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Sample records for dmd gene deletion

  1. Somatic mosaicism for a DMD gene deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kayoko; Ikeya, Kiyoko; Kondo, Eri

    1995-03-13

    Mosaicism is a mixed state, with two cell populations of different genetic origins caused by a cell mutation occurring after fertilization. In the present case, DNA analysis of lymphocytes led to a DMD diagnosis before death. Postmortem immunocytochemical and DNA analysis showed somatic mosaicism. At age 18 years, blood lymphocyte DNA analysis showed a DMD gene deletion, upstream from exon 7 to the 5{prime} end containing both muscle and brain promoters. As the patient`s mother and elder sister had no deletions, he was considered to have a new mutation. Immunocytochemical studies of postmortem tissues showed that dystrophin was absent from the tongue, deltoid, intercostal, psoas and rectus femoris muscles, but there was a mix of dystrophin-positive and negative fibers in the rectus abdominis, cardiac, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles. All diaphragm cells were dystrophin positive. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification from all tissues except the temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles, diaphragm and kidney, in which no deletion was found, showed the deletion from at least exon 6 to the 5{prime} end containing both muscle and brain promoters. In this case, a genomic deletion of the DMD gene contributed to the formation of tissues derived from both ectoderm and endoderm, and cells of mesodermal origin showed genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Our results indicate a mutation of the present case may have occurred just before the period of germ layer formation. 34 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Clinical features of patients with dystrophinopathy sharing the 45-55 exon deletion of DMD gene.

    PubMed

    Taglia, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; D'Ambrosio, Paola; Picillo, Esther; Torella, Annalaura; Orsini, Chiara; Ergoli, Manuela; Scutifero, Marianna; Passamano, Luigia; Palladino, Alberto; Nigro, Gerardo; Politano, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was first described in 1953 by Emile Becker as a benign variant of Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Compared with DMD, BMD is clinically more heterogeneous, with initial presentation in the teenage years and loss of ambulation beyond the age of 16 and a wide spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from only myalgias and muscle cramps to exercise intolerance and myoglobinuria, asymptomatic elevation of serum creatin-kinase, or mild limb-girdle weakness and quadriceps myopathy. About 50% of patients become symptomatic by the age of 10 and the most part by the age of 20 years. However few patients can be free of symptoms till their fifties and cases of late-onset Becker Muscular Dystrophy have also been described. In this report we describe the clinical features of patients with dystrophinopathy sharing a deletion of exons 45-55, occasionally or retrospectively diagnosed. These data are important for both the prognostic aspects of children presenting this dystrophin gene mutation, and for the genetic counseling in these families (reassuring them on the benign course of the disease), and last but not least to keep in mind a diagnosis of BMD in asymptomatic adults with mild hyperckemia. PMID:26155064

  3. Identification of a new DMD gene deletion by ectopic transcript analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Rininsland, F; Hahn, A; Niemann-Seyde, S; Slomski, R; Hanefeld, F; Reiss, J

    1992-01-01

    The detailed genetic analysis of the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy gene is hindered by the large number of exons involved and their separation by huge introns. These problems can be overcome by the analysis of mRNA rather than genomic DNA and ectopic transcripts derived from peripheral blood lymphocytes provide a convenient source of material. Using reverse transcription and nested PCR, we show here a comprehensive strategy for the rapid and complete analysis of the coding sequences from complex genes and illustrate its potential by the identification of a hitherto undescribed single exon deletion. Images PMID:1383546

  4. Intronic breakpoint definition and transcription analysis in DMD/BMD patients with deletion/duplication at the 5' mutation hot spot of the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Gualandi, F; Rimessi, P; Trabanelli, C; Spitali, P; Neri, M; Patarnello, T; Angelini, C; Yau, S C; Abbs, S; Muntoni, F; Calzolari, E; Ferlini, A

    2006-03-29

    Dystrophin mutations occurring at the 5' end of the gene frequently behave as exceptions to the "frame rule," their clinical severity being variable and often not related to the perturbation of the translation reading frame. The molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotypic variability of 5' dystrophin mutations have not been fully clarified. We have characterized the genomic breakpoints within introns 2, 6 and 7 and identified the splicing profiles in a cohort of DMD/BMD patients with deletion of dystrophin exons 3-7, 3-6 and duplication of exons 2-4. Our findings indicate that the occurrence of intronic cryptic promoter as well as corrective splicing events are unlikely to play a role in exons 3-7 deleted patients phenotypic variability. Our data suggest that re-initiation of translation could represent a major mechanism responsible for the production of a residual dystrophin in some patients with exons 3-7 deletion. Furthermore, we observed that the out-of-frame exon 2a is almost constantly spliced into a proportion of the dystrophin transcripts in the analysed patients. In the exons 2-4 duplicated DMD patient, producing both in-frame and out-of-frame transcripts, this splicing behaviour might represent a critical factor contributing to the severe phenotype. In conclusion, we suggest that multiple mechanisms may have a role in modulating the outcome of 5' dystrophin mutations, including recoding mechanisms and unusual splicing choices.

  5. Pitfalls in prenatal diagnosis of DMD due to placental mosaicism of the X-chromosomes: prenatal and postnatal findings in a fetus with a deletion of exons 67-71 of the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Vondran, S; Edelmann, J; Holland, H; Wolf, C; Strenge, S; Thamm, B; Thiele, H; Froster, U G

    1999-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD) is performed as a routine procedure in many laboratories. The major potential problem is an incorrect diagnosis that could be obtained due to contamination with maternal tissue. We report a case of mosaicism of the X-chromosomes confined to the placenta as a possible source of confusing results in prenatal diagnosis of DMD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of this problem in a prenatal DMD diagnosis. PMID:10073911

  6. Are there ethnic differences in deletions in the dystrophin gene?

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.; Verma, I.C.

    1997-01-20

    We studied 160 cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) drawn from all parts of India, using multiplex PCR of 27 exons. Of these, 103 (64.4%) showed intragenic deletions. Most (69.7%) of the deletions involved exons 45-51. The phenotype of cases with deletion of single exons did not differ significantly from those with deletion of multiple exons. The distribution of deletions in studies from different countries was variable, but this was accounted for either by the small number of cases studied, or by fewer exons analyzed. It is concluded that there is likely to be no ethnic difference with respect to deletions in the DMD gene. 38 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-02-18

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  8. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  9. The emerging role of viral vectors as vehicles for DMD gene editing.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Ignazio; Chen, Xiaoyu; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The DMD gene, spanning over 2.4 megabases along the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp21.2), is the largest genetic locus known in the human genome. The size of DMD, combined with the complexity of the DMD phenotype and the extent of the affected tissues, begs for the development of novel, ideally complementary, therapeutic approaches. Genome editing based on the delivery of sequence-specific programmable nucleases into dystrophin-defective cells has recently enriched the portfolio of potential therapies under investigation. Experiments involving different programmable nuclease platforms and target cell types have established that the application of genome-editing principles to the targeted manipulation of defective DMD loci can result in the rescue of dystrophin protein synthesis in gene-edited cells. Looking towards translation into the clinic, these proof-of-principle experiments have been swiftly followed by the conversion of well-established viral vector systems into delivery agents for DMD editing. These gene-editing tools consist of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered homing endoculeases (HEs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) based on clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 systems. Here, we succinctly review these fast-paced developments and technologies, highlighting their relative merits and potential bottlenecks, when used as part of in vivo and ex vivo gene-editing strategies. PMID:27215286

  10. Relatively low proportion of dystrophin gene deletions in Israeili Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shomrat, R.; Gluck, E.; Legum, C.; Shiloh, Y.

    1994-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene. The most common mutations in western populations are deletions that are spread non-randomly throughout the gene. Molecular analysis of the dystrophin gene structure by hybridization of the full length cDNA to Southern blots and by PCR in 62 unrelated Israeli male DMD/BMD patients showed deletions in 23 (37%). This proportion is significantly lower than that found in European and North American populations (55-65%). Seventy-eight percent of the deletions were confined to exons 44-52, half of these exons 44-45, and the remaining 22% to exons 1 and 19. There was no correlation between the size of the deletion and the severity of the disease. All the deletions causing frameshift resulted in the DMD phenotypes. 43 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. FUBP1: a new protagonist in splicing regulation of the DMD gene

    PubMed Central

    Miro, Julie; Laaref, Abdelhamid Mahdi; Rofidal, Valérie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Hem, Sonia; Thorel, Delphine; Méchin, Déborah; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms for in-frame skipping of DMD exon 39 caused by the nonsense c.5480T>A mutation in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. RNase-assisted pull down assay coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that the mutant RNA probe specifically recruits hnRNPA1, hnRNPA2/B1 and DAZAP1. Functional studies in a human myoblast cell line transfected with DMD minigenes confirmed the splicing inhibitory activity of hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1, and showed that DAZAP1, also known to activate splicing, acts negatively in the context of the mutated exon 39. Furthermore, we uncovered that recognition of endogenous DMD exon 39 in muscle cells is promoted by FUSE binding protein 1 (FUBP1), a multifunctional DNA- and RNA-binding protein whose role in splicing is largely unknown. By serial deletion and mutagenesis studies in minigenes, we delineated a functional intronic splicing enhancer (ISE) in intron 38. FUBP1 recruitment to the RNA sequence containing the ISE was established by RNA pull down and RNA EMSA, and further confirmed by RNA-ChIP on endogenous DMD pre-mRNA. This study provides new insights about the splicing regulation of DMD exon 39, highlighting the emerging role of FUBP1 in splicing and describing the first ISE for constitutive exon inclusion in the mature DMD transcript. PMID:25662218

  12. Molecular analysis of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in Spanish individuals: Deletion detection and familial diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Patino, A.; Garcia-Delgado, M.; Narbona, J.

    1995-11-06

    Deletion studies were performed in 26 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients through amplification of nine different exons by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA from paraffin-embedded muscle biopsies was analyzed in 12 of the 26 patients studied. Optimization of this technique is of great utility because it enables analysis of material stored in pathology archives. PCR deletion detection, useful in DMD-affected boys, is problematic in determining the carrier state in female relatives. For this reason, to perform familial linkage diagnosis, we made use of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (STRP, or short tandem repeat polymorphism) located in intron 49 of the gene. We designed a new pair of primers that enabled the detection of 22 different alleles in relatives in the 14 DMD families studied. The use of this marker allowed familial diagnosis in 11 of the 14 DMD families and detection of de novo deletions in 3 of the probands. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  14. Assessment of the structural and functional impact of in-frame mutations of the DMD gene, using the tools included in the eDystrophin online database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dystrophin is a large essential protein of skeletal and heart muscle. It is a filamentous scaffolding protein with numerous binding domains. Mutations in the DMD gene, which encodes dystrophin, mostly result in the deletion of one or several exons and cause Duchenne (DMD) and Becker (BMD) muscular dystrophies. The most common DMD mutations are frameshift mutations resulting in an absence of dystrophin from tissues. In-frame DMD mutations are less frequent and result in a protein with partial wild-type dystrophin function. The aim of this study was to highlight structural and functional modifications of dystrophin caused by in-frame mutations. Methods and results We developed a dedicated database for dystrophin, the eDystrophin database. It contains 209 different non frame-shifting mutations found in 945 patients from a French cohort and previous studies. Bioinformatics tools provide models of the three-dimensional structure of the protein at deletion sites, making it possible to determine whether the mutated protein retains the typical filamentous structure of dystrophin. An analysis of the structure of mutated dystrophin molecules showed that hybrid repeats were reconstituted at the deletion site in some cases. These hybrid repeats harbored the typical triple coiled-coil structure of native repeats, which may be correlated with better function in muscle cells. Conclusion This new database focuses on the dystrophin protein and its modification due to in-frame deletions in BMD patients. The observation of hybrid repeat reconstitution in some cases provides insight into phenotype-genotype correlations in dystrophin diseases and possible strategies for gene therapy. The eDystrophin database is freely available: http://edystrophin.genouest.org/. PMID:22776072

  15. Deletion pattern in the dystrophin gene in Turks and a comparison with Europeans and Indians.

    PubMed

    Onengüt, S; Kavaslar, G N; Battaloğlu, E; Serdaroğlu, P; Deymeer, F; Ozdemir, C; Calafell, F; Tolun, A

    2000-01-01

    Patterns of dystrophin gene deletions in DMD/BMD patients were compared in four populations: Turks (n = 146 deletions), Europeans (n = 838), North Indians (n = 89), and Indians from all over India (n = 103). Statistical tests revealed that there are differences in the proportions of small deletions. In contrast, the distribution of deletion breakpoints and the frequencies of specific deletions commonly observed in the four populations are not significantly different. The variations strongly suggest that sequence differences exist in the introns, and the differences are in agreement with genetic distances among populations. The similarities suggest that some intronic sequences have been conserved and that those will trigger recurrent deletions, since it is unlikely that gene flow would disperse the deleted chromosomes, which vanish from the gene pool in a few generations.

  16. Nonsense mutation-associated Becker muscular dystrophy: interplay between exon definition and splicing regulatory elements within the DMD gene

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, Kevin M.; Dunn, Diane M.; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Howard, Michael T.; Sampson, Jacinda B.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Bromberg, Mark B.; Mendell, Jerry R.; Taylor, Laura; Anderson, Christine B.; Pestronk, Alan; Florence, Julaine; Connolly, Anne M.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Wong, Brenda; Finkel, Richard S.; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Day, John W.; McDonald, Craig; Weiss, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsense mutations are usually predicted to function as null alleles due to premature termination of protein translation. However, nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, encoding the dystrophin protein, have been associated with both the severe Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and milder Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) phenotypes. In a large survey, we identified 243 unique nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, and for 210 of these we could establish definitive phenotypes. We analyzed the reading frame predicted by exons flanking those in which nonsense mutations were found, and present evidence that nonsense mutations resulting in BMD likely do so by inducing exon skipping, confirming that exonic point mutations affecting exon definition have played a significant role in determining phenotype. We present a new model based on the combination of exon definition and intronic splicing regulatory elements for the selective association of BMD nonsense mutations with a subset of DMD exons prone to mutation-induced exon skipping. PMID:21972111

  17. Nonsense mutation-associated Becker muscular dystrophy: interplay between exon definition and splicing regulatory elements within the DMD gene.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, Kevin M; Dunn, Diane M; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Howard, Michael T; Sampson, Jacinda B; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Bromberg, Mark B; Mendell, Jerry R; Taylor, Laura E; Anderson, Christine B; Pestronk, Alan; Florence, Julaine M; Connolly, Anne M; Mathews, Katherine D; Wong, Brenda; Finkel, Richard S; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Day, John W; McDonald, Craig; Weiss, Robert B

    2011-03-01

    Nonsense mutations are usually predicted to function as null alleles due to premature termination of protein translation. However, nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, encoding the dystrophin protein, have been associated with both the severe Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and milder Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) phenotypes. In a large survey, we identified 243 unique nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, and for 210 of these we could establish definitive phenotypes. We analyzed the reading frame predicted by exons flanking those in which nonsense mutations were found, and present evidence that nonsense mutations resulting in BMD likely do so by inducing exon skipping, confirming that exonic point mutations affecting exon definition have played a significant role in determining phenotype. We present a new model based on the combination of exon definition and intronic splicing regulatory elements for the selective association of BMD nonsense mutations with a subset of DMD exons prone to mutation-induced exon skipping.

  18. DMD mutation spectrum analysis in 613 Chinese patients with dystrophinopathy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruolan; Zhu, Guosheng; Zhu, Huimin; Ma, Ruiyu; Peng, Ying; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-08-01

    Dystrophinopathy is a group of inherited diseases caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Within the dystrophinopathy spectrum, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are common X-linked recessive disorders that mainly feature striated muscle necrosis. We combined multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification with Sanger sequencing to detect large deletions/duplications and point mutations in the DMD gene in 613 Chinese patients. A total of 571 (93.1%) patients were diagnosed, including 428 (69.8%) with large deletions/duplications and 143 (23.3%) with point mutations. Deletion/duplication breakpoints gathered mostly in introns 44-55. Reading frame rules could explain 88.6% of deletion mutations. We identified seventy novel point mutations that had not been previously reported. Spectrum expansion and genotype-phenotype analysis of DMD mutations on such a large sample size in Han Chinese population would provide new insights into the pathogenic mechanism underlying dystrophinopathies.

  19. Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes: Deletion quantitation with bivariate flow karyotyping allows mapping of patient breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, E.R.B.; Towbin, J.A. ); Engh, G. van den; Trask, B.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Bivariate flow karyotyping was used to estimate the deletion sizes for a series of patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes. The deletion estimates were used to develop an approximate scale for the genomic map in Xp21. The bivariate flow karyotype results were compared with clinical and molecular genetic information on the extent of the patients' deletions, and these various types of data were consistent. The resulting map spans >15 Mb, from the telomeric interval between DXS41 (99-6) and DXS68 (1-4) to a position centromeric to the ornithine transcarbamylase locus. The deletion sizing was considered to be accurate to [plus minus]1 Mb. The map provides information on the relative localization of genes and markers within this region. For example, the map suggests that the adrenal hypoplasia congenita and glycerol kinase genes are physically close to each other, are within 1-2 Mb of the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, and are nearer to the DMD locus than to the more distal marker DXS28 (C7). Information of this type is useful in developing genomic strategies for positional cloning in Xp21. These investigations demonstrate that the DNA from patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes can be valuable reagents, not only for ordering loci and markers but also for providing an approximate scale to the map of the Xp21 region surrounding DMD. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Clinical and Genetic Characterization of Manifesting Carriers of DMD Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Soltanzadeh, Payam; Friez, Michael J.; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Gurvich, Olga L.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Sampson, Jacinda B.; Pestronk, Alan; Connolly, Anne M.; Florence, Julaine M.; Finkel, Richard S.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Medne, Livija; Mendell, Jerry R.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Wong, Brenda L.; Sussman, Michael D.; Zonana, Jonathan; Kovak, Karen; Gospe, Sidney M.; Gappmaier, Eduard; Taylor, Laura E.; Howard, Michael T.; Weiss, Robert B.; Flanigan, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Manifesting carriers of DMD gene mutations may present diagnostic challenges, particularly in the absence of a family history of dystrophinopathy. We review the clinical and genetic features in fifteen manifesting carriers identified among 860 subjects within the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a large clinical dystrophinopathy cohort whose members undergo comprehensive DMD mutation analysis. We defined manifesting carriers as females with significant weakness, excluding those with only myalgias/cramps. DNA extracted from peripheral blood was used to study X chromosome inactivation patterns. Among these manifesting carriers, age at symptom onset ranged from 2 to 47 years. Seven had no family history and eight had male relatives with Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD). Clinical severity among the manifesting carriers varied from a DMD-like progression to a very mild Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype. Eight had exonic deletions or duplications and six had point mutations. One patient had two mutations (an exonic deletion and a splice site mutation), consistent with a heterozygous compound state. The X chromosome inactivation pattern was skewed toward nonrandom in four out of seven informative deletions or duplications but was random in all cases with nonsense mutations. We present the results of DMD mutation analysis in this manifesting carrier cohort, including the first example of a presumably compound heterozygous DMD mutation. Our results demonstrate that improved molecular diagnostic methods facilitate the identification of DMD mutations in manifesting carriers, and confirm the heterogeneity of mutational mechanisms as well as the wide spectrum of phenotypes. PMID:20630757

  1. Screening of deletions in the dystrophin gene with the cDNA probes Cf23a, Cf56a, and Cf115.

    PubMed Central

    Passos-Bueno, M R; Rapaport, D; Love, D; Flint, T; Bortolini, E R; Zatz, M; Davies, K E

    1990-01-01

    We have analysed 38 DMD patients from 34 families and 30 BMD patients from 12 families using the cDNA probes Cf23a and Cf56a, which map near the centre of the dystrophin gene, and Cf115, which is close to the 3' end of this gene. Together, probes Cf23a and Cf56a detected deletions in 50% of the DMD families and 33% of the BMD families. Probe Cf115 detected a deletion in only one DMD patient, which has not been reported before in severe X linked myopathy. Most of the DMD deletions could be detected with Cf56a while all four BMD deletions were detected with Cf23a. The pattern of deletions could not be used to predict the precise clinical course of the disease and no correlation was found between the severity of the disease and the extent of the gene deletion. A higher frequency of deletions was observed in sporadic (73%) compared with familial DMD (28%) and BMD cases (33%). This result, if confirmed in a larger sample, would have important implications for genetic counselling. Images PMID:2182872

  2. Gene Deletion by Synthesis in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsil; Kim, Dong-Uk; Hoe, Kwang-Lae

    2017-01-01

    Targeted gene deletion is a useful tool for understanding the function of a gene and its protein product. We have developed an efficient and robust gene deletion approach in yeast that employs oligonucleotide-based gene synthesis. This approach requires a deletion cassette composed of three modules: a central 1397-bp KanMX4 selection marker module and two 366-bp gene-specific flanking modules. The invariable KanMX4 module can be used in combination with different pairs of flanking modules targeting different genes. The two flanking modules consist of both sequences unique to each cassette (chromosomal homologous regions and barcodes) and those common to all deletion constructs (artificial linkers and restriction enzyme sites). Oligonucleotides for each module and junction regions are designed using the BatchBlock2Oligo program and are synthesized on a 96-well basis. The oligonucleotides are ligated into a single deletion cassette by ligase chain reaction, which is then amplified through two rounds of nested PCR to obtain sufficient quantities for yeast transformation. After removal of the artificial linkers, the deletion cassettes are transformed into wild-type diploid fission yeast SP286 cells. Verification of correct clone and gene deletion is achieved by performing check PCR and tetrad analysis. This method with proven effectiveness, as evidenced by a high success rate of gene deletion, can be potentially applicable to create systematic gene deletion libraries in a variety of yeast species. PMID:27671940

  3. Contrasting evolutionary histories of two introns of the duchenne muscular dystrophy gene, Dmd, in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, M W; Crowell, S L

    2000-01-01

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Dmd) locus lies in a region of the X chromosome that experiences a high rate of recombination and is thus expected to be relatively unaffected by the effects of selection on nearby genes. To provide a picture of nucleotide variability at a high-recombination locus in humans, we sequenced 5. 4 kb from two introns of Dmd in a worldwide sample of 41 alleles from Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. These same regions were also sequenced in one common chimpanzee and one orangutan. Dramatically different patterns of genetic variation were observed at these two introns, which are separated by >500 kb of DNA. Nucleotide diversity at intron 44 pi = 0.141% was more than four times higher than nucleotide diversity at intron 7 pi = 0.034% despite similar levels of divergence for these two regions. Intron 7 exhibited significant linkage disequilibrium extending over 10 kb and also showed a significant excess of rare polymorphisms. In contrast, intron 44 exhibited little linkage disequilibrium and no skew in the frequency distribution of segregating sites. Intron 7 was much more variable in Africa than in other continents, while intron 44 displayed similar levels of variability in different geographic regions. Comparison of intraspecific polymorphism to interspecific divergence using the HKA test revealed a significant reduction in variability at intron 7 relative to intron 44, and this effect was most pronounced in the non-African samples. These results are best explained by positive directional selection acting at or near intron 7 and demonstrate that even genes in regions of high recombination may be influenced by selection at linked sites. PMID:10924480

  4. Sequence characterisation of deletion breakpoints in the dystrophin gene by PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Abbs, S.; Sandhu, S.; Bobrow, M.

    1994-09-01

    Partial deletions of the dystrophin gene account for 65% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A high proportion of these structural changes are generated by new mutational events, and lie predominantly within two `hotspot` regions, yet the underlying reasons for this are not known. We are characterizing and sequencing the regions surrounding deletion breakpoints in order to: (i) investigate the mechanisms of deletion mutation, and (ii) enable the design of PCR assays to specifically amplify mutant and normal sequences, allowing us to search for the presence of somatic mosaicism in appropriate family members. Using this approach we have been able to demonstrate the presence of somatic mosaicism in a maternal grandfather of a DMD-affected male, deleted for exons 49-50. Three deletions, namely of exons 48-49, 49-50, and 50, have been characterized using a PCR approach that avoids any cloning procedures. Breakpoints were initially localized to within regions of a few kilobases using Southern blot restriction analyses with exon-specific probes and PCR amplification of exonic and intronic loci. Sequencing was performed directly on PCR products: (i) mutant sequences were obtained from long-range or inverse-PCR across the deletion junction fragments, and (ii) normal sequences were obtained from the products of standard PCR, vectorette PCR, or inverse-PCR performed on YACs. Further characterization of intronic sequences will allow us to amplify and sequence across other deletion breakpoints and increase our knowledge of the mechanisms of mutation in the dystophin gene.

  5. IAP gene deletion and conditional knockout models.

    PubMed

    Silke, John; Vaux, David L

    2015-03-01

    Gene deletion studies have helped reveal the unique and overlapping roles played by IAP proteins. Crossing IAP mutant mice has helped unravel the complex feed-back regulatory circuits in which cIAP1, cIAP2 and XIAP allow innate defensive responses to microbial pathogens, without the development of auto-inflammatory syndromes. Deletion of genes for Survivin and its homologs in yeasts, invertebrates and mammals has shown that it functions differently, as it is not a regulator of innate immunity or apoptosis, but acts together with INCENP, aurora kinase B and Borealin to allow chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:25545814

  6. Electroretinographic genotype-phenotype correlations for mouse and man at the dmd/DMD locus

    SciTech Connect

    Millers, D.M.; Weleber, R.G.; Woodward, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    Reduced or absent b-waves in the dark-adapted electroretinogram (ERG) of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) patients led to the identification of dystrophin in human retina and the proposal that it plays a role in retinal electrophysiology. Study of a large group of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy males to determine their ocular characteristics indicated that there were position-specific effects of deletions, with 3{prime} defects associated with severe electroretinographic changes, whereas some 5{prime} patients demonstrated less severe, or even normal, ERGs. We studied the mdx mouse, a model with X-linked muscular dystrophy and defective full-length dystrophin, which failed to show any ERG abnormalities. Given the presence of alternate isoforms of dystrophin in retina, and the 5{prime} deletion DMD/BMD patients with normal ERGs, we studied mouse models with differing dystrophin mutations (mdx{sup Cv3}, mdx{sup Cv5}) to determine the usefulness of alternate strains as models for the visual effects of dystropin. Abnormal ERGs similar to those seen in DMD/BMS patients exist in the mdx{sup Cv3} strain of muscular dystrophy mice. Normal ERGs were found the mdx{sup Cv5} strain. The mutations in the mdx and mdx{sup Cv5} mice have been mapped to the 5{prime} end of the dmd gene, while the mutation in the mdx{sup Cv3} mouse is in the 3{prime} end. Thus, there are position effects of the gene defect on the ERG phenotype that are conserved in the mouse. Such genotype-phenotype correlations may reflect differential expression of shorter isoforms of dystrophin.

  7. Detection of somatic mosaicism in DMD using computer-assisted laser densitometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.E.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; MacKenzie, J.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately two-thirds of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients have a deletion in the dystrophin gene located at Xp21.1. Two PCR-based multiplex systems have been developed which detect 98% of deletions in affected males. Diagnosis of carrier females requires densitometry of PCR products following gel electrophoresis to calculate dosage of specific exons. We have developed a system in which fluorescently labelled PCR products are analysed using a GENESCANNER automated fragment analyser (ABI). Dosage is determined using computer-assisted laser densitometry (CALD). Recently, we diagnosed somatic mosaicism in the mother of an affected boy using this method. PCR analysis showed that the patient had a deletion that included exons 47-51 of his dystrophin gene. CALD analysis on the patient`s 36-year-old mother revealed a 29-34% reduction in the intensity of the bands corresponding to the deleted region of the gene rather than the 50% reduction normally seen in carrier females. A skin biopsy was obtain and monoclonal fibroblast colonies were tested by CALD for the deletion. Four of the twenty colonies screened were found to be deleted while the remaining colonies had two intact copies of the gene. We conclude that this patient is a somatic mosaic for DMD and that the mutation was the result of a post-zygotic event. This is the only case of somatic mosaicism detected among 800 women from 400 DMD families tested using CALD in our laboratory. At least one other case of possible somatic mosaicism has been reported but not confirmed. Germinal mosaicism is thought to occur in approximately 10% of mothers of sporadic DMD patients. Our findings indicate that somatic mosaicism is a much rarer condition among DMD carriers, thus suggesting that mitotic mutations in the dystrophin gene are more likely to occur later in embryogenesis after differentiation of the germline.

  8. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy. PMID:26911353

  9. Learning About Gene Regulatory Networks From Gene Deletion Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Brazma, Alvis

    2002-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks are a major focus of interest in molecular biology. A crucial question is how complex regulatory systems are encoded and controlled by the genome. Three recent publications have raised the question of what can be learned about gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments on gene deletion mutants. Using this indirect approach, topological features such as connectivity and modularity have been studied. PMID:18629255

  10. DMD Mutations in 576 Dystrophinopathy Families: A Step Forward in Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    PubMed

    Juan-Mateu, Jonas; Gonzalez-Quereda, Lidia; Rodriguez, Maria Jose; Baena, Manel; Verdura, Edgard; Nascimento, Andres; Ortez, Carlos; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) require precise genetic diagnosis because most therapeutic strategies are mutation-specific. To understand more about the genotype-phenotype correlations of the DMD gene we performed a comprehensive analysis of the DMD mutational spectrum in a large series of families. Here we provide the clinical, pathological and genetic features of 576 dystrophinopathy patients. DMD gene analysis was performed using the MLPA technique and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. The impact of the DNA variants on mRNA splicing and protein functionality was evaluated by in silico analysis using computational algorithms. DMD mutations were detected in 576 unrelated dystrophinopathy families by combining the analysis of exonic copies and the analysis of small mutations. We found that 471 of these mutations were large intragenic rearrangements. Of these, 406 (70.5%) were exonic deletions, 64 (11.1%) were exonic duplications, and one was a deletion/duplication complex rearrangement (0.2%). Small mutations were identified in 105 cases (18.2%), most being nonsense/frameshift types (75.2%). Mutations in splice sites, however, were relatively frequent (20%). In total, 276 mutations were identified, 85 of which have not been previously described. The diagnostic algorithm used proved to be accurate for the molecular diagnosis of dystrophinopathies. The reading frame rule was fulfilled in 90.4% of DMD patients and in 82.4% of Becker muscular dystrophy patients (BMD), with significant differences between the mutation types. We found that 58% of DMD patients would be included in single exon-exon skipping trials, 63% from strategies directed against multiexon-skipping exons 45 to 55, and 14% from PTC therapy. A detailed analysis of missense mutations provided valuable information about their impact on the protein structure.

  11. DMD Mutations in 576 Dystrophinopathy Families: A Step Forward in Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Maria Jose; Baena, Manel; Verdura, Edgard; Nascimento, Andres; Ortez, Carlos; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) require precise genetic diagnosis because most therapeutic strategies are mutation-specific. To understand more about the genotype-phenotype correlations of the DMD gene we performed a comprehensive analysis of the DMD mutational spectrum in a large series of families. Here we provide the clinical, pathological and genetic features of 576 dystrophinopathy patients. DMD gene analysis was performed using the MLPA technique and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. The impact of the DNA variants on mRNA splicing and protein functionality was evaluated by in silico analysis using computational algorithms. DMD mutations were detected in 576 unrelated dystrophinopathy families by combining the analysis of exonic copies and the analysis of small mutations. We found that 471 of these mutations were large intragenic rearrangements. Of these, 406 (70.5%) were exonic deletions, 64 (11.1%) were exonic duplications, and one was a deletion/duplication complex rearrangement (0.2%). Small mutations were identified in 105 cases (18.2%), most being nonsense/frameshift types (75.2%). Mutations in splice sites, however, were relatively frequent (20%). In total, 276 mutations were identified, 85 of which have not been previously described. The diagnostic algorithm used proved to be accurate for the molecular diagnosis of dystrophinopathies. The reading frame rule was fulfilled in 90.4% of DMD patients and in 82.4% of Becker muscular dystrophy patients (BMD), with significant differences between the mutation types. We found that 58% of DMD patients would be included in single exon-exon skipping trials, 63% from strategies directed against multiexon-skipping exons 45 to 55, and 14% from PTC therapy. A detailed analysis of missense mutations provided valuable information about their impact on the protein structure. PMID:26284620

  12. Pregnancy after preimplantation diagnosis for a deletion in the dystrophin gene by polymerase chain reaction in embryos obtained after intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    SciTech Connect

    Lissens, W.; Liu, J.; Van Broeckhoven, C.

    1994-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common X-linked recessive diseases. In order to be able to perform a DMD-specific preimplantation diagnosis (PID) in a female carrier of a deletion of exons 3 to 18 in the dystrophin gene, we have developed a PCR assay to detect the deletion based on sequences of exon 17. The efficiency of this PCR was evaluated on 50 single blastomeres from 12 normal control embryos and on 41 blastomeres for 9 male and 3 female embryos from the female DMD carrier, obtained after a first preimplantation diagnosis by sexing. The exon 17 region was amplified with 100% efficiency, except in all 21 blastomeres from 6 male embryos from the carrier where no PCR signals were observed. The negative results in these blastomeres were interpreted as being found only in male embryos carrying the deletion. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection was carried out on the carrier`s metaphase II oocytes retrieved after ovarian stimulation. Embryos were analyzed for the presence of exon 17 and 2 male embryos were found to be deleted, while 4 embryos showed normal amplification signals. Three of the latter embryos were replaced, resulting in a singleton pregnancy. Amniotic cell analysis showed a normal female karyotype and DNA analysis indicated a non-carrier.

  13. Deletion of the trichodiene synthase gene of Fusarium venenatum: two systems for repeated gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Royer, J C; Christianson, L M; Yoder, W T; Gambetta, G A; Klotz, A V; Morris, C L; Brody, H; Otani, S

    1999-10-01

    The trichodiene synthase (tri5) gene of Fusarium venenatum was cloned from a genomic library. Vectors were created in which the tri5 coding sequence was replaced with the Neurospora crassa nitrate reductase (nit3) gene and with the Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase (amdS) gene flanked by direct repeats. The first vector was utilized to transform a nitrate reductase (niaD) mutant of F. venenatum to prototrophy, and the second vector was utilized to confer acetamide utilization to the wild-type strain. Several of the transformants lost the capacity to produce the trichothecene diacetoxyscirpenol and were shown by hybridization analysis to have gene replacements at the tri5 locus. The nit3 gene was removed by retransformation with a tri5 deletion fragment and selection on chlorate. The amdS gene was shown to excise spontaneously via the flanking direct repeats when spores were plated onto fluoroacetamide. PMID:10512673

  14. Muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz: an inversion disrupts the DMD and RPGR genes.

    PubMed

    Atencia-Fernandez, Sabela; Shiel, Robert E; Mooney, Carmel T; Nolan, Catherine M

    2015-04-01

    An X-linked muscular dystrophy, with deficiency of full-length dystrophin and expression of a low molecular weight dystrophin-related protein, has been described in Japanese Spitz dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutation and develop a specific test to identify affected cases and carrier animals. Gene expression studies in skeletal muscle of an affected animal indicated aberrant expression of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (dystrophin) gene and an anomaly in intron 19 of the gene. Genome-walking experiments revealed an inversion that interrupts two genes on the X chromosome, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene and the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene. All clinically affected dogs and obligate carriers that were tested had the mutant chromosome, and it is concluded that the inversion is the causative mutation for X-linked muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz breed. A PCR assay that amplifies mutant and wild-type alleles was developed and proved capable of identifying affected and carrier individuals. Unexpectedly, a 7-year-old male animal, which had not previously come to clinical attention, was shown to possess the mutant allele and to have a relatively mild form of the disease. This observation indicates phenotypic heterogeneity in Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, a feature described previously in humans and Golden Retrievers. With the availability of a simple, fast and accurate test for Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, detection of carrier animals and selected breeding should help eliminate the mutation from the breed.

  15. Deletions of the elastin gene in Williams Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, F.; Nickerson, E.; McCaskill, C.

    1994-09-01

    To investigate deletions in the elastin gene in patients with Williams Syndrome (WS), we screened 37 patients and their parents for deletions in the elastin gene by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using cosmid cELN272 containing the 5{prime} end of the elastin gene and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer pair which amplifies intron 17 in the elastin gene, producing a polymorphic amplification product. Thirty-two patients have been investigated by both the FISH and PCR techniques, one patient was studied only by PCR, and 4 patients were studied only by FISH. Overall, 34 of 37 patients (92%) were deleted for the elastin gene. Using the PCR marker, 14 patients were informative and 12 were shown to be deleted [maternal (n=5) and paternal (n=7)]. Using cosmid cELN272, 33 of 36 patients demonstrated a deletion of chromosome 7q11.23. In one family, both the mother and daughter were deleted due to an apparently de novo deletion arising in the mother. Three patients were not deleted using the elastin cosmid; 2 of these patients have classic WS. Another non-deleted patient has the typical facial features and hypercalcemia but normal intelligence. These three patients will be important in delineating the critical region(s) responsible for the facial features, hypercalcemia, mental retardation and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). There was not an absolute correlation between deletions in elastin and SVAS, although these individuals may be at risk for other cardiovascular complications such as hypertention. Since the majority of WS patients are deleted for a portion of the elastin gene, most likely this marker will be an important diagnostic tool, although more patients will need to be studied. Those patients who are not deleted but clinically have WS will be missed using only this one marker. Expansion of the critical region to other loci and identification of additional markers will be essential for identifying all patients with WS.

  16. Polymorphic insertions and deletions in parabasalian enolase genes.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Patrick J

    2004-05-01

    Insertions and deletions in gene sequences have been used as characters to infer phylogenetic relationships and, like any character, the information they contain varies in utility between different levels of evolution. In one case, the absence of two otherwise highly conserved deletions in the enolase genes of parabasalian protists has been interpreted as a primitive characteristic that suggests these were among the first eukaryotes. Here, semi-environmental 3'-RACE was used to sample enolases from parabasalia in the hindgut of the termite Zootermopsis angusticolis to examine the conservation of this character within the parabasalia. Parabasalian homologues were found to be polymorphic for these deletions, and the phylogeny of parabasalian enolases shows that the deletion-possessing genes branch within deletion-lacking genes (i.e., they did not form two clearly distinct groups). Phylogenetic incongruence was detected in the carboxy-terminal third of the sequence (in the region of the deletions), but there is no unambiguous evidence for recombination. The polymorphism of this character discredits these deletions as strong evidence for the early origin of parabasalia, although the complex distribution makes it impossible to state whether parabasalian enolases were ancestrally like those of other eukaryotes. These observations stress the importance of strong corroborating evidence when considering insertion and deletion data, and raises some interesting questions about the apparent variation in degree of conservation of these deletions between different eukaryotic groups.

  17. Comprehensive Analysis of Pathogenic Deletion Variants in Fanconi Anemia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Elizabeth K.; Kamat, Aparna; Lach, Francis P.; Donovan, Frank X.; Kimble, Danielle C.; Narisu, Narisu; Sanborn, Erica; Boulad, Farid; Davies, Stella M.; Gillio, Alfred P.; Harris, Richard E.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Wagner, John E.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disease resulting from mutations in one of at least 16 different genes. Mutation types and phenotypic manifestations of FA are highly heterogeneous and influence the clinical management of the disease. We analyzed 202 FA families for large deletions, using high-resolution Comparative Genome Hybridization arrays (arrayCGH), Single Nucleotide Polymorphism arrays (SNParrays) and DNA sequencing. We found pathogenic deletions in 88 FANCA, seven FANCC, two FANCD2, and one FANCB families. We find 35% of FA families carry large deletions, accounting for 18% of all FA pathogenic variants. Cloning and sequencing across the deletion breakpoints revealed that 52 FANCA deletion ends, and one FANCC deletion end extended beyond the gene boundaries, potentially affecting neighboring genes with phenotypic consequences. Seventy-five percent of the FANCA deletions are Alu-Alu mediated, predominantly by AluY elements, and appear to be caused by Non-Allelic Homologous Recombination. Individual Alu hotspots were identified. Defining the haplotypes of four FANCA deletions shared by multiple families revealed that three share a common ancestry. Knowing the exact molecular changes that lead to the disease may be critical for a better understanding of the FA phenotype, and to gain insight into the mechanisms driving these pathogenic deletion variants. PMID:25168418

  18. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Bilateral hand amyotrophy with PMP-22 gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Gochard, A; Guennoc, A M; Praline, J; Malinge, M C; de Toffol, B; Corcia, P

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) phenotypes are heterogeneous. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman without medical history, who complained of bilateral hand weakness suggestive first of a motor neuron disorder. The presence of a diffuse predominant distal demyelinating neuropathy suggested a deletion of PMP-22 gene, which was confirmed by genetic analysis. This case report underlines a novel phenotype related to the deletion of PMP-22 gene.

  20. Endogenous Multiple Exon Skipping and Back-Splicing at the DMD Mutation Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kameyama, Toshiki; Saito, Takashi; Masuda, Satoru; Tanihata, Jun; Nagata, Tetsuya; Mayeda, Akila; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscular disorder. It was reported that multiple exon skipping (MES), targeting exon 45–55 of the DMD gene, might improve patients’ symptoms because patients who have a genomic deletion of all these exons showed very mild symptoms. Thus, exon 45–55 skipping treatments for DMD have been proposed as a potential clinical cure. Herein, we detected the expression of endogenous exons 44–56 connected mRNA transcript of the DMD using total RNAs derived from human normal skeletal muscle by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and identified a total of eight types of MES products around the hotspot. Surprisingly, the 5′ splice sites of recently reported post-transcriptional introns (remaining introns after co-transcriptional splicing) act as splicing donor sites for MESs. We also tested exon combinations to generate DMD circular RNAs (circRNAs) and determined the preferential splice sites of back-splicing, which are involved not only in circRNA generation, but also in MESs. Our results fit the current circRNA-generation model, suggesting that upstream post-transcriptional introns trigger MES and generate circRNA because its existence is critical for the intra-intronic interaction or for extremely distal splicing. PMID:27754374

  1. Deletion of pyruvate decarboxylase by a new method for efficient markerless gene deletions in Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Peters, Björn; Junker, Anja; Brauer, Katharina; Mühlthaler, Bernadette; Kostner, David; Mientus, Markus; Liebl, Wolfgang; Ehrenreich, Armin

    2013-03-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans, a biotechnologically relevant species which incompletely oxidizes a large variety of carbohydrates, alcohols, and related compounds, contains a gene for pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC). This enzyme is found only in very few species of bacteria where it is normally involved in anaerobic ethanol formation via acetaldehyde. In order to clarify the role of PDC in the strictly oxidative metabolism of acetic acid bacteria, we developed a markerless in-frame deletion system for strain G. oxydans 621H which uses 5-fluorouracil together with a plasmid-encoded uracil phosphoribosyltransferase as counter selection method and used this technique to delete the PDC gene (GOX1081) of G. oxydans 621H. The PDC deletion mutant accumulated large amounts of pyruvate but almost no acetate during growth on D-mannitol, D-fructose or in the presence of L-lactate. This suggested that in G. oxydans acetate formation occurs by decarboxylation of pyruvate and subsequent oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. This observation and the efficiency of the markerless deletion system were confirmed by constructing deletion mutants of two acetaldehyde dehydrogenases (GOX1122 and GOX2018) and of the acetyl-CoA-synthetase (GOX0412). Acetate formation during growth of these mutants on mannitol did not differ significantly from the wild-type strain.

  2. Screening Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients for deletions in 30 exons of the dystrophin gene by three-multiplex PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Risch, N. )

    1992-09-01

    Deletion mutations of the dystrophin gene may cause either the severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or the milder, allelic Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and are clustered in two high-frequency-deletion regions (HFDRs) located, respectively, 500 kb and 1,200 kb downstream from the 5[prime] end of the gene. Three PCR reactions described allowed the analysis of a total of 30 exons and led, to the identification of three additional deletions involving the following exons: (a) 42 only, (b) 28-42, and (c) 16 only, none of which were detected with the two original multiplex reactions. Therefore, the three modified multiplexes detected 95 of the 96 deletions identified among the 152 patients studied so far by using Southern analysis and cDNA probes. The only deletion that remained undetected with this system involves exons 22-25 and generates the junction fragment described elsewhere. The percentage of deletion mutations among DMS/BMD patients amounts to 63%, which is in agreement with similar estimates from other laboratories. When field-inversion gel electrophoresis is coupled to Southern analysis, the detection rate of deletion and duplication mutations reaches 65%.

  3. Megabase deletions of gene deserts result in viable mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Zhu, Yiwen; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Afzal,Veena; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-05-01

    The functional importance of the approximately 98 percent of mammalian genomes not corresponding to protein coding sequences remain largely un-scrutinized 1. To test experimentally whether some extensive regions of non-coding DNA, referred to as gene deserts 2-4, contain critical functions essential for the viability of the organism, we deleted two large non-coding intervals, 1,511 kb and 845 kb in length, from the mouse genome. Viable mice homozygous for the deletions were generated and were indistinguishable from wild-type litter mates with regards to morphology, reproductive fitness, growth, longevity and a variety of parameters assaying general homeostasis. Further in-depth analysis of the expression of genes bracketing the deletions revealed similar expression characteristics in homozygous deletion and wild-type mice. Together, the two deleted segments harbour 1,243 non-coding sequences conserved between humans and rodents (>100bp, 70 percent identity). These studies demonstrate that some large-scale deletions of non-coding DNA can be well tolerated by an organism, bringing into question the role of many human-mouse conserved sequences 5,6, and further supports the existence of potentially ''disposable DNAi'' in the genomes of mammals.

  4. Targeted next-generation sequencing as a comprehensive test for patients with and female carriers of DMD/BMD: a multi-population diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Dai, Yi; Yu, Ping; Qu, Ning; Lan, Zhangzhang; Hong, Xiafei; Sun, Yan; Yang, Guanghui; Xie, Shuqi; Shi, Quan; Zhou, Hanlin; Zhu, Qian; Chu, Yuxing; Yao, Fengxia; Wang, Jinming; He, Jingni; Yang, Yun; Liang, Yu; Yang, Yi; Qi, Ming; Yang, Ling; Wang, Wei; Wu, Haitao; Duan, Jing; Shen, Cheng; Wang, Jun; Cui, Liying; Yi, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most commonly inherited neuromuscular disease. However, accurate and convenient molecular diagnosis cannot be achieved easily because of the enormous size of the dystrophin gene and complex causative mutation spectrum. Such traditional methods as multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification plus Sanger sequencing require multiple steps to fulfill the diagnosis of DMD/BMD. Here, we introduce a new single-step method for the genetic analysis of DMD patients and female carriers in real clinical settings and demonstrate the validation of its accuracy. A total of 89 patients, 18 female carriers and 245 non-DMD patients were evaluated using our targeted NGS approaches. Compared with traditional methods, our new method yielded 99.99% specificity and 98.96% sensitivity for copy number variations detection and 100% accuracy for the identification of single-nucleotide variation mutations. Additionally, this method is able to detect partial deletions/duplications, thus offering precise personal DMD gene information for gene therapy. We detected novel partial deletions of exons in nine samples for which the breakpoints were located within exonic regions. The results proved that our new method is suitable for routine clinical practice, with shorter turnaround time, higher accuracy, and better insight into comprehensive genetic information (detailed breakpoints) for ensuing gene therapy. PMID:23756440

  5. Targeted next-generation sequencing as a comprehensive test for patients with and female carriers of DMD/BMD: a multi-population diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Dai, Yi; Yu, Ping; Qu, Ning; Lan, Zhangzhang; Hong, Xiafei; Sun, Yan; Yang, Guanghui; Xie, Shuqi; Shi, Quan; Zhou, Hanlin; Zhu, Qian; Chu, Yuxing; Yao, Fengxia; Wang, Jinming; He, Jingni; Yang, Yun; Liang, Yu; Yang, Yi; Qi, Ming; Yang, Ling; Wang, Wei; Wu, Haitao; Duan, Jing; Shen, Cheng; Wang, Jun; Cui, Liying; Yi, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most commonly inherited neuromuscular disease. However, accurate and convenient molecular diagnosis cannot be achieved easily because of the enormous size of the dystrophin gene and complex causative mutation spectrum. Such traditional methods as multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification plus Sanger sequencing require multiple steps to fulfill the diagnosis of DMD/BMD. Here, we introduce a new single-step method for the genetic analysis of DMD patients and female carriers in real clinical settings and demonstrate the validation of its accuracy. A total of 89 patients, 18 female carriers and 245 non-DMD patients were evaluated using our targeted NGS approaches. Compared with traditional methods, our new method yielded 99.99% specificity and 98.96% sensitivity for copy number variations detection and 100% accuracy for the identification of single-nucleotide variation mutations. Additionally, this method is able to detect partial deletions/duplications, thus offering precise personal DMD gene information for gene therapy. We detected novel partial deletions of exons in nine samples for which the breakpoints were located within exonic regions. The results proved that our new method is suitable for routine clinical practice, with shorter turnaround time, higher accuracy, and better insight into comprehensive genetic information (detailed breakpoints) for ensuing gene therapy.

  6. A HindIII polymorphism detected by cDMD 4-5a at the DMD locus in a family with Becker muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Gibb, M.F.; Greenberg, C.R.; Carson, N.L.

    1994-09-01

    Deletions within the dystrophin gene can be detected by hybridizing a series of cDNA probes to HindIII-digested DNA, with the absence of one or more fragments indicating the presence of a deletion. However, incorrect interpretations can be made if the absence of a fragment is due to a polymorphism rather than a deletion. Otto and Rothbery reported that the 5.2 kb fragment detected by cM 4-5a could be resolved, with extended electrophoresis, into two fragments estimated to be 5.2 and 5.15 kb in size. They concluded that the extra fragment of this doublet appears to be polymorphic, inherited in a Mendelian dominant fashion. The mother, who is an obligate carrier of BMD, does not have the upper fragment as is the case for her normal and affected sons. The father, who clinically has no evidence of neuromuscular disease, does have the upper fragment as do all their daughters. Given a dominant pattern of inheritance, the daughters should be heterozygous. Analysis of one grandson, who was predicted to have inherited the grandpaternal dystrophin gene, showed that he did have the upper fragment, consistent with our conclusions. To date, we have been unable to analyze a grandson that has inherited the grandmaternal allele; however, presuably he would not have the upper fragment of this doublet. We conclude that there likely is a dominant HindIII polymorphism detected with the cDMD 4-5a probe at the DMD locus. Population studies will be required to determine the frequency of this polymorphism; however, it should be noted that absence of the upper fragment of this doublet in a male with BMD/DMD does not necessarily correspond to the presence of a deletion.

  7. Ped gene deletion polymorphism frequency in wild mice.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Judith A; Sacher, Frank; Jones, Gwilym S; Warner, Carol M

    2002-07-01

    The Ped gene influences the rate of cleavage of preimplantation embryos and their subsequent survival. Embryos that express the product of the Ped gene, Qa-2 protein, cleave at a faster rate than embryos with an absence of Qa-2 protein. In addition, the Ped gene has pleiotropic effects on reproduction. Thus, there is a reproductive advantage to those mouse strains that are Qa-2 positive. The presence or absence of Qa-2 is reflected at the DNA level by the presence or absence (deletion polymorphism) of the gene(s) encoding Qa-2 protein. Many inbred and wild-derived mouse strains have been characterized as Qa-2 positive or negative, but no previous studies have looked at the distribution of the Ped gene in a population of free-living wild mice. The purpose of this study was to determine the Ped gene deletion polymorphism frequency in a sample of free-living wild mice. Twenty-nine mice were collected and identified as Mus musculus. Genomic DNA extraction was performed on tail tips, and PCR was used to amplify a region from the Ped gene. Known Qa-2 positive and negative mice were used as controls. Results showed that all 29 wild mice were positive for the Ped gene. Since the Ped gene is dominant and provides a reproductive advantage, it is not surprising that all of the wild mice were Qa-2 positive. However, our assay could not distinguish homozygous from heterozygous mice. It is possible that the Qa-2 deletion polymorphism is segregating in the population, and a larger sample size would identify some Qa-2 negative mice. PMID:12115912

  8. Iron-regulatory proteins DmdR1 and DmdR2 of Streptomyces coelicolor form two different DNA-protein complexes with iron boxes.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Francisco J; Martín, Juan F

    2004-01-01

    In high G+C Gram-positive bacteria, the control of expression of genes involved in iron metabolism is exerted by a DmdR [divalent (bivalent) metal-dependent regulatory protein] in the presence of Fe2+ or other bivalent ions. The dmdR1 and dmdR2 genes of Streptomyces coelicolor were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the DmdR1 and DmdR2 proteins were purified to homogeneity. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed that both DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the 19-nt tox and desA iron boxes forming two different complexes in each case. Increasing the concentrations of DmdR1 or DmdR2 protein shifted these complexes from their low-molecular-mass form to the high-molecular-mass complexes. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was prevented by the bivalent metal chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl and by antibodies specific against the DmdR proteins. Cross-linking with glutaraldehyde of pure DmdR1 or DmdR2 proteins showed that DmdR1 forms dimers, whereas DmdR2 is capable of forming dimers and probably tetramers. Ten different iron boxes were found in a search for iron boxes in the genome of S. coelicolor. Most of them correspond to putative genes involved in siderophore biosynthesis. Since the nucleotide sequence of these ten boxes is identical (or slightly different) with the synthetic DNA fragment containing the desA box used in the present study, it is proposed that DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the iron boxes upstream of at least ten different genes in S. coelicolor. PMID:14960152

  9. Different mosaicism frequencies for proximal and distal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mutations indicate difference in etiology and recurrence risk.

    PubMed Central

    Passos-Bueno, M R; Bakker, E; Kneppers, A L; Takata, R I; Rapaport, D; den Dunnen, J T; Zatz, M; van Ommen, G J

    1992-01-01

    In about 65% of the cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) a partial gene deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene can be detected. These mutations are clustered at two hot spots: 30% at the hot spot in the proximal part of the gene and about 70% at a more distal hot spot. Unexpectedly we observed a higher frequency of proximal gene rearrangements among proved "germ line" mosaic cases. Of the 24 mosaic cases we are aware of, 19 (79%) have a proximal mutation, while only 5 (21%) have a distal mutation. This finding indicates that the mutations at the two hot spots in the dystrophin gene differ in origin. Independent support for the different mosaicism frequency was found by comparing the mutation spectra observed in isolated cases of DMD and familial cases of DMD. In a large two-center study of 473 patients from Brazil and the Netherlands, we detected a significant difference in the deletion distribution of isolated (proximal:distal ratio 1:3) and familial cases (ratio 1:1). We conclude from these data that proximal deletions most likely occur early in embryonic development, causing them to have a higher chance of becoming familial, while distal deletions occur later and have a higher chance of causing only isolated cases. Finally, our findings have important consequences for the calculation of recurrence-risk estimates according to the site of the deletion: a "proximal" new mutant has an increased recurrence risk of approximately 30%, and a "distal" new mutant has a decreased recurrence risk of approximately 4%. PMID:1415256

  10. Different mosaicism frequencies for proximal and distal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mutations indicate difference in etiology and recurrence risk

    SciTech Connect

    Passos-Bueno, M.R.; Takata, R.I.; Rapaport, D.; Bakker, E.; Kneppers, A.L.J.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Ommen, J.B. van

    1992-11-01

    In about 65% of the cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) a partial gene deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene can be detected. These mutations are clustered at two hot spots: 30% at the hot spot in the proximal part of the gene and about 70% at a more distal hot spot. Unexpectedly the authors observed a higher frequency of proximal gene rearrangements among proved germ line' mosaic cases. Of the 24 mosaic cases they are aware of, 19 (79%) have a proximal mutation, while only 5 (21%) have a distal mutation. This finding indicates that the mutations at the two hot spots in the dystrophin gene differ in origin. Independent support for the different mosaicism frequency was found by comparing the mutation spectra observed in isolated cases of DMD and familial cases (ratio 1:1). The authors conclude from these data that proximal deletions most likely occur early in embryonic development, causing them to have a higher chance of becoming familial, while distal deletions occur later and have a higher chance of causing only isolated cases. Finally, the findings have important consequences for the calculation of recurrence-risk estimates according to the site of the deletion: a [open quote]proximal[close quote] new mutant has an increased recurrence risk of approximately 30%, and a [open quote]distal[close quote] new mutant has a decreased recurrence risk of approximately 4%. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Amplified and Homozygously Deleted Genes in Glioblastoma: Impact on Gene Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Inês; Tão, Hermínio; Nieto, Ana Belen; Rebelo, Olinda; Domingues, Patrícia; Vital, Ana Luísa; Patino, Maria del Carmen; Barbosa, Marcos; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) displays multiple amplicons and homozygous deletions that involve relevant pathogenic genes and other genes whose role remains unknown. Methodology Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-arrays were used to determine the frequency of recurrent amplicons and homozygous deletions in GBM (n = 46), and to evaluate the impact of copy number alterations (CNA) on mRNA levels of the genes involved. Principal Findings Recurrent amplicons were detected for chromosomes 7 (50%), 12 (22%), 1 (11%), 4 (9%), 11 (4%), and 17 (4%), whereas homozygous deletions involved chromosomes 9p21 (52%) and 10q (22%). Most genes that displayed a high correlation between DNA CNA and mRNA levels were coded in the amplified chromosomes. For some amplicons the impact of DNA CNA on mRNA expression was restricted to a single gene (e.g., EGFR at 7p11.2), while for others it involved multiple genes (e.g., 11 and 5 genes at 12q14.1–q15 and 4q12, respectively). Despite homozygous del(9p21) and del(10q23.31) included multiple genes, association between these DNA CNA and RNA expression was restricted to the MTAP gene. Conclusions Overall, our results showed a high frequency of amplicons and homozygous deletions in GBM with variable impact on the expression of the genes involved, and they contributed to the identification of other potentially relevant genes. PMID:23029397

  12. DMD and BMD in the same family due to two distinct mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, L.; Mora, M.; Di Blasi, C.; Brugnoni, R.

