie; Liu, Chuanpeng; Liu, Lushan; Zhu, Lingxiang; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qiming

    2016-01-01

    Chaperone DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ plays various essential roles such as in assisting in the folding of nascent peptides, preventing protein aggregation and maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. Global transcriptional changes in vivo associated with deletion of dnaKJ were monitored using DNA microarray to elucidate the role of DnaKJ at the transcriptional level. Microarray profiling and bioinformatics analysis revealed that a few chaperone and protease genes, stress-related genes and genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation were up-regulated, whereas various transporter genes, pentose phosphate pathway and transcriptional regulation related genes were down-regulated. This study is the first to systematically analyze the alterations at the transcriptional level in vivo in deletion of dnaKJ. Fatty acid methyl esters analysis indicated that the amount of unsaturated fatty acid sharply increased and subcellular location prediction analysis showed a marked decrease in transcription of inner-membrane protein genes, which might have triggered the development of aberrant cell shape and susceptibility for some antibiotics in the ΔdnaKJ strain. PMID:27242140

  12. Analysis of Noncanonical Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Toxoplasma gondii by Targeted Gene Deletion Using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Long, Shaojun; Wang, Qiuling; Sibley, L David

    2016-05-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are expanded in apicomplexan parasites, especially in Toxoplasma gondii where 14 separate genes encoding these enzymes are found. Although previous studies have shown that several CDPKs play a role in controlling invasion, egress, and cell division in T. gondii, the roles of most of these genes are unexplored. Here we developed a more efficient method for gene disruption using CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) that was modified to completely delete large, multiexonic genes from the genome and to allow serial replacement by recycling of the selectable marker using Cre-loxP. Using this system, we generated a total of 24 mutants in type 1 and 2 genetic backgrounds to ascertain the functions of noncanonical CDPKs. Remarkably, although we were able to confirm the essentiality of CDPK1 and CDPK7, the majority of CDPKs had no discernible phenotype for growth in vitro or infection in the mouse model. The exception to this was CDPK6, loss of which leads to reduced plaquing, fitness defect in a competition assay, and reduced tissue cyst formation in chronically infected mice. Our findings highlight the utility of CRISPR/Cas9 for rapid serial gene deletion and also suggest that additional models are needed to reveal the functions of many genes in T. gondii. PMID:26755159

  13. Identification of two rare and novel large deletions in ITGB4 gene causing epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia.

    PubMed

    Mencía, Ángeles; García, Marta; García, Eva; Llames, Sara; Charlesworth, Alexandra; de Lucas, Raúl; Vicente, Asunción; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Coto, Pablo; Costa, Marta; Vera, Ángel; López-Pestaña, Arantxa; Murillas, Rodolfo; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Jorcano, José Luis; Conti, Claudio J; Escámez Toledano, María José; Del Río Nechaevsky, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease with a variable prognosis from lethal to very mild. EB-PA is classified into Simplex form (EBS-PA: OMIM #612138) and Junctional form (JEB-PA: OMIM #226730), and it is caused by mutations in ITGA6, ITGB4 and PLEC genes. We report the analysis of six patients with EB-PA, including two dizygotic twins. Skin immunofluorescence epitope mapping was performed followed by PCR and direct sequencing of the ITGB4 gene. Two of the patients presented with non-lethal EB-PA associated with missense ITGB4 gene mutations. For the other four, early postnatal demise was associated with complete lack of β4 integrin due to a variety of ITGB4 novel mutations (2 large deletions, 1 splice-site mutation and 3 missense mutations). One of the deletions spanned 278 bp, being one of the largest reported to date for this gene. Remarkably, we also found for the first time a founder effect for one novel mutation in the ITGB4 gene. We have identified 6 novel mutations in the ITGB4 gene to be added to the mutation database. Our results reveal genotype-phenotype correlations that contribute to the molecular understanding of this heterogeneous disease, a pivotal issue for prognosis and for the development of novel evidence-based therapeutic options for EB management. PMID:26739954

  14. Candidate Genes and the Behavioral Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Sarah E.; Howley, Sarah; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an overwhelming evidence that children and adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a characteristic behavioral phenotype. In particular, there is a growing body of evidence that indicates an unequivocal association between 22q11.2DS and schizophrenia, especially in adulthood. Deletion of 22q11.2 is the third highest risk…

  15. A chloroplast DNA deletion located in RNA polymerase gene rpoC2 in CMS lines of sorghum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Muthukrishnan, S; Liang, G H; Schertz, K F; Hart, G E

    1993-01-01

    Fertile lines of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were shown to differ from cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) lines by the presence of a 3.8 kb HindIII chloroplast DNA fragment in the former and a smaller (3.7 kb) fragment in the latter. DNA/DNA hybridization studies showed that these two fragments are homologous. Fertile plants from S. versicolor, S. almum, S. halepense, and Sorghastrum nutans (Yellow Indiangrass) also have the 3.8 kb fragment, and CMS lines studied containing A1, A2 and A3 cytoplasms have the 3.7 kb fragment. The size difference between the two fragments was localized to a 1.0 kb SacI-HindIII fragment by restriction mapping. A 165 bp deletion, which is flanked by a 51 bp tandem repeat, was identified in the CMS lines by sequencing the clones. Comparison of the two sequences with those from maize, rice, tobacco, spinach, pea, and liverwort revealed that the deleted sequence is located in the middle of the RNA polymerase beta" subunit encoded by the gene rpoC2. The amino acid sequence deleted in the CMS lines is in a monocot-specific region which contains two protein motifs that are characteristic of several transcriptional activation factors, namely, a leucine zipper motif and an acidic domain capable of forming an amphipathic alpha-helix. Further studies designed to determine whether or not the deletion is involved in CMS of sorghum are underway. PMID:8437572

  16. Genes Required for Survival in Microgravity Revealed by Genome-Wide Yeast Deletion Collections Cultured during Spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Nislow, Corey; Lee, Anna Y.; Allen, Patricia L.; Giaever, Guri; Smith, Andrew; Gebbia, Marinella; Stodieck, Louis S.; Hammond, Jeffrey S.; Birdsall, Holly H.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight is a unique environment with profound effects on biological systems including tissue redistribution and musculoskeletal stresses. However, the more subtle biological effects of spaceflight on cells and organisms are difficult to measure in a systematic, unbiased manner. Here we test the utility of the molecularly barcoded yeast deletion collection to provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of microgravity on a model organism. We developed robust hardware to screen, in parallel, the complete collection of ~4800 homozygous and ~5900 heterozygous (including ~1100 single-copy deletions of essential genes) yeast deletion strains, each carrying unique DNA that acts as strain identifiers. We compared strain fitness for the homozygous and heterozygous yeast deletion collections grown in spaceflight and ground, as well as plus and minus hyperosmolar sodium chloride, providing a second additive stressor. The genome-wide sensitivity profiles obtained from these treatments were then queried for their similarity to a compendium of drugs whose effects on the yeast collection have been previously reported. We found that the effects of spaceflight have high concordance with the effects of DNA-damaging agents and changes in redox state, suggesting mechanisms by which spaceflight may negatively affect cell fitness. PMID:25667933

  17. Genes required for survival in microgravity revealed by genome-wide yeast deletion collections cultured during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Nislow, Corey; Lee, Anna Y; Allen, Patricia L; Giaever, Guri; Smith, Andrew; Gebbia, Marinella; Stodieck, Louis S; Hammond, Jeffrey S; Birdsall, Holly H; Hammond, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight is a unique environment with profound effects on biological systems including tissue redistribution and musculoskeletal stresses. However, the more subtle biological effects of spaceflight on cells and organisms are difficult to measure in a systematic, unbiased manner. Here we test the utility of the molecularly barcoded yeast deletion collection to provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of microgravity on a model organism. We developed robust hardware to screen, in parallel, the complete collection of ~4800 homozygous and ~5900 heterozygous (including ~1100 single-copy deletions of essential genes) yeast deletion strains, each carrying unique DNA that acts as strain identifiers. We compared strain fitness for the homozygous and heterozygous yeast deletion collections grown in spaceflight and ground, as well as plus and minus hyperosmolar sodium chloride, providing a second additive stressor. The genome-wide sensitivity profiles obtained from these treatments were then queried for their similarity to a compendium of drugs whose effects on the yeast collection have been previously reported. We found that the effects of spaceflight have high concordance with the effects of DNA-damaging agents and changes in redox state, suggesting mechanisms by which spaceflight may negatively affect cell fitness. PMID:25667933

  18. Contribution of Scaffoldins to Biomass Degradation by Clostridium Thermocellum: The Effect of Scaffoldin-Deletions on Expression of Other Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qi; Podkaminer, Kara; Resch, Michael G.; Donohoe, Bryon; Olson, Daniel G.; Baker, John O.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Syed, Mustafa; Wilson, Charlotte M.; Brown, Steven D.; Yang, Shihui; Magnusson, Lauren; Maness, Pin-Ching; Decker, Steve R.; Lynd, Lee R.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2014-04-28

    The cellulosome system contributes greatly to the extreme efficiency of C. thermocellum cellulose degradation. In order to further understand the cellulosome working mechanism, we have knocked out C. thermocellum scaffoldin genes to generate a variety of deletion mutants. The knockout most detrimental to enzymatic hydrolysis by the secretome is that of the primary scaffoldin CipA. Deletion of multiple secondary scaffoldins results in secretome activities intermediate between those of the parent strain and the CipA-knockout mutants. The order of relative secretome activities is the same, whether the cellulosic substrate is microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) or deacetylated acid-pretreated corn stover (DACS), but the relative magnitudes of the deletion effects are strongly substrate-dependent. Similar trends are observed in fermentation studies of the abilities of the parent and knockout strains themselves to utilize Avicel and DACS. Data from transcriptomic and proteomic studies of these strains when grown on both substrates are used to relate the activity and growth effects of the deletions to their effects on the overall expression of lignocellulose-degrading enzymes by C. thermocellum.

  19. OMP gene deletion results in an alteration in odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Youngentob, S L; Kent, P F; Margolis, F L

    2003-12-01

    Previous behavioral work, using a complex five-odorant identification task, demonstrated that olfactory marker protein (OMP) is critically involved in odor processing to the extent that its loss results in an alteration in odorant quality perception. Exactly how the lack of OMP exerts its influence on the perception of odorant quality is unknown. However, there is considerable neurophysiological evidence that different odorants produce different spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity at the level of the mucosa and that these patterns predict the psychophysically determined perceptual relationship among odorants. In this respect, OMP gene deletion is known to result in a constellation of physiologic defects (i.e., marked reduction in the electroolfactogram (EOG) and altered response and recovery kinetics) that would be expected to alter the odorant-induced spatiotemporal activity patterns that are characteristic of different odorants. This, in turn, would be expected to alter the spatiotemporal patterning of information that results from the mucosal projection onto the bulb, thereby changing odorant quality perception. To test the hypothesis that odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns are altered in mice lacking the gene for OMP, we optically recorded the fluorescent changes in response to odorant stimulation from both the septum and turbinates of both OMP-null and control mice using a voltage-sensitive dye (di-4-ANEPPS Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and a Dalsa 120 x 120, 12-bit CCD camera. To maintain continuity with the previous behavioral work, the odorants 2-propanol, citral, carvone, ethylacetoacetate, and propyl acetate were again used. Each odorant was randomly presented to each mucosal surface in a Latin-Square design. The results of this study demonstrated that, for both mouse strains, there do indeed exist different spatiotemporal activity patterns for different odorants. More importantly, however, these patterns significantly differed between OMP

  20. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome in a Family with a Deletion Followed by an Insertion within the HPRT1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu; Nyhan, William L

    2015-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare X-linked inherited neurogenetic disorder of purine metabolism in which the enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase(HGprt) is defective. The authors report a novel mutation which led to LNS in a family with a deletion followed by an insertion (INDELS) via the serial replication slippage mechanism: c.428_432delTGCAGinsAGCAAA, p.Met143Lysfs*12 in exon 6 of HPRT1 gene. Molecular diagnosis discloses the genetic heterogeneity of HPRT1 gene responsible for HGprt deficiency. It allows fast, accurate carrier detection and genetic counseling. PMID:25965333

  1. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2016-08-01

    Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27494202

  2. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2016-01-01

    Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  3. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  4. Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea; Jensen, Lars R; Groth, Camilla; Glenthøj, Birte; Rizzo, Renata; Debes, Nanette Mol; Skov, Liselotte; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Paschou, Peristera; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Tümer, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlying environmental and genetic factors are largely unknown. IMMP2L (inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase, subunit 2) located on chromosome 7q31 is one of the genes suggested as a susceptibility factor in disease pathogenesis. Through screening of a Danish cohort comprising 188 unrelated Tourette syndrome patients for copy number variations, we identified seven patients with intragenic IMMP2L deletions (3.7%), and this frequency was significantly higher (P=0.0447) compared with a Danish control cohort (0.9%). Four of the seven deletions identified did not include any known exons of IMMP2L, but were within intron 3. These deletions were found to affect a shorter IMMP2L mRNA species with two alternative 5′-exons (one including the ATG start codon). We showed that both transcripts (long and short) were expressed in several brain regions, with a particularly high expression in cerebellum and hippocampus. The current findings give further evidence for the role of IMMP2L as a susceptibility factor in Tourette syndrome and suggest that intronic changes in disease susceptibility genes should be investigated further for presence of alternatively spliced exons. PMID:24549057

  5. Unexpected effects of gene deletion on mercury interactions with the methylation-deficient mutant hgcAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hui; Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Liang, Liyuan; Elias, Dwayne A; Gu, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    The hgcA and hgcB gene pair is essential for mercury (Hg) methylation by certain anaerobic bacteria,1 but little is known about how deletion of hgcAB affects cell surface interactions and intracellular uptake of Hg. Here, we compare hgcAB mutants with the wild-type (WT) strains of both Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 and observe differences in Hg redox transformations, adsorption, and uptake in laboratory incubation studies. In both strains, deletion of hgcAB increased the reduction of Hg(II) but decreased the oxidation of Hg(0) under anaerobic conditions. The measured cellular thiol content in hgcAB mutants was lower than the WT, accounting for decreased adsorption and uptake of Hg. Despite the lack of methylation activity, Hg uptake by the hgcAB continued, albeit at a slower rate than the WT. These findings demonstrate that deletion of the hgcAB gene not only eliminates Hg methylation but also alters cell physiology, resulting in changes to Hg redox reactions, sorption, and uptake by cells.

  6. Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy in Golden Retriever Dogs Is Caused by a Deletion in the Mitochondrial tRNATyr Gene

    PubMed Central

    Baranowska, Izabella; Jäderlund, Karin Hultin; Nennesmo, Inger; Holmqvist, Erik; Heidrich, Nadja; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Andersson, Göran; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.; Hedhammar, Åke; Wibom, Rolf; Andersson, Leif

    2009-01-01

    Sensory ataxic neuropathy (SAN) is a recently identified neurological disorder in golden retrievers. Pedigree analysis revealed that all affected dogs belong to one maternal lineage, and a statistical analysis showed that the disorder has a mitochondrial origin. A one base pair deletion in the mitochondrial tRNATyr gene was identified at position 5304 in affected dogs after re-sequencing the complete mitochondrial genome of seven individuals. The deletion was not found among dogs representing 18 different breeds or in six wolves, ruling out this as a common polymorphism. The mutation could be traced back to a common ancestor of all affected dogs that lived in the 1970s. We used a quantitative oligonucleotide ligation assay to establish the degree of heteroplasmy in blood and tissue samples from affected dogs and controls. Affected dogs and their first to fourth degree relatives had 0–11% wild-type (wt) sequence, while more distant relatives ranged between 5% and 60% wt sequence and all unrelated golden retrievers had 100% wt sequence. Northern blot analysis showed that tRNATyr had a 10-fold lower steady-state level in affected dogs compared with controls. Four out of five affected dogs showed decreases in mitochondrial ATP production rates and respiratory chain enzyme activities together with morphological alterations in muscle tissue, resembling the changes reported in human mitochondrial pathology. Altogether, these results provide conclusive evidence that the deletion in the mitochondrial tRNATyr gene is the causative mutation for SAN. PMID:19492087

  7. A case of 9.7 Mb terminal Xp deletion including OA1 locus associated with contiguous gene syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Hae; Kim, Sook-Young; Kim, Jin-Kyung

    2012-10-01

    Terminal or interstitial deletions of Xp (Xp22.2→Xpter) in males have been recognized as a cause of contiguous gene syndromes showing variable association of apparently unrelated clinical manifestations such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (SHOX), chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX1), mental retardation (NLGN4), ichthyosis (STS), Kallmann syndrome (KAL1), and ocular albinism (GPR143). Here we present a case of a 13.5 yr old boy and sister with a same terminal deletion of Xp22.2 resulting in the absence of genes from the telomere of Xp to GPR143 of Xp22. The boy manifested the findings of all of the disorders mentioned above. We began a testosterone enanthate monthly replacement therapy. His sister, 11 yr old, manifested only Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, and had engaged in growth hormone therapy for 3 yr. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a male with a 9.7 Mb terminal Xp deletion including the OA1 locus in Korea. PMID:23091330

  8. Transposition of a duplicate antibiotic resistance gene and generation of deletions in plasmid R6K.

    PubMed Central

    Holmans, P L; Clowes, R C

    1979-01-01

    Transformation experiments showed that spontaneous deletions which result in loss of streptomycin resistance and an increase in conjugal transfer efficiency are present at a frequency of about 10(-4) in plasmid molecules of R6K. Similar deletions were thus readily selected by conjugal transfer of R6K, and their appearance was dependent upon recA+ activity in either donor or recipient host. The deoxyribonucleic acid segment deleted in four mutants examined was concluded to extend from the same terminus of the transposon, TnA, in the same direction, but to different extents, and to retain the TnA region intact. Insertions of a duplicate TnA element were found in R6K plasmids isolated from strains selected for increased ampicillin resistance, which were unstable in recA+ strains. In four plasmids examined after transfer to a recA host, an inverted repeat of the preexisting TnA element was shown to have been inserted at a similar location and was in two instances associated with deletions which extended from the same direction as those described above. The deletions are ascribed to the result of recA+-dependent recombination between direct repeats of TnA. Images PMID:370107

  9. The major and minor chicken vitellogenin genes are each adjacent to partially deleted pseudogene copies of the other.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R; Fischer, A H; Burch, J B

    1989-01-01

    The major chicken vitellogenin gene (VTGII) has previously been cloned and sequenced. We now report the isolation of genomic clones that encompass a minor chicken vitellogenin gene (VTGIII) which is also expressed in the liver in response to estradiol. Our analysis reveals that a pseudogene for VTGII (psi VTGII) lies 1,426 base pairs upstream of this VTGIII gene. A reevaluation of published sequence data reveals that the converse is also true, namely, that a pseudogene for VTGIII (psi VTGIII) lies 1,345 base pairs downstream of the VTGII gene. Our results show that a 335-base-pair deletion has removed the psi VTGIII promoter and cap site but left residual estrogen response element in a region where nuclease-hypersensitive sites have been reported to be induced in response to estradiol. Images PMID:2796998

  10. Isolation and characterization of the complete chicken beta-globin gene region: frequent deletion of the adult beta-globin genes in lambda.

    PubMed Central

    Villeponteau, B; Martinson, H

    1981-01-01

    A library of bacteriophage lambda clones containing chicken chromosomal DNA was screened, using the adult beta-globin cDNA plasmid pHb 1001 as a probe. Sixteen overlapping clones were isolated containing 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of chicken DNA. Characterization of these clones revealed four beta-like globin genes, some genomically repeated sequences, but no pseudo-genes. The four beta-like genes have an average intergenic distance of less than half of that found for the mammalian beta-like globin gene clusters so far characterized. The overall features of the map were confirmed by genomic Southern analysis. Frequent deletions were shown to occur between the various beta-like globin genes during phage propagation. The presumptive hatching gene in particular was always associated with abnormal lambda clones although we were able to find one such clone that did contain a normal copy of the hatching gene itself. Probably such deletions explain the failure to recover this gene in previous attempts. Images PMID:6269092

  11. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 markerless gene deletion using a combination of λ Red recombineering and Cre/loxP site-specific recombination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Yang, Yunwen; Ling, Wen; Zhuang, Hao; Li, Qin; Shang, Guangdong

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a saprophytic, environmental microorganism that plays important roles in the biodegradation of environmental toxic compounds and production of polymers, chemicals and secondary metabolites. Gene deletion of KT2440 usually involves cloning of the flanking homologous fragments of the gene of interest into a suicide vector followed by transferring into KT2440 via triparental conjugation. Selection and counterselection steps are then employed to generate gene deletion mutant. However, these methods are tedious and are not suitable for the manipulation of multiple genes simultaneously. Herein, a two-step, markerless gene deletion method is presented. First, homologous armsflanked loxP-neo-loxP was knocked-in to replace the gene of interest, then the kanamycin resistance marker is removed by Cre recombinase catalyzed site-specific recombination. Both two-plasmid and one-plasmid gene systems were established. MekR/PmekA regulated gene expression system was found to be suitable for tight Cre expression in one-plasmid deletion system. The straightforward, time saving and highly efficient markerless gene deletion strategy has the potential to facilitate the genetics and functional genomics study of P. putida KT2440. PMID:26802072

  12. Understanding the Role of Tbx1 as a Candidate Gene for 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Li, Xiao; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is caused by a commonly occurring microdeletion on chromosome 22. Clinical findings include cardiac malformations, thymic and parathyroid hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and dental defects. These phenotypes are due mainly to abnormal development of the pharyngeal apparatus. Targeted deletion studies in mice and analysis of naturally occurring mutations in humans have implicated Tbx1 as a candidate gene for 22q11.2DS. Tbx1 belongs to an evolutionarily conserved T-box family of transcription factors, whose expression is precisely regulated during embryogenesis, and it appears to regulate the proliferation and differentiation of various progenitor cells during organogenesis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of Tbx1 during development of the heart, thymus and parathyroid glands, as well as during formation of the palate, teeth, and other craniofacial features. PMID:23996541

  13. Diverse fission yeast genes required for responding to oxidative and metal stress: Comparative analysis of glutathione-related and other defense gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Pluskal, Tomáš; Sajiki, Kenichi; Becker, Joanne; Takeda, Kojiro; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Living organisms have evolved multiple sophisticated mechanisms to deal with reactive oxygen species. We constructed a collection of twelve single-gene deletion strains of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe designed for the study of oxidative and heavy metal stress responses. This collection contains deletions of biosynthetic enzymes of glutathione (Δgcs1 and Δgsa1), phytochelatin (Δpcs2), ubiquinone (Δabc1) and ergothioneine (Δegt1), as well as catalase (Δctt1), thioredoxins (Δtrx1 and Δtrx2), Cu/Zn- and Mn- superoxide dismutases (SODs; Δsod1 and Δsod2), sulfiredoxin (Δsrx1) and sulfide-quinone oxidoreductase (Δhmt2). First, we employed metabolomic analysis to examine the mutants of the glutathione biosynthetic pathway. We found that ophthalmic acid was produced by the same enzymes as glutathione in S. pombe. The identical genetic background of the strains allowed us to assess the severity of the individual gene knockouts by treating the deletion strains with oxidative agents. Among other results, we found that glutathione deletion strains were not particularly sensitive to peroxide or superoxide, but highly sensitive to cadmium stress. Our results show the astonishing diversity in cellular adaptation mechanisms to various types of oxidative and metal stress and provide a useful tool for further research into stress responses. PMID:27005325

  14. Dopaminergic neuron-specific deletion of p53 gene is neuroprotective in an experimental Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xin; Davis, Brandon; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Filichia, Emily; Barnett, Austin; Greig, Nigel H; Hoffer, Barry; Luo, Yu

    2016-09-01

    p53, a stress response gene, is involved in diverse cell death pathways and its activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether the neuronal p53 protein plays a direct role in regulating dopaminergic (DA) neuronal cell death is unknown. In this study, in contrast to the global inhibition of p53 function by pharmacological inhibitors and in traditional p53 knock-out (KO) mice, we examined the effect of DA specific p53 gene deletion in DAT-p53KO mice. These DAT-p53KO mice did not exhibit apparent changes in the general structure and neuronal density of DA neurons during late development and in aging. However, in DA-p53KO mice treated with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), we found that the induction of Bax and p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) mRNA and protein levels by MPTP were diminished in both striatum and substantia nigra of these mice. Notably, deletion of the p53 gene in DA neurons significantly reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss in substantia nigra, dopaminergic neuronal terminal loss at striatum and, additionally, decreased motor deficits in mice challenged with MPTP. In contrast, there was no difference in astrogliosis between WT and DAT-p53KO mice in response to MPTP treatment. These findings demonstrate a specific contribution of p53 activation in DA neuronal cell death by MPTP challenge. Our results further support the role of programmed cell death mediated by p53 in this animal model of PD and identify Bax, BAD and PUMA genes as downstream targets of p53 in modulating DA neuronal death in the in vivo MPTP-induced PD model. We deleted p53 gene in dopaminergic neurons in late developmental stages and found that DA specific p53 deletion is protective in acute MPTP animal model possibly through blocking MPTP-induced BAX and PUMA up-regulation. Astrocyte activation measured by GFAP positive cells and GFAP gene up-regulation in the striatum shows no difference

  15. Targeted Deletion of Regions Rich in Immune-Evasive Genes from the Cytomegalovirus Genome as a Novel Vaccine Strategy▿

    PubMed Central

    Čičin-Šain, Luka; Bubić, Ivan; Schnee, Margit; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Mohr, Christian; Jonjić, Stipan; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2007-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ubiquitous human pathogen, is a leading cause of congenital infections and represents a serious health risk for the immunosuppressed patient. A vaccine against CMV is currently not available. CMV is characterized by its large genome and by multiple genes modulating the immunity of the host, which cluster predominantly at genome termini. Here, we tested whether the deletion of gene blocks rich in immunomodulatory genes could be used as a novel concept in the generation of immunogenic but avirulent, herpesvirus vaccines. To generate an experimental CMV vaccine, we selectively deleted 32 genes from the mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) genome. The resulting mutant grew to titers similar to that of wild-type MCMV in vitro. In vivo, the mutant was 10,000-fold attenuated and well tolerated, even by highly susceptible mice deficient for B, T, and NK cells or for the interferon type I receptor. Equally relevant for safety concerns, immune suppression did not lead to the mutant's reactivation from latency. Immunization with the replication-competent mutant, but not with inactivated virus, resulted in protective immunity, which increased over time. Vaccination induced MCMV-specific antibodies and a strong T-cell response. We propose that a targeted and rational approach can improve future herpesvirus vaccines and vaccine vectors. PMID:17913824

  16. Intronic deletions of tva receptor gene decrease the susceptibility to infection by avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiguo; Liu, Yang; Li, Hongxing; Chang, Shuang; Shu, Dingming; Zhang, Huanmin; Chen, Feng; Xie, Qingmei

    2015-01-01

    The group of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) in chickens contains six highly related subgroups, A to E and J. Four genetic loci, tva, tvb, tvc and tvj, encode for corresponding receptors that determine the susceptibility to the ASLV subgroups. The prevalence of ASLV in hosts may have imposed strong selection pressure toward resistance to ASLV infection, and the resistant alleles in all four receptor genes have been identified. In this study, two new alleles of the tva receptor gene, tvar5 and tvar6, with similar intronic deletions were identified in Chinese commercial broilers. These natural mutations delete the deduced branch point signal within the first intron, disrupting mRNA splicing of the tva receptor gene and leading to the retention of intron 1 and introduction of premature TGA stop codons in both the longer and shorter tva isoforms. As a result, decreased susceptibility to subgroup A ASLV in vitro and in vivo was observed in the subsequent analysis. In addition, we identified two groups of heterozygous allele pairs which exhibited quantitative differences in host susceptibility to ASLV-A. This study demonstrated that defective splicing of the tva receptor gene can confer genetic resistance to ASLV subgroup A in the host. PMID:25873518

  17. Glycosylation defects and virulence phenotypes of Leishmania mexicana phosphomannomutase and dolicholphosphate-mannose synthase gene deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Garami, A; Mehlert, A; Ilg, T

    2001-12-01

    Leishmania parasites synthesize an abundance of mannose (Man)-containing glycoconjugates thought to be essential for virulence to the mammalian host and for viability. These glycoconjugates include lipophosphoglycan (LPG), proteophosphoglycans (PPGs), glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins, glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPLs), and N-glycans. A prerequisite for their biosynthesis is an ample supply of the Man donors GDP-Man and dolicholphosphate-Man. We have cloned from Leishmania mexicana the gene encoding the enzyme phosphomannomutase (PMM) and the previously described dolicholphosphate-Man synthase gene (DPMS) that are involved in Man activation. Surprisingly, gene deletion experiments resulted in viable parasite lines lacking the respective open reading frames (DeltaPMM and DeltaDPMS), a result against expectation and in contrast to the lethal phenotype observed in gene deletion experiments with fungi. L. mexicana DeltaDPMS exhibits a selective defect in LPG, protein GPI anchor, and GIPL biosynthesis, but despite the absence of these structures, which have been implicated in parasite virulence and viability, the mutant remains infectious to macrophages and mice. By contrast, L. mexicana DeltaPMM are largely devoid of all known Man-containing glycoconjugates and are unable to establish an infection in mouse macrophages or the living animal. Our results define Man activation leading to GDP-Man as a virulence pathway in Leishmania. PMID:11689705

  18. Projection display systems based on the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younse, Jack M.

    1995-09-01

    The DMD is a semiconductor light switch which is making an impact in digital light processingTM (DLP) applications. It is the world's largest micro-electro-mechanical structures (MEMS) device with chips ranging from 442-thousand to 2.3 million moving mirrors. The DMD operates in a bistable (binary) mode and fully supports the movement to all-digital display systems. Currently, DMD devices are being used to develop a family of projection display products. An overview of digital light processing systems will be given with emphasis on the performance of the first prototypes using this technology, including their value propositions. Finally, the general markets served by this technology, along with the advantages DMD technology offers, will be discussed.

  19. Factor IXMadrid 2: a deletion/insertion in factor IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site.

    PubMed Central

    Solera, J; Magallón, M; Martin-Villar, J; Coloma, A

    1992-01-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5' end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3' end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been replaced by a 47-bp sequence from the normal factor IX gene, although this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment. Images Figure 1 PMID:1346483

  20. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification detection of an unknown large deletion of the CREB-binding protein gene in a patient with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Calì, F; Failla, P; Chiavetta, V; Ragalmuto, A; Ruggeri, G; Schinocca, P; Schepis, C; Romano, V; Romano, C

    2013-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder characterized by postnatal growth retardation, psychomotor developmental delay, skeletal anomalies, peculiar facial morphology, and tumorigenesis. Mutations in the gene encoding the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB, also known as CREBBP or CBP) on chromosome 16p13.3 have been identified. In addition, some patients with low intelligence quotients and autistic features bear large deletions. Based on these observations, we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to search for large deletions affecting the CREBBP gene in a Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome patient. We identified a novel heterozygote deletion removing five exons (exons 17-21), encoding the histone acetyltransferase domain. We propose the use of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification as a fast, accurate and cheap test for detecting large deletions in the CREBBP gene in the sub-group of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome patients with low intelligence quotients and autistic features. PMID:23315884

  1. CDKN2 Gene Deletion as Poor Prognosis Predictor Involved in the Progression of Adult B-Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Na; Li, Yu-ling; Zhou, Xuan; Cao, Rui; Li, Huan; Lu, Qi-si; Li, Lin; Lu, Zi-yuan; Huang, Ji-xian; Sun, Jing; Liu, Qi-fa; Du, Qing-feng; Liu, Xiao-li

    2015-01-01

    Deletion of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/B (CDKN2A/B) is well known in many hematologic malignancies, but only few reports have investigated this deletion effect on clinical prognosis. This study performed analysis of the CDKN2 deletion in 215 adult B- lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) patients, and related cytogenetic prognostic factors (BCR/ABL; E2A/PBXl; TEL/AML1; Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) rearrangement; MYC, Immunoglobulin heavy locus (IGH) translocation). The prevalence of CDKN2 deletions in all study populations was 28.4%. There is no difference between patients with CDKN2 deletion and wild-type patients in sex, age, white blood cells (WBC) count, BM blast percentage, extra infiltration and induction complete remission (CR) rate. Analysis in relapse patients revealed that the distribution of CDKN2 deletion is higher in relapse patients (44.6%) than all patients (28.4%, P=0.006). Deletion of CDKN2 was significantly associated with poor outcomes including decreased overall survival (OS) (P<0.001), lower disease free-survival (DFS) (P<0.001), and increased cumulative incidence of relapse (P=0.002); Also, CDKN2 deletion was strongly associated with IGH translocation (P=0.021); and had an adverse effect on patients with BCR-ABL fusion gene or with MLL rearrangement. Patients with CDKN2 gene deletion benefited from allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT). Deletion of CDKN2 gene was commonly observed through leukemia progression and was poor prognostic marker in long-term outcomes. PMID:26516359

  2. [Detection of bcr/abl fusion gene and its derivative chromosome 9 deletions in CML by using home-made bcr/abl extra-signal probe].

    PubMed

    Lai, Yue-Yun; Feng, Lin; Wang, Zheng; Lü, Shan; Dang, Hui; Shi, Yan; He, Qi; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed to verify the efficacy of home-made LSI bcr/abl ES probe for detection of bcr/abl fusion gene and derivative chromosome 9 deletions in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was carried out with dual color bcr/abl extra signal (ES) probe in 97 cases of CML based on morphology and cytogenetic karyotype and 129 cases of non-hematological malignancies/non-myeloproliferative diseases with normal cytogenetic karyotype. For the patients with signals of 1R1G1F indicating der(9) deletions, FISH were done using ASS DNA probe. The results showed that 91 cases with standard t(9;22) and 6 cases with variant translocation of t(9;22) were detected by conventional G banding technique. All of the 97 patients displayed bcr/abl fusion gene by ES-FISH, including 16 cases with signal patterns of 1R1G1F showing der(9) deletions. Among the 16 cases with der(9) deletions, 13 cases were detected to have deletions of ASS gene. Meanwhile, none of the 129 cases of negative control showed bcr/abl fusion gene by ES-FISH. It is concluded that home-made LSI bcr/abl ES probe is effective to identify the bcr/abl fusion gene and der(9) deletions in CML, and the ES-FISH results are consistent with conventional cytogenetic karyotype. PMID:20137147

  3. Novel deletion of the E3A ubiquitin protein ligase gene detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in a patient with Angelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Calì, Francesco; Ragalmuto, Alda; Chiavetta, Valeria; Calabrese, Giuseppe; Fichera, Marco; Vinci, Mirella; Ruggeri, Giuseppa; Schinocca, Pietro; Sturnio, Maurizio; Romano, Salvatore; Elia, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurobehavioural disorder caused by failure of expression of the maternal copy of the imprinted domain located on 15q11-q13. There are different mechanisms leading to AS: maternal microdeletion, uniparental disomy, defects in a putative imprinting centre, mutations of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (UBE3A) gene. However, some of suspected cases of AS are still scored negative to all the latter mutations. Recently, it has been shown that a proportion of negative cases bear large deletions overlapping one or more exons of the UBE3A gene. These deletions are difficult to detect by conventional gene-scanning methods due to the masking effect by the non-deleted allele. In this study, we have used for the first time multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and comparative multiplex dosage analysis (CMDA) to search for large deletions affecting the UBE3A gene. Using this approach, we identified a novel causative deletion involving exon 8 in an affected sibling. Based on our results, we propose the use of MLPA as a fast, accurate and inexpensive test to detect large deletions in the UBE3A gene in a small but significant percentage of AS patients. PMID:21072004

  4. Mechanistic Evaluation for Mixed-field Agglutination in the K562 Cell Study Model with Exon 3 Deletion of A1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Ping; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Lin, Chi-Jui; Wang, Wei-Ting; Sun, Chien-Feng

    2015-01-01

    In the case of blood type B3 with typical mixed-field agglutination of RBCs in the presence of anti-B or anti-AB antibody, a number of genetic alternations have been reported. It is well known that the IVS3+5G→A mutation in the B gene destroys the consensus of the splice donor site leading to exon 3 skipping during mRNA splicing. The lack of exon 3 likely causes a short stem region, producing an unstable B3 protein, and is concomitant with a decrease in B3 protein expression. Whether the phenomenon also appears in the type A blood group is of question. In this study, we evaluate whether exon 3 deletion in the blood type A gene also results in mixed-field phenotype. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate cDNA encoding A1 gene with exon 3 deletion. The cDNA was stably expressed in K562 cells. The expression of A antigen was compared with expression in parental K562 cells that did not express A antigen and in the stable K562 cell line expressing A(1) cDNA by flow cytometry analyses. The expression of A antigen in A1 stable cells and parental K562 cells was set as 100% and 0%, respectively. The mean relative percentage of A antigen expression for the cells of A1 with exon 3 deletion was 59.9% of A1 stable cells. Consistent with the observations of B3, which is B gene with exon 3 deletion, mixed field agglutination was observed for the cells expressing A1 with exon 3 deletion. Exon 3 deletion results in mixed field phenotype in both type A and B RBCs. However, the degree of antigen expression change for exon 3 deletion in A gene was less severe when compared with the deletion occurred in B gene. PMID:26663798

  5. Radiation-induced total-deletion mutations in the human hprt gene: a biophysical model based on random walk interphase chromatin geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Sachs, R. K.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a biophysical model that explains the sizes of radiation-induced hprt deletions. METHODS: Key assumptions: (1) Deletions are produced by two DSB that are closer than an interaction distance at the time of DSB induction; (2) Interphase chromatin is modelled by a biphasic random walk distribution; and (3) Misrejoining of DSB from two separate tracks dominates at low-LET and misrejoining of DSB from a single track dominates at high-LET. RESULTS: The size spectra for radiation-induced total deletions of the hprt gene are calculated. Comparing with the results of Yamada and coworkers for gamma-irradiated human fibroblasts the study finds that an interaction distance of 0.75 microm will fit both the absolute frequency and the size spectrum of the total deletions. It is also shown that high-LET radiations produce, relatively, more total deletions of sizes below 0.5 Mb. The model predicts an essential gene to be located between 2 and 3 Mb from the hprt locus towards the centromere. Using the same assumptions and parameters as for evaluating mutation frequencies, a frequency of intra-arm chromosome deletions is calculated that is in agreement with experimental data. CONCLUSIONS: Radiation-induced total-deletion mutations of the human hprt gene and intrachange chromosome aberrations share a common mechanism for their induction.

  6. A new insertion/deletion fragment polymorphism of inhibin-α gene associated with follicular cysts in Large White sows

    PubMed Central

    LI, Wanhong; CHEN, Shuxiong; LI, Hongjiao; LIU, Zhuo; ZHAO, Yun; CHEN, Lu; ZHOU, Xu; LI, Chunjing

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian follicular cysts are anovulatory follicular structures that lead to infertility. Hormones play key roles in the formation and persistence of cysts. Inhibins are heterodimeric gonadal glycoprotein hormones that belong to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily. These hormones suppress the secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone. In this report, partial fragment of inhibin-α (INHA) subunit gene of Large White pig was detected from the genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction. The sequence showed a 283 bp fragment insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in INHA subunit gene. A total of 49 Large White sows with cystic follicles and 152 normal sows were screened for this polymorphism. The relationship of INHA I/D polymorphisms with follicular cysts was investigated. The distribution of I/D was significantly different between cystic and normal sows, thereby suggesting that the INHA subunit gene might be a potential biological marker for breeding programs in pig. PMID:26521695

  7. A new insertion/deletion fragment polymorphism of inhibin-α gene associated with follicular cysts in Large White sows.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanhong; Chen, Shuxiong; Li, Hongjiao; Liu, Zhuo; Zhao, Yun; Chen, Lu; Zhou, Xu; Li, Chunjing

    2016-05-18

    Ovarian follicular cysts are anovulatory follicular structures that lead to infertility. Hormones play key roles in the formation and persistence of cysts. Inhibins are heterodimeric gonadal glycoprotein hormones that belong to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily. These hormones suppress the secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone. In this report, partial fragment of inhibin-α (INHA) subunit gene of Large White pig was detected from the genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction. The sequence showed a 283 bp fragment insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in INHA subunit gene. A total of 49 Large White sows with cystic follicles and 152 normal sows were screened for this polymorphism. The relationship of INHA I/D polymorphisms with follicular cysts was investigated. The distribution of I/D was significantly different between cystic and normal sows, thereby suggesting that the INHA subunit gene might be a potential biological marker for breeding programs in pig. PMID:26521695

  8. Pleiotropy in microdeletion syndromes: Neurologic and spermatogenic abnormalities in mice homozygous for the p{sup 6H} deletion are likely due to dysfunction of a single gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rinchik, E.M.; Carpenter, D.A.; Handel, M.A.

    1995-07-03

    Variability and complexity of phenotypes observed in microdeletion syndromes can be due to deletion of a single gene whose product participates in several aspects of development or can be due to the deletion of a number of tightly linked genes, each adding its own effect to the syndrome. The p{sup 6H} deletion in mouse chromosome 7 presents a good model with which to address this question of multigene vs. single-gene pleiotropy. Mice homozygous for the p{sup 6H} deletion are diluted in pigmentation, are smaller than their littermates, and manifest a nervous jerky-gait phenotype. Male homozygotes are sterile and exhibit profound abnormalities in spermiogenesis. By using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (EtNU) mutagenesis and a breeding protocol designed to recover recessive mutations expressed hemizygously opposite a large p-locus deletion, we have generated three noncomplementing mutations that map to the p{sup 6H} deletion. Each of these EtNU-induced mutations has adverse effects on the size, nervous behavior, and progression of spermiogenesis that characterize p{sup 6H} deletion homozygotes. Because etNU is thought to induce primarily intragenic (point) mutations in mouse stem-cell spermatogonia, we propose that the trio of phenotypes (runtiness, nervous jerky gait, and male sterility) expressed in p{sup 6H} deletion homozygotes is the result of deletion of a single highly pleiotropic gene. We also predict that a homologous single locus, quite possibly tightly linked and distal to the D15S12 (P) locus in human chromosome 15q11-q13, may be associated with similar developmental abnormalities in humans. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Tph2 gene deletion enhances amphetamine-induced hypermotility: effect of 5-HT restoration and role of striatal noradrenaline release.

    PubMed

    Carli, Mirjana; Kostoula, Chrysaugi; Sacchetti, Giuseppina; Mainolfi, Pierangela; Anastasia, Alessia; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William

    2015-11-01

    Variants of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), the gene encoding enzyme responsible for the synthesis of brain serotonin (5-HT), have been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, substance abuse and addiction. This study assessed the effect of Tph2 gene deletion on motor behavior and found that motor activity induced by 2.5 and 5 mg/kg amphetamine was enhanced in Tph2(-/-) mice. Using the in vivo microdialysis technique we found that the ability of amphetamine to stimulate noradrenaline (NA) release in the striatum was reduced by about 50% in Tph2(-/-) mice while the release of dopamine (DA) was not affected. Tph2 deletion did not affect the release of NA and DA in the prefrontal cortex. The role of endogenous 5-HT in enhancing the effect of amphetamine was confirmed showing that treatment with the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (10 mg/kg) restored tissue and extracellular levels of brain 5-HT and the effects of amphetamine on striatal NA release and motor activity in Tph2(-/-) mice. Treatment with the NA precursor dihydroxyphenylserine (400 mg/kg) was sufficient to restore the effect of amphetamine on striatal NA release and motor activity in Tph2(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that amphetamine-induced hyperactivity is attenuated by endogenous 5-HT through the inhibition of striatal NA release. Tph2(-/-) mice may be a useful preclinical model to assess the role of 5-HT-dependent mechanisms in the action of psychostimulants. Acute sensitivity to the motor effects of amphetamine has been associated to increased risk of psychostimulant abuse. Here, we show that deletion of Tph2, the gene responsible for brain 5-HT synthesis, enhances the motor effect of amphetamine in mice through the inhibition of striatal NA release. This suggests that Tph2(-/-) mice is a useful preclinical model to assess the role of 5-HT-dependent mechanisms in psychostimulants action. Tph2, tryptophan hydroxylase-2. PMID:26259827

  10. Double gene deletion reveals the lack of cooperation between PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta} in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Bedu, E.; Desplanches, D.; Pequignot, J.; Bordier, B.; Desvergne, B. . E-mail: beatrice.desvergne@unil.ch

    2007-06-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are involved in the regulation of most of the pathways linked to lipid metabolism. PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta} isotypes are known to regulate muscle fatty acid oxidation and a reciprocal compensation of their function has been proposed. Herein, we investigated muscle contractile and metabolic phenotypes in PPAR{alpha}-/-, PPAR{beta}-/-, and double PPAR{alpha}-/- {beta}-/- mice. Heart and soleus muscle analyses show that the deletion of PPAR{alpha} induces a decrease of the HAD activity ({beta}-oxidation) while soleus contractile phenotype remains unchanged. A PPAR{beta} deletion alone has no effect. However, these mild phenotypes are not due to a reciprocal compensation of PPAR{beta} and PPAR{alpha} functions since double gene deletion PPAR{alpha}-PPAR{beta} mostly reproduces the null PPAR{alpha}-mediated reduced {beta}-oxidation, in addition to a shift from fast to slow fibers. In conclusion, PPAR{beta} is not required for maintaining skeletal muscle metabolic activity and does not compensate the lack of PPAR{alpha} in PPAR{alpha} null mice.