    1995-12-04

    We report on a family with a boy affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and an asymptomatic cousin with a Becker-type dystrophin abnormality, diagnosed by chance. Dystrophin gene analysis showed that these conditions were caused by two distinct deletions with breakpoints in different exons. In Xp21 families, DNA analysis and dystrophin testing of asymptomatic males with high CK plasma levels might detect different dystrophin mutations in separate haplotypes as in our family, although we stress there should be clear clinical or familial indications for such testing. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Deletion and deletion/insertion mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Kristin K.; Smonskey, Matthew T.; DeFedericis, HanChun; Deeb, George; Sait, Sheila N.J.; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S.; Starostik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to FLT3 ITD mutations, in-frame deletions in the FLT3 gene have rarely been described in adult acute leukemia. We report two cases of AML with uncommon in-frame mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene: a 3-bp (c.1770_1774delCTACGinsGT; p.F590_V592delinsLF) deletion/insertion and a 12-bp (c.1780_1791delTTCAGAGAATAT; p.F594_Y597del) deletion. We verified by sequencing that the reading frame of the FLT3 gene was preserved and by cDNA analysis that the mRNA of the mutant allele was expressed in both cases. Given the recent development of FLT3 inhibitors, our findings may be of therapeutic value for AML patients harboring similar FLT3 mutations. PMID:25379410

  14. Short, direct repeats at the breakpoints of deletions of the retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Canning, S.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1989-07-01

    The authors found deletions involving the retinoblastoma gene in 12 of 49 tumors from patients with retinoblastoma or osteosarcoma. After mapping the deletion breakpoints, they found that no two breakpoints coincided. Thus, the data do not support the conclusions of others regarding the existence of a hotspot for deletion breakpoints in this gene. In 4 of the tumors, they sequenced 200 base pairs surrounding each deletion breakpoint. Three deletions had termini within pairs of short, direct repeats ranging in size from 4 to 7 base pairs. These results indicate that the slipped mispairing mechanism may predominate in the generation of deletions at this locus. The review of deletion breakpoints at other genetic loci reveals that the nature of the sequences present at deletion breakpoints (short, direct repeats versus middle repetitive elements) varies according to the genetic locus under study.

  15. More deletions in the 5{prime} region than in the central region of the dystrophin gene were identified among Filipino Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-06

    This report describes mutations in the dystrophin gene and the frequency of these mutations in Filipino pedigrees with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD). The findings suggest the presence of genetic variability among DMD/BMD patients in different populations. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  16. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle.

  17. Lysis Delay and Burst Shrinkage of Coliphage T7 by Deletion of Terminator Tφ Reversed by Deletion of Early Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huong Minh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophage T7 terminator Tφ is a class I intrinsic terminator coding for an RNA hairpin structure immediately followed by oligo(U), which has been extensively studied in terms of its transcription termination mechanism, but little is known about its physiological or regulatory functions. In this study, using a T7 mutant phage, where a 31-bp segment of Tφ was deleted from the genome, we discovered that deletion of Tφ from T7 reduces the phage burst size but delays lysis timing, both of which are disadvantageous for the phage. The burst downsizing could directly result from Tφ deletion-caused upregulation of gene 17.5, coding for holin, among other Tφ downstream genes, because infection of gp17.5-overproducing Escherichia coli by wild-type T7 phage showed similar burst downsizing. However, the lysis delay was not associated with cellular levels of holin or lysozyme or with rates of phage adsorption. Instead, when allowed to evolve spontaneously in five independent adaptation experiments, the Tφ-lacking mutant phage, after 27 or 29 passages, recovered both burst size and lysis time reproducibly by deleting early genes 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7 of class I, among other mutations. Deletion of genes 0.5 to 0.7 from the Tφ-lacking mutant phage decreased expression of several Tφ downstream genes to levels similar to that of the wild-type phage. Accordingly, phage T7 lysis timing is associated with cellular levels of Tφ downstream gene products. This suggests the involvement of unknown factor(s) besides the known lysis proteins, lysozyme and holin, and that Tφ plays a role of optimizing burst size and lysis time during T7 infection. IMPORTANCE E. coli PMID:24335287

  18. L1CAM whole gene deletion in a child with L1 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chidsey, Brandalyn A; Baldwin, Erin E; Toydemir, Reha; Ahles, Lauren; Hanson, Heather; Stevenson, David A

    2014-06-01

    L1 syndrome is a group of overlapping, X-linked disorders caused by mutations in L1CAM. Clinical phenotypes within L1 syndrome include X-linked hydrocephalus with stenosis of the aqueduct of sylvius (HSAS); mental retardation, adducted thumbs, shuffling gait, and aphasia (MASA) syndrome; spastic paraplegia type 1; and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Over 200 mutations in L1CAM have been reported; however, only a few large gene deletions have been observed. We report on a 4-month-old male with a de novo whole gene deletion of L1CAM presenting with congenital hydrocephalus, aqueductal stenosis, and adducted thumbs. Initial failure of L1CAM gene sequencing suggested the possibility of a whole gene deletion of L1CAM. Further investigation through chromosome microarray analysis showed a 62Kb deletion encompassing the first exon of the PDZD4 gene and the entire L1CAM gene. Investigations into genotype-phenotype correlations have suggested that mutations leading to truncated or absent L1 protein cause more severe forms of L1 syndrome. Based on the presentation of the proband and other reported patients with whole gene deletions, we provide further evidence that L1CAM whole gene deletions result in L1 syndrome with a severe phenotype, deletions of PDZD4 do not cause additional manifestations, and that X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus reported in a subset of patients with large L1CAM deletions results from the loss of AVPR2. PMID:24668863

  19. The evolution of an intron: Analysis of a long, deletion-prone intron in the human dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    McNaughton, J.C.; Hughes, G.; Jones, W.A.

    1997-03-01

    The sequence of a 112-kb region of the human dystrophin (DMD/BMD) gene encompassing the deletion prone intron 7 (110 kb) and the much shorter intron 8 (1.1 kb) has been determined. Recognizable insertion sequences account for approximately 40% of intron 7. LINE-1 and THE-1/LTR sequences occur in intron 7 with significantly higher frequency than would be expected statistically while Alu sequences are underrepresented. Intron 7 also contains numerous mammalian-wide interspersed repeats, a diverse range of medium reiteration repeats of unknown origin, and a sequence derived from a mariner transposon. By contrast, the shorter intron 8 contains no detectable insertion sequences. Dating of the L1 and Alu sequences suggests that intron 7 has approximately doubled in size within the past 130 million years, and comparison with the corresponding intron from the pufferfish (Fugu rubripes) suggests that the intron has expanded some 44-fold over a period of 400 million years. The possible contribution of the insertion elements to the instability of intron 7 is discussed. 66 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA: Common double deletion in the N-Acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase gene (GALNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Toshinori; Tomatsu, Shunji; Fukuda, Seiji

    1995-04-10

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS). We found two separate deletions of nearly 8.0 and 6.0 kb in the GALNS gene, including some exons. There are Alu repetitive elements near the breakpoints of the 8.0-kb deletion, and this deletion resulted from an Alu-Alu recombination. The other 6.0-kb deletion involved illegitimate recombinational events between incomplete short direct repeats of 8 bp at deletion breakpoints. The same rearrangement has been observed in a heteroallelic state in four unrelated patients. This is the first documentation of a common double deletion a gene that is not a member of a gene cluster. 39 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Mosaic 7q31 deletion involving FOXP2 gene associated with language impairment.

    PubMed

    Palka, Chiara; Alfonsi, Melissa; Mohn, Angelika; Cerbo, Renato; Guanciali Franchi, Paolo; Fantasia, Donatella; Morizio, Elisena; Stuppia, Liborio; Calabrese, Giuseppe; Zori, Roberto; Chiarelli, Francesco; Palka, Giandomenico

    2012-01-01

    We report on a 10-year-old patient with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and mild dysmorphic features. Although multiple karyotypes were reported as normal, a bacterial artificial chromosome array comparative genomic hybridization revealed the presence of a de novo 14.8-Mb mosaic deletion of chromosome 7q31. The deleted region involved several genes, including FOXP2, which has been associated with CAS. Interestingly, the deletion reported here was observed in about 50% of cells, which is the first case of mosaicism in a 7q31 deletion. Despite the presence of the deletion in only 50% of cells, the phenotype of the patient was not milder than other published cases. To date, 6 cases with a deletion of 9.1-20 Mb involving the FOXP2 gene have been reported, suggesting a new contiguous gene deletion syndrome characterized mainly by CAS caused by haploinsufficiency of the genes encompassed in the 7q critical region. This report suggests that children found with a deletion involving the FOXP2 region should be evaluated for CAS and that analysis of the FOXP2 gene including array comparative genomic hybridization should be considered in selected patients with CAS. Mosaic deletions in this area may also be considered as causative of CAS.

  2. Tetranectin gene deletion induces Parkinson's disease by enhancing neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhifeng; Wang, Ersong; Hu, Rong; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Jue; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Hong

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). We previously identified tetranectin (TET) as a potential biomarker for PD whose expression is downregulated in the cerebrospinal fluid of PD patients. In the present study, we investigate the role of TET in neurodegeneration in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that siRNA knockdown of TET decreased cell viability and the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells, whereas it increased caspase-3 activity and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in cultured primary dopaminergic neurons. Overexpression of TET protected dopaminergic neurons against neuronal apoptosis in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium cell culture model in vitro. In TET knockdown mouse model of PD, TET gene deletion decreased the number of TH positive cells in the SNpc, induced apoptosis via the p53/Bax pathway, and significantly impaired the motor behavior of transgenic mice. The findings suggest that TET plays a neuroprotective role via reducing neuron apoptosis and could be a valuable biomarker or potential therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with PD. PMID:26597345

  3. Transmitted deletions of medial 5p and learning difficulties; does the cadherin cluster only become penetrant when flanking genes are deleted?

    PubMed

    Barber, John C K; Huang, Shuwen; Bateman, Mark S; Collins, Amanda L

    2011-11-01

    The central portion of the short arm of chromosome 5 is unusual in that large, cytogenetically visible interstitial deletions segregate in families with and without phenotypic consequences. Here we present a family in which a transmitted interstitial deletion of 5p13.3 to 5p14.3 co-segregated with learning and/or behavioral difficulties in six family members. Facial dysmorphism was not striking but a father and daughter both had lacrimal fistulae. The deletion was 12.23 Mb in size (chr5:20,352,535-32,825,775) and contained fifteen known protein coding genes. Five of these (GOLPH3; MTMR12; ZFR; SUB1; and NPR3) and an ultra-conserved microRNA (hsa-miR-579) were present in an 883 kb candidate gene region in 5p13.3 that was deleted in the present family but not in previously reported overlapping benign deletions. Members of the cadherin precursor gene cluster, with brain specific expression, were deleted in both affected and benign deletion families. The candidate genes in 5p13.3 may be sufficient to account for the consistent presence or absence of phenotype in medial 5p deletions. However, we consider the possibility of position effects in which CDH6, and/or other cadherin genes, become penetrant when adjacent genes, or modifiers of gene expression, are also deleted. This could account for the absence of intellectual disability in benign deletions of the cadherin cluster, the cognitive phenotype in medial 5p deletion syndrome and the greater severity of intellectual disability in patients with cri-du-chat syndrome and deletions of 5p15 that extend into the region deleted in the present family. PMID:21965044

  4. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS) cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1), mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement. PMID:22260333

  5. Deletions spanning the neurofibromatosis 1 gene: identification and phenotype of five patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kayes, L. M.; Burke, W.; Riccardi, V. M.; Bennett, R.; Ehrlich, P.; Rubenstein, A.; Stephens, K.

    1994-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by marked variation in clinical severity. To investigate the contribution to variability by genes either contiguous to or contained within the NF1 gene, we screened six NF1 patients with mild facial dysmorphology, mental retardation, and/or learning disabilities, for DNA rearrangement of the NF1 region. Five of the six patients had NF1 gene deletions on the basis of quantitative densitometry, locus hemizygosity, and analysis of somatic cell hybrid lines. Analyses of hybrid lines carrying each of the patient's chromosomes 17, with 15 regional DNA markers, demonstrated that each of the five patients carried a deletion > 700 kb in size. Minimally, each of the deletions involved the entire 350-kb NF1 gene; the three genes--EVI2A, EVI2B, and OMG--that are contained within an NF1 intron; and considerable flanking DNA. For four of the patients, the deletions mapped to the same interval; the deletion in the fifth patient was larger, extending farther in both directions. The remaining NF1 allele presumably produced functional neurofibromin; no gene rearrangements were detected, and RNA-PCR demonstrated that it was transcribed. These data provide compelling evidence that the NF1 disorder results from haploid insufficiency of neurofibromin. Of the three documented de novo deletion cases, two involved the paternal NF1 allele and one the maternal allele. The parental origin of the single remaining expressed NF1 allele had no dramatic effect on patient phenotype. The deletion patients exhibited a variable number of physical anomalies that were not correlated with the extent of their deletion. All five patients with deletions were remarkable for exhibiting a large number of neurofibromas for their age, suggesting that deletion of an unknown gene in the NF1 region may affect tumor initiation or development. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8116612

  6. Deletions spanning the neurofibromatosis I gene: Identification and phenotype of five patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kayes, L.M.; Burke, W.; Bennett, R.; Ehrlich, P.; Stephens, K. ); Riccardi, V.M. ); Rubenstein, A. )

    1994-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by marked variation in clinical severity. To investigate the contribution to variability by genes either contiguous to or contained within the NF1 gene, the authors screened six NF1 patients with mild facial dysmorphology, mental retardation, and/or learning disabilities, for DNA rearrangement of the NF1 region. Five of the six patients had NF1 gene deletions on the basis of quantitative densitometry, locus hemizygosity, and analysis of somatic cell hybrid lines. Analysis of hybrid lines carrying each of the patient's chromosomes 17, with 15 regional DNA markers, demonstrated that each of the five patients carried a deletion >700 kb in size. Minimally, each of the deletions involved the entire 350-kb NF1 gene; the three genes - EVI2A, EVI2B, and OMG-that are contained within an NF1 intron; and considerable flanking DNA. For four of the patients, the deletions mapped to the same interval; the deletion in the fifth patient was larger, extending farther in both directions. The remaining NF1 allele presumably produced functional neurofibromin; no gene rearrangements were detected, and RNA-PCR demonstrated that it was transcribed. These data provide compelling evidence that the NF1 disorder results from haploid insufficiency of neurofibromin. Of the three documented de novo deletion cases, two involved the paternal NF1 allele and one the maternal allele. The parental origin of the single remaining expresses NF1 allele had no dramatic effect on patient phenotype. The deletion patients exhibited a variable number of physical anomalies that were not correlated with the extent of their deletion. All five patients with deletions were remarkable for exhibiting a large number of neurfibromas for their age, suggesting that deletion of an unknown gene in the NF1 region may affect tumor initiation or development. 69 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Application of the FLP/FRT system for conditional gene deletion in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang-Nim; Masison, Daniel; Eisenberg, Evan; Greene, Lois E

    2011-09-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model organism to study the function of proteins. One of the many advantages of yeast is the many genetic tools available to manipulate gene expression, but there are still limitations. To complement the many methods used to control gene expression in yeast, we have established a conditional gene deletion system by using the FLP/FRT system on yeast vectors to conditionally delete specific yeast genes. Expression of Flp recombinase, which is under the control of the GAL1 promoter, was induced by galactose, which in turn excised FRT sites flanked genes. The efficacy of this system was examined using the FRT site-flanked genes HSP104, URA3 and GFP. The pre-excision frequency of this system, which might be caused by the basal activity of the GAL1 promoter or by spontaneous recombination between FRT sites, was detected ca. 2% under the non-selecting condition. After inducing expression of Flp recombinase, the deletion efficiency achieved ca. 96% of cells in a population within 9 h. After conditional deletion of the specific gene, protein degradation and cell division then diluted out protein that was expressed from this gene prior to its excision. Most importantly, the specific protein to be deleted could be expressed under its own promoter, so that endogenous levels of protein expression were maintained prior to excision by the Flp recombinase. Therefore, this system provides a useful tool for the conditional deletion of genes in yeast.

  8. Site-specific deletion and rearrangement of integron insert genes catalyzed by the integron DNA integrase.

    PubMed

    Collis, C M; Hall, R M

    1992-03-01

    Deletion of individual antibiotic resistance genes found within the variable region of integrons is demonstrated. Evidence for gene duplications and rearrangements resulting from the insertion of gene units at new locations is also presented. Deletion, duplication, and rearrangement occur only in the presence of the integron-encoded DNA integrase. These events are precise and involve loss or gain of one or more complete insert units or gene cassettes. This confirms the recent definition of gene cassettes as consisting of the gene coding sequences, all except the last 7 bases of the 59-base element found at the 3' end of the gene, and the core site located 5' to the gene (Hall et al., Mol. Microbiol. 5:1941-1959, 1991) and demonstrates that individual gene cassettes are functional units which can be independently mobilized. Both deletions and duplications can be generated by integrase-mediated cointegrate formation followed by integrase-mediated resolution involving a different pair of sites. However, deletion occurs 10 times more frequently than duplication, and we propose that the majority of deletion events are likely to involve integrase-dependent excision of the gene unit to generate a circular gene cassette. The implications of these findings in understanding the evolution of integrons and the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial populations is discussed.

  9. Virus Attenuation after Deletion of the Cytomegalovirus Fc Receptor Gene Is Not due to Antibody Control

    PubMed Central

    Crnković-Mertens, Irena; Messerle, Martin; Milotić, Irena; Szepan, Uwe; Kučić, Natalija; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    1998-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) fcr-1 gene codes for a glycoprotein located at the surface of infected cells which strongly binds the Fc fragment of murine immunoglobulin G. To determine the biological significance of the fcr-1 gene during viral infection, we constructed MCMV fcr-1 deletion mutants and revertants. The fcr-1 gene was disrupted by insertion of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene. In another mutant, the marker gene was also deleted, by recombinase cre. As expected for its hypothetical role in immunoevasion, the infection of mice with fcr-1 deletion mutants resulted in significantly restricted replication in comparison with wild-type MCMV and revertant virus. In mutant mice lacking antibodies, however, the fcr-1 deletion mutants also replicated poorly. This demonstrated that the cell surface-expressed viral glycoprotein with FcR activity strongly modulates the virus-host interaction but that this biological function is not caused by the immunoglobulin binding property. PMID:9445038

  10. Discrimination of Deletion and Duplication Subtypes of the Deleted in Azoospermia Gene Family in the Context of Frequent Interloci Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Vaszkó, Tibor; Papp, János; Krausz, Csilla; Casamonti, Elena; Géczi, Lajos; Olah, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Due to its palindromic setup, AZFc (Azoospermia Factor c) region of chromosome Y is one of the most unstable regions of the human genome. It contains eight gene families expressed mainly in the testes. Several types of rearrangement resulting in changes in the cumulative copy number of the gene families were reported to be associated with diseases such as male infertility and testicular germ cell tumors. The best studied AZFc rearrangement is gr/gr deletion. Its carriers show widespread phenotypic variation from azoospermia to normospermia. This phenomenon was initially attributed to different gr/gr subtypes that would eliminate distinct members of the affected gene families. However, studies conducted to confirm this hypothesis have brought controversial results, perhaps, in part, due to the shortcomings of the utilized subtyping methodology. This proof-of-concept paper is meant to introduce here a novel method aimed at subtyping AZFc rearrangements. It is able to differentiate the partial deletion and partial duplication subtypes of the Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ) gene family. The keystone of the method is the determination of the copy number of the gene family member-specific variant(s) in a series of sequence family variant (SFV) positions. Most importantly, we present a novel approach for the correct interpretation of the variant copy number data to determine the copy number of the individual DAZ family members in the context of frequent interloci gene conversion.Besides DAZ1/DAZ2 and DAZ3/DAZ4 deletions, not yet described rearrangements such as DAZ2/DAZ4 deletion and three duplication subtypes were also found by the utilization of the novel approach. A striking feature is the extremely high concordance among the individual data pointing to a certain type of rearrangement. In addition to being able to identify DAZ deletion subtypes more reliably than the methods used previously, this approach is the first that can discriminate DAZ duplication subtypes as well

  11. Deletions of the survival motor neuron gene in unaffected siblings of patients with spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Cobben, J.M.; Steege, G. van der; Grootscholten, P.

    1995-10-01

    DNA studies in 103 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients from The Netherlands revealed homozygosity for a survival motor neuron (SMN) deletion in 96 (93%) of 103. Neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein deletions were found in 38 (37%) of 103 and occurred most frequently in SMA type 1. SMN deletions have not yet been described to occur in healthy subjects. In this study, however, four unaffected sibs from two SMA families showed homozygosity for SMN deletions. Homozygosity for an SMN deletion in unaffected persons seems to be very rare. Therefore, demonstration of a homozygous SMN deletion in a clinically presumed SMA patient should be considered as a confirmation of the diagnosis, whether or not SMN is in fact the causal gene for SMA. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  12. An efficient gene replacement and deletion system for an extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Tamakoshi, M; Yaoi, T; Oshima, T; Yamagishi, A

    1999-04-15

    A Thermus thermophilus host strain of which the leuB gene was totally deleted was constructed from a delta pyrE strain by a two step method. First, the leuB gene was replaced with the pyrE gene. Second, the inserted pyrE gene was deleted by using 5-fluoroorotic acid. A plasmid vector with the leuB marker was constructed and the plasmid complemented the leuB deficiency of the host. When the leuB gene from Escherichia coli and its derivative encoding a stabilized enzyme were expressed with the host-vector system, their growth temperature reflected the stability of the enzyme. These results suggest that the gene replacement deletion method using the pyrE gene is useful for the construction of a reliable plasmid vector system and it can be applied to the selection of stabilized enzymes. PMID:10227171

  13. 5q14.3 deletion neurocutaneous syndrome: Contiguous gene syndrome caused by simultaneous deletion of RASA1 and MEF2C: A progressive disease.

    PubMed

    Ilari, Rita; Agosta, Guillermo; Bacino, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a young girl who was presented with complex clinical symptoms caused by the deletion of contiguous genes: RASA1 and MEF2C, located on chromosome 5q14.3. Specifically, the diagnosis of her skin disorder and vascular malformations involving central nervous system is consistent with a RASopathy. The child's neurological manifestations are observed in most patients suffering from 5q14.3 by deletion or mutation of the MEF2C gene. A review of the literature allowed us to conclude that the contiguous deletion of genes RASA1 and MEF2C fulfills the criteria for the diagnosis of a Neurocutaneous syndrome as proposed by Carr et al. [2011]. We also assessed the penetrance of RASA1 and clinical manifestations of MEF2C according to the type of deletion. This child described presents the complete symptomatology of both deleted genes. We would also like to highlight the progression of the disorder.

  14. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27560363

  15. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-01-01

    The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27560363

  16. Dissecting the phenotypes of Dravet syndrome by gene deletion

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Moran; Han, Sung; Tai, Chao; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Hunker, Avery; Scheuer, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric syndromes often have multiple disease traits, yet it is unknown how such multi-faceted deficits arise from single mutations. Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable childhood-onset epilepsy with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, autistic-like behaviours, and premature death. Deletion of Nav1.1 channels selectively impairs excitability of GABAergic interneurons. We studied mice having selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In brain slices, these deletions cause increased threshold for action potential generation, impaired action potential firing in trains, and reduced amplification of postsynaptic potentials in those interneurons. Selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons increases susceptibility to thermally-induced seizures, which are strikingly prolonged when Nav1.1 is deleted in both interneuron types. Mice with global haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 display autistic-like behaviours, hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. Haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons causes autistic-like behaviours, but not hyperactivity, whereas haploinsufficiency in somatostatin-expressing interneurons causes hyperactivity without autistic-like behaviours. Heterozygous deletion in both interneuron types is required to impair long-term spatial memory in context-dependent fear conditioning, without affecting short-term spatial learning or memory. Thus, the multi-faceted phenotypes of Dravet syndrome can be genetically dissected, revealing synergy in causing epilepsy, premature death and deficits in long-term spatial memory, but interneuron-specific effects on hyperactivity and autistic-like behaviours. These results show that multiple disease traits can arise from similar functional deficits in specific interneuron types. PMID:26017580

  17. Deletion of the "OPHN1" Gene Detected by aCGH

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrigal, I.; Rodriguez-Revenga, L.; Badenas, C.; Sanchez, A.; Mila, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The oligophrenin 1 gene ("OPHN1") is an Rho-GTPase-activating protein involved in the regulation of the G-protein cycle required for dendritic spine morphogenesis. Mutations in this gene are implicated in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Methods: We report a deletion spanning exons 21 and 22 of the "OPHN1" gene identified by a…

  18. [Deletion of marker gene in transgenic goat by Cre/LoxP system].

    PubMed

    Lan, Chong; Ren, Lina; Wu, Min; Liu, Siguo; Liu, Guohui; Xu, Xujun; Chen, Jianquan; Ma, Hengdong; Cheng, Guoxiang

    2013-12-01

    In producing transgenic livestock, selectable marker genes (SMGs) are usually used to screen transgenic cells from numerous normal cells. That results in SMGs integrating into the genome and transmitting to offspring. In fact, SMGs could dramatically affect gene regulation at integration sites and also make the safety evaluation of transgenic animals complicated. In order to determine the deletion time and methods in the process of producing transgenic goats, the feasibility of deleting SMGs was explored by Cre/LoxP before or after somatic cell cloning. In addition, we compared the efficiency of protein transduction with plasmids co-transduction. We could delete 43.9% SMGs after screening out the transgenic cell clones, but these cells could not be applied to somatic cells cloning because of serious aging after two gene modifications. The SMG-free cells suitable for nuclear transfer were accessible by using the cells of transgenic goats, but this approach was more time consuming. Finally, we found that the Cre plasmid could delete SMGs with an efficiency of 7.81%, but about 30% in SMG-free cells had sequences of Cre plasmid. Compared with Cre plasmid, the integration of new exogenous gene could be avoided by TAT-CRE protein transduction, and the deletion rate of TAT-CRE transduction was between 43.9 and 72.8%. Therefore, TAT-Cre transduction could be an effective method for deleting selectable marker genes.

  19. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells#

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason K.W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Yan, Winston X.; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y.; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Church, George M.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated but still functional protein. In this study, we develop and test a direct gene editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored Dystrophin reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes and muscle stem cells following local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR-treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  20. Two Italian families with ITPR1 gene deletion presenting a broader phenotype of SCA15.

    PubMed

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Orsi, Laura; Godani, Massimiliano; Vaula, Giovanna; Jensen, Stella; Salmon, Eric; Ferrari, Giancarlo; Squadrone, Stefania; Abete, Maria Cesarina; Cagnoli, Claudia; Brussino, Alessandro; Brusco, Alfredo

    2010-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type15 (SCA15) is a pure ataxia characterized by very slow progression. Only seven families have been identified worldwide, in which partial deletions and a missense mutation of the inositol triphosphate receptor type I gene (ITPR1) have been reported. We examined a four-generation Italian family segregating an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, in which linkage analysis was positive for the SCA15 locus. We performed a genomic real-time polymerase chain reaction to search for ITPR1 gene deletions in this family and in 60 SCA index cases negative for mutations in the SCA1-3, 6-8, 10, 12,and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy genes. The deleted segments were characterized using a custom array comparative genomic hybridization analysis. We have identified two families with an ITPR1 gene deletion: in one, the deletion involved ITPR1 only, while in the other both sulfatase-modifying factor 1 and ITPR1. Clinical data of ten patients and brain MRI (available for six) showed that the phenotype substantially overlapped known SCA15 cases,but we also noted buccolingual dyskinesias, facial myokymias,and pyramidal signs never reported in SCA15. ITPR1 expression analysis of two deleted cases showed a half dose. Our results further support ITPR1 gene as causative of SCA15. The families reported show that SCA15 is present in Italy and has a greater variability in the age at onset and clinical features than previously reported. We propose that the search for ITPR1 deletions is mandatory in the clinical hypothesis of SCA15 and that ITPR1-reduced expression in blood may be a useful marker to identify SCA15 patients harboring genomic deletions and possibly point mutations causing reduction of mRNA level.

  1. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-05-01

    From 1971--1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. Absence of any of these fragments on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. Tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southern blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, 1 of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice showed a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  2. Identification and molecular characterization of four new large deletions in the beta-globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fact that mutations in the human beta-globin gene cluster are essentially point mutations, a significant number of large deletions have also been described. We present here four new large deletions in the beta-globin gene cluster that have been identified on patients displaying an atypical hemoglobin phenotype (high HbF) at routine analysis. The first deletion, which spreads over 2.0 kb, removes the entire beta-globin gene, including its promoter, and is associated with a typical beta-thal minor phenotype. The three other deletions are larger (19.7 to 23.9 kb) and remove both the delta and beta-globin genes. Phenotypically, they look like an HPFH-deletion as they are associated with normal hematological parameters. The precise localization of their 5' and 3' breakpoints gives new insights about the differences between HPFH and (deltabeta)(0)-thalassemia at the molecular level. The importance of detection of these deletions in prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening of hemoglobinopathies is also discussed.

  3. An atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes FMRI gene

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, F.; Zonana, J.; Gunter, K.; Peterson, K.L.; Magenis, R.E., Popovich, B.W.

    1995-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation and results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR1 gene. In the vast majority of cases, this is caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG repeat in the first exon of the FMR1 gene. We describe here a phenotypically atypical case of fragile X syndrome, caused by a deletion that includes the entire FMR1 gene and {ge}9.0 Mb of flanking DNA. The proband, RK, was a 6-year-old mentally retarded male with obesity and anal atresia. A diagnosis of fragile X syndrome was established by the failure of RK`s DNA to hybridize to a 558-bp PstI-XhoI fragment (pfxa3) specific for the 5{prime}-end of the FMR1 gene. The analysis of flanking markers in the interval from Xq26.3-q28 indicated a deletion extending from between 160-500 kb distal and 9.0 Mb proximal to the FMR1 gene. High-resolution chromosome banding confirmed a deletion with breakpoints in Xq26.3 and Xq27.3. This deletion was maternally transmitted and arose as a new mutation on the grandpaternal X chromosome. The maternal transmission of the deletion was confirmed by FISH using a 34-kb cosmid (c31.4) containing most of the FMR1 gene. These results indicated that RK carried a deletion of the FMR1 region with the most proximal breakpoint described to date. This patient`s unusual clinical presentation may indicate the presence of genes located in the deleted interval proximal to the FMR1 locus that are able to modify the fragile X syndrome phenotype. 36 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Novel heterozygous OTX2 mutations and whole gene deletions in anophthalmia, microphthalmia and coloboma.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Alexander; Bakrania, Preeti; Bunyan, David J; Osborne, Robert J; Crolla, John A; Salt, Alison; Ayuso, Carmen; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Abou-Rayyah, Y; Collin, J Richard O; Robinson, David; Ragge, Nicola

    2008-11-01

    Severe ocular malformations, including anophthalmia-microphthalmia (AM), are responsible for around 25% of severe visual impairment in childhood. Recurrent interstitial deletions of 14q22-23 are associated with AM and a wide range of extra-ocular phenotypes including brain anomalies. The homeobox gene OTX2 is located at 14q22.3 and has recently been identified as mutated in AM patients. Eight human OTX2 mutations have been reported in subjects with severe eye malformations, including AM, and variable developmental delay. We screened a novel AM cohort for mutations and deletions in OTX2, and identified four new mutations in six individuals and two cases of whole gene deletions. Our data suggest that OTX2 mutations and deletions account for 2-3% of AM cases.

  5. Large-scale Phenotypic Profiling of Gene Deletion Mutants in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Tscherner, Michael; Kuchler, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method enabling the phenotypic profiling of genome-scale deletion collections of fungal mutants to detect phenotypes for various stress conditions. These stress conditions include among many others antifungal drug susceptibility, temperature-induced and osmotic as well as heavy metal or oxidative stress. The protocol was extensively used to phenotype a collection of gene deletion mutants in the human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata) (Schwarzmüller et al., 2014). PMID:27774498

  6. Mosaic 18q21.2 deletions including the TCF4 gene: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Labalme, Audrey; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Till, Marianne; Blanchard, Gaëlle; Dubois, Remi; Guibaud, Laurent; Heissat, Sophie; Javouhey, Etienne; Lachaux, Alain; Mure, Pierre-Yves; Ville, Dorothée; Edery, Patrick; Sanlaville, Damien

    2012-12-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) is characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphism, profound intellectual disability, and the possible occurrence of epilepsy and breathing anomalies. It is caused by haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 gene. No significant difference in clinical severity has been reported to date between PTHS patients carrying 18q21 deletions including the TCF4 gene, and those harboring TCF4 point mutations, suggesting a lack of genotype/phenotype correlation. Moreover, the size of 18q21 deletions including the TCF4 gene does not appear to have a significant effect on the phenotypic severity, suggesting that TCF4 haploinsufficiency is the most important prognostic factor in 18q deletions. We describe two unrelated patients presenting with clinical features reminiscent of PTHS and carrying mosaic interstitial 18q21 deletions characterized by array comparative genomic hybridization. One of the patients presented the lowest level of mosaic 18q21 deletion reported to date (5-10%). Our report and a review of the literature show that the mosaic status does not appear to have a significant effect on the clinical severity of 18q21 deletions, which are associated with a poor neurological outcome, whereas a mosaic TCF4 point mutation can result in a significantly milder phenotype. Malformations of internal organs are currently considered to be rare in PTHS. The patients described here had visceral anomalies, suggesting that a full morphological assessment, including heart and abdominal ultrasound scans, should be performed systematically in PTHS patients. PMID:23165966

  7. Patterns of dystrophin gene deletion in Egyptian Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    PubMed Central

    El Sherif, RM; Aly Fahmy, N; Nonaka, I; Etribi, MA

    2007-01-01

    Summary Large variations in the proportion of intragenic deletion in the dystrophin gene have been observed in different populations. Although dystrophin gene deletion was extensively studied all over the world, only few studies were done on Egyptian population and there was no account on the dystrophin gene duplication. In this study, we present our results on the pattern of deletion of the dystrophin gene together with the usage of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a method for duplication analysis within the dystrophin gene in Egyptian patients. Forty one Duchene/Becker muscular dystrophy patients were included in this study. The diagnosis was based on detailed clinical assessment, serum creatine kinase (CK) level, neurophysiologic study and muscle biopsy for histopathological analysis. DNA was extracted from ten milliliter peripheral blood according to basic protocol, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction for dystrophin gene using both Chamberlin and Beggs sets of primers amplifying eighteen exons covering the two main dystrophin gene hot spots. In addition primers from Abbs set were used when it was necessary to check the exon borders. DNA from cases with no detectable deletion was analyzed for dystrophin gene duplication using quantitative PCR technique. We had a percentage of 61.1% deletion which is higher than data from previous Egyptian studies and most of the deletion was localized in the major hotspot region between exons 44 and 52 and we had 5% of the cases with duplication. Our results were compared with previous studies from Egypt and with studies from different populations especially with data recorded in the Middle East and North Africa. PMID:18646563

  8. Third case of 8q23.3-q24.13 deletion in a patient with Langer-Giedion syndrome phenotype without TRPS1 gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2012-03-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) is a contiguous gene syndrome caused by a hemizygous deletion on chromosome 8q23.3-q24.11 involving TRPS1 and EXT1 genes. We report on a girl with LGS phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 8q23.3-q24.13. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) revealed a deletion encompassing only the EXT1 and not the TRPS1 gene. Even though the deletion of TRPS1 and EXT1 genes is responsible for craniofacial and skeletal features of LGS, there have been previous reports of patients with LGS phenotype and 8q24 deletions leaving the TRPS1 gene intact. To our knowledge, this is the third such case. Our patient differs from previously reported LGS patients without TRPS1 gene deletion in that she has the typical LGS facial dysmorphism and skeletal abnormalities. However, the girl is of normal height and has only a mild developmental delay. Additionally, she has dyslalia and premature adrenarche classified as Tanner stage 3 premature pubarche which have not yet been described as features of LGS. We examine the molecular breakpoints and phenotypes of our patient and previously reported cases.

  9. Deletion of the Olfactomedin 4 Gene Is Associated with Progression of Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhen; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Liu, Wenli; Zhu, Jianqiong; Hanson, Jeffrey C.; Pack, Svetlana; Zhuang, Zhengping; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2014-01-01

    The olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) gene is located on chromosome 13q14.3, which frequently is deleted in human prostate cancer. However, direct genetic evidence of OLFM4 gene alteration in human prostate cancer has not yet been obtained. In this study, we investigated the genetics, protein expression, and functions of the OLFM4 gene in human prostate cancer. We found overall 25% deletions within the OLFM4 gene in cancerous epithelial cells compared with adjacent normal epithelial cells that were microdissected from 31 prostate cancer specimens using laser-capture microdissection and genomic DNA sequencing. We found 28% to 45% hemizygous and 15% to 57% homozygous deletions of the OLFM4 gene via fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis from 44 different prostate cancer patient samples. Moreover, homozygous deletion of the OLFM4 gene significantly correlated with advanced prostate cancer. By using immunohistochemical analysis of 162 prostate cancer tissue array samples representing a range of Gleason scores, we found that OLFM4 protein expression correlated inversely with advanced prostate cancer, consistent with the genetic results. We also showed that a truncated mutant of OLFM4 that lacks the olfactomedin domain eliminated suppression of PC-3 prostate cancer cell growth. Together, our findings indicate that OLFM4 is a novel candidate tumor-suppressor gene for chromosome 13q and may shed new light on strategies that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24070418

  10. Genome-wide consequences of deleting any single gene

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xinchen; Dayhoff-Brannigan, Margaret; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Gilbert, Catherine E.; Sing, Cierra N.; Diny, Nicola L.; Wheelan, Sarah J.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Boeke, Jef D.; Pineda, Fernando J.; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2013-01-01

    Summary Loss or duplication of chromosome segments can lead to further genomic changes associated with cancer. However, it is not known if only a select subset of genes is responsible for driving further changes. To determine if perturbation of any given gene in a genome suffices to drive subsequent genetic changes, we analyzed the yeast knockout collection for secondary mutations of functional consequence. Unlike wild type, most gene knockout strains were found to have one additional mutant gene affecting nutrient responses and/or heat-stress-induced cell death. Moreover, independent knockouts of the same gene often evolved mutations in the same secondary gene. Genome sequencing identified acquired mutations in several human tumor suppressor homologs. Thus, mutation of any single gene may cause a genomic imbalance with consequences sufficient to drive adaptive genetic changes. This complicates genetic analyses, but is a logical consequence of losing a functional unit originally acquired under pressure during evolution. PMID:24211263

  11. Development of an Unmarked Gene Deletion System for the Filamentous Fungi Aspergillus niger and Talaromyces versatilis

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Stéphane; Llanos, Agustina; Parrou, Jean-Luc; Kokolski, Matthew; Pullan, Steven T.; Shunburne, Lee

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a method to delete genes in filamentous fungi that allows recycling of the selection marker and is efficient in a nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-proficient strain. We exemplify the approach by deletion of the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator XlnR in the fungus Aspergillus niger. To show the efficiency and advantages of the method, we deleted 8 other genes and constructed a double mutant in this species. Moreover, we showed that the same principle also functions in a different genus of filamentous fungus (Talaromyces versatilis, basionym Penicillium funiculosum). This technique will increase the versatility of the toolboxes for genome manipulation of model and industrially relevant fungi. PMID:24682295

  12. Targeted deletion and inversion of tandemly arrayed genes in Arabidopsis thaliana using zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yiping; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yong; Starker, Colby G; Baltes, Nicholas J; Zhang, Feng; Sander, Jeffry D; Reyon, Deepak; Joung, J Keith; Voytas, Daniel F

    2013-10-01

    Tandemly arrayed genes (TAGs) or gene clusters are prevalent in higher eukaryotic genomes. For example, approximately 17% of genes are organized in tandem in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The genetic redundancy created by TAGs presents a challenge for reverse genetics. As molecular scissors, engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) make DNA double-strand breaks in a sequence-specific manner. ZFNs thus provide a means to delete TAGs by creating two double-strand breaks in the gene cluster. Using engineered ZFNs, we successfully targeted seven genes from three TAGs on two Arabidopsis chromosomes, including the well-known RPP4 gene cluster, which contains eight resistance (R) genes. The resulting gene cluster deletions ranged from a few kb to 55 kb with frequencies approximating 1% in somatic cells. We also obtained large chromosomal deletions of ~9 Mb at approximately one tenth the frequency, and gene cluster inversions and duplications also were achieved. This study demonstrates the ability to use sequence-specific nucleases in plants to make targeted chromosome rearrangements and create novel chimeric genes for reverse genetics and biotechnology.

  13. Deletion in the gene BruAb2_0168 of Brucella abortus strains: diagnostic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dean, A S; Schelling, E; Bonfoh, B; Kulo, A E; Boukaya, G A; Pilo, P; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    Three Brucella abortus strains were isolated from joint hygromas from cows in northern Togo. Two deletions in the 5′ side of the gene BruAb2_0168 were identified. As this gene is used for species identification, these deletions have consequences for diagnostic procedures. Multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis was therefore performed for species identification. The strains showed unique VNTR profiles, providing some of the first genotypic data from West Africa. More molecular and epidemiological data are needed from the region, in order to better understand transmission patterns and develop suitable diagnostic assays. PMID:24450581

  14. A Catalog of Genes Homozygously Deleted in Human Lung Cancer and the Candidacy of PTPRD as a Tumor Suppressor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Takashi; Otsuka, Ayaka; Girard, Luc; Sato, Masanori; Iwakawa, Reika; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Minna, John D.; Yokota, Jun

    2010-01-01

    A total of 176 genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer were identified by DNA array-based whole genome scanning of 52 lung cancer cell lines and subsequent genomic PCR in 74 cell lines, including the 52 cell lines scanned. One or more exons of these genes were homozygously deleted in one (1%) to 20 (27%) cell lines. These genes included known tumor suppressor genes, e.g., CDKN2A/p16, RB1, and SMAD4, and candidate tumor suppressor genes whose hemizygous or homozygous deletions were reported in several types of human cancers, such as FHIT, KEAP1, and LRP1B/LRP-DIP. CDKN2A/p16 and p14ARF located in 9p21 were most frequently deleted (20/74, 27%). The PTPRD gene was most frequently deleted (8/74, 11%) among genes mapping to regions other than 9p21. Somatic mutations, including a nonsense mutation, of the PTPRD gene were detected in 8/74 (11%) of cell lines and 4/95 (4%) of surgical specimens of lung cancer. Reduced PTPRD expression was observed in the majority (>80%) of cell lines and surgical specimens of lung cancer. Therefore, PTPRD is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. Microarray-based expression profiling of 19 lung cancer cell lines also indicated that some of the 176 genes, such as KANK and ADAMTS1, are preferentially inactivated by epigenetic alterations. Genetic/epigenetic as well as functional studies of these 176 genes will increase our understanding of molecular mechanisms behind lung carcinogenesis. PMID:20073072

  15. A catalog of genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer and the candidacy of PTPRD as a tumor suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takashi; Otsuka, Ayaka; Girard, Luc; Sato, Masanori; Iwakawa, Reika; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Minna, John D; Yokota, Jun

    2010-04-01

    A total of 176 genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer were identified by DNA array-based whole genome scanning of 52 lung cancer cell lines and subsequent genomic PCR in 74 cell lines, including the 52 cell lines scanned. One or more exons of these genes were homozygously deleted in one (1%) to 20 (27%) cell lines. These genes included known tumor suppressor genes, e.g., CDKN2A/p16, RB1, and SMAD4, and candidate tumor suppressor genes whose hemizygous or homozygous deletions were reported in several types of human cancers, such as FHIT, KEAP1, and LRP1B/LRP-DIP. CDKN2A/p16 and p14ARF located in 9p21 were most frequently deleted (20/74, 27%). The PTPRD gene was most frequently deleted (8/74, 11%) among genes mapping to regions other than 9p21. Somatic mutations, including a nonsense mutation, of the PTPRD gene were detected in 8/74 (11%) of cell lines and 4/95 (4%) of surgical specimens of lung cancer. Reduced PTPRD expression was observed in the majority (>80%) of cell lines and surgical specimens of lung cancer. Therefore, PTPRD is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. Microarray-based expression profiling of 19 lung cancer cell lines also indicated that some of the 176 genes, such as KANK and ADAMTS1, are preferentially inactivated by epigenetic alterations. Genetic/epigenetic as well as functional studies of these 176 genes will increase our understanding of molecular mechanisms behind lung carcinogenesis.

  16. Investigation of TBX1 gene deletion in Iranian children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: correlation with conotruncal heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Hamid; Salehi, Mansoor; Sedghi, Maryam; Abdali, Hossein; Nouri, Nayereh; Sadri, Leyli; Hosseinzadeh, Majid; Vakili, Bahareh; Lotfi, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Background DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the result of a microdeletion in chromosome 22q11.2 in over 90% of cases. DGS is the second most frequent syndrome after Down syndrome and has an incidence of 1/4000 births. Unequal crossover between low-copy repeats, on the proximal part of the long arm of chromosome 22, usually results in a 3 Mb deletion in one of the chromosome 22 and a reciprocal and similarly sized duplication on the other one. Several studies have indicated that TBX1 (T-box 1) haploinsufficiency is responsible for many of the phenotypic traits of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Conotruncal heart defects (CTDs) are present in 75–85% of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in Western countries. Methods Among 78 patients fulfilling the criteria for DGS diagnosed by the fluorescence in situ hybridisation test, 24 had 22q11.2 deletion. Screening for TBX1 gene deletion was performed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Results Our results revealed that of 24 patients with TBX1 gene deletion, 12 had CTDs while 12 did not show any heart defects. Conclusions Our findings indicate that other genes or gene interactions may play a role in penetrance or the severity of heart disease among patients with DGS. PMID:27326128

  17. A 50 kb L1-type deletion mutation of the HEXB gene in Sandhoff disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.X.; Wakamatsu, N.; Akerman, B.R.

    1994-09-01

    Sandhoff disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting from mutations of the HEXB gene encoding the {beta}-subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A. A 16 kb deletion spanning the promoter region to intron 5 of the HEXB gene, occurring in {approximately}25% of mutant alleles, is the most common mutation known. We have identified a second large deletion in a patient with the severe, infantile form of Sandhoff disease. Single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis revealed that the proband, a carrier sister and their mother had one dose of the HEXB gene. This was distinguished through the identification of several polymorphic sites between the promoter and exon 5 (father heterozygous at all sites, others {open_quotes}hemizygous{close_quotes}). Using a combination of pulse field electrophoresis and fine mapping by Southern blot analysis, we found that the deletion begins {approximately}25 kb 5{prime} of the HEXB promoter and ends within a BamHI/MscI fragment in intron 6. Sequence analysis of the region abutting the site of the deletion in intron 6 suggests that the deletion arose from recombination between L1-type sequence repeats. The second mutation, inherited from the father, was found by SSCP analysis and direct sequencing of exon 1 PCR products to be C{sub 185}{yields}T (S62T) and was not present in 60 control chromosomes.

  18. Rb and p53 gene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted on mouse lung adenocarcinoma tissues that were formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago to investigate the large gene deletions of mRb and p53 in B6CF{sub 1} male mice. A total of 80 lung tissue samples from irradiated mice and 40 lung samples from nonirradiated controls were randomly selected and examined in the mRb portion of this study. The results showed a significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of mRb deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to 60 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses than those from mice receiving 24 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses at low doses and low dose rates; however, the percentage was not significantly different (P > 0.05) from that for spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas or lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to single-dose {gamma} irradiation at a similar total dose. mRb fragments 3 (71%) and 5 (67%), the parts of the gene that encoded the pocket binding region of Rb protein to adenovirus E1A and SV40 T-antigen, were the most frequently deleted fragments. p53 gene deletion analysis was carried out on normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found to bear mRb deletions. Exons 1,4,5,6, and 9 were chosen to be analyzed.

  19. Type I oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1) associated with a large deletion of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Wick, P.A.; Holmes, S.A.; Schnur, R.E. |

    1994-09-01

    OCA1 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin is reduced or absent in skin, hair, and eyes, due to deficient enzymatic activity of tyrosinase. TYR consists of 5 exons spanning over 65 kb at 11q14-q21. Analyses of TYR in >400 unrelated patients with OCA1 have identified more than 50 different point mutations; however, no large deletions have been detected. Here we report a large deletion of TYR in a Caucasian boy with OCA1B. Simultaneous SSCP/heteroduplex screening and DNA sequence analysis indicated that the patient was apparently homozygous for a previously described TYR mutation, adjacent to the 3` splice site of IVS2 (-7, t{r_arrow}a). To distinguish between possible gene deletion vs. maternal uniparental isodisomy, we characterized several chromosome 11 polymorphisms. Maternal uniparental isodisomy was excluded by the patient`s heterozygosity for alleles at D11S35 (11q21-122) and HBG2 (11p15.5). In addition, the patient failed to inherit paternal alleles at an MboI RFLP in exon 1 of TYR and at a TaqI RFLP in the promoter region of the gene. To detect a possible submicroscopic deletion, we performed quantitative Southern blot hybridization using a full length TYR cDNA. Compared with controls, both the patient and his father appeared deleted for two or three TYR-derived PstI fragments; the two TYRL-derived fragments appeared normal. These data indicate that the patient and his father have a partial TYR deletion, including at least exons 1, 2, and IVS2. Based on the organization of the gene, this deletion is at least 50 kb in size. The patient is thus hemizygous for the maternally-inherited mutation in IVS2, accounting for his OCA1B phenotype.

  20. A cluster of cooperating tumor-suppressor gene candidates in chromosomal deletions

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Kitzing, Thomas; Roessler, Stephanie; Zuber, Johannes; Krasnitz, Alexander; Schultz, Nikolaus; Revill, Kate; Weissmueller, Susann; Rappaport, Amy R.; Simon, Janelle; Zhang, Jack; Luo, Weijun; Hicks, James; Zender, Lars; Wang, Xin Wei; Powers, Scott; Wigler, Michael; Lowe, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    The large chromosomal deletions frequently observed in cancer genomes are often thought to arise as a “two-hit” mechanism in the process of tumor-suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation. Using a murine model system of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and in vivo RNAi, we test an alternative hypothesis, that such deletions can arise from selective pressure to attenuate the activity of multiple genes. By targeting the mouse orthologs of genes frequently deleted on human 8p22 and adjacent regions, which are lost in approximately half of several other major epithelial cancers, we provide evidence suggesting that multiple genes on chromosome 8p can cooperatively inhibit tumorigenesis in mice, and that their cosuppression can synergistically promote tumor growth. In addition, in human HCC patients, the combined down-regulation of functionally validated 8p TSGs is associated with poor survival, in contrast to the down-regulation of any individual gene. Our data imply that large cancer-associated deletions can produce phenotypes distinct from those arising through loss of a single TSG, and as such should be considered and studied as distinct mutational events. PMID:22566646

  1. Gamma thalassemia resulting from the deletion of a gamma-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, P K; Nakatsuji, T; Gardiner, M B; Reese, A L; Gilman, J G; Huisman, T H

    1983-01-01

    The first example of a deletion of one of the two gamma globin genes has been characterized through an analysis of the DNA of the heterozygous parent of a homozygous newborn, using restriction endonuclease mapping techniques. A deletion of approximately 5 kb was observed which was probably caused by an unequal crossing-over between the -G gamma- and -A gamma- genes resulting in the formation of a -G gamma A gamma- hybrid gene. Data on proportions of G gamma and A gamma chains in newborn babies assumed to be heterozygous for the hybrid and normal genes suggest that this hybrid gene may be producing its A gamma chain at levels normally seen only for the G gamma chain. Images PMID:6306596

  2. Recurring exon deletions in the haptoglobin (HP) gene associate with lower blood cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Boettger, Linda M.; Salem, Rany M.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Peloso, Gina; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Two exons of the human haptoglobin (HP) gene exhibit copy number variation that affects HP multimerization and underlies one of the first protein polymorphisms identified in humans. The evolutionary origins and medical significance of this polymorphism have been uncertain. Here we show that this variation has likely arisen from the recurring reversion of an ancient hominin-specific duplication of these exons. Though this polymorphism has been largely invisible to genome-wide genetic studies to date, we describe a way to analyze it by imputation from SNP haplotypes and find among 22,288 individuals that these HP exonic deletions associate with reduced LDL and total cholesterol levels. We show that these deletions, and a SNP that affects HP expression, are the likely drivers of the strong but complex association of cholesterol levels to SNPs near HP. Recurring exonic deletions in the haptoglobin gene likely enhance human health by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. PMID:26901066

  3. Markerless Gene Deletion with Cytosine Deaminase in Thermus thermophilus Strain HB27

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Hoffmann, Jana; Watzlawick, Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    We developed a counterselectable deletion system for Thermus thermophilus HB27 based on cytosine deaminase (encoded by codA) from Thermaerobacter marianensis DSM 12885 and the sensitivity of T. thermophilus HB27 to the antimetabolite 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The deletion vector comprises the pUC18 origin of replication, a thermostable kanamycin resistance marker functional in T. thermophilus HB27, and codA under the control of a constitutive putative trehalose promoter from T. thermophilus HB27. The functionality of the system was demonstrated by deletion of the bglT gene, encoding a β-glycosidase, and three carotenoid biosynthesis genes, CYP175A1, crtY, and crtI, from the genome of T. thermophilus HB27. PMID:26655764

  4. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-04-01

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  5. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF[sub 1] mice irradiated with [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from [gamma]-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5[prime] region of the mRb gene.

  6. Porcine Zygote Injection with Cas9/sgRNA Results in DMD-Modified Pig with Muscle Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Hao; Zhao, Heng; Qing, Yu-Bo; Pan, Wei-Rong; Jia, Bao-Yu; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Huang, Xing-Xu; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD) is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology and anatomy with humans and are thus an excellent animal model of human disease. Here, we successfully achieved precise DMD targeting in Chinese Diannan miniature pigs by co-injecting zygotes with Cas9 mRNA and sgRNA targeting DMD. Two piglets were obtained after embryo transfer, one of piglets was identified as DMD-modified individual via traditional cloning, sequencing and T7EN1 cleavage assay. An examination of targeting rates in the DMD-modified piglet revealed that sgRNA:Cas9-mediated on-target mosaic mutations were 70% and 60% of dystrophin alleles in skeletal and smooth muscle, respectively. Meanwhile, no detectable off-target mutations were found, highlighting the high specificity of genetic modification using CRISPR/Cas9. The DMD-modified piglet exhibited degenerative and disordered phenotypes in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and declining thickness of smooth muscle in the stomach and intestine. In conclusion, we successfully generated myopathy animal model by modifying the DMD via CRISPR/Cas9 system in a miniature pig. PMID:27735844

  7. Establishment of a Cre recombinase based mutagenesis protocol for markerless gene deletion in Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Koczula, A; Willenborg, J; Bertram, R; Takamatsu, D; Valentin-Weigand, P; Goethe, R

    2014-12-01

    The lack of knowledge about pathogenicity mechanisms of Streptococcus (S.) suis is, at least partially, attributed to limited methods for its genetic manipulation. Here, we established a Cre-lox based recombination system for markerless gene deletions in S. suis serotype 2 with high selective pressure and without undesired side effects.

  8. Direct cellobiose production from cellulose using sextuple beta-glucosidase gene deletion Neurospora crassa mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct cellobiose production from cellulose by a genetically modified fungus—Neurospora crassa, was explored in this study. A library of N. crassa sextuple beta-glucosidase (bgl) gene deletion strains was constructed. Various concentrations of cellobiose were detected in the culture broth of the N. ...

  9. Soluble epoxide hydrolase: Gene structure, expression and deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Todd R.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts epoxides to their corresponding diols through the addition of a water molecule. sEH readily hydrolyzes lipid signaling molecules, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), epoxidized lipids produced from arachidonic acid by the action of cytochrome p450s. Through its metabolism of the EETs and other lipid mediators, sEH contributes to the regulation of vascular tone, nociception, angiogenesis and the inflammatory response. Because of its central physiological role in disease states such as cardiac hypertrophy, diabetes, hypertension, and pain sEH is being investigated as a therapeutic target. This review begins with a brief introduction to sEH protein structure and function. sEH evolution and gene structure are then discussed before human small nucleotide polymorphisms and mammalian gene expression are described in the context of several disease models. The review ends with an overview of studies that have employed the sEH knockout mouse model. PMID:23701967

  10. Soluble epoxide hydrolase: gene structure, expression and deletion.

    PubMed

    Harris, Todd R; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-09-10

    Mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts epoxides to their corresponding diols through the addition of a water molecule. sEH readily hydrolyzes lipid signaling molecules, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), epoxidized lipids produced from arachidonic acid by the action of cytochrome p450s. Through its metabolism of the EETs and other lipid mediators, sEH contributes to the regulation of vascular tone, nociception, angiogenesis and the inflammatory response. Because of its central physiological role in disease states such as cardiac hypertrophy, diabetes, hypertension, and pain sEH is being investigated as a therapeutic target. This review begins with a brief introduction to sEH protein structure and function. sEH evolution and gene structure are then discussed before human small nucleotide polymorphisms and mammalian gene expression are described in the context of several disease models. The review ends with an overview of studies that have employed the sEH knockout mouse model. PMID:23701967

  11. Targeted gene deletion of Leishmania major genes encoding developmental stage-specific leishmanolysin (GP63).

    PubMed

    Joshi, P B; Sacks, D L; Modi, G; McMaster, W R

    1998-02-01

    The major surface glycoprotein of Leishmania major is a zinc metalloproteinase of 63 kDa referred to as leishmanolysin or GP63, which is encoded by a family of seven genes. Targeted gene replacement was used to delete gp63 genes 1-6 encoding the highly expressed promastigote and constitutively expressed GP63. In the L. major homozygous mutants deficient in gp63 genes 1-6, there was no expression of GP63 as detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or fluorescent staining in promastigotes from the procyclic stage (logarithmic growth phase). The remaining L. major gP63 gene 7 was shown to be developmentally regulated, as it was expressed exclusively in infectious metacyclic stage (late stationary growth phase) promastigotes and in lesion amastigotes. The gp63 genes 1-6-deficient mutants showed increased sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis. The sensitivity to lysis was greater in procyclics than in metacyclics when compared with the equivalent wild-type stages. Increased resistance of the mutant metacyclic promastigotes correlated with the expression of gp63 gene 7 and was restored to the same levels as wild-type promastigotes by transfection with gp63 gene 1. Thus, expression of GP63 is clearly involved in conferring resistance to complement-mediated lysis. The L. major GP63 1-6 mutants were capable of infecting mouse macrophages and differentiating into amastigotes. Similar levels of infection and subsequent intracellular survival were observed when mouse macrophages were infected in vitro with wild type, GP63 1-6 mutants and mutants transfected with gp63 gene 1. The GP63 1-6 mutants were capable of lesion formation in BALB/c mice and, thus, gp63 genes 1-6 do not play a role in the survival of the parasite within mouse macrophages. The role of gp63 genes 1-6 in parasite development within the sandfly vector was studied. GP63 1-6 mutants grew normally in the blood-engorged midgut of both Phlebotomus argentipes and P. papatasi However

  12. Deletion pattern of the STS gene in X-linked ichthyosis in a Mexican population.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Vaca, A. L.; Valdes-Flores, M. del R.; Rivera-Vega, M. R.; González-Huerta, L. M.; Kofman-Alfaro, S. H.; Cuevas-Covarrubias, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is an inherited disorder due to steroid sulfatase deficiency (STS). Most XLI patients (>90%) have complete deletion of the STS gene and flanking sequences. The presence of low copy number repeats (G1.3 and CRI-S232) on either side of the STS gene seems to play a role in the high frequency of these interstitial deletions. In the present study, we analyzed 80 Mexican patients with XLI and complete deletion of the STS gene. MATERIALS AND METHODS: STS activity was measured in the leukocytes using 7-[(3)H]-dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate as a substrate. Amplification of the regions telomeric-DXS89, DXS996, DXS1139, DXS1130, 5' STS, 3' STS, DXS1131, DXS1133, DXS237, DXS1132, DXF22S1, DXS278, DXS1134-centromeric was performed through PCR. RESULTS: No STS activity was detected in the XLI patients (0.00 pmoles/mg protein/h). We observed 3 different patterns of deletion. The first two groups included 25 and 32 patients, respectively, in which homologous sequences were involved. These subjects showed the 5' STS deletion at the sequence DXS1139, corresponding to the probe CRI-S232A2. The group of 32 patients presented the 3' STS rupture site at the sequence DXF22S1 (probe G1.3) and the remaining 25 patients had the 3' STS breakpoint at the sequence DXS278 (probe CRI-S232B2). The third group included 23 patients with the breakpoints at several regions on either side of the STS gene. No implication of the homologous sequences were observed in this group. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that more complex mechanisms, apart from homologous recombination, are occurring in the genesis of the breakpoints of the STS gene of XLI Mexican patients. PMID:11844872

  13. Human Cone Visual Pigment Deletions Spare Sufficient Photoreceptors to Warrant Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Hufnagel, Robert B.; Carroll, Joseph; Sumaroka, Alexander; Luo, Xunda; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Dubra, Alfredo; Land, Megan; Michaelides, Michel; Gardner, Jessica C.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Moore, Anthony T.; Sisk, Robert A.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Kohl, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Human X-linked blue-cone monochromacy (BCM), a disabling congenital visual disorder of cone photoreceptors, is a candidate disease for gene augmentation therapy. BCM is caused by either mutations in the red (OPN1LW) and green (OPN1MW) cone photoreceptor opsin gene array or large deletions encompassing portions of the gene array and upstream regulatory sequences that would predict a lack of red or green opsin expression. The fate of opsin-deficient cone cells is unknown. We know that rod opsin null mutant mice show rapid postnatal death of rod photoreceptors. Using in vivo histology with high-resolution retinal imaging, we studied a cohort of 20 BCM patients (age range 5–58) with large deletions in the red/green opsin gene array. Already in the first years of life, retinal structure was not normal: there was partial loss of photoreceptors across the central retina. Remaining cone cells had detectable outer segments that were abnormally shortened. Adaptive optics imaging confirmed the existence of inner segments at a spatial density greater than that expected for the residual blue cones. The evidence indicates that human cones in patients with deletions in the red/green opsin gene array can survive in reduced numbers with limited outer segment material, suggesting potential value of gene therapy for BCM. PMID:24067079

  14. FOXP2 gene deletion and infant feeding difficulties: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Emily; Maron, Jill L

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P2 (FOXP2) is a well-studied gene known to play an essential role in normal speech development. Deletions in the gene have been shown to result in developmental speech disorders and regulatory disruption of downstream gene targets associated with common forms of language impairments. Despite similarities in motor planning and execution between speech development and oral feeding competence, there have been no reports to date linking deletions within the FOXP2 gene to oral feeding impairments in the newborn. The patient was a nondysmorphic, appropriately and symmetrically grown male infant born at 35-wk gestational age. He had a prolonged neonatal intensive care unit stay because of persistent oral feeding incoordination requiring gastrostomy tube placement. Cardiac and neurological imagings were within normal limits. A microarray analysis found an ∼9-kb loss within chromosome band 7q3.1 that contains exon 2 of FOXP2, demonstrating a single copy of this region instead of the normal two copies per diploid gene. This case study expands our current understanding of the role FOXP2 exerts on motor planning and coordination necessary for both oral feeding success and speech-language development. This case report has important consequences for future diagnosis and treatment for infants with FOXP2 deletions, mutations, and varying levels of gene expression.

  15. FOXP2 gene deletion and infant feeding difficulties: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Emily; Maron, Jill L.

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P2 (FOXP2) is a well-studied gene known to play an essential role in normal speech development. Deletions in the gene have been shown to result in developmental speech disorders and regulatory disruption of downstream gene targets associated with common forms of language impairments. Despite similarities in motor planning and execution between speech development and oral feeding competence, there have been no reports to date linking deletions within the FOXP2 gene to oral feeding impairments in the newborn. The patient was a nondysmorphic, appropriately and symmetrically grown male infant born at 35-wk gestational age. He had a prolonged neonatal intensive care unit stay because of persistent oral feeding incoordination requiring gastrostomy tube placement. Cardiac and neurological imagings were within normal limits. A microarray analysis found an ∼9-kb loss within chromosome band 7q3.1 that contains exon 2 of FOXP2, demonstrating a single copy of this region instead of the normal two copies per diploid gene. This case study expands our current understanding of the role FOXP2 exerts on motor planning and coordination necessary for both oral feeding success and speech–language development. This case report has important consequences for future diagnosis and treatment for infants with FOXP2 deletions, mutations, and varying levels of gene expression. PMID:27148578

  16. Seven gene deletions in seven days: Fast generation of Escherichia coli strains tolerant to acetate and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sheila I; Lennen, Rebecca M; Herrgård, Markus J; Nielsen, Alex T

    2015-12-08

    Generation of multiple genomic alterations is currently a time consuming process. Here, a method was established that enables highly efficient and simultaneous deletion of multiple genes in Escherichia coli. A temperature sensitive plasmid containing arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and a rhamnose inducible flippase recombinase was constructed to facilitate fast marker-free deletions. To further speed up the procedure, we integrated the arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and the rhamnose inducible FLP into the genome of E. coli K-12 MG1655. This system enables growth at 37 °C, thereby facilitating removal of integrated antibiotic cassettes and deletion of additional genes in the same day. Phosphorothioated primers were demonstrated to enable simultaneous deletions during one round of electroporation. Utilizing these methods, we constructed strains in which four to seven genes were deleted in E. coli W and E. coli K-12. The growth rate of an E. coli K-12 quintuple deletion strain was significantly improved in the presence of high concentrations of acetate and NaCl. In conclusion, we have generated a method that enables efficient and simultaneous deletion of multiple genes in several E. coli variants. The method enables deletion of up to seven genes in as little as seven days.

  17. Seven gene deletions in seven days: Fast generation of Escherichia coli strains tolerant to acetate and osmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Sheila I.; Lennen, Rebecca M.; Herrgård, Markus J.; Nielsen, Alex T.

    2015-01-01

    Generation of multiple genomic alterations is currently a time consuming process. Here, a method was established that enables highly efficient and simultaneous deletion of multiple genes in Escherichia coli. A temperature sensitive plasmid containing arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and a rhamnose inducible flippase recombinase was constructed to facilitate fast marker-free deletions. To further speed up the procedure, we integrated the arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and the rhamnose inducible FLP into the genome of E. coli K-12 MG1655. This system enables growth at 37 °C, thereby facilitating removal of integrated antibiotic cassettes and deletion of additional genes in the same day. Phosphorothioated primers were demonstrated to enable simultaneous deletions during one round of electroporation. Utilizing these methods, we constructed strains in which four to seven genes were deleted in E. coli W and E. coli K-12. The growth rate of an E. coli K-12 quintuple deletion strain was significantly improved in the presence of high concentrations of acetate and NaCl. In conclusion, we have generated a method that enables efficient and simultaneous deletion of multiple genes in several E. coli variants. The method enables deletion of up to seven genes in as little as seven days. PMID:26643270

  18. Seven gene deletions in seven days: Fast generation of Escherichia coli strains tolerant to acetate and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sheila I; Lennen, Rebecca M; Herrgård, Markus J; Nielsen, Alex T

    2015-01-01

    Generation of multiple genomic alterations is currently a time consuming process. Here, a method was established that enables highly efficient and simultaneous deletion of multiple genes in Escherichia coli. A temperature sensitive plasmid containing arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and a rhamnose inducible flippase recombinase was constructed to facilitate fast marker-free deletions. To further speed up the procedure, we integrated the arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and the rhamnose inducible FLP into the genome of E. coli K-12 MG1655. This system enables growth at 37 °C, thereby facilitating removal of integrated antibiotic cassettes and deletion of additional genes in the same day. Phosphorothioated primers were demonstrated to enable simultaneous deletions during one round of electroporation. Utilizing these methods, we constructed strains in which four to seven genes were deleted in E. coli W and E. coli K-12. The growth rate of an E. coli K-12 quintuple deletion strain was significantly improved in the presence of high concentrations of acetate and NaCl. In conclusion, we have generated a method that enables efficient and simultaneous deletion of multiple genes in several E. coli variants. The method enables deletion of up to seven genes in as little as seven days. PMID:26643270

  19. An analysis of substitution, deletion and insertion mutations in cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Iengar, Prathima

    2012-08-01

    Cancer-associated mutations in cancer genes constitute a diverse set of mutations associated with the disease. To gain insight into features of the set, substitution, deletion and insertion mutations were analysed at the nucleotide level, from the COSMIC database. The most frequent substitutions were c → t, g → a, g → t, and the most frequent codon changes were to termination codons. Deletions more than insertions, FS (frameshift) indels more than I-F (in-frame) ones, and single-nucleotide indels, were frequent. FS indels cause loss of significant fractions of proteins. The 5'-cut in FS deletions, and 5'-ligation in FS insertions, often occur between pairs of identical bases. Interestingly, the cut-site and 3'-ligation in insertions, and 3'-cut and join-pair in deletions, were each found to be the same significantly often (p < 0.001). It is suggested that these features aid the incorporation of indel mutations. Tumor suppressors undergo larger numbers of mutations, especially disruptive ones, over the entire protein length, to inactivate two alleles. Proto-oncogenes undergo fewer, less-disruptive mutations, in selected protein regions, to activate a single allele. Finally, catalogues, in ranked order, of genes mutated in each cancer, and cancers in which each gene is mutated, were created. The study highlights the nucleotide level preferences and disruptive nature of cancer mutations.

  20. Tackling the issue of environmental survival of live Salmonella Typhimurium vaccines: deletion of the lon gene.

    PubMed

    Leyman, Bregje; Boyen, Filip; Van Parys, Alexander; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination is an important measure to control Salmonella contamination in the meat production chain. A previous study showed that both the ΔrfaJ and ΔrfaL strains are suitable markers and allow serological differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. The aim of this study was to verify whether deletion of the lon gene in a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔrfaJ marker strain resulted in decreased environmental survival. Our results indicate that deletion of the lon gene in the ΔrfaJ strain did not affect invasiveness in IPEC-J2 cells and resulted in an increased susceptibility to UV, disinfectants (such as hydrogen peroxide and tosylchloramide sodium) and citric acid. Immunization of pigs with inactivated ΔrfaJ or ΔlonΔrfaJ vaccines allowed differentiation of infected and vaccinated pigs. Furthermore, deletion of the lon gene did not reduce the protection conferred by live wild type or ΔrfaJ vaccines against subsequent challenge with a virulent Salmonella Typhimurium strain in BALB/c mice. Based on our results in mice, we conclude that deletion of lon in ΔrfaJ contributes to environmental safety of the ΔrfaJ DIVA strain.

  1. Aneuploidies, deletion, and overexpression of TP53 gene in intestinal metaplasia of patients without gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    César, Ana Cristina Gobbo; Borim, Aldenis Albaneze; Caetano, Alaor; Cury, Patrícia Maluf; Silva, Ana Elizabete

    2004-09-01

    Gastric carcinogenesis is attributable to interacting environmental and genetic factors, through a sequence of events including intestinal metaplasia. Using a fluorescence in situ hybridization technique, we investigated the occurrence of aneuploidies of chromosomes 3, 7, 8, 9, and 17, TP53 gene deletion, and expression of p53 in 21 intestinal metaplasia (IM) samples from cancer-free patients and in 20 gastric adenocarcinoma samples. Aneuploidies were found in 71% (15/21) of the IM samples. Trisomy of chromosomes 7 and 9 occurred mainly in complete-type IM; in the incomplete type, trisomy of chromosomes 7 and 8 were more commonly found. The TP53 gene deletion was observed in 60% (3/5) of the IM cases, and immunohistochemistry revealed p53 overexpression in 12% (2/17) of the analyzed IM cases. All gastric adenocarcinoma cases presented higher frequencies of trisomy or tetrasomy of chromosomes 3, 7, 8, 9, and 17. The TP53 deletion was found in all three of the gastric adenocarcinoma analyzed for it, and immunohistochemistry detected overexpression of protein p53 in 80% (12/15) of the analyzed cases. Our study revealed for the first time the presence of aneuploidies of chromosomes 7, 8, 9, and 17 and of TP53 gene deletion and overexpression in IM samples from cancer-free patients. These results suggest that IM and gastric adenocarcinoma may share the same genetic alterations. PMID:15350302

  2. Large exonic deletions in POLR3B gene cause POLR3-related leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mariana; Thiffault, Isabelle; Guerrero, Kether; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Tran, Luan T; Benko, William; van der Knaap, Marjo S; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Wolf, Nicole I; Bernard, Geneviève

    2015-06-05

    POLR3-related (or 4H) leukodystrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in POLR3A or POLR3B and is characterized by neurological and non-neurological features. In a small proportion of patients, no mutation in either gene or only one mutation is found. Analysis of the POLR3B cDNA revealed a large deletion of exons 21-22 in one case and of exons 26-27 in another case. These are the first reports of long deletions causing POLR3-related leukodystrophy, suggesting that deletions and duplications in POLR3A or POLR3B should be investigated in patients with a compatible phenotype, especially if one pathogenic variant has been identified.

  3. Total alpha-globin gene cluster deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.A.; Haruyama, A.Z.; Chu, B.M.

    1994-09-01

    Most {alpha}-thalassemias [Thal] are due to large deletions. In Southeast Asians, the (--{sup SEA}) double {alpha}-globin gene deletion is common, 3 (--{sup Tot}) total {alpha}-globin cluster deletions are known: Filipino (--{sup Fil}), Thai (--{sup Thai}), and Chinese (--{sup Chin}). In a Hawaii Thal project, provisional diagnosis of {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygotes was based on microcytosis, normal isoelectric focusing, and no iron deficiency. One in 10 unselected Filipinos was an {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygote, 2/3 of these had a (--{sup Tot}) deletion: a {var_sigma}-cDNA probe consistently showed fainter intensity of the constant 5.5 kb {var_sigma}{sub 2} BamHI band, with no heterzygosity for {var_sigma}-globin region polymorphisms; {alpha}-cDNA or {var_sigma}-cDNA probes showed no BamHI or BglII bands diagnostic of the (--{sup SEA}) deletion; bands for the (-{alpha}) {alpha}-Thal-2 single {alpha}-globin deletions were only seen in Hb H cases. A reliable monoclonal anti-{var_sigma}-peptide antibody test for the (--{sup SEA}) deletion was always negative in (--{sup Tot}) samples. Southern digests with the Lo probe, a gift from D. Higgs of Oxford Univ., confirmed that 49 of 50 (--{sup Tot}) chromosomes in Filipinos were (--{sup Fil}). Of 20 {alpha}-Thal-1 hydrops born to Filipinos, 11 were (--{sup Fil}/--{sup SEA}) compound heterozygotes; 9 were (--{sup SEA}/--{sup SEA}) homozygotes, but none was a (--{sup Fil}/--{sup Fil}).

  4. Phenotype-Genotype Discrepancy Due to a 5.5-kb Deletion in the GALT Gene.

    PubMed

    González-del Angel, Ariadna; Velázquez-Aragón, José; Alcántara-Ortigoza, Miguel A; Vela-Amieva, Marcela; Hernández-Martínez, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT). More than 200 mutations have been described in the GALT gene. A 5.5-kb GALT deletion, first described in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, may lead either to an erroneous genotype assignment of classical galactosemia or to discrepancies with parental genotypes and the expected biochemical phenotype. The presence of the 5.5-kb deletion was examined in 27 Mexican nonrelated families with at least one child with reduced GALT activity in erythrocytes and it was detected in the 5.5% (n=3) of the 54 alleles tested. The first molecular studies in three of our families showed that the genotypes of the parents were inconsistent with those of their children, which were considered initially as homozygous p.N314D-Duarte 2, but after analyzing for the presence of the 5.5-kb deletion, were reassigned as compound heterozygotes [5.5-kb deletion]+[p.N314D-Duarte 2]. Identification of the 5.5-kb deletion in Mexican patients suggests that this mutation might not be exclusive to a given ethnic group and should be tested in other populations, especially when there is a discrepancy between the genotypes of patients and parents or by incongruence between biochemical phenotype and GALT genotype. Establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation for the 5.5-kb GALT deletion and determining the appropriate management will require additional studies in patients with a G/G genotype bearing the 5.5-kb GALT deletion.

  5. Molecular basis and consequences of a deletion in the amelogenin gene, analyzed by capture PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerstroem-Fermer, M.; Pettersson, U.; Landegren, U. )

    1993-07-01

    A mutation that disrupts the gene for one of the major proteins in tooth enamel has been investigated. The mutation is located in the amelogenin gene and causes X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta, characterized by defective mineralization of tooth enamel. The authors have isolated the breakpoints of a 5-kb deletion in the amelogenin gene on the basis of nucleotide sequence information located upstream of the lesion, using a technique termed capture PCR. The deletion removes five of the seven exons, spanning from the second intron to the last exon. Only the first two codons for the mature protein remain, consistent with the relatively severe phenotype of affected individuals in the present family. The mutation appears to have arisen as an illegitimate recombination event since of 11 nucleotide positions immediately surrounding the two breakpoints, 9 are identical. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Chronic granulomatous disease, the McLeod phenotype and the contiguous gene deletion syndrome-a review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD), a disorder of the NADPH oxidase system, results in phagocyte functional defects and subsequent infections with bacterial and fungal pathogens (such as Aspergillus species and Candida albicans). Deletions and missense, frameshift, or nonsense mutations in the gp91phox gene (also termed CYBB), located in the Xp21.1 region of the X chromosome, are associated with the most common form of CGD. When larger X-chromosomal deletions occur, including the XK gene deletion, a so-called "Contiguous Gene Deletion Syndrome" may result. The contiguous gene deletion syndrome is known to associate the Kell phenotype/McLeod syndrome with diseases such as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. These patients are often complicated and management requires special attention to the various facets of the syndrome. PMID:22111908

  7. Increased biomass production and glycogen accumulation in apcE gene deleted Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The effect of phycobilisome antenna-truncation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 on biomass production and glycogen accumulation have not yet been fully clarified. To investigate these effects here, the apcE gene, which encodes the anchor protein linking the phycobilisome to the thylakoid membrane, was deleted in a glucose tolerant strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Biomass production of the apcE-deleted strain under photoautotrophic and atmospheric air conditions was 1.6 times higher than that of strain PCC 6803 (1.32 ± 0.01 versus 0.84 ± 0.07 g cell-dry weight L−1, respectively) after 15 days of cultivation. In addition, the glycogen content of the apcE-deleted strain (24.2 ± 0.7%) was also higher than that of strain PCC 6803 (11.1 ± 0.3%). Together, these results demonstrate that antenna truncation by deleting the apcE gene was effective for increasing biomass production and glycogen accumulation under photoautotrophic and atmospheric air conditions in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. PMID:24949254

  8. Rabies Virus Vector Transgene Expression Level and Cytotoxicity Improvement Induced by Deletion of Glycoprotein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Shinya; Sato, Sho; Oyama, Kei; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Iijima, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is required for binding to neuronal receptors and for viral entry. G-deleted RV vector is a powerful tool for investigating the organization and function of the neural circuits. It gives the investigator the ability to genetically target initial infection to particular neurons and to control trans-synaptic propagation. In this study we have quantitatively evaluated the effect of G gene deletion on the cytotoxicity and transgene expression level of the RV vector. We compared the characteristics of the propagation-competent RV vector (rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP) and the G-deleted RV vector (rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP), both of which are based on the attenuated HEP-Flury strain and express monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) as a transgene. rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP showed lower cytotoxicity than rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP, and within 16 days of infection we found no change in the basic electrophysiological properties of neurons infected with the rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP. The mRFP expression level of rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP was much higher than that of rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP, and 3 days after infection the retrogradely infected neurons were clearly visualized by the expressed fluorescent protein without any staining. This may be due to the low cytotoxicity and/or the presumed change in the polymerase gene (L) expression level of the G-deleted RV vector. Although the mechanisms remains to be clarified, the results of this study indicate that deletion of the G gene greatly improves the usability of the RV vector for studying the organization and function of the neural circuits by decreasing the cytotoxicity and increasing the transgene expression level. PMID:24244660

  9. Early-onset obesity and paternal 2pter deletion encompassing the ACP1, TMEM18, and MYT1L genes

    PubMed Central

    Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Leroy, Camille; Schneider, Anouck; Petit, Florence; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Andrieux, Joris; Perrin-Sabourin, Laurence; Landais, Emilie; Aboura, Azzedine; Puechberty, Jacques; Girard, Manon; Tournaire, Magali; Sanchez, Elodie; Rooryck, Caroline; Ameil, Agnès; Goossens, Michel; Jonveaux, Philippe; Lefort, Geneviève; Taine, Laurence; Cailley, Dorothée; Gaillard, Dominique; Leheup, Bruno; Sarda, Pierre; Geneviève, David

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a common but highly, clinically, and genetically heterogeneous disease. Deletion of the terminal region of the short arm of chromosome 2 is rare and has been reported in about 13 patients in the literature often associated with a Prader–Willi-like phenotype. We report on five unrelated patients with 2p25 deletion of paternal origin presenting with early-onset obesity, hyperphagia, intellectual deficiency, and behavioural difficulties. Among these patients, three had de novo pure 2pter deletions, one presented with a paternal derivative der(2)t(2;15)(p25.3;q26) with deletion in the 2pter region and the last patient presented with an interstitial 2p25 deletion. The size of the deletions was characterized by SNP array or array-CGH and was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Four patients shared a 2p25.3 deletion with a minimal critical region estimated at 1.97 Mb and encompassing seven genes, namely SH3HYL1, ACP1, TMEMI8, SNTG2, TPO, PXDN, and MYT1L genes. The fifth patient had a smaller interstitial deletion encompassing the TPO, PXDN, and MYT1L genes. Paternal origin of the deletion was determined by genotyping using microsatellite markers. Analysis of the genes encompassed in the deleted region led us to speculate that the ACP1, TMEM18, and/or MYT1L genes might be involved in early-onset obesity. In addition, intellectual deficiency and behavioural troubles can be explained by the heterozygous loss of the SNTG2 and MYT1L genes. Finally, we discuss the parent-of-origin of the deletion. PMID:24129437

  10. Early-onset obesity and paternal 2pter deletion encompassing the ACP1, TMEM18, and MYT1L genes.

    PubMed

    Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Leroy, Camille; Schneider, Anouck; Petit, Florence; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Andrieux, Joris; Perrin-Sabourin, Laurence; Landais, Emilie; Aboura, Azzedine; Puechberty, Jacques; Girard, Manon; Tournaire, Magali; Sanchez, Elodie; Rooryck, Caroline; Ameil, Agnès; Goossens, Michel; Jonveaux, Philippe; Lefort, Geneviève; Taine, Laurence; Cailley, Dorothée; Gaillard, Dominique; Leheup, Bruno; Sarda, Pierre; Geneviève, David

    2014-04-01

    Obesity is a common but highly, clinically, and genetically heterogeneous disease. Deletion of the terminal region of the short arm of chromosome 2 is rare and has been reported in about 13 patients in the literature often associated with a Prader-Willi-like phenotype. We report on five unrelated patients with 2p25 deletion of paternal origin presenting with early-onset obesity, hyperphagia, intellectual deficiency, and behavioural difficulties. Among these patients, three had de novo pure 2pter deletions, one presented with a paternal derivative der(2)t(2;15)(p25.3;q26) with deletion in the 2pter region and the last patient presented with an interstitial 2p25 deletion. The size of the deletions was characterized by SNP array or array-CGH and was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Four patients shared a 2p25.3 deletion with a minimal critical region estimated at 1.97 Mb and encompassing seven genes, namely SH3HYL1, ACP1, TMEMI8, SNTG2, TPO, PXDN, and MYT1L genes. The fifth patient had a smaller interstitial deletion encompassing the TPO, PXDN, and MYT1L genes. Paternal origin of the deletion was determined by genotyping using microsatellite markers. Analysis of the genes encompassed in the deleted region led us to speculate that the ACP1, TMEM18, and/or MYT1L genes might be involved in early-onset obesity. In addition, intellectual deficiency and behavioural troubles can be explained by the heterozygous loss of the SNTG2 and MYT1L genes. Finally, we discuss the parent-of-origin of the deletion.

  11. Insertion and Deletion Mismatches Distant from the Target Position Improve Gene Correction with a Tailed Duplex.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Nishigaki, Natsuki; Ikeda, Akihiro; Yukawa, Seiya; Morita, Yukiko; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-07-01

    A 5'-tailed duplex (TD) DNA corrects a base-substitution mutation. In this study, the effects of insertion and deletion (indel) mismatches distant from the target position on the gene correction were examined. Three target plasmid DNAs with and without indel mismatches ∼330 bases distant from the correction target position were prepared, and introduced into HeLa cells together with the TD. The indel mismatches improved the gene correction efficiency and specificity without sequence conversions at the indel mismatch site. These results suggested that the gene correction efficiency and specificity are increased when an appropriate second mismatch is introduced into the TD fragment. PMID:27253876

  12. Treacher Collins syndrome with a de Novo 5-bp deletion in the TCOF1 gene.

    PubMed

    Su, Pen-Hua; Chen, Jia-Yu; Chen, Suh-Jen; Yu, Ju-Shan

    2006-06-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with features including malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, microtia, downward slanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid coloboma, conductive hearing loss, and cleft palate. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the nuclear phosphoprotein treacle. Here, we describe a 1-day-old male infant with classical TCS presentation. A 5-bp deletion in exon 22 of the TCOF1 gene (3469del ACTCT) was found to cause a premature stop codon. This is the first report of TCOF1 gene mutation in the Taiwanese population.

  13. Codon Deletions in the Influenza A Virus PA Gene Generate Temperature-Sensitive Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Léa; Sausset, Alix; Sedano, Laura; Da Costa, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, which is composed of three subunits, PB1, PB2, and PA, catalyzes genome replication and transcription within the cell nucleus. The PA linker (residues 197 to 256) can be altered by nucleotide substitutions to engineer temperature-sensitive (ts), attenuated mutants that display a defect in the transport of the PA–PB1 complex to the nucleus at a restrictive temperature. In this study, we investigated the ability of the PA linker to tolerate deletion mutations for further in vitro and in vivo characterization. Four viable mutants with single-codon deletions were generated; all of them exhibited a ts phenotype that was associated with the reduced efficiency of replication/transcription of a pseudoviral reporter RNA in a minireplicon assay. Using fluorescently tagged PB1, we observed that the deletion mutants did not efficiently recruit PB1 to reach the nucleus at a restrictive temperature (39.5°C). Mouse infections showed that the four mutants were attenuated and induced antibodies that were able to protect mice from challenge with a lethal homologous wild-type virus. Serial in vitro passages of two deletion mutants at 39.5°C and 37°C did not allow the restoration of a wild-type phenotype among virus progeny. Thus, our results identify codons that can be deleted in the PA gene to engineer genetically stable ts mutants that could be used to design novel attenuated vaccines. IMPORTANCE In order to generate genetically stable live influenza A virus vaccines, we constructed viruses with single-codon deletions in a discrete domain of the RNA polymerase PA gene. The four rescued viruses exhibited a temperature-sensitive phenotype that we found was associated with a defect in the transport of the PA–PB1 dimer to the nucleus, where viral replication occurs. These ts deletion mutants were shown to be attenuated and to be able to produce antibodies in mice and to protect them from a lethal challenge. Assays to

  14. Nociceptor-specific gene deletion using heterozygous NaV1.8-Cre recombinase mice.

    PubMed

    Stirling, L Caroline; Forlani, Greta; Baker, Mark D; Wood, John N; Matthews, Elizabeth A; Dickenson, Anthony H; Nassar, Mohammed A

    2005-01-01

    NaV1.8 is a voltage-gated sodium channel expressed only in a subset of sensory neurons of which more than 85% are nociceptors. In order to delete genes in nociceptive neurons, we generated heterozygous transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the NaV1.8 promoter. Functional Cre recombinase expression replicated precisely the expression pattern of NaV1.8. Cre expression began at embryonic day 14 in small diameter neurons in dorsal root, trigeminal and nodose ganglia, but was absent in non-neuronal or CNS tissues into adulthood. Sodium channel subtypes were normal in isolated DRG neurons. Pain behaviour in response to mechanical or thermal stimuli, and in acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain was also normal. These data demonstrate that the heterozygous NaV1.8-Cre mouse line is a useful tool to analyse the effects of deleting floxed genes on pain behaviour. PMID:15621361

  15. Gene deletion strategy to examine the involvement of the two chondroitin lyases in Flavobacterium columnare virulence.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Qin, Ting; Zhang, Xiao Lin; Huang, Bei; Liu, Zhi Xin; Xie, Hai Xia; Zhang, Jin; McBride, Mark J; Nie, Pin

    2015-11-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is an important bacterial pathogen of freshwater fish that causes high mortality of infected fish and heavy economic losses in aquaculture. The pathogenesis of this bacterium is poorly understood, in part due to the lack of efficient methods for genetic manipulation. In this study, a gene deletion strategy was developed and used to determine the relationship between the production of chondroitin lyases and virulence. The F. johnsoniae ompA promoter (PompA) was fused to sacB to construct a counterselectable marker for F. columnare. F. columnare carrying PompA-sacB failed to grow on media containing 10% sucrose. A suicide vector carrying PompA-sacB was constructed, and a gene deletion strategy was developed. Using this approach, the chondroitin lyase-encoding genes, cslA and cslB, were deleted. The ΔcslA and ΔcslB mutants were both partially deficient in digestion of chondroitin sulfate A, whereas a double mutant (ΔcslA ΔcslB) was completely deficient in chondroitin lyase activity. Cells of F. columnare wild-type strain G4 and of the chondroitin lyase-deficient ΔcslA ΔcslB mutant exhibited similar levels of virulence toward grass carp in single-strain infections. Coinfections, however, revealed a competitive advantage for the wild type over the chondroitin lyase mutant. The results indicate that chondroitin lyases are not essential virulence factors of F. columnare but may contribute to the ability of the pathogen to compete and cause disease in natural infections. The gene deletion method developed in this study may be employed to investigate the virulence factors of this bacterium and may have wide application in many other members of the phylum Bacteroidetes.

  16. Deletion of the meq gene significantly decreases immunosuppression in chickens caused by pathogenic marek's disease virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Marek's disease virus (MDV) causes an acute lymphoproliferative disease in chickens, resulting in immunosuppression, which is considered to be an integral aspect of the pathogenesis of Marek's disease (MD). A recent study showed that deletion of the Meq gene resulted in loss of transformation of T-cells in chickens and a Meq-null virus, rMd5ΔMeq, could provide protection superior to CVI988/Rispens. Results In the present study, to investigate whether the Meq-null virus could be a safe vaccine candidate, we constructed a Meq deletion strain, GX0101ΔMeq, by deleting both copies of the Meq gene from a pathogenic MDV, GX0101 strain, which was isolated in China. Pathogenesis experiments showed that the GX0101ΔMeq virus was fully attenuated in specific pathogen-free chickens because none of the infected chickens developed Marek's disease-associated lymphomas. The study also evaluated the effects of GX0101ΔMeq on the immune system in chickens after infection with GX0101ΔMeq virus. Immune system variables, including relative lymphoid organ weight, blood lymphocytes and antibody production following vaccination against AIV and NDV were used to assess the immune status of chickens. Experimental infection with GX0101ΔMeq showed that deletion of the Meq gene significantly decreased immunosuppression in chickens caused by pathogenic MDV. Conclusion These findings suggested that the Meq gene played an important role not only in tumor formation but also in inducing immunosuppressive effects in MDV-infected chickens. PMID:21205328

  17. Gene deletion strategy to examine the involvement of the two chondroitin lyases in Flavobacterium columnare virulence.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Qin, Ting; Zhang, Xiao Lin; Huang, Bei; Liu, Zhi Xin; Xie, Hai Xia; Zhang, Jin; McBride, Mark J; Nie, Pin

    2015-11-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is an important bacterial pathogen of freshwater fish that causes high mortality of infected fish and heavy economic losses in aquaculture. The pathogenesis of this bacterium is poorly understood, in part due to the lack of efficient methods for genetic manipulation. In this study, a gene deletion strategy was developed and used to determine the relationship between the production of chondroitin lyases and virulence. The F. johnsoniae ompA promoter (PompA) was fused to sacB to construct a counterselectable marker for F. columnare. F. columnare carrying PompA-sacB failed to grow on media containing 10% sucrose. A suicide vector carrying PompA-sacB was constructed, and a gene deletion strategy was developed. Using this approach, the chondroitin lyase-encoding genes, cslA and cslB, were deleted. The ΔcslA and ΔcslB mutants were both partially deficient in digestion of chondroitin sulfate A, whereas a double mutant (ΔcslA ΔcslB) was completely deficient in chondroitin lyase activity. Cells of F. columnare wild-type strain G4 and of the chondroitin lyase-deficient ΔcslA ΔcslB mutant exhibited similar levels of virulence toward grass carp in single-strain infections. Coinfections, however, revealed a competitive advantage for the wild type over the chondroitin lyase mutant. The results indicate that chondroitin lyases are not essential virulence factors of F. columnare but may contribute to the ability of the pathogen to compete and cause disease in natural infections. The gene deletion method developed in this study may be employed to investigate the virulence factors of this bacterium and may have wide application in many other members of the phylum Bacteroidetes. PMID:26253667

  18. Mullerian Duct Cyst Causing Bladder Outlet Obstruction in a Patient with HNF-1β Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Honore, Matthew; Fowler, Ross; Kiosoglous, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male was referred to a tertiary hospital for a possible prostatic abscess. The patient went into acute urinary retention. Transurethral drainage was performed. MRI pelvis three days post-operatively identified the prostatic cystic structure as a müllerian duct cyst. Several other phenotypical features were noted on examination as well as findings on investigations. From these diagnosis of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF-1β) gene deletion was made. PMID:27390584

  19. Deletions at the SOX10 Gene Locus Cause Waardenburg Syndrome Types 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Bondurand, Nadege ; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence ; Stanchina, Laure ; Collot, Nathalie ; Baral, Viviane ; Marlin, Sandrine ; Attie-Bitach, Tania ; Giurgea, Irina ; Skopinski, Laurent ; Reardon, William ; Toutain, Annick ; Sarda, Pierre ; Echaieb, Anis ; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marilyn ; Touraine, Renaud ; Amiel, Jeanne ; Goossens, Michel ; Pingault, Veronique 

    2007-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair and skin. Depending on additional symptoms, WS is classified into four subtypes, WS1–WS4. Absence of additional features characterizes WS2. The association of facial dysmorphic features defines WS1 and WS3, whereas the association with Hirschsprung disease (aganglionic megacolon) characterizes WS4, also called “Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease.” Mutations within the genes MITF and SNAI2 have been identified in WS2, whereas mutations of EDN3, EDNRB, and SOX10 have been observed in patients with WS4. However, not all cases are explained at the molecular level, which raises the possibility that other genes are involved or that some mutations within the known genes are not detected by commonly used genotyping methods. We used a combination of semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization to search for SOX10 heterozygous deletions. We describe the first characterization of SOX10 deletions in patients presenting with WS4. We also found SOX10 deletions in WS2 cases, making SOX10 a new gene of WS2. Interestingly, neurological phenotypes reminiscent of that observed in WS4 (PCWH syndrome [peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, WS, and Hirschsprung disease]) were observed in some WS2-affected patients with SOX10 deletions. This study further characterizes the molecular complexity and the close relationship that links the different subtypes of WS. PMID:17999358

  20. The interleukin 3 gene is located on human chromosome 5 and is deleted in myeloid leukemias with a deletion of 5q.

    PubMed Central

    Le Beau, M M; Epstein, N D; O'Brien, S J; Nienhuis, A W; Yang, Y C; Clark, S C; Rowley, J D

    1987-01-01

    The gene IL-3 encodes interleukin 3, a hematopoietic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) that is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types. By using somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, we localized this gene to human chromosome 5 at bands q23-31, a chromosomal region that is frequently deleted [del(5q)] in patients with myeloid disorders. By in situ hybridization, IL-3 was found to be deleted in the 5q-chromosome of one patient with refractory anemia who had a del(5)(q15q33.3), of three patients with refractory anemia (two patients) or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) de novo who had a similar distal breakpoint [del(5)(q13q33.3)], and of a fifth patient, with therapy-related ANLL, who had a similar distal breakpoint in band q33 [del(5)(q14q33.3)]. Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the normal or the deleted chromosome 5 from two patients with the refractory anemia 5q- syndrome indicated that IL-3 sequences were absent form the hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 5 but not from hybrids that had a cytologically normal chromosome 5. Thus, a small segment of chromosome 5 contains IL-3, GM-CSF (the gene encoding granulocyte-macrophage-CSF), CSF-1 (the gene encoding macrophage-CSF), and FMS (the human c-fms protooncogene, which encodes the CSF-1 receptor). Our findings and earlier results indicating that GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS were deleted in the 5q-chromosome, suggest that loss of IL-3 or of other CSF genes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders associated with a del(5q). Images PMID:3497400

  1. [Analysis of a GSTM1 gene deletion in the context of the GSTM genomic cluster diversity in three Russian populations].

    PubMed

    Filippova, I N; Khrunin, A V; Limborskaia, S A

    2014-01-01

    A total of 16 to 60% of individuals in human populations are homozygous with respect to a deletion of the Glutathione-S-transferase M1 gene. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the GSTM1 gene deletion and genetic diversity of the GSTM cluster, which includes this gene, in three Russian populations. The study was based on the comparison of the haplotype distribution in two groups of individuals subdivided accordingly to the presence of the deletion. The first group included individuals with completely deleted GSTM1 gene, and the second group comprised individuals having at least one functional variant of GSTM1 gene. The analysis of the haplotype frequencies in groups revealed no specificity in their distribution both within the populations and between them.

  2. Deletion of Indian hedgehog gene causes dominant semi-lethal Creeper trait in chicken.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sihua; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Yanyun; Yi, Guoqiang; Li, Junying; Lian, Ling; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Hou, Zhuocheng; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Creeper trait, a classical monogenic phenotype of chicken, is controlled by a dominant semi-lethal gene. This trait has been widely cited in the genetics and molecular biology textbooks for illustrating autosomal dominant semi-lethal inheritance over decades. However, the genetic basis of the Creeper trait remains unknown. Here we have utilized ultra-deep sequencing and extensive analysis for targeting causative mutation controlling the Creeper trait. Our results indicated that the deletion of Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene was only found in the whole-genome sequencing data of lethal embryos and Creeper chickens. Large scale segregation analysis demonstrated that the deletion of IHH was fully linked with early embryonic death and the Creeper trait. Expression analysis showed a much lower expression of IHH in Creeper than wild-type chickens. We therefore suggest the deletion of IHH to be the causative mutation for the Creeper trait in chicken. Our findings unravel the genetic basis of the longstanding Creeper phenotype mystery in chicken as the same gene also underlies bone dysplasia in human and mouse, and thus highlight the significance of IHH in animal development and human haploinsufficiency disorders. PMID:27439785

  3. Nrf2 gene deletion fails to alter psychostimulant-induced behavior or neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pacchioni, Alejandra M; Vallone, Joseph; Melendez, Roberto I; Shih, Andy; Murphy, Timothy H; Kalivas, Peter W

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2) regulates the induction of phase 2 detoxifying enzymes by oxidative stress, including synthesis of the catalytic subunit (xCT) of the heterodimeric cystine-glutamate exchanger (system xc-). Repeated cocaine treatment in rats causes persistent neuroadaptations in glutamate neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens that result, in part, from reduced activity of system xc-. Since in vitro under- or over-expression of Nrf2 regulates system xc- activity and xCT content, it was hypothesized that in vivo deletion of the Nrf2 gene would: 1) decrease system xc- activity, 2) produce a behavioral phenotype resembling that elicited by chronic cocaine administration, and 3) enhance dopamine depletion after methamphetamine-induced oxidative stress. In all three experiments no genotypic difference was measured between mice sustaining homozygous Nrf2 gene deletion and wild-type littermates. Thus, while Nrf2 is a transcriptional regulator of xCT and capable of protecting cells from oxidative stress, following Nrf2 gene deletion this role can be partially compensated by other mechanisms and methamphetamine-induced oxidative stress and dopamine toxicity does not significantly involve Nrf2.

  4. Deletion of Indian hedgehog gene causes dominant semi-lethal Creeper trait in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sihua; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Yanyun; Yi, Guoqiang; Li, Junying; Lian, Ling; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Hou, Zhuocheng; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Creeper trait, a classical monogenic phenotype of chicken, is controlled by a dominant semi-lethal gene. This trait has been widely cited in the genetics and molecular biology textbooks for illustrating autosomal dominant semi-lethal inheritance over decades. However, the genetic basis of the Creeper trait remains unknown. Here we have utilized ultra-deep sequencing and extensive analysis for targeting causative mutation controlling the Creeper trait. Our results indicated that the deletion of Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene was only found in the whole-genome sequencing data of lethal embryos and Creeper chickens. Large scale segregation analysis demonstrated that the deletion of IHH was fully linked with early embryonic death and the Creeper trait. Expression analysis showed a much lower expression of IHH in Creeper than wild-type chickens. We therefore suggest the deletion of IHH to be the causative mutation for the Creeper trait in chicken. Our findings unravel the genetic basis of the longstanding Creeper phenotype mystery in chicken as the same gene also underlies bone dysplasia in human and mouse, and thus highlight the significance of IHH in animal development and human haploinsufficiency disorders. PMID:27439785

  5. Exon skipping and translation in patients with frameshift deletions in the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sherratt, T.G.; Dubowitz, V.; Sewry, C.A.; Strong, P.N. ); Vulliamy, T. )

    1993-11-01

    Although many Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have a deletion in the dystrophin gene which disrupts the translational reading frame, they express dystrophin in a small proportion of skeletal muscle fibers ([open quotes]revertant fibers[close quotes]). Antibody studies have shown, indirectly, that dystrophin synthesis in revertant fibers is facilitated by a frame-restoring mechanism; in the present study, the feasibility of mRNA splicing was investigated. Dystrophin transcripts were analyzed in skeletal muscle from individuals possessing revertant fibers and a frameshift deletion in the dystrophin gene. In each case a minor in-frame transcript was detected, in which exons adjacent to those deleted from the genome had been skipped. There appeared to be some correlation between the levels of in-frame transcripts and the predicted translation products. Low levels of alternatively spliced transcripts were also present in normal muscle. The results provide further evidence of exon skipping in the dystrophin gene and indicate that this may be involved in the synthesis of dystrophin by revertant fibers. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  6. A guinea-pig hereditary cataract contains a splice-site deletion in a crystallin gene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, I R; Gonzalez, P; Zigler, J S; Borrás, T

    1992-10-13

    A congenital cataract present in guinea pigs provided a unique opportunity to study a hereditary lens disease at the molecular level. zeta-Crystallin, one of the most abundant guinea pig lens proteins, was found to be altered in the lens of cataractous animals. Several zeta-crystallin cDNA clones were isolated from a cataractous lens library and found to contain a 102-bp deletion towards the 3' end of the coding region. This deletion does not interfere with the reading frame but results in a protein 34 amino acids shorter. Sequence analysis of a normal genomic zeta-crystallin clone revealed that the missing 102-bp fragment corresponds to an entire exon (exon 7). PCR analysis of the genomic DNA isolated from cataractous animals showed that exon 7, though missing from the mRNA, is intact in the cataractous genome. Further sequence analysis of the zeta-crystallin gene disclosed a dinucleotide deletion of the universal AG at the acceptor splice-site of intron 6 of the mutant gene. The presence of this mutation results in the skipping of exon 7 during the mRNA processing which in turn results in the altered zeta-crystallin protein. This is the first time a genomic mutation in an enzyme/crystallin gene has been directly linked to a congenital cataract.

  7. DMD reliability: a MEMS success story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) developed by Texas Instruments (TI) has made tremendous progress in both performance and reliability since it was first invented in 1987. From the first working concept of a bistable mirror, the DMD is now providing high-brightness, high-contrast, and high-reliability in over 1,500,000 projectors using Digital Light Processing technology. In early 2000, TI introduced the first DMD chip with a smaller mirror (14-micron pitch versus 17-micron pitch). This allowed a greater number of high-resolution DMD chips per wafer, thus providing an increased output capacity as well as the flexibility to use existing package designs. By using existing package designs, subsequent DMDs cost less as well as met our customers' demand for faster time to market. In recent years, the DMD achieved the status of being a commercially successful MEMS device. It reached this status by the efforts of hundreds of individuals working toward a common goal over many years. Neither textbooks nor design guidelines existed at the time. There was little infrastructure in place to support such a large endeavor. The knowledge we gained through our characterization and testing was all we had available to us through the first few years of development. Reliability was only a goal in 1992 when production development activity started; a goal that many throughout the industry and even within Texas Instruments doubted the DMD could achieve. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that we succeeded by exceeding the reliability goals.

  8. Possible deletion of a developmentally regulated heavy-chain variable region gene in autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Olee, Tsaiwei; Kozin, F.; Carson, D.A.; Chen, P.P. ); Olsen, N.J. ); Siminovitch, K.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Several autoantibody-associated variable region (V) genes are preferentially expressed during early ontogenic development, suggesting strongly that they are of developmental and physiological importance. As such, it is possible that polymorphisms in one or more of these genes may alter susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The authors have searched extensively for a probe related to a developmentally regulated V gene that has the power to differentiate among highly homologous V genes in human populations. Using such a probe (i.e., Humhv3005/P1) related to both anti-DNA and anti-IgG autoantibodies, they studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus and found an apparent heavy-chain V (V{sub H}) gene deletion that was nearly restricted to the autoimmune patients. These data suggest that deletions of physiologically important V{sub H} genes may increase the risk of autoimmunity through indirect effects on the development and homeostasis of the B-cell repertoire.

  9. Candida albicans Gene Deletion with a Transient CRISPR-Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyunghun; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Woolford, Carol A; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated gene 9 (CRISPR-Cas9) systems are used for a wide array of genome-editing applications in organisms ranging from fungi to plants and animals. Recently, a CRISPR-Cas9 system has been developed for the diploid fungal pathogen Candida albicans; the system accelerates genetic manipulation dramatically [V. K. Vyas, M. I. Barrasa, and G. R. Fink, Sci Adv 1(3):e1500248, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1500248]. We show here that the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic elements can function transiently, without stable integration into the genome, to enable the introduction of a gene deletion construct. We describe a transient CRISPR-Cas9 system for efficient gene deletion in C. albicans. Our observations suggest that there are two mechanisms that lead to homozygous deletions: (i) independent recombination of transforming DNA into each allele and (ii) recombination of transforming DNA into one allele, followed by gene conversion of the second allele. Our approach will streamline gene function analysis in C. albicans, and our results indicate that DNA can function transiently after transformation of this organism. IMPORTANCE The fungus Candida albicans is a major pathogen. Genetic analysis of this organism has revealed determinants of pathogenicity, drug resistance, and other unique biological features, as well as the identities of prospective drug targets. The creation of targeted mutations has been greatly accelerated recently through the implementation of CRISPR genome-editing technology by Vyas et al. [Sci Adv 1(3):e1500248, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1500248]. In this study, we find that CRISPR elements can be expressed from genes that are present only transiently, and we develop a transient CRISPR system that further accelerates C. albicans genetic manipulation.

  10. Candida albicans Gene Deletion with a Transient CRISPR-Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyunghun; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Woolford, Carol A; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated gene 9 (CRISPR-Cas9) systems are used for a wide array of genome-editing applications in organisms ranging from fungi to plants and animals. Recently, a CRISPR-Cas9 system has been developed for the diploid fungal pathogen Candida albicans; the system accelerates genetic manipulation dramatically [V. K. Vyas, M. I. Barrasa, and G. R. Fink, Sci Adv 1(3):e1500248, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1500248]. We show here that the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic elements can function transiently, without stable integration into the genome, to enable the introduction of a gene deletion construct. We describe a transient CRISPR-Cas9 system for efficient gene deletion in C. albicans. Our observations suggest that there are two mechanisms that lead to homozygous deletions: (i) independent recombination of transforming DNA into each allele and (ii) recombination of transforming DNA into one allele, followed by gene conversion of the second allele. Our approach will streamline gene function analysis in C. albicans, and our results indicate that DNA can function transiently after transformation of this organism. IMPORTANCE The fungus Candida albicans is a major pathogen. Genetic analysis of this organism has revealed determinants of pathogenicity, drug resistance, and other unique biological features, as well as the identities of prospective drug targets. The creation of targeted mutations has been greatly accelerated recently through the implementation of CRISPR genome-editing technology by Vyas et al. [Sci Adv 1(3):e1500248, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1500248]. In this study, we find that CRISPR elements can be expressed from genes that are present only transiently, and we develop a transient CRISPR system that further accelerates C. albicans genetic manipulation. PMID:27340698

  11. Selecting One of Several Mating Types through Gene Segment Joining and Deletion in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, Marcella D.; Hamilton, Eileen P.; Xiong, Jie; Lawson, Michael J.; Yuan, Dongxia; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Miao, Wei; Orias, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Tetrahymena thermophila has seven mating types. Cells can mate only when they recognize cells of a different mating type as non-self. As a ciliate, Tetrahymena separates its germline and soma into two nuclei. During growth the somatic nucleus is responsible for all gene transcription while the germline nucleus remains silent. During mating, a new somatic nucleus is differentiated from a germline nucleus and mating type is decided by a stochastic process. We report here that the somatic mating type locus contains a pair of genes arranged head-to-head. Each gene encodes a mating type-specific segment and a transmembrane domain that is shared by all mating types. Somatic gene knockouts showed both genes are required for efficient non-self recognition and successful mating, as assessed by pair formation and progeny production. The germline mating type locus consists of a tandem array of incomplete gene pairs representing each potential mating type. During mating, a complete new gene pair is assembled at the somatic mating type locus; the incomplete genes of one gene pair are completed by joining to gene segments at each end of germline array. All other germline gene pairs are deleted in the process. These programmed DNA rearrangements make this a fascinating system of mating type determination. PMID:23555191

  12. Refinement of causative genes in monosomy 1p36 through clinical and molecular cytogenetic characterization of small interstitial deletions.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Crolla, John A; Tomkins, Susan; Bader, Patricia; Morrow, Bernice; Gorski, Jerome; Troxell, Robin; Forster-Gibson, Cynthia; Cilliers, Deirdre; Hislop, R Gordon; Lamb, Allen; Torchia, Beth; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2010-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion syndrome seen in humans, occurring in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. Common features include mental retardation, characteristic dysmorphic features, hypotonia, seizures, hearing loss, heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and behavior abnormalities. Similar phenotypes are seen among patients with a variety of deletion sizes, including terminal and interstitial deletions, complex rearrangements, and unbalanced translocations. Consequently, critical regions harboring causative genes for each of these features have been difficult to identify. Here we report on five individuals with 200-823 kb overlapping deletions of proximal 1p36.33, four of which are apparently de novo. They present with features of monosomy 1p36, including developmental delay and mental retardation, dysmorphic features, hypotonia, behavioral abnormalities including hyperphagia, and seizures. The smallest region of deletion overlap is 174 kb and contains five genes; these genes are likely candidates for some of the phenotypic features in monosomy 1p36. Other genes deleted in a subset of the patients likely play a contributory role in the phenotypes, including GABRD and seizures, PRKCZ and neurologic features, and SKI and dysmorphic and neurologic features. Characterization of small deletions is important for narrowing critical intervals and for the identification of causative or candidate genes for features of monosomy 1p36 syndrome.