  11. Deletion of the thymidine kinase gene induces complete attenuation of the Georgia isolate of African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Sanford, B; Holinka, L G; O'Donnell, V; Krug, P W; Carlson, J; Alfano, M; Carrillo, C; Wu, Ping; Lowe, Andre; Risatti, G R; Gladue, D P; Borca, M V

    2016-02-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal viral disease of domestic pigs. There are no vaccines to control Africa swine fever (ASF). Experimental vaccines have been developed using genetically modified live attenuated ASFVs obtained by specifically deleting virus genes involved in virulence, including the thymidine kinase (TK) gene. TK has been shown to be involved in the virulence of several viruses, including ASFV. Here we report the construction of a recombinant virus (ASFV-G/V-ΔTK) obtained by deleting the TK gene in a virulent strain of ASFV Georgia adapted to replicate in Vero cells (ASFV-G/VP30). ASFV-G/P-ΔTK demonstrated decreased replication both in primary swine macrophage cell cultures and in Vero cells compared with ASFV-G/VP30. In vivo, intramuscular administration of up to 10(6) TCID50 of ASFV-G/V-ΔTK does not result in ASF disease. However, these animals are not protected when challenged with the virulent parental Georgia strain. PMID:26656424

  12. Neutrophil-specific deletion of the CARD9 gene expression regulator suppresses autoantibody-induced inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Németh, Tamás; Futosi, Krisztina; Sitaru, Cassian; Ruland, Jürgen; Mócsai, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are terminally differentiated cells with limited transcriptional activity. The biological function of their gene expression changes is poorly understood. CARD9 regulates transcription during antifungal immunity but its role in sterile inflammation is unclear. Here we show that neutrophil CARD9 mediates pro-inflammatory chemokine/cytokine but not lipid mediator release during non-infectious inflammation. Genetic deficiency of CARD9 suppresses autoantibody-induced arthritis and dermatitis in mice. Neutrophil-specific deletion of CARD9 is sufficient to induce that phenotype. Card9(-/-) neutrophils show defective immune complex-induced gene expression changes and pro-inflammatory chemokine/cytokine release but normal LTB4 production and other short-term responses. In vivo deletion of CARD9 reduces tissue levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines but not LTB4. The CARD9-mediated signalling pathway involves Src-family kinases, Syk, PLCγ2, Bcl10/Malt1 and NFκB. Collectively, CARD9-mediated gene expression changes within neutrophils play important roles during non-infectious inflammation in vivo and CARD9 acts as a divergence point between chemokine/cytokine and lipid mediator release. PMID:27032818

  13. Neutrophil-specific deletion of the CARD9 gene expression regulator suppresses autoantibody-induced inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Tamás; Futosi, Krisztina; Sitaru, Cassian; Ruland, Jürgen; Mócsai, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are terminally differentiated cells with limited transcriptional activity. The biological function of their gene expression changes is poorly understood. CARD9 regulates transcription during antifungal immunity but its role in sterile inflammation is unclear. Here we show that neutrophil CARD9 mediates pro-inflammatory chemokine/cytokine but not lipid mediator release during non-infectious inflammation. Genetic deficiency of CARD9 suppresses autoantibody-induced arthritis and dermatitis in mice. Neutrophil-specific deletion of CARD9 is sufficient to induce that phenotype. Card9−/− neutrophils show defective immune complex-induced gene expression changes and pro-inflammatory chemokine/cytokine release but normal LTB4 production and other short-term responses. In vivo deletion of CARD9 reduces tissue levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines but not LTB4. The CARD9-mediated signalling pathway involves Src-family kinases, Syk, PLCγ2, Bcl10/Malt1 and NFκB. Collectively, CARD9-mediated gene expression changes within neutrophils play important roles during non-infectious inflammation in vivo and CARD9 acts as a divergence point between chemokine/cytokine and lipid mediator release. PMID:27032818

  14. Deletion of the core-H region in mice abolishes the expression of three proximal odorant receptor genes in cis

    PubMed Central

    Nishizumi, Hirofumi; Kumasaka, Kouhei; Inoue, Nobuko; Nakashima, Ai; Sakano, Hitoshi

    2007-01-01

    We have previously reported that a 2.1-kb homology (H) sequence, conserved between mouse and human, regulates the odorant receptor (OR) gene MOR28 in transgenic mice. Here, we narrowed down the essential sequences of the H to a core of 124 bp by using a transient expression system in zebrafish embryos. Transgenic experiments in mice demonstrated that the core-H sequence is sufficient to endow expression of the MOR28 minigene. Deletion and mutation analyses of the core-H region revealed two homeodomain sequences to be essential for the H enhancer activity. Targeted deletion of the core-H abolished expression of three proximal OR genes, MOR28, MOR10, and MOR83, in cis, indicating the presence of another locus control region/enhancer in the downstream region, that regulates four distal OR genes in the same MOR28 cluster. In the heterozygous mice, the H− phenotype of the mutant allele was not rescued by the wild-type H+ allele in trans. PMID:18077433

  15. Properties of a herpes simplex virus multiple immediate-early gene-deleted recombinant as a vaccine vector

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Brockman, Mark A.; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Mathews, Lydia; Lucas, William T.; Murphy, Cynthia G.; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Deluca, Neal A.; Knipe, David M. . E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2007-01-20

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) recombinants induce durable immune responses in rhesus macaques and mice and have induced partial protection in rhesus macaques against mucosal challenge with virulent simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). In this study, we evaluated the properties of a new generation HSV vaccine vector, an HSV-1 multiple immediate-early (IE) gene deletion mutant virus, d106, which contains deletions in the ICP4, ICP27, ICP22, and ICP47 genes. Because several of the HSV IE genes have been implicated in immune evasion, inactivation of the genes encoding these proteins was expected to result in enhanced immunogenicity. The d106 virus expresses few HSV gene products and shows minimal cytopathic effect in cultured cells. When d106 was inoculated into mice, viral DNA accumulated at high levels in draining lymph nodes, consistent with an ability to transduce dendritic cells and activate their maturation and movement to lymph nodes. A d106 recombinant expressing Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase induced durable {beta}-gal-specific IgG and CD8{sup +} T cell responses in naive and HSV-immune mice. Finally, d106-based recombinants have been constructed that express simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag, env, or a rev-tat-nef fusion protein for several days in cultured cells. Thus, d106 shows many of the properties desirable in a vaccine vector: limited expression of HSV gene products and cytopathogenicity, high level expression of transgenes, ability to induce durable immune responses, and an ability to transduce dendritic cells and induce their maturation and migration to lymph nodes.

  16. Sequencing of rhesus macaque Y chromosome clarifies origins and evolution of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) genes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jennifer F; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2012-12-01

    Studies of Y chromosome evolution often emphasize gene loss, but this loss has been counterbalanced by addition of new genes. The DAZ genes, which are critical to human spermatogenesis, were acquired by the Y chromosome in the ancestor of Old World monkeys and apes. We and our colleagues recently sequenced the rhesus macaque Y chromosome, and comparison of this sequence to human and chimpanzee enables us to reconstruct much of the evolutionary history of DAZ. We report that DAZ arrived on the Y chromosome about 38 million years ago via the transposition of at least 1.1 megabases of autosomal DNA. This transposition also brought five additional genes to the Y chromosome, but all five genes were subsequently lost through mutation or deletion. As the only surviving gene, DAZ experienced extensive restructuring, including intragenic amplification and gene duplication, and has been the target of positive selection in the chimpanzee lineage. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays Should Y stay or should Y go: The evolution of non-recombining sex chromosomes Abstract. PMID:23055411

  17. CNS-restricted Transduction and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Deletion with an Engineered AAV Vector.

    PubMed

    Murlidharan, Giridhar; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Rao, Lavanya; Corriher, Travis; Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping; Sullivan, Patrick; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is emerging as a promising approach to treat central nervous system disorders such as Spinal muscular atrophy, Batten, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease amongst others. A critical remaining challenge for central nervous system-targeted gene therapy, silencing or gene editing is to limit potential vector dose-related toxicity in off-target cells and organs. Here, we characterize a lab-derived AAV chimeric (AAV2g9), which displays favorable central nervous system attributes derived from both parental counterparts, AAV2 and AAV9. This synthetic AAV strain displays preferential, robust, and widespread neuronal transduction within the brain and decreased glial tropism. Importantly, we observed minimal systemic leakage, decreased sequestration and gene transfer in off-target organs with AAV2g9, when administered into the cerebrospinal fluid. A single intracranial injection of AAV2g9 vectors encoding guide RNAs targeting the schizophrenia risk gene MIR137 (encoding MIR137) in CRISPR/Cas9 knockin mice resulted in brain-specific gene deletion with no detectable events in the liver. This engineered AAV vector is a promising platform for treating neurological disorders through gene therapy, silencing or editing modalities. PMID:27434683

  18. De novo 13q13.3-21.31 deletion involving RB1 gene in a patient with hemangioendothelioma of the liver.

    PubMed

    Rapini, Novella; Lidano, Roberta; Pietrosanti, Silvia; Vitiello, Giuseppina; Grimaldi, Chiara; Postorivo, Diana; Nardone, Anna Maria; Del Bufalo, Francesca; Brancati, Francesco; Manca Bitti, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 13 (13q) are related with variable phenotypes, according to the size and the location of the deleted region. The main clinical features are moderate/severe mental and growth retardation, cranio-facial dysmorphism, variable congenital defects and increased susceptibility to tumors. Here we report a 3-year-old girl carrying a de novo 13q13.3-21.32 interstitial deletion. She showed developmental delay, growth retardation and mild dysmorphism including curly hair, high forehead, short nose, thin upper lip and long philtrum. An abnormal mass was surgically removed from her liver resulting in a hemangioendothelioma. Array analysis allowed us to define a deleted region of about 27.87 Mb, which includes the RB1 gene. This is the first report of a 13q deletion associated with infantile hemangioendothelioma of the liver. PMID:24433316

  19. De Novo 13q13.3-21.31 deletion involving RB1 gene in a patient with hemangioendothelioma of the liver

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 13 (13q) are related with variable phenotypes, according to the size and the location of the deleted region. The main clinical features are moderate/severe mental and growth retardation, cranio-facial dysmorphism, variable congenital defects and increased susceptibility to tumors. Here we report a 3-year-old girl carrying a de novo 13q13.3-21.32 interstitial deletion. She showed developmental delay, growth retardation and mild dysmorphism including curly hair, high forehead, short nose, thin upper lip and long philtrum. An abnormal mass was surgically removed from her liver resulting in a hemangioendothelioma. Array analysis allowed us to define a deleted region of about 27.87 Mb, which includes the RB1 gene. This is the first report of a 13q deletion associated with infantile hemangioendothelioma of the liver. PMID:24433316

  20. Deletions involving genes WHSC1 and LETM1 may be necessary, but are not sufficient to cause Wolf–Hirschhorn Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Erica F; Carey, John C; Earl, Dawn L; Corzo, Deyanira; Suttie, Michael; Hammond, Peter; South, Sarah T

    2014-01-01

    Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a complex genetic disorder caused by the loss of genomic material from the short arm of chromosome 4. Genotype–phenotype correlation studies indicated that the loss of genes within 4p16.3 is necessary for expression of the core features of the phenotype. Within this region, haploinsufficiency of the genes WHSC1 and LETM1 is thought to be a major contributor to the pathogenesis of WHS. We present clinical findings for three patients with relatively small (<400 kb) de novo interstitial deletions that overlap WHSC1 and LETM1. 3D facial analysis was performed for two of these patients. Based on our findings, we propose that hemizygosity of WHSC1 and LETM1 is associated with a clinical phenotype characterized by growth deficiency, feeding difficulties, and motor and speech delays. The deletion of additional genes nearby WHSC1 and LETM1 does not result in a marked increase in the severity of clinical features, arguing against their haploinsufficiency. The absence of seizures and typical WHS craniofacial findings in our cohort suggest that deletion of distinct or additional 4p16.3 genes is necessary for expression of these features. Altogether, these results show that although loss-of-function for WHSC1 and/or LETM1 contributes to some of the features of WHS, deletion of additional genes is required for the full expression of the phenotype, providing further support that WHS is a contiguous gene deletion disorder. PMID:23963300

  1. Deletions involving genes WHSC1 and LETM1 may be necessary, but are not sufficient to cause Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Erica F; Carey, John C; Earl, Dawn L; Corzo, Deyanira; Suttie, Michael; Hammond, Peter; South, Sarah T

    2014-04-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a complex genetic disorder caused by the loss of genomic material from the short arm of chromosome 4. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies indicated that the loss of genes within 4p16.3 is necessary for expression of the core features of the phenotype. Within this region, haploinsufficiency of the genes WHSC1 and LETM1 is thought to be a major contributor to the pathogenesis of WHS. We present clinical findings for three patients with relatively small (<400 kb) de novo interstitial deletions that overlap WHSC1 and LETM1. 3D facial analysis was performed for two of these patients. Based on our findings, we propose that hemizygosity of WHSC1 and LETM1 is associated with a clinical phenotype characterized by growth deficiency, feeding difficulties, and motor and speech delays. The deletion of additional genes nearby WHSC1 and LETM1 does not result in a marked increase in the severity of clinical features, arguing against their haploinsufficiency. The absence of seizures and typical WHS craniofacial findings in our cohort suggest that deletion of distinct or additional 4p16.3 genes is necessary for expression of these features. Altogether, these results show that although loss-of-function for WHSC1 and/or LETM1 contributes to some of the features of WHS, deletion of additional genes is required for the full expression of the phenotype, providing further support that WHS is a contiguous gene deletion disorder. PMID:23963300

  2. Induction of Potent Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses by Attenuated Vaccinia Virus Vectors with Deleted Serpin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Fatema A.; Verardi, Paulo H.; Jones, Leslie A.; Chan, Kenneth S.; Peng, Yue; Yilma, Tilahun D.

    2004-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) has been effectively utilized as a live vaccine against smallpox as well as a vector for vaccine development and immunotherapy. Increasingly there is a need for a new generation of highly attenuated and efficacious VV vaccines, especially in light of the AIDS pandemic and the threat of global bioterrorism. We therefore developed recombinant VV (rVV) vaccines that are significantly attenuated and yet elicit potent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. B13R (SPI-2) and B22R (SPI-1) are two VV immunomodulating genes with sequence homology to serine protease inhibitors (serpins) that possess antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties. We constructed and characterized rVVs that have the B13R or B22R gene insertionally inactivated (vΔB13R and vΔB22R) and coexpress the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (v50ΔB13R and v50ΔB22R). Virulence studies with immunocompromised BALB/cBy nude mice indicated that B13R or B22R gene deletion decreases viral replication and significantly extends time of survival. Viral pathogenesis studies in immunocompetent CB6F1 mice further demonstrated that B13R or B22R gene inactivation diminishes VV virulence, as measured by decreased levels of weight loss and limited viral spread. Finally, rVVs with B13R and B22R deleted elicited potent humoral, T-helper, and cytotoxic T-cell immune responses, revealing that the observed attenuation did not reduce immunogenicity. Therefore, inactivation of immunomodulating genes such as B13R or B22R represents a general method for enhancing the safety of rVV vaccines while maintaining a high level of immunogenicity. Such rVVs could serve as effective vectors for vaccine development and immunotherapy. PMID:14990697

  3. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of psbB, the gene encoding CP47, employing a deletion mutant strain of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Eaton-Rye, J J; Vermaas, W F

    1991-12-01

    A mutant strain of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC (Pasteur Culture Collection) 6803 has been developed in which psbB, the gene coding for the chlorophyl alpha-binding protein CP47 in Photosystem II (PSII), has been deleted. This deletion mutant can be used for the reintroduction of modified psbB into the cyanobacterium. To study the role of a large hydrophilic region in CP47, presumably located on the lumenal side of the thylakoid membrane between the fifth and sixth membrane-spanning regions, specific deletions have been introduced in psbB coding for regions within this domain. One psbB mutation leads to deletion of Gly-351 to Thr-365 in CP47, another psbB mutation was targeted towards deletion of Arg-384 to Val-392 in this protein. The deletion from Gly-351 to Thr-365 results in a loss of PSII activity and of photoautotrophic growth of the mutant, but the deletion between Arg-384 and Val-392 retains PSII activity and the ability to grow photoautotrophically. The mutant strain with the deletion from Gly-351 to Thr-365 does not assemble a stable PSII reaction center complex in its thylakoid membranes, and exhibits diminished levels of CP47 and of the reaction center proteins D1 and D2. In contrast to the Arg-384 to Val-392 portion of this domain, the region between Gly-351 and Thr-365 appears essential for the normal structure and function of photosystem II. PMID:1932693

  4. Role of the RuvAB protein in avoiding spontaneous formation of deletion mutations in the Escherichia coli K-12 endogenous tonB gene.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Kazumi; Nagata, Yuki; Kawata, Masakado; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    The endogenous tonB gene of Escherichia coli was used as a target for spontaneous deletion mutations which were isolated from ruvAB-, recG-, and ruvC- cells. The rates of tonB mutation were essentially the same in ruv+, ruvAB-, recG-, and ruvC- cells. We analyzed tonB mutants by sequencing. In the ruv+, recG-, and ruvC- strains, the spectra were different from those obtained from the ruvAB- cells, where deletions dominated followed by IS insertions, base substitutions, and frameshifts, in that order. We then analyzed the tonB-trp large deletion, due to simultaneous mutations of the trp operon, and found that the frequency in ruvAB- was higher than those in ruv+, recG-, and ruvC- cells. To characterize deletion formation further, we analyzed all the tonB mutants from one colicin plate. Seven deletions were identified at five sites from the 45 tonB mutants of ruv+ cells and 24 deletions at 11 sites from the 43 tonB mutants of ruvAB- cells. Thus, the ruvAB- strain is a deletion mutator. We discuss the role of RuvAB in avoiding deletions. PMID:15351721

  5. [Novel large deletion c.22-1320_633+1224del in the CYB5R3 gene from patients with hereditary methemoglobinemia].

    PubMed

    Galeeva, N M; Nenasheva, S A; Kleĭmenova, I S; Poliakov, A V

    2012-11-01

    Hereditary types I and II methemoglobinemia is a rare autosomal recessive disease due to a deficiency of either soluble or soluble and membrane-bound forms of the enzyme NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. The molecular genetic bases of both types of the disease consist in changes in the CYB5R3 gene. In this study, the novel and, to date, only large deletion in this gene is described, discovered in two unrelated families with types I and II methemoglobinemia. The common founder haplotype on the chromosomes carrying this mutation was identified. A universal approach for searching for the deletion boundaries was developed, and the c.22-1320_633+1224del deletion breakpoints were determined. In addition, a system for identifying the deletion in heterozygous and homozygous states was designed. PMID:23297489

  6. Paradoxical effects of prodynorphin gene deletion on basal and cocaine-evoked dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Chefer, V I; Shippenberg, T S

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative and conventional microdialysis were used to investigate the effects of constitutive deletion of the prodynorphin gene on basal dopamine (DA) dynamics in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the responsiveness of DA neurons to an acute cocaine challenge. Saline- and cocaine-evoked locomotor activity were also assessed. Quantitative microdialysis revealed that basal extracellular DA levels were decreased, while the DA extraction fraction, an indirect measure of DA uptake, was unchanged in dynorphin (DYN) knockout (KO) mice. The ability of cocaine to increase NAc DA levels was reduced in KO. Similarly, cocaine-evoked locomotor activity was decreased in KO. The selective kappa opioid receptor agonist U-69593 decreased NAc dialysate DA levels in wildtype mice and this effect was enhanced in KO. Administration of the selective kappa opioid receptor (KOPr) antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to KO mice attenuated the decrease in cocaine-induced DA levels. However, it was ineffective in altering the decreased locomotor response to cocaine. These studies demonstrate that constitutive deletion of prodynorphin is associated with a reduction of extracellular NAc DA levels and a decreased responsiveness to acute cocaine. Data regarding the effects of U-69593 and nor-binaltorphimine in KO suggest that the kappa opioid receptor is up-regulated as a consequence of prodynorphin gene deletion and that this adaptation underlies the decrease in basal DA dynamics and cocaine-evoked DA levels observed in DYN KO mice. These findings suggest that the phenotype of DYN KO mice is not solely due to loss of endogenous opioid peptide but also reflects developmental compensations that occur at the level of the opioid receptor. PMID:16420432

  7. Delineation of a contiguous gene syndrome with multiple exostoses, enlarged parietal foramina, craniofacial dysostosis, and mental retardation, caused by deletions in the short arm of chromosome 11.

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, O.; Wuyts, W.; Van Hul, W.; Hecht, J. T.; Meinecke, P.; Hogue, D.; Werner, W.; Zabel, B.; Hinkel, G. K.; Powell, C. M.; Shaffer, L. G.; Willems, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    A contiguous gene syndrome due to deletions of the proximal short arm of chromosome 11 is described in eight patients belonging to four families. The main clinical features are multiple exostoses, enlarged parietal foramina, craniofacial dysostosis, and mental retardation. The patients have cytogenetic and/or molecular deletions of chromosome 11p11-p13. These deletions are located between the centromere and D11S914 in a region of approximately 20cM. The present study confirms the presence of a multiple exostoses gene on chromosome 11p. Furthermore, it suggests that the gene for isolated foramina parietalie permagna and genes associated with craniofacial dysostosis and mental retardation reside in the same chromosomal region. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8644736

  8. Delineation of a contiguous gene syndrome with multiple exostoses, enlarged parietal foramina, craniofacial dysostosis, and mental retardation, caused by deletions on the short arm of chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, O.; Werner, W.; Hinkel, G.K.; Van Hul, W.; Willems, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    A contiguous gene syndrome due to deletions of the proximal short arm of chromosome 11 is described in eight patients belonging to four families. The main clinical features are multiple exostoses, enlarged parietal foramina, craniofacial dysostosis, and mental retardation. The patients have cytogenetic and/or molecular deletions of chromosome 11p11-p13. These deletions are located between the centromere and D11S914 in a region of {approximately}20 cM. The present study confirms the presence of a multiple exostoses gene on chromosome 11p. Furthermore, it suggests that the gene for isolated foramina parietalia permagna and genes associated with craniofacial dysostosis and mental retardation reside in the same chromosomal region. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Diet-induced Lethality Due to Deletion of the Hdac3 Gene in Heart and Skeletal Muscle*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Singh, Nikhil; Mullican, Shannon E.; Everett, Logan J.; Li, Li; Yuan, Lijun; Liu, Xi; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2011-01-01

    Many human diseases result from the influence of the nutritional environment on gene expression. The environment interacts with the genome by altering the epigenome, including covalent modification of nucleosomal histones. Here, we report a novel and dramatic influence of diet on the phenotype and survival of mice in which histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) is deleted postnatally in heart and skeletal muscle. Although embryonic deletion of myocardial Hdac3 causes major cardiomyopathy that reduces survival, we found that excision of Hdac3 in heart and muscle later in development leads to a much milder phenotype and does not reduce survival when mice are fed normal chow. Remarkably, upon switching to a high fat diet, the mice begin to die within weeks and display signs of severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Down-regulation of myocardial mitochondrial bioenergetic genes, specifically those involved in lipid metabolism, precedes the full development of cardiomyopathy, suggesting that HDAC3 is important in maintaining proper mitochondrial function. These data suggest that loss of the epigenomic modifier HDAC3 causes dietary lethality by compromising the ability of cardiac mitochondria to respond to changes of nutritional environment. In addition, this study provides a mouse model for diet-inducible heart failure. PMID:21808063

  10. The PML gene is linked to a megabase-scale insertion/deletion restriction fragment length polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Goy, A.; Xiao, Y.H.; Passalaris, T.