  13. Identification of critical regions and candidate genes for cardiovascular malformations and cardiomyopathy associated with deletions of chromosome 1p36.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Hitisha P; Beck, Tyler F; Hernández-García, Andrés; Shelly, Katharine E; Montgomery, Tara; van Haeringen, Arie; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Patel, Chirag; Goel, Himanshu; Houge, Gunnar; Morrow, Bernice E; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R; Scott, Daryl A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations and cardiomyopathy are among the most common phenotypes caused by deletions of chromosome 1p36 which affect approximately 1 in 5000 newborns. Although these cardiac-related abnormalities are a significant source of morbidity and mortality associated with 1p36 deletions, most of the individual genes that contribute to these conditions have yet to be identified. In this paper, we use a combination of clinical and molecular cytogenetic data to define five critical regions for cardiovascular malformations and two critical regions for cardiomyopathy on chromosome 1p36. Positional candidate genes which may contribute to the development of cardiovascular malformations associated with 1p36 deletions include DVL1, SKI, RERE, PDPN, SPEN, CLCNKA, ECE1, HSPG2, LUZP1, and WASF2. Similarly, haploinsufficiency of PRDM16-a gene which was recently shown to be sufficient to cause the left ventricular noncompaction-SKI, PRKCZ, RERE, UBE4B and MASP2 may contribute to the development of cardiomyopathy. When treating individuals with 1p36 deletions, or providing prognostic information to their families, physicians should take into account that 1p36 deletions which overlie these cardiac critical regions may portend to cardiovascular complications. Since several of these cardiac critical regions contain more than one positional candidate gene-and large terminal and interstitial 1p36 deletions often overlap more than one cardiac critical region-it is likely that haploinsufficiency of two or more genes contributes to the cardiac phenotypes associated with many 1p36 deletions.

  14. Partial gene deletion in LEC rat: An animal model for Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Forbes, J.R.; Cox, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease is an inherited disorder of copper transport in which incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin and excretion of copper into bile are greatly reduced. Copper accumulates to a toxic level in the liver and also in the brain and kidney, causing a spectrum of hepatic and neurological abnormalities. We have recently cloned the gene for Wilson disease (designated ATP7B), which encodes a putative copper-transporting P-type ATPase. The inbred mutant Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat strain shows similarity to Wilson disease in many clinical and biochemical features. We have cloned cDNAs for the rat homologue (Atp7b) of the human Wilson disease gene (ATP7B) and have shown that the two genes have {approximately}82% identity at the amino acid sequence level. Rat cDNA sequences were used to identify a partial deletion in the Atp7b gene in the LEC rat. The deletion removes at least 750 bp of the coding region at the 3{prime} end, which includes the crucial ATP binding domain and extends downstream of the gene. The proximal breakpoint has been precisely localized at the cDNA level. Our results provide convincing evidence that the LEC rat is an animal model for Wilson disease. This model will be important for studying liver pathophysiology, for developing therapy for Wilson disease, and for studying the pathway of copper transport and its possible interaction with other heavy metals.

  15. Systematic phenotyping of a large-scale Candida glabrata deletion collection reveals novel antifungal tolerance genes.

    PubMed

    Schwarzmüller, Tobias; Ma, Biao; Hiller, Ekkehard; Istel, Fabian; Tscherner, Michael; Brunke, Sascha; Ames, Lauren; Firon, Arnaud; Green, Brian; Cabral, Vitor; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Quintin, Jessica; Seider, Katja; Frohner, Ingrid; Glaser, Walter; Jungwirth, Helmut; Bachellier-Bassi, Sophie; Chauvel, Murielle; Zeidler, Ute; Ferrandon, Dominique; Gabaldón, Toni; Hube, Bernhard; d'Enfert, Christophe; Rupp, Steffen; Cormack, Brendan; Haynes, Ken; Kuchler, Karl

    2014-06-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is a frequent cause of candidiasis, causing infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated disease. The inherent tolerance of C. glabrata to azole drugs makes this pathogen a serious clinical threat. To identify novel genes implicated in antifungal drug tolerance, we have constructed a large-scale C. glabrata deletion library consisting of 619 unique, individually bar-coded mutant strains, each lacking one specific gene, all together representing almost 12% of the genome. Functional analysis of this library in a series of phenotypic and fitness assays identified numerous genes required for growth of C. glabrata under normal or specific stress conditions, as well as a number of novel genes involved in tolerance to clinically important antifungal drugs such as azoles and echinocandins. We identified 38 deletion strains displaying strongly increased susceptibility to caspofungin, 28 of which encoding proteins that have not previously been linked to echinocandin tolerance. Our results demonstrate the potential of the C. glabrata mutant collection as a valuable resource in functional genomics studies of this important fungal pathogen of humans, and to facilitate the identification of putative novel antifungal drug target and virulence genes.

  16. Systematic Phenotyping of a Large-Scale Candida glabrata Deletion Collection Reveals Novel Antifungal Tolerance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Ekkehard; Istel, Fabian; Tscherner, Michael; Brunke, Sascha; Ames, Lauren; Firon, Arnaud; Green, Brian; Cabral, Vitor; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Quintin, Jessica; Seider, Katja; Frohner, Ingrid; Glaser, Walter; Jungwirth, Helmut; Bachellier-Bassi, Sophie; Chauvel, Murielle; Zeidler, Ute; Ferrandon, Dominique; Gabaldón, Toni; Hube, Bernhard; d'Enfert, Christophe; Rupp, Steffen; Cormack, Brendan; Haynes, Ken; Kuchler, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is a frequent cause of candidiasis, causing infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated disease. The inherent tolerance of C. glabrata to azole drugs makes this pathogen a serious clinical threat. To identify novel genes implicated in antifungal drug tolerance, we have constructed a large-scale C. glabrata deletion library consisting of 619 unique, individually bar-coded mutant strains, each lacking one specific gene, all together representing almost 12% of the genome. Functional analysis of this library in a series of phenotypic and fitness assays identified numerous genes required for growth of C. glabrata under normal or specific stress conditions, as well as a number of novel genes involved in tolerance to clinically important antifungal drugs such as azoles and echinocandins. We identified 38 deletion strains displaying strongly increased susceptibility to caspofungin, 28 of which encoding proteins that have not previously been linked to echinocandin tolerance. Our results demonstrate the potential of the C. glabrata mutant collection as a valuable resource in functional genomics studies of this important fungal pathogen of humans, and to facilitate the identification of putative novel antifungal drug target and virulence genes. PMID:24945925

  17. A summary of 7q interstitial deletions and exclusion mapping of the gene for beta-glucuronidase.

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, K; Gill, A; Henry, R; Wilkinson, I; Carey, B

    1989-01-01

    Three patients are described with different phenotypes and differing de novo interstitial deletions of the long arm of a chromosome 7. The first patient has a deletion with loss of the proximal 7q11.23 band. Only three other cases have been reported with this particular deletion. Our second case shows mild dysmorphism similar to the other four patients reported with deletion of bands 7q21.12----21.3. Our third patient has a deletion of the 7q22.1----32.2 segment and has many of the phenotypic features of the other reported cases of del 7q22----32. GUSB, the gene for beta-glucuronidase, has been localised to the 7cen----q22 region. Analysis of beta-glucuronidase levels in blood leucocytes of our patients has helped more precisely to assign this gene locus to 7q21.11 or 7q22.1. Images PMID:2486209

  18. Deletion of the fibrinogen [correction of fibrogen] alpha-chain gene (FGA) causes congenital afibrogenemia.

    PubMed

    Neerman-Arbez, M; Honsberger, A; Antonarakis, S E; Morris, M A

    1999-01-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the complete absence of detectable fibrinogen. Uncontrolled bleeding after birth from the umbilical cord is common, and spontaneous intracerebral bleeding and splenic rupture can occur throughout life. Patients respond well to fibrinogen replacement therapy, either prophylactically or on demand. Because the half-life of infused fibrinogen is essentially normal, the genetic defect is assumed to be at the level of synthesis, but no responsible locus has been identified. Preliminary studies using Southern blotting suggested that no gross structural changes of the fibrinogen genes were present in patients. We report the identification of causative mutations in a nonconsanguineous Swiss family with congenital afibrinogenemia. The four affected male individuals (two brothers and their two first cousins) have homozygous deletions of approximately 11 kb of the fibrinogen alpha-chain gene (FGA). Haplotype data suggest that these deletions occurred separately, on three distinct ancestral chromosomes, implying that the FGA region of the fibrinogen locus is susceptible to deletion by a common mechanism. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that humans, like mice, may be born without the capacity to synthesize functional fibrinogen.

  19. Deletion and aberrant CpG island methylation of Caspase 8 gene in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Pilar; Bello, M Josefa; Inda, M Mar; Alonso, M Eva; Arjona, Dolores; Amiñoso, Cinthia; Lopez-Marin, Isabel; de Campos, Jose M; Sarasa, Jose L; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2004-09-01

    Aberrant methylation of promoter CpG islands in human genes is an alternative genetic inactivation mechanism that contributes to the development of human tumors. Nevertheless, few studies have analyzed methylation in medulloblastomas. We determined the frequency of aberrant CpG island methylation for Caspase 8 (CASP8) in a group of 24 medulloblastomas arising in 8 adult and 16 pediatric patients. Complete methylation of CASP8 was found in 15 tumors (62%) and one case displayed hemimethylation. Three samples amplified neither of the two primer sets for methylated or unmethylated alleles, suggesting that genomic deletion occurred in the 5' flanking region of CASP8. Our findings suggest that methylation commonly contributes to CASP8 silencing in medulloblastomas and that homozygous deletion or severe sequence changes involving the promoter region may be another mechanism leading to CASP8 inactivation in this neoplasm.

  20. Interleukin 3 gene is located on human chromosome 5 and is deleted in myeloid leukemias with a deletion of 5q

    SciTech Connect

    Le Beau, M.M.; Epstein, N.D.; O'Brien, S.J.; Nienhuis, A.W.; Yang, Y.C.; Clark, S.C.; Rowley, J.D.

    1987-08-01

    The gene IL-3 encodes interleukin 3, a hematopoietic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) that is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types. By using somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, the authors localized this gene to human chromosome 5 at bands q23-31, a chromosomal region that is frequently deleted (del(5q)) in patients with myeloid disorders. By in situ hybridization, IL-3 was found to be deleted in the 5q-chromosome of one patient with refractory anemia who had a del(5)(q15q33.3), of three patients with refractory anemia (two patients) or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) de novo who had a similar distal breakpoint (del(5)(q13q33.3)), and of a fifth patient, with therapy-related ANLL, who had a similar distal breakpoint in band q33(del(5)(q14q33.3)). Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the normal or the deleted chromosome 5 from two patients with the refractory anemia 5q- syndrome indicated that IL-3 sequences were absent from the hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 5 but not from hybrids that had a cytologically normal chromosome 5. Thus, a small segment of chromosome 5 contains IL-3, GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS. The findings and earlier results indicating that GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS were deleted in the 5q- chromosome, suggest that loss of IL-3 or of other CSF genes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders associated with a del(5q).

  1. Novel large deletion in the ACTA1 gene in a child with autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bethany; Simpson, Kara; Tesi-Rocha, Carolina; Zhou, Delu; Palmer, Cheryl A; Suchy, Sharon F

    2014-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder resulting from a disruption of the thin filament proteins of the striated muscle sarcomere. The disorder is typically characterized by muscle weakness including the face, neck, respiratory, and limb muscles and is clinically classified based on the age of onset and severity. Mutations in the ACTA1 gene contribute to a significant proportion of NM cases. The majority of ACTA1 gene mutations are missense mutations causing autosomal dominant NM by producing an abnormal protein. However, approximately 10% of ACTA1 gene mutations are associated with autosomal recessive NM; these mutations are associated with loss of protein function. We report the first case of a large deletion in the ACTA1 gene contributing to autosomal recessive NM. This case illustrates the importance of understanding disease mechanisms at the molecular level to accurately infer the inheritance pattern and potentially aid with clinical management. PMID:24447884

  2. The TREAT-NMD DMD Global Database: Analysis of More than 7,000 Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bladen, Catherine L; Salgado, David; Monges, Soledad; Foncuberta, Maria E; Kekou, Kyriaki; Kosma, Konstantina; Dawkins, Hugh; Lamont, Leanne; Roy, Anna J; Chamova, Teodora; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Chan, Sophelia; Korngut, Lawrence; Campbell, Craig; Dai, Yi; Wang, Jen; Barišić, Nina; Brabec, Petr; Lahdetie, Jaana; Walter, Maggie C; Schreiber-Katz, Olivia; Karcagi, Veronika; Garami, Marta; Viswanathan, Venkatarman; Bayat, Farhad; Buccella, Filippo; Kimura, En; Koeks, Zaïda; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Rodrigues, Miriam; Roxburgh, Richard; Lusakowska, Anna; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Zimowski, Janusz; Santos, Rosário; Neagu, Elena; Artemieva, Svetlana; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Vojinovic, Dina; Posada, Manuel; Bloetzer, Clemens; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves; Joncourt, Franziska; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Gallardo, Eduard; Karaduman, A Ayşe; Topaloğlu, Haluk; El Sherif, Rasha; Stringer, Angela; Shatillo, Andriy V; Martin, Ann S; Peay, Holly L; Bellgard, Matthew I; Kirschner, Jan; Flanigan, Kevin M; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Verschuuren, Jan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Béroud, Christophe; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing the type and frequency of patient-specific mutations that give rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an invaluable tool for diagnostics, basic scientific research, trial planning, and improved clinical care. Locus-specific databases allow for the collection, organization, storage, and analysis of genetic variants of disease. Here, we describe the development and analysis of the TREAT-NMD DMD Global database (http://umd.be/TREAT_DMD/). We analyzed genetic data for 7,149 DMD mutations held within the database. A total of 5,682 large mutations were observed (80% of total mutations), of which 4,894 (86%) were deletions (1 exon or larger) and 784 (14%) were duplications (1 exon or larger). There were 1,445 small mutations (smaller than 1 exon, 20% of all mutations), of which 358 (25%) were small deletions and 132 (9%) small insertions and 199 (14%) affected the splice sites. Point mutations totalled 756 (52% of small mutations) with 726 (50%) nonsense mutations and 30 (2%) missense mutations. Finally, 22 (0.3%) mid-intronic mutations were observed. In addition, mutations were identified within the database that would potentially benefit from novel genetic therapies for DMD including stop codon read-through therapies (10% of total mutations) and exon skipping therapy (80% of deletions and 55% of total mutations). PMID:25604253

  3. Deletion of Siah-Interacting Protein gene in Drosophila causes cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Casad, Michelle E.; Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph P.; Wolf, Matthew J.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila is a useful model organism in which to study the genetics of human diseases, including recent advances in identification of the genetics of heart development and disease in the fly. To identify novel genes that cause cardiomyopathy, we performed a deficiency screen in adult Drosophila. Using optical coherence tomography to phenotype cardiac function in awake adult Drosophila, we identified Df(1)Exel6240 as having cardiomyopathy. Using a number of strategies including customized smaller deletions, screening of mutant alleles, and transgenic rescue, we identified CG3226 as the causative gene for this deficiency. CG3226 is an uncharacterized gene in Drosophila possessing homology to the mammalian Siah-interacting-protein (SIP) gene. Mammalian SIP functions as an adaptor protein involved in one of the β-catenin degradation complexes. To investigate the effects of altering β-catenin/Armadillo signaling in the adult fly, we measured heart function in flies expressing either constitutively active Armadillo or transgenic constructs that block Armadillo signaling, specifically in the heart. While increasing Armadillo signaling in the heart did not have an effect on adult heart function, decreasing Armadillo signaling in the fly heart caused the significant reduction in heart chamber size. In summary, we show that deletion of CG3226, which has homology to mammalian SIP, causes cardiomyopathy in adult Drosophila. Alterations in Armadillo signaling during development lead to important changes in the size and function of the adult heart. PMID:22398840

  4. The RB1 gene is the target of chromosome 13 deletions in malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Chibon, F; Mairal, A; Fréneaux, P; Terrier, P; Coindre, J M; Sastre, X; Aurias, A

    2000-11-15

    Forty-four malignant fibrous histiocytomas (MFHs) were studied by comparative genomic hybridization. Among the observed imbalances, losses of the 13q14-q21 region were observed in almost all tumors (78%), suggesting that a gene localized in this region could act as a tumor suppressor gene and that its inactivation could be relevant for MFH oncogenesis and/or progression. We determined by CA repeat analyses a consensus region of deletion focusing on the RB1 region. The RB1 gene was then analyzed by protein truncation test, direct sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization, Southern blotting, and immunohistochemistry. RB1 mutations and/or homozygous deletions were found in 7 of the 34 tumors analyzed (20%). Among the 35 tumors with comparative genomic hybridization imbalances analyzed by immunohistochemistry, 30 (86%) did not exhibit significant nuclear labeling. The high correlation between chromosome 13 losses and absence of RB1 protein expression and the mutations detected strongly suggest that RB1 gene inactivation is a pivotal event in MFH oncogenesis. Moreover, the observation of a high incidence of MFH in patients previously treated for hereditary retinoblastoma fits well this hypothesis. PMID:11103795

  5. Gene deletions and amplifications in human hepatocellular carcinomas: correlation with hepatocyte growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Nalesnik, Michael A; Tseng, George; Ding, Ying; Xiang, Guo-Sheng; Zheng, Zhong-liang; Yu, YanPing; Marsh, James W; Michalopoulos, George K; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2012-04-01

    Tissues from 98 human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) obtained from hepatic resections were subjected to somatic copy number variation (CNV) analysis. Most of these HCCs were discovered in livers resected for orthotopic transplantation, although in a few cases, the tumors themselves were the reason for the hepatectomies. Genomic analysis revealed deletions and amplifications in several genes, and clustering analysis based on CNV revealed five clusters. The LSP1 gene had the most cases with CNV (46 deletions and 5 amplifications). High frequencies of CNV were also seen in PTPRD (21/98), GNB1L (18/98), KIAA1217 (18/98), RP1-1777G6.2 (17/98), ETS1 (11/98), RSU1 (10/98), TBC1D22A (10/98), BAHCC1 (9/98), MAML2 (9/98), RAB1B (9/98), and YIF1A (9/98). The existing literature regarding hepatocytes or other cell types has connected many of these genes to regulation of cytoskeletal architecture, signaling cascades related to growth regulation, and transcription factors directly interacting with nuclear signaling complexes. Correlations with existing literature indicate that genomic lesions associated with HCC at the level of resolution of CNV occur on many genes associated directly or indirectly with signaling pathways operating in liver regeneration and hepatocyte growth regulation.

  6. Infectious bronchitis viruses with naturally occurring genomic rearrangement and gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Kylie A; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2011-02-01

    Infectious bronchitis viruses (IBVs) are group III coronaviruses that infect poultry worldwide. Genetic variations, including whole-gene deletions, are key to IBV evolution. Australian subgroup 2 IBVs contain sequence insertions and multiple gene deletions that have resulted in a substantial genomic divergence from international IBVs. The genomic variations present in Australian IBVs were investigated and compared to those of another group III coronavirus, turkey coronavirus (TCoV). Open reading frames (ORFs) found throughout the genome of Australian IBVs were analogous in sequence and position to TCoV ORFs, except for ORF 4b, which appeared to be translocated to a different position in the subgroup 2 strains. Subgroup 2 strains were previously reported to lack genes 3a, 3b and 5a, with some also lacking 5b. Of these, however, genes 3b and 5b were found to be present but contained various mutations that may affect transcription. In this study, it was found that subgroup 2 IBVs have undergone a more substantial genomic rearrangements than previously thought.

  7. A mouse model for adult cardiac-specific gene deletion with CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kelli J.; Makarewich, Catherine A.; McAnally, John; Anderson, Douglas M.; Zentilin, Lorena; Liu, Ning; Giacca, Mauro; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas)9 genomic editing has revolutionized the generation of mutant animals by simplifying the creation of null alleles in virtually any organism. However, most current approaches with this method require zygote injection, making it difficult to assess the adult, tissue-specific functions of genes that are widely expressed or which cause embryonic lethality when mutated. Here, we describe the generation of cardiac-specific Cas9 transgenic mice, which express high levels of Cas9 in the heart, but display no overt defects. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used Adeno-Associated Virus 9 (AAV9) to deliver single-guide RNA (sgRNA) that targets the Myh6 locus exclusively in cardiomyocytes. Intraperitoneal injection of postnatal cardiac-Cas9 transgenic mice with AAV9 encoding sgRNA against Myh6 resulted in robust editing of the Myh6 locus. These mice displayed severe cardiomyopathy and loss of cardiac function, with elevation of several markers of heart failure, confirming the effectiveness of this method of adult cardiac gene deletion. Mice with cardiac-specific expression of Cas9 provide a tool that will allow rapid and accurate deletion of genes following a single injection of AAV9-sgRNAs, thereby circumventing embryonic lethality. This method will be useful for disease modeling and provides a means of rapidly editing genes of interest in the heart. PMID:26719419

  8. Enhancement or attenuation of disease by deletion of genes from Citrus tristeza virus.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Dawson, William O

    2012-08-01

    Stem pitting is a common virus-induced disease of perennial woody plants induced by a range of different viruses. The phenotype results from sporadic areas of the stem in which normal xylem and phloem development is prevented during growth of stems. These alterations interfere with carbohydrate transport, resulting in reduced plant growth and yield. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a phloem-limited closterovirus, induces economically important stem-pitting diseases of citrus. CTV has three nonconserved genes (p33, p18, and p13) that are not related to genes of other viruses and that are not required for systemic infection of some species of citrus, which allowed us to examine the effect of deletions of these genes on symptom phenotypes. In the most susceptible experimental host, Citrus macrophylla, the full-length virus causes only very mild stem-pitting symptoms. Surprisingly, we found that certain deletion combinations (p33 and p18 and/or p13) induced greatly increased stem-pitting symptoms, while other combinations (p13 or p13 plus p18) resulted in reduced stem pitting. These results suggest that the stem-pitting phenotype, which is one of more economically important disease phenotypes, can result not from a specific sequence or protein but from a balance between the expression of different viral genes. Unexpectedly, using green fluorescent protein-tagged full-length virus and deletion mutants (CTV9Δp33 and CTV9Δp33Δp18Δp13), the virus was found at pitted areas in abnormal locations outside the normal ring of phloem. Thus, increased stem pitting was associated not only with a prevention of xylem production but also with a proliferation of cells that supported viral replication, suggesting that at random areas of stems the virus can elicit changes in cellular differentiation and development.

  9. Assessment of the Toxicity of CuO Nanoparticles by Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutants with Multiple Genes Deleted

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Shaopan; Lu, Qicong; Dai, Heping; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    To develop applicable and susceptible models to evaluate the toxicity of nanoparticles, the antimicrobial effects of CuO nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) on various Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) strains (wild type, single-gene-deleted mutants, and multiple-gene-deleted mutants) were determined and compared. Further experiments were also conducted to analyze the mechanisms associated with toxicity using copper salt, bulk CuO (bCuO), carbon-shelled copper nanoparticles (C/Cu-NPs), and carbon nanoparticles (C-NPs) for comparisons. The results indicated that the growth inhibition rates of CuO-NPs for the wild-type and the single-gene-deleted strains were comparable, while for the multiple-gene deletion mutant, significantly higher toxicity was observed (P < 0.05). When the toxicity of the CuO-NPs to yeast cells was compared with the toxicities of copper salt and bCuO, we concluded that the toxicity of CuO-NPs should be attributed to soluble copper rather than to the nanoparticles. The striking difference in adverse effects of C-NPs and C/Cu-NPs with equivalent surface areas also proved this. A toxicity assay revealed that the multiple-gene-deleted mutant was significantly more sensitive to CuO-NPs than the wild type. Specifically, compared with the wild-type strain, copper was readily taken up by mutant strains when cell permeability genes were knocked out, and the mutants with deletions of genes regulated under oxidative stress (OS) were likely producing more reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hence, as mechanism-based gene inactivation could increase the susceptibility of yeast, the multiple-gene-deleted mutants should be improved model organisms to investigate the toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:26386067

  10. An atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes the FMR-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, F.; Johnson, D.B.; Anoe, K.S.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR-1 gene. This is commonly caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG trinucleotide repeat in the first exon of the FMR-1 gene. We describe here an atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes the FMR-1 gene. RK is a 6-year-old hyperactive, mentally retarded male. Southern analysis of PstI digested genomic DNA was performed using a 558 bp XhoI-PstI fragment specific for the 5`-end of the FMR-1 gene. This analysis revealed the absence of the normal 1.0 kb PstI fragment, indicating the deletion of at least a portion of the FMR-1 gene. PCR analysis using Xq27.3 microsatellite and STS markers confirmed the presence of a deletion of at least 600 kb encompassing the FMR-1 gene. Southern blot and PCR analysis demonstrated that this deletion was maternally transmitted and arose as a new mutation on the grandpaternal X-chromosome. High resolution chromosome banding revealed an extremely small deletion of a portion of band Xq27 which was confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridrization (FISH) analysis using a 34 kb cosmid containing the FMR-1 gene. As expected, RK manifests physical features typical of fragile X syndrome, including a high arched palate, prognathism, and large ears. Interestingly, RK also presents with anal atresia, obesity and short stature, features not part of fragile X syndrome. In addition, RK has normal sized testicles and does not exhibit the characteristic gaze avoidance, hand-flapping, and crowd anxiety behaviors. These atypical features may result from the deletion of additional genes in the vicinity of the FMR-1 gene. Further work is underway to determine more precisely the extent of the deletion in RK`s DNA.

  11. A VNTR element associated with steroid sulfatase gene deletions stimulates recombination in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Y.; Li, X.M.; Shapiro, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    Steroid sulfatase deficiency is a common genetic disorder, with a prevalence of approximately one in every 3500 males world wide. About 90% of these patients have complete gene deletions, which appear to result from recombination between members of a low-copy repeat family (CRI-232 is the prototype) that flank the gene. RU1 and RU2 are two VNTR elements found within each of these family members. RU1 consists of 30 bp repeating units and its length shows minimal variation among individuals. The RU2 element consists of repeating sequences which are highly asymmetric, with about 90% purines and no C`s on one strand, and range from 0.6 kb to over 23 kb among different individuals. We conducted a study to determine if the RU1 or RU2 elements can promote recombination in an in vivo test system. We inserted these elements adjacent to the neo gene in each of two pSV2neo derivatives, one of which has a deletion in the 5{prime} portion of the neo gene and the other having a deletion in the 3{prime} portion. These plasmids were combined and used to transfect EJ cells. Survival of cells in G418 indicates restoration of a functional neo gene by recombination between two deletion constructs. Thus counting G418 resistant colonies gives a quantitative measure of the enhancement of recombination by the inserted VNTR elements. The results showed no effect on recombination by the inserted RU1 element (compared to the insertion of a nonspecific sequence), while the RU2 element stimulated recombination by 3.5-fold (P<0.01). A separate set of constructs placed RU1 or RU2 within the intron of an exon trapping vector. Following tranfection of cells, recombination events were monitored by a PCR assay that detected the approximation of primer binding sites (as a result of recombination). These studies showed that, as in the first set of experiments, the highly variable RU2 element is capable of stimulating somatic recombination in mammalian cells.

  12. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies.

    PubMed

    Toh, Zhi Yon Charles; Thandar Aung-Htut, May; Pinniger, Gavin; Adams, Abbie M; Krishnaswarmy, Sudarsan; Wong, Brenda L; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels) manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes. PMID:26745801

  13. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Zhi Yon Charles; Thandar Aung-Htut, May; Pinniger, Gavin; Adams, Abbie M.; Krishnaswarmy, Sudarsan; Wong, Brenda L.; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels) manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes. PMID:26745801

  14. Molecular deletion patterns in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients from KwaZulu Natal.

    PubMed

    Hallwirth Pillay, K D; Bill, P L A; Madurai, S; Mubaiwa, L; Rapiti, P

    2007-01-15

    There exists much phenotypic heterogeneity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its allelic variant, Becker muscular dystrophy. The molecular findings on 53 patients with Duchenne and 15 patients with Becker type muscular dystrophy in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa are reported. Multiplex PCR was performed using primers targeting 18 hot-spot exons throughout the dystrophin gene. Analysis of the multiplex PCR data revealed that 39/68 (57.0%) patients included in the study showed a deletion (33 DMD and 6 BMD patients). Twenty-five patients were Black, 4 were White and 10 were Indian. Using the Chamberlain and Beggs multiplex PCR assays, the region of the genome most frequently affected by a deletion includes exons 47-51. The distal region of the dystrophin gene was most frequently affected by the deletion in both Black and Indian patients. There were too few White patients for conclusions to be drawn concerning the most frequently affected part of the gene. Although the numbers are insufficient to determine whether ethnic differences are present, the Chamberlain and Beggs multiplex PCR assays detect deletions with the same frequency in South African DMD/BMD patients as that reported in the literature. PMID:17141273

  15. Genome-wide analysis of syntenic gene deletion in the grasses.

    PubMed

    Schnable, James C; Freeling, Michael; Lyons, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The grasses, Poaceae, are one of the largest and most successful angiosperm families. Like many radiations of flowering plants, the divergence of the major grass lineages was preceded by a whole-genome duplication (WGD), although these events are not rare for flowering plants. By combining identification of syntenic gene blocks with measures of gene pair divergence and different frequencies of ancient gene loss, we have separated the two subgenomes present in modern grasses. Reciprocal loss of duplicated genes or genomic regions has been hypothesized to reproductively isolate populations and, thus, speciation. However, in contrast to previous studies in yeast and teleost fishes, we found very little evidence of reciprocal loss of homeologous genes between the grasses, suggesting that post-WGD gene loss may not be the cause of the grass radiation. The sets of homeologous and orthologous genes and predicted locations of deleted genes identified in this study, as well as links to the CoGe comparative genomics web platform for analyzing pan-grass syntenic regions, are provided along with this paper as a resource for the grass genetics community.

  16. Prevalence of inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 gene deletion, the mutation for spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, in Japan screened by gene dosage.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Masato; Ishikawa, Kinya; Izumi, Yuishin; Takahashi, Makoto; Niimi, Yusuke; Sato, Nozomu; Onodera, Osamu; Kaji, Ryuji; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 15 (SCA15) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by late-onset, slowly progressive pure cerebellar ataxia. This disease is caused by a heterozygous deletion of the inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (ITPR1) gene, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of the receptor function is the plausible disease mechanism. To clarify the prevalence of SCA15 in Japan, we designed four sets of probes and primers in different regions of ITPR1 and performed TaqMan PCR assay to search for gene deletions in 226 index SCA patients excluded for repeat expansion disorders. Deletion was found in only one patient, in whom gait ataxia started at 51 years of age and progressed to show cerebellar ataxia. This study demonstrates a simple but efficient method for screening ITPR1 deletion. We also conclude that ITPR1 gene deletions are much rare in Japan than in Europe, comprising only 0.3% in all SCAs in Japan.

  17. The impact of gene duplication, insertion, deletion, lateral gene transfer and sequencing error on orthology inference: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Dalquen, Daniel A; Altenhoff, Adrian M; Gonnet, Gaston H; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The identification of orthologous genes, a prerequisite for numerous analyses in comparative and functional genomics, is commonly performed computationally from protein sequences. Several previous studies have compared the accuracy of orthology inference methods, but simulated data has not typically been considered in cross-method assessment studies. Yet, while dependent on model assumptions, simulation-based benchmarking offers unique advantages: contrary to empirical data, all aspects of simulated data are known with certainty. Furthermore, the flexibility of simulation makes it possible to investigate performance factors in isolation of one another.Here, we use simulated data to dissect the performance of six methods for orthology inference available as standalone software packages (Inparanoid, OMA, OrthoInspector, OrthoMCL, QuartetS, SPIMAP) as well as two generic approaches (bidirectional best hit and reciprocal smallest distance). We investigate the impact of various evolutionary forces (gene duplication, insertion, deletion, and lateral gene transfer) and technological artefacts (ambiguous sequences) on orthology inference. We show that while gene duplication/loss and insertion/deletion are well handled by most methods (albeit for different trade-offs of precision and recall), lateral gene transfer disrupts all methods. As for ambiguous sequences, which might result from poor sequencing, assembly, or genome annotation, we show that they affect alignment score-based orthology methods more strongly than their distance-based counterparts.

  18. The Contribution of Whole Gene Deletions and Large Rearrangements to the Mutation Spectrum in Inherited Tumor Predisposing Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Miriam J; Urquhart, Jill E; Harkness, Elaine F; Miles, Emma K; Bowers, Naomi L; Byers, Helen J; Bulman, Michael; Gokhale, Carolyn; Wallace, Andrew J; Newman, William G; Evans, D Gareth

    2016-03-01

    Heterozygous whole gene deletions (WGDs), and intragenic microdeletions, account for a significant proportion of mutations underlying cancer predisposition syndromes. We analyzed the frequency and genotype-phenotype correlations of microdeletions in 12 genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2, NF1, NF2, APC, PTCH1, and VHL) representing seven tumor predisposition syndromes in 5,897 individuals (2,611 families) from our center. Overall, microdeletions accounted for 14% of identified mutations. As expected, smaller deletions or duplications were more common (12%) than WGDs (2.2%). Where a WGD was identified in the germline in NF2, the mechanism of somatic second hit was not deletion, as previously described for NF1. For neurofibromatosis type 1 and 2, we compared the mechanism of germline deletion. Unlike NF1, where three specific deletion sizes account for most germline WGDs, NF2 deletion breakpoints were different across seven samples tested. One of these deletions was 3.93 Mb and conferred a severe phenotype, thus refining the region for a potential NF2 modifier gene to a 2.04-Mb region on chromosome 22. The milder phenotype of NF2 WGDs may be due to the apparent absence of chromosome 22 loss as the second hit. These observations of WGD phenotypes will be helpful for interpreting incidental findings from microarray analysis and next-generation sequencing. PMID:26615784

  19. R3-R4 deletion in the PRNP gene is associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)

    SciTech Connect

    Cervenakova, L.; Brown, P.; Nagle, J.

    1994-09-01

    There are conflicting reports on the association of deletions in the PRNP gene on chromosome 20 with CJD, a rapidly progressive fatal spongiform encephalopathy. We accumulated data suggesting that a deletion of R3-R4 type (parts of the third and fourth repeats are deleted from the area of four repeating 24 bp sequences in the 5{prime} region of the gene) is causing CJD. Screening of 129 unaffected control individuals demonstrated presence of a deletion of R2 type in four (1.55% of the studied chromosomes), but none of them had the R3-R4 type. Of 181 screened patients with spongiform encephalopathies, two had a deletion of R3-R4 type with no other mutations in the coding sequence. Both patients had a classical rapidly progressive dementing disease and diffuse spongiform degeneration, and both cases were apparently sporadic. The same R3-R4 type of deletion was detected in three additional neuropathologically confirmed spongiform encephalopathy patients, of which two had other known pathogenic mutations in the PRNP gene: at codon 178 on the methionine allele exhibiting the phenotype of fatal familial insomnia, and codon 200 causing CJD with severe dementia; the third was a patient with iatrogenic CJD who developed the disease after treatment with growth hormone extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. In all cases the deletion coincided with a variant sequence at position 129 coding for methionine.

  20. Deletion of Rapgef6, a candidate schizophrenia susceptibility gene, disrupts amygdala function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Levy, R J; Kvajo, M; Li, Y; Tsvetkov, E; Dong, W; Yoshikawa, Y; Kataoka, T; Bolshakov, V Y; Karayiorgou, M; Gogos, J A

    2015-01-01

    In human genetic studies of schizophrenia, we uncovered copy-number variants in RAPGEF6 and RAPGEF2 genes. To discern the effects of RAPGEF6 deletion in humans, we investigated the behavior and neural functions of a mouse lacking Rapgef6. Rapgef6 deletion resulted in impaired amygdala function measured as reduced fear conditioning and anxiolysis. Hippocampal-dependent spatial memory and prefrontal cortex-dependent working memory tasks were intact. Neural activation measured by cFOS phosphorylation demonstrated a reduction in hippocampal and amygdala activation after fear conditioning, while neural morphology assessment uncovered reduced spine density and primary dendrite number in pyramidal neurons of the CA3 hippocampal region of knockout mice. Electrophysiological analysis showed enhanced long-term potentiation at cortico–amygdala synapses. Rapgef6 deletion mice were most impaired in hippocampal and amygdalar function, brain regions implicated in schizophrenia pathophysiology. The results provide a deeper understanding of the role of the amygdala in schizophrenia and suggest that RAPGEF6 may be a novel therapeutic target in schizophrenia. PMID:26057047

  1. Discordant phenotype of two overlapping deletions involving the PAX3 gene in chromosome 2q35.

    PubMed

    Pasteris, N G; Trask, B J; Sheldon, S; Gorski, J L

    1993-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS), the most common form of inherited congenital deafness, is a pleiotropic, autosomal dominant condition with variable penetrance and expressivity. WS is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The basis for the phenotypic variability observed among and between WS families is unknown. However, mutations within the paired-box gene, PAX3, have been associated with a subset of WS patients. In this report we use cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques to study a patient with WS type 3, a form of WS consisting of typical WS type 1 features plus mental retardation, microcephaly, and severe skeletal anomalies. Our results show that the WS3 patient has a de novo paternally derived deletion, del (2)(q35q36), that spans the genetic loci PAX3 and COL4A3. A molecular analysis of a chromosome 2 deletional mapping panel maps the PAX3 locus to 2q35 and suggests the locus order: centromere-(INHA, DES)-PAX3-COL4A3-(ALPI, CHRND)-telomere. Our analyses also show that a patient with a cleft palate and lip pits, but lacking diagnostic WS features, has a deletion, del (2)(q33q35), involving the PAX3 locus. This result suggests that not all PAX3 mutations are associated with a WS phenotype and that additional regional loci may modify or regulate the PAX3 locus and/or the development of a WS phenotype. PMID:8103404

  2. Novel technique for rapid detection of alpha-globin gene mutations and deletions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingzhong; Jia, Xingyuan; Tang, Ning; Zhang, Xu; Wu, Xiaoyi; Cai, Ren; Wang, Lirong; Liu, Quanzhang; Xiao, Bai; Zhu, Jim; Wang, Qingtao

    2010-03-01

    Populations in Southeast Asia and South China have high frequencies of alpha-thalassemia caused by alpha-globin gene mutations and/or deletions. This study was designed to find an efficient and simple diagnostic test for the mutations and deletions. A duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC) was used to detect the mutations and deletions. A blinded study of 110 samples, which included 92 alpha-thalassemia samples with various genotypes and 18 normal DNA samples, was carried out by the methods. The duplex PCR products of the sample with known Constand spring mutation (CS)/alphaalpha, Quonsze mutation (QS)/alphaalpha, and Weastmead mutation (WS)/alphaalpha DNA showed significantly different profiles, which suggests that DHPLC analysis at 63.8 degrees C can detect potential mutations directly. The DHPLC at 50 degrees C analysis can distinguish the --SEA and nondeletional alleles. The new assay is 100% concordant with the original genotype. In conclusion, the technique including the duplex PCR assay followed by DHPLC analysis can be used to diagnose alpha-thalassemia; this methodology is simple, rapid, accurate, semiautomatic, and high output, and thus, it is suitable for large-scale screening.

  3. Genome-scale genetic screen of lead ion-sensitive gene deletion mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Cao, C; Jiang, L

    2015-06-01

    Pb (lead) is one of the most widespread and toxic heavy metal contaminants and imposes potential harm to human health. Pb ions cause cellular damage and induce loss of cell viability. However, mechanisms regulating Pb toxicity remain poorly understood. Through a genome-scale screen, we have identified 30 yeast single-gene deletion mutants that are sensitive to lead ions. These genes are involved in the metabolism, transcription, protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, protein folding, modification, destination, as well as cellular transport process. Comparative analyses to cadmium-sensitive mutations identified from previous studies indicate that overlapping genes of lead- and cadmium-sensitive mutations are involved in both the metabolism and the cellular transport process. Furthermore, eleven lead-sensitive mutants show elevated levels of lead contents in response to lead stress. Our findings provide a basis to understand molecular mechanisms underlying the detoxification of lead ions by yeast cells.

  4. Functional Dissection of Regulatory Models Using Gene Expression Data of Deletion Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Han, Jing-Dong J.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide gene expression profiles accumulate at an alarming rate, how to integrate these expression profiles generated by different laboratories to reverse engineer the cellular regulatory network has been a major challenge. To automatically infer gene regulatory pathways from genome-wide mRNA expression profiles before and after genetic perturbations, we introduced a new Bayesian network algorithm: Deletion Mutant Bayesian Network (DM_BN). We applied DM_BN to the expression profiles of 544 yeast single or double deletion mutants of transcription factors, chromatin remodeling machinery components, protein kinases and phosphatases in S. cerevisiae. The network inferred by this method identified causal regulatory and non-causal concurrent interactions among these regulators (genetically perturbed genes) that are strongly supported by the experimental evidence, and generated many new testable hypotheses. Compared to networks reconstructed by routine similarity measures or by alternative Bayesian network algorithms, the network inferred by DM_BN excels in both precision and recall. To facilitate its application in other systems, we packaged the algorithm into a user-friendly analysis tool that can be downloaded at http://www.picb.ac.cn/hanlab/DM_BN.html. PMID:24039601

  5. Generation of stable mutants and targeted gene deletion strains in Cryptococcus neoformans through electroporation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaorong; Chacko, Nadia; Wang, Linqi; Pavuluri, Yashwant

    2015-04-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the etiologic agent of cryptococcal meningitis that causes more than half a million deaths worldwide each year. This capsulated basidiomycetous yeast also serves as a model for micropathogenic studies. The ability to make stable mutants, either via ectopic integration or homologous recombination, has been accomplished using biolistic transformation. This technical advance has greatly facilitated the research on the basic biology and pathogenic mechanisms of this pathogen in the past two decades. However, biolistic transformation is costly, and its reproducibility varies widely. Here we found that stable ectopic integration or targeted gene deletion via homologous replacement could be accomplished through electroporative transformation. The stability of the transformants obtained through electroporation and the frequency of homologous replacement is highly dependent on the selective marker. A frequency of homologous recombination among the stable transformants obtained by electroporation is comparable to those obtained by biolistic transformation (∼10%) when dominant drug selection markers are used, which is much higher than what has been previously reported for electroporation when auxotrophic markers were used (0.001% to 0.1%). Furthermore, disruption of the KU80 gene or generation of gene deletion constructs using the split marker strategy, two approaches known to increase homologous replacement among transformants obtained through biolistic transformation, also increase the frequency of homologous replacement among transformants obtained through electroporation. Therefore, electroporation provides a low cost alternative for mutagenesis in Cryptococcus.

  6. DIA1R Is an X-Linked Gene Related to Deleted In Autism-1

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Azhari; Harrop, Sean P.; Bishop, Naomi E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are frequently occurring disorders diagnosed by deficits in three core functional areas: social skills, communication, and behaviours and/or interests. Mental retardation frequently accompanies the most severe forms of ASDs, while overall ASDs are more commonly diagnosed in males. Most ASDs have a genetic origin and one gene recently implicated in the etiology of autism is the Deleted-In-Autism-1 (DIA1) gene. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a bioinformatics-based approach, we have identified a human gene closely related to DIA1, we term DIA1R (DIA1-Related). While DIA1 is autosomal (chromosome 3, position 3q24), DIA1R localizes to the X chromosome at position Xp11.3 and is known to escape X-inactivation. The gene products are of similar size, with DIA1 encoding 430, and DIA1R 433, residues. At the amino acid level, DIA1 and DIA1R are 62% similar overall (28% identical), and both encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. Both genes are ubiquitously expressed, including in fetal and adult brain tissue. Conclusions/Significance Examination of published literature revealed point mutations in DIA1R are associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) and DIA1R deletion is associated with syndromes with ASD-like traits and/or XLMR. Together, these results support a model where the DIA1 and DIA1R gene products regulate molecular traffic through the cellular secretory pathway or affect the function of secreted factors, and functional deficits cause disorders with ASD-like symptoms and/or mental retardation. PMID:21264219

  7. A Genetic Screen for Fission Yeast Gene Deletion Mutants Exhibiting Hypersensitivity to Latrunculin A

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Farzad; Michalski, Dorothy; Karagiannis, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast cells treated with low doses of the actin depolymerizing drug, latrunculin A (LatA), delay entry into mitosis via a mechanism that is dependent on both the Clp1p and Rad24p proteins. During this delay, cells remain in a cytokinesis-competent state that is characterized by continuous repair and/or reestablishment of the actomyosin ring. In this manner, cells ensure the faithful completion of the preceding cytokinesis in response to perturbation of the cell division machinery. To uncover other genes with a role in this response, or simply genes with roles in adapting to LatA-induced stress, we carried out a genome-wide screen and identified a group of 38 gene deletion mutants that are hyper-sensitive to the drug. As expected, we found genes affecting cytokinesis and/or the actin cytoskeleton within this set (ain1, acp2, imp2). We also identified genes with roles in histone modification (tra1, ngg1), intracellular transport (apl5, aps3), and glucose-mediated signaling (git3, git5, git11, pka1, cgs2). Importantly, while the identified gene deletion mutants are prone to cytokinesis failure in the presence of LatA, they are nevertheless fully capable of cell division in the absence of the drug. These results indicate that fission yeast cells make use of a diverse set of regulatory modules to counter abnormal cytoskeletal perturbations, and furthermore, that these modules act redundantly to ensure cell survival and proliferation. PMID:27466272

  8. Total beta-globin gene deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, N.; Miyakawa, F.; Hunt, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    The distribution of {beta}-thalassemia [{beta}{sup Th}] mutations is unique to each ethnic group. Most mutations affect one or a few bases; large deletions have been rare. Among families screened in Hawaii, [{beta}{sup Th}] heterozygotes were diagnosed by microcytosis, absence of abnormal hemoglobins on isoelectric focusing, and raised Hb A{sub 2} by chromatography. Gene frequency for {beta}{sup Th} was 0.02 in Filipinos. In Filipinos, polymerase chain reaction [PCR] with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for {beta}{sup Th} mutations detected a mutation in only 6 of 42 {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes; an IVS2-666 C/T polymorphism showed non-heterozygosity in 37 and heterozygosity in only 5 of these {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes. One {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} major patient and his mother had no mutation detected by allele-specific oligomer hybridization; PCR failed to amplify any DNA from his {beta}-globin gene. After a total {beta}-globin gene deletion [{beta}{sup Del}] was found in a Filipino family in Ontario, specific PCR amplification for {beta}{sup Del} detected this in 43 of 53 {beta}{sup Th} Filipino samples tested; the above {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} patient was a ({beta}{sup Del}/{beta}{sup Del}) homozygote. The {beta}{sup Del} may account for over 60% of all {beta}{sup Th} alleles in Filipinos; this is the highest proportion of a deletion {beta}{sup Th} mutation reported from any population. Most but not all {beta}{sup Del} heterozygotes had high Hb F [5.13 {plus_minus} 3.94 mean {plus_minus} 1 s.d.] compared to the codon 41/42 four base deletion common in Chinese [2.30 {plus_minus} 0.86], or to {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes with normal {alpha}-globin genes [2.23 {plus_minus} 0.80].

  9. An intronic deletion in the PROM1 gene leads to autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Eidinger, Osnat; Leibu, Rina; Newman, Hadas; Rizel, Leah; Perlman, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic basis for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) in a consanguineous Israeli Jewish family. Methods Patients underwent a detailed ophthalmic evaluation, including eye examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and electrophysiological tests, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed to identify homozygous regions shared among two of the affected individuals. Mutation screening of the underlying gene was performed with direct sequencing. In silico and in vitro analyses were used to predict the effect of the identified mutation on splicing. Results The affected family members are three siblings who have various degrees of progressive visual deterioration, glare, color vision abnormalities, and night vision difficulties. Visual field tests revealed central scotomas of different extension. Cone and rod ERG responses were reduced, with cones more severely affected. Homozygosity mapping revealed several homozygous intervals shared among two of the affected individuals. One included the PROM1 gene. Sequence analysis of the 26 coding exons of PROM1 in one affected individual revealed no mutations in the coding sequence or in intronic splice sites. However, in intron 21, proximate to the intron–exon junction, we observed a homozygous 10 bp deletion between positions −26 and −17 (c.2281–26_-17del). The deletion was linked to a known SNP, c.2281–6C>G. The deletion cosegregated with the disease in the family, and was not detected in public databases or in 101 ethnically-matched control individuals. In silico analysis predicted that this deletion would lead to altered intron 21 splicing. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that a recognition site for the SRSF2 splicing factor is located within the deleted sequence. The in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that c.2281–26_-17del leads to

  10. Analysis of a large cluster of nonessential genes deleted from a vaccinia virus terminal transposition mutant.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, G J; Moss, B

    1988-12-01

    The principal objectives of this study were to analyze the structure and coding potential of a long segment of DNA missing from a previously isolated (B. Moss, E. Winters, and J. A. Cooper (1981) J. Virol. 40, 387-395) attenuated variant of vaccinia virus strain WR and to examine the precise changes in the genome accompanying the deletion. The sequences of a 14.5-kbp region located at the left end of the standard vaccinia virus genome, extending from within the inverted terminal repetition (ITR) of the HindIII C fragment to the end of the HindIII N fragment, and of a 3-kbp segment from a corresponding region of the variant genome were determined. A comparison of these sequences revealed that the variant contained a deletion of 12 kbp and an insertion of 2.1 kbp. The origin of the inserted DNA was traced to the HindIII B region by using oligonucleotide probes indicating that a transposition of unique DNA located adjacent to the right ITR had occurred. Structural analysis indicated no extensive homologies, nucleotide substitutions, additions, or deletions at the boundaries of the transposed DNA. Examination of the right end of the variant genome indicated that a copy of the transposed DNA was still present and, therefore, the length of the ITR had been increased by 2.1 kbp. The variant genome could have formed by a mechanism that resulted in the replacement of a 22-kbp left-terminal fragment with a 12-kbp right-terminal fragment. The DNA missing from the variant and contained within the standard vaccinia virus WR genome contains 17 contiguous open reading frames (ORFs), all of which are directed leftward and apparently not required for replication in cultured cells. One deleted ORF has a 60% sequence similarity to another gene encoding a 42,000-Da protein present within the ITR suggesting that duplications have previously occurred during the evolution of vaccinia virus. Another deleted ORF has a 39% sequence similarity to a complement 4b binding protein. The

  11. Large deletions encompassing the TCOF1 and CAMK2A genes are responsible for Treacher Collins syndrome with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Marie; Collet, Corinne; Verloes, Alain; Lambert, Laetitia; Herlin, Christian; Blanchet, Catherine; Sanchez, Elodie; Drunat, Séverine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Puechberty, Jacques; Sarda, Pierre; Geneviève, David

    2014-01-01

    Mandibulofacial dysostosis is part of a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of craniofacial development, which lead to malar and mandibular hypoplasia. Treacher Collins syndrome is the major cause of mandibulofacial dysostosis and is due to mutations in the TCOF1 gene. Usually patients with Treacher Collins syndrome do not present with intellectual disability. Recently, the EFTUD2 gene was identified in patients with mandibulofacial dysostosis associated with microcephaly, intellectual disability and esophageal atresia. We report on two patients presenting with mandibulofacial dysostosis characteristic of Treacher Collins syndrome, but associated with unexpected intellectual disability, due to a large deletion encompassing several genes including the TCOF1 gene. We discuss the involvement of the other deleted genes such as CAMK2A or SLC6A7 in the cognitive development delay of the patients reported, and we propose the systematic investigation for 5q32 deletion when intellectual disability is associated with Treacher Collins syndrome.

  12. Forebrain glucocorticoid receptor gene deletion attenuates behavioral changes and antidepressant responsiveness during chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-10-01

    Stress is an important risk factor for mood disorders. Stress also stimulates the secretion of glucocorticoids, which have been found to influence mood. To determine the role of forebrain glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in behavioral responses to chronic stress, the present experiments compared behavioral effects of repeated social defeat in mice with forebrain GR deletion and in floxed GR littermate controls. Repeated defeat produced alterations in forced swim and tail suspension immobility in floxed GR mice that did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion. Defeat-induced changes in immobility in floxed GR mice were prevented by chronic antidepressant treatment, indicating that these behaviors were dysphoria-related. In contrast, although mice with forebrain GR deletion exhibited antidepressant-induced decreases in tail suspension immobility in the absence of stress, this response did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion after defeat. There were no marked differences in plasma corticosterone between genotypes, suggesting that behavioral differences depended on forebrain GR rather than on abnormal glucocorticoid secretion. Defeat-induced gene expression of the neuronal activity marker c-fos in the ventral hippocampus, paraventricular thalamus and lateral septum correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral effects of defeat, whereas c-fos induction in the nucleus accumbens and central and basolateral amygdala correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral responses to antidepressant treatment. The dependence of both negative (dysphoria-related) and positive (antidepressant-induced) behaviors on forebrain GR is consistent with the contradictory effects of glucocorticoids on mood, and implicates these or other forebrain regions in these effects.

  13. Forebrain glucocorticoid receptor gene deletion attenuates behavioral changes and antidepressant responsiveness during chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Stress is an important risk factor for mood disorders. Stress also stimulates the secretion of glucocorticoids, which have been found to influence mood. To determine the role of forebrain glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in behavioral responses to chronic stress, the present experiments compared behavioral effects of repeated social defeat in mice with forebrain GR deletion and in floxed GR littermate controls. Repeated defeat produced alterations in forced swim and tail suspension immobility in floxed GR mice that did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion. Defeat-induced changes in immobility in floxed GR mice were prevented by chronic antidepressant treatment, indicating that these behaviors were dysphoria-related. In contrast, although mice with forebrain GR deletion exhibited antidepressant-induced decreases in tail suspension immobility in the absence of stress, this response did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion after defeat. There were no marked differences in plasma corticosterone between genotypes, suggesting that behavioral differences depended on forebrain GR rather than on abnormal glucocorticoid secretion. Defeat-induced gene expression of the neuronal activity marker c-fos in the ventral hippocampus, paraventricular thalamus and lateral septum correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral effects of defeat, whereas c-fos induction in the nucleus accumbens and central and basolateral amygdala correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral responses to antidepressant treatment. The dependence of both negative (dysphoria-related) and positive (antidepressant-induced) behaviors on forebrain GR is consistent with the contradictory effects of glucocorticoids on mood, and implicates these or other forebrain regions in these effects. PMID:25168761

  14. Improving freeze-tolerance of baker's yeast through seamless gene deletion of NTH1 and PUT1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian; Chen, Didi; Wang, Guanglu; Zhang, Cuiying; Du, Liping; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-06-01

    Baker's yeast strains with freeze-tolerance are highly desirable to maintain high leavening ability after freezing. Enhanced intracellular concentration of trehalose and proline in yeast is linked with freeze-tolerance. In this study, we constructed baker's yeast with enhanced freeze-tolerance by simultaneous deletion of the neutral trehalase-encoded gene NTH1 and the proline oxidase-encoded gene PUT1. We first used the two-step integration-based seamless gene deletion method to separately delete NTH1 and PUT1 in haploid yeast. Subsequently, through two rounds of hybridization and sporulation-based allelic exchange and colony PCR-mediated tetrad analysis, we obtained strains with restored URA3 and deletion of NTH1 and/or PUT1. The resulting strain showed higher cell survival and dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to the wild-type strain due to enhanced accumulation of trehalose and/or proline. Moreover, mutant with simultaneous deletion of NTH1 and PUT1 exhibits the highest relative dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to mutants with single-gene deletion perhaps due to elevated levels of both trehalose and proline. These results verified that it is applicable to construct frozen dough baker's yeast using the method proposed in this paper.