    1995-03-20

    The PML gene located on chromosome band 15q22 is involved with the RAR{alpha} locus (17q21) in a balanced reciprocal translocation uniquely observed in acute promyelocytic leukemia. Physical mapping studies by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the PML gene is flanked by two CpG islands that are separated by a variable distance in normal individuals. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that this is the consequence of a large insertion/deletion polymorphism linked to the PML locus: (1) overlapping fragments obtained with a variety of rare-cutting restriction enzymes demonstrated the same variability in distance between the flanking CpG islands; (2) mapping with restriction enzymes insensitive to CpG methylation confirmed that the findings were not a consequence of variable methylation of CpG dinucleotides; (3) the polymorphism followed a Mendelian inheritance pattern. This polymorphism is localized 3{prime} to the PML locus. There are five common alleles, described on the basis of BssHII fragments, ranging from 220 to 350 kb with increments of approximately 30 kb between alleles. Both heterozygous (61%) and homozygous (391%) patterns were observed in normal individuals. Mega-base-scale insertion/deletion restriction fragment length polymorphisms are very rare and have been described initially in the context of multigene families. Such structures have been also reported as likely regions of genetic instability. High-resolution restriction mapping of this particular structure linked to the PML locus is underway. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Broad spectrum of Fabry disease manifestation in an extended Spanish family with a new deletion in the GLA gene

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Jan; Torras, Joan; Navarro, Itziar; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Böttcher, Tobias; Mascher, Hermann; Lackner, Karl J.; Fauler, Guenter; Paschke, Eduard; Cruzado, Josep M.; Dudesek, Ales; Wittstock, Matthias; Meyer, Wolfgang; Rolfs, Arndt

    2012-01-01

    Background Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked inherited disease based on the absence or reduction of lysosomal-galactosidase (Gla) activity. The enzymatic defect results in progressive impairment of cerebrovascular, renal and cardiac function. Normally, female heterozygote mutation carriers are less strongly affected than male hemizygotes aggravating disease diagnosis. Method Close examination of the patients by renal biopsy, echo- and electrocardiography and MRI. Blood work and subsequent DNA analysis were carried out utilizing approved protocols for PCR and Sequencing. MLPA analysis was done to unveil deletions within the GLA gene locus. Quantitative detection of Glycolipids in patient plasma and urine were carried out using HPLC/MS-MS and ESI-MS. Results In the presented case, a female index patient led to the examination of three generations of a Spanish family. She presented with severe oto-cochlear symptoms and covert renal and cardiac involvement. While conventional sequencing failed to detect a causative mutation, MLPA analysis revealed a deletion within the GLA gene locus, which we were able to map to a region spanning exon 2 and adjacent intronic parts. The analysis of different biomarkers revealed elevated lyso-Gb3 levels in all affected family members. Conclusion Our findings highlight the broad intrafamilial spectrum of symptoms of FD and emphasise the need to use MLPA screening in symptomatic females without conclusive sequencing result. Finally, plasma lyso-Gb3 proved to be a reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of FD. PMID:26019814

  12. Role of porins in the antibiotic susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: construction of mutants with deletions in the multiple porin genes.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, H; Yamano, Y; Nakae, T

    1995-08-01

    We inserted deletions in the chromosomal genes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa coded for the outer membrane porins, proteins C, D2, or E1, and all possible combinations of these proteins by the gene replacement technique and selecting for imipenem-resistance. Determination of the minimum inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol and gentamicin in these mutants revealed that most mutants showed equal susceptibility to the porin-sufficient strain. The only exception was that imipenem and meropenem showed increased minimum inhibitory concentrations in all of the mutants lacking protein D2. These results firmly established that the P. aeruginosa porins identified so far form the pores do not accommodate the passage of most antipseudomonal antibiotics, with the exception of carbapenems. PMID:7639767

  13. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.; Fukai, K.; Holmes, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. One of these, a deletion of exon 7, is strongly predominant, accounting for {approximately}77% of mutant alleles in this group of patients. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Clinical and molecular characterization of a cohort of patients with novel nucleotide alterations of the Dystrophin gene detected by direct sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Duchenne and Becker Muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which encodes a sarcolemmal protein responsible for muscle integrity. Deletions and duplications account for approximately 75% of mutations in DMD and 85% in BMD. The implementation of techniques allowing complete gene sequencing has focused attention on small point mutations and other mechanisms underlying complex rearrangements. Methods We selected 47 patients (41 families; 35 DMD, 6 BMD) without deletions and duplications in DMD gene (excluded by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis). This cohort was investigated by systematic direct sequence analysis to study sequence variation. We focused our attention on rare mutational events which were further studied through transcript analysis. Results We identified 40 different nucleotide alterations in DMD gene and their clinical correlates; altogether, 16 mutations were novel. DMD probands carried 9 microinsertions/microdeletions, 19 nonsense mutations, and 7 splice-site mutations. BMD patients carried 2 nonsense mutations, 2 splice-site mutations, 1 missense substitution, and 1 single base insertion. The most frequent stop codon was TGA (n = 10 patients), followed by TAG (n = 7) and TAA (n = 4). We also analyzed the molecular mechanisms of five rare mutational events. They are two frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene 3'end in BMD and three novel splicing defects: IVS42: c.6118-3C>A, which causes a leaky splice-site; c.9560A>G, which determines a cryptic splice-site activation and c.9564-426 T>G, which creates pseudoexon retention within IVS65. Conclusion The analysis of our patients' sample, carrying point mutations or complex rearrangements in DMD gene, contributes to the knowledge on phenotypic correlations in dystrophinopatic patients and can provide a better understanding of pre-mRNA maturation defects and dystrophin

  15. Heterozygous deletion of CHL1 gene: detailed array-CGH and clinical characterization of a new case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tassano, Elisa; Biancheri, Roberta; Denegri, Laura; Porta, Simona; Novara, Francesca; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Gimelli, Giorgio; Cuoco, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    CHL1 gene maps at 3p26.3 and encodes a cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily highly expressed in the brain. CHL1 regulates neuronal migration and neurite overgrowth in the developing brain, while in mature neurons it accumulates in the axonal membrane and regulates synapse function via the clathrin-dependent pathways. To our knowledge, to date only three familial cases presenting heterozygous deletion of chromosome 3 at band p26.3, including only the CHL1 gene, have been reported. All the patients presented cognitive impairment characterized by learning and language difficulties. Here, we describe a six-year-old boy in which array-CGH analysis disclosed a terminal 3p26.3 deletion. The deletion was transmitted from his normal mother and included only the CHL1 gene. Our patient presented microcephaly, short stature, mild mental retardation, learning and language delay, and strabismus. In our study we compare the phenotypic and molecular cytogenetic features of CHL1 gene deletion cases. Verbal function developmental delay seems to be a common key finding. The concomitance of the genetic and phenotypic alterations could be a good evidence of a new emerging syndrome associated with the deletion of CHL1 gene alone, although the identification of new cases is required. PMID:25451713

  16. Deletion of the msdS/AfmsdC gene induces abnormal polarity and septation in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjie; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Depeng; Zhou, Hui; Ouyang, Haomiao; Ming, Jia; Jin, Cheng

    2008-07-01

    alpha-Mannosidases play an important role in the processing of mannose-containing glycans in eukaryotes. A deficiency in alpha-mannosidase is lethal in humans and cattle. In contrast to mammals, Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not require the endoplasmic reticulum alpha-mannosidase gene for growth. However, little is known of the consequence of loss of function of class I alpha-mannosidases in filamentous fungi. In this study, the msdS/AfmsdC gene was identified to encode 1,2-alpha-mannosidase MsdS in Aspergillus fumigatus. Soluble MsdS expressed in Escherichia coli was characterized as a typical class I alpha-mannosidase. The msdS gene was deleted by replacement of the msdS gene with a pyrG gene. Although the mutant showed a defect in N-glycan processing, as well as a reduction of cell wall components and a reduced ability of conidiation, it appeared that the rate of hyphal growth was not affected. Morphology analysis revealed abnormal polarity and septation at the stages of germination, hyphal growth and conidiation. Although the mechanism by which the N-glycan processing affects polarity and septation is unclear, our results show that msdS is involved in polarity and septation in A. fumigatus. PMID:18599824

  17. Parallel detection experiment of fluorescence confocal microscopy using DMD.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gui, Kun; Guo, Hanming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-05-01

    Parallel detection of fluorescence confocal microscopy (PDFCM) system based on Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is reported in this paper in order to realize simultaneous multi-channel imaging and improve detection speed. DMD is added into PDFCM system, working to take replace of the single traditional pinhole in the confocal system, which divides the laser source into multiple excitation beams. The PDFCM imaging system based on DMD is experimentally set up. The multi-channel image of fluorescence signal of potato cells sample is detected by parallel lateral scanning in order to verify the feasibility of introducing the DMD into fluorescence confocal microscope. In addition, for the purpose of characterizing the microscope, the depth response curve is also acquired. The experimental result shows that in contrast to conventional microscopy, the DMD-based PDFCM system has higher axial resolution and faster detection speed, which may bring some potential benefits in the biology and medicine analysis. SCANNING 38:234-239, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26331288

  18. The optical-mechanical design of DMD modulation imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianting; Xu, Xiping; Qiao, Yang; Li, Lei; Pan, Yue

    2014-09-01

    In order to avoid the phenomenon of some image information were lost, which is due to the jamming signals, such as incident laser, make the pixels dot on CCD saturated. In this article a device of optical-mechanical structure was designed, which utilized the DMD (Digital Micro mirror Device) to modulate the image. The DMD reflection imaging optical system adopts the telecentric light path. However, because the design is not only required to guarantee a 66° angle between the optical axis of the relay optics and the DMD, but also to ensure that the optical axis of the projection system keeps parallel with the perpendicular bisector of the micro-mirror which is in the "flat" state, so the TIR prism is introduced,and making the relay optics and the DMD satisfy the optical institution's requirements. In this paper, a mechanical structure of the imaging optical system was designed and at the meanwhile the lens assembly has been well connected and fixed and fine-tuned by detailed structural design, which included the tilt decentered lens, wedge flanges, prisms. By optimizing the design, the issues of mutual restraint between the inverting optical system and the projecting system were well resolved, and prevented the blocking of the two systems. In addition, the structure size of the whole DMD reflection imaging optical system was minimized; it reduced the energy loss and ensured the image quality.

  19. Dietary MicroRNA Database (DMD): An Archive Database and Analytic Tool for Food-Borne microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kevin; Shu, Jiang; Zempleni, Janos; Cui, Juan

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of high throughput technology, a huge amount of microRNA information has been added to the growing body of knowledge for non-coding RNAs. Here we present the Dietary MicroRNA Databases (DMD), the first repository for archiving and analyzing the published and novel microRNAs discovered in dietary resources. Currently there are fifteen types of dietary species, such as apple, grape, cow milk, and cow fat, included in the database originating from 9 plant and 5 animal species. Annotation for each entry, a mature microRNA indexed as DM0000*, covers information of the mature sequences, genome locations, hairpin structures of parental pre-microRNAs, cross-species sequence comparison, disease relevance, and the experimentally validated gene targets. Furthermore, a few functional analyses including target prediction, pathway enrichment and gene network construction have been integrated into the system, which enable users to generate functional insights through viewing the functional pathways and building protein-protein interaction networks associated with each microRNA. Another unique feature of DMD is that it provides a feature generator where a total of 411 descriptive attributes can be calculated for any given microRNAs based on their sequences and structures. DMD would be particularly useful for research groups studying microRNA regulation from a nutrition point of view. The database can be accessed at http://sbbi.unl.edu/dmd/. PMID:26030752

  20. Dietary MicroRNA Database (DMD): An Archive Database and Analytic Tool for Food-Borne microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kevin; Shu, Jiang; Zempleni, Janos; Cui, Juan

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of high throughput technology, a huge amount of microRNA information has been added to the growing body of knowledge for non-coding RNAs. Here we present the Dietary MicroRNA Databases (DMD), the first repository for archiving and analyzing the published and novel microRNAs discovered in dietary resources. Currently there are fifteen types of dietary species, such as apple, grape, cow milk, and cow fat, included in the database originating from 9 plant and 5 animal species. Annotation for each entry, a mature microRNA indexed as DM0000*, covers information of the mature sequences, genome locations, hairpin structures of parental pre-microRNAs, cross-species sequence comparison, disease relevance, and the experimentally validated gene targets. Furthermore, a few functional analyses including target prediction, pathway enrichment and gene network construction have been integrated into the system, which enable users to generate functional insights through viewing the functional pathways and building protein-protein interaction networks associated with each microRNA. Another unique feature of DMD is that it provides a feature generator where a total of 411 descriptive attributes can be calculated for any given microRNAs based on their sequences and structures. DMD would be particularly useful for research groups studying microRNA regulation from a nutrition point of view. The database can be accessed at http://sbbi.unl.edu/dmd/. PMID:26030752

  1. Deletion of mouse FXR gene disturbs multiple neurotransmitter systems and alters neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Wang, Tingting; Lan, Yunyi; Yang, Li; Pan, Weihong; Zhu, Yonghui; Lv, Boyang; Wei, Yuting; Shi, Hailian; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jie; Duan, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhibi; Wu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in bile acid synthesis and homeostasis. Dysfunction of FXR is involved in cholestasis and atherosclerosis. FXR is prevalent in liver, gallbladder, and intestine, but it is not yet clear whether it modulates neurobehavior. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that mouse FXR deficiency affects a specific subset of neurotransmitters and results in an unique behavioral phenotype. The FXR knockout mice showed less depressive-like and anxiety-related behavior, but increased motor activity. They had impaired memory and reduced motor coordination. There were changes of glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, and norepinephrinergic neurotransmission in either hippocampus or cerebellum. FXR deletion decreased the amount of the GABA synthesis enzyme GAD65 in hippocampus but increased GABA transporter GAT1 in cerebral cortex. FXR deletion increased serum concentrations of many bile acids, including taurodehydrocholic acid, taurocholic acid, deoxycholic acid (DCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), tauro-α-muricholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, and hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA). There were also changes in brain concentrations of taurocholic acid, taurodehydrocholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, tauro-β-muricholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and lithocholic acid (LCA). Taken together, the results from studies with FXR knockout mice suggest that FXR contributes to the homeostasis of multiple neurotransmitter systems in different brain regions and modulates neurobehavior. The effect appears to be at least partially mediated by bile acids that are known to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) inducing potential neurotoxicity. PMID:25870546

  2. Speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein gene deletion in ovarian cancer: Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of a tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    HU, XIAOYU; YANG, ZHU; ZENG, MANMAN; LIU, YI; YANG, XIAOTAO; LI, YANAN; LI, XU; YU, QIUBO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the status of speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein (SPOP) gene located on chromosome 17q21 in ovarian cancer (OC). The present study evaluated a tissue microarray, which contained 90 samples of ovarian cancer and 10 samples of normal ovarian tissue, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH is a method where a SPOP-specific DNA red fluorescence probe was used for the experimental group and a centromere-specific DNA green fluorescence probe for chromosome 17 was used for the control group. The present study demonstrated that a deletion of the SPOP gene was observed in 52.27% (46/88) of the ovarian cancer tissues, but was not identified in normal ovarian tissues. Simultaneously, monosomy 17 was frequently identified in the ovarian cancer tissues, but not in the normal ovarian tissues. Furthermore, the present data revealed that the ovarian cancer histological subtype and grade were significantly associated with a deletion of the SPOP gene, which was assessed by the appearance of monosomy 17 in the ovarian cancer samples; the deletion of the SPOP gene was observed in a large proportion of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (41/61; 67.21%), particularly in grade 3 (31/37; 83.78%). In conclusion, deletion of the SPOP gene on chromosome 17 in ovarian cancer samples, which results from monosomy 17, indicates that the SPOP gene may serve as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer. PMID:27347196

  3. Feasibility of establishing deletion of the late cornified envelope genes LCE3B and LCE3C as a susceptibility factor for psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Safia; Hassan, Iffat; Majid, Sabhiya; Bhat, Yasmeen Jabeen; Farooq, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a chronic hyperproliferative inflammatory disease of the skin, genetic predisposition to which is well-established. The late cornified envelope genes LCE3B and LCE3C are involved in maintaining the integrity of skin barrier especially following skin barrier disruption. The deletion of these genes would lead to an impaired epidermal response following damage to the skin barrier thus predisposing to psoriatic lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the common deletion of late cornified envelope genes (LCE 3B/3C) in psoriasis patients of Kashmiri ethnic population of North India. Materials and Methods: It was a hospital-based, case-control study which included 100 psoriasis cases and an equal number of controls. Blood samples were obtained, and DNA was extracted from all the samples by a kit-based method. To determine the LCE3C_LCE3B-del genotype, a three-primer polymerase chain reaction assay was performed. Results: The genotype for the common LCE3C_LCE3B deletion in 100 psoriasis patients and 100 controls was determined. Among the cases, 17 cases were homozygous for insertion genotype (I/I), 40 cases were heterozygous for insertion/deletion genotype (I/D) and 43 cases were homozygous for deletion genotype (D/D), compared to controls where 20 cases were homozygous for insertion genotype (I/I), 45 cases were heterozygous for insertion/deletion genotype (I/D), and 35 cases were homozygous for deletion genotype (D/D). The del/del frequency was higher among psoriatic patients compared to controls (43% vs. 35%) although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.507). Conclusion: We hereby infer that LCE3C_LCE3B deletion does not appear to be associated with the risk of psoriasis in our population. PMID:27376048

  4. Deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARO8 gene, encoding an aromatic amino acid transaminase, enhances phenylethanol production from glucose.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Liti, Gianni; Louis, Edward J; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Phenylethanol has a characteristic rose-like aroma that makes it a popular ingredient in foods, beverages and cosmetics. Microbial production of phenylethanol currently relies on whole-cell bioconversion of phenylalanine with yeasts that harbour an Ehrlich pathway for phenylalanine catabolism. Complete biosynthesis of phenylethanol from a cheap carbon source, such as glucose, provides an economically attractive alternative for phenylalanine bioconversion. In this study, synthetic genetic array (SGA) screening was applied to identify genes involved in regulation of phenylethanol synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen focused on transcriptional regulation of ARO10, which encodes the major decarboxylase involved in conversion of phenylpyruvate to phenylethanol. A deletion in ARO8, which encodes an aromatic amino acid transaminase, was found to underlie the transcriptional upregulation of ARO10 during growth, with ammonium sulphate as the sole nitrogen source. Physiological characterization revealed that the aro8Δ mutation led to substantial changes in the absolute and relative intracellular concentrations of amino acids. Moreover, deletion of ARO8 led to de novo production of phenylethanol during growth on a glucose synthetic medium with ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. The aro8Δ mutation also stimulated phenylethanol production when combined with other, previously documented, mutations that deregulate aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. The resulting engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced >3 mm phenylethanol from glucose during growth on a simple synthetic medium. The strong impact of a transaminase deletion on intracellular amino acid concentrations opens new possibilities for yeast-based production of amino acid-derived products. PMID:24733517

  5. Diminished dosage of 22q11 genes disrupts neurogenesis and cortical development in a mouse model of 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Tucker, Eric S.; Maynard, Thomas M.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The 22q11 deletion (or DiGeorge) syndrome (22q11DS), the result of a 1.5- to 3-megabase hemizygous deletion on human chromosome 22, results in dramatically increased susceptibility for “diseases of cortical connectivity” thought to arise during development, including schizophrenia and autism. We show that diminished dosage of the genes deleted in the 1.5-megabase 22q11 minimal critical deleted region in a mouse model of 22q11DS specifically compromises neurogenesis and subsequent differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Proliferation of basal, but not apical, progenitors is disrupted, and subsequently, the frequency of layer 2/3, but not layer 5/6, projection neurons is altered. This change is paralleled by aberrant distribution of parvalbumin-labeled interneurons in upper and lower cortical layers. Deletion of Tbx1 or Prodh (22q11 genes independently associated with 22q11DS phenotypes) does not similarly disrupt basal progenitors. However, expression analysis implicates additional 22q11 genes that are selectively expressed in cortical precursors. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage disrupts cortical neurogenesis and interneuron migration. Such developmental disruption may alter cortical circuitry and establish vulnerability for developmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism. PMID:19805316

  6. [New recurrent extended deletion, including GJB2 and GJB6 genes, results in isolated sensorineural hearing impairment with autosomal recessive type of inheritance].

    PubMed

    Bliznets, E A; Makienko, O N; Okuneva, E G; Markova, T G; Poliakov, A V

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary hearing loss with the autosomal recessive type of inheritance of the DFNB 1 genetic type, caused by mutations in the GJB2 gene, is the main reason of innate non-syndromal hearing impairment in most developed countries of the world (including Russia). Intragenic point mutations prevail among the GJB2 gene defectors; however, extended deletions in the DFNB1 locus are also found with considerable frequency in some populations (for example, Spain, Great Britain, France, United States, and Brazil). Among the four known extended deletions, only one deletion affects directly the GJB2 gene sequence and was described in a single family. A new extended deletion in the GJB2 and GJB6 gene sequences (approximately 101 kb in size; NC_000013.10:g.20,757,021_20,858,394del), detected in three unrelated Russian patients, was described and characterized. Ingush origin of this mutation is assumed. If the new deletion is frequent, its detection is very important for the genetic consulting of families with hereditary hearing impairment. PMID:25715449

  7. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A.; Morris, M. A.