  15. Improving freeze-tolerance of baker's yeast through seamless gene deletion of NTH1 and PUT1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian; Chen, Didi; Wang, Guanglu; Zhang, Cuiying; Du, Liping; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-06-01

    Baker's yeast strains with freeze-tolerance are highly desirable to maintain high leavening ability after freezing. Enhanced intracellular concentration of trehalose and proline in yeast is linked with freeze-tolerance. In this study, we constructed baker's yeast with enhanced freeze-tolerance by simultaneous deletion of the neutral trehalase-encoded gene NTH1 and the proline oxidase-encoded gene PUT1. We first used the two-step integration-based seamless gene deletion method to separately delete NTH1 and PUT1 in haploid yeast. Subsequently, through two rounds of hybridization and sporulation-based allelic exchange and colony PCR-mediated tetrad analysis, we obtained strains with restored URA3 and deletion of NTH1 and/or PUT1. The resulting strain showed higher cell survival and dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to the wild-type strain due to enhanced accumulation of trehalose and/or proline. Moreover, mutant with simultaneous deletion of NTH1 and PUT1 exhibits the highest relative dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to mutants with single-gene deletion perhaps due to elevated levels of both trehalose and proline. These results verified that it is applicable to construct frozen dough baker's yeast using the method proposed in this paper. PMID:26965428

  16. [Construction and Function Verification of a Novel Shuttle Vector Containing a Marker Gene Self-deletion System].

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Wang, Zhan; Zhou, Yubai; Zhang, Fang; Shen, Sisi; Li, Zelin; Zeng, Yi

    2015-09-01

    For rapid and accurate screening of recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA) that satisfied the quality standards of clinical trials, a novel shuttle vector that can delete the marker gene automatically during virus propagation was construted: pZL-EGFP. To construct the pZL-EGFP, the original shuttle vector pSC11 was modified by replacing the LacZ marker gene with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and then inserting homologous sequences of TKL into the flank regions of EGFP. Baby hamster kidney (BHK)-21 cells were cotransfected with pZL-EGFP and MVA, and underwent ten passages and one plaque screening to obtain the EGFP-free rMVA carrying the exogenous gene. Resulting rMVA was tested by polymerase chain reaction and western blotting to verify pZL-EGFP function. A novel shuttle vector pZL-EGFP containing an EGFP marker gene which could be deleted automatically was constructed. This gene deletion had no effect on the activities of rMVA, and the exogenous gene could be expressed stably. These results suggest that rMVA can be packaged efficiently by homologous recombination between pZL-EGFP and MVA in BHK-21 cells, and that the carried EGFP gene can be removed automatically by intramolecular homologous recombination during virus passage. Meanwhile, the gene deletion had no influence on the activities of rMVA and the expression of exogenous target gene. This study lays a solid foundation for the future research.

  17. Deletion of a Chitin Synthase Gene in a Citric Acid Producing Strain of Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, Torri E.; Baker, Scott E.

    2007-01-29

    Citric acid production by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is carried out in a process that causes the organism to drastically alter its morphology. This altered morphology includes hyphal swelling and highly limited polar growth resulting in clumps of swollen cells that eventually aggregate into pellets of approximately 100 microns in diameter. In this pelleted form, A. niger has increased citric acid production as compared to growth in filamentous form. Chitin is a crucial component of the cell wall of filamentous fungi. Alterations in the deposition or production of chitin may have profound effects on the morphology of the organism. In order to study the role of chitin synthesis in pellet formation we have deleted a chitin synthase gene (csmA) in Aspergillus niger strain ATCC 11414 using a PCR based deletion construct. This class of chitin synthases is only found in filamentous fungi and is not present in yeasts. The csmA genes contain a myosin motor domain at the N-terminus and a chitin synthesis domain at the C-terminus. They are believed to contribute to the specialized polar growth observed in filamentous fungi that is lacking in yeasts. The csmA deletion strain (csmAΔ) was subjected to minimal media with and without osmotic stabilizers as well as tested in citric acid production media. Without osmotic stabilizers, the mutant germlings were abnormally swollen, primarily in the subapical regions, and contained large vacuoles. However, this swelling is ultimately not inhibitory to growth as the germlings are able to recover and undergo polar growth. Colony formation was largely unaffected in the absence of osmotic stabilizers. In citric acid production media csmAΔ was observed to have a 2.5 fold increase in citric acid production. The controlled expression of this class of chitin synthases may be useful for improving production of organic acids in filamentous fungi.

  18. A Japanese boy with myalgia and cramps has a novel in-frame deletion of the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, C; Patria, S Y; Nishio, H; Yabe, M; Matsuo, M

    1996-05-01

    We report a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) patient with occasional myalgia and cramps during normal activity that developed at the age of 28 months. His family history was negative for neuromuscular diseases. Muscle biopsy analyses, including dystrophin immunostaining, disclosed no clinically relevant findings. The diagnosis of BMD was initially made at the age of 10 years, when indications of persistent high serum levels of CK prompted us to screen deletions in the dystrophin gene by amplification of 19 deletion-prone exons from the genomic DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Among the exons examined, exons 13 and 17 were deleted. To clarify the size of the deletion, the dystrophin transcript was analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The determined nucleotide sequence of the amplified product encompassing exons 10 to 20 disclosed that the entire segment corresponding to exons 13 to 18 (810 bp) was absent, a deletion that would be expected to cause the production of a dystrophin protein lacking 270 amino acids from the rod domain. This result indicates that occasional myalgia and cramps could be early clinical manifestations of mild BMD, especially in patients who have a deletion in the rod domain, and that deletion screening of the dystrophin gene might be the only reliable method to diagnose such cases.

  19. Breakpoint analysis of Turner patients with partial Xp deletions: implications for the lymphoedema gene location

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, C.; Sargent, C.; Ogata, T.; Affara, N.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Turner syndrome is characterised by a 45,X karyotype and a variety of skeletal, lymphoedemic, and gonadal anomalies. Genes involved in the Turner phenotype are thought to be X/Y homologous with the X genes escaping X inactivation. Haploinsufficiency of the SHOX gene has been reported to cause the short stature seen in Turner syndrome patients. More recently, mutations of this gene have been shown to be associated with other skeletal abnormalities, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of SHOX causes all the Turner skeletal anomalies. No such gene has yet been identified for the lymphoedemic features.
METHODS—Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis with PAC clones on nine patients with partially deleted X chromosomes was performed.
RESULTS/DISCUSSION—The Turner syndrome stigmata for each patient are described and correlation between the breakpoint and the phenotype discussed. A lymphoedema critical region in Xp11.4 is proposed and its gene content discussed with respect to that in the previously reported Yp11.2 lymphoedema critical region.


Keywords: Turner syndrome; lymphoedema; Xp11.4 PMID:11546827

  20. Efficient PRNP deletion in bovine genome using gene-editing technologies in bovine cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, WooJae; Kim, Eunji; Yum, Soo-Young; Lee, ChoongIl; Lee, JiHyun; Moon, JoonHo; Ramachandra, Sisitha; Malaweera, Buddika Oshadi; Cho, JongKi; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, SeokJoong; Jang, Goo

    2015-01-01

    Even though prion (encoded by the PRNP gene) diseases like bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are fatal neurodegenerative diseases in cattle, their study via gene deletion has been limited due to the absence of cell lines or mutant models. In this study, we aim to develop an immortalized fibroblast cell line in which genome-engineering technology can be readily applied to create gene-modified clones for studies. To this end, this study is designed to 1) investigate the induction of primary fibroblasts to immortalization by introducing Bmi-1 and hTert genes; 2) investigate the disruption of the PRNP in those cells; and 3) evaluate the gene expression and embryonic development using knockout (KO) cell lines. Primary cells from a male neonate were immortalized with Bmi-1and hTert. Immortalized cells were cultured for more than 180 days without any changes in their doubling time and morphology. Furthermore, to knockout the PRNP gene, plasmids that encode transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) pairs were transfected into the cells, and transfected single cells were propagated. Mutated clonal cell lines were confirmed by T7 endonuclease I assay and sequencing. Four knockout cell lines were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and the resulting embryos were developed to the blastocyst stage. The genes (CSNK2A1, FAM64A, MPG and PRND) were affected after PRNP disruption in immortalized cells. In conclusion, we established immortalized cattle fibroblasts using Bmi-1 and hTert genes, and used TALENs to knockout the PRNP gene in these immortalized cells. The efficient PRNP KO is expected to be a useful technology to develop our understanding of in vitro prion protein functions in cattle. PMID:26217959

  1. A Population of Deletion Mutants and an Integrated Mapping and Exome-seq Pipeline for Gene Discovery in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shangang; Li, Aixia; Morton, Kyla; Avoles-Kianian, Penny; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David

    2016-01-01

    To better understand maize endosperm filling and maturation, we used γ-irradiation of the B73 maize reference line to generate mutants with opaque endosperm and reduced kernel fill phenotypes, and created a population of 1788 lines including 39 Mo17 × F2s showing stable, segregating, and viable kernel phenotypes. For molecular characterization of the mutants, we developed a novel functional genomics platform that combined bulked segregant RNA and exome sequencing (BSREx-seq) to map causative mutations and identify candidate genes within mapping intervals. To exemplify the utility of the mutants and provide proof-of-concept for the bioinformatics platform, we present detailed characterization of line 937, an opaque mutant harboring a 6203 bp in-frame deletion covering six exons within the Opaque-1 gene. In addition, we describe mutant line 146 which contains a 4.8 kb intragene deletion within the Sugary-1 gene and line 916 in which an 8.6 kb deletion knocks out a Cyclin A2 gene. The publically available algorithm developed in this work improves the identification of causative deletions and its corresponding gaps within mapping peaks. This study demonstrates the utility of γ-irradiation for forward genetics in large nondense genomes such as maize since deletions often affect single genes. Furthermore, we show how this classical mutagenesis method becomes applicable for functional genomics when combined with state-of-the-art genomics tools. PMID:27261000

  2. Deletion of the Bacillus subtilis isocitrate dehydrogenase gene causes a block at stage I of sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S; Levin, P A; Matsuno, K; Grossman, A D; Sonenshein, A L

    1997-01-01

    A Bacillus subtilis mutant with a deletion of citC, the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase, the third enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid branch of the Krebs cycle, had a greatly reduced ability to sporulate. Analysis of expression of lacZ fusions to various sporulation gene promoters revealed that in the citC mutant development is probably blocked between stage 0 and stage II. That is, genes expressed very early in sporulation, under the direct control of the Spo0A transcription factor, were induced normally in the citC mutant. However, genes expressed after asymmetric septation (stage II) in wild-type cells were not induced in the citC mutant. Analysis of cell morphology by thin-section electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the mutant formed axial chromosomal filaments and accumulated rings of FtsZ protein at potential polar division sites but failed to form asymmetric division septa, indicating that sporulation is blocked at stage I. The growth and sporulation defects of the B. subtilis citC mutant were fully overcome by introduction and expression of the Escherichia coli icd gene, encoding an isocitrate dehydrogenase similar to the enzyme from B. subtilis. PMID:9244258

  3. Inversin, a novel gene in the vertebrate left-right axis pathway, is partially deleted in the inv mouse.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D; Turnpenny, L; Goodship, J; Dai, W; Majumder, K; Matthews, L; Gardner, A; Schuster, G; Vien, L; Harrison, W; Elder, F F; Penman-Splitt, M; Overbeek, P; Strachan, T

    1998-10-01

    Visceral left-right asymmetry occurs in all vertebrates, but the inversion of embryo turning (inv) mouse, which resulted following a random transgene insertion, is the only model in which these asymmetries are consistently reversed. We report positional cloning of the gene underlying this recessive phenotype. Although transgene insertion was accompanied by neighbouring deletion and duplication events, our YAC phenotype rescue studies indicate that the mutant phenotype results from the deletion. After extensively characterizing the 47-kb deleted region and flanking sequences from the wild-type mouse genome, we found evidence for only one gene sequence in the deleted region. We determined the full-length 5.5-kb cDNA sequence and identified 16 exons, of which exons 3-11 were eliminated by the deletion, causing a frameshift. The novel gene specifies a 1062-aa product with tandem ankyrin-like repeat sequences. Characterization of complementing and non-complementing YAC transgenic families revealed that correction of the inv mutant phenotype was concordant with integration and intact expression of this novel gene, which we have named inversin (Invs). PMID:9771707

  4. Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome: the first Italian case of BCOR and co-occurring OTC gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, C; Lombardo, B; Fabbricatore, C; Munno, C; Caliendo, I; Gallo, F; Pastore, L

    2015-04-01

    Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome is a rare genetic disorder affecting ocular, facial, dental and cardiac systems. The syndrome is an X-linked dominant trait and it might be lethal in males. This syndrome is usually caused by mutations in the BCL6 interacting co-repressor gene (BCOR). We described a female child with mild phenotype of oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) analysis revealed a de novo heterozygous deletion in the Xp11.4 region of approximately 2.3 Mb, involving BCOR and ornithine carbamoyl-transferase (OTC) genes. The deletion observed was subsequently confirmed by real time PCR. In this study we report a first case with co-occurrence of BCOR and OTC genes completely deleted in OFCD syndrome.

  5. Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome: the first Italian case of BCOR and co-occurring OTC gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, C; Lombardo, B; Fabbricatore, C; Munno, C; Caliendo, I; Gallo, F; Pastore, L

    2015-04-01

    Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome is a rare genetic disorder affecting ocular, facial, dental and cardiac systems. The syndrome is an X-linked dominant trait and it might be lethal in males. This syndrome is usually caused by mutations in the BCL6 interacting co-repressor gene (BCOR). We described a female child with mild phenotype of oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) analysis revealed a de novo heterozygous deletion in the Xp11.4 region of approximately 2.3 Mb, involving BCOR and ornithine carbamoyl-transferase (OTC) genes. The deletion observed was subsequently confirmed by real time PCR. In this study we report a first case with co-occurrence of BCOR and OTC genes completely deleted in OFCD syndrome. PMID:25620158

  6. Deletion at 14q22-23 indicates a contiguous gene syndrome comprising anophthalmia, pituitary hypoplasia, and ear anomalies.

    PubMed

    Nolen, Leisha D; Amor, David; Haywood, Ashley; St Heaps, Luke; Willcock, Chris; Mihelec, Marija; Tam, Patrick; Billson, Frank; Grigg, John; Peters, Greg; Jamieson, Robyn V

    2006-08-15

    Anophthalmia and pituitary gland hypoplasia are both debilitating conditions where the underlying genetic defect is unknown in the majority of cases. We identified a patient with bilateral anophthalmia and absence of the optic nerves, chiasm and tracts, as well as pituitary gland hypoplasia and ear anomalies with a de novo apparently balanced chromosomal translocation, 46,XY,t(3;14)(q28;q23.2). Translocation breakpoint analysis using FISH and high-resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has identified a 9.66 Mb deleted region on the long arm of chromosome 14 which includes the genes BMP4, OTX2, RTN1, SIX6, SIX1, and SIX4. Three other patients with interstitial deletions involving 14q22-23 have been described, all with bilateral anophthalmia, pituitary abnormalities, ear anomalies, and a facial phenotype similar to our patient. OTX2 is involved in ocular developmental defects, and the severity of the ocular phenotype in our patient and the other 14q22-23 deletion patients, suggests this genomic region harbors other gene/s involved in ocular development. BMP4 haploinsufficiency is predicted to contribute to the ocular phenotype on the basis of its expression pattern and observed murine mutant phenotypes. In addition, deletion of BMP4 and SIX6 is likely to contribute to the abnormal pituitary development, and SIX1 deletion may contribute to the ear and other craniofacial features. This indicates that contiguous gene deletion may contribute to the phenotypic features in the 14q22-23 deletion patients.

  7. Hepatitis A viruses with deletions in the 2A gene are infectious in cultured cells and marmosets.

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, S A; Emerson, S U; Huang, Y K; Summers, D F; Ehrenfeld, E

    1995-01-01

    The 2A gene of hepatitis A virus (HAV) bears no obvious similarity to the corresponding genes of other picornaviruses and has no known function. In a preliminary effort to gain information about the HAV 2A gene product, we constructed several HAV cDNAs containing deletions of 30 or 45 nucleotides in the predicted central portion of the 2A gene. These deletions did not affect the sites of protein processing, although the rates or efficiencies of polyprotein cleavage at the surrounding cleavage junctions appeared slightly reduced. Transfection of FRhK-4 cells with RNA transcripts of the deleted HAV cDNAs generated small foci of infected cells and produced infectious virus that retained the deletion mutations. In contrast, a single amino acid insertion in the 2B coding region was lethal to virus replication despite normal protein processing. Another deletion, which included the predicted 2A/2B junction and extended into the 2B coding sequence, did not support polyprotein processing or generate viable virus. One of the viable internal 2A deletions was introduced into a wild-type HAV cDNA background, and transcripts were tested for infectivity by inoculation directly into the livers of two marmosets. Both animals seroconverted, displayed elevated serum liver enzymes, and excreted infectious virus. Thus, deletion of 10 or 15 amino acid residues from the predicted central portion of the 2A protein was tolerated with only relatively minor effects on the growth of HAV in cultured cells and in marmoset liver. PMID:7637003

  8. Overlapping submicroscopic deletions in Xq28 in two unrelated boys with developmental disorders: Identification of a gene near FRAXE

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Sutherland, G.R. |; Ades, L.C.; Gecz, J.; Baker, E.; Mulley, J.C.; Keinaenen, M.; Kaeaeriaeinen, H.

    1995-04-01

    Two unrelated boys are described with delay in development and submicroscopic deletions in Xq28, near FRAXE. Molecular diagnosis to exclude the fragile X (FRAXA) syndrome used the direct probe pfxa3, together with a control probe pS8 (DXS296), against PstI restriction digests of DNA. Deletions were detected initially by the control probe pS8, which is an anonymous fragment subcloned from YAC 539, within 1 Mb distal to FRAXA. Further molecular analyses determined that the maximum size of the deletion is <100 kb in one boy (MK) and is wholly overlapped by the deletion of up to {approximately}200 kb in the other (CB). These deletions lie between the sequences detected by the probe VK21C (DXS296) and a dinucleotide repeat VK18AC (DXS295). The patient MK had only speech delay with otherwise normal development, while patient CB had global developmental delay that included speech delay. Detection of overlapping deletions in these two cases led to speculation that coding sequences of a gene(s) important in language development may be affected. Hybridization of the pS8 and VK21A probes to zooblots revealed cross-species homology. This conservation during evolution suggested that this region contains sequences with functional significance in normal development. The VK21A probe detected a 9.5-kb transcript in placenta and brain and a smaller, 2.5-kb, transcript in other tissues analyzed. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Deletion of genes encoding fatty acid desaturases leads to alterations in stress sensitivity in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Zhe; Yu, Qilin; Mao, Jiwei; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2015-06-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) are key compounds which have important roles in maintaining cell membrane physiological functions and the adaption to tough conditions. Defects of fatty acid desaturases will change cellular UFA constitution. Pichia pastoris GS115 has four fatty acid desaturase genes, namely FAD9A, FAD9B, FAD12 and FAD15. Their products catalyze the synthesis of three kinds of UFAs, oleic acid (catalyzed by Fad9A and Fad9B), linoleic acid (catalyzed by Fad12) and α-linolenic acid (catalyzed by Fad15), respectively. In this study, we found that deletion of FAD12 led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Cellular lipid peroxidation levels declined in the fad12Δ mutant upon H2O2 treatment. Cellular fatty acids compositions were changed with the increased expression of FAD9A. On the other hand, deletion of FAD9A resulted in increased tolerance to the plasma membrane (PM) damage agent SDS, and PM deformation was not detected in the fad9AΔ mutant under this stress. Our results showed that UFAs are related to cell adaption to adverse environmental changes.

  10. Relationship between angiotensin I-converting enzyme insertion/deletion gene polymorphism and retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the association between angiotensin I-converting enzyme insertion/deletion (ACE I/D) gene polymorphism and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). A total of 80 patients with retinal vein occlusion who was admitted to the Eye Department of Kartal Training and Research Hospital between 2008 and 2011, and 80 subjects were enrolled in this retrospective case–control study. Patients who experienced RVO within one week to six months of study enrolment were included, and those with coronary artery diseases, prior myocardial infarction history and coagulation disturbances were excluded from the study. The diagnosis was made by ophthalmoscopic fundus examination and fluorescein angiography. The ACE gene I/D polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction, and the ACE gene was classified into three types: I/I, I/D and D/D. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, ACE D/D genotype (p = 0.035), diabetes-mellitus (p = 0.019) and hypertension (p = 0.001) were found to be independent predictive factors for RVO. The results of the present study reveal that ACE D/D polymorphism is an independent predictive factor for RVO. However, one cannot definitely conclude that ACE gene polymorphism is a risk factor for retinal vein occlusion. PMID:25161389

  11. Deletion of a Malaria Invasion Gene Reduces Death and Anemia, in Model Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Noé D.; Safeukui, Innocent; Adelani, Aanuoluwa A.; Tewari, Rita; Reddy, Janardan K.; Rao, Sam; Holder, Anthony; Buffet, Pierre; Mohandas, Narla; Haldar, Kasturi

    2011-01-01

    Malaria parasites induce complex cellular and clinical phenotypes, including anemia, cerebral malaria and death in a wide range of mammalian hosts. Host genes and parasite ‘toxins’ have been implicated in malarial disease, but the contribution of parasite genes remains to be fully defined. Here we assess disease in BALB/c mice and Wistar rats infected by the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei with a gene knock out for merozoite surface protein (MSP) 7. MSP7 is not essential for infection but in P. falciparum, it enhances erythrocyte invasion by 20%. In vivo, as compared to wild type, the P. berghei Δmsp7 mutant is associated with an abrogation of death and a decrease from 3% to 2% in peak, circulating parasitemia. The Δmsp7 mutant is also associated with less anemia and modest increase in the size of follicles in the spleen. Together these data show that deletion of a single parasite invasion ligand modulates blood stage disease, as measured by death and anemia. This work is the first to assess the contribution of a gene present in all plasmodial species in severe disease. PMID:21980474

  12. Soluble epoxide hydrolase gene deletion improves blood flow and reduces infarct size after cerebral ischemia in reproductively senescent female mice

    PubMed Central

    Zuloaga, Kristen L.; Zhang, Wenri; Roese, Natalie E.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a key enzyme in the metabolism of vasodilatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), is sexually dimorphic, suppressed by estrogen, and contributes to underlying sex differences in cerebral blood flow and injury after cerebral ischemia. We tested the hypothesis that sEH inhibition or gene deletion in reproductively senescent (RS) female mice would increase cerebral perfusion and decrease infarct size following stroke. RS (15–18 month old) and young (3–4 month old) female sEH knockout (sEHKO) mice and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to 45 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with laser Doppler perfusion monitoring. WT mice were treated with vehicle or a sEH inhibitor t-AUCB at the time of reperfusion and every 24 h thereafter for 3 days. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow were measured in vivo using optical microangiography (OMAG). Infarct size was measured 3 days after reperfusion. Infarct size and cerebral perfusion 24 h after MCAO were not altered by age. Both sEH gene deletion and sEH inhibition increased cortical perfusion 24 h after MCAO. Neither sEH gene deletion nor sEH inhibition reduced infarct size in young mice. However, sEH gene deletion, but not sEH inhibition of the hydrolase domain of the enzyme, decreased infarct size in RS mice. Results of these studies show that sEH gene deletion and sEH inhibition enhance cortical perfusion following MCAO and sEH gene deletion reduces damage after ischemia in RS female mice; however this neuroprotection in absent is young mice. PMID:25642188

  13. A novel method to generate unmarked gene deletions in the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi using 5-fluorocytosine conditional lethality

    PubMed Central

    van der Geize, R.; de Jong, W.; Hessels, G. I.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel method to efficiently generate unmarked in-frame gene deletions in Rhodococcus equi was developed, exploiting the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) by the action of cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) enzymes. The opportunistic, intracellular pathogen R. equi is resistant to high concentrations of 5-FC. Introduction of Escherichia coli genes encoding CD and UPRT conferred conditional lethality to R. equi cells incubated with 5-FC. To exemplify the use of the codA::upp cassette as counter-selectable marker, an unmarked in-frame gene deletion mutant of R. equi was constructed. The supA and supB genes, part of a putative cholesterol catabolic gene cluster, were efficiently deleted from the R. equi wild-type genome. Phenotypic analysis of the generated ΔsupAB mutant confirmed that supAB are essential for growth of R. equi on cholesterol. Macrophage survival assays revealed that the ΔsupAB mutant is able to survive and proliferate in macrophages comparable to wild type. Thus, cholesterol metabolism does not appear to be essential for macrophage survival of R. equi. The CD-UPRT based 5-FC counter-selection may become a useful asset in the generation of unmarked in-frame gene deletions in other actinobacteria as well, as actinobacteria generally appear to be 5-FC resistant and 5-FU sensitive. PMID:18984616

  14. Deletion and Gene Expression Analyses Define the Paxilline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Penicillium paxilli

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Barry; Young, Carolyn A.; Saikia, Sanjay; McMillan, Lisa K.; Monahan, Brendon J.; Koulman, Albert; Astin, Jonathan; Eaton, Carla J.; Bryant, Andrea; Wrenn, Ruth E.; Finch, Sarah C.; Tapper, Brian A.; Parker, Emily J.; Jameson, Geoffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    The indole-diterpene paxilline is an abundant secondary metabolite synthesized by Penicillium paxilli. In total, 21 genes have been identified at the PAX locus of which six have been previously confirmed to have a functional role in paxilline biosynthesis. A combination of bioinformatics, gene expression and targeted gene replacement analyses were used to define the boundaries of the PAX gene cluster. Targeted gene replacement identified seven genes, paxG, paxA, paxM, paxB, paxC, paxP and paxQ that were all required for paxilline production, with one additional gene, paxD, required for regular prenylation of the indole ring post paxilline synthesis. The two putative transcription factors, PP104 and PP105, were not co-regulated with the pax genes and based on targeted gene replacement, including the double knockout, did not have a role in paxilline production. The relationship of indole dimethylallyl transferases involved in prenylation of indole-diterpenes such as paxilline or lolitrem B, can be found as two disparate clades, not supported by prenylation type (e.g., regular or reverse). This paper provides insight into the P. paxilli indole-diterpene locus and reviews the recent advances identified in paxilline biosynthesis. PMID:23949005

  15. A deletion in the bovine FANCI gene compromises fertility by causing fetal death and brachyspina.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Carole; Agerholm, Jorgen Steen; Coppieters, Wouter; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Li, Wanbo; de Jong, Gerben; Fasquelle, Corinne; Karim, Latifa; Cirera, Susanna; Cambisano, Nadine; Ahariz, Naima; Mullaart, Erik; Georges, Michel; Fredholm, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Fertility is one of the most important traits in dairy cattle, and has been steadily declining over the last decades. We herein use state-of-the-art genomic tools, including high-throughput SNP genotyping and next-generation sequencing, to identify a 3.3 Kb deletion in the FANCI gene causing the brachyspina syndrome (BS), a rare recessive genetic defect in Holstein dairy cattle. We determine that despite the very low incidence of BS (<1/100,000), carrier frequency is as high as 7.4% in the Holstein breed. We demonstrate that this apparent discrepancy is likely due to the fact that a large proportion of homozygous mutant calves die during pregnancy. We postulate that several other embryonic lethals may segregate in livestock and significantly compromise fertility, and propose a genotype-driven screening strategy to detect the corresponding deleterious mutations. PMID:22952632

  16. Impact of UGT2B17 gene deletion on the steroid profile of an athlete.

    PubMed

    Martín-Escudero, Pilar; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesús; Del Prado, Nayade; Galindo Canales, Mercedes; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel; Vargas, Soledad; Soldevilla, Ana B; Serrano-Garde, Ester; Miguel-Tobal, Francisco; Maestro de Las Casas, Marisa; Fernandez-Pérez, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of the testosterone to epitestosterone ratio (T/E ratio) in urine is often used as a marker for testosterone administration in the doping control field. This study examines the frequencies of the different expression forms of the UGT2B17 gene, and assesses their effects on this marker in volunteer subjects. The sample for this descriptive study was composed of male and female athletes aged between 16 and 55 years old who practiced different sports disciplines. All participants underwent a sports-medical physical examination, and subsequently provided 10 urine samples consecutively over a period of 48 h. The dependent variable examined was T/E and the main independent variable was the UGT2B17 gene polymorphism. During 1 year, 1410 urine samples were obtained from 141 athletes. The frequencies of the three genotypes were as follows: wt homozygotes (ins/ins) 48.2% (n = 68), mutant homozygotes (del/del) 12.1% (n = 17), and heterozygotes (ins/del) 39.7% (n = 56). Genotype distributions varied significantly (P < 0.001) according to ethnicity, 80% of Asian subjects being homozygous for the gene deletion (del/del) compared to 6.9% of Caucasian subjects. A multivariate analysis adjusted for genotype, age, sex, and sports discipline revealed that athletes with the del/del polymorphism showed a significantly lower mean T/E than heterozygotes (ins/del). In contrast, homozygous athletes for the gene insertion (ins/ins) showed higher mean T/E ratios than heterozygotes (ins/del). UGT2B17 gene deletion has a strong influence on the T/E ratio in urine, which is the most efficient indicator of testosterone prohormone misuse. Others factors studied seem not to have such an impact. The genotyping of UGT2B17 is an important source of information for understanding steroid profiling in the doping control field; therefore it is suggested that it be included in the Athletes Biological Passport.

  17. Characterisation of two deletions involving NPC1 and flanking genes in Niemann-Pick type C disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pascau, Laura; Toma, Claudio; Macías-Vidal, Judit; Cozar, Mónica; Cormand, Bru; Lykopoulou, Lilia; Coll, Maria Josep; Grinberg, Daniel; Vilageliu, Lluïsa

    2012-12-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder characterised by the accumulation of a complex pattern of lipids in the lysosomal-late endosomal system. More than 300 disease-causing mutations have been identified so far in the NPC1 and NPC2 genes, including indel, missense, nonsense and splicing mutations. Only one genomic deletion, of more than 23 kb, has been previously reported. We describe two larger structural variants, encompassing NPC1 and flanking genes, as a cause of the disease. QMPSF, SNP inheritance and CytoScan® HD Array were used to confirm and further characterise the presence of hemizygous deletions in two patients. One of the patients (NPC-57) bore a previously described missense mutation (p.T1066N) and an inherited deletion that included NPC1, C18orf8 and part of ANKRD29 gene. The second patient (NPC-G1) had a 1-bp deletion (c.852delT; p.F284Lfs*26) and a deletion encompassing the promoter region and exons 1-10 of NPC1 and the adjacent ANKRD29 and LAMA3. This study characterised two novel chromosomal microdeletions at 18q11-q12 that cause NPC disease and provide insight into missing NPC1 mutant alleles. PMID:23142039

  18. Hypogonadism and obesity in mice with a targeted deletion of the Nhlh2 gene.

    PubMed

    Good, D J; Porter, F D; Mahon, K A; Parlow, A F; Westphal, H; Kirsch, I R

    1997-04-01

    The family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes comprises transcription factors involved in many aspects of growth and development. We have previously described two bHLH transcription factors, Nhlh1 and Nhlh2 (originally named NSCL1 and NSCL2). The nucleotide and predicted protein sequences of Nhlh1 and Nhlh2 are homologous within their bHLH domain where there are only three conservative amino acid differences. During murine embryogenesis, Nhlh1 and Nhlh2 share an overlapping but distinct pattern of expression in the developing nervous system. To improve our understanding of the role of these genes during neurogenesis, we have generated mice containing targeted deletions of both genes and here describe our results for Nhlh2. Loss of Nhlh2 results in a disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in mice. Male Nhlh2-/- mice are microphallic, hypogonadal and infertile with alterations in circulating gonadotropins, a defect in spermatogenesis and a loss of instinctual male sexual behaviour. Female Nhlh2-/- mice reared alone are hypogonadal, but when reared in the presence of males, their ovaries and uteri develop normally and they are fertile. Both male and female homozygotes exhibit progressive adult-onset obesity. Nhlh2 is expressed in the ventral-medial and lateral hypothalamus, Rathke's pouch and in the anterior lobe of the adult pituitary. Our results support a role for Nhlh2 in the onset of puberty and the regulation of body weight metabolism.

  19. Deletion of exon 3 of the insulin receptor gene in a kindred with a familial form of insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Wertheimer, E.; Barbetti, F.; Accili, D.; Taylor, S.I.; Litvin, Y.; Ebstein, R.P.; Bennet, E.R.

    1994-05-01

    Molecular scanning techniques, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), greatly facilitate screening candidate genes for mutations. The authors have used DGGE to screen for mutations in the insulin receptor gene in a family in which four of five daughters were affected by type A insulin resistance in association with acanthosis nigricans and hyperandrogenism. DGGE did not detect mutations in any of the 22 exons of the insulin receptor gene. Nevertheless, Southern blot analysis suggested that there was a deletion of exon 3 in the other paternal allele of the insulin receptor gene. Analysis of the father`s cDNA confirmed that exon 3 was deleted from mRNA molecules derived from one of his two alleles of the insulin receptor gene. Furthermore, the father was found to be hemizygous for a polymorphic sequence (GAC{sup Asp} at codon 234) in exon 3 that was not inherited by any of the five daughters. Instead, all five daughters inherited the paternal allele with the deletion mutation. They did not detect mutations in the mother`s insulin receptor gene. Furthermore, the clinical syndrome did not segregate with either of the mother`s two alleles of the insulin receptor gene. Although the youngest daughter inherited the mutant allele from her father, she was not clinically affected. The explanation for the incomplete penetrance is not known. These results emphasize the importance of specifically searching for deletion mutations when screening candidate genes for mutations. Furthermore, the existence of apparently asymptomatic carriers of mutations in the insulin receptor gene, such as the father in the present study, suggests that the prevalence of mutations in the insulin receptor gene may be higher than would be predicted on the basis of the observed prevalence of patients with extreme insulin resistance. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Deletion of 30 murine cytochrome p450 genes results in viable mice with compromised drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Nico; McLaughlin, Lesley A; Rode, Anja; Macleod, A Kenneth; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland

    2014-06-01

    In humans, 75% of all drugs are metabolized by the cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase system. Enzymes encoded by the CYP2C, CYP2D, and CYP3A gene clusters account for ∼80% of this activity. There are profound species differences in the multiplicity of cytochrome P450 enzymes, and the use of mouse models to predict pathways of drug metabolism is further complicated by overlapping substrate specificity between enzymes from different gene families. To establish the role of the hepatic and extrahepatic P450 system in drug and foreign chemical disposition, drug efficacy, and toxicity, we created a unique mouse model in which 30 cytochrome P450 genes from the Cyp2c, Cyp2d, and Cyp3a gene clusters have been deleted. Remarkably, despite a wide range of putative important endogenous functions, Cyp2c/2d/3a KO mice were viable and fertile, demonstrating that these genes have evolved primarily as detoxification enzymes. Although there was no overt phenotype, detailed examination showed Cyp2c/2d/3a KO mice had a smaller body size (15%) and larger livers (20%). Changes in hepatic morphology and a decreased blood glucose (30%) were also noted. A five-drug cocktail of cytochrome P450 isozyme probe substrates were used to evaluate changes in drug pharmacokinetics; marked changes were observed in either the pharmacokinetics or metabolites formed from Cyp2c, Cyp2d, and Cyp3a substrates, whereas the metabolism of the Cyp1a substrate caffeine was unchanged. Thus, Cyp2c/2d/3a KO mice provide a powerful model to study the in vivo role of the P450 system in drug metabolism and efficacy, as well as in chemical toxicity. PMID:24671958

  1. Proteomic changes associated with deletion of the Magnaporthe oryzae conidial morphology-regulating gene COM1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is a major constraint on world rice production. The conidia produced by this fungal pathogen are the main source of disease dissemination. The morphology of conidia may be a critical factor in the spore dispersal and virulence of M. oryzae in the field. Deletion of a conidial morphology regulating gene encoding putative transcriptional regulator COM1 in M. oryzae resulted in aberrant conidial shape, reduced conidiation and attenuated virulence. Results In this study, a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/matrix assisted laser desorption ionization- time of flight mass spectrometry (2-DE/MALDI-TOF MS) based proteomics approach was employed to identify the cellular and molecular components regulated by the COM1 protein (COM1p) that might contribute to the aberrant phenotypes in M. oryzae. By comparing the conidial proteomes of COM1 deletion mutant and its isogenic wild-type strain P131, we identified a potpourri of 31 proteins that exhibited statistically significant alterations in their abundance levels. Of these differentially regulated proteins, the abundance levels of nine proteins were elevated and twelve were reduced in the Δcom1 mutant. Three proteins were detected only in the Δcom1 conidial proteome, whereas seven proteins were apparently undetectable. The data obtained in the study suggest that the COM1p plays a key role in transcriptional reprogramming of genes implicated in melanin biosynthesis, carbon and energy metabolism, structural organization of cell, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, etc. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the down-regulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in melanin biosynthesis in the COM1 mutant. Conclusions Our results suggest that the COM1p may regulate the transcription of genes involved in various cellular processes indispensable for conidial development and appressorial penetration. These functions are likely to contribute to the effects of

  2. Sub-optimal phenotypes of double-knockout mutants of Escherichia coli depend on the order of gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Gawand, Pratish; Said Abukar, Fatumina; Venayak, Naveen; Partow, Siavash; Motter, Adilson E; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic networks are characterized by multiple redundant reactions that do not have a clear biological function. The redundancies in the metabolic networks are implicated in adaptation to random mutations and survival under different environmental conditions. Reactions that are not active under wild-type growth conditions, but get transiently activated after a mutation event such as gene deletion are known as latent reactions. Characterization of multiple-gene knockout mutants can identify the physiological roles of latent reactions. In this study, we characterized double-gene deletion mutants of E. coli with the aim of investigating the sub-optimal physiology of the mutants and the possible roles of latent reactions. Specifically, we investigated the effects of the deletion of the glyoxylate-shunt gene aceA (encoding a latent reaction enzyme, isocitrate lyase) on the growth characteristics of the mutant E. coli Δpgi. The deletion of aceA reduced the growth rate of E. coli Δpgi, indicating that the activation of the glyoxylate shunt plays an important role in adaptation of the mutant E. coli Δpgi when no other latent reactions are concurrently inactivated. We also investigated the effect of the order of the gene deletions on the growth rates and substrate uptake rates of the double-gene deletion mutants. The results indicate that the order in which genes are deleted determines the phenotype of the mutants during the sub-optimal growth phase. To elucidate the mechanism behind the difference between the observed phenotypes, we carried out transcriptomic analysis and constraint-based modeling of the mutants. Transcriptomic analysis showed differential expression of the gene aceK (encoding the protein isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase) involved in controlling the isocitrate flux through the TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt. Higher acetate production in the E. coli ΔaceA1 Δpgi2 mutant was consistent with the increased aceK expression, which limits the TCA cycle

  3. Intellectual ability in the duchenne muscular dystrophy and dystrophin gene mutation location.

    PubMed

    Milic Rasic, V; Vojinovic, D; Pesovic, J; Mijalkovic, G; Lukic, V; Mladenovic, J; Kosac, A; Novakovic, I; Maksimovic, N; Romac, S; Todorovic, S; Savic Pavicevic, D

    2014-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy during childhood. Mutations in dystrophin (DMD) gene are also recognized as a cause of cognitive impairment. We aimed to determine the association between intelligence level and mutation location in DMD genes in Serbian patients with DMD. Forty-one male patients with DMD, aged 3 to 16 years, were recruited at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in Belgrade, Serbia. All patients had defined DMD gene deletions or duplications [multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR)] and cognitive status assessment (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Brunet-Lezine scale, Vineland-Doll scale). In 37 patients with an estimated full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ), six (16.22%) had borderline intelligence (70DMD and characterizing the genotype can define necessity of early cognitive interventions in DMD patients. PMID:25937795

  4. Murine cytomegalovirus with a deletion of genes spanning HindIII-J and -I displays altered cell and tissue tropism.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, V J; Stenberg, R M; Staley, T L; Virgin, H W; MacDonald, M R; Paetzold, S; Farrell, H E; Rawlinson, W D; Campbell, A E

    1996-03-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) gene products dispensable for growth in cell culture are likely to have important functions within the infected host, influencing tissue tropism, dissemination, or immunological responses against the virus. To identify such genes, our strategy was to delete large regions of the MCMV genome likely to contain genes nonessential for virus replication in NIH 3T3 cells. Mutant virus RV7 contained a deletion of 7.7 kb spanning portions of MCMV HindIII-J and -I. This virus grew comparably to wild-type (WT) virus in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, primary embryo fibroblasts, and bone marrow macrophages. However, RV7 failed to replicate in target organs of immunocompetent BALB/c mice and severe combined immunodeficient mice, which are exquisitely sensitive to MCMV infection. This defect in vivo growth may be related to the observation that RV7 grew poorly in the peritoneal macrophage cell line IC-21, which is highly permissive for growth of WT MCMV. Two other mutant viruses with an insertion or smaller deletion in the region common to the RV7 deletion grew comparably to WT virus in the macrophage cell line and replicated in salivary gland tissue. The poor growth of RV7 in IC-21 cells was due to a block in immediate-early gene expression, as levels of RNA from immediate-early gene IE1 were reduced eightfold compared with levels for WT virus in macrophages infected with RV7. Consequently, levels of RNA from early and late genes were also reduced. The lower expression of IE1 in RV7-infected IC-21 macrophages was not due to defective entry of virus into the cells, as equal amounts of viral DNA were present in cells 3 h after infection with RV7 or WT MCMV. These studies demonstrate that deletion of sequences in HindIII-J and -I confer altered cell and tissue tropism. PMID:8627652

  5. Murine cytomegalovirus with a deletion of genes spanning HindIII-J and -I displays altered cell and tissue tropism.

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, V J; Stenberg, R M; Staley, T L; Virgin, H W; MacDonald, M R; Paetzold, S; Farrell, H E; Rawlinson, W D; Campbell, A E

    1996-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) gene products dispensable for growth in cell culture are likely to have important functions within the infected host, influencing tissue tropism, dissemination, or immunological responses against the virus. To identify such genes, our strategy was to delete large regions of the MCMV genome likely to contain genes nonessential for virus replication in NIH 3T3 cells. Mutant virus RV7 contained a deletion of 7.7 kb spanning portions of MCMV HindIII-J and -I. This virus grew comparably to wild-type (WT) virus in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, primary embryo fibroblasts, and bone marrow macrophages. However, RV7 failed to replicate in target organs of immunocompetent BALB/c mice and severe combined immunodeficient mice, which are exquisitely sensitive to MCMV infection. This defect in vivo growth may be related to the observation that RV7 grew poorly in the peritoneal macrophage cell line IC-21, which is highly permissive for growth of WT MCMV. Two other mutant viruses with an insertion or smaller deletion in the region common to the RV7 deletion grew comparably to WT virus in the macrophage cell line and replicated in salivary gland tissue. The poor growth of RV7 in IC-21 cells was due to a block in immediate-early gene expression, as levels of RNA from immediate-early gene IE1 were reduced eightfold compared with levels for WT virus in macrophages infected with RV7. Consequently, levels of RNA from early and late genes were also reduced. The lower expression of IE1 in RV7-infected IC-21 macrophages was not due to defective entry of virus into the cells, as equal amounts of viral DNA were present in cells 3 h after infection with RV7 or WT MCMV. These studies demonstrate that deletion of sequences in HindIII-J and -I confer altered cell and tissue tropism. PMID:8627652

  6. Alu Sx repeat-induced homozygous deletion of the StAR gene causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Eiden-Plach, Antje; Nguyen, Huy-Hoang; Schneider, Ursula; Hartmann, Michaela F; Bernhardt, Rita; Hannemann, Frank; Wudy, Stefan A

    2012-05-01

    Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (Lipoid CAH) is the most severe form of the autosomal recessive disorder CAH. A general loss of the steroid biosynthetic activity caused by defects in the StAR gene manifests as life-threatening primary adrenal insufficiency. We report a case of Lipoid CAH caused by a so far not described homozygous deletion of the complete StAR gene and provide diagnostic results based on a GC-MS steroid metabolomics and molecular genetic analysis. The patient presented with postnatal hypoglycemia, vomiting, adynamia, increasing pigmentation and hyponatremia. The constellation of urinary steroid metabolites suggested Lipoid CAH and ruled out all other forms of CAH or defects of aldosterone biosynthesis. After treatment with sodium supplementation, hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone the child fully recovered. Molecular genetic analysis demonstrated a homozygous 12.1 kb deletion in the StAR gene locus. The breakpoints of the deletion are embedded into two typical genomic repetitive Alu Sx elements upstream and downstream of the gene leading to the loss of all exons and regulatory elements. We established deletion-specific and intact allele-specific PCR methods and determined the StAR gene status of all available family members over three generations. This analysis revealed that one of the siblings, who died a few weeks after birth, carried the same genetic defect. Since several Alu repeats at the StAR gene locus increase the probability of deletions, patients with typical symptoms of lipoid CAH lacking evidence for the presence of both StAR alleles should be analyzed carefully for this kind of disorder.

  7. The somatic hypermutation activity of a follicular lymphoma links to large insertions and deletions of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Wu, H Y; Kaartinen, M

    1995-07-01

    A biopsy specimen from a patient with follicular lymphoma was divided into two fragments. DNA was extracted from one fragment and a 1.2 kb region of the functional heavy chain (IgH) gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced (eight clones). From the other fragment a cell line (HF-1) was started. The IgH gene region was amplified from the cell line, and sequenced without cloning. The nine sequences obtained could be arranged into a genealogical tree where the individual sequences differed from the deduced ancestor by 16-29 single nucleotide changes, some also by an insertion and/or a deletion. It is apparent that the sequence alterations were caused by somatic mutations during the growth of the lymphoma. The comparison of the sequences with two published (allelic) germline sequences of the human JH region showed approximately 20% non-homology. The differences included five additional multinucleotide insertion/deletion changes, the longest of them a 101-nucleotide insertion. Two long insertions were homologous to the adjacent germline sequences. We propose that most of the changes observed, including long deletions and insertions, represent or are linked to somatic hypermutation events of the Ig gene type. Although in a few cases large deletions and insertions (> 2 bp) have been found in mutated immunoglobulin genes, our results, for the first time, firmly link these deletions/insertions to somatic hypermutations; their frequency was found to be 2.2% of the observed mutational events in the non-translated gene regions. HF-1 is the first follicular lymphoma line successfully established from a lymphoma known to have hypermutated its Ig genes during the malignant growth. It is a candidate cell line to be studied for its ability to generate mutations of B cell type in cell cultures.

  8. Deletion of the Pichia pastoris KU70 homologue facilitates platform strain generation for gene expression and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Näätsaari, Laura; Mistlberger, Beate; Ruth, Claudia; Hajek, Tanja; Hartner, Franz S; Glieder, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Targeted gene replacement to generate knock-outs and knock-ins is a commonly used method to study the function of unknown genes. In the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, the importance of specific gene targeting has increased since the genome sequencing projects of the most commonly used strains have been accomplished, but rapid progress in the field has been impeded by inefficient mechanisms for accurate integration. To improve gene targeting efficiency in P. pastoris, we identified and deleted the P. pastoris KU70 homologue. We observed a substantial increase in the targeting efficiency using the two commonly known and used integration loci HIS4 and ADE1, reaching over 90% targeting efficiencies with only 250-bp flanking homologous DNA. Although the ku70 deletion strain was noted to be more sensitive to UV rays than the corresponding wild-type strain, no lethality, severe growth retardation or loss of gene copy numbers could be detected during repetitive rounds of cultivation and induction of heterologous protein production. Furthermore, we demonstrated the use of the ku70 deletion strain for fast and simple screening of genes in the search of new auxotrophic markers by targeting dihydroxyacetone synthase and glycerol kinase genes. Precise knock-out strains for the well-known P. pastoris AOX1, ARG4 and HIS4 genes and a whole series of expression vectors were generated based on the wild-type platform strain, providing a broad spectrum of precise tools for both intracellular and secreted production of heterologous proteins utilizing various selection markers and integration strategies for targeted or random integration of single and multiple genes. The simplicity of targeted integration in the ku70 deletion strain will further support protein production strain generation and synthetic biology using P. pastoris strains as platform hosts. PMID:22768112

  9. Robust Parameter Identification to Perform the Modeling of pta and poxB Genes Deletion Effect on Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Torres, V; Rios-Lozano, M; Badillo-Corona, J A; Chairez, I; Garibay-Orijel, C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to design a robust parameter identification algorithm to characterize the effect of gene deletion on Escherichia coli (E. coli) MG1655. Two genes (pta and poxB) in the competitive pathways were deleted from this microorganism to inhibit pyruvate consumption. This condition deviated the E. coli metabolism toward the Krebs cycle. As a consequence, the biomass, substrate (glucose), lactic, and acetate acids as well as ethanol concentrations were modified. A hybrid model was proposed to consider the effect of gene deletion on the metabolism of E. coli. The model parameters were estimated by the application of a least mean square method based on the instrument variable technique. To evaluate the parametric identifier method, a set of robust exact differentiators, based on the super-twisting algorithm, was implemented. The hybrid model was successfully characterized by the parameters obtained from experimental information of E. coli MG1655. The significant difference between parameters obtained with wild-type strain and the modified (with deleted genes) justifies the application of the parametric identification algorithm. This characterization can be used to optimize the production of different byproducts of commercial interest.

  10. Live, attenuated coronavirus vaccines through the directed deletion of group-specific genes provide protection against feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Haijema, Bert Jan; Volders, Haukeline; Rottier, Peter J M

    2004-04-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal immunity-mediated disease caused by mutants of a ubiquitous coronavirus. Since previous attempts to protect cats under laboratory and field conditions have been largely unsuccessful, we used our recently developed system of reverse genetics (B. J. Haijema, H. Volders, and P. J. M. Rottier, J. Virol. 77:4528-4538, 2003) for the development of a modified live FIP vaccine. With this objective, we deleted the group-specific gene cluster open reading frame 3abc or 7ab and obtained deletion mutant viruses that not only multiplied well in cell culture but also showed an attenuated phenotype in the cat. At doses at which the wild-type virus would be fatal, the mutants with gene deletions did not cause any clinical symptoms. They still induced an immune response, however, as judged from the high levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The FIP virus (FIPV) mutant lacking the 3abc cluster and, to a lesser extent, the mutant missing the 7ab cluster, protected cats against a lethal homologous challenge; no protection was obtained with the mutant devoid of both gene clusters. Our studies show that the deletion of group-specific genes from the coronavirus genome results in live attenuated candidate vaccines against FIPV. More generally, our approach may allow the development of vaccines against infections with other pathogenic coronaviruses, including that causing severe acute respiratory syndrome in humans.

  11. A self-excising beta-recombinase/six cassette for repetitive gene deletion and homokaryon purification in Neurospora crassa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study we developed a cassette employing a bacterial beta-recombinase acting on six recognition sequences (beta-rec/six), which allowed repetitive site-specific gene deletion and marker recycling in Neurospora crassa. However, only one positive selection marker was used in the cassette...

  12. Robust Parameter Identification to Perform the Modeling of pta and poxB Genes Deletion Effect on Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Torres, V; Rios-Lozano, M; Badillo-Corona, J A; Chairez, I; Garibay-Orijel, C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to design a robust parameter identification algorithm to characterize the effect of gene deletion on Escherichia coli (E. coli) MG1655. Two genes (pta and poxB) in the competitive pathways were deleted from this microorganism to inhibit pyruvate consumption. This condition deviated the E. coli metabolism toward the Krebs cycle. As a consequence, the biomass, substrate (glucose), lactic, and acetate acids as well as ethanol concentrations were modified. A hybrid model was proposed to consider the effect of gene deletion on the metabolism of E. coli. The model parameters were estimated by the application of a least mean square method based on the instrument variable technique. To evaluate the parametric identifier method, a set of robust exact differentiators, based on the super-twisting algorithm, was implemented. The hybrid model was successfully characterized by the parameters obtained from experimental information of E. coli MG1655. The significant difference between parameters obtained with wild-type strain and the modified (with deleted genes) justifies the application of the parametric identification algorithm. This characterization can be used to optimize the production of different byproducts of commercial interest. PMID:27093969

  13. Metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma shows frequent deletion in the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Type D gene.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sally R; Harwood, Catherine A; Purdie, Karin J; Gulati, Abha; Matin, Rubeta N; Romanowska, Malgorzata; Cerio, Rino; Kelsell, David P; Leigh, Irene M; Proby, Charlotte M

    2012-08-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the second most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), and its incidence is increasing rapidly. Metastatic cSCC accounts for the majority of deaths associated with NMSC, but the genetic basis for cSCC progression remains poorly understood. A previous study identified small deletions (typically <1 Mb) in the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Type D (PTPRD) gene that segregated with more aggressive cSCC. To investigate the apparent association between deletion within PTPRD and cSCC metastasis, a series of 74 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors from 31 patients was analyzed using a custom Illumina 384 SNP microarray. Deletions were found in 37% of patients with metastatic cSCC and were strongly associated with metastatic tumors when compared to those that had not metastasized (p = 0.007). Subsequent mutation analysis revealed a higher mutation rate for PTPRD than has been reported in any other cancer type, with 37% of tumors harboring a somatic mutation. Conversely, bisulfite sequencing showed that methylation was not a mechanism of PTPRD disruption in cSCC. This is the first report to observe an association between deletion within PTPRD and metastatic disease and highlights the potential use of these deletions as a diagnostic biomarker for tumor progression. Combined with the high mutation rate observed in our study, PTPRD is one of the most commonly altered genes in cSCC and warrants further investigation to determine its significance for metastasis in other tumor types.

  14. DDX3Y gene rescue of a Y chromosome AZFa deletion restores germ cell formation and transcriptional programs

    PubMed Central

    Ramathal, Cyril; Angulo, Benjamin; Sukhwani, Meena; Cui, Jun; Durruthy-Durruthy, Jens; Fang, Fang; Schanes, Paula; Turek, Paul J.; Orwig, Kyle E.; Reijo Pera, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of the AZFa region (AZoospermia Factor-a) region of the human Y chromosome cause irreversible spermatogenic failure that presents clinically in men as Sertoli-cell only (SCO) pathology of the testis. Deletions of the AZFa region typically encompass two genes: DDX3Y and USP9Y. However, human genetic evidence indicates that SCO is most tightly linked to deletion of DDX3Y and that deletions/mutations of USP9Y can be transmitted from one generation to the next. Here, we generated stable iPSC lines with AZFa deletions, tested complementation via introduction of DDX3Y, and assessed ability to form germ cells in vivo in a xenotransplantation model. We observed a quantifiable improvement in formation of germ cell like cells (GCLCs) from complemented donor iPSCs. Moreover, expression of UTF1, a prospermatogonial protein, was restored in cells complemented by introduction of DDX3Y on the AZFa background. Whole-genome RNA sequencing of purified GCLCs revealed an enrichment of genes involved in translational suppression and transcriptional control in DDX3Y-rescued GCLCs over mutant GCLCs, which maintained a molecular phenotype more similar to undifferentiated iPSCs. This study demonstrates the ability to probe fundamental genetics of human germ cell formation by complementation and indicates that DDX3Y functions in the earliest stages of human germ cell development. PMID:26456624

  15. Identification of a Novel Deletion in AVP-NPII Gene in a Patient with Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Ferhat; Acar, Ceren; Saglar, Emel; Erdem, Beril; Karaduman, Tugce; Yonem, Arif; Cagiltay, Eylem; Ay, Seyit Ahmet; Mergen, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) is caused by a deficiency of antidiuretic hormone and characterized by polyuria, polydipsia and inability to concentrate urine. Our objective was to present the results of the molecular analyses of AVP-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene in a large familial neurohypophyseal (central) DI pedigree. A male patient and his family members were analyzed and the prospective clinical data were collected. The proband applied to hospital for eligibility to be a recruit in Armed Forces. The patient had severe polyuria (20 L/day), polydipsia (20.5 L/day), fatique, and deep thirstiness. CDI was confirmed with the water deprivation-desmopressin test according to an increase in urine osmolality from 162 mOsm/kg to 432 mOsm/kg after desmopressin acetate injection. To evaluate the coding regions of AVP-NPII gene, polymerase chain reactions were performed and amplified regions were submitted to direct sequence analysis. We detected a heterozygous three base pair deletion at codon 69-70 (207_209delGGC) in exon 2, which lead to a deletion of the amino acid alanine. A three-dimensional protein structure prediction was shown for the deleted AVP-NPII and compared with the wild type. The three base pair deletion may yield an abnormal AVP precursor in neurophysin moiety, but further functional analyses are needed to understand the function of the deleted protein.