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  8. Co-inheritance of compound heterozygous Hb Constant Spring and a single -alpha(3.7) gene deletion with heterozygous deltabeta thalassaemia: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Azma, Raja Zahratul; Othman, Ainoon; Azman, Norazlina; Alauddin, Hafiza; Ithnin, Azlin; Yusof, Nurasyikin; Razak, Noor Farisah; Sardi, Nor Hidayati; Hussin, Noor Hamidah

    2012-06-01

    Haemoglobin Constant Spring (Hb CS) mutation and single gene deletions are common underlying genetic abnormalities for alpha thalassaemias. Co-inheritance of deletional and non-deletional alpha (alpha) thalassaemias may result in various thalassaemia syndromes. Concomitant co-inheritance with beta (beta) and delta (delta) gene abnormalities would result in improved clinical phenotype. We report here a 33-year-old male patient who was admitted with dengue haemorrhagic fever, with a background history of Grave's disease, incidentally noted to have mild hypochromic microcytic red cell indices. Physical examination revealed no thalassaemic features or hepatosplenomegaly. His full blood picture showed hypochromic microcytic red cells with normal haemoglobin (Hb) level. Quantitation of Hb using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) revealed raised Hb F, normal Hb A2 and Hb A levels. There was also small peak of Hb CS noted in CE. H inclusions was negative. Kleihauer test was positive with heterocellular distribution of Hb F among the red cells. DNA analysis for alpha globin gene mutations showed a single -alpha(-3.7) deletion and Hb CS mutation. These findings were suggestive of compound heterozygosity of Hb CS and a single -alpha(-3.7) deletion with a concomitant heterozygous deltabeta thalassaemia. Co-inheritance of Hb CS and a single -alpha(-3.7) deletion is expected to result at the very least in a clinical phenotype similar to that of two alpha genes deletion. However we demonstrate here a phenotypic modification of alpha thalassemia presumptively as a result of co-inheritance with deltabeta chain abnormality as suggested by the high Hb F level. PMID:22870600

  9. Identification of an intragenic deletion in the SGCB gene through a re-evaluation of negative next generation sequencing results.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Teresa; Fanin, Marina; Savarese, Marco; Piluso, Giulio; Angelini, Corrado; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    A large mutation screening of 504 patients with muscular dystrophy or myopathy has been performed by next generation sequencing (NGS). Among this cohort of patients, we report a case with a severe form of muscular dystrophy with a proximal weakness in the limb-girdle muscles. Her biopsy revealed typical dystrophic features and immunohistochemistry for α- and γ-sarcoglycans showed an absent reaction, addressing the clinical diagnosis toward a sarcoglycanopathy. Considering that no causative point mutation was detected in any of the four sarcoglycan genes, we re-evaluated the NGS data by careful quantitative analysis of the specific reads mapping on the four sarcoglycan genes. A complete absence of reads from the sixth exon of the β-sarcoglycan gene was found. Subsequent array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis confirmed the result with the identification of a novel 3.3 kb intragenic deletion in the SGCB gene. This case illustrates the importance of a multidisciplinary approach involving clinicians and molecular geneticists and the need for a careful re-evaluation of NGS data. PMID:27108072

  10. Cell-Type Specific Oxytocin Gene Expression from AAV Delivered Promoter Deletion Constructs into the Rat Supraoptic Nucleus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Makoto; Gainer, Harold

    2012-01-01

    The magnocellular neurons (MCNs) in the hypothalamus selectively express either oxytocin (OXT) or vasopressin (AVP) neuropeptide genes, a property that defines their phenotypes. Here we examine the molecular basis of this selectivity in the OXT MCNs by stereotaxic microinjections of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors that contain various OXT gene promoter deletion constructs using EGFP as the reporter into the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON). Two weeks following injection of the AAVs, immunohistochemical assays of EGFP expression from these constructs were done to determine whether the EGFP reporter co-localizes with either the OXT- or AVP-immunoreactivity in the MCNs. The results show that the key elements in the OT gene promoter that regulate the cell-type specific expression the SON are located −216 to −100 bp upstream of the transcription start site. We hypothesize that within this 116 bp domain a repressor exists that inhibits expression specifically in AVP MCNs, thereby leading to the cell-type specific expression of the OXT gene only in the OXT MCNs. PMID:22363799

  11. Gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis is sex dependent in mice with growth hormone receptor deletion in liver.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Ilona; Masternak, Michal M; List, Edward O; Stout, Michael B; Berryman, Darlene E; Lewinski, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Gesing, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an essential process for cell viability. Mice with disruption of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene (Ghr gene) in the liver (LiGHRKO), in contrast to long-lived mice with global deletion of the Ghr gene (GHRKO), are characterized by lack of improved insulin sensitivity and severe hepatic steatosis. Tissue-specific disruption of the GHR in liver results in a mouse model with dramatically altered GH/IGF1 axis. We have previously shown increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis in insulin-sensitive GHRKO mice. The aim of the present study is to assess, using real-time PCR, the gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2) and a marker of mitochondrial activity (CoxIV) in brains, kidneys and livers of male and female LiGHRKO and wild-type (WT) mice. There were significant differences between males and females. In the brain, expression of Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2 was lower in pooled females compared to pooled males. In the kidneys, expression of Ampk and Sirt1 was also lower in female mice. In the liver, no differences between males and females were observed. Sexual dimorphism may play an important role in regulating the biogenesis of mitochondria. PMID:25855408

  12. Zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) gene deletion reduces spinal cord white matter damage and motor deficits in a murine MOG-induced multiple sclerosis model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bo Young; Kim, In Yeol; Kim, Jin Hee; Kho, A Ra; Lee, Song Hee; Lee, Bo Eun; Sohn, Min; Koh, Jae-Young; Suh, Sang Won

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) on multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease model of multiple sclerosis, was induced by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55) in female mice. Three weeks after the initial immunization, demyelination, immune cell infiltration and blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the spinal cord were analyzed. Clinical signs of EAE first appeared on day 11 and reached a peak level on day 19 after the initial immunization. ZnT3 gene deletion profoundly reduced the daily clinical score of EAE. The ZnT3 gene deletion-mediated inhibition of the clinical course of EAE was accompanied by suppression of inflammation and demyelination in the spinal cord. The motor deficit accompanying neuropathological changes associated with EAE were mild in ZnT3 gene deletion mice. This reduction in motor deficit was accompanied by coincident reductions in demyelination and infiltration of encephalitogenic immune cells including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD20+ B cells and F4/80+ microglia in the spinal cord. These results demonstrate that ZnT3 gene deletion inhibits the clinical features and neuropathological changes associated with EAE. ZnT3 gene deletion also remarkably inhibited formation of EAE-associated aberrant synaptic zinc patches, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) activation and BBB disruption. Therefore, amelioration of EAE-induced clinical and neuropathological changes by ZnT3 gene deletion suggests that vesicular zinc may be involved in several steps of MS pathogenesis. PMID:27370228

  13. Targeted Genes Sequencing Identified a Novel 15 bp Deletion on GJA8 in a Chinese Family with Autosomal Dominant Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Min, Han-Yi; Qiao, Peng-Peng; Asan; Yan, Zhi-Hui; Jiang, Hui-Feng; Zhu, Ya-Ping; Du, Hui-Qian; Li, Qin; Wang, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Jie; Sun, Jun; Yi, Xin; Yang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital cataract (CC) is the leading cause of visual impairment or blindness in children worldwide. Because of highly genetic and clinical heterogeneity, a molecular diagnosis of the lens disease remains a challenge. Methods: In this study, we tested a three-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant CCs by targeted sequencing of 45 CC genes on next generation sequencing and evaluated the pathogenicity of the detected mutation by protein structure, pedigree validation, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Results: A novel 15 bp deletion on GJA8 (c.426_440delGCTGGAGGGGACCCT or p. 143_147delLEGTL) was detected in the family. The deletion, concerned with an in-frame deletion of 5 amino acid residues in a highly evolutionarily conserved region within the cytoplasmic loop domain of the gap junction channel protein connexin 50 (Cx50), was in full cosegregation with the cataract phenotypes in the family but not found in 1100 control exomes. MD simulation revealed that the introduction of the deletion destabilized the Cx50 gap junction channel, indicating the deletion as a dominant-negative mutation. Conclusions: The above results support the pathogenic role of the 15 bp deletion on GJA8 in the Chinese family and demonstrate targeted genes sequencing as a resolution to molecular diagnosis of CCs. PMID:26996484

  14. In vivo and in vitro genetic recombination between conventional and gene-deleted vaccine strains of pseudorabies virus.

    PubMed

    Henderson, L M; Katz, J B; Erickson, G A; Mayfield, J E

    1990-10-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV), an alpha-herpesvirus, causes substantial economic losses in the swine industry and is currently the focus of eradication and control programs. Some of these programs rely on the ability of veterinarians to differentiate animals exposed to virulent strains of PRV from animals exposed to avirulent vaccine strains of PRV on the basis of a serologic response to nonessential glycoproteins that are deleted in some vaccine strains of PRV. Genetic recombination resulting in the creation of virulent strains of PRV with the same negative immunologic markers as vaccine strains could disrupt these programs. Two strains of PRV were coinoculated either into tissue culture or into sheep to facilitate recombination. Progeny viruses were selected to detect a specific recombinant phenotype. We were able to detect genetic recombination between vaccine strains of PRV following in vitro or in vivo coinoculation of 2 strains of PRV. The selected recombinants had marker-deleted phenotypes in strains with restored virulence genes. Increased virulence was observed in sheep after coinoculation of 2 avirulent vaccine strains of PRV. PMID:2173449

  15. Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1 (MIC-1/GDF15) Gene Deletion Promotes Cancer Growth in TRAMP Prostate Cancer Prone Mice

    PubMed Central

    Husaini, Yasmin; Lockwood, Glen P.; Nguyen, Trung V.; Tsai, Vicky Wang-Wei; Mohammad, Mohammad G.; Russell, Pamela J.; Brown, David A.; Breit, Samuel N.

    2015-01-01

    The divergent TGF-β superfamily member, macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1/GDF15), is overexpressed by most cancers, including prostate cancer (PCa). Whilst its circulating levels are linked to cancer outcome, the role MIC-1/GDF15 plays in cancer development and progression is incompletely understood. To investigate its effect on PCa development and spread, we have used TRAMP prostate cancer prone mice bearing a germline deletion of MIC-1/GDF15 (TRAMPMIC-/-). On average TRAMPMIC-/- mice died about 5 weeks earlier and had larger prostatic tumors compared with TRAMP mice that were wild type for MIC-1/GDF15 (TRAMPMIC+/+). Additionally, at the time of death or ethical end point, even when adjusted for lifespan, there were no significant differences in the number of mice with metastases between the TRAMPMIC+/+ and TRAMPMIC-/- groups. However, consistent with our previous data, more than twice as many TRAMP mice overexpressing MIC-1/GDF15 (TRAMPfmsmic-1) had metastases than TRAMPMIC+/+ mice (p<0.0001). We conclude that germ line gene deletion of MIC-1/GDF15 leads to increased local tumor growth resulting in decreased survival consistent with an overall protective role for MIC-1/GDF15 in early primary tumor development. However, in advancing disease, as we have previously noted, MIC-1/GDF15 overexpression may promote local invasion and metastatic spread. PMID:25695521

  16. Implications of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in health and disease: a snapshot review

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    This review considers the 250+ papers concerning the association of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs1799752) and various disease conditions published in 2009. The deletion allele occurs in approximately 55% of the population and is associated with increased activity of the ACE enzyme. It might be predicted that the D allele, therefore, might be associated with pathologies involving increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system. The D allele was seen to be associated with an increased risk of hypertension, pre-eclampsia, heart failure, cerebral infarct, diabetic nephropathy, encephalopathy, asthma, severe hypoglycaemia in diabetes, gastric cancer (in Caucasians) and poor prognosis following kidney transplant. On the positive side, the D allele appears to offer protection against schizophrenia and chronic periodontitis and confers greater up-per-body strength in old age. The I allele, meanwhile, offers improved endurance/athletic performance and aerobic capacity as determined by lung function tests, although it does increase the risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma and obstructive sleep apnoea in hypertensives. PMID:21537387

  17. Macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1/GDF15) gene deletion promotes cancer growth in TRAMP prostate cancer prone mice.

    PubMed

    Husaini, Yasmin; Lockwood, Glen P; Nguyen, Trung V; Tsai, Vicky Wang-Wei; Mohammad, Mohammad G; Russell, Pamela J; Brown, David A; Breit, Samuel N

    2015-01-01

    The divergent TGF-β superfamily member, macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1/GDF15), is overexpressed by most cancers, including prostate cancer (PCa). Whilst its circulating levels are linked to cancer outcome, the role MIC-1/GDF15 plays in cancer development and progression is incompletely understood. To investigate its effect on PCa development and spread, we have used TRAMP prostate cancer prone mice bearing a germline deletion of MIC-1/GDF15 (TRAMPMIC-/-). On average TRAMPMIC-/- mice died about 5 weeks earlier and had larger prostatic tumors compared with TRAMP mice that were wild type for MIC-1/GDF15 (TRAMPMIC+/+). Additionally, at the time of death or ethical end point, even when adjusted for lifespan, there were no significant differences in the number of mice with metastases between the TRAMPMIC+/+ and TRAMPMIC-/- groups. However, consistent with our previous data, more than twice as many TRAMP mice overexpressing MIC-1/GDF15 (TRAMPfmsmic-1) had metastases than TRAMPMIC+/+ mice (p<0.0001). We conclude that germ line gene deletion of MIC-1/GDF15 leads to increased local tumor growth resulting in decreased survival consistent with an overall protective role for MIC-1/GDF15 in early primary tumor development. However, in advancing disease, as we have previously noted, MIC-1/GDF15 overexpression may promote local invasion and metastatic spread. PMID:25695521

  18. Virtual reality 3D headset based on DMD light modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Evans, Allan; Tang, Edward

    2014-06-13

    We present the design of an immersion-type 3D headset suitable for virtual reality applications based upon digital micro-mirror devices (DMD). Our approach leverages silicon micro mirrors offering 720p resolution displays in a small form-factor. Supporting chip sets allow rapid integration of these devices into wearable displays with high resolution and low power consumption. Applications include night driving, piloting of UAVs, fusion of multiple sensors for pilots, training, vision diagnostics and consumer gaming. Our design is described in which light from the DMD is imaged to infinity and the user’s own eye lens forms a real image on the user’s retina.

  19. DMD-based spatially Fourier-encoded photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We present spatially Fourier-encoded photoacoustic microscopy using a digital micromirror device (DMD). The spatial fluence distribution of laser pulses is Fourier-encoded by the DMD, and a series of such encoded photoacoustic (PA) measurements enables decoding of the spatial distribution of optical absorption. By imaging a chromium target, we demonstrated the throughput and Fellgett advantages, which increased the PA signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to raster scanning. The system was used to image two biological targets, a monolayer of red blood cells, and melanoma cells. The enhanced SNR benefited PA images by increasing the image's contrast-to-noise ratio and target identifiability.

  20. Deletion of Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 gene in Japanese and Brazilian gastric carcinomas, metastatic lesions, and reactive lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, K.; Chen, W. G.; Chen, Y. Y.; Murakami, I.; Chen, H. L.; Ohara, N.; Nose, S.; Hamaya, K.; Matsui, S.; Bacchi, M. M.; Bacchi, C. E.; Chang, K. L.; Weiss, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    A 30-bp deletion in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) gene has been reported in nasopharyngeal carcinoma and EBV-associated malignant lymphomas. Information on this deletion in EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) is limited. The association of gastric carcinoma (GC) with EBV was examined by EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization in 510 patients from Japan and 80 patients from Brazil. We studied the prevalence of 30-bp LMP1 gene deletion in EBVaGC in Japan (29 cases) and Brazil (four cases) in comparison with the corresponding EBER1-positive metastatic lesions in lymph nodes (10 cases) and EBV-infected reactive lymphocytes from dissected nonmetastatic lymph nodes (22 cases), microdissected non-neoplastic gastric mucosa of EBVaGC (five cases), and EBV-nonassociated GC (25 cases). We studied the status of the LMP1 gene by Southern blot hybridization of polymerase chain reaction products obtained after amplification with primers flanking the site of the deletion. We also performed EBV typing and LMP1 protein immunohistochemistry. EBV DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction in 30 of 33 EBVaGC cases, 8 of 10 metastatic carcinomas, 14 non-neoplastic tissues from 27 EBVaGC cases, and 12 of 25 non-EBV-associated GC cases with EBER1-positive lymphocytes. The 30-bp LMP1 gene deletion was observed in 23 of 26 (88.5%) cases of EBVaGC from Japan and two of four (50%) cases of Brazilian EBVaGC as compared with EBER1-positive reactive lymphocytes from 11 of 14 (78.6%) EBVaGC cases and 9 of 12 (75%) cases of non-EBV-associated GC. The variant type (the 30-bp deletion variant or nondeleted wild type) of LMP1 gene was the same among reactive lymphocytes, primary and secondary lesions of EBVaGC in all cases for which all three tissue types were studied (six of six). There was no correlation between the presence of the 30-bp deletion with depth of cancer invasion or presence of metastasis. Type A was detected in all available EBV

  1. Screening of point mutations by multiple SSCP analysis in the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lasa, A.; Baiget, M.; Gallano, P.

    1994-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked neuromuscular disorder. The population frequency of DMD is one in approximately 3500 boys, of which one third is thought to be a new mutant. The DMD gene is the largest known to date, spanning over 2,3 Mb in band Xp21.2; 79 exons are transcribed into a 14 Kb mRNA coding for a protein of 427 kD which has been named dystrophin. It has been shown that about 65% of affected boys have a gene deletion with a wide variation in localization and size. The remaining affected individuals who have no detectable deletions or duplications would probably carry more subtle mutations that are difficult to detect. These mutations occur in several different exons and seem to be unique to single patients. Their identification represents a formidable goal because of the large size and complexity of the dystrophin gene. SSCP is a very efficient method for the detection of point mutations if the parameters that affect the separation of the strands are optimized for a particular DNA fragment. The multiple SSCP allows the simultaneous study of several exons, and implies the use of different conditions because no single set of conditions will be optimal for all fragments. Seventy-eight DMD patients with no deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene were selected for the multiple SSCP analysis. Genomic DNA from these patients was amplified using the primers described for the diagnosis procedure (muscle promoter and exons 3, 8, 12, 16, 17, 19, 32, 45, 48 and 51). We have observed different mobility shifts in bands corresponding to exons 8, 12, 43 and 51. In exons 17 and 45, altered electrophoretic patterns were found in different samples identifying polymorphisms already described.

  2. The Fundamentals of Using the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD(TM)) for Projection Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Lars A.

    1995-01-01

    Developed by Texas Instruments (TI) the digital micromirror device (DMD(tm)) is a quickly emerging and highly useful micro-electro-mechanical structures (MEMS) device. Using standard semiconductor fabrication technology, the DMD's simplicity in concept and design will provide advantageous solutions for many different applications. At the rudimentary level, the DMD is a precision, semiconductor light switch. In the initial commercial development of DMD technology, TI has concentrated on projection display and hardcopy. This paper will focus on how the DMD is used for projection display. Other application areas are being explored and evaluated to find appropriate and beneficial uses for the DMD.

  3. Heterologous protection in pigs induced by a plasmid-cured and crp gene-deleted Salmonella choleraesuis live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chun-Yen; Wang, Shiang-Yiu; Chen, Zeng-Weng; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Huang, Ji-Ping; Chen, Jen-Jin; Hong, Li-Shian; Shiau, Ai-Li; Tsai, Jeng-Liang; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2007-10-10

    In this study, we exploited a crp (cAMP receptor protein) gene-deleted, virulence plasmid-cured Salmonella choleraesuis mutant with decreased carbon source utilization, designated S.C.-Deltacrp/vpl(-), as a live vaccine strain. Normal weight gain with no clinical signs was observed in pigs immunized with high doses of S.C.-Deltacrp/vpl(-) live vaccine. Vaccination in pregnant sows induced high maternal antibodies, which could prevent piglets from Salmonella infection. Moreover, serial transmission of the vaccine strain in piglets produced no evidence of reversion to virulence. Furthermore, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from immunized piglets also developed Salmonella specific T-cell proliferative response in vitro. Our results indicate that immunogenic antigens in S.C.-Deltacrp/vpl(-) can induce adequate immunity to protect pigs against challenge with a heterologous virulent strain. Thus, this mutant holds promise for the development of a new live S. choleraesuis vaccine. PMID:17825957

  4. The angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion–deletion polymorphism in a white British patient cohort with obstetric cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Müllenbach, Roman; Tetlow, Natasha; Bennett, Amanda; Pipkin, Fiona Broughton; Morgan, Linda; Williamson, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The DD genotype of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene is over-represented in Finnish patients with obstetric cholestasis (OC). The purpose of this study was to establish whether this genotype is associated with cholestasis in UK cases. In a retrospective case-control study, we determined the ACE insertion/deletion frequencies in 166 British cases and 100 control women by polymerase chain reaction analysis. No significant difference in allele frequencies was found between these groups, but allele frequencies differed significantly between Finnish and UK OC cases (P = 0.0005). The prevalence of the DD genotype is lower in UK cases than in controls (χ2 [1 d.f.] = 4.32, P = 0.05) and the odds ratio for OC associated with the DD genotypeis 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.30–0.97. In contrast to Finnish OC cases, the DD genotype of the ACE is not increased in UK cases.

  5. A Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Hot Spot Mutation in Dystrophin-Deficient Cavalier King Charles Spaniels Is Amenable to Exon 51 Skipping

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Gemma L.; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Fernandez-Fuente, Marta; Burke, Margaret M.; Nagel, Nicole; Holder, Angela; Stanley, Rachael; Chandler, Kate; Marks, Stanley L.; Muntoni, Francesco; Shelton, G. Diane; Piercy, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which afflicts 1 in 3500 boys, is one of the most common genetic disorders of children. This fatal degenerative condition is caused by an absence or deficiency of dystrophin in striated muscle. Most affected patients have inherited or spontaneous deletions in the dystrophin gene that disrupt the reading frame resulting in unstable truncated products. For these patients, restoration of the reading frame via antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach. The major DMD deletion “hot spot” is found between exons 45 and 53, and skipping exon 51 in particular is predicted to ameliorate the dystrophic phenotype in the greatest number of patients. Currently the mdx mouse is the most widely used animal model of DMD, although its mild phenotype limits its suitability in clinical trials. The Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) model has a severe phenotype, but due to its large size, is expensive to use. Both these models have mutations in regions of the dystrophin gene distant from the commonly mutated DMD “hot spot”. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the severe phenotype, histopathological findings, and molecular analysis of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy (CKCS-MD). The dogs harbour a missense mutation in the 5′ donor splice site of exon 50 that results in deletion of exon 50 in mRNA transcripts and a predicted premature truncation of the translated protein. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated skipping of exon 51 in cultured myoblasts from an affected dog restored the reading frame and protein expression. Conclusions/Significance Given the small size of the breed, the amiable temperament and the nature of the mutation, we propose that CKCS-MD is a valuable new model for clinical trials of antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping and other therapeutic approaches for DMD. PMID:20072625

  6. Prevalence of pfhrp2 and/or pfhrp3 Gene Deletion in Plasmodium falciparum Population in Eight Highly Endemic States in India

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Praveen Kumar; Chandel, Himanshu Singh; Ahmad, Amreen; Krishna, Sri; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Singh, Neeru

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum encoded histidine rich protein (HRP2) based malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are used in India. Deletion of pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 genes contributes to false negative test results, and large numbers of such deletions have been reported from South America, highlighting the importance of surveillance to detect such deletions. Methods This is the first prospective field study carried out at 16 sites located in eight endemic states of India to assess the performance of PfHRP2 based RDT kits used in the national malaria control programme. In this study, microscopically confirmed P. falciparum but RDT negative samples were assessed for presence of pfhrp2, pfhrp3, and their flanking genes using PCR. Results Among 1521 microscopically positive P. falciparum samples screened, 50 were negative by HRP2 based RDT test. Molecular testing was carried out using these 50 RDT negative samples by assuming that 1471 RDT positive samples carried pfhrp2 gene. It was found that 2.4% (36/1521) and 1.8% (27/1521) of samples were negative for pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 genes, respectively. However, the frequency of pfhrp2 deletions varied between the sites ranging from 0–25% (2.4, 95% CI; 1.6–3.3). The frequency of both pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 gene deletion varied from 0–8% (1.6, 95% CI; 1.0–2.4). Conclusion This study provides evidence for low level presence of pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 deleted P. falciparum parasites in different endemic regions of India, and periodic surveillance is warranted for reliable use of PfHRP2 based RDTs. PMID:27518538

  7. Heterozygous Hfe gene deletion leads to impaired glucose homeostasis, but not liver injury in mice fed a high-calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Britton, Laurence; Jaskowski, Lesley; Bridle, Kim; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Reiling, Janske; Musgrave, Nick; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell

    2016-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the Hfe gene have been proposed as cofactors in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Homozygous Hfe deletion previously has been shown to lead to dysregulated hepatic lipid metabolism and accentuated liver injury in a dietary mouse model of NAFLD We sought to establish whether heterozygous deletion of Hfe is sufficient to promote liver injury when mice are exposed to a high-calorie diet (HCD). Eight-week-old wild-type and Hfe(+/-) mice received 8 weeks of a control diet or HCD Liver histology and pathways of lipid and iron metabolism were analyzed. Liver histology demonstrated that mice fed a HCD had increased NAFLD activity score (NAS), steatosis, and hepatocyte ballooning. However, liver injury was unaffected by Hfe genotype. Hepatic iron concentration (HIC) was increased in Hfe(+/-) mice of both dietary groups. HCD resulted in a hepcidin-independent reduction in HIC Hfe(+/-) mice demonstrated raised fasting serum glucose concentrations and HOMA-IR score, despite unaltered serum adiponectin concentrations. Downstream regulators of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (pAKT, SREBP-1, Fas, Scd1) and fatty acid oxidation (AdipoR2, Pparα, Cpt1) were largely unaffected by genotype. In summary, heterozygous Hfe gene deletion is associated with impaired iron and glucose metabolism. However, unlike homozygous Hfe deletion, heterozygous gene deletion did not affect lipid metabolism pathways or liver injury in this model. PMID:27354540

  8. Single nucleotide deletion of cqm1 gene results in the development of resistance to Bacillus sphaericus in Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing-yun; Cai, Quan-xin; Yan, Jian-ping; Hu, Xiao-min; Zheng, Da-sheng; Yuan, Zhi-ming

    2013-09-01

    The entomopathogen Bacillus sphaericus is one of the most effective biolarvicides used to control the Culex species of mosquito. The appearance of resistance in mosquitoes to this bacterium, however, remains a threat to its continuous use in integrated mosquito control programs. Previous work showed that the resistance to B. sphaericus in Culex colonies was associated with the absence of the 60-kDa binary toxin receptor (Cpm1/Cqm1), an alpha-glucosidase present in the larval midgut microvilli. In this work, we studied the molecular basis of the resistance developed by Culex quinquefasciatus to B. sphaericus C3-41. The cqm1 genes were cloned from susceptible (CqSL) and resistant (CqRL/C3-41) colonies, respectively. The sequence of the cDNA and genomic DNA derived from CqRL/C3-41 colony differed from that of CqSL one by a one-nucleotide deletion which resulted in a premature stop codon, leading to production of a truncated protein. Recombinant Cqm1S from the CqSL colony expressed in Escherichia coli specifically bound to the Bin toxin and had α-glucosidase activity, whereas the Cqm1R from the CqRL/C3-41 colony, with a deletion of three quarters of the receptor's C-terminal lost its α-glucosidase activity and could not bind to the binary toxin. Immunoblotting experiments showed that Cqm1 was undetectable in CqRL/C3-41 larvae, although the gene was correctly transcribed. Thus, the cqm1R represents a new allele in C. quinquefasciatus that confers resistance to B. sphaericus. PMID:23871751

  9. Deletion of Tenascin-C gene Exacerbates Atherosclerosis and Induces Intraplaque Hemorrhage in Apo E Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lai; Wang, Wei; Shah, Prediman K.; Song, Lei; Yang, Mingjie; Sharifi, Behrooz G.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Tenascin-C (TNC), a matricellular protein, is upregulated in atherosclerotic plaques. We investigated whether the deletion of TNC gene affects the development of atherosclerosis in a murine model. Methods TNC−/−/apo E−/− mice were generated and used for atherosclerosis studies. We compared these results to those observed in control groups of apo E−/− mice. Results The en face analysis of aortic area showed that the mean aortic lesion area of the double KO mice was significantly higher than control mice at different times after feeding of atherogenic diet; the accumulation of lesional macrophages and lipids were significantly higher, respectively. Analysis of cell adhesion molecules revealed that VCAM-1, but not ICAM-1, was upregulated 1 week after feeding of atherogenic diet in the double KO mouse as compared to apo E−/− mouse. Cell culture studies revealed that the expression of VCAM-1 in endothelial cells isolated from the double KO mouse is more sensitive to the TNFα stimulation than the cells isolated from apo E−/− mice. Cell adhesion studies showed that the adherence of RAW monocytic cells to the endothelial cells was significantly enhanced in the cultured endothelial cells from the TNC gene-deleted cells. Following the prolonged feeding of an atherogenic diet (28–30 weeks), the aortic and carotid atherosclerotic lesions frequently demonstrated large grossly visible areas of intraplaque hemorrhage in the double KO mice compared to control. Conclusions These data unveil a protective role for TNC in atherosclerosis and suggest that TNC signaling may have the potential to reduce atherosclerosis, in part by modulating VCAM-1 expression. PMID:22300502

  10. A recombination outside the BB deletion refines the location of the X linked retinitis pigmentosa locus RP3.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, R.; Bingham, E.; Forsythe, P.; McHenry, C.; Aita, V.; Navia, B. A.; Dry, K.; Segal, M.; Devoto, M.; Bruns, G.; Wright, A. F.; Ott, J.; Sieving, P. A.; Swaroop, A.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic loci for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) have been mapped between Xp11.22 and Xp22.13 (RP2, RP3, RP6, and RP15). The RP3 gene, which is responsible for the predominant form of XLRP in most Caucasian populations, has been localized to Xp21.1 by linkage analysis and the map positions of chromosomal deletions associated with the disease. Previous linkage studies have suggested that RP3 is flanked by the markers DXS1110 (distal) and OTC (proximal). Patient BB was thought to have RP because of a lesion at the RP3 locus, in addition to chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), mild mental retardation, and the McLeod phenotype. This patient carried a deletion extending approximately 3 Mb from DMD in Xp21.3 to Xp21.1, with the proximal breakpoint located approximately 40 kb centromeric to DXS1110. The RP3 gene, therefore, is believed to reside between DXS1110 and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. In order to refine the location of RP3 and to ascertain patients with RP3, we have been analyzing several XLRP families for linkage to Xp markers. Linkage analysis in an American family of 27 individuals demonstrates segregation of XLRP with markers in Xp21.1, consistent with the RP3 subtype. One affected mate shows a recombination event proximal to DXS1110. Additional markers within the DXS1110-OTC interval show that the crossover is between two novel polymorphic markers, DXS8349 and M6, both of which are present in BB DNA and lie centromeric to the proximal breakpoint. This recombination places the XLRP mutation in this family outside the BB deletion and redefines the location of RP3. PMID:8659520

  11. A recombination outside the BB deletion refines the location of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa locus RP3

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.; Bingham, E.; Forsythe, P.; McHenry, C.

    1996-07-01

    Genetic loci for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) have been mapped between Xp11.22 and Xp22.13 (RP2, RP3, RP6, and RP15). The RP3 gene, which is responsible for the predominant form of XLRP in most Caucasian populations, has been localized to Xp21.1 by linkage analysis and the map positions of chromosomal deletions associated with the disease. Previous linkage studies have suggested that RP3 is flanked by the markers DXS1110 (distal) and OTC (proximal). Patient BB was though to have RP because of a lesion at the RP3 locus, in addition to chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), mild mental retardation, and the McLeod phenotype. This patient carried a deletion extending {approximately}3 Mb from DMD in Xp21.3 to Xp21.1, with the proximal breakpoint located {approximately}40 kb centromeric to DXS1110. The RP3 gene, therefore, is believed to reside between DXS1110 and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. In order to refine the location of RP3 and to ascertain patients with RP3, we have been analyzing several XLRP families for linkage to Xp markers. Linkage analysis in an American family of 27 individuals demonstrates segregation of XLRP with markers in Xp21.1, consistent with the RP3 subtype. One affected male shows a recombination event proximal to DXS1110. Additional markers within the DXS1110-OTC interval show that the crossover is between two novel polymorphic markers, DXS8349 and M6, both of which are present in BB DNA and lie centromeric to the proximal breakpoint. This recombination places the XLRP mutation in this family outside the BB deletion and redefines the location of RP3. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Na+ dependent acid-base transporters in the choroid plexus; insights from slc4 and slc9 gene deletion studies

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Henriette L.; Nguyen, An T.; Pedersen, Fredrik D.; Damkier, Helle H.

    2013-01-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is located in the ventricular system of the brain, where it secretes the majority of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that fills the ventricular system and surrounds the central nervous system. The CPE is a highly vascularized single layer of cuboidal cells with an unsurpassed transepithelial water and solute transport rate. Several members of the slc4a family of bicarbonate transporters are expressed in the CPE. In the basolateral membrane the electroneutral Na+ dependent Cl−/HCO3− exchanger, NCBE (slc4a10) is expressed. In the luminal membrane, the electrogenic Na+:HCO3− cotransporter, NBCe2 (slc4a5) is expressed. The electroneutral Na+:HCO3− cotransporter, NBCn1 (slc4a7), has been located in both membranes. In addition to the bicarbonate transporters, the Na+/H+ exchanger, NHE1 (slc9a1), is located in the luminal membrane of the CPE. Genetically modified mice targeting slc4a2, slc4a5, slc4a7, slc4a10, and slc9a1 have been generated. Deletion of slc4a5, 7 or 10, or slc9a1 has numerous impacts on CP function and structure in these mice. Removal of the transporters affects brain ventricle size (slc4a5 and slc4a10) and intracellular pH regulation (slc4a7 and slc4a10). In some instances, removal of the proteins from the CPE (slc4a5, 7, and 10) causes changes in abundance and localization of non-target transporters known to be involved in pH regulation and CSF secretion. The focus of this review is to combine the insights gathered from these knockout mice to highlight the impact of slc4 gene deletion on the CSF production and intracellular pH regulation resulting from the deletion of slc4a5, 7 and 10, and slc9a1. Furthermore, the review contains a comparison of the described human mutations of these genes to the findings in the knockout studies. Finally, the future perspective of utilizing these proteins as potential targets for the treatment of CSF disorders will be discussed. PMID:24155723

  13. Systematic screening for PRKAR1A gene rearrangement in Carney complex: identification and functional characterization of a new in-frame deletion

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, S B; Libé, R; Dambrun, M; Chevalier, C; Nigou, M; Auzan, C; North, M O; Sa, J; Gomes, L; Salpea, P; Horvath, A; Stratakis, C A; Hamzaoui, N; Bertherat, J; Clauser, E

    2016-01-01

    Background Point mutations of the PRKAR1A gene are a genetic cause of Carney complex (CNC) and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), but in 30% of the patients no mutation is detected. Objective Set up a routine-based technique for systematic detection of large deletions or duplications of this gene and functionally characterize these mutations. Methods Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) of the 12 exons of the PRKAR1A gene was validated and used to detect large rearrangements in 13 typical CNC and 39 confirmed or putative PPNAD without any mutations of the gene. An in-frame deletion was characterized by western blot and bioluminescence resonant energy transfer technique for its interaction with the catalytic subunit. Results MLPA allowed identification of exons 3–6 deletion in three patients of a family with typical CNC. The truncated protein is expressed, but rapidly degraded, and does not interact with the protein kinase A catalytic subunit. Conclusions MLPA is a powerful technique that may be used following the lack of mutations detected by direct sequencing in patients with bona fide CNC or PPNAD. We report here one such new deletion, as an example. However, these gene defects are not a frequent cause of CNC or PPNAD. PMID:24144965

  14. An efficient deletion mutant packaging system for defective herpes simplex virus vectors: Potential applications to human gene therapy and neuronal physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, A.I.; Keyomarsi, K.; Bryan, J.; Pardee, A.B. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors have previously described a defective herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vector system that permits that introduction of virtually any gene into nonmitotic cells. pHSVlac, the prototype vector, stably expresses Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase from a constitutive promoter in many human cell lines, in cultured rat neurons from throughout the nervous system, and in cells in the adult rat brain. HSV-1 vectors expressing other genes may prove useful for studying neuronal physiology or performing human gene therapy for neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease or brain tumors. A HSV-1 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant, ts K, has been used as helper virus; ts mutants revert to wild type. In contrast, HSV-1 deletion mutants essentially cannot revert to wild type; therefore, use of a deletion mutant as helper virus might permit human gene therapy with HSV-1 vectors. They now report an efficient packaging system for HSV-1 VECTORS USING A DELETION MUTANT, d30EBA, as helper virus; virus is grown on the complementing cell line M64A. pHSVlac virus prepared using the deletion mutant packaging system stably expresses {beta}-galactosidase in cultured rat sympathetic neurons and glia. Both D30EBA and ts K contain a mutation in the IE3 gene of HSV-1 strain 17 and have the same phenotype; therefore, changing the helper virus from ts K to D30EBA does not alter the host range or other properties of the HSV-1 vector system.

  15. Association of angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and familial hypercholesterolemia in the Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study of the association between genotype and phenotype is of great importance for the prediction of multiple diseases and pathophysiological conditions. The relationship between angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) Insertion/Deletion (I/D) polymorphism and Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) has been not fully investigated in all the ethnicities. In this study we sought to determine the frequency of I/D polymorphism genotypes of ACE gene in Saudi patients with FH. Results This is a case–control study carried out purely in Saudi population. Genomic DNA was isolated from 128 subjects who have participated in this study. ACE gene I/D polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction in 64 FH cases and 64 healthy controls. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to genotype distribution. Furthermore, we did not find any significant difference in the frequency of ACE I/D polymorphism in FH subjects when stratified by gender (p = 0.43). Conclusion Our data suggest that ACE gene I/D polymorphism examined in this study has no role in predicting the occurrence and diagnosis of FH. PMID:24289455

  16. Otitis Media in a New Mouse Model for CHARGE Syndrome with a Deletion in the Chd7 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Cong; Yu, Heping; Yang, Bin; Han, Fengchan; Zheng, Ye; Bartels, Cynthia F.; Schelling, Deborah; Arnold, James E.; Scacheri, Peter C.; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2012-01-01

    Otitis media is a middle ear disease common in children under three years old. Otitis media can occur in normal individuals with no other symptoms or syndromes, but it is often seen in individuals clinically diagnosed with genetic diseases such as CHARGE syndrome, a complex genetic disease caused by mutation in the Chd7 gene and characterized by multiple birth defects. Although otitis media is common in human CHARGE syndrome patients, it has not been reported in mouse models of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we report a mouse model with a spontaneous deletion mutation in the Chd7 gene and with chronic otitis media of early onset age accompanied by hearing loss. These mice also exhibit morphological alteration in the Eustachian tubes, dysregulation of epithelial proliferation, and decreased density of middle ear cilia. Gene expression profiling revealed up-regulation of Muc5ac, Muc5b and Tgf-β1 transcripts, the products of which are involved in mucin production and TGF pathway regulation. This is the first mouse model of CHARGE syndrome reported to show otitis media with effusion and it will be valuable for studying the etiology of otitis media and other symptoms in CHARGE syndrome. PMID:22539951

  17. Deletion of the Aconitase Gene in Corynebacterium glutamicum Causes Strong Selection Pressure for Secondary Mutations Inactivating Citrate Synthase▿†

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Meike; Mustafi, Nurije; Krug, Andreas; Bott, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The aconitase gene acn of Corynebacterium glutamicum is regulated by four transcriptional regulators, indicating that the synthesis of this enzyme is carefully controlled. To understand the causes for this elaborate regulation, the properties of the Δacn-1 deletion mutant were analyzed in detail. The mutant was glutamate auxotrophic in glucose minimal medium, showed a strong growth defect, and secreted large amounts of acetate. None of these phenotypes could be complemented by plasmid-encoded aconitase, suggesting the presence of a secondary mutation. In fact, a point mutation within the gltA gene encoding citrate synthase was identified that caused the instability of the protein and an almost complete lack of its enzymatic activity. Subsequently, 27 further, independent Δacn clones were isolated, and 15 of them were found to contain distinct mutations in gltA, causing the loss of citrate synthase activity. A similar result was observed for mutants lacking the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene icd. In this case, 8 of 24 Δicd clones contained additional mutations in gltA. Indirect evidence was obtained that elevated intracellular citrate concentrations could be the cause of this selection pressure. Accordingly, the careful control of aconitase synthesis might have evolved due to the necessity to avoid inhibitory cytoplasmic citrate levels on the one hand and to prevent the excessive synthesis of an oxygen-sensitive protein requiring both iron and sulfur on the other hand. PMID:21984793

  18. Constitutional de novo deletion of the FBXW7 gene in a patient with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and multiple primitive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Roversi, Gaia; Picinelli, Chiara; Bestetti, Ilaria; Crippa, Milena; Perotti, Daniela; Ciceri, Sara; Saccheri, Fabiana; Collini, Paola; Poliani, Pietro L.; Catania, Serena; Peissel, Bernard; Pagni, Fabio; Russo, Silvia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Finelli, Palma

    2015-01-01

    Multiple primary malignant neoplasms are rare entities in the clinical setting, but represent an important issue in the clinical management of patients since they could be expression of a genetic predisposition to malignancy. A high resolution genome wide array CGH led us to identify the first case of a de novo constitutional deletion confined to the FBXW7 gene, a well known tumor suppressor, in a patient with a syndromic phenotype characterized by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and multiple primary early/atypical onset tumors, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Wilms tumor and breast cancer. Other genetic defects may be associated with patient’s phenotype. In this light, constitutional mutations at BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, PALB2 and WT1 genes were excluded by performing sequencing and MLPA analysis; similarly, we ruled out constitutional abnormalities at the imprinted 11p15 region by methylation specific -MLPA assay. Our observations sustain the role of FBXW7 as cancer predisposition gene and expand the spectrum of its possible associated diseases. PMID:26482194

  19. A candidate gene approach to identify modifiers of the palatal phenotype in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Widdershoven, Josine C.C.; Bowser, Mark; Sheridan, Molly B.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Solot, Cynthia B.; Kirschner, Richard E.; Beemer, Frits A.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Devoto, Marcella; Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Palatal anomalies are one of the identifying features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) affecting about one third of patients. To identify genetic variants that increase the risk of cleft or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients, we performed a candidate gene association study in 101 patients with 22q11.2DS genotyped with the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0. Methods Patients from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, USA and Wilhelmina Children's Hospital Utrecht, The Netherlands were stratified based on palatal phenotype (overt cleft, submucosal cleft, bifid uvula). SNPs in 21 candidate genes for cleft palate were analyzed for genotype-phenotype association. In addition, TBX1 sequencing was carried out. Quality control and association analyses were conducted using the software package PLINK. Results Genotype and phenotype data of 101 unrelated patients (63 non-cleft subjects (62.4%), 38 cleft subjects (37.6%)) were analyzed. A Total of 39 SNPs on 10 genes demonstrated a p-value ≤0.05 prior to correction. The most significant SNPs were found on FGF10. However none of the SNPs remained significant after correcting for multiple testing. Conclusions Although these results are promising, analysis of additional samples will be required to confirm that variants in these regions influence risk for cleft palate or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients. PMID:23121717

  20. High-resolution array-CGH in patients with oculocutaneous albinism identifies new deletions of the TYR, OCA2, and SLC45A2 genes and a complex rearrangement of the OCA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Morice-Picard, Fanny; Lasseaux, Eulalie; Cailley, Dorothée; Gros, Audrey; Toutain, Jérome; Plaisant, Claudio; Simon, Delphine; François, Stéphane; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Kaplan, Josseline; Rooryck, Caroline; Lacombe, Didier; Arveiler, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is caused by mutations in six different genes, and their molecular diagnosis encompasses the search for point mutations and intragenic rearrangements. Here, we used high-resolution array-comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to search for rearrangements across exons, introns and regulatory sequences of four OCA genes: TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and SLC45A2. We identified a total of ten new deletions in TYR, OCA2, and SLC45A2. A complex rearrangement of OCA2 was found in two unrelated patients. Whole-genome sequencing showed deletion of a 184-kb fragment (identical to a deletion previously found in Polish patients), whereby a large portion of the deleted sequence was re-inserted after severe reshuffling into intron 1 of OCA2. The high-resolution array-CGH presented here is a powerful tool to detect gene rearrangements. Finally, we review all known deletions of the OCA1-4 genes reported so far in the literature and show that deletions or duplications account for 5.6% of all mutations identified in the OCA1-4 genes. PMID:24118800

  1. Delimitation of the Earliness per se D1 (Eps-D1) flowering gene to a subtelomeric chromosomal deletion in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    PubMed Central

    Zikhali, Meluleki; Wingen, Luzie U.; Griffiths, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Earliness per se (Eps) genes account for the variation in flowering time when vernalization and photoperiod requirements are satisfied. Genomics and bioinformatics approaches were used to describe allelic variation for 40 Triticum aestivum genes predicted, by synteny with Brachypodium distachyon, to be in the 1DL Eps region. Re-sequencing 1DL genes revealed that varieties carrying early heading alleles at this locus, Spark and Cadenza, carry a subtelomeric deletion including several genes. The equivalent region in Rialto and Avalon is intact. A bimodal distribution in the segregating Spark X Rialto single seed descent (SSD) populations enabled the 1DL QTL to be defined as a discrete Mendelian factor, which we named Eps-D1. Near isogenic lines (NILs) and NIL derived key recombinants between markers flanking Eps-D1 suggest that the 1DL deletion contains the gene(s) underlying Eps-D1. The deletion spans the equivalent of the Triticum monoccocum Eps-A m 1 locus, and hence includes MODIFIER OF TRANSCRIPTION 1 (MOT1) and FTSH PROTEASE 4 (FTSH4), the candidates for Eps-A m 1. The deletion also contains T. aestivum EARLY FLOWERING 3-D1 (TaELF3-D1) a homologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock gene EARLY FLOWERING 3. Eps-D1 is possibly a homologue of Eps-B1 on chromosome 1BL. NILs carrying the Eps-D1 deletion have significantly reduced total TaELF3 expression and altered TaGIGANTEA (TaGI) expression compared with wild type. Altered TaGI expression is consistent with an ELF3 mutant, hence we propose TaELF3-D1 as the more likely candidate for Eps-D1. This is the first direct fine mapping of Eps effect in bread wheat. PMID:26476691

  2. A gene-specific effect of an internal deletion in the Bdp1 subunit of the RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor TFIIIB.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Akira; Kassavetis, George A

    2003-07-31

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPR1 gene encodes the RNA subunit of its RNase P, which processes RNA polymerase (pol) III primary transcripts. RPR1, which is transcribed by pol III, has been isolated as a multicopy suppressor of a specific small internal deletion (amino acids 253-269) in the Bdp1 subunit of transcription factor TFIIIB, the core pol III transcription factor. The selective effect of this Bdp1 deletion on RPR1 transcription has been analyzed in vitro. It is shown that TFIIIC-dependent assembly of TFIIIB on the RPR1 promoter is specifically sensitive to this Bdp1 deletion, leading to gene-specifically defective single-round and multiple-round transcription. PMID:12885403

  3. High-dynamic range DMD-based IR scene projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Julia R.; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Newbry, Scott P.