  16. Gene expression profiling of a nisin-sensitive Listeria monocytogenes Scott A ctsR deletion mutant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhong; Morgan, Shannon; Ream, Amy; Huang, Lihan

    2013-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of significant threat to public health. Nisin is the only bacteriocin that can be used as a food preservative. Due to its antimicrobial activity, it can be used to control L. monocytogenes in food; however, the antimicrobial mechanism of nisin activity against L. monocytogenes is not fully understood. The CtsR (class III stress gene repressor) protein negatively regulates the expression of class III heat shock genes. A spontaneous pressure-tolerant ctsR deletion mutant that showed increased sensitivity to nisin has been identified. Microarray technology was used to monitor the gene expression profiles of the ctsR mutant under treatments with nisin. Compared to the nisin-treated wild type, 113 genes were up-regulated (>2-fold increase) in the ctsR deletion mutant whereas four genes were down-regulated (<-2-fold decrease). The up-regulated genes included genes that encode for ribosomal proteins, membrane proteins, cold-shock domain proteins, translation initiation and elongation factors, cell division, an ATP-dependent ClpC protease, a putative accessory gene regulator protein D, transport and binding proteins, a beta-glucoside-specific phosphotransferase system IIABC component, as well as hypothetical proteins. The down-regulated genes consisted of genes that encode for virulence, a transcriptional regulator, a stress protein, and a hypothetical protein. The gene expression changes determined by microarray assays were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analyses. Moreover, an in-frame deletion mutant for one of the induced genes (LMOf2365_1877) was constructed in the wild-type L. monocytogenes F2365 background. ΔLMOf2365_1877 had increased nisin sensitivity compared to the wild-type strain. This study enhances our understanding of how nisin interacts with the ctsR gene product in L. monocytogenes and may contribute to the understanding of the antibacterial mechanisms of nisin. PMID:23494707

  17. Deletions in a ribosomal protein-coding gene are associated with tigecycline resistance in Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Niebel, Marc; Quick, Joshua; Prieto, Ana Maria Guzman; Hill, Robert L R; Pike, Rachel; Huber, Damon; David, Miruna; Hornsey, Michael; Wareham, David; Oppenheim, Beryl; Woodford, Neil; van Schaik, Willem; Loman, Nicholas

    2015-11-01

    Enterococcus faecium is an emerging nosocomial pathogen associated with antibiotic therapy in the hospital environment. Whole-genome sequences were determined for three pairs of related, consecutively collected E. faecium clinical isolates to determine putative mechanisms of resistance to tigecycline. The first isolates (1S, 2S and 3S) in each of the three pairs were sensitive to tigecycline [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.125 mg/L]. Following tigecycline therapy, the second isolate in each pair demonstrated increased resistance to tigecycline. Two isolates (1R and 2R) were resistant (MIC of 8 mg/L) and one isolate (3I) demonstrated reduced susceptibility (MIC of 0.5 mg/L). Mutations distinguishing each pair of sensitive and resistant isolates were determined through alignment to a reference genome and variant detection. In addition, a de novo assembly of each isolate genome was constructed to confirm mutations. A total of 16 mutations in eleven coding sequences were determined. Mutations in the rpsJ gene, which encodes a structural protein forming part of the 30S ribosomal subunit, were detected in each of the pairs. Mutations were in regions proximal to the predicted tigecycline-binding site. Predicted amino acid substitutions were detected in 1R and 3I. The resistant strains were additionally associated with deletions of 15 nucleotides (2R) and 3 nucleotides (1R). This study confirms that amino acid substitutions in rpsJ contribute towards reduced susceptibility to tigecycline and suggests that deletions may be required for tigecycline resistance in E. faecium.

  18. Characterization of a large deletion in the {beta}-globin gene cluster in a newborn with hemoglobin FE

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, E.; Dietz, L.; Shafer, F.

    1994-09-01

    A sample on a newborn with hemoglobin FE screen results was obtained to investigate whether E/E or B/{beta}{degrees} thalassemia was present using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methodology. The newborn appeared homozygous for the hemoglobin E mutation in our initial study, but the parents` genotypes did not support this diagnosis. The father is homozygous for the absence of the hemoglobin E mutation (non E/non E) and the mother is heterozygous (E/non E) for this mutation. The limitation of PCR analysis is an assumption that the amplification of the two {beta}-globin alleles is equivalent. A large deletion on one {beta}-globin gene, which would produce E/{beta}{degrees} thalassemia, would be missed if it included part or the entire region subjected to amplification. The family results were consistent with either non-paternity, sample mix-up or such a deletion of the {beta}-globin gene in the father and child. To rule out the possibility of non-paternity, two polymorphic loci (HLA on chromosome 6 and a VNTR system of chromosome 17) that are outside of the {beta}-globin gene were analyzed and show that inheritance is consistent and the likelihood of a sample mix-up is then reduced. We therefore believe there is a gene deletion in this family. At the present time, analyses of the RFLPs that are 5{prime} of the {beta}-globin gene cluster show that the polymorphisms most distal from the 5{prime} {beta}-globin gene are not being inherited as expected. These results support our interpretation that a deletion exists in the father and was inherited by the child. The father`s clinical picture of possible HPFH (the father has 12% hemoglobin F) also supports the interpretation of a deletion in this family. Deletions of the {beta}-globin gene within this ethnic group are rare. Currently, Southern blots on the family are being probed to determine the extent of the putative deletion.

  19. Deletion in the EVC2 gene causes chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Tyrolean Grey cattle.

    PubMed

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Benazzi, Cinzia; Bolcato, Marilena; Brunetti, Barbara; Muscatello, Luisa Vera; Dittmer, Keren; Piffer, Christian; Gentile, Arcangelo; Drögemüller, Cord

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2013 seven Italian Tyrolean Grey calves were born with abnormally short limbs. Detailed clinical and pathological examination revealed similarities to chondrodysplastic dwarfism. Pedigree analysis showed a common founder, assuming autosomal monogenic recessive transmission of the defective allele. A positional cloning approach combining genome wide association and homozygosity mapping identified a single 1.6 Mb genomic region on BTA 6 that was associated with the disease. Whole genome re-sequencing of an affected calf revealed a single candidate causal mutation in the Ellis van Creveld syndrome 2 (EVC2) gene. This gene is known to be associated with chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Japanese Brown cattle, and dwarfism, abnormal nails and teeth, and dysostosis in humans with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of a 2 bp deletion in exon 19 (c.2993_2994ACdel) that led to a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of bovine EVC2, and was concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier animals. This loss of function mutation confirms the important role of EVC2 in bone development. Genetic testing can now be used to eliminate this form of chondrodysplastic dwarfism from Tyrolean Grey cattle.

  20. A novel heterozygous deletion in the EVC2 gene causes Weyers acrofacial dysostosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoqian; Song, Guangtai; Fan, Mingwen; Shi, Lisong; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Huang, Shangzhi; Guo, Ruiqiang; Bian, Zhuan

    2006-03-01

    Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (MIM 193530) is an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by mild short stature, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy and dysplastic teeth. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, MIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a similar, but more severe phenotype. Mutations in the EVC have been identified in both syndromes. However, the EVC mutations only occur in a small proportion of EvC patients. Recently, mutations in a new gene, EVC2, were found to be associated with other EvC cases. The EVC and EVC2 are located close to each other in a head-to-head configuration and may be functionally related. In this study, we report identification of a novel heterozygous deletion in the EVC2 that is responsible for autosomal dominant Weyers acrofacial dysostosis in a large Chinese family. This constitutes the first report of Weyers acrofacial dysostosis caused by this gene. Hence, the spectrum of malformation syndromes due to EVC2 mutations is further extended. Our data provides conclusive evidence that Weyers acrofacial dysostosis and EvC syndrome are allelic and genetically heterogeneous conditions.

  1. Deletion in the EVC2 gene causes chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Tyrolean Grey cattle.

    PubMed

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Benazzi, Cinzia; Bolcato, Marilena; Brunetti, Barbara; Muscatello, Luisa Vera; Dittmer, Keren; Piffer, Christian; Gentile, Arcangelo; Drögemüller, Cord

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2013 seven Italian Tyrolean Grey calves were born with abnormally short limbs. Detailed clinical and pathological examination revealed similarities to chondrodysplastic dwarfism. Pedigree analysis showed a common founder, assuming autosomal monogenic recessive transmission of the defective allele. A positional cloning approach combining genome wide association and homozygosity mapping identified a single 1.6 Mb genomic region on BTA 6 that was associated with the disease. Whole genome re-sequencing of an affected calf revealed a single candidate causal mutation in the Ellis van Creveld syndrome 2 (EVC2) gene. This gene is known to be associated with chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Japanese Brown cattle, and dwarfism, abnormal nails and teeth, and dysostosis in humans with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of a 2 bp deletion in exon 19 (c.2993_2994ACdel) that led to a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of bovine EVC2, and was concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier animals. This loss of function mutation confirms the important role of EVC2 in bone development. Genetic testing can now be used to eliminate this form of chondrodysplastic dwarfism from Tyrolean Grey cattle. PMID:24733244

  2. Deletion in the EVC2 Gene Causes Chondrodysplastic Dwarfism in Tyrolean Grey Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Benazzi, Cinzia; Bolcato, Marilena; Brunetti, Barbara; Muscatello, Luisa Vera; Dittmer, Keren; Piffer, Christian; Gentile, Arcangelo; Drögemüller, Cord

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2013 seven Italian Tyrolean Grey calves were born with abnormally short limbs. Detailed clinical and pathological examination revealed similarities to chondrodysplastic dwarfism. Pedigree analysis showed a common founder, assuming autosomal monogenic recessive transmission of the defective allele. A positional cloning approach combining genome wide association and homozygosity mapping identified a single 1.6 Mb genomic region on BTA 6 that was associated with the disease. Whole genome re-sequencing of an affected calf revealed a single candidate causal mutation in the Ellis van Creveld syndrome 2 (EVC2) gene. This gene is known to be associated with chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Japanese Brown cattle, and dwarfism, abnormal nails and teeth, and dysostosis in humans with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of a 2 bp deletion in exon 19 (c.2993_2994ACdel) that led to a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of bovine EVC2, and was concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier animals. This loss of function mutation confirms the important role of EVC2 in bone development. Genetic testing can now be used to eliminate this form of chondrodysplastic dwarfism from Tyrolean Grey cattle. PMID:24733244

  3. 60 YEARS OF POMC: The proopiomelanocortin gene: discovery, deletion and disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian J L

    2016-05-01

    The cloning of the bovine proopiomelanocortin (POMC) cDNA in 1978 by Nakanishi and colleagues was the result of a remarkable series of exacting and ingenious experiments. With this work, they instantly confirmed the single precursor hypothesis for adrenocorticotrophic hormone-β-lipotropin, as it was then known, and in so doing revealed the existence of additional, largely unpredicted, N-terminal peptides that together formed the POMC precursor peptide. This work paved the way for a host of additional studies into the physiology of these peptides and their regulation. Furthermore, the cloning of the murine Pomc gene was essential for subsequent studies, in which Pomc was intentionally deleted in the mouse illuminating its substantial role in body weight regulation and adrenal function. Contemporaneously with this work, naturally occurring mutations in human POMC came to light underlining the vital role of this gene in appetite regulation. This article reviews each of these aspects of POMC with the benefit of several decades of hindsight and informed by more recent genomic and transcriptomic data.

  4. Tumor suppressor genes FHIT and WWOX are deleted in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debasmita; Sin, Sang-Hoon; Damania, Blossom

    2011-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a diffuse-large B-cell lymphoma with poor prognosis. One hundred percent of PELs carry the genome of Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus and a majority are coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We profiled genomic aberrations in PEL cells using the Affymetrix 6.0 SNP array. This identified for the first time individual genes that are altered in PEL cells. Eleven of 13 samples (85%) were deleted for the fragile site tumor suppressors WWOX and FHIT. Alterations were also observed in the DERL1, ETV1, RASA4, TPK1, TRIM56, and VPS41 genes, which are yet to be characterized for their roles in cancer. Coinfection with EBV was associated with significantly fewer gross genomic aberrations, and PEL could be segregated into EBV-positive and EBV-negative clusters on the basis of host chromosome alterations. This suggests a model in which both host genetic aberrations and the 2 viruses contribute to the PEL phenotype. PMID:21685375

  5. Common fragile site profiling in epithelial and erythroid cells reveals that most recurrent cancer deletions lie in fragile sites hosting large genes.

    PubMed

    Le Tallec, Benoît; Millot, Gaël Armel; Blin, Marion Esther; Brison, Olivier; Dutrillaux, Bernard; Debatisse, Michelle

    2013-08-15

    Cancer genomes exhibit numerous deletions, some of which inactivate tumor suppressor genes and/or correspond to unstable genomic regions, notably common fragile sites (CFSs). However, 70%-80% of recurrent deletions cataloged in tumors remain unexplained. Recent findings that CFS setting is cell-type dependent prompted us to reevaluate the contribution of CFS to cancer deletions. By combining extensive CFS molecular mapping and a comprehensive analysis of CFS features, we show that the pool of CFSs for all human cell types consists of chromosome regions with genes over 300 kb long, and different subsets of these loci are committed to fragility in different cell types. Interestingly, we find that transcription of large genes does not dictate CFS fragility. We further demonstrate that, like CFSs, cancer deletions are significantly enriched in genes over 300 kb long. We now provide evidence that over 50% of recurrent cancer deletions originate from CFSs associated with large genes.

  6. Parathyroid gland-specific deletion of the mouse Men1 gene results in parathyroid neoplasia and hypercalcemic hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Libutti, Steven K; Crabtree, Judy S; Lorang, Dominique; Burns, A Lee; Mazzanti, Chiara; Hewitt, Stephen M; O'Connor, Sarah; Ward, Jerrold M; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Remaley, Alan; Miller, Marshall; Turner, Ewa; Alexander, H Richard; Arnold, Andrew; Marx, Stephen J; Collins, Francis S; Spiegel, Allen M

    2003-11-15

    The inactivation of the MEN1 tumor suppressor gene in patients leads to a constellation of changes in endocrine tissues, including parathyroid neoplasia, pituitary adenomas, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, and carcinoids. To study the pathophysiological consequences of the deletion of the MEN1 gene, we set out to create a mouse model of hyperparathyroidism resulting from the deletion of the Men1 gene in parathyroid tissue. We introduced a Men1 gene flanked by loxP sites into the mouse germ line and then used a parathyroid cell-specific promoter to drive the expression of Cre recombinase, resulting in the deletion of the Men1 gene. Here, we show that loss of Men1 gene function in the parathyroid glands of mice results in histological changes consistent with parathyroid neoplasia as well as systemic hypercalcemia. This model provides a means for dissecting the molecular basis of this familial cancer syndrome and may allow for the development of new strategies to treat related forms of hypercalcemia.

  7. A gene (SRPX) encoding a sushi-repeat-containing protein is deleted in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Meindl, A; Carvalho, M R; Herrmann, K; Lorenz, B; Achatz, H; Lorenz, B; Apfelstedt-Sylla, E; Wittwer, B; Ross, M; Meitinger, T

    1995-12-01

    X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) is characterized by retinal degeneration with night blindness and progressive reduction of the visual fields. By linkage and deletion analysis a gene locus (RP3) has been mapped to the short arm of the X chromosome between the genes CYBB and OTC. Analysis of transcript in this region has revealed a gene which is abundantly expressed in human retina and encodes a putative membrane protein with significant homologies to short consensus repeat (SCR/sushi) domains known from selections and complement proteins. The gene termed SRPX (sushi-repeat-containing protein, x chromosome) is deleted in an RP patient who also suffers from chronic granulomatous disease and McLeod syndrome. A 75 kb deletion removing exon 1 of the gene was also found in two brothers of a second XLRP family. However, no further functionally significant mutations were detected by SSCP screening of all 10 exons in 34 unrelated XLRP patients nor by full length RT-PCR sequencing in two RP3 families. The role of this highly conserved retinal gene in the pathogenesis of RP therefore remains to be determined.

  8. In ovo vaccination of commercial broilers with a glycoprotein J gene-deleted strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Anna; Riblet, Sylva M; Zavala, Guillermo; García, Maricarmen

    2013-06-01

    Conventional live attenuated vaccines have been used as the main tool worldwide for the control of infectious laryngotracheitis. However, their suboptimal attenuation combined with poor mass administration practices allowed chicken embryo origin vaccine-derived isolates to circulate in the field, regain virulence, and be the cause of continuous outbreaks of the disease. Previous studies indicated that stable attenuation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) can be achieved by the deletion of individual viral genes that are not essential for viral replication in vitro. One of these genes is the glycoprotein J (gJ) gene. Its deletion provided significant attenuation to virulent ILTV strains from Europe and the United States. The objective of this study was to construct an attenuated gJ-deleted ILTV strain and evaluate its safety and efficacy for in ovo (IO) administration of commercial broilers. A novel gJ-deleted virus (N(delta)gJ) was constructed, and a 10(3) median tissue culture infective dose administered at 18 days of embryo age was considered safe because it did not affect hatchability or survivability of chickens during the first week posthatch. Broilers vaccinated IO and IO + eye drop at 14 days of age presented a significant reduction in clinical signs and reduction of virus loads after challenge, as compared with the nonvaccinated challenged group of chickens. Therefore, this study presents initial proof that the N(delta)gJ strain is a potential ILTV live-attenuated vaccine candidate suitable for IO vaccination of commercial broilers. PMID:23901771

  9. The NPHP1 gene deletion associated with juvenile nephronophthisis is present in a subset of individuals with Joubert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Melissa A; Bennett, Craig L; Eckert, Melissa L; Dobyns, William B; Gleeson, Joseph G; Shaw, Dennis W W; McDonald, Ruth; Eddy, Allison; Chance, Phillip F; Glass, Ian A

    2004-07-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disease characterized by cerebellar vermis hypoplasia with prominent superior cerebellar peduncles (the "molar tooth sign" [MTS] on axial magnetic resonance imaging), mental retardation, hypotonia, irregular breathing pattern, and eye-movement abnormalities. Some individuals with JS have retinal dystrophy and/or progressive renal failure characterized by nephronophthisis (NPHP). Thus far, no mutations in the known NPHP genes, particularly the homozygous deletion of NPHP1 at 2q13, have been identified in subjects with JS. A cohort of 25 subjects with JS and either renal and/or retinal complications and 2 subjects with only juvenile NPHP were screened for mutations in the NPHP1 gene by standard methods. Two siblings affected with a mild form of JS were found to have a homozygous deletion of the NPHP1 gene identical, by mapping, to that in subjects with NPHP alone. A control subject with NPHP and with a homozygous NPHP1 deletion was also identified, retrospectively, as having a mild MTS and borderline intelligence. The NPHP1 deletion represents the first molecular defect associated with JS in a subset of mildly affected subjects. Cerebellar malformations consistent with the MTS may be relatively common in patients with juvenile NPHP without classic symptoms of JS.

  10. Efficient dual sgRNA-directed large gene deletion in rabbit with CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuning; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Yong; Chen, Mao; Deng, Jichao; Lv, Qingyan; Sui, Tingting; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2016-08-01

    The CRISPR RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease gene-targeting system has been extensively used to edit the genome of several organisms. However, most mutations reported to date have been are indels, resulting in multiple mutations and numerous alleles in targeted genes. In the present study, a large deletion of 105 kb in the TYR (tyrosinase) gene was generated in rabbit via a dual sgRNA-directed CRISPR/Cas9 system. The typical symptoms of albinism accompanied significantly decreased expression of TYR in the TYR knockout rabbits. Furthermore, the same genotype and albinism phenotype were found in the F1 generation, suggesting that large-fragment deletions can be efficiently transmitted to the germline and stably inherited in offspring. Taken together, our data demonstrate that mono and biallelic large deletions can be achieved using the dual sgRNA-directed CRISPR/Cas9 system. This system produces no mosaic mutations or off-target effects, making it an efficient tool for large-fragment deletions in rabbit and other organisms. PMID:26817461

  11. Analysis of the CYP21A2 gene with intergenic recombination and multiple gene deletions in the RCCX module.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shwu-Fen; Lee, Hsien-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent bimodular RCCX module of the RP1-C4A-CYP21A1P-TNXA-RP2-C4B-CYP21A2-TNXB gene sequence is located on chromosome 6p21.3. To determine RCCX alterations, we used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product containing the tenascin B (TNXB) and CYP21A2 genes with TaqI digestion and Southern blot analysis with AseI and NdeI endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA from congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients with common mutations resulting from an intergenic conversion of CYP21A1P, such as an I2 splice, I172N, V281L, F306-L307insT, Q318X, and R356W, and dual mutations of I236N/V237E in the CYP21A2 gene. The results showed that a 3.7-kb fragment of the CYP21A2 gene was detected in each case, and 21.6- and 11.3-kb DNA fragments were found in the RCCX region by a Southern blot analysis with these corresponding mutations. However, the IVS2-12A/C- > G (I2 splice) haplotype in combination with the 707-714delGAGACTAC (without the P30L mutation) mutation produced a 3.2-kb TaqI fragment in the PCR product analysis and a specific 9.3-kb fragment by the Southern blot method. Therefore, we concluded that the rearrangement in the RCCX region resulting from processing of either an intergenic recombination or multiple gene deletions can be identified by the PCR analysis and Southern blot method based on a fragment-distinguishing configuration without a family study.

  12. A Partial Gene Deletion of SLC45A2 Causes Oculocutaneous Albinism in Doberman Pinscher Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Paige A.; Gornik, Kara R.; Ramsey, David T.; Dubielzig, Richard R.; Venta, Patrick J.; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.; Bartoe, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP) dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1) produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2) objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3) determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs); cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (<5 years of age: 4/12; >5 years of age: 8/8) and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001). Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968–77,067,051). This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model. PMID:24647637

  13. Homozygously deleted gene DACH1 regulates tumor-initiating activity of glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Akira; Ogiwara, Hideki; Ehata, Shogo; Mukasa, Akitake; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Maeda, Daichi; Ueki, Keisuke; Ino, Yasushi; Todo, Tomoki; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Fukayama, Masashi; Saito, Nobuhito; Miyazono, Kohei; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Loss or reduction in function of tumor suppressor genes contributes to tumorigenesis. Here, by allelic DNA copy number analysis using single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping array and mass spectrometry, we report homozygous deletion in glioblastoma multiformes at chromosome 13q21, where DACH1 gene is located. We found decreased cell proliferation of a series of glioma cell lines by forced expression of DACH1. We then generated U87TR-Da glioma cells, where DACH1 expression could be activated by exposure of the cells to doxycycline. Both ex vivo cellular proliferation and in vivo growth of s.c. transplanted tumors in mice are reduced in U87TR-Da cells with DACH1 expression (U87-DACH1-high), compared with DACH1-nonexpressing U87TR-Da cells (U87-DACH1-low). U87-DACH1-low cells form spheroids with CD133 and Nestin expression in serum-free medium but U87-DACH1-high cells do not. Compared with spheroid-forming U87-DACH1-low cells, adherent U87-DACH1-high cells display lower tumorigenicity, indicating DACH1 decreases the number of tumor-initiating cells. Gene expression analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveal that fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2/bFGF) is transcriptionally repressed by DACH1, especially in cells cultured in serum-free medium. Exogenous bFGF rescues spheroid-forming activity and tumorigenicity of the U87-DACH1-high cells, suggesting that loss of DACH1 increases the number of tumor-initiating cells through transcriptional activation of bFGF. These results illustrate that DACH1 is a distinctive tumor suppressor, which does not only suppress growth of tumor cells but also regulates bFGF-mediated tumor-initiating activity of glioma cells. PMID:21750150

  14. A partial gene deletion of SLC45A2 causes oculocutaneous albinism in Doberman pinscher dogs.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Paige A; Gornik, Kara R; Ramsey, David T; Dubielzig, Richard R; Venta, Patrick J; Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Bartoe, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP) dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1) produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2) objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3) determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs); cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (<5 years of age: 4/12; >5 years of age: 8/8) and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001). Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968-77,067,051). This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model. PMID:24647637

  15. Detection of an atypical teratoid rhabdoid brain tumor gene deletion in circulating blood using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chakravadhanula, Madhavi; Tembe, Waibhav; Legendre, Christophe; Carpentieri, David; Liang, Winnie S; Bussey, Kimberly J; Carpten, John; Berens, Michael E; Bhardwaj, Ratan D

    2014-09-01

    Circulating biomarkers such as somatic chromosome mutations are novel diagnostic tools to detect cancer noninvasively. We describe focal deletions found in a patient with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor, a highly aggressive early childhood pediatric tumor. First, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology to study the tumor anatomy. Next, we used whole genome sequencing (Next Gen Sequencing) and Bioinformatics interrogation to discover the presence of 3 focal deletions in tumor tissue and 2 of these 3 focal deletions in patient's blood also. About 20% of the blood DNA sequencing reads matched the tumor DNA reads at the SMARCB1 gene locus. Circulating, tumor-specific DNA aberrations are a promising biomarker for atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor patients. The high percentage of tumor DNA detected in blood indicates that either circulating brain tumor cells lyse in the blood or that contents of brain tumor cells traverse a possibly compromised blood-brain barrier in this patient.

  16. Lethal osteogenesis imperfecta congenita and a 300 base pair gene deletion for an alpha 1(I)-like collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, F M; Cheah, K S; Nicholls, A C; Price, A B; Grosveld, F G

    1984-01-01

    Broad boned lethal osteogenesis imperfecta is a severely crippling disease of unknown cause. By means of recombinant DNA technology a 300 base pair deletion in an alpha 1(I)-like collagen gene was detected in six patients and four complete parent-child groups including patients with this disease. One from each set of the patients' clinically unaffected parents also carried the deletion, implying that affected patients were genetic compounds. The study suggests that prenatal diagnosis should be possible with 100% accuracy in subjects without the deletion and with 50% accuracy in those who possess it (who would be either heterozygous--normal, or affected with the disease). Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6419953

  17. Familiar hypopigmentation syndrome in sheep associated with homozygous deletion of the entire endothelin type-B receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Lühken, Gesine; Fleck, Katharina; Pauciullo, Alfredo; Huisinga, Maike; Erhardt, Georg

    2012-01-01

    In humans, rodents and horses, pigmentary anomalies in combination with other disorders, notably intestinal aganglionosis, are associated with variants of the endothelin type-B receptor gene (EDNRB). In an inbred Cameroon sheep flock, five white lambs with light blue eyes were sired from the same ram and died within a few hours up to a few days after birth, some of them with signs of intestinal obstruction. The aim of this study was to investigate if the observed hypopigmentation and a possible lethal condition were associated with a molecular change at the ovine EDNRB locus, and to check if such a genetic alteration also occurs in other Cameroon sheep flocks. Sequence analysis revealed a deletion of about 110 kb on sheep chromosome 10, comprising the entire EDNRB gene, on both chromosomes in the two available hypopigmented lambs and on a single chromosome in the two dams and three other unaffected relatives. This micro-chromosomal deletion was also confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Genotyping of a total of 127 Cameroon sheep in 7 other flocks by duplex PCR did not identify additional carriers of the deletion. Although both hypopigmented lambs available for post-mortem examination had a considerably dilated cecum and remaining meconium, histopathological examination of intestinal samples showed morphologically normal ganglion cells in appropriate number and distribution. This is to our knowledge the first description of an ENDRB gene deletion and associated clinical signs in a mammalian species different from humans and rodents. In humans and rats it is postulated that the variable presence and severity of intestinal aganglionosis and other features in individuals with EDNRB deletion is due to a variable genetic background and multiple gene interactions. Therefore the here analyzed sheep are a valuable animal model to test these hypotheses in another species.

  18. Familiar Hypopigmentation Syndrome in Sheep Associated with Homozygous Deletion of the Entire Endothelin Type-B Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lühken, Gesine; Fleck, Katharina; Pauciullo, Alfredo; Huisinga, Maike; Erhardt, Georg

    2012-01-01

    In humans, rodents and horses, pigmentary anomalies in combination with other disorders, notably intestinal aganglionosis, are associated with variants of the endothelin type-B receptor gene (EDNRB). In an inbred Cameroon sheep flock, five white lambs with light blue eyes were sired from the same ram and died within a few hours up to a few days after birth, some of them with signs of intestinal obstruction. The aim of this study was to investigate if the observed hypopigmentation and a possible lethal condition were associated with a molecular change at the ovine EDNRB locus, and to check if such a genetic alteration also occurs in other Cameroon sheep flocks. Sequence analysis revealed a deletion of about 110 kb on sheep chromosome 10, comprising the entire EDNRB gene, on both chromosomes in the two available hypopigmented lambs and on a single chromosome in the two dams and three other unaffected relatives. This micro-chromosomal deletion was also confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Genotyping of a total of 127 Cameroon sheep in 7 other flocks by duplex PCR did not identify additional carriers of the deletion. Although both hypopigmented lambs available for post-mortem examination had a considerably dilated cecum and remaining meconium, histopathological examination of intestinal samples showed morphologically normal ganglion cells in appropriate number and distribution. This is to our knowledge the first description of an ENDRB gene deletion and associated clinical signs in a mammalian species different from humans and rodents. In humans and rats it is postulated that the variable presence and severity of intestinal aganglionosis and other features in individuals with EDNRB deletion is due to a variable genetic background and multiple gene interactions. Therefore the here analyzed sheep are a valuable animal model to test these hypotheses in another species. PMID:23300849

  19. Partial deletion of the LAMA3 gene is responsible for hereditary junctional epidermolysis bullosa in the American Saddlebred Horse.

    PubMed

    Graves, K T; Henney, P J; Ennis, R B

    2009-02-01

    Laminin 5 is a heterotrimeric basement membrane protein integral to the structure and function of the dermal-epidermal junction. It consists of three glycoprotein subunits: the alpha3, beta3 and gamma2 chains, which are encoded by the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes respectively. A mutation in any of these genes results in the condition known as hereditary junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). A 6589-bp deletion spanning exons 24-27 was found in the LAMA3 gene in American Saddlebred foals born with the skin-blistering condition epitheliogenesis imperfecta. The deletion confirms that this autosomal recessive condition in the American Saddlebred Horse can indeed be classified as JEB and corresponds to Herlitz JEB in humans. A diagnostic test was developed and nine of 175 randomly selected American Saddlebred foals from the 2007 foal crop were found to be carriers of the mutation (frequency of 0.026). PMID:19016681

  20. Methylation dependent expression of the mom gene of bacteriophage Mu: deletions downstream from the methylation sites affect expression.

    PubMed Central

    Adley, C C; Bukhari, A I

    1984-01-01

    The expression of the DNA modification gene (mom) of bacteriophage Mu requires the cellular deoxyadenosine methylase (dam) and a transactivation factor from the phage. By hypothesis, the transcription of mom is activated by methylation of three GATC sequences upstream from the mom gene. We have introduced small deletions at a fourth GATC site located about 140 base pairs downstream from the primary methylation region. Some of the deletions severely affect the mom gene expression. We propose from this analysis that (1) some important elements, possibly the promoter, concerned with the expression of mom are located between nucleotides 840 and 880 from the right end of Mu and (2) the mom protein starts with the codon GTG located at position 810. We favor the hypothesis that methylation turns off transcription upstream, thereby allowing the main mom promoter to function. Images PMID:6328425

  1. A site-specific deletion in mitochondrial DNA of Podospora is under the control of nuclear genes.

    PubMed Central

    Belcour, L; Begel, O; Picard, M

    1991-01-01

    In the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina, the association of two nuclear genes inevitably leads to a "premature death" phenotype consisting of an early end of vegetative growth a few days after ascospore germination. Mycelia showing this phenotype contain a mitochondrial chromosome that always bears the same deletion. One of the break points is exactly at the 5' splice site of a particular mitochondrial intron, suggesting that the deletion event could result from molecular mechanisms also involved in intron mobility. One of the nuclear genes involved in triggering this site-specific event belongs to the mating-type minus haplotype; the other is a mutant allele of a gene encoding a cytosolic ribosomal protein. Images PMID:2023905

  2. Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome: Altered phenotype of a contiguous gene syndrome by the presence of a chromosomal deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Hersh, J.H.; Williams, P.G.; Yen, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is characterized by craniofacial anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, polydactyly of the hands and feet, and variable syndactyly. Intellectual abilities are usually normal. Inheritance is in an autosomal dominant fashion. The disorder has been mapped to chromosome 7p13, suggesting that the condition represents a contiguous gene syndrome (CGS). A male infant presented with multiple congenital anomalies, including omphalocele, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, esotropia, broad thumbs and halluces, syndactyly, polydactyly of one foot, hypotonia and developmental delay. A de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 7p was detected, 46,XY,del(7)(p13p15). Although clinical findings in this case were reminiscent of GCPS, and the chromosomal abnormality included the region assigned to the candidate gene for this syndrome, additional physical abnormalities were present, as well as cognitive deficits. Some of these features have been previously described in patients with chromosomal deletions of 7p. The chromosomal abnormality in our case provides supportive evidence of the gene locus in GCPS, and that GCPS represents a new CGS. However, a larger deletion, extending beyond the limits of the gene, significantly altered the phenotype. Isolation of the gene responsible for GCPS, and identification of additional patients with chromosomal abnormalities in this region of chromosome 7, should help to provide more accurate genotype-phenotype correlations.

  3. Intrachromosomal Amplification, Locus Deletion and Point Mutation in the Aquaglyceroporin AQP1 Gene in Antimony Resistant Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis

    PubMed Central

    Monte-Neto, Rubens; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Leprohon, Philippe; Reis, Priscila; Frézard, Frédéric; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Antimony resistance complicates the treatment of infections caused by the parasite Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings Using next generation sequencing, we sequenced the genome of four independent Leishmania guyanensis antimony-resistant (SbR) mutants and found different chromosomal alterations including aneuploidy, intrachromosomal gene amplification and gene deletion. A segment covering 30 genes on chromosome 19 was amplified intrachromosomally in three of the four mutants. The gene coding for the multidrug resistance associated protein A involved in antimony resistance was also amplified in the four mutants, most likely through chromosomal translocation. All mutants also displayed a reduced accumulation of antimony mainly due to genomic alterations at the level of the subtelomeric region of chromosome 31 harboring the gene coding for the aquaglyceroporin 1 (LgAQP1). Resistance involved the loss of LgAQP1 through subtelomeric deletions in three mutants. Interestingly, the fourth mutant harbored a single G133D point mutation in LgAQP1 whose role in resistance was functionality confirmed through drug sensitivity and antimony accumulation assays. In contrast to the Leishmania subspecies that resort to extrachromosomal amplification, the Viannia strains studied here used intrachromosomal amplification and locus deletion. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of a naturally occurred point mutation in AQP1 in antimony resistant parasites. PMID:25679388

  4. In-Frame and Unmarked Gene Deletions in Burkholderia cenocepacia via an Allelic Exchange System Compatible with Gateway Technology

    PubMed Central

    Fazli, Mustafa; Harrison, Joe J.; Gambino, Michela; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an emerging opportunistic pathogen causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals and in patients with cystic fibrosis, which are often difficult, if not impossible, to treat. Understanding the genetic basis of virulence in this emerging pathogen is important for the development of novel treatment regimes. Generation of deletion mutations in genes predicted to encode virulence determinants is fundamental to investigating the mechanisms of pathogenesis. However, there is a lack of appropriate selectable and counterselectable markers for use in B. cenocepacia, making its genetic manipulation problematic. Here we describe a Gateway-compatible allelic exchange system based on the counterselectable pheS gene and the I-SceI homing endonuclease. This system provides efficiency in cloning homology regions of target genes and allows the generation of precise and unmarked gene deletions in B. cenocepacia. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate its utility by deleting the Bcam1349 gene, encoding a cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-responsive regulator protein important for biofilm formation. PMID:25795676

  5. Use of the Meganuclease I-SceI of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to select for gene deletions in actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Martínez, Lorena T.; Bibb, Mervyn J.

    2014-01-01

    The search for new natural products is leading to the isolation of novel actinomycete species, many of which will ultimately require genetic analysis. Some of these isolates will likely exhibit low intrinsic frequencies of homologous recombination and fail to sporulate under laboratory conditions, exacerbating the construction of targeted gene deletions and replacements in genetically uncharacterised strains. To facilitate the genetic manipulation of such species, we have developed an efficient method to generate gene or gene cluster deletions in actinomycetes by homologous recombination that does not introduce any other changes to the targeted organism's genome. We have synthesised a codon optimised I-SceI gene for expression in actinomycetes that results in the production of the yeast I-SceI homing endonuclease which produces double strand breaks at a unique introduced 18 base pair recognition sequence. Only those genomes that undergo homologous recombination survive, providing a powerful selection for recombinants, approximately half of which possess the desired mutant genotype. To demonstrate the efficacy and efficiency of the system, we deleted part of the gene cluster for the red-pigmented undecylprodiginine complex of compounds in Streptomyces coelicolor M1141. We believe that the system we have developed will be broadly applicable across a wide range of actinomycetes. PMID:25403842

  6. Use of the meganuclease I-SceI of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to select for gene deletions in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Lorena T; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2014-11-18

    The search for new natural products is leading to the isolation of novel actinomycete species, many of which will ultimately require genetic analysis. Some of these isolates will likely exhibit low intrinsic frequencies of homologous recombination and fail to sporulate under laboratory conditions, exacerbating the construction of targeted gene deletions and replacements in genetically uncharacterised strains. To facilitate the genetic manipulation of such species, we have developed an efficient method to generate gene or gene cluster deletions in actinomycetes by homologous recombination that does not introduce any other changes to the targeted organism's genome. We have synthesised a codon optimised I-SceI gene for expression in actinomycetes that results in the production of the yeast I-SceI homing endonuclease which produces double strand breaks at a unique introduced 18 base pair recognition sequence. Only those genomes that undergo homologous recombination survive, providing a powerful selection for recombinants, approximately half of which possess the desired mutant genotype. To demonstrate the efficacy and efficiency of the system, we deleted part of the gene cluster for the red-pigmented undecylprodiginine complex of compounds in Streptomyces coelicolor M1141. We believe that the system we have developed will be broadly applicable across a wide range of actinomycetes.

  7. Hereditary fructose intolerance: functional study of two novel ALDOB natural variants and characterization of a partial gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Gabriella; Imperato, Maria Rosaria; Ieno, Luigi; Sorvillo, Rosa; Benigno, Vincenzo; Parenti, Giancarlo; Parini, Rossella; Vitagliano, Luigi; Zagari, Adriana; Salvatore, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by impaired functioning of human liver aldolase (ALDOB). At least 54 subtle/point mutations and only two large intragenic deletions have been found in the ALDOB gene. Here we report two novel ALDOB variants (p.R46W and p.Y343H) and an intragenic deletion that we found in patients with suspected HFI. The residual catalytic activity of the recombinant p.R46W and p.Y343H variants toward F1P was particularly altered. We also characterized a large intragenic deletion that we found in six unrelated patients. This is the first report of six unrelated patients sharing the same ALDOB deletion, thus indicating a founder effect for this allele in our geographic area. Because this deletion involves ALDOB exon 5, it can mimic worldwide common pathogenic genotypes, that is, homozygous p.A150P and p.A175D. Finally, the identification of only one ALDOB mutation in symptomatic patients suggests that HFI symptoms can, albeit rarely, appear also in heterozygotes. Therefore, an excessive and continuous fructose dietary intake may have deleterious effects even in apparently asymptomatic HFI carriers.

  8. A novel deletion/insertion caused by a replication error in the β-globin gene locus control region.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Meley, Roland; Pondarré, Corinne; Francina, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Deletions in the β-globin locus control region (β-LCR) lead to (εγδβ)(0)-thalassemia [(εγδβ)(0)-thal]. In patients suffering from these rare deletions, a normal hemoglobin (Hb), phenotype is found, contrasting with a hematological thalassemic phenotype. Multiplex-ligation probe amplification (MLPA) is an efficient tool to detect β-LCR deletions combined with long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing to pinpoint deletion breakpoints. We present here a novel 11,155 bp β-LCR deletion found in a French Caucasian patient which removes DNase I hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) to HS4 of the β-LCR. Interestingly, a 197 bp insertion of two inverted sequences issued from the HS2-HS3 inter-region is present and suggests a complex rearrangement during replication. Carriers of this type of thalassemia can be misdiagnosed as an α-thal trait. Consequently, a complete α- and β-globin gene cluster analysis is required to prevent a potentially damaging misdiagnosis in genetic counselling.

  9. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with allelic deletions at 13q14 commonly have one intact RB1 gene: Evidence for a role of an adjacent locus

    SciTech Connect

    Leu, Y.; Grander, D.; Linder, S.; Einhorn, S.; Soederhall, S. ); Szekely, L. ); Juliusson, G.; Gahrton, G. )

    1993-09-15

    The authors have previously shown that 30% of patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) have hemizygous deletions of the retinoblastoma (RB1) gene at 13q14. RB1 gene deletions may thus participate in malignant transformation of B-CLL, but is it also possible that a neighboring gene on 13q is the relevant one. To answer this question the remaining RB1 allele of eight clones with hemizygous deletions was studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and immunofluorescense techniques. Cells from 10 patients without RB1 gene deletions were also studied by these methods. Lack of RB1 mRNA and RB protein expression was seen in leukemia cells from one of the patients. All other cases were found to be normal with regard to immunofluorescense, RT-PCR, and SSCP analysis, indicating at least one functional RB1 allele and supporting the importance of another gene in the 13q14 deletions. The authors then performed extended Southern blot analysis of the 13q region, using probes for 10 different loci. In 14 of 31 CLL clones (45%), deletions of a region telomeric to the RB1 gene (D13S25) were observed. In 4 of the cases the deletions were homozygous. Hemizygous deletions of the RB1 gene were observed in 11 of these patients and in one of the patients without D13S25 deletions. These data thus indicate that a gene(s) telomeric to RB1 is involved in the malignant transformation of CLL clones and that deletions of this region are a common event in this disease. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Determination of gene dosage by a quantitative adaptation of the polymerase chain reaction (gd-PCR): Rapid detection of deletions and duplications of gene sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Celi, F.S.; Roth, J.; Schuldiner, A.R. Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD ); Cohen, M.M. ); Antonarakis, S.E. ); Wertheimer, E. )

    1994-05-15

    Screening methods based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, single-stranded conformational polymorphism, and heteroduplex analysis, are powerful tools for the detection of point mutations as well as small deletions and insertions, but are unable to detect heterozygous deletions or duplications of exons, genes, or chromosomes. The authors now report a PCR-based approach, designated gene dosage-PCR (gd-PCR), that allows rapid screening for heterozygous deletions and duplications of genes or exons. Gene dosage-PCR is a quantitative method in which two in vitro-synthesized DNA internal standards are coamplified with the genomic DNA sample, one corresponding to the gene of interest (test sequence) and the other to a reference (disomic) gene (reference sequence). Both internal standards are designed to be amplified with the same primer pairs and with efficiencies similar to those of their genomic DNA counterparts, yielding PCR products slightly smaller than those derived from genomic DNA. Amplification of approximately equimolar amounts of the two internal standards and genomic DNA, in the presence of [[sup 32]P]dCTP, results in four radiolabeled PCR products; after electrophoresis and quantification of the products, gene dosage is easily calculated. For validation, genomic DNA from 56 subjects, 28 with cytogenetically documented Down syndrome (trisomy 21) and 28 controls that were disomic for chromosome 21, was assayed. Using the [beta]-amyloid precursor protein gene (APP: Chromosome 21q21) as the test sequence, control subjects had an adjusted mean gene dose of 2.00 [+-] 0.29, while subjects with Down syndrome had a mean gene dose of 3.05 [+-] 0.27. There was a clear separation of all of the samples between the two groups. The authors also successfully used gd-PCR to detect allelic deletions by screening pertinent regions of the insulin receptor gene. 48 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Parathyroid hormone ablation alters erythrocyte parameters that are rescued by calcium-sensing receptor gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Romero, Jose R; Youte, Rodeler; Brown, Edward M; Pollak, Martin R; Goltzman, David; Karaplis, Andrew; Pong, Lie-Chin; Chien, Lawrence; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Rivera, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    The mechanisms by which parathyroid hormone (PTH) produces anemia are unclear. Parathyroid hormone secretion is regulated by the extracellular Ca2+ -sensing receptor. We investigated the effects of ablating PTH on hematological indices and erythrocytes volume regulation in wild-type, PTH-null, and Ca2+ -sensing receptor-null/PTH-null mice. The erythrocyte parameters were measured in whole mouse blood, and volume regulatory systems were determined by plasma membrane K+ fluxes, and osmotic fragility was measured by hemoglobin determination at varying osmolarities. We observed that the absence of PTH significantly increases mean erythrocyte volume and reticulocyte counts, while decreasing erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. These changes were accompanied by increases in erythrocyte cation content, a denser cell population, and increased K+ permeability, which were in part mediated by activation of the K+ /Cl- cotransporter and Gardos channel. In addition we observed that erythrocyte osmotic fragility in PTH-null compared with wild-type mice was enhanced. When Ca2+ -sensing receptor gene was deleted on the background of PTH-null mice, we observed that several of the alterations in erythrocyte parameters of PTH-null mice were largely rescued, particularly those related to erythrocyte volume, K+ fluxes and osmotic fragility, and became similar to those observed in wild-type mice. Our results demonstrate that Ca2+ -sensing receptor and parathyroid hormone are functionally coupled to maintain erythrocyte homeostasis. PMID:23528155

  12. Immunoglobulin gene insertions and deletions in the affinity maturation of HIV-1 broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S Munir; Bhaskarabhatla, Rekha; Zhang, Ruijun; Yandava, Chandri; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Kelsoe, Garnett; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Stolarchuk, Christina; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim S Abdool; Cohen, Myron S; Walter, Emmanuel; Moody, M Anthony; Wu, Xueling; Altae-Tran, Han R; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwong, Peter D; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-09-10

    Induction of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development but has remained challenging partially due to unusual traits of bnAbs, including high somatic hypermutation (SHM) frequencies and in-frame insertions and deletions (indels). Here we examined the propensity and functional requirement for indels within HIV-1 bnAbs. High-throughput sequencing of the immunoglobulin (Ig) VHDJH genes in HIV-1 infected and uninfected individuals revealed that the indel frequency was elevated among HIV-1-infected subjects, with no unique properties attributable to bnAb-producing individuals. This increased indel occurrence depended only on the frequency of SHM point mutations. Indel-encoded regions were generally proximal to antigen binding sites. Additionally, reconstruction of a HIV-1 CD4-binding site bnAb clonal lineage revealed that a large compound VHDJH indel was required for bnAb activity. Thus, vaccine development should focus on designing regimens targeted at sustained activation of bnAb lineages to achieve the required SHM and indel events.

  13. Protective effect of myostatin gene deletion on aging-related muscle metabolic decline.

    PubMed

    Chabi, B; Pauly, M; Carillon, J; Carnac, G; Favier, F B; Fouret, G; Bonafos, B; Vanterpool, F; Vernus, B; Coudray, C; Feillet-Coudray, C; Bonnieu, A; Lacan, D; Koechlin-Ramonatxo, C

    2016-06-01

    While myostatin gene deletion is a promising therapy to fight muscle loss during aging, this approach induces also skeletal muscle metabolic changes such as mitochondrial deficits, redox alteration and increased fatigability. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of aging on these features in aged wild-type (WT) and mstn knockout (KO) mice. Moreover, to determine whether an enriched-antioxidant diet may be useful to prevent age-related disorders, we orally administered to the two genotypes a melon concentrate rich in superoxide dismutase for 12 weeks. We reported that mitochondrial functional abnormalities persisted (decreased state 3 and 4 of respiration; p<0.05) in skeletal muscle from aged KO mice; however, differences with WT mice were attenuated at old age in line with reduced difference on running endurance between the two genotypes. Interestingly, we showed an increase in glutathione levels, associated with lower lipid peroxidation levels in KO muscle. Enriched antioxidant diet reduced the aging-related negative effects on maximal aerobic velocity and running limit time (p<0.05) in both groups, with systemic adaptations on body weight. The redox status and the hypertrophic phenotype appeared to be beneficial to KO mice, mitigating the effect of aging on the skeletal muscle metabolic remodeling.

  14. Gene Deletion Screen for Cardiomyopathy in Adult Drosophila Identifies a New Notch Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Man; Wolf, Matthew J.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Drosophila has been recognized as a model to study human cardiac diseases. Objective Despite these findings, and the wealth of tools that are available to the fly community, forward genetic screens for adult heart phenotypes have been rarely performed due to the difficulty in accurately measuring cardiac function in adult Drosophila. Methods and Results Using optical coherence tomography to obtain real-time analysis of cardiac function in awake Drosophila, we performed a genomic deficiency screen in adult flies. Based on multiple complementary approaches, we identified CG31665 as a novel gene causing dilated cardiomyopathy. CG31665, which we name weary (wry), has structural similarities to members of the Notch family. Using cell aggregation assays and γ-secretase inhibitors we show that Wry is a novel Notch ligand that can mediate cellular adhesion with Notch expressing cells and transactivates Notch to promote signaling and nuclear transcription. Importantly, Wry lacks a DSL (Delta-Serrate-Lag) domain that is common feature to the other Drosophila Notch ligands. We further show that Notch signaling is critically important for the maintenance of normal heart function of the adult fly. Conclusions In conclusion, we identify a previously unknown Notch ligand in Drosophila that when deleted causes cardiomyopathy. Our study suggests that Notch signaling components may be a therapeutic target for dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:20203305

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE) insertion/deletion polymorphism in Mexican populations.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Hernández-Pacheco, Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Pavón, Zinnia; Fragoso, José Manuel; Juarez-Cedillo, Teresa; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Granados, Julio

    2003-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE) insertion/deletion polymorphism was determined in 211 Mexican healthy individuals belonging to different Mexican ethnic groups (98 Mestizos, 64 Teenek, and 49 Nahuas). ACE polymorphism differed among Mexicans with a high frequency of the D allele and the D/D genotype in Mexican Mestizos. The D/D genotype was absent in Teenek and present in only one Nahua individual (2.0%). When comparisons were made, we observed that Caucasian, African, and Asian populations presented the highest frequencies of the D allele, whereas Amerindian (Teenek and Pima) and Australian Aboriginals showed the highest frequencies of the I allele. The distribution of I/D genotype was heterogeneous in all populations: Australian Aboriginals presented the lowest frequency (4.9%), whereas Nahuas presented the highest (73.4%). The present study shows the frequencies of a polymorphism not analyzed previously in Mexican populations and establishes that this polymorphism distinguishes the Amerindian populations of other groups. On the other hand, since ACE alleles have been associated with genetic susceptibility to developing cardiovascular diseases and hypertension, knowledge of the distribution of these alleles could help to define the true significance of ACE polymorphism as a genetic susceptibility marker in the Amerindian populations.

  16. Virulence characteristics of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli deletion of gene encoding the outer membrane protein X

    PubMed Central

    MENG, Xianrong; LIU, Xueling; ZHANG, Liyuan; HOU, Bo; LI, Binyou; TAN, Chen; LI, Zili; ZHOU, Rui; LI, Shaowen

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and its homologues have been proposed to contribute to the virulence in various bacterial species. But, their role in virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is yet to be determined. This study evaluates the role of OmpX in ExPEC virulence in vitro and in vivo using a clinical strain PPECC42 of porcine origin. The ompX deletion mutant exhibited increased swimming motility and decreased adhesion to, and invasion of pulmonary epithelial A549 cell, compared to the wild-type strain. A mild increase in LD50 and distinct decrease in bacterial load in such organs as heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney were observed in mice infected with the ompX mutant. Complementation of the complete ompX gene in trans restored the virulence of mutant strain to the level of wild-type strain. Our results reveal that OmpX contributes to ExPEC virulence, but may be not an indispensable virulence determinant. PMID:27149893

  17. Gene Deletions Resulting in Increased Nitrogen Release by Azotobacter vinelandii: Application of a Novel Nitrogen Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Eberhart, Lauren J.; Ohlert, Janet M.; Knutson, Carolann M.; Plunkett, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a widely studied model diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) bacterium and also an obligate aerobe, differentiating it from many other diazotrophs that require environments low in oxygen for the function of the nitrogenase. As a free-living bacterium, A. vinelandii has evolved enzymes and transporters to minimize the loss of fixed nitrogen to the surrounding environment. In this study, we pursued efforts to target specific enzymes and further developed screens to identify individual colonies of A. vinelandii producing elevated levels of extracellular nitrogen. Targeted deletions were done to convert urea into a terminal product by disrupting the urease genes that influence the ability of A. vinelandii to recycle the urea nitrogen within the cell. Construction of a nitrogen biosensor strain was done to rapidly screen several thousand colonies disrupted by transposon insertional mutagenesis to identify strains with increased extracellular nitrogen production. Several disruptions were identified in the ammonium transporter gene amtB that resulted in the production of sufficient levels of extracellular nitrogen to support the growth of the biosensor strain. Further studies substituting the biosensor strain with the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed that levels of nitrogen produced were sufficient to support the growth of this organism when the medium was supplemented with sufficient sucrose to support the growth of the A. vinelandii in coculture. The nature and quantities of nitrogen released by urease and amtB disruptions were further compared to strains reported in previous efforts that altered the nifLA regulatory system to produce elevated levels of ammonium. These results reveal alternative approaches that can be used in various combinations to yield new strains that might have further application in biofertilizer schemes. PMID:25888177

  18. Hypertension and ace gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in pediatric renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Serdaroglu, Erkin; Mir, Sevgi; Berdeli, Afig

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the risk factors for hypertension and to analyze the influence of insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) on hypertension in pediatric renal transplant recipients. Twenty-six pediatric renal transplant recipients with stable renal function and treated with the same immunosuppression protocol were included in the study. Their mean age was 12.5 +/- 3.3 yr and mean time after transplantation was 38.5 +/- 39.8 month. Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was performed by SpaceLabs (90207) device. The I/D polymorphism of the ACE was determined by PCR and ACE serum level was analyzed by colorimetric method. Hypertension was present in 15 patients (57.7%) by causal blood pressure measurements and 19 patients (73.1%) by ABPM. Twenty-two patients (84.6%) were found to be non-dipper and eight of them had reverse dipping. Only time after transplantation (38 +/- 31 vs. 79 +/-49 month, p = 0.016) and cyclosporin A trough plasma levels (206 +/-78 vs. 119 +/- 83 ng/mL, p = 0.020) influenced the presence of hypertension by multiple logistic regression analysis. The distribution of genotypes were II = 2 (7.7%), ID = 8 (30.8%), DD = 16 (61.5%). There was no effect of ACE gene I/D polymorphism or serum ACE levels on hypertension prevalence and circadian variability of blood pressures. Hypertension was related to the time after transplantation and cyclosporin A levels. The ACE gene I/D polymorphism and serum ACE levels did not influence the blood pressure values or circadian variability of blood pressure among pediatric renal transplant patients. PMID:16176418

  19. Hereditary spherocytosis associated with deletion of human erythrocyte ankyrin gene on chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Lux, S E; Tse, W T; Menninger, J C; John, K M; Harris, P; Shalev, O; Chilcote, R R; Marchesi, S L; Watkins, P C; Bennett, V

    1990-06-21

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is one of the most common hereditary haemolytic anaemias. HS red cells from both autosound dominant and recessive variants are spectrin-deficient, which correlates with the severity of the disease. Some patients with recessive HS have a mutation in the spectrin alpha-2 domain (S.L.M. et al., unpublished observations), and a few dominant HS patients have an unstable beta-spectrin that is easily oxidized, which damages the protein 4.1 binding site and weakens spectrin-actin interactions. In most patients, however, the cause of spectrin deficiency is unknown. The alpha- and beta-spectrin loci are on chromosomes 1 and 14 respectively. The only other genetic locus for HS is SPH2, on the short arm of chromosome 8 (8p11). This does not correspond to any of the known loci of genes for red cell membrane proteins including protein 4.1 (1p36.2-p34), the anion exchange protein (AE1, band 3; 17q21-qter), glycophorin C (2q14-q21), and beta-actin (7pter-q22). Human erythrocyte ankyrin, which links beta-spectrin to the anion exchange protein, has recently been cloned. We now show that the ankyrin gene maps to chromosome 8p11.2, and that one copy is missing from DNA of two unrelated children with severe HS and heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8 (del(8)(p11-p21.1)). Affected red cells are also ankyrin-deficient. The data suggest that defects or deficiency or ankyrin are responsible for HS at the SPH2 locus.