    2013-03-01

    OPTRA is developing a next-generation digital micromirror device (DMD) based two-band infrared scene projector (IRSP) with infinite bit-depth independent of frame rate and an order of magnitude improvement in contrast over the state of the art. Traditionally DMD-based IRSPs have offered larger format and superior uniformity and pixel operability relative to resistive and diode arrays, however, they have been limited in contrast and also by the inherent bitdepth / frame rate tradeoff imposed by pulse width modulation (PWM). OPTRA's high dynamic range IRSP (HIDRA SP) has broken this dependency with a dynamic structured illumination solution. The HIDRA SP uses a source conditioning DMD to impose the structured illumination on two projector DMDs - one for each spectral band. The source conditioning DMD is operated in binary mode, and the relay optics which form the structured illumination act as a low pass spatial filter. The structured illumination is therefore spatially grayscaled and more importantly is analog with no PWM. In addition, the structured illumination concentrates energy where bright object will be projected and extinguishes energy in dark regions; the result is a significant improvement in contrast. The projector DMDs are operated with 8-bit PWM, however the total projected image is analog with no bit-depth / frame rate dependency. In this paper we describe our progress towards the development, build, and test of a prototype HIDRA SP.

  4. High-dynamic range DMD-based infrared scene projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Newbry, Scott P.; Rentz Dupuis, Julia

    2013-05-01

    OPTRA is developing a next-generation digital micromirror device (DMD) based two-band infrared scene projector (IRSP) with infinite bit-depth independent of frame rate and an order of magnitude improvement in contrast over the state of the art. Traditionally DMD-based IRSPs have offered larger format and superior uniformity and pixel operability relative to resistive and diode arrays, however, they have been limited in contrast and also by the inherent bitdepth / frame rate tradeoff imposed by pulse width modulation (PWM). OPTRA's high dynamic range IRSP (HIDRA SP) has broken this dependency with a dynamic structured illumination solution. The HIDRA SP uses a source conditioning DMD to impose the structured illumination on two projector DMDs - one for each spectral band. The source conditioning DMD is operated in binary mode, and the relay optics which form the structured illumination act as a low pass spatial filter. The structured illumination is therefore spatially grayscaled and more importantly is analog with no PWM. In addition, the structured illumination concentrates energy where bright object will be projected and extinguishes energy in dark regions; the result is a significant improvement in contrast. The projector DMDs are operated with 8-bit PWM, however the total projected image is analog with no bit-depth / frame rate dependency. In this paper we describe our progress towards the development, build, and test of a prototype HIDRA SP.

  5. Development of a DMD-based fluorescence microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrova, Nadya; Rieger, Bernd; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2015-03-01

    We present a versatile fluorescence microscope, built by complementing a conventional fluorescence microscope with a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) in the illumination path. Arbitrary patterns can be created on the DMD and projected onto the sample. This patterned illumination can be used to improve lateral and axial resolution over the resolution of a wide-field microscope, as well as to reduce the illumination dose. Different illumination patterns require different reconstruction strategies and result in an image quality similar to confocal or structured illumination microscopy. We focus on the optical design and characterization of a DMD-based microscope. Estimation of the optical quality of the microscope has been carried out by measuring the modulation transfer function from edge profiles. We have obtained optically sectioned images by applying multi-spot illumination patterns followed by digital pinholing. The sectioning capabilities of our DMD-based microscope were estimated from the dependence of the signal-to-background and signalto-noise ratios on the pitch of the projected multi-spot patterns and the size of the digital pinhole. In addition, we provide an outlook on the use of pseudo-random illumination patterns for achieving both sectioning and resolution enhancement.

  6. Tablet PC interaction with digital micromirror device (DMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refai, Hakki H.; Dahshan, Mostafa H.; Sluss, James J., Jr.

    2007-02-01

    Digital light processing (DLP) is an innovative display technology that uses an optical switch array, known as a digital micromirror device (DMD), which allows digital control of light. To date, DMDs have been used primarily as high-speed spatial light modulators for projector applications. A tablet PC is a notebook or slate-shaped mobile PC. Its touch screen or digitizing tablet technology allows the user to operate the notebook with a stylus or digital pen instead of using a keyboard or mouse. In this paper, we describe an interface solution that translates any sketch on the tablet PC screen to an identical mirror-copy over the cross-section of the DMD micromirrors such that the image of the sketch can be projected onto a special screen. An algorithm has been created to control each single micromirror of the hundreds of thousands of micromirrors that cover the DMD surface. We demonstrate the successful application of a DMD to a high-speed two-dimensional (2D) scanning environment, acquiring the data from the tablet screen and launching its contents to the projection screen; with very high accuracy up to 13.68 μm x 13.68 μm of mirror pitch.

  7. Mutations in PRG1, a yeast proteasome-related gene, cause defects in nuclear division and are suppressed by deletion of a mitotic cyclin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, H; Snyder, M

    1994-01-01

    Proteasomes are ubiquitous complexes exhibiting proteolytic activity in vitro. The function(s) of these enzymes in vivo is not known. To investigate the in vivo role of proteasomes, four temperature-sensitive alleles of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteasome-related gene, PRG1, were constructed and analyzed. At both the permissive and restrictive temperatures, many prg1 cells have a large bud, contain replicated DNA, and have their nucleus positioned at the neck with a short spindle. These different phenotypes indicate a defect in nuclear division. Consistent with a nuclear division defect, prg1 mutant strains lose a dispensable chromosome at a higher frequency than wild-type cells. Importantly, deletion of CLB2, a gene encoding a mitotic cyclin, suppresses the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of prg1 mutant strains. Our results indicate that proteasomes are important for nuclear division and suggest that they participate in degradation of the Clb2 protein (Clb2p). Images PMID:8134345

  8. Proteomics and bioinformatics analysis of mouse hypothalamic neurogenesis with or without EPHX2 gene deletion

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lijun; Zhou, Juntuo; Wang, Dawei; Zou, Xiajuan; Lou, Yaxin; Liu, Dan; Yang, Bin; Zhu, Yi; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify differently expressed proteins in the presence and absence of EPHX2 gene in mouse hypothalamus using proteomics profiling and bioinformatics analysis. This study was performed on 3 wild type (WT) and 3 EPHX2 gene global knockout (KO) mice (EPHX2 -/-). Using the nano- electrospray ionization (ESI)-LC-MS/MS detector, we identified 31 over-expressed proteins in WT mouse hypothalamus compared to the KO counterparts. Gene Ontology (GO) annotation in terms of the protein-protein interaction network indicated that cellular metabolic process, protein metabolic process, signaling transduction and protein post-translation biological processes involved in EPHX2 -/- regulatory network. In addition, signaling pathway enrichment analysis also highlighted chronic neurodegenerative diseases and some other signaling pathways, such as TGF-beta signaling pathway, T cell receptor signaling pathway, ErbB signaling pathway, Neurotrophin signaling pathway and MAPK signaling pathway, were strongly coupled with EPHX2 gene knockout. Further studies into the molecular functions of EPHX2 gene in hypothalamus will help to provide new perspective in neurogenesis. PMID:26722453

  9. A UL47 Gene Deletion Mutant of Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1 Exhibits Impaired Growth in Cell Culture and Lack of Virulence in Cattle▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lobanov, Vladislav A.; Maher-Sturgess, Sheryl L.; Snider, Marlene G.; Lawman, Zoe; Babiuk, Lorne A.; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Tegument protein VP8 encoded by the UL47 gene of bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) is the most abundant constituent of mature virions. In the present report, we describe the characterization of UL47 gene-deleted BHV-1 in cultured cells and its natural host. The UL47 deletion mutant exhibited reduced plaque size and more than 100-fold decrease in intracellular and extracellular viral titers in cultured cells. Ultrastructural observations of infected cells showed normal maturation of BHV-1 virions in the absence of VP8. There was no evidence for a change in immediate-early gene activator function of VP16 in the UL47 deletion mutant virus-infected cells, since bovine ICP4 mRNA and protein levels were similar to those in the wild-type and revertant virus-infected cells throughout the course of infection. Whereas VP16, glycoprotein C (gC), gB, and VP5 were expressed to wild-type levels in the UL47 deletion mutant-infected cells, the gD and VP22 protein levels were significantly reduced. The reduction in gD protein was associated with increased turnover of the protein. Furthermore, some of the analyzed early and late proteins were expressed with earlier kinetics in the absence of VP8. Extracellular virions of the UL47 deletion mutant contained reduced amounts of gD, gB, gC, and VP22 but similar amounts of VP16 compared to those of wild-type or revertant virus particles. In addition, the UL47 gene product was indispensable for BHV-1 replication in vivo, since no clinical manifestations or viral shedding were detected in the UL47 deletion mutant-infected calves, and the virus failed to induce significant levels of humoral and cellular immunity. PMID:19864376

  10. Large Deletions in the pAtC58 Megaplasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Can Confer Reduced Carriage Cost and Increased Expression of Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Elise R.; Merritt, Peter M.; Bever, James D.; Fuqua, Clay

    2013-01-01

    The accessory plasmid pAtC58 of the common laboratory strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens confers numerous catabolic functions and has been proposed to play a role in virulence. Genomic sequencing of evolved laboratory strains of A. tumefaciens revealed the presence of multiple deletion events in the At plasmid, with reductions in plasmid size ranging from 25% to 30% (115–194 kb). Flanking both ends of the sites of these deletions is a short-nucleotide repeat sequence that is in a single copy in the deleted plasmids, characteristic of a phage- or transposon-mediated deletion event. This repeat sequence is widespread throughout the C58 genome, but concentrated on the At plasmid, suggesting its frequency to be nonrandom. In this study, we assess the prevalence of the larger of these deletions in multiple C58 derivatives and characterize its functional significance. We find that in addition to elevating virulence gene expression, this deletion is associated with a significantly reduced carriage cost to the cell. These observations are a clear demonstration of the dynamic nature of the bacterial genome and suggest a mechanism for genetic plasticity of these costly but otherwise stable plasmids. Additionally, this phenomenon could be the basis for some of the dramatic recombination events so ubiquitous within and among megaplasmids. PMID:23783172

  11. Murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah) gene is disrupted by a neonatally lethal albino deletion that defines the hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation 1 (hsdr-1) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Klebig, M.L. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN ); Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M. )

    1992-02-15

    Homozygous deletion of the hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation 1 (hsdr-1) locus in mouse chromosome 7 results in perinatal death and a pleiotropic syndrome characterized by ultrastructural abnormalities of the liver and kidney, failure of induction of a number of specific transcription units in the liver and kidney during late gestation, and marked overexpression of an enzyme that defends against oxidative stress. Previously, the breakpoints of two albino (c) deletions (c{sup 14CoS} and c{sup IFAFyh}) that genetically define hsdr-1 were localized, on a long-range map, in the vicinity of the distal breakpoint of a viable albino deletion (c{sup 24R75M}) that breaks proximally within the c locus. Here the authors report the use of a probe derived from a deletion breakpoint fusion fragment cloned from c{sup 24R75M}/c{sup 24R75M} DNA to clone a breakpoint fusion fragment caused by the c{sup 14CoS} deletion. The proximal breakpoint of the c{sup 14CoS} deletion was discovered to disrupt a gene (Fah) encoding fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine degradation pathway. These mouse mutants may also provide models for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia, which is associated with fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency and liver and kidney dysfunction.

  12. Deletion of the Sm1 encoding motif in the lsm gene results in distinct changes in the transcriptome and enhanced swarming activity of Haloferax cells.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Benz, Juliane; Fischer, Susan; Alstetter, Martina; Jaschinski, Katharina; Hilker, Rolf; Becker, Anke; Allers, Thorsten; Soppa, Jörg; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-10-01

    Members of the Sm protein family are important for the cellular RNA metabolism in all three domains of life. The family includes archaeal and eukaryotic Lsm proteins, eukaryotic Sm proteins and archaeal and bacterial Hfq proteins. While several studies concerning the bacterial and eukaryotic family members have been published, little is known about the archaeal Lsm proteins. Although structures for several archaeal Lsm proteins have been solved already more than ten years ago, we still do not know much about their biological function, however one can confidently propose that the archaeal Lsm proteins will also be involved in RNA metabolism. Therefore, we investigated this protein in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii. The Haloferax genome encodes a single Lsm protein, the lsm gene overlaps and is co-transcribed with the gene for the ribosomal L37.eR protein. Here, we show that the reading frame of the lsm gene contains a promoter which regulates expression of the overlapping rpl37R gene. This rpl37R specific promoter ensures high expression of the rpl37R gene in exponential growth phase. To investigate the biological function of the Lsm protein we generated a lsm deletion mutant that had the coding sequence for the Sm1 motif removed but still contained the internal promoter for the downstream rpl37R gene. The transcriptome of this deletion mutant was compared to the wild type transcriptome, revealing that several genes are down-regulated and many genes are up-regulated in the deletion strain. Northern blot analyses confirmed down-regulation of two genes. In addition, the deletion strain showed a gain of function in swarming, in congruence with the up-regulation of transcripts encoding proteins required for motility. PMID:25754521

  13. Expression of the herpes thymidine kinase gene in Xenopus laevis oocytes: an assay for the study of deletion mutants constructed in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, S L; Gavis, E R

    1980-01-01

    When Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclei are injected with a recombinant plasmid containing the Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (tk) gene, a 100-fold increase in tk enzymatic activity is observed. Three lines of evidence show that this increase in tk activity is a result of the expression of the HSV tk gene. First, the enzymatic activity is selectively inactivated by the IgG fraction of antiserum raised against HSV tk protein. Second, a polypeptide that comigrates with authentic HSV tk on polyacrylamide gels is synthesized uniquely by oocytes injected with the HSV tk gene. Third, the induced tk activity found in injected oocytes is capable of phosphorylating deoxycytidine, a substrate that is utilized by HSV tk but not by cellular tk. We have used these observations to establish an assay for examining the activity of mutated variants of the HSV tk gene. Two sets of deletion mutants of the tk gene were constructed in vitro. In one set varying amounts of 5' flanking and intragenic sequences are deleted. The other set is deleted at the 3' end of the gene. By testing the activity of each mutant in the oocyte injection assay we have delimited functional boundaries corresponding to the 5' and 3' termini of the HSV tk gene. Images PMID:6258155

  14. Concomitant alpha- and gamma-sarcoglycan deficiencies in a Turkish boy with a novel deletion in the alpha-sarcoglycan gene.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Gulden; Tosun Yildirim, Hulya; Gokben, Sarenur; Serdaroglu, Gul; Hazan, Filiz; Yararbas, Kanay; Tukun, Ajlan

    2014-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD-2D) is caused by autosomal recessive defects in the alpha-sarcoglycan gene located on chromosome 17q21. In this study, we present a child with alpha-sarcoglycanopathy and describe a novel deletion in the alpha-sarcoglycan gene. A 5-year-old boy had a very high serum creatinine phosphokinase level, which was determined incidentally, and a negative molecular test for the dystrophin gene. Muscle biopsy showed dystrophic features. Immunohistochemistry showed that there was diminished expression of alpha- and gamma-sarcoglycans. DNA analysis revealed a novel 7 bp homozygous deletion in exon 3 of the alpha-sarcoglycan gene. His parents were consanguineous heterozygous carriers of the same deletion. We believe this is the first confirmed case of primary alpha-sarcoglycanopathy with a novel deletion in Turkey. In addition, this study demonstrated that both muscle biopsy and DNA analysis remain important methods for the differential diagnosis of muscular dystrophies because dystrophinopathies and sarcoglycanopathies are so similar. PMID:25050186

  15. Deletion of clock gene Per2 exacerbates cholestatic liver injury and fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Kakan, Xiamusiya; Wang, Shiming; Dong, Wei; Jia, Aiqun; Cai, Chun; Zhang, Jianfa

    2013-05-01

    The Period 2 (Per2) gene is an important component of the circadian system and is thought to modulate many physiological and pathological processes in mammals. In the previous study, we have disclosed the protective role of Per2 against carbon tetrachloride induced liver injury and fibrosis. Here we further assess the effect of Per2 deficiency on cholestatic hepatic injury and fibrosis. Cholestasis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) for 10 days in wild-type (WT) and Per2(-/-) mice. Masson trichrome staining and analysis of α-SMA immunohistochemistry were performed to show the collagen accumulation and the HSC activation, respectively. The mRNA levels of fibrosis-related genes were monitored by quantitative real-time PCR. Following BDL, livers from Per2(-/-) mice exhibited markedly increased extent of bile infarct and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition compared with WT mice. Furthermore, the expressions of fibrosis-related genes like TNF-α, TGF-β1, Col1α1 and TIMP-1 were dramatically elevated in Per2(-/-) cholestatic liver. Our observations indicated that clock gene Per2 plays a protective role in mediating liver injury and fibrosis during cholestasis. PMID:22261359

  16. Secondary EWSR1 gene abnormalities in SMARCB1-deficient tumors with 22q11-12 regional deletions: Potential pitfalls in interpreting EWSR1 FISH results.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-10-01

    SMARCB1 inactivation occurs in a variety of tumors, being caused by various genetic mechanisms. Since SMARCB1 and EWSR1 genes are located close to each other on chromosome 22, larger SMARCB1 deletions may encompass the EWSR1 locus. Herein, we report four cases with SMARCB1-deletions showing concurrent EWSR1 gene abnormalities by FISH, which lead initially to misinterpretations as EWSR1-rearranged tumors. Our study group included various morphologies: a poorly differentiated chordoma, an extrarenal rhabdoid tumor, a myoepithelial carcinoma, and a proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma. All cases showed loss of SMARCB1 (INI1) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and displayed characteristic histologic features for the diagnoses. The SMARCB1 FISH revealed homozygous or heterozygous deletions in three and one case, respectively. The co-hybridized EWSR1 probes demonstrated either unbalanced split signals or heterozygous deletion in two cases each. The former suggested bona fide rearrangement, while the latter resembled an unbalanced translocation. However, all the FISH patterns were quite complex and distinct from the simple and uniform split signals seen in typical EWSR1 rearrangements. We conclude that in the context of 22q11-12 regional alterations present in SMARCB1-deleted tumors, simultaneous EWSR1 involvement may be misinterpreted as equivalent to EWSR1 rearrangement. A detailed clinicopathologic correlation and supplementing the EWSR1 FISH assay with complementary methodology is mandatory for correct diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218413

  17. pNEB193-derived suicide plasmids for gene deletion and protein expression in the methane-producing archaeon, Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    PubMed

    Shea, Mitchell T; Walter, Mary E; Duszenko, Nikolas; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Aldridge, Jared; King, Shannon K; Buan, Nicole R

    2016-01-01

    Gene deletion and protein expression are cornerstone procedures for studying metabolism in any organism, including methane-producing archaea (methanogens). Methanogens produce coenzymes and cofactors not found in most bacteria, therefore it is sometimes necessary to express and purify methanogen proteins from the natural host. Protein expression in the native organism is also useful when studying post-translational modifications and their effect on gene expression or enzyme activity. We have created several new suicide plasmids to complement existing genetic tools for use in the methanogen, Methanosarcina acetivorans. The new plasmids are derived from the commercially available Escherichia coli plasmid, pNEB193, and cannot replicate autonomously in methanogens. The designed plasmids facilitate markerless gene deletion, gene transcription, protein expression, and purification of proteins with cleavable affinity tags from the methanogen, M. acetivorans. PMID:26876941

  18. Tissue-specific loss of fucosylated glycolipids in mice with targeted deletion of alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Iwamori, Masao; Domino, Steven E

    2004-01-01

    Glycolipids in epithelial tissues of the gastrointestinal tract act as receptors for enteric bacteria and are implicated in the activation of the intestinal immune system. To clarify the genes involved in the fucosylation of the major glycolipids, substrate glycolipids and fucosylated products were measured in tissues of wild-type and mutant mice lacking alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes FUT1 or FUT2. Quantitative determination was performed by TLC-immunostaining for GA1 (Gg4Cer), FGA1 (fucosyl GA1), GM1 (II3NeuAc-Gg4Cer), FGM1 (fucosyl GM1), and Forssman glycolipids. Both FGM1 and FGA1 completely disappeared from the antrum, cecum, and colon of FUT2-null mice, but not those of FUT1-null and wild-type mice. Precursor glycolipids, GM1 and GA1, accumulated in tissues of FUT2-null mice, indicating that the FUT2-encoded enzyme preferentially participates in the fucosylation of GA1 and GM1 in these tissues. Female reproductive organs were similarly found to utilize FUT2 for the fucosylation of glycolipids FGA1 (uterus and cervix), and FGM1 (ovary), due to their absence in FUT2-null mice. In FUT1-null mice FGA1 was lost from the pancreas, but was present in wild-type and FUT2-null mice, indicating that FUT1 is essential for fucosylation of GA1 in the pancreas. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I lectin histochemistry for alpha(1,2)fucose residues confirmed the absence of alpha(1,2)fucose residues from the apical surface of pancreatic acinar glands of FUT1-null mice. Ileum, epididymis, and testis retained specific fucosylated glycolipids, irrespective of targeted deletion of either gene, indicating either compensation for or redundancy of the alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes in these tissues. PMID:14967068

  19. New intragenic deletions in the Phex gene clarify X-linked hypophosphatemia-related abnormalities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Guido, Victoria E.; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Zheng, Qing Yin; Gagnon, Leona H.; Bauschatz, Joiel D.; Davisson, Muriel T.; Washburn, Linda L.; Donahue, Leah Rae; Strom, Tim M.; Eicher, Eva M.

    2010-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) in humans is caused by mutations in the PHEX gene. Previously, three mutations in the mouse Phex gene have been reported: PhexHyp, Gy, and PhexSka1. Here we report analysis of two new spontaneous mutations in the mouse Phex gene, PhexHyp-2J and PhexHyp-Duk. PhexHyp-2J and PhexHyp-Duk involve intragenic deletions of at least 7.3 kb containing exon 15, and 30 kb containing exons 13 and 14, respectively. Both mutations cause similar phenotypes in males, including shortened hind legs and tail, a shortened square trunk, hypophosphatemia, hypocalcemia, and rachitic bone disease. In addition, mice carrying the PhexHyp-Duk mutation exhibit background-dependent variable expression of deafness, circling behavior, and cranial dysmorphology, demonstrating the influence of modifying genes on Phex-related phenotypes. Cochlear cross-sections from PhexHyp-2J/Y and PhexHyp-Duk/Y males reveal a thickening of the temporal bone surrounding the cochlea with the presence of a precipitate in the scala tympani. Evidence of the degeneration of the organ of Corti and spiral ganglion also are present in the hearing-impaired PhexHyp-Duk/Y mice, but not in the normal-hearing PhexHyp-2J/Y mice. Analysis of the phenotypes noted in PhexHyp-Duk/Y an PhexHyp-2J/Y males, together with those noted in PhexSka1/Y and PhexHyp/Y males, now allow XLH-related phenotypes to be separated from non-XLH-related phenotypes, such as those noted in Gy/Y males. Also, identification of the genetic modifiers of hearing and craniofacial dysmorphology in PhexHyp-Duk/Y mice could provide insight into the phenotypic variation of XLH in humans. PMID:15029877

  20. Tissue-specific loss of fucosylated glycolipids in mice with targeted deletion of alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes.

    PubMed

    Iwamori, Masao; Domino, Steven E

    2004-05-15

    Glycolipids in epithelial tissues of the gastrointestinal tract act as receptors for enteric bacteria and are implicated in the activation of the intestinal immune system. To clarify the genes involved in the fucosylation of the major glycolipids, substrate glycolipids and fucosylated products were measured in tissues of wild-type and mutant mice lacking alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes FUT1 or FUT2. Quantitative determination was performed by TLC-immunostaining for GA1 (Gg4Cer), FGA1 (fucosyl GA1), GM1 (II3NeuAc-Gg4Cer), FGM1 (fucosyl GM1), and Forssman glycolipids. Both FGM1 and FGA1 completely disappeared from the antrum, cecum, and colon of FUT2-null mice, but not those of FUT1-null and wild-type mice. Precursor glycolipids, GM1 and GA1, accumulated in tissues of FUT2-null mice, indicating that the FUT2-encoded enzyme preferentially participates in the fucosylation of GA1 and GM1 in these tissues. Female reproductive organs were similarly found to utilize FUT2 for the fucosylation of glycolipids FGA1 (uterus and cervix), and FGM1 (ovary), due to their absence in FUT2-null mice. In FUT1-null mice FGA1 was lost from the pancreas, but was present in wild-type and FUT2-null mice, indicating that FUT1 is essential for fucosylation of GA1 in the pancreas. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I lectin histochemistry for alpha(1,2)fucose residues confirmed the absence of alpha(1,2)fucose residues from the apical surface of pancreatic acinar glands of FUT1-null mice. Ileum, epididymis, and testis retained specific fucosylated glycolipids, irrespective of targeted deletion of either gene, indicating either compensation for or redundancy of the alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes in these tissues. PMID:14967068

  1. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition and gene deletion are protective against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in vivo.

    PubMed

    Motoki, Atsuko; Merkel, Matthias J; Packwood, William H; Cao, Zhiping; Liu, Lijuan; Iliff, Jeffrey; Alkayed, Nabil J; Van Winkle, Donna M

    2008-11-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) metabolizes epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. EETs are formed from arachidonic acid during myocardial ischemia and play a protective role against ischemic cell death. Deletion of sEH has been shown to be protective against myocardial ischemia in the isolated heart preparation. We tested the hypothesis that sEH inactivation by targeted gene deletion or pharmacological inhibition reduces infarct size (I) after regional myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in vivo. Male C57BL\\6J wild-type or sEH knockout mice were subjected to 40 min of left coronary artery (LCA) occlusion and 2 h of reperfusion. Wild-type mice were injected intraperitoneally with 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid butyl ester (AUDA-BE), a sEH inhibitor, 30 min before LCA occlusion or during ischemia 10 min before reperfusion. 14,15-EET, the main substrate for sEH, was administered intravenously 15 min before LCA occlusion or during ischemia 5 min before reperfusion. The EET antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (EEZE) was given intravenously 15 min before reperfusion. Area at risk (AAR) and I were assessed using fluorescent microspheres and triphenyltetrazolium chloride, and I was expressed as I/AAR. I was significantly reduced in animals treated with AUDA-BE or 14,15-EET, independent of the time of administration. The cardioprotective effect of AUDA-BE was abolished by the EET antagonist 14,15-EEZE. Immunohistochemistry revealed abundant sEH protein expression in left ventricular tissue. Strategies to increase 14,15-EET, including sEH inactivation, may represent a novel therapeutic approach for cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:18835921

  2. Roles of the RecJ and RecQ proteins in spontaneous formation of deletion mutations in the Escherichia coli K12 endogenous tonB gene.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Kazumi; Kawata, Masakado; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2003-07-01

    The endogenous tonB gene of Escherichia coli was used as a target for spontaneous deletion mutations which were isolated from recJ(-) and recQ(-) cells. Large deletions, due to simultaneous mutations of the trp operon, were also isolated. The rates of tonB mutation were 2.77 x 10(-8), 4.13 x 10(-8) and 5.00 x 10(-8) for rec(+), recJ(-) and recQ(-) cells, respectively. We analyzed 94 and 99 tonB mutants from the recJ(-) and recQ(-) cells, respectively, by sequencing. We found that IS insertion dominated, followed by base substitutions, frameshifts and deletions in both recJ(-) and recQ(-) strains. We then analyzed 55 tonB-trp deletions, ranging in size from 5907 to 20,832 bp, from the recJ(-) strains and 47 tonB-trp deletions, ranging in size from 4,959 to 16,390 bp from the recQ(-) strains. About one-third of tonB-trp deletions from both the recJ(-) and the recQ(-) cells were found to have occurred between short sequence repeats at the deletion termini. About one-third of tonB-trp deletions from both mutants showed 2-4 bp repeats in the immediate vicinity of the endpoints, which appeared to indicate no clear association with deletion. The remaining one-third of tonB-trp deletions had no homology at the endpoint. These results were similar to those for the rec(+) cells. Hanada and colleagues demonstrated that structually similar rearrangements arising during lambda bio phage formation (illegitimate recombination) increased in the recQ(-) strain. To explain this discrepancy, we interpreted as distinctive the mechanism for rearrangement during transducing phage formation which is recQ-dependent and that for deletions formed in chromosomes which is recQ-independent. PMID:12840109

  3. Deletion of PREPL, a Gene Encoding a Putative Serine Oligopeptidase, in Patients with Hypotonia-Cystinuria Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jaeken, Jaak; Martens, Kevin; François, Inge; Eyskens, François; Lecointre, Claudine; Derua, Rita; Meulemans, Sandra; Slootstra, Jerry W.; Waelkens, Etienne; Zegher, Francis de; Creemers, John W. M.; Matthijs, Gert

    2006-01-01

    In 11 patients with a recessive congenital disorder, which we refer to as “the hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome,” microdeletion of part of the SLC3A1 and PREPL genes on chromosome 2p21 was found. Patients present with generalized hypotonia at birth, nephrolithiasis, growth hormone deficiency, minor facial dysmorphism, and failure to thrive, followed by hyperphagia and rapid weight gain in late childhood. Since loss-of-function mutations in SLC3A1 are known to cause isolated cystinuria type I, and since the expression of the flanking genes, C2orf34 and PPM1B, was normal, the extended phenotype can be attributed to the deletion of PREPL. PREPL is localized in the cytosol and shows homology with prolyl endopeptidase and oligopeptidase B. Substitution of the predicted catalytic residues (Ser470, Asp556, and His601) by alanines resulted in loss of reactivity with a serine hydrolase-specific probe. In sharp contrast to prolyl oligopeptidase and oligopeptidase B, which require both aminoterminal and carboxyterminal sequences for activity, PREPL activity appears to depend only on the carboxyterminal domain. Taken together, these results suggest that PREPL is a novel oligopeptidase, with unique structural and functional characteristics, involved in hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome. PMID:16385448

  4. Identification of a homozygous deletion in the AP3B1 gene causing Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, type 2

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Johannes; Bohn, Georg; Allroth, Anna; Boztug, Kaan; Brandes, Gudrun; Sandrock, Inga; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Rathinam, Chozhavendan; Köllner, Inga; Beger, Carmela; Schilke, Reinhard; Welte, Karl; Grimbacher, Bodo; Klein, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    We report on the molecular etiology of an unusual clinical phenotype associating congenital neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, developmental delay, and hypopigmentation. Using genetic linkage analysis and targeted gene sequencing, we defined a homozygous genomic deletion in AP3B1, the gene encoding the β chain of the adaptor protein-3 (AP-3) complex. The mutation leads to in-frame skipping of exon 15 and thus perturbs proper assembly of the heterotetrameric AP-3 complex. Consequently, trafficking of transmembrane lysosomal proteins is aberrant, as shown for CD63. In basal keratinocytes, the incorporated immature melanosomes were rapidly degraded in large phagolysosomes. Despite distinct ultramorphologic changes suggestive of aberrant vesicular maturation, no functional aberrations were detected in neutrophil granulocytes. However, a comprehensive immunologic assessment revealed that natural killer (NK) and NKT-cell numbers were reduced in AP-3-deficient patients. Our findings extend the clinical and molecular phenotype of human AP-3 deficiency (also known as Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, type 2) and provide further insights into the role of the AP-3 complex for the innate immune system. (Blood. 2006;108:362-369) PMID:16537806

  5. New assignment of the adenosine deaminase gene locus to chromosome 20q13 X 11 by study of a patient with interstitial deletion 20q.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, M B; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, N; Nygaard, P; Edwards, H

    1987-01-01

    A karyotype 46,XY,del(20)(q11 X 23q13 X 11) was found in a three year old boy with mental and growth retardation, low set ears, broad nasal bridge, and macrostomia. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was reduced by about 50%, assigning the gene locus to the deleted segment. A review of the previously reported regional assignments suggests that the ADA gene is in the region of band 20q13 X 11. Images PMID:3560174

  6. Molecular characterization of the breakpoints of a 12-kb deletion in the NF1 gene in a family showing germ-line mosaicism.

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro, C; Gaona, A; Lynch, M; Kruyer, H; Ravella, A; Estivill, X

    1995-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is caused by deletions, insertions, translocations, and point mutations in the NF1 gene, which spans 350 kb on the long arm of human chromosome 17. Although several point mutations have been described, large molecular abnormalities have rarely been characterized in detail. We describe here the molecular breakpoints of a 12-kb deletion of the NF1 gene, which is responsible for the NF1 phenotype in a kindred with two children affected because of germline mosaicism in the unaffected father, who has the mutation in 10% of his spermatozoa. The mutation spans introns 31-39, removing 12,021 nt and inserting 30 bp, of which 19 bp are a direct repetition of a sequence located in intron 31, just 4 bp before the 5' breakpoint. The 5' and 3' breakpoints contain the sequence TATTTTA, which could be involved in the generation of the deletion. The most plausible explanation for the mechanism involved in the generation of this 12-kb deletion is homologous/nonhomologous recombination. Since sperm of the father does not contain the corresponding insertion of the 12-kb deleted sequence, this deletion could have occurred within the NF1 chromosome through loop formation. RNA from lymphocytes of one of the NF1 patients showed similar levels of the mutated and normal transcripts, suggesting that the NF1-mRNA from mutations causing frame shifts of the reading frame or stop codons in this gene is not degraded during its processing. The mutation was not detected in fresh lymphocytes from the unaffected father by PCR analysis, supporting the case for true germ-line mosaicism. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7485153

  7. Deletion of the E-cadherin gene in hepatitis B virus-positive Chinese hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Slagle, B L; Zhou, Y Z; Birchmeier, W; Scorsone, K A

    1993-10-01

    Frequent allele loss from chromosome 16q was recently described for human tumors of the breast, prostate gland and liver, indicating the possible presence of a tumor-suppressor gene on that chromosome arm. In this study, the chromosome 16 allele status of 38 hepatocellular carcinomas in Chinese patients was determined with restriction-fragment-length polymorphism analysis. Tumor-specific allele loss was detected in 14 (74%) of 19 patients informative for 16p markers and in 22 (85%) of 26 patients informative for 16q markers. Quantitative densitometric analysis revealed reduction to hemizygosity of the E-cadherin cell adhesion gene (localized to 16q22.1) in 18 (64%) of the 28 patients for whom quantitative data were available. Reduced expression of E-cadherin has been associated with invasion and metastasis in several human cell lines and primary tumors, and our results suggest that one mechanism of reduced E-cadherin expression is the loss of one copy of the E-cadherin gene. PMID:8104855

  8. Heterozygous deletion of the LRFN2 gene is associated with working memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Julien; Souchay, Céline; Seabold, Gail K; Dygai-Cochet, Inna; Callier, Patrick; Gay, Sébastien; Corbin, Lucie; Duplomb, Laurence; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; El Chehadeh, Salima; Avila, Magali; Minot, Delphine; Guedj, Eric; Chancenotte, Sophie; Bonnet, Marlène; Lehalle, Daphne; Wang, Ya-Xian; Kuentz, Paul; Huet, Frédéric; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Marle, Nathalie; Petralia, Ronald S; Faivre, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Learning disabilities (LDs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases. Array-CGH and high-throughput sequencing have dramatically expanded the number of genes implicated in isolated intellectual disabilities and LDs, highlighting the implication of neuron-specific post-mitotic transcription factors and synaptic proteins as candidate genes. We report a unique family diagnosed with autosomal dominant learning disability and a 6p21 microdeletion segregating in three patients. The 870 kb microdeletion encompassed the brain-expressed gene LRFN2, which encodes for a synaptic cell adhesion molecule. Neuropsychological assessment identified selective working memory deficits, with borderline intellectual functioning. Further investigations identified a defect in executive function, and auditory-verbal processes. These data were consistent with brain MRI and FDG-PET functional brain imaging, which, when compared with controls, revealed abnormal brain volume and hypometabolism of gray matter structures implicated in working memory. We performed electron microscopy immunogold labeling demonstrating the localization of LRFN2 at synapses of cerebellar and hippocampal rat neurons, often associated with the NR1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Altogether, the combined approaches imply a role for LRFN2 in LD, specifically for working memory processes and executive function. In conclusion, the identification of familial cases of clinically homogeneous endophenotypes of LD might help in both the management of patients and genetic counseling for families. PMID:26486473

  9. Exon deletions of the EP300 and CREBBP genes in two children with Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome detected by aCGH

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; J Dossett, Cherilyn; Walton, Carol S; E Cramer, Andrea; Eng, Patti A; Nowakowska, Beata A; Pursley, Amber N; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of an exon coverage microarray platform in detecting intragenic deletions: one in exons 24–27 of the EP300 gene and another in exons 27 and 28 of the CREBBP gene in two patients with Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome (RSTS). RSTS is a heterogeneous disorder in which ∼45–55% of cases result from deletion or mutations in the CREBBP gene and an unknown portion of cases result from gene changes in EP300. The first case is a 3-year-old female with an exonic deletion of the EP300 gene who has classic facial features of RSTS without the thumb and great toe anomalies, consistent with the milder skeletal phenotype that has been described in other RSTS cases with EP300 mutations. In addition, the mother of this patient also had preeclampsia during pregnancy, which has been infrequently reported. The second case is a newborn male who has the classical features of RSTS. Our results illustrate that exon-targeted array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful tool for detecting clinically significant intragenic rearrangements that would be otherwise missed by aCGH platforms lacking sufficient exonic coverage or sequencing of the gene of interest. PMID:20717166

  10. Exon deletions of the EP300 and CREBBP genes in two children with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome detected by aCGH.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; Dossett, Cherilyn J; Walton, Carol S; Cramer, Andrea E; Eng, Patti A; Nowakowska, Beata A; Pursley, Amber N; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of an exon coverage microarray platform in detecting intragenic deletions: one in exons 24-27 of the EP300 gene and another in exons 27 and 28 of the CREBBP gene in two patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS). RSTS is a heterogeneous disorder in which approximately 45-55% of cases result from deletion or mutations in the CREBBP gene and an unknown portion of cases result from gene changes in EP300. The first case is a 3-year-old female with an exonic deletion of the EP300 gene who has classic facial features of RSTS without the thumb and great toe anomalies, consistent with the milder skeletal phenotype that has been described in other RSTS cases with EP300 mutations. In addition, the mother of this patient also had preeclampsia during pregnancy, which has been infrequently reported. The second case is a newborn male who has the classical features of RSTS. Our results illustrate that exon-targeted array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful tool for detecting clinically significant intragenic rearrangements that would be otherwise missed by aCGH platforms lacking sufficient exonic coverage or sequencing of the gene of interest. PMID:20717166

  11. Varied manifestations of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous with graded somatic mosaic deletion of a single gene

    PubMed Central

    Mary-Sinclair, Michelle N.; Wang, XiaoFei; Swanson, Douglas J.; Sung, Caroline Y.; Mendonca, Eneida A.; Wroblewski, Kristen; Baumer, Shannon H.; Goldowitz, Dan; Jablonski, Monica M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) represents a developmental eye disease known to have diverse manifestations ranging from a trivial remnant of hyaloid vessels to a dense fibrovascular mass causing lens opacity and retinal detachment. PHPV can be modeled in mice lacking individual genes, but certain features of such models differ from the clinical realm. For example, mice lacking the Arf gene have uniformly severe disease with consistent autosomal recessive disease penetrance. We tested whether the graded somatic loss of Arf in a subset of cells in chimeric mice mimics the range of disease in a non-heritable manner. Methods Wild type ↔ Arf −/− mouse chimeras were generated by morulae fusion, and when the mice were 10 weeks old, fundoscopic, slit-lamp, and histological evaluations were performed. The relative fraction of cells of the Arf −/− lineage was assessed with visual, molecular genetic, and histological analysis. Objective quantification of various aspects of the phenotype was correlated with the genotype. Results Sixteen chimeras were generated and shown to have low, medium, and high contributions of Arf −/− cells to tail DNA, the cornea, and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), with excellent correlation between chimerism in the tail DNA and the RPE. Phenotypic differences (coat color and severity of eye disease) were evident, objectively quantified, and found to correlate with the contribution of Arf −/− cells to the RPE and tail-derived DNA, but not the cornea. Conclusions Generating animals composed of different numbers of Arf −/− cells mimicked the range of disease severity observed in patients with PHPV. This establishes the potential for full manifestations of PHPV to be caused by somatic mutations of a single gene during development. PMID:24623965

  12. Deletion mutations of the Bs-alpha gene in patients with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy: Possible mutation hot-spot in exon 7

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, L.S.; Hainline, B.E.; Schuster, V.

    1994-09-01

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by short stature, centripetal obesity, subcutaneous ossifications and focal brachydactyly. Patients with this disorder may have these features alone (pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism) or these features in association with resistance to multiple hormones which raise intracellular cAMP (pseudohypoparathyroidism, PHP). In most kindreds, affected members have decreased function of the G protein Gs and decreased levels of the Gs{alpha}-subunit. Heterozygous inactivating mutations of the Gs{alpha} gene have been previously identified in AHO. Exons 2-13 of the Gs{alpha} gene and their splice junctions were PCR-amplified and the products analyzed by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) and direct sequencing. Using this approach, a new heterozygous 2 bp deletion in exon 4 creating a premature stop codon was identified in 5 affected members of a previously reported family. The mutation was not present in an unaffected family member. We also have identified a previously reported 4 bp deletion in the coding region of exon 7 in 2 further unrelated sporadic cases of PHP. In one case, the mutation was absent in her siblings and in both parents, confirming that this is a de novo mutation in this patient. This specific 4 bp deletion has now been reported in 4 PHP patients, at least 3 of whom are unrelated. These results suggest that this region of the Gs{alpha} gene may be a hot-spot for deletions.

  13. Partial protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) gene deletions, due to different Alu-mediated mechanisms, identified by MLPA analysis in patients with variegate porphyria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Variegate porphyria (VP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited hepatic porphyria. The genetic defect in the PPOX gene leads to a partial defect of protoporphyrinogen oxidase, the penultimate enzyme of heme biosynthesis. Affected individuals can develop cutaneous symptoms in sun-exposed areas of the skin and/or neuropsychiatric acute attacks. The identification of the genetic defect in VP families is of crucial importance to detect the carrier status which allows counseling to prevent potentially life threatening neurovisceral attacks, usually triggered by factors such as certain drugs, alcohol or fasting. In a total of 31 Swedish VP families sequence analysis had identified a genetic defect in 26. In the remaining five families an extended genetic investigation was necessary. After the development of a synthetic probe set, MLPA analysis to screen for single exon deletions/duplications was performed. We describe here, for the first time, two partial deletions within the PPOX gene detected by MLPA analysis. One deletion affects exon 5 and 6 (c.339-197_616+320del1099) and has been identified in four families, most probably after a founder effect. The other extends from exon 5 to exon 9 (c.339-350_987+229del2609) and was found in one family. We show that both deletions are mediated by Alu repeats. Our findings emphasize the usefulness of MLPA analysis as a complement to PPOX gene sequencing analysis for comprehensive genetic diagnostics in patients with VP. PMID:23324528

  14. A Deletion in the VLDLR Gene in Eurasier Dogs with Cerebellar Hypoplasia Resembling a Dandy-Walker-Like Malformation (DWLM)

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Martina; Fischer, Andrea; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Schmidt, Martin J.; Bernardino, Filipa; Manz, Eberhard; Matiasek, Kaspar; Rentmeister, Kai; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    Dandy-Walker-like malformation (DWLM) is the result of aberrant brain development and mainly characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia. DWLM affected dogs display a non-progressive cerebellar ataxia. Several DWLM cases were recently observed in the Eurasier dog breed, which strongly suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance in this breed. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 9 cases and 11 controls and found the best association of DWLM with markers on chromosome 1. Subsequent homozygosity mapping confirmed that all 9 cases were homozygous for a shared haplotype in this region, which delineated a critical interval of 3.35 Mb. We sequenced the genome of an affected Eurasier and compared it with the Boxer reference genome and 47 control genomes of dogs from other breeds. This analysis revealed 4 private non-synonymous variants in the critical interval of the affected Eurasier. We genotyped these variants in additional dogs and found perfect association for only one of these variants, a single base deletion in the VLDLR gene encoding the very low density lipoprotein receptor. This variant, VLDLR:c.1713delC is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon (p.W572Gfs*10). Variants in the VLDLR gene have been shown to cause congenital cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation in human patients and Vldlr knockout mice also display an ataxia phenotype. Our combined genetic data together with the functional knowledge on the VLDLR gene from other species thus strongly suggest that VLDLR:c.1713delC is indeed causing DWLM in Eurasier dogs. PMID:25668033

  15. The Proteomic Profile of Deleted in Breast Cancer 1 (DBC1) Interactions Points to a Multifaceted Regulation of Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Sophie S B; Guise, Amanda J; Jean Beltran, Pierre M; Joshi, Preeti M; Greco, Todd M; Quach, Olivia L; Kong, Jeffery; Cristea, Ileana M

    2016-03-01

    Deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) has emerged as an important regulator of multiple cellular processes, ranging from gene expression to cell cycle progression. DBC1 has been linked to tumorigenesis both as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, HDAC3 and sirtuin 1, and as a transcriptional cofactor for nuclear hormone receptors. However, despite mounting interest in DBC1, relatively little is known about the range of its interacting partners and the scope of its functions. Here, we carried out a functional proteomics-based investigation of DBC1 interactions in two relevant cell types, T cells and kidney cells. Microscopy, molecular biology, biochemistry, and mass spectrometry studies allowed us to assess DBC1 mRNA and protein levels, localization, phosphorylation status, and protein interaction networks. The comparison of DBC1 interactions in these cell types revealed conserved regulatory roles for DBC1 in gene expression, chromatin organization and modification, and cell cycle progression. Interestingly, we observe previously unrecognized DBC1 interactions with proteins encoded by cancer-associated genes. Among these interactions are five components of the SWI/SNF complex, the most frequently mutated chromatin remodeling complex in human cancers. Additionally, we identified a DBC1 interaction with TBL1XR1, a component of the NCoR complex, which we validated by reciprocal isolation. Strikingly, we discovered that DBC1 associates with proteins that regulate the circadian cycle, including DDX5, DHX9, and SFPQ. We validated this interaction by colocalization and reciprocal isolation. Functional assessment of this association demonstrated that DBC1 protein levels are important for regulating CLOCK and BMAL1 protein oscillations in synchronized T cells. Our results suggest that DBC1 is integral to the maintenance of the circadian molecular clock. Furthermore, the identified interactions provide a valuable resource for the exploration of pathways involved in DBC1

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