  20. Characterization of a de novo 43-bp deletion of the Gs[alpha] gene (GNAS1) in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Luttikhuis, M.E.M.O.; Trembath, R.C. ); Wilson, L.C. Institute of Child Health, London ); Leonard, J.V. )

    1994-05-15

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, obesity, mental retardation, subcutaneous calcification, and brachy-metaphalangia. Two distinct forms of AHO exist; pseudohypoparathyroidism type I (PHPI) and pseudopseudohypoparathyrodism (PPHP). The classification is dependent upon the presence or absence, respectively, of resistance to parathyroid and other hormones that bind to Gs-protein-coupled membrane receptors stimulating adenylyl cyclase. Gs is a heterotrimeric protein comprising [alpha], [beta], and [gamma]-subunits encoded by separate genes. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral leukocytes from 13 unrelated AHO patients. Exon 4 and flanking intronic sequence of GNAS1 were PCR amplified. A single PCR product corresponding to the expected 159-bp fragment was identified in 12 affected individuals with either PHPIa or PPHP. In patient 10285 an additional smaller fragment was detected but was not present in either of the unaffected parents. These two fragments were isolated from a 2% agarose gel. Direct sequencing of the smaller fragment revealed a 43-bp deletion comprising at least 35 hp of the 3[prime] end of exon 4 and the donor splice site of intron 4 and extending into the following intro. The 43-bp deletion would lead to a premature stop codon, 62 codons downstream of the deletion. The de novo mutation reported here is the largest deletion in the Gs[alpha] gene described so far for AHO patients.

  1. Biological and virulence characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium following deletion of glucose-inhibited division (gidA) gene.

    PubMed

    Shippy, Daniel C; Eakley, Nicholas M; Bochsler, Philip N; Chopra, Ashok K; Fadl, Amin A

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a frequent cause of enteric disease due to the consumption of contaminated food. Identification and characterization of bacterial factors involved in Salmonella pathogenesis would help develop effective strategies for controlling salmonellosis. To investigate the role of glucose-inhibited division gene (gidA) in Salmonella virulence, we constructed a Salmonella mutant strain in which gidA was deleted. Deletion of gidA rendered Salmonella deficient in the invasion of intestinal epithelial cells, bacterial motility, intracellular survival, and induction of cytotoxicity in host cells. Deletion of gidA rendered the organism to display a filamentous morphology compared to the normal rod-shaped nature of Salmonella. Furthermore, a significant attenuation in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, histopathological lesions, and systemic infection was observed in mice infected with the gidA mutant. Most importantly, a significant increase in LD(50) was observed in mice infected with the gidA mutant, and mice immunized with the gidA mutant were able to survive a lethal dose of wild-type Salmonella. Additionally, deletion of gidA significantly altered the expression of several bacterial factors associated with pathogenesis as indicated by global transcriptional and proteomic profiling. Taken together, our data indicate GidA as a potential regulator of Salmonella virulence genes.

  2. Delineation of candidate genes responsible for structural brain abnormalities in patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q27

    PubMed Central

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Nagamani, Sandesh CS; Erez, Ayelet; Hunter, Jill V; Holder Jr, J Lloyd; Carlin, Mary E; Bader, Patricia I; Perras, Helene MF; Allanson, Judith E; Newman, Leslie; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna; Powell, Erin; Mohanty, Aaron; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2015-01-01

    Patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q present with structural brain abnormalities including agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and cerebellar malformations. The 6q27 region harbors genes that are important for the normal development of brain and delineation of a critical deletion region for structural brain abnormalities may lead to a better genotype–phenotype correlation. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven unrelated patients with deletions involving chromosome 6q27. All patients had structural brain abnormalities. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. The smallest region of overlap spans 1.7 Mb and contains DLL1, THBS2, PHF10, and C6orf70 (ERMARD) that are plausible candidates for the causation of structural brain abnormalities. Our study reiterates the importance of 6q27 region in normal development of brain and helps identify putative genes in causation of structural brain anomalies. PMID:24736736

  3. Delineation of candidate genes responsible for structural brain abnormalities in patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q27.

    PubMed

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Hunter, Jill V; Holder, J Lloyd; Carlin, Mary E; Bader, Patricia I; Perras, Helene M F; Allanson, Judith E; Newman, Leslie; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna; Powell, Erin; Mohanty, Aaron; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2015-01-01

    Patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q present with structural brain abnormalities including agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and cerebellar malformations. The 6q27 region harbors genes that are important for the normal development of brain and delineation of a critical deletion region for structural brain abnormalities may lead to a better genotype-phenotype correlation. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven unrelated patients with deletions involving chromosome 6q27. All patients had structural brain abnormalities. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. The smallest region of overlap spans 1.7 Mb and contains DLL1, THBS2, PHF10, and C6orf70 (ERMARD) that are plausible candidates for the causation of structural brain abnormalities. Our study reiterates the importance of 6q27 region in normal development of brain and helps identify putative genes in causation of structural brain anomalies.

  4. Screening the dystrophin gene suggests a high rate of polymorphism in general but no exonic deletions in schizophrenics

    SciTech Connect

    Lindor, N.M.; Sobell, J.L.; Thibodeau, S.N.

    1994-03-15

    The dystrophin gene, located at chromosome Xp21, was evaluated as a candidate gene in chronic schizophrenia in response to the report of a large family in which schizophrenia cosegregated with Becker muscular dystrophy. Genomic DNA from 94 men with chronic schizophrenia was evaluated by Southern blot analysis using cDNA probes that span exons 1-59. No exonic deletions were identified. An unexpectedly high rate of polymorphism was calculated in this study and two novel polymorphisms were found, demonstrating the usefulness of the candidate gene approach even when results of the original study are negative. 41 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    PubMed

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    AChE is an alternatively spliced gene. Exons 2, 3 and 4 are invariantly spliced, and this sequence is responsible for catalytic function. The 3' alternatively spliced exons, 5 and 6, are responsible for AChE disposition in tissue [J. Massoulie, The origin of the molecular diversity and functional anchoring of cholinesterases. Neurosignals 11 (3) (2002) 130-143; Y. Li, S. Camp, P. Taylor, Tissue-specific expression and alternative mRNA processing of the mammalian acetylcholinesterase gene. J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8) (1993) 5790-5797]. The splice to exon 5 produces the GPI anchored form of AChE found in the hematopoietic system, whereas the splice to exon 6 produces a sequence that binds to the structural subunits PRiMA and ColQ, producing AChE expression in brain and muscle. A third alternative RNA species is present that is not spliced at the 3' end; the intron 3' of exon 4 is used as coding sequence and produces the read-through, unanchored form of AChE. In order to further understand the role of alternative splicing in the expression of the AChE gene, we have used homologous recombination in stem cells to produce gene specific deletions in mice. Alternatively and together exon 5 and exon 6 were deleted. A cassette containing the neomycin gene flanked by loxP sites was used to replace the exon(s) of interest. Tissue analysis of mice with exon 5 deleted and the neomycin cassette retained showed very low levels of AChE expression, far less than would have been anticipated. Only the read-through species of the enzyme was produced; clearly the inclusion of the selection cassette disrupted splicing of exon 4 to exon 6. The selection cassette was then deleted in exon 5, exon 6 and exons 5 + 6 deleted mice by breeding to Ella-cre transgenic mice. AChE expression in serum, brain and muscle has been analyzed. Another AChE gene targeted mouse strain involving a region in the first intron, found to be critical for AChE expression in muscle cells [S. Camp, L. Zhang, M. Marquez, B

  6. A deletion in the gene encoding sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) results in osteogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Isabelle; Adams, Carolyn P; Opsahl, Sibylle; Septier, Dominique; Bishop, Colin E; Auge, Nathalie; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Goldberg, Michel; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Poirier, Christophe

    2005-08-01

    The mouse mutation fragilitas ossium (fro) leads to a syndrome of severe osteogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta with no detectable collagen defect. Positional cloning of the locus identified a deletion in the gene encoding neutral sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) that led to complete loss of enzymatic activity. Our knowledge of SMPD3 function is consistent with the pathology observed in mutant mice and provides new insight into human pathologies.

  7. A large deletion of the AVPR2 gene causing severe nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Turkish family.

    PubMed

    Saglar, Emel; Deniz, Ferhat; Erdem, Beril; Karaduman, Tugce; Yönem, Arif; Cagiltay, Eylem; Mergen, Hatice

    2014-05-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a rare hereditary disease caused by mutations in arginine vasopressin type 2 receptor (AVPR2) and characterized by the production of large amounts of urine and an inability to concentrate urine in response to the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. We have identified a novel 388 bp deletion starting in intron 1 and ending in exon 2 in the AVPR2 gene in a patient with NDI and in his family. We have revealed that this mutation is a de novo mutation for the mother of the proband patient. Prospective clinical data were collected for all family members. The water deprivation test confirmed the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus. The patient has severe symptoms like deep polyuria nocturia, polydipsia, and fatigue. He was given arginine vasopressin treatment while he was a child. However, he could not get well due to his nephrogenic type of illness. Both of his nephews have the same complains in addition to failure to grow. We have sequenced all exons and intron-exon boundaries of the AVPR2 gene of all family members. The analyses of bioinformatics and comparative genomics of the deletion were done via considering the DNA level damage. AVPR2 gene mutation results in the absence of the three transmembrane domains, two extracellular domains, and one cytoplasmic domain. Three-dimensional protein structure prediction was shown. We concluded that X-linked NDI and severity of illness in this family is caused by a novel 388 bp deletion in the AVPR2 gene that is predicted to truncate the receptor protein, and also this deletion may lead to dysfunctioning in protein activity and inefficient or inadequate binding abilities.

  8. Encephalopathy and bilateral cataract in a boy with an interstitial deletion of Xp22 comprising the CDKL5 and NHS genes.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Hilde; Jansen, Anna; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2007-02-15

    We describe a male patient with a deletion at Xp22, detected by high resolution X-array CGH. The clinical phenotype present in this infant boy, consists of severe encephalopathy, congenital cataracts and tetralogy of Fallot and can be attributed to the deletion of the genes within the interval. Among these deleted genes are the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome and the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5), responsible for the early seizure variant of Rett syndrome. This is the first description of a male patient with a deletion of these genes, showing the involvement of CDKL5 in severe epileptic encephalopathy in males. Moreover it illustrates the added value of high resolution array-CGH in molecular diagnosis of mental retardation-multiple congenital anomaly cases.

  9. Familial 46,XY sex reversal without campomelic dysplasia caused by a deletion upstream of the SOX9 gene

    PubMed Central

    Layman, Lawrence C.; Ullmann, Reinhard; Shen, Yiping; Ha, Kyungsoo; Rehman, Khurram; Looney, Stephen; McDonough, Paul G.; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Carr, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Background 46,XY sex reversal is a rare disorder and familial cases are even more rare. The purpose of the present study was to determine the molecular basis for a family with three affected siblings who had 46,XY sex reversal. Methods DNA was extracted from three females with 46,XY sex reversal, two normal sisters, and both unaffected parents. All protein coding exons of the SRY and NR5A1 genes were subjected to PCR-based DNA sequencing. In addition, array comparative genomic hybridization was performed on DNA from all seven family members. A deletion was confirmed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Expression of SOX9 gene was quantified using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results A 349kb heterozygous deletion located 353kb upstream of the SOX9 gene on the long arm of chromosome 17 was discovered in the father and three affected siblings, but not in the mother. The expression of SOX9 was significantly decreased in the affected siblings. Two of three affected sisters had gonadoblastomas. Conclusion This is the first report of 46,XY sex reversal in three siblings who have a paternally inherited deletion upstream of SOX9 associated with reduced SOX9 mRNA expression. PMID:24907458

  10. Analysis of sporadic tuberous sclerosis patients with the TSC2 cDNA reveals several gene rearrangements and deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.J.; Short, M.P.; Bove, C.

    1994-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hamartomas and hamartias in many organs including brain, skin, heart and kidneys. Two TSC genes have been localized through linkage analysis, TSC1 to 9q34 and TSC2 to 16p13.3. TSC2 was recently cloned. The distribution of sporadic TSC patients between TSC1 and TSC2 is at present unknown, but tests of genetic heterogeneity in families suggest that each is equally represented. Genetic heterogeneity may account for some of the variation in clinical expression; however, there is no evidence at present to support differences in clinical phenotypes between the 2 genetic loci. With the isolation of the TSC2 gene we have commenced mutation studies of our familial and sporadic TSC patients. Thus far six chromosome 16-linked families have been screened with the TSC2 cDNA and no detectable changes were observed using Southern analysis. In addition, 85 sporadic TSC patients were analyzed by Southern analysis. Using multiple restriction digests, nine patients revealed altered patterns, including three patients that appeared to have complete deletions. RT-PCR was performed on these patients confirming that the TSC2 gene was deleted. However, the remaining patients showed normal patterns, indicating that they either have TSC1 mutations or they possess more subtle small deletions or point mutations. At present we are designing an SSCP-based approach to determine the nature of the mutations in our 16 linked TSC families.

  11. Candidate Genes and the Behavioral Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Sarah E.; Howley, Sarah; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an overwhelming evidence that children and adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a characteristic behavioral phenotype. In particular, there is a growing body of evidence that indicates an unequivocal association between 22q11.2DS and schizophrenia, especially in adulthood. Deletion of 22q11.2 is the third highest risk…

  12. Ovarian function and morphology after deletion of the DARPP-32 gene in mice.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, A; Fritz, S; Mani, S; Rajendra Kumar, T; Thalhammer, A; Ingrassia, P; Fienberg, A A; Greengard, P

    2004-09-01

    A plethora of systemic and local signaling molecules regulate ovarian function, but how different signaling molecules interact within an ovarian target cell is not known. Here we report that endocrine cells of the ovary express a phosphoprotein, DARPP-32 (dopamine and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein of Mr 32,000), which integrates signaling molecules in neurons. We thus hypothesized that DARPP-32 might act in a similar way in ovarian endocrine cells and therefore studied whether DARPP-32 gene deletion has consequences for ovarian functions in mice. Reproductive performance of adult mutants did not differ from wild-type females, as judged from numbers of litters and pups delivered. Similar steroid levels in mutant and wild-type mice ruled out gross abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. However, an analysis of ovarian morphology, using serially sectioned ovaries, revealed several differences. Ovaries of young adult mutant mice at 2 - 3 months contained luteinized follicles, but fewer corpora lutea. At 5 - 6 months, large cysts were found in mutant mice, as well as reduced numbers of preantral follicles and antral follicles. Interstitial cell hypertrophy and degeneration was marked in all mutant ovaries at this age. Thus, while the lack of DARPP-32 does not overtly alter reproductive performance in adult mice, it is associated with progressive alterations and derangements of growth and development of ovarian follicles, suggesting premature ovarian ageing. This implies that ovarian DARPP-32 is involved in follicular development, presumably by integrating effects of signaling molecules, which act together to ensure efficient follicular development.

  13. Tetrahydrodipicolinate N-Succinyltransferase and Dihydrodipicolinate Synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Structure Analysis and Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Robert; Oehlmann, Wulf; Sandalova, Tatyana; Braun, Yvonne; Huck, Carmen; Maringer, Marko; Singh, Mahavir; Schneider, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    The diaminopimelic acid pathway of lysine biosynthesis has been suggested to provide attractive targets for the development of novel antibacterial drugs. Here we report the characterization of two enzymes from this pathway in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, utilizing structural biology, biochemistry and genetics. We show that tetrahydrodipicolinate N-succinyltransferase (DapD) from P. aeruginosa is specific for the L-stereoisomer of the amino substrate L-2-aminopimelate, and its D-enantiomer acts as a weak inhibitor. The crystal structures of this enzyme with L-2-aminopimelate and D-2-aminopimelate, respectively, reveal that both compounds bind at the same site of the enzyme. Comparison of the binding interactions of these ligands in the enzyme active site suggests misalignment of the amino group of D-2-aminopimelate for nucleophilic attack on the succinate moiety of the co-substrate succinyl-CoA as the structural basis of specificity and inhibition. P. aeruginosa mutants where the dapA gene had been deleted were viable and able to grow in a mouse lung infection model, suggesting that DapA is not an optimal target for drug development against this organism. Structure-based sequence alignments, based on the DapA crystal structure determined to 1.6 Å resolution revealed the presence of two homologues, PA0223 and PA4188, in P. aeruginosa that could substitute for DapA in the P. aeruginosa PAO1ΔdapA mutant. In vitro experiments using recombinant PA0223 protein could however not detect any DapA activity. PMID:22359568

  14. Deletion of the Slo3 gene abolishes alkalization-activated K+ current in mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xu-Hui; Yang, Chengtao; Kim, Sung Tae; Lingle, Christopher J; Xia, Xiao-Ming

    2011-04-01

    Mouse spermatozoa express a pH-dependent K(+) current (KSper) thought to be composed of subunits encoded by the Slo3 gene. However, the equivalence of KSper and Slo3-dependent current remains uncertain, because heterologous expression of Slo3 results in currents that are less effectively activated by alkalization than are native KSper currents. Here, we show that genetic deletion of Slo3 abolishes all pH-dependent K(+) current at physiological membrane potentials in corpus epididymal sperm. A residual pH-dependent outward current (I(Kres)) is observed in Slo3(-/-) sperm at potentials of >0 mV. Differential inhibition of KSper/Slo3 and I(Kres) by clofilium reveals that the amplitude of I(Kres) is similar in both wild-type (wt) and Slo3(-/-) sperm. The properties of I(Kres) suggest that it likely represents outward monovalent cation flux through CatSper channels. Thus, KSper/Slo3 may account for essentially all mouse sperm K(+) current and is the sole pH-dependent K(+) conductance in these sperm. With physiological ionic gradients, alkalization depolarizes Slo3(-/-) spermatozoa, presumably from CatSper activation, in contrast to Slo3/KSper-mediated hyperpolarization in wt sperm. Slo3(-/-) male mice are infertile, but Slo3(-/-) sperm exhibit some fertility within in vitro fertilization assays. Slo3(-/-) sperm exhibit a higher incidence of morphological abnormalities accentuated by hypotonic challenge and also exhibit deficits in motility in the absence of bicarbonate, revealing a role of KSper under unstimulated conditions. Together, these results show that KSper/Slo3 is the primary spermatozoan K(+) current, that KSper may play a critical role in acquisition of normal morphology and sperm motility when faced with hyperosmotic challenges, and that Slo3 is critical for fertility. PMID:21427226

  15. Large-scale gene expression profiling reveals physiological response to deletion of chaperone dnaKJ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dongjie; Liu, Chuanpeng; Liu, Lushan; Zhu, Lingxiang; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qiming

    2016-01-01

    Chaperone DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ plays various essential roles such as in assisting in the folding of nascent peptides, preventing protein aggregation and maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. Global transcriptional changes in vivo associated with deletion of dnaKJ were monitored using DNA microarray to elucidate the role of DnaKJ at the transcriptional level. Microarray profiling and bioinformatics analysis revealed that a few chaperone and protease genes, stress-related genes and genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation were up-regulated, whereas various transporter genes, pentose phosphate pathway and transcriptional regulation related genes were down-regulated. This study is the first to systematically analyze the alterations at the transcriptional level in vivo in deletion of dnaKJ. Fatty acid methyl esters analysis indicated that the amount of unsaturated fatty acid sharply increased and subcellular location prediction analysis showed a marked decrease in transcription of inner-membrane protein genes, which might have triggered the development of aberrant cell shape and susceptibility for some antibiotics in the ΔdnaKJ strain. PMID:27242140

  16. Identification of two rare and novel large deletions in ITGB4 gene causing epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia.

    PubMed

    Mencía, Ángeles; García, Marta; García, Eva; Llames, Sara; Charlesworth, Alexandra; de Lucas, Raúl; Vicente, Asunción; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Coto, Pablo; Costa, Marta; Vera, Ángel; López-Pestaña, Arantxa; Murillas, Rodolfo; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Jorcano, José Luis; Conti, Claudio J; Escámez Toledano, María José; del Río Nechaevsky, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease with a variable prognosis from lethal to very mild. EB-PA is classified into Simplex form (EBS-PA: OMIM #612138) and Junctional form (JEB-PA: OMIM #226730), and it is caused by mutations in ITGA6, ITGB4 and PLEC genes. We report the analysis of six patients with EB-PA, including two dizygotic twins. Skin immunofluorescence epitope mapping was performed followed by PCR and direct sequencing of the ITGB4 gene. Two of the patients presented with non-lethal EB-PA associated with missense ITGB4 gene mutations. For the other four, early postnatal demise was associated with complete lack of β4 integrin due to a variety of ITGB4 novel mutations (2 large deletions, 1 splice-site mutation and 3 missense mutations). One of the deletions spanned 278 bp, being one of the largest reported to date for this gene. Remarkably, we also found for the first time a founder effect for one novel mutation in the ITGB4 gene. We have identified 6 novel mutations in the ITGB4 gene to be added to the mutation database. Our results reveal genotype-phenotype correlations that contribute to the molecular understanding of this heterogeneous disease, a pivotal issue for prognosis and for the development of novel evidence-based therapeutic options for EB management.

  17. Analysis of Noncanonical Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Toxoplasma gondii by Targeted Gene Deletion Using CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Long, Shaojun; Wang, Qiuling

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are expanded in apicomplexan parasites, especially in Toxoplasma gondii where 14 separate genes encoding these enzymes are found. Although previous studies have shown that several CDPKs play a role in controlling invasion, egress, and cell division in T. gondii, the roles of most of these genes are unexplored. Here we developed a more efficient method for gene disruption using CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) that was modified to completely delete large, multiexonic genes from the genome and to allow serial replacement by recycling of the selectable marker using Cre-loxP. Using this system, we generated a total of 24 mutants in type 1 and 2 genetic backgrounds to ascertain the functions of noncanonical CDPKs. Remarkably, although we were able to confirm the essentiality of CDPK1 and CDPK7, the majority of CDPKs had no discernible phenotype for growth in vitro or infection in the mouse model. The exception to this was CDPK6, loss of which leads to reduced plaquing, fitness defect in a competition assay, and reduced tissue cyst formation in chronically infected mice. Our findings highlight the utility of CRISPR/Cas9 for rapid serial gene deletion and also suggest that additional models are needed to reveal the functions of many genes in T. gondii. PMID:26755159

  18. Contribution of Scaffoldins to Biomass Degradation by Clostridium Thermocellum: The Effect of Scaffoldin-Deletions on Expression of Other Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qi; Podkaminer, Kara; Resch, Michael G.; Donohoe, Bryon; Olson, Daniel G.; Baker, John O.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Syed, Mustafa; Wilson, Charlotte M.; Brown, Steven D.; Yang, Shihui; Magnusson, Lauren; Maness, Pin-Ching; Decker, Steve R.; Lynd, Lee R.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2014-04-28

    The cellulosome system contributes greatly to the extreme efficiency of C. thermocellum cellulose degradation. In order to further understand the cellulosome working mechanism, we have knocked out C. thermocellum scaffoldin genes to generate a variety of deletion mutants. The knockout most detrimental to enzymatic hydrolysis by the secretome is that of the primary scaffoldin CipA. Deletion of multiple secondary scaffoldins results in secretome activities intermediate between those of the parent strain and the CipA-knockout mutants. The order of relative secretome activities is the same, whether the cellulosic substrate is microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) or deacetylated acid-pretreated corn stover (DACS), but the relative magnitudes of the deletion effects are strongly substrate-dependent. Similar trends are observed in fermentation studies of the abilities of the parent and knockout strains themselves to utilize Avicel and DACS. Data from transcriptomic and proteomic studies of these strains when grown on both substrates are used to relate the activity and growth effects of the deletions to their effects on the overall expression of lignocellulose-degrading enzymes by C. thermocellum.

  19. Multiple genetic origins of histidine-rich protein 2 gene deletion in Plasmodium falciparum parasites from Peru

    PubMed Central

    Akinyi, Sheila; Hayden, Tonya; Gamboa, Dionicia; Torres, Katherine; Bendezu, Jorge; Abdallah, Joseph F.; Griffing, Sean M.; Quezada, Wilmer Marquiño; Arrospide, Nancy; De Oliveira, Alexandre Macedo; Lucas, Carmen; Magill, Alan J.; Bacon, David J.; Barnwell, John W.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2013-01-01

    The majority of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) detect Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2), encoded by the pfhrp2 gene. Recently, P. falciparum isolates from Peru were found to lack pfhrp2 leading to false-negative RDT results. We hypothesized that pfhrp2-deleted parasites in Peru derived from a single genetic event. We evaluated the parasite population structure and pfhrp2 haplotype of samples collected between 1998 and 2005 using seven neutral and seven chromosome 8 microsatellite markers, respectively. Five distinct pfhrp2 haplotypes, corresponding to five neutral microsatellite-based clonal lineages, were detected in 1998-2001; pfhrp2 deletions occurred within four haplotypes. In 2003-2005, outcrossing among the parasite lineages resulted in eight population clusters that inherited the five pfhrp2 haplotypes seen previously and a new haplotype; pfhrp2 deletions occurred within four of these haplotypes. These findings indicate that the genetic origin of pfhrp2 deletion in Peru was not a single event, but likely occurred multiple times. PMID:24077522

  20. A chloroplast DNA deletion located in RNA polymerase gene rpoC2 in CMS lines of sorghum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Muthukrishnan, S; Liang, G H; Schertz, K F; Hart, G E

    1993-01-01

    Fertile lines of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were shown to differ from cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) lines by the presence of a 3.8 kb HindIII chloroplast DNA fragment in the former and a smaller (3.7 kb) fragment in the latter. DNA/DNA hybridization studies showed that these two fragments are homologous. Fertile plants from S. versicolor, S. almum, S. halepense, and Sorghastrum nutans (Yellow Indiangrass) also have the 3.8 kb fragment, and CMS lines studied containing A1, A2 and A3 cytoplasms have the 3.7 kb fragment. The size difference between the two fragments was localized to a 1.0 kb SacI-HindIII fragment by restriction mapping. A 165 bp deletion, which is flanked by a 51 bp tandem repeat, was identified in the CMS lines by sequencing the clones. Comparison of the two sequences with those from maize, rice, tobacco, spinach, pea, and liverwort revealed that the deleted sequence is located in the middle of the RNA polymerase beta" subunit encoded by the gene rpoC2. The amino acid sequence deleted in the CMS lines is in a monocot-specific region which contains two protein motifs that are characteristic of several transcriptional activation factors, namely, a leucine zipper motif and an acidic domain capable of forming an amphipathic alpha-helix. Further studies designed to determine whether or not the deletion is involved in CMS of sorghum are underway.

  1. Genes Required for Survival in Microgravity Revealed by Genome-Wide Yeast Deletion Collections Cultured during Spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Nislow, Corey; Lee, Anna Y.; Allen, Patricia L.; Giaever, Guri; Smith, Andrew; Gebbia, Marinella; Stodieck, Louis S.; Hammond, Jeffrey S.; Birdsall, Holly H.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight is a unique environment with profound effects on biological systems including tissue redistribution and musculoskeletal stresses. However, the more subtle biological effects of spaceflight on cells and organisms are difficult to measure in a systematic, unbiased manner. Here we test the utility of the molecularly barcoded yeast deletion collection to provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of microgravity on a model organism. We developed robust hardware to screen, in parallel, the complete collection of ~4800 homozygous and ~5900 heterozygous (including ~1100 single-copy deletions of essential genes) yeast deletion strains, each carrying unique DNA that acts as strain identifiers. We compared strain fitness for the homozygous and heterozygous yeast deletion collections grown in spaceflight and ground, as well as plus and minus hyperosmolar sodium chloride, providing a second additive stressor. The genome-wide sensitivity profiles obtained from these treatments were then queried for their similarity to a compendium of drugs whose effects on the yeast collection have been previously reported. We found that the effects of spaceflight have high concordance with the effects of DNA-damaging agents and changes in redox state, suggesting mechanisms by which spaceflight may negatively affect cell fitness. PMID:25667933

  2. Multiple genetic origins of histidine-rich protein 2 gene deletion in Plasmodium falciparum parasites from Peru.

    PubMed

    Akinyi, Sheila; Hayden, Tonya; Gamboa, Dionicia; Torres, Katherine; Bendezu, Jorge; Abdallah, Joseph F; Griffing, Sean M; Quezada, Wilmer Marquiño; Arrospide, Nancy; De Oliveira, Alexandre Macedo; Lucas, Carmen; Magill, Alan J; Bacon, David J; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2013-09-30

    The majority of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) detect Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2), encoded by the pfhrp2 gene. Recently, P. falciparum isolates from Peru were found to lack pfhrp2 leading to false-negative RDT results. We hypothesized that pfhrp2-deleted parasites in Peru derived from a single genetic event. We evaluated the parasite population structure and pfhrp2 haplotype of samples collected between 1998 and 2005 using seven neutral and seven chromosome 8 microsatellite markers, respectively. Five distinct pfhrp2 haplotypes, corresponding to five neutral microsatellite-based clonal lineages, were detected in 1998-2001; pfhrp2 deletions occurred within four haplotypes. In 2003-2005, outcrossing among the parasite lineages resulted in eight population clusters that inherited the five pfhrp2 haplotypes seen previously and a new haplotype; pfhrp2 deletions occurred within four of these haplotypes. These findings indicate that the genetic origin of pfhrp2 deletion in Peru was not a single event, but likely occurred multiple times.

  3. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of the keap1 gene activates Nrf2 and confers potent resistance against acute drug toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Okawa, Hiromi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Akira; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kensler, Thomas W.; Yamamoto, Masayuki . E-mail: masi@tara.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2006-01-06

    Nrf2 is a key regulator of many detoxifying enzyme genes, and cytoplasmic protein Keap1 represses the Nrf2 activity under quiescent conditions. Germ line deletion of the keap1 gene results in constitutive activation of Nrf2, but the pups unexpectedly died before weaning. To investigate how constitutive activation of Nrf2 influences the detoxification system in adult mice, we generated mice bearing a hepatocyte-specific disruption of the keap1 gene. Homozygous mice were viable and their livers displayed no apparent abnormalities, but nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 is elevated. Microarray analysis revealed that, while many detoxifying enzyme genes are highly expressed, some of the typical Nrf2-dependent genes are only marginally increased in the Keap1-deficient liver. The mutant mice were significantly more resistant to toxic doses of acetaminophen than control animals. These results demonstrate that chronic activation of Nrf2 confers animals with resistance to xenobiotics without affecting the morphological and physiological integrity of hepatocytes.

  4. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Mitochondrial Dysfunction in an Imprinting Center Deletion Mouse Model of Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Weiwei; Coskun, Pinar E.; Nalbandian, Angèle; Knoblach, Susan; Resnick, James L.; Hoffman, Eric; Wallace, Douglas C.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2013-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder caused by deficiency of imprinted gene expression from the paternal chromosome 15q11-15q13 and clinically characterized by neonatal hypotonia, short stature, cognitive impairment, hypogonadism, hyperphagia, morbid obesity and diabetes. Previous clinical studies suggest that a defect in energy metabolism may be involved in the pathogenesis of PWS. We focused our attention on the genes associated with energy metabolism and found that there were 95 and 66 mitochondrial genes differentially expressed in PWS muscle and brain, respectively. Assessment of enzyme activities of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes in the brain, heart, liver and muscle were assessed. We found the enzyme activities of the cardiac mitochondrial complexes II+III were upregulated in the imprinting center deletion (PWS-IC) mice compared to the wild type littermates. These studies suggest that differential gene expression, especially of the mitochondrial genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of PWS. PMID:24127921

  5. Central precocious puberty in a patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Won; Kang, So Young; Kim, Gu Hwan; Yoo, Han Wook; Yu, Jeesuk

    2013-06-01

    X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is caused by the mutation of DAX-1 gene (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1), and can occur as part of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in association with glycerol kinase (GK) deficiency, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and X-linked interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene deficiency. It is usually associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, although in rare cases, it has been reported to occur in normal puberty or even central precocious puberty. This study addresses a case in which central precocious puberty developed in a boy with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita who had complete deletion of the genes DAX-1, GK and IL1RAPL1 (Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome). Initially he was admitted for the management of adrenal crisis at the age of 2 months, and managed with hydrocortisone and florinef. At 45 months of age, his each testicular volumes of 4 mL and a penile length of 5 cm were noted, with pubic hair of Tanner stage 2. His bone age was advanced and a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test showed a luteinizing hormone peak of 8.26 IU/L, confirming central precocious puberty. He was then treated with a GnRH agonist, as well as steroid replacement therapy. In Korea, this is the first case of central precocious puberty developed in a male patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita. PMID:24904859

  6. OMP gene deletion results in an alteration in odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Youngentob, S L; Kent, P F; Margolis, F L

    2003-12-01

    Previous behavioral work, using a complex five-odorant identification task, demonstrated that olfactory marker protein (OMP) is critically involved in odor processing to the extent that its loss results in an alteration in odorant quality perception. Exactly how the lack of OMP exerts its influence on the perception of odorant quality is unknown. However, there is considerable neurophysiological evidence that different odorants produce different spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity at the level of the mucosa and that these patterns predict the psychophysically determined perceptual relationship among odorants. In this respect, OMP gene deletion is known to result in a constellation of physiologic defects (i.e., marked reduction in the electroolfactogram (EOG) and altered response and recovery kinetics) that would be expected to alter the odorant-induced spatiotemporal activity patterns that are characteristic of different odorants. This, in turn, would be expected to alter the spatiotemporal patterning of information that results from the mucosal projection onto the bulb, thereby changing odorant quality perception. To test the hypothesis that odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns are altered in mice lacking the gene for OMP, we optically recorded the fluorescent changes in response to odorant stimulation from both the septum and turbinates of both OMP-null and control mice using a voltage-sensitive dye (di-4-ANEPPS Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and a Dalsa 120 x 120, 12-bit CCD camera. To maintain continuity with the previous behavioral work, the odorants 2-propanol, citral, carvone, ethylacetoacetate, and propyl acetate were again used. Each odorant was randomly presented to each mucosal surface in a Latin-Square design. The results of this study demonstrated that, for both mouse strains, there do indeed exist different spatiotemporal activity patterns for different odorants. More importantly, however, these patterns significantly differed between OMP

  7. Allelic deletion of the MEN1 gene in duodenal gastrin and somatostatin cell neoplasms and their precursor lesions

    PubMed Central

    Anlauf, M; Perren, A; Henopp, T; Rudolph, T; Garbrecht, N; Schmitt, A; Raffel, A; Gimm, O; Weihe, E; Knoefel, W T; Dralle, H; Heitz, Ph U; Komminoth, P; Klöppel, G

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients with a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)‐associated Zollinger–Ellison syndrome (ZES) show multifocal duodenal gastrinomas and precursor lesions. Aims To test these lesions for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the MEN1 gene locus on chromosome 11q13, and to investigate whether the MEN1‐related endocrine cell changes also involved somatostatin cells. Material and methods Tissue specimens from six patients with MEN1 and ZES were analysed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. LOH analysis was performed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), using probes containing the MEN1 gene locus and the centromere 11 (C11) region. For simultaneous analysis of hormones and allelic deletions, a combined FISH/immunofluorescence protocol was established. Results 28 of a total of 33 duodenal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) were gastrin‐producing tumours; 13/28 (46.4%) revealed LOH on 11q13 and/or C11. Five of the NETs were somatostatin‐expressing tumours, two revealing LOH. Allelic loss was detected in tumours as small as 300 μm (gastrin) and 400 μm (somatostatin) in diameter. The gastrin‐producing tumours showed different deletion/retention patterns. Hyperplastic somatostatin cell lesions, similar to those of the gastrin cells, were present in all patients. The hyperplastic lesions of both cell lines consistently retained both 11q13 alleles. Conclusions Allelic deletion of the MEN1 gene may reflect a pivotal event in the development of multifocal gastrin and somatostatin cell neoplasms in the duodenum of patients with MEN1. The observation of distinct deletion patterns in small synchronous tumours supports the concept that each gastrin‐producing tumour in an individual MEN1 patient arises from an independent cell clone. PMID:17135306

  8. Unusual presentation of pelizaeus-merzbacher disease: female patient with deletion of the proteolipid protein 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Brender, Teva; Wallerstein, Donna; Sum, John; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is neurodegenerative leukodystrophy caused by dysfunction of the proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene on Xq22, which codes for an essential myelin protein. As an X-linked condition, PMD primarily affects males; however there have been a small number of affected females reported in the medical literature with a variety of different mutations in this gene. No affected females to date have a deletion like our patient. In addition to this, our patient has skewed X chromosome inactivation which adds to her presentation as her unaffected mother also carries the mutation. PMID:25789183

  9. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome in a Family with a Deletion Followed by an Insertion within the HPRT1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu; Nyhan, William L

    2015-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare X-linked inherited neurogenetic disorder of purine metabolism in which the enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase(HGprt) is defective. The authors report a novel mutation which led to LNS in a family with a deletion followed by an insertion (INDELS) via the serial replication slippage mechanism: c.428_432delTGCAGinsAGCAAA, p.Met143Lysfs*12 in exon 6 of HPRT1 gene. Molecular diagnosis discloses the genetic heterogeneity of HPRT1 gene responsible for HGprt deficiency. It allows fast, accurate carrier detection and genetic counseling. PMID:25965333

  10. Unusual Presentation of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease: Female Patient with Deletion of the Proteolipid Protein 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Brender, Teva; Wallerstein, Donna; Sum, John; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is neurodegenerative leukodystrophy caused by dysfunction of the proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene on Xq22, which codes for an essential myelin protein. As an X-linked condition, PMD primarily affects males; however there have been a small number of affected females reported in the medical literature with a variety of different mutations in this gene. No affected females to date have a deletion like our patient. In addition to this, our patient has skewed X chromosome inactivation which adds to her presentation as her unaffected mother also carries the mutation. PMID:25789183

  11. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  12. A DNA Fragment Mapped within the Submicroscopic Deletion of Ph1, a Chromosome Pairing Regulator Gene in Polyploid Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gill, K. S.; Gill, B. S.

    1991-01-01

    Bread wheat is an allohexaploid consisting of three genetically related (homoeologous) genomes. The homoeologous chromosomes are capable of pairing but strict homologous pairing is observed at metaphase 1. The diploid-like pairing is regulated predominantly by Ph1, a gene mapped on long arm of chromosome 5B. We report direct evidence that a mutant of the gene (ph1b) arose from a submicroscopic deletion. A probe (XksuS1-5) detects the same missing fragment in two independent mutants ph1b and ph1c and a higher intensity fragment in a duplication of the Ph1 gene. It is likely that XksuS1-5 lies adjacent to Ph1 on the same chromosome fragment that is deleted in ph1b and ph1c. XksuS1-5 can be used to tag Ph1 gene to facilitate incorporation of genetic material from homoeologous genomes of the Triticeae. It may also be a useful marker in cloning Ph1 gene by chromosome walking. PMID:1936962

  13. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2016-01-01

    Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  14. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2016-01-01

    Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients.

  15. Development of a Double-Crossover Markerless Gene Deletion System in Bifidobacterium longum: Functional Analysis of the α-Galactosidase Gene for Raffinose Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Yosuke; Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Fukuma, Hidenori; Murayama, Hiroki; Kano, Yasunobu; Yokota, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Functional analysis of Bifidobacterium genes is essential for understanding host-Bifidobacterium interactions with beneficial effects on human health; however, the lack of an effective targeted gene inactivation system in bifidobacteria has prevented the development of functional genomics in this bacterium. Here, we report the development of a markerless gene deletion system involving a double crossover in Bifidobacterium longum. Incompatible plasmid vectors were used to facilitate a second crossover step. The conditional replication vector pBS423-ΔrepA, which lacks the plasmid replication gene repA, was integrated into the target gene by a first crossover event. Subsequently, the replicative plasmid pTBR101-CM, which harbors repA, was introduced into this integrant to facilitate the second crossover step and subsequent elimination of the excised conditional replication vector from the cells by plasmid incompatibility. The proposed system was confirmed to work as expected in B. longum 105-A using the chromosomal full-length β-galactosidase gene as a target. Markerless gene deletion was tested using the aga gene, which encodes α-galactosidase, whose substrates include raffinose. Almost all the pTBR101-CM-transformed strains became double-crossover recombinants after subculture, and 4 out of the 270 double-crossover recombinants had lost the ability to assimilate raffinose. Genotype analysis of these strains revealed markerless gene deletion of aga. Carbohydrate assimilation analysis and α-galactosidase activity measurement were conducted using both the representative mutant and a plasmid-based aga-complemented strain. These functional analyses revealed that aga is the only gene encoding a functional α-galactosidase enzyme in B. longum 105-A. PMID:22582061

  16. Development of a double-crossover markerless gene deletion system in Bifidobacterium longum: functional analysis of the α-galactosidase gene for raffinose assimilation.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yosuke; Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Fukuma, Hidenori; Murayama, Hiroki; Kano, Yasunobu; Fukiya, Satoru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    Functional analysis of Bifidobacterium genes is essential for understanding host-Bifidobacterium interactions with beneficial effects on human health; however, the lack of an effective targeted gene inactivation system in bifidobacteria has prevented the development of functional genomics in this bacterium. Here, we report the development of a markerless gene deletion system involving a double crossover in Bifidobacterium longum. Incompatible plasmid vectors were used to facilitate a second crossover step. The conditional replication vector pBS423-ΔrepA, which lacks the plasmid replication gene repA, was integrated into the target gene by a first crossover event. Subsequently, the replicative plasmid pTBR101-CM, which harbors repA, was introduced into this integrant to facilitate the second crossover step and subsequent elimination of the excised conditional replication vector from the cells by plasmid incompatibility. The proposed system was confirmed to work as expected in B. longum 105-A using the chromosomal full-length β-galactosidase gene as a target. Markerless gene deletion was tested using the aga gene, which encodes α-galactosidase, whose substrates include raffinose. Almost all the pTBR101-CM-transformed strains became double-crossover recombinants after subculture, and 4 out of the 270 double-crossover recombinants had lost the ability to assimilate raffinose. Genotype analysis of these strains revealed markerless gene deletion of aga. Carbohydrate assimilation analysis and α-galactosidase activity measurement were conducted using both the representative mutant and a plasmid-based aga-complemented strain. These functional analyses revealed that aga is the only gene encoding a functional α-galactosidase enzyme in B. longum 105-A.

  17. Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy in Golden Retriever Dogs Is Caused by a Deletion in the Mitochondrial tRNATyr Gene

    PubMed Central

    Baranowska, Izabella; Jäderlund, Karin Hultin; Nennesmo, Inger; Holmqvist, Erik; Heidrich, Nadja; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Andersson, Göran; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.; Hedhammar, Åke; Wibom, Rolf; Andersson, Leif

    2009-01-01

    Sensory ataxic neuropathy (SAN) is a recently identified neurological disorder in golden retrievers. Pedigree analysis revealed that all affected dogs belong to one maternal lineage, and a statistical analysis showed that the disorder has a mitochondrial origin. A one base pair deletion in the mitochondrial tRNATyr gene was identified at position 5304 in affected dogs after re-sequencing the complete mitochondrial genome of seven individuals. The deletion was not found among dogs representing 18 different breeds or in six wolves, ruling out this as a common polymorphism. The mutation could be traced back to a common ancestor of all affected dogs that lived in the 1970s. We used a quantitative oligonucleotide ligation assay to establish the degree of heteroplasmy in blood and tissue samples from affected dogs and controls. Affected dogs and their first to fourth degree relatives had 0–11% wild-type (wt) sequence, while more distant relatives ranged between 5% and 60% wt sequence and all unrelated golden retrievers had 100% wt sequence. Northern blot analysis showed that tRNATyr had a 10-fold lower steady-state level in affected dogs compared with controls. Four out of five affected dogs showed decreases in mitochondrial ATP production rates and respiratory chain enzyme activities together with morphological alterations in muscle tissue, resembling the changes reported in human mitochondrial pathology. Altogether, these results provide conclusive evidence that the deletion in the mitochondrial tRNATyr gene is the causative mutation for SAN. PMID:19492087

  18. Unexpected effects of gene deletion on mercury interactions with the methylation-deficient mutant hgcAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hui; Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Liang, Liyuan; Elias, Dwayne A; Gu, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    The hgcA and hgcB gene pair is essential for mercury (Hg) methylation by certain anaerobic bacteria,1 but little is known about how deletion of hgcAB affects cell surface interactions and intracellular uptake of Hg. Here, we compare hgcAB mutants with the wild-type (WT) strains of both Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 and observe differences in Hg redox transformations, adsorption, and uptake in laboratory incubation studies. In both strains, deletion of hgcAB increased the reduction of Hg(II) but decreased the oxidation of Hg(0) under anaerobic conditions. The measured cellular thiol content in hgcAB mutants was lower than the WT, accounting for decreased adsorption and uptake of Hg. Despite the lack of methylation activity, Hg uptake by the hgcAB continued, albeit at a slower rate than the WT. These findings demonstrate that deletion of the hgcAB gene not only eliminates Hg methylation but also alters cell physiology, resulting in changes to Hg redox reactions, sorption, and uptake by cells.

  19. A case of 9.7 Mb terminal Xp deletion including OA1 locus associated with contiguous gene syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Hae; Kim, Sook-Young; Kim, Jin-Kyung

    2012-10-01

    Terminal or interstitial deletions of Xp (Xp22.2→Xpter) in males have been recognized as a cause of contiguous gene syndromes showing variable association of apparently unrelated clinical manifestations such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (SHOX), chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX1), mental retardation (NLGN4), ichthyosis (STS), Kallmann syndrome (KAL1), and ocular albinism (GPR143). Here we present a case of a 13.5 yr old boy and sister with a same terminal deletion of Xp22.2 resulting in the absence of genes from the telomere of Xp to GPR143 of Xp22. The boy manifested the findings of all of the disorders mentioned above. We began a testosterone enanthate monthly replacement therapy. His sister, 11 yr old, manifested only Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, and had engaged in growth hormone therapy for 3 yr. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a male with a 9.7 Mb terminal Xp deletion including the OA1 locus in Korea. PMID:23091330

  20. Evidence for a new contiguous gene syndrome, the chromosome 16p13.3 deletion syndrome alias severe Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Oliver; Rasi, Sasan; Delicado, Alicia; Dyack, Sarah; Neumann, Luitgard M; Seemanová, Eva; Volleth, Marianne; Haaf, Thomas; Kalscheuer, Vera M

    2006-09-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a well-known autosomal dominant mental retardation syndrome with typical facial and skeletal abnormalities. Previously, we have reported two patients presenting with RSTS and additional clinical features including failure to thrive, seizures, and intractable infections (Bartsch et al. in Eur J Hum Genet 7:748-756, 1999). Recently we identified a third patient with this condition, termed here severe RSTS, or chromosome 16p13.3 deletion syndrome. The three patients died in infancy, and all displayed a specific mutation, a chromosomal microdeletion including the 3'-end of the CREBBP gene. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and closely spaced DNA probes, we characterized the deletion intervals in these patients and in three individuals with a deletion of CREBBP and typical RSTS. The deleted DNA segments were found to greatly vary in size, spanning from approximately 40 kb to >3 Mb. Four individuals, including the patients with severe RSTS, exhibited deletions containing gene/s in addition to CREBBP. The patients with severe RSTS all had deletions comprising telomeric neighbor genes of CREBBP, including DNASE1, a dominant gene encoding a nuclease that has been associated with systemic lupus erythematodes. Our findings suggest that severe RSTS is distinct from RSTS and represents a novel true contiguous gene syndrome (chromosome 16p13.3 deletion syndrome). Because of the risk of critical infections and high mortality rate, we recommend that the size of the deletion interval should be determined in CREBBP deletion-positive patients with RSTS, especially in young children. Further studies are needed to delineate the clinical spectrum of the new disorder and to clarify the role of DNASE1.

  1. The major and minor chicken vitellogenin genes are each adjacent to partially deleted pseudogene copies of the other.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R; Fischer, A H; Burch, J B

    1989-01-01

    The major chicken vitellogenin gene (VTGII) has previously been cloned and sequenced. We now report the isolation of genomic clones that encompass a minor chicken vitellogenin gene (VTGIII) which is also expressed in the liver in response to estradiol. Our analysis reveals that a pseudogene for VTGII (psi VTGII) lies 1,426 base pairs upstream of this VTGIII gene. A reevaluation of published sequence data reveals that the converse is also true, namely, that a pseudogene for VTGIII (psi VTGIII) lies 1,345 base pairs downstream of the VTGII gene. Our results show that a 335-base-pair deletion has removed the psi VTGIII promoter and cap site but left residual estrogen response element in a region where nuclease-hypersensitive sites have been reported to be induced in response to estradiol. Images PMID:2796998

  2. Loss of src, topoisomerase 1 and phospholipase C genes in 20q deletions in myeloid leukemia by FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.N.; Hayworth, R.; Carroll, A.J. |

    1994-09-01

    Deletion of 20q is one of the more consistent abnormalities in myeloid leukemia (ML). This has led to the suggestion of a loss of(a) tumor-suppressor gene(s) that could provide a proliferative advantage to myeloid cells. Using in situ hybridization mapping, the deleted region was determined to be between 20q11.2 to q12, flanked proximally by ribophorin and distally by D20S17. We have been constructing a genetic map of the 20q12-q13.1 region and the MODY locus. We further defined the del(20q) by studying 5 patients with ML and cytogenetically identifiable deletions of 20q, using multicolor FISH, and scored for the presence or absence of the following probes: oncogenes hck and src, phospholipase C (plc1), adenosine deaminase (ada), DNA topoisomerase 1 (top1), D20S17, and D20S16. hck mapped to proximal 20q11.2 and was present in the normal and deleted chromosome 20. D20S16 was observed in all but one patient suggesting that it is also not part of the critical region of deletion. src, ada, top1, plc1, and 20S17 were deleted in all patients. The loss of plc1 and top1 in ML is reported for the first time and is important given their function in cell growth and replication. top1 relaxes supercoiled DNA and is important for RNA transcription, DNA replication and repair. A lack of DNA repair caused by the inactivation of top1 may lead to genomic instability and thus neoplasia and apoptosis. plc1 catalyzes inositol phospholipids to second messenger molecules diacylglycerol and inositol triphosphate which directly affect cell division and growth. If there is a loss or alteration of plc1, it is speculated that the leukemic cells instead of undergoing apoptosis, may follow an alternative pathway that provides proliferative signals causing the progression to an aggressive acute myeloid leukemia. Further studies regarding the role of plc1 in apoptosis and ML may lead to promising results.

  3. Detection of an atypical 7q11.23 deletion in Williams syndrome patients which does not include the STX1A and FZD3 genes

    PubMed Central

    Botta, A; Novelli, G; Mari, A; Novelli, A; Sabani, M; Korenberg, J; Osborne, L; Digilio, M; Giannotti, A; Dallapiccola, B

    1999-01-01

    We present two patients with the full Williams syndrome (WS) phenotype carrying a smaller deletion than typically observed. The deleted region spans from the elastin gene to marker D7S1870. This observation narrows the minimal region of deletion in WS and suggests that the syntaxin 1A and frizzled genes are not responsible for the major features of this developmental disorder and provides important insight into understanding the genotype-phenotype correlation in WS.


Keywords: Williams syndrome; elastin; syntaxin; frizzled PMID:10874638

  4. Diverse fission yeast genes required for responding to oxidative and metal stress: Comparative analysis of glutathione-related and other defense gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Pluskal, Tomáš; Sajiki, Kenichi; Becker, Joanne; Takeda, Kojiro; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Living organisms have evolved multiple sophisticated mechanisms to deal with reactive oxygen species. We constructed a collection of twelve single-gene deletion strains of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe designed for the study of oxidative and heavy metal stress responses. This collection contains deletions of biosynthetic enzymes of glutathione (Δgcs1 and Δgsa1), phytochelatin (Δpcs2), ubiquinone (Δabc1) and ergothioneine (Δegt1), as well as catalase (Δctt1), thioredoxins (Δtrx1 and Δtrx2), Cu/Zn- and Mn- superoxide dismutases (SODs; Δsod1 and Δsod2), sulfiredoxin (Δsrx1) and sulfide-quinone oxidoreductase (Δhmt2). First, we employed metabolomic analysis to examine the mutants of the glutathione biosynthetic pathway. We found that ophthalmic acid was produced by the same enzymes as glutathione in S. pombe. The identical genetic background of the strains allowed us to assess the severity of the individual gene knockouts by treating the deletion strains with oxidative agents. Among other results, we found that glutathione deletion strains were not particularly sensitive to peroxide or superoxide, but highly sensitive to cadmium stress. Our results show the astonishing diversity in cellular adaptation mechanisms to various types of oxidative and metal stress and provide a useful tool for further research into stress responses. PMID:27005325

  5. Deletion of exon 8 from the EXT1 gene causes multiple osteochondromas (MO) in a family with three affected members.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Lei; Gerber, Simon D; Kuchen, Stefan; Villiger, Peter M; Trueb, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Multiple osteochondromas (also called hereditary multiple exostoses) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple cartilaginous tumors, which are caused by mutations in the genes for exostosin-1 (EXT1) and exostosin-2 (EXT2). The goal of this study was to elucidate the genetic alterations in a family with three affected members. Isolation of RNA from the patients' blood followed by reverse transcription and PCR amplification of selected fragments showed that the three patients lack a specific region of 90 bp from their EXT1 mRNA. This region corresponds to the sequence of exon 8 from the EXT1 gene. No splice site mutation was found around exon 8. However, long-range PCR amplification of the region from intron 7 to intron 8 indicated that the three patients contain a deletion of 4318 bp, which includes exon 8 and part of the flanking introns. There is evidence that the deletion was caused by non-homologous end joining because the breakpoints are not located within a repetitive element, but contain multiple copies of the deletion hotspot sequence TGRRKM. Exon 8 encodes part of the active site of the EXT1 enzyme, including the DXD signature of all UDP-sugar glycosyltransferases. It is conceivable that the mutant protein exerts a dominant negative effect on the activity of the EXT glycosyltransferase since it might interact with normal copies of the enzyme to form an inactive hetero-oligomeric complex. We suggest that sequencing of RNA might be superior to exome sequencing to detect short deletions of a single exon.

  6. Dopaminergic neuron-specific deletion of p53 gene is neuroprotective in an experimental Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xin; Davis, Brandon; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Filichia, Emily; Barnett, Austin; Greig, Nigel H; Hoffer, Barry; Luo, Yu

    2016-09-01

    p53, a stress response gene, is involved in diverse cell death pathways and its activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether the neuronal p53 protein plays a direct role in regulating dopaminergic (DA) neuronal cell death is unknown. In this study, in contrast to the global inhibition of p53 function by pharmacological inhibitors and in traditional p53 knock-out (KO) mice, we examined the effect of DA specific p53 gene deletion in DAT-p53KO mice. These DAT-p53KO mice did not exhibit apparent changes in the general structure and neuronal density of DA neurons during late development and in aging. However, in DA-p53KO mice treated with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), we found that the induction of Bax and p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) mRNA and protein levels by MPTP were diminished in both striatum and substantia nigra of these mice. Notably, deletion of the p53 gene in DA neurons significantly reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss in substantia nigra, dopaminergic neuronal terminal loss at striatum and, additionally, decreased motor deficits in mice challenged with MPTP. In contrast, there was no difference in astrogliosis between WT and DAT-p53KO mice in response to MPTP treatment. These findings demonstrate a specific contribution of p53 activation in DA neuronal cell death by MPTP challenge. Our results further support the role of programmed cell death mediated by p53 in this animal model of PD and identify Bax, BAD and PUMA genes as downstream targets of p53 in modulating DA neuronal death in the in vivo MPTP-induced PD model. We deleted p53 gene in dopaminergic neurons in late developmental stages and found that DA specific p53 deletion is protective in acute MPTP animal model possibly through blocking MPTP-induced BAX and PUMA up-regulation. Astrocyte activation measured by GFAP positive cells and GFAP gene up-regulation in the striatum shows no difference

  7. Dopaminergic neuron-specific deletion of p53 gene is neuroprotective in an experimental Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xin; Davis, Brandon; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Filichia, Emily; Barnett, Austin; Greig, Nigel H; Hoffer, Barry; Luo, Yu

    2016-09-01

    p53, a stress response gene, is involved in diverse cell death pathways and its activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether the neuronal p53 protein plays a direct role in regulating dopaminergic (DA) neuronal cell death is unknown. In this study, in contrast to the global inhibition of p53 function by pharmacological inhibitors and in traditional p53 knock-out (KO) mice, we examined the effect of DA specific p53 gene deletion in DAT-p53KO mice. These DAT-p53KO mice did not exhibit apparent changes in the general structure and neuronal density of DA neurons during late development and in aging. However, in DA-p53KO mice treated with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), we found that the induction of Bax and p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) mRNA and protein levels by MPTP were diminished in both striatum and substantia nigra of these mice. Notably, deletion of the p53 gene in DA neurons significantly reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss in substantia nigra, dopaminergic neuronal terminal loss at striatum and, additionally, decreased motor deficits in mice challenged with MPTP. In contrast, there was no difference in astrogliosis between WT and DAT-p53KO mice in response to MPTP treatment. These findings demonstrate a specific contribution of p53 activation in DA neuronal cell death by MPTP challenge. Our results further support the role of programmed cell death mediated by p53 in this animal model of PD and identify Bax, BAD and PUMA genes as downstream targets of p53 in modulating DA neuronal death in the in vivo MPTP-induced PD model. We deleted p53 gene in dopaminergic neurons in late developmental stages and found that DA specific p53 deletion is protective in acute MPTP animal model possibly through blocking MPTP-induced BAX and PUMA up-regulation. Astrocyte activation measured by GFAP positive cells and GFAP gene up-regulation in the striatum shows no difference

  8. Identification of single gene deletions at 15q13.3: further evidence that CHRNA7 causes the 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hoppman-Chaney, N; Wain, K; Seger, P R; Superneau, D W; Hodge, J C

    2013-04-01

    The 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome (OMIM #612001) is characterized by a wide range of phenotypic features, including intellectual disability, seizures, autism, and psychiatric conditions. This deletion is inherited in approximately 75% of cases and has been found in mildly affected and normal parents, consistent with variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. The common deletion is approximately 2 Mb and contains several genes; however, the gene(s) responsible for the resulting clinical features have not been clearly defined. Recently, four probands were reported with small deletions including only the CHRNA7 gene. These patients showed a wide range of phenotypic features similar to those associated with the larger 15q13.3 microdeletion. To further correlate genotype and phenotype, we queried our database of >15,000 patients tested in the Mayo Clinic Cytogenetics Laboratory from 2008 to 2011 and identified 19 individuals (10 probands and 9 family members) with isolated heterozygous CHRNA7 gene deletions. All but two infants displayed multiple features consistent with 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome. We also identified the first de novo deletion confined to CHRNA7 as well as the second known case with homozygous deletion of CHRNA7 only. These results provide further evidence implicating CHRNA7 as the gene responsible for the clinical findings associated with 15q13.3 microdeletion.

  9. RIII S/J (H-2r). An inbred mouse strain with a massive deletion of T cell receptor V beta genes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have identified an inbred strain of mouse, RIII S/J (H-2r), that has the largest known deletion of the TCR V beta genes by screening with mAb and TCR V beta specific probes. Upon screening of PBL with mAb F23.1, which is specific for V beta 8 TCR, RIII S/J was found to be negative. On further screening with mAb KJ 23a, which is specific for V beta 17a TCR, RIII S/J was completely negative. We next tested RIII S/J with mAb 44-22-1, which is specific for V beta 6 TCR, and found it also to be negative. The (B10 X RIII)F1 mice showed a 50% expression of V beta 6 gene, indicating a genomic rather than a clonal deletion. mAb KJ25, detecting V beta 3, was positive in RIII S/J, denoting the downstream boundary for the deletion. Southern blot analysis of liver DNA using TCR V beta-specific probes confirmed the deletion of V beta 8 gene subfamily and V beta 5 gene subfamily, along with V beta 9, V beta 11, V beta 12, and V beta 13 genes similar to the known TCR V beta deletion mutants (SWR, SJL, C57L, and C57Br). In addition, RIII S/J is missing V beta 6, V beta 15, and V beta 17 genes. Our mapping of the deletion indicates that RIII S/J has lost approximately 130 kb of V beta chromosome and with it 13 V beta genes out of the known 21 V beta genes of the TCR. The deletion is marked by the presence of V beta 10 gene upstream and V beta 3 gene downstream. PMID:2525171

  10. Targeted Deletion of Regions Rich in Immune-Evasive Genes from the Cytomegalovirus Genome as a Novel Vaccine Strategy▿

    PubMed Central

    Čičin-Šain, Luka; Bubić, Ivan; Schnee, Margit; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Mohr, Christian; Jonjić, Stipan; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2007-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ubiquitous human pathogen, is a leading cause of congenital infections and represents a serious health risk for the immunosuppressed patient. A vaccine against CMV is currently not available. CMV is characterized by its large genome and by multiple genes modulating the immunity of the host, which cluster predominantly at genome termini. Here, we tested whether the deletion of gene blocks rich in immunomodulatory genes could be used as a novel concept in the generation of immunogenic but avirulent, herpesvirus vaccines. To generate an experimental CMV vaccine, we selectively deleted 32 genes from the mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) genome. The resulting mutant grew to titers similar to that of wild-type MCMV in vitro. In vivo, the mutant was 10,000-fold attenuated and well tolerated, even by highly susceptible mice deficient for B, T, and NK cells or for the interferon type I receptor. Equally relevant for safety concerns, immune suppression did not lead to the mutant's reactivation from latency. Immunization with the replication-competent mutant, but not with inactivated virus, resulted in protective immunity, which increased over time. Vaccination induced MCMV-specific antibodies and a strong T-cell response. We propose that a targeted and rational approach can improve future herpesvirus vaccines and vaccine vectors. PMID:17913824

  11. Duplication of the DR3 gene on human chromosome 1p36 and its deletion in human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Grenet, J; Valentine, V; Kitson, J; Li, H; Farrow, S N; Kidd, V J

    1998-05-01

    The human DR3 gene, whose product is also known as Wsl-1/APO-3/TRAMP/LARD, encodes a tumor necrosis factor-related receptor that is expressed primarily on the surface of thymocytes and lymphocytes. DR3 is capable of inducing both NF-kappa B activation and apoptosis when overexpressed in mammalian cells, although its ligand has not yet been identified. We report here that the DR3 gene locus is tandemly duplicated on human chromosome band 1p36.2-p36.3 and that these genes are hemizygously deleted and/or translocated to another chromosome in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines with amplified MYCN. Duplication of at least a portion of the DR3 gene, including the extracellular and transmembrane regions but not the cytoplasmic domain, was demonstrated by both fluorescence in situ hybridization and genomic Southern blotting. In most NB cell lines, both the DR3 and the DR3L sequences are simultaneously deleted and/or translocated to another chromosome. Finally, DR3/ Wsl-1 protein expression is quite variable among these NB cell lines, with very low or undetectable levels in 7 of 17 NB cell lines.

  12. Intronic deletions of tva receptor gene decrease the susceptibility to infection by avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiguo; Liu, Yang; Li, Hongxing; Chang, Shuang; Shu, Dingming; Zhang, Huanmin; Chen, Feng; Xie, Qingmei

    2015-01-01

    The group of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) in chickens contains six highly related subgroups, A to E and J. Four genetic loci, tva, tvb, tvc and tvj, encode for corresponding receptors that determine the susceptibility to the ASLV subgroups. The prevalence of ASLV in hosts may have imposed strong selection pressure toward resistance to ASLV infection, and the resistant alleles in all four receptor genes have been identified. In this study, two new alleles of the tva receptor gene, tvar5 and tvar6, with similar intronic deletions were identified in Chinese commercial broilers. These natural mutations delete the deduced branch point signal within the first intron, disrupting mRNA splicing of the tva receptor gene and leading to the retention of intron 1 and introduction of premature TGA stop codons in both the longer and shorter tva isoforms. As a result, decreased susceptibility to subgroup A ASLV in vitro and in vivo was observed in the subsequent analysis. In addition, we identified two groups of heterozygous allele pairs which exhibited quantitative differences in host susceptibility to ASLV-A. This study demonstrated that defective splicing of the tva receptor gene can confer genetic resistance to ASLV subgroup A in the host. PMID:25873518

  13. Acheiropodia is caused by a genomic deletion in C7orf2, the human orthologue of the Lmbr1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ianakiev, P; van Baren MJ; Daly, M J; Toledo, S P; Cavalcanti, M G; Neto, J C; Silveira, E L; Freire-Maia, A; Heutink, P; Kilpatrick, M W; Tsipouras, P

    2001-01-01

    Acheiropodia is an autosomal recessive developmental disorder presenting with bilateral congenital amputations of the upper and lower extremities and aplasia of the hands and feet. This severely handicapping condition appears to affect only the extremities, with no other systemic manifestations reported. Recently, a locus for acheiropodia was mapped on chromosome 7q36. Herein we report the narrowing of the critical region for the acheiropodia gene and the subsequent identification of a common mutation in C7orf2-the human orthologue of the mouse Lmbr1 gene-that is responsible for the disease. Analysis of five families with acheiropodia, by means of 15 polymorphic markers, narrowed the critical region to 1.3 cM, on the basis of identity by descent, and to <0.5 Mb, on the basis of physical mapping. Analysis of C7orf2, the human orthologue of the mouse Lmbr1 gene, identified a deletion in all five families, thus identifying a common acheiropodia mutation. The deletion was identified at both the genomic-DNA and mRNA level. It leads to the production of a C7orf2 transcript lacking exon 4 and introduces a premature stop codon downstream of exon 3. Given the nature of the acheiropodia phenotype, it appears likely that the Lmbr1 gene plays an important role in limb development.

  14. Discovery of genes involved in mitosis, cell division, cell wall integrity and chromosome segregation through construction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion strains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Song; Beckley, Janel R; Ren, Liping; Feoktistova, Anna; Jensen, Michael A; Rhind, Nicholas; Gould, Kathleen L

    2016-09-01

    The fission yeast model system Schizosaccharomyces pombe is used to study fundamental biological processes. To continue to fill gaps in the Sz. pombe gene deletion collection, we constructed a set of 90 haploid gene deletion strains covering many previously uncharacterized genes. To begin to understand the function of these genes, we exposed this collection of strains to a battery of stress conditions. Using this information in combination with microscopy, proteomics and mini-chromosome loss assays, we identified genes involved in cell wall integrity, cytokinesis, chromosome segregation and DNA metabolism. This subset of non-essential gene deletions will add to the toolkits available for the study of biological processes in Sz. pombe. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Factor IXMadrid 2: a deletion/insertion in factor IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site.

    PubMed

    Solera, J; Magallón, M; Martin-Villar, J; Coloma, A

    1992-02-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5' end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3' end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been replaced by a 47-bp sequence from the normal factor IX gene, although this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment.

  16. Factor IXMadrid 2: a deletion/insertion in factor IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site.

    PubMed Central

    Solera, J; Magallón, M; Martin-Villar, J; Coloma, A

    1992-01-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5' end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3' end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been replaced by a 47-bp sequence from the normal factor IX gene, although this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment. Images Figure 1 PMID:1346483

  17. Deletions in the repeating sequences of the toxin A gene of toxin A-negative, toxin B-positive Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Kato, H; Kato, N; Katow, S; Maegawa, T; Nakamura, S; Lyerly, D M

    1999-06-15

    The repeating sequences of the toxin A gene from toxin A-negative, toxin B-positive (toxin A-, toxin B+) strains of Clostridium difficile which were isolated in geographically separated facilities in Japan and Indonesia were determined. All six strains tested had identical repeating sequences with two deletions (1548 and 273 nucleotides in size) in the toxin A gene. A PCR method was designed to detect the deletions and the deletions were confirmed in all 50 toxin A-, toxin B+ strains examined by this method. Western immunoblot analysis revealed that polyclonal antiserum against native toxin A did not react with the concentrated culture filtrates of the toxin A-, toxin B+ strains. These results may suggest that toxin A-, toxin B+ strains have deletions of the two thirds of the repeating regions of the toxin A gene, which encodes the epitopes fully responsible for the reaction with the polyclonal antiserum.

  18. An insertion/deletion TEX28 polymorphism and its application to analysis of red/green visual pigment gene arrays.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Hisao; Torii, Ryuzo; Tanabe, Shoko; Oda, Sanae; Yamade, Shinichi

    2004-01-01

    TEX28 gene (fTEX) is present immediately downstream of the red/green visual pigment gene array on the human X chromosome. Its pseudogene (pTEX) that lacks exon 1 is present within the array between pigment genes. We found that both fTEX and pTEX genes had a 697 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in their introns 3. In color-normal male subjects, the frequency of the 697 bp region was 43% (40/94) in pTEX and 97% (91/94) in fTEX in the array of Red-pTEX-Green-fTEX and 10% (9/94) in pTEX and 87% (41/47) in fTEX in the array of Red-pTEX-Green-pTEX-Green-fTEX. These results suggest that normal arrays with multiple green genes may have arisen through gene duplication rather than unequal homologous crossover. In color-vision-deficient male subjects with a single-gene array, the frequency of the 697 bp region was 83% (25/30) in the array of Green-fTEX and 66% (74/112) in the array of Red-fTEX. In color-vision-deficient male subjects with a 2-gene array, the frequency of the region was 44% (16/36) in pTEX and 97% (35/36) in fTEX in the array of Green-pTEX-Green-fTEX and 75% (18/24) in pTEX and 92% (22/24) in fTEX in the array of Red-pTEX-Red-fTEX. These results suggest that 2-green-gene arrays have arisen through unequal homologous crossover between a normal 2-gene array and a single-green-gene array. With data from a long-range PCR method using the insertion/deletion polymorphism, we proposed a structure of the second gene of 3-gene arrays, Green-pTEX-Green-pTEX-Green-fTEX and Red-pTEX-Red-pTEX-Red-fTEX, in color-vision-deficient subjects. PMID:15378397

  19. Novel deletion of the E3A ubiquitin protein ligase gene detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in a patient with Angelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Calì, Francesco; Ragalmuto, Alda; Chiavetta, Valeria; Calabrese, Giuseppe; Fichera, Marco; Vinci, Mirella; Ruggeri, Giuseppa; Schinocca, Pietro; Sturnio, Maurizio; Romano, Salvatore; Elia, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurobehavioural disorder caused by failure of expression of the maternal copy of the imprinted domain located on 15q11-q13. There are different mechanisms leading to AS: maternal microdeletion, uniparental disomy, defects in a putative imprinting centre, mutations of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (UBE3A) gene. However, some of suspected cases of AS are still scored negative to all the latter mutations. Recently, it has been shown that a proportion of negative cases bear large deletions overlapping one or more exons of the UBE3A gene. These deletions are difficult to detect by conventional gene-scanning methods due to the masking effect by the non-deleted allele. In this study, we have used for the first time multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and comparative multiplex dosage analysis (CMDA) to search for large deletions affecting the UBE3A gene. Using this approach, we identified a novel causative deletion involving exon 8 in an affected sibling. Based on our results, we propose the use of MLPA as a fast, accurate and inexpensive test to detect large deletions in the UBE3A gene in a small but significant percentage of AS patients. PMID:21072004

  20. Smaller and larger deletions of the Williams Beuren syndrome region implicate genes involved in mild facial phenotype, epilepsy and autistic traits

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Carmela; Micale, Lucia; Augello, Bartolomeo; Teresa Pellico, Maria; Menghini, Deny; Alfieri, Paolo; Cristina Digilio, Maria; Mandriani, Barbara; Carella, Massimo; Palumbo, Orazio; Vicari, Stefano; Merla, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Williams Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a multisystemic disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion of 1.5 Mb on chromosome 7q11.23 spanning 28 genes. A few patients with larger and smaller WBS deletion have been reported. They show clinical features that vary between isolated SVAS to the full spectrum of WBS phenotype, associated with epilepsy or autism spectrum behavior. Here we describe four patients with atypical WBS 7q11.23 deletions. Two carry ∼3.5 Mb larger deletion towards the telomere that includes Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxigenase activation protein gamma (YWHAG) genes. Other two carry a shorter deletion of ∼1.2 Mb at centromeric side that excludes the distal WBS genes BAZ1B and FZD9. Along with previously reported cases, genotype–phenotype correlation in the patients described here further suggests that haploinsufficiency of HIP1 and YWHAG might cause the severe neurological and neuropsychological deficits including epilepsy and autistic traits, and that the preservation of BAZ1B and FZD9 genes may be related to mild facial features and moderate neuropsychological deficits. This report highlights the importance to characterize additional patients with 7q11.23 atypical deletions comparing neuropsychological and clinical features between these individuals to shed light on the pathogenic role of genes within and flanking the WBS region. PMID:23756441

  1. Smaller and larger deletions of the Williams Beuren syndrome region implicate genes involved in mild facial phenotype, epilepsy and autistic traits.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Carmela; Micale, Lucia; Augello, Bartolomeo; Teresa Pellico, Maria; Menghini, Deny; Alfieri, Paolo; Cristina Digilio, Maria; Mandriani, Barbara; Carella, Massimo; Palumbo, Orazio; Vicari, Stefano; Merla, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Williams Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a multisystemic disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion of 1.5 Mb on chromosome 7q11.23 spanning 28 genes. A few patients with larger and smaller WBS deletion have been reported. They show clinical features that vary between isolated SVAS to the full spectrum of WBS phenotype, associated with epilepsy or autism spectrum behavior. Here we describe four patients with atypical WBS 7q11.23 deletions. Two carry ~3.5 Mb larger deletion towards the telomere that includes Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxigenase activation protein gamma (YWHAG) genes. Other two carry a shorter deletion of ~1.2 Mb at centromeric side that excludes the distal WBS genes BAZ1B and FZD9. Along with previously reported cases, genotype-phenotype correlation in the patients described here further suggests that haploinsufficiency of HIP1 and YWHAG might cause the severe neurological and neuropsychological deficits including epilepsy and autistic traits, and that the preservation of BAZ1B and FZD9 genes may be related to mild facial features and moderate neuropsychological deficits. This report highlights the importance to characterize additional patients with 7q11.23 atypical deletions comparing neuropsychological and clinical features between these individuals to shed light on the pathogenic role of genes within and flanking the WBS region.

  2. Mouse otocyst transuterine gene transfer restores hearing in mice with connexin 30 deletion-associated hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Toru; Minoda, Ryosei; Ise, Momoko; Yamada, Takao; Yumoto, Eiji

    2013-06-01

    Although numerous causative genes for hereditary hearing loss have been identified, there are no fundamental treatments for this condition. Herein, we describe a novel potential treatment for genetic hearing loss. Because mutations or deletions in the connexin (Cx) genes are common causes of profound congenital hearing loss in both humans and mice, we investigated whether gene supplementation therapy using the wild-type Cx gene could cure hearing loss. We first generated inner ear-specific connexin 30 (Cx30)-deficient mice via the transuterine transfer of Cx30-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA-Cx30) into otocysts. The inner ear-specific Cx30-deficient mice mimicked homozygous Cx30-deficient mice both histologically and physiologically. Subsequently, we cotransfected the shRNA-Cx30 and the wild-type Cx30 gene. The cotransfected mice exhibited Cx30 expression in the cochleae and displayed normal auditory functions. Next, we performed the transuterine transfer of the wild-type Cx30 gene into the otocysts of homozygous Cx30-deficient mice, thereby rescuing the lack of Cx30 expression in the cochleae and restoring auditory functioning. These results demonstrate that supplementation therapy with wild-type genes can restore postnatal auditory functioning. Moreover, this is the first report to show that Cx-related genetic hearing loss is treatable by in vivo gene therapy.

  3. Radiation-induced total-deletion mutations in the human hprt gene: a biophysical model based on random walk interphase chromatin geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Sachs, R. K.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a biophysical model that explains the sizes of radiation-induced hprt deletions. METHODS: Key assumptions: (1) Deletions are produced by two DSB that are closer than an interaction distance at the time of DSB induction; (2) Interphase chromatin is modelled by a biphasic random walk distribution; and (3) Misrejoining of DSB from two separate tracks dominates at low-LET and misrejoining of DSB from a single track dominates at high-LET. RESULTS: The size spectra for radiation-induced total deletions of the hprt gene are calculated. Comparing with the results of Yamada and coworkers for gamma-irradiated human fibroblasts the study finds that an interaction distance of 0.75 microm will fit both the absolute frequency and the size spectrum of the total deletions. It is also shown that high-LET radiations produce, relatively, more total deletions of sizes below 0.5 Mb. The model predicts an essential gene to be located between 2 and 3 Mb from the hprt locus towards the centromere. Using the same assumptions and parameters as for evaluating mutation frequencies, a frequency of intra-arm chromosome deletions is calculated that is in agreement with experimental data. CONCLUSIONS: Radiation-induced total-deletion mutations of the human hprt gene and intrachange chromosome aberrations share a common mechanism for their induction.

  4. Mechanistic Evaluation for Mixed-field Agglutination in the K562 Cell Study Model with Exon 3 Deletion of A1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Ping; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Lin, Chi-Jui; Wang, Wei-Ting; Sun, Chien-Feng

    2015-01-01

    In the case of blood type B3 with typical mixed-field agglutination of RBCs in the presence of anti-B or anti-AB antibody, a number of genetic alternations have been reported. It is well known that the IVS3+5G→A mutation in the B gene destroys the consensus of the splice donor site leading to exon 3 skipping during mRNA splicing. The lack of exon 3 likely causes a short stem region, producing an unstable B3 protein, and is concomitant with a decrease in B3 protein expression. Whether the phenomenon also appears in the type A blood group is of question. In this study, we evaluate whether exon 3 deletion in the blood type A gene also results in mixed-field phenotype. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate cDNA encoding A1 gene with exon 3 deletion. The cDNA was stably expressed in K562 cells. The expression of A antigen was compared with expression in parental K562 cells that did not express A antigen and in the stable K562 cell line expressing A(1) cDNA by flow cytometry analyses. The expression of A antigen in A1 stable cells and parental K562 cells was set as 100% and 0%, respectively. The mean relative percentage of A antigen expression for the cells of A1 with exon 3 deletion was 59.9% of A1 stable cells. Consistent with the observations of B3, which is B gene with exon 3 deletion, mixed field agglutination was observed for the cells expressing A1 with exon 3 deletion. Exon 3 deletion results in mixed field phenotype in both type A and B RBCs. However, the degree of antigen expression change for exon 3 deletion in A gene was less severe when compared with the deletion occurred in B gene. PMID:26663798

  5. A 66-bp deletion in growth hormone releasing hormone gene 5'-flanking region with largemouth bass recessive embryonic lethal.

    PubMed

    Ma, D M; Han, L Q; Bai, J J; Li, S J; Fan, J J; Yu, L Y; Quan, Y C

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) regulates the secretion of growth hormone (GH) in the pituitary gland. A 66-bp deletion (c.-923_-858del) was detected in the 5'-flanking sequence of the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) GHRH gene. In two cultured random populations of adult individuals (A: n = 170 and B: n = 150), the genotype ratios of +/+:+/- were 2.5:1 and 2.8:1 respectively. Only one -/- fish was detected. A Largemouth bass family was constructed with two heterozygous individuals (+/-) as parents. The genotype ratio of +/+:+/-:-/- in the filial generation embryos was 1:1.6:0.1 at the neurula and 1:2:0 at hatched larvae stages. This indicated that the 66-bp deletion was a recessive lethal site and that homozygous individuals (-/-) died off in embryonic development. The growth traits (body weight, body length and body depth) were measured, and the GHRH mRNA expression levels in brain tissue were detected using real-time PCR. The effects of genotype (+/-) on growth traits and GHRH mRNA expression were not significant. Although the cause of death was not clear, the results hint that the 66-bp deletion site in GHRH 5'-flanking sequence significantly affects the livability in largemouth bass embryonic development. PMID:24697798

  6. A 66-bp deletion in growth hormone releasing hormone gene 5'-flanking region with largemouth bass recessive embryonic lethal.

    PubMed

    Ma, D M; Han, L Q; Bai, J J; Li, S J; Fan, J J; Yu, L Y; Quan, Y C

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) regulates the secretion of growth hormone (GH) in the pituitary gland. A 66-bp deletion (c.-923_-858del) was detected in the 5'-flanking sequence of the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) GHRH gene. In two cultured random populations of adult individuals (A: n = 170 and B: n = 150), the genotype ratios of +/+:+/- were 2.5:1 and 2.8:1 respectively. Only one -/- fish was detected. A Largemouth bass family was constructed with two heterozygous individuals (+/-) as parents. The genotype ratio of +/+:+/-:-/- in the filial generation embryos was 1:1.6:0.1 at the neurula and 1:2:0 at hatched larvae stages. This indicated that the 66-bp deletion was a recessive lethal site and that homozygous individuals (-/-) died off in embryonic development. The growth traits (body weight, body length and body depth) were measured, and the GHRH mRNA expression levels in brain tissue were detected using real-time PCR. The effects of genotype (+/-) on growth traits and GHRH mRNA expression were not significant. Although the cause of death was not clear, the results hint that the 66-bp deletion site in GHRH 5'-flanking sequence significantly affects the livability in largemouth bass embryonic development.

  7. Deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARO8 gene, encoding an aromatic amino acid transaminase, enhances phenylethanol production from glucose.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Liti, Gianni; Louis, Edward J; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Phenylethanol has a characteristic rose-like aroma that makes it a popular ingredient in foods, beverages and cosmetics. Microbial production of phenylethanol currently relies on whole-cell bioconversion of phenylalanine with yeasts that harbour an Ehrlich pathway for phenylalanine catabolism. Complete biosynthesis of phenylethanol from a cheap carbon source, such as glucose, provides an economically attractive alternative for phenylalanine bioconversion. In this study, synthetic genetic array (SGA) screening was applied to identify genes involved in regulation of phenylethanol synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen focused on transcriptional regulation of ARO10, which encodes the major decarboxylase involved in conversion of phenylpyruvate to phenylethanol. A deletion in ARO8, which encodes an aromatic amino acid transaminase, was found to underlie the transcriptional upregulation of ARO10 during growth, with ammonium sulphate as the sole nitrogen source. Physiological characterization revealed that the aro8Δ mutation led to substantial changes in the absolute and relative intracellular concentrations of amino acids. Moreover, deletion of ARO8 led to de novo production of phenylethanol during growth on a glucose synthetic medium with ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. The aro8Δ mutation also stimulated phenylethanol production when combined with other, previously documented, mutations that deregulate aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. The resulting engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced >3 mm phenylethanol from glucose during growth on a simple synthetic medium. The strong impact of a transaminase deletion on intracellular amino acid concentrations opens new possibilities for yeast-based production of amino acid-derived products.

  8. Double gene deletion reveals the lack of cooperation between PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta} in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Bedu, E.; Desplanches, D.; Pequignot, J.; Bordier, B.; Desvergne, B. . E-mail: beatrice.desvergne@unil.ch

    2007-06-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are involved in the regulation of most of the pathways linked to lipid metabolism. PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta} isotypes are known to regulate muscle fatty acid oxidation and a reciprocal compensation of their function has been proposed. Herein, we investigated muscle contractile and metabolic phenotypes in PPAR{alpha}-/-, PPAR{beta}-/-, and double PPAR{alpha}-/- {beta}-/- mice. Heart and soleus muscle analyses show that the deletion of PPAR{alpha} induces a decrease of the HAD activity ({beta}-oxidation) while soleus contractile phenotype remains unchanged. A PPAR{beta} deletion alone has no effect. However, these mild phenotypes are not due to a reciprocal compensation of PPAR{beta} and PPAR{alpha} functions since double gene deletion PPAR{alpha}-PPAR{beta} mostly reproduces the null PPAR{alpha}-mediated reduced {beta}-oxidation, in addition to a shift from fast to slow fibers. In conclusion, PPAR{beta} is not required for maintaining skeletal muscle metabolic activity and does not compensate the lack of PPAR{alpha} in PPAR{alpha} null mice.

  9. Tph2 gene deletion enhances amphetamine-induced hypermotility: effect of 5-HT restoration and role of striatal noradrenaline release.

    PubMed

    Carli, Mirjana; Kostoula, Chrysaugi; Sacchetti, Giuseppina; Mainolfi, Pierangela; Anastasia, Alessia; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William

    2015-11-01

    Variants of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), the gene encoding enzyme responsible for the synthesis of brain serotonin (5-HT), have been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, substance abuse and addiction. This study assessed the effect of Tph2 gene deletion on motor behavior and found that motor activity induced by 2.5 and 5 mg/kg amphetamine was enhanced in Tph2(-/-) mice. Using the in vivo microdialysis technique we found that the ability of amphetamine to stimulate noradrenaline (NA) release in the striatum was reduced by about 50% in Tph2(-/-) mice while the release of dopamine (DA) was not affected. Tph2 deletion did not affect the release of NA and DA in the prefrontal cortex. The role of endogenous 5-HT in enhancing the effect of amphetamine was confirmed showing that treatment with the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (10 mg/kg) restored tissue and extracellular levels of brain 5-HT and the effects of amphetamine on striatal NA release and motor activity in Tph2(-/-) mice. Treatment with the NA precursor dihydroxyphenylserine (400 mg/kg) was sufficient to restore the effect of amphetamine on striatal NA release and motor activity in Tph2(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that amphetamine-induced hyperactivity is attenuated by endogenous 5-HT through the inhibition of striatal NA release. Tph2(-/-) mice may be a useful preclinical model to assess the role of 5-HT-dependent mechanisms in the action of psychostimulants. Acute sensitivity to the motor effects of amphetamine has been associated to increased risk of psychostimulant abuse. Here, we show that deletion of Tph2, the gene responsible for brain 5-HT synthesis, enhances the motor effect of amphetamine in mice through the inhibition of striatal NA release. This suggests that Tph2(-/-) mice is a useful preclinical model to assess the role of 5-HT-dependent mechanisms in psychostimulants action. Tph2, tryptophan hydroxylase-2.

  10. Analysis of p16 gene mutation, deletion and methylation in patients with arseniasis produced by indoor unventilated-stove coal usage in Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Hua; Bin, Hai-Hua; Pan, Xue-Li; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine p16 gene mutation, deletion, and promoter 5' CpG island hypermethylation in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocyte of patients with arseniasis as attributed to exposure to indoor unventilated coal stove. The role of the aberrant change of p16 gene in the induction and development of carcinogenesis in endemic arsenisiasis region in China was also examined. Polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), multiplex PCR (mPCR), methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and sequencing techniques were performed to detect (1) mutation of the p16 gene exon 2, (2) homozygous deletion of the p16 gene exon 1 and exon 2, and (3) hypermethylation of the promoter CpG island in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocyte of patients with arseniasis. Results showed no mutation was found in exon 2 of p16 gene. The homozygous deletion frequency of p16 gene was 5 and 15% in control and arseniasis patients, respectively. The homozygous deletion occurred mainly in exon 2, with significant deletion frequencies of 9, 13, and 20% in mild, intermediate, and severe arseniasis groups. The significant homozygous deletion frequency was 9 and 39% in noncarcinoma and carcinoma individuals. The positive rate of p16 gene promoter CpG island hyermethylation was 42 and 2% in the exposed group and the control group, respectively. The positive rate was 26, 42, and 50% in mild, intermediate, and severe arseniasis. The marked different positive rate was 22 and 56% in noncarcinoma and carcinoma individuals, respectively. In conclusion, homozygous deletion and hypermethylation of p16 gene may play an important role in the initiation and development of manifestations seen in endemic arseniasis including carcinogenesis.

  11. Neutrophil-specific deletion of the CARD9 gene expression regulator suppresses autoantibody-induced inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Tamás; Futosi, Krisztina; Sitaru, Cassian; Ruland, Jürgen; Mócsai, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are terminally differentiated cells with limited transcriptional activity. The biological function of their gene expression changes is poorly understood. CARD9 regulates transcription during antifungal immunity but its role in sterile inflammation is unclear. Here we show that neutrophil CARD9 mediates pro-inflammatory chemokine/cytokine but not lipid mediator release during non-infectious inflammation. Genetic deficiency of CARD9 suppresses autoantibody-induced arthritis and dermatitis in mice. Neutrophil-specific deletion of CARD9 is sufficient to induce that phenotype. Card9−/− neutrophils show defective immune complex-induced gene expression changes and pro-inflammatory chemokine/cytokine release but normal LTB4 production and other short-term responses. In vivo deletion of CARD9 reduces tissue levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines but not LTB4. The CARD9-mediated signalling pathway involves Src-family kinases, Syk, PLCγ2, Bcl10/Malt1 and NFκB. Collectively, CARD9-mediated gene expression changes within neutrophils play important roles during non-infectious inflammation in vivo and CARD9 acts as a divergence point between chemokine/cytokine and lipid mediator release. PMID:27032818

  12. Deletion of the thymidine kinase gene induces complete attenuation of the Georgia isolate of African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Sanford, B; Holinka, L G; O'Donnell, V; Krug, P W; Carlson, J; Alfano, M; Carrillo, C; Wu, Ping; Lowe, Andre; Risatti, G R; Gladue, D P; Borca, M V

    2016-02-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal viral disease of domestic pigs. There are no vaccines to control Africa swine fever (ASF). Experimental vaccines have been developed using genetically modified live attenuated ASFVs obtained by specifically deleting virus genes involved in virulence, including the thymidine kinase (TK) gene. TK has been shown to be involved in the virulence of several viruses, including ASFV. Here we report the construction of a recombinant virus (ASFV-G/V-ΔTK) obtained by deleting the TK gene in a virulent strain of ASFV Georgia adapted to replicate in Vero cells (ASFV-G/VP30). ASFV-G/P-ΔTK demonstrated decreased replication both in primary swine macrophage cell cultures and in Vero cells compared with ASFV-G/VP30. In vivo, intramuscular administration of up to 10(6) TCID50 of ASFV-G/V-ΔTK does not result in ASF disease. However, these animals are not protected when challenged with the virulent parental Georgia strain.

  13. Properties of a herpes simplex virus multiple immediate-early gene-deleted recombinant as a vaccine vector

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Brockman, Mark A.; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Mathews, Lydia; Lucas, William T.; Murphy, Cynthia G.; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Deluca, Neal A.; Knipe, David M. . E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2007-01-20

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) recombinants induce durable immune responses in rhesus macaques and mice and have induced partial protection in rhesus macaques against mucosal challenge with virulent simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). In this study, we evaluated the properties of a new generation HSV vaccine vector, an HSV-1 multiple immediate-early (IE) gene deletion mutant virus, d106, which contains deletions in the ICP4, ICP27, ICP22, and ICP47 genes. Because several of the HSV IE genes have been implicated in immune evasion, inactivation of the genes encoding these proteins was expected to result in enhanced immunogenicity. The d106 virus expresses few HSV gene products and shows minimal cytopathic effect in cultured cells. When d106 was inoculated into mice, viral DNA accumulated at high levels in draining lymph nodes, consistent with an ability to transduce dendritic cells and activate their maturation and movement to lymph nodes. A d106 recombinant expressing Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase induced durable {beta}-gal-specific IgG and CD8{sup +} T cell responses in naive and HSV-immune mice. Finally, d106-based recombinants have been constructed that express simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag, env, or a rev-tat-nef fusion protein for several days in cultured cells. Thus, d106 shows many of the properties desirable in a vaccine vector: limited expression of HSV gene products and cytopathogenicity, high level expression of transgenes, ability to induce durable immune responses, and an ability to transduce dendritic cells and induce their maturation and migration to lymph nodes.

  14. The synergy of tobacco and alcohol and glutathione S-transferase θ 1 gene deletion and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    D’ Mello, Sarah; Bavle, Radhika Manoj; Paremala, K; Makarla, Soumya; Sudhakara, M; Bhatt, Madhura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the leading cancer among males in India. It is related to tobacco habits and alcohol consumption as well as the individual susceptibility for xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme polymorphisms. Glutathione S-transferase θ 1 (GSTT1) is a Phase II metabolic enzyme which is directly involved in catalyzing chemicals to mutagenic intermediates. This gene is characterized by genetic polymorphism resulting in complete gene deletion and subsequent absence of the enzyme, which ultimately dictates the risk of cancer development. Scraping buccal mucosa to obtain DNA from the cells is a simple, readily acceptable and rapid method to detect and assess the gene. Aim: To assess GSTT1 gene deletion in individuals giving a history of tobacco smoking and/or chewing and alcohol consumption and absence of clinically detectable lesions; and in OSCC cases to gauge if GSTT1 gene deletion confers protection to an individual and whether it can be used as a “single” marker to arrive at this conclusion. To validate the use of buccal scrape for determining the genotype of an individual by assessing the polymorphism at GSTT1 gene locus (22q11.2). Materials and Methods: Fifty-two cases were evaluated using buccal mucosal scrapes of tobacco habituates for 8 or more years, without clinically evident lesion (Group I) and from mucosa of tobacco habituates with clinically evident and histopathologically confirmed OSCC (Group II). DNA extraction and genotype at GSTT1 gene locus was determined by polymerase chain reaction assay. Statistical Analysis: The results were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: 90.66% of subjects had GSTT1 null genotype in Group I subjects. In Group II, subjects with both clinically and histopathologically diagnosed oral cancer, about 76.96% had GSTT1 null genotype. Conclusion: GSTT1 null genotype confers protection to individuals with tobacco habits and alcohol consumption, predominantly to those who used

  15. De Novo 13q13.3-21.31 deletion involving RB1 gene in a patient with hemangioendothelioma of the liver

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 13 (13q) are related with variable phenotypes, according to the size and the location of the deleted region. The main clinical features are moderate/severe mental and growth retardation, cranio-facial dysmorphism, variable congenital defects and increased susceptibility to tumors. Here we report a 3-year-old girl carrying a de novo 13q13.3-21.32 interstitial deletion. She showed developmental delay, growth retardation and mild dysmorphism including curly hair, high forehead, short nose, thin upper lip and long philtrum. An abnormal mass was surgically removed from her liver resulting in a hemangioendothelioma. Array analysis allowed us to define a deleted region of about 27.87 Mb, which includes the RB1 gene. This is the first report of a 13q deletion associated with infantile hemangioendothelioma of the liver. PMID:24433316

  16. CNS-restricted Transduction and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Deletion with an Engineered AAV Vector.

    PubMed

    Murlidharan, Giridhar; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Rao, Lavanya; Corriher, Travis; Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping; Sullivan, Patrick; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is emerging as a promising approach to treat central nervous system disorders such as Spinal muscular atrophy, Batten, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease amongst others. A critical remaining challenge for central nervous system-targeted gene therapy, silencing or gene editing is to limit potential vector dose-related toxicity in off-target cells and organs. Here, we characterize a lab-derived AAV chimeric (AAV2g9), which displays favorable central nervous system attributes derived from both parental counterparts, AAV2 and AAV9. This synthetic AAV strain displays preferential, robust, and widespread neuronal transduction within the brain and decreased glial tropism. Importantly, we observed minimal systemic leakage, decreased sequestration and gene transfer in off-target organs with AAV2g9, when administered into the cerebrospinal fluid. A single intracranial injection of AAV2g9 vectors encoding guide RNAs targeting the schizophrenia risk gene MIR137 (encoding MIR137) in CRISPR/Cas9 knockin mice resulted in brain-specific gene deletion with no detectable events in the liver. This engineered AAV vector is a promising platform for treating neurological disorders through gene therapy, silencing or editing modalities. PMID:27434683

  17. Sequencing of rhesus macaque Y chromosome clarifies origins and evolution of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) genes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jennifer F; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2012-12-01

    Studies of Y chromosome evolution often emphasize gene loss, but this loss has been counterbalanced by addition of new genes. The DAZ genes, which are critical to human spermatogenesis, were acquired by the Y chromosome in the ancestor of Old World monkeys and apes. We and our colleagues recently sequenced the rhesus macaque Y chromosome, and comparison of this sequence to human and chimpanzee enables us to reconstruct much of the evolutionary history of DAZ. We report that DAZ arrived on the Y chromosome about 38 million years ago via the transposition of at least 1.1 megabases of autosomal DNA. This transposition also brought five additional genes to the Y chromosome, but all five genes were subsequently lost through mutation or deletion. As the only surviving gene, DAZ experienced extensive restructuring, including intragenic amplification and gene duplication, and has been the target of positive selection in the chimpanzee lineage. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays Should Y stay or should Y go: The evolution of non-recombining sex chromosomes Abstract. PMID:23055411

  18. Deletions involving genes WHSC1 and LETM1 may be necessary, but are not sufficient to cause Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Erica F; Carey, John C; Earl, Dawn L; Corzo, Deyanira; Suttie, Michael; Hammond, Peter; South, Sarah T

    2014-04-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a complex genetic disorder caused by the loss of genomic material from the short arm of chromosome 4. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies indicated that the loss of genes within 4p16.3 is necessary for expression of the core features of the phenotype. Within this region, haploinsufficiency of the genes WHSC1 and LETM1 is thought to be a major contributor to the pathogenesis of WHS. We present clinical findings for three patients with relatively small (<400 kb) de novo interstitial deletions that overlap WHSC1 and LETM1. 3D facial analysis was performed for two of these patients. Based on our findings, we propose that hemizygosity of WHSC1 and LETM1 is associated with a clinical phenotype characterized by growth deficiency, feeding difficulties, and motor and speech delays. The deletion of additional genes nearby WHSC1 and LETM1 does not result in a marked increase in the severity of clinical features, arguing against their haploinsufficiency. The absence of seizures and typical WHS craniofacial findings in our cohort suggest that deletion of distinct or additional 4p16.3 genes is necessary for expression of these features. Altogether, these results show that although loss-of-function for WHSC1 and/or LETM1 contributes to some of the features of WHS, deletion of additional genes is required for the full expression of the phenotype, providing further support that WHS is a contiguous gene deletion disorder.

  19. Deletions involving genes WHSC1 and LETM1 may be necessary, but are not sufficient to cause Wolf–Hirschhorn Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Erica F; Carey, John C; Earl, Dawn L; Corzo, Deyanira; Suttie, Michael; Hammond, Peter; South, Sarah T

    2014-01-01

    Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a complex genetic disorder caused by the loss of genomic material from the short arm of chromosome 4. Genotype–phenotype correlation studies indicated that the loss of genes within 4p16.3 is necessary for expression of the core features of the phenotype. Within this region, haploinsufficiency of the genes WHSC1 and LETM1 is thought to be a major contributor to the pathogenesis of WHS. We present clinical findings for three patients with relatively small (<400 kb) de novo interstitial deletions that overlap WHSC1 and LETM1. 3D facial analysis was performed for two of these patients. Based on our findings, we propose that hemizygosity of WHSC1 and LETM1 is associated with a clinical phenotype characterized by growth deficiency, feeding difficulties, and motor and speech delays. The deletion of additional genes nearby WHSC1 and LETM1 does not result in a marked increase in the severity of clinical features, arguing against their haploinsufficiency. The absence of seizures and typical WHS craniofacial findings in our cohort suggest that deletion of distinct or additional 4p16.3 genes is necessary for expression of these features. Altogether, these results show that although loss-of-function for WHSC1 and/or LETM1 contributes to some of the features of WHS, deletion of additional genes is required for the full expression of the phenotype, providing further support that WHS is a contiguous gene deletion disorder. PMID:23963300

  20. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of psbB, the gene encoding CP47, employing a deletion mutant strain of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Eaton-Rye, J J; Vermaas, W F

    1991-12-01

    A mutant strain of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC (Pasteur Culture Collection) 6803 has been developed in which psbB, the gene coding for the chlorophyl alpha-binding protein CP47 in Photosystem II (PSII), has been deleted. This deletion mutant can be used for the reintroduction of modified psbB into the cyanobacterium. To study the role of a large hydrophilic region in CP47, presumably located on the lumenal side of the thylakoid membrane between the fifth and sixth membrane-spanning regions, specific deletions have been introduced in psbB coding for regions within this domain. One psbB mutation leads to deletion of Gly-351 to Thr-365 in CP47, another psbB mutation was targeted towards deletion of Arg-384 to Val-392 in this protein. The deletion from Gly-351 to Thr-365 results in a loss of PSII activity and of photoautotrophic growth of the mutant, but the deletion between Arg-384 and Val-392 retains PSII activity and the ability to grow photoautotrophically. The mutant strain with the deletion from Gly-351 to Thr-365 does not assemble a stable PSII reaction center complex in its thylakoid membranes, and exhibits diminished levels of CP47 and of the reaction center proteins D1 and D2. In contrast to the Arg-384 to Val-392 portion of this domain, the region between Gly-351 and Thr-365 appears essential for the normal structure and function of photosystem II. PMID:1932693

  1. Role of the RuvAB protein in avoiding spontaneous formation of deletion mutations in the Escherichia coli K-12 endogenous tonB gene.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Kazumi; Nagata, Yuki; Kawata, Masakado; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    The endogenous tonB gene of Escherichia coli was used as a target for spontaneous deletion mutations which were isolated from ruvAB-, recG-, and ruvC- cells. The rates of tonB mutation were essentially the same in ruv+, ruvAB-, recG-, and ruvC- cells. We analyzed tonB mutants by sequencing. In the ruv+, recG-, and ruvC- strains, the spectra were different from those obtained from the ruvAB- cells, where deletions dominated followed by IS insertions, base substitutions, and frameshifts, in that order. We then analyzed the tonB-trp large deletion, due to simultaneous mutations of the trp operon, and found that the frequency in ruvAB- was higher than those in ruv+, recG-, and ruvC- cells. To characterize deletion formation further, we analyzed all the tonB mutants from one colicin plate. Seven deletions were identified at five sites from the 45 tonB mutants of ruv+ cells and 24 deletions at 11 sites from the 43 tonB mutants of ruvAB- cells. Thus, the ruvAB- strain is a deletion mutator. We discuss the role of RuvAB in avoiding deletions. PMID:15351721

  2. [Novel large deletion c.22-1320_633+1224del in the CYB5R3 gene from patients with hereditary methemoglobinemia].

    PubMed

    Galeeva, N M; Nenasheva, S A; Kleĭmenova, I S; Poliakov, A V

    2012-11-01

    Hereditary types I and II methemoglobinemia is a rare autosomal recessive disease due to a deficiency of either soluble or soluble and membrane-bound forms of the enzyme NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. The molecular genetic bases of both types of the disease consist in changes in the CYB5R3 gene. In this study, the novel and, to date, only large deletion in this gene is described, discovered in two unrelated families with types I and II methemoglobinemia. The common founder haplotype on the chromosomes carrying this mutation was identified. A universal approach for searching for the deletion boundaries was developed, and the c.22-1320_633+1224del deletion breakpoints were determined. In addition, a system for identifying the deletion in heterozygous and homozygous states was designed. PMID:23297489

  3. Nontoxic Strains of Cyanobacteria Are the Result of Major Gene Deletion Events Induced by a Transposable Element

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Guntram; Molitor, Carole; Philmus, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    Blooms that are formed by cyanobacteria consist of toxic and nontoxic strains. The mechanisms that result in the occurrence of nontoxic strains are enigmatic. All the nontoxic strains of the filamentous cyanobacterium Planktothrix that were isolated from 9 European countries were found to have lost 90% of a large microcystin synthetase (mcy) gene cluster that encoded the synthesis of the toxic peptide microcystin (MC). Those strains still contain the flanking regions of the mcy gene cluster along with remnants of the transposable elements that are found in between. The majority of the strains still contain a gene coding for a distinct thioesterase type II (mcyT), which is putatively involved in MC synthesis. The insertional inactivation of mcyT in an MC-producing strain resulted in the reduction of MC synthesis by 94 ± 2% (1 standard deviation). Nontoxic strains that occur in shallow lakes throughout Europe form a monophyletic lineage. A second lineage consists of strains that contain the mcy gene cluster but differ in their photosynthetic pigment composition, which is due to the occurrence of strains that contain phycocyanin or large amounts of phycoerythrin in addition to phycocyanin. Strains containing phycoerythrin typically occur in deep-stratified lakes. The rare occurrence of gene cluster deletion, paired with the evolutionary diversification of the lineages of strains that lost or still contain the mcy gene cluster, needs to be invoked in order to explain the absence or dominance of toxic cyanobacteria in various habitats. PMID:18502770

  4. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS): partial gene deletions contribute to APS I.

    PubMed

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S; Bruland, O; Løvås, K; Meager, A; Pedersen, C; Husebye, E S; Knappskog, P M

    2008-03-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms or copy number variations in the AIRE gene were associated with AAD and APS II. First, nine SNPs in the AIRE gene were analyzed in 311 patients with AAD and APS II and 521 healthy controls, identifying no associated risk. Second, in a subgroup of 25 of these patients, AIRE sequencing revealed three novel polymorphisms. Finally, the AIRE copy number was determined by duplex quantitative PCR in 14 patients with APS I, 161 patients with AAD and APS II and in 39 healthy subjects. In two Scandinavian APS I patients previously reported to be homozygous for common AIRE mutations, we identified large deletions of the AIRE gene covering at least exon 2 to exon 8. We conclude that polymorphisms in the AIRE gene are not associated with AAD and APS II. We further suggest that DNA analysis of the parents of patients found to be homozygous for mutations in AIRE, always should be performed.

  5. Enhanced freeze tolerance of baker's yeast by overexpressed trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene (TPS1) and deleted trehalase genes in frozen dough.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haigang; Dong, Jian; Wang, Guanglu; Xu, Haiyan; Zhang, Cuiying; Xiao, Dongguang

    2014-08-01

    Several recombinant strains with overexpressed trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene (TPS1) and/or deleted trehalase genes were obtained to elucidate the relationships between TPS1, trehalase genes, content of intracellular trehalose and freeze tolerance of baker's yeast, as well as improve the fermentation properties of lean dough after freezing. In this study, strain TL301(TPS1) overexpressing TPS1 showed 62.92 % higher trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (Tps1) activity and enhanced the content of intracellular trehalose than the parental strain. Deleting ATH1 exerted a significant effect on trehalase activities and the degradation amount of intracellular trehalose during the first 30 min of prefermentation. This finding indicates that acid trehalase (Ath1) plays a role in intracellular trehalose degradation. NTH2 encodes a functional neutral trehalase (Nth2) that was significantly involved in intracellular trehalose degradation in the absence of the NTH1 and/or ATH1 gene. The survival ratio, freeze-tolerance ratio and relative fermentation ability of strain TL301(TPS1) were approximately twice as high as those of the parental strain (BY6-9α). The increase in freeze tolerance of strain TL301(TPS1) was accompanied by relatively low trehalase activity, high Tps1 activity and high residual content of intracellular trehalose. Our results suggest that overexpressing TPS1 and deleting trehalase genes are sufficient to improve the freeze tolerance of baker's yeast in frozen dough. The present study provides guidance for the commercial baking industry as well as the research on the intracellular trehalose mobilization and freeze tolerance of baker's yeast. PMID:24951963

  6. A novel DMD IRES results in a functional N-truncated dystrophin, providing a potential route to therapy for patients with 5’ mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wein, Nicolas; Vulin, Adeline; Sofia Falzarano, Maria; Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Christina; Maiti, Baijayanta; Findlay, Andrew; Heller, Kristin N; Uhlén, Mathias; Bakthavachalu, Baskar; Messina, Sonia; Vita, Giuseppe; Passarelli, Chiara; Gualandi, Francesca; Wilton, Steve D; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Yang, Lin; Dunn, Diane M.; Schoenberg, Daniel; Weiss, Robert B.; Howard, Michael T.; Ferlini, Alessandra; Flanigan, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Most mutations that truncate the reading frame of the DMD gene cause loss of dystrophin expression and lead to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, amelioration of disease severity can result from alternate translation initiation beginning in DMD exon 6 that leads to expression of a highly functional N-truncated dystrophin. This novel isoform results from usage of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) within exon 5 that is glucocorticoid-inducible. IRES activity is confirmed in patient muscle by both peptide sequencing and ribosome profiling. Generation of a truncated reading frame upstream of the IRES by exon skipping leads to synthesis of a functional N-truncated isoform in both patient-derived cell lines and in a new DMD mouse model, where expression protects muscle from contraction-induced injury and corrects muscle force to the same level as control mice. These results support a novel therapeutic approach for patients with mutations within the 5’ exons of DMD. PMID:25108525

  7. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.; Fukai, K.; Holmes, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. One of these, a deletion of exon 7, is strongly predominant, accounting for {approximately}77% of mutant alleles in this group of patients. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Deletion of the msdS/AfmsdC gene induces abnormal polarity and septation in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjie; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Depeng; Zhou, Hui; Ouyang, Haomiao; Ming, Jia; Jin, Cheng

    2008-07-01

    alpha-Mannosidases play an important role in the processing of mannose-containing glycans in eukaryotes. A deficiency in alpha-mannosidase is lethal in humans and cattle. In contrast to mammals, Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not require the endoplasmic reticulum alpha-mannosidase gene for growth. However, little is known of the consequence of loss of function of class I alpha-mannosidases in filamentous fungi. In this study, the msdS/AfmsdC gene was identified to encode 1,2-alpha-mannosidase MsdS in Aspergillus fumigatus. Soluble MsdS expressed in Escherichia coli was characterized as a typical class I alpha-mannosidase. The msdS gene was deleted by replacement of the msdS gene with a pyrG gene. Although the mutant showed a defect in N-glycan processing, as well as a reduction of cell wall components and a reduced ability of conidiation, it appeared that the rate of hyphal growth was not affected. Morphology analysis revealed abnormal polarity and septation at the stages of germination, hyphal growth and conidiation. Although the mechanism by which the N-glycan processing affects polarity and septation is unclear, our results show that msdS is involved in polarity and septation in A. fumigatus. PMID:18599824

  9. Analysis of pools of targeted Salmonella deletion mutants identifies novel genes affecting fitness during competitive infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Santiviago, Carlos A; Reynolds, M Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Choi, Sang-Ho; Long, Fred; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L; McClelland, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Pools of mutants of minimal complexity but maximal coverage of genes of interest facilitate screening for genes under selection in a particular environment. We constructed individual deletion mutants in 1,023 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genes, including almost all genes found in Salmonella but not in related genera. All mutations were confirmed simultaneously using a novel amplification strategy to produce labeled RNA from a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, introduced during the construction of each mutant, followed by hybridization of this labeled RNA to a Typhimurium genome tiling array. To demonstrate the ability to identify fitness phenotypes using our pool of mutants, the pool was subjected to selection by intraperitoneal injection into BALB/c mice and subsequent recovery from spleens. Changes in the representation of each mutant were monitored using T7 transcripts hybridized to a novel inexpensive minimal microarray. Among the top 120 statistically significant spleen colonization phenotypes, more than 40 were mutations in genes with no previously known role in this model. Fifteen phenotypes were tested using individual mutants in competitive assays of intraperitoneal infection in mice and eleven were confirmed, including the first two examples of attenuation for sRNA mutants in Salmonella. We refer to the method as Array-based analysis of cistrons under selection (ABACUS).

  10. Deletion and replacement of the mouse adult beta-globin genes by a "plug and socket" repeated targeting strategy.

    PubMed

    Detloff, P J; Lewis, J; John, S W; Shehee, W R; Langenbach, R; Maeda, N; Smithies, O

    1994-10-01

    We describe a two-step strategy to alter any mouse locus repeatedly and efficiently by direct positive selection. Using conventional targeting for the first step, a functional neo gene and a nonfunctional HPRT minigene (the "socket") are introduced into the genome of HPRT- embryonic stem (ES) cells close to the chosen locus, in this case the beta-globin locus. For the second step, a targeting construct (the "plug") that recombines homologously with the integrated socket and supplies the remaining portion of the HPRT minigene is used; this homologous recombination generates a functional HPRT gene and makes the ES cells hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine resistant. At the same time, the plug provides DNA sequences that recombine homologously with sequences in the target locus and modifies them in the desired manner; the plug is designed so that correctly targeted cells also lose the neo gene and become G418 sensitive. We have used two different plugs to make alterations in the mouse beta-globin locus starting with the same socket-containing ES cell line. One plug deleted 20 kb of DNA containing the two adult beta-globin genes. The other replaced the same region with the human beta-globin gene containing the mutation responsible for sickle cell anemia.

  11. Deletion analysis of two tandemly arranged virulence genes in myxoma virus, M11L and myxoma growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Opgenorth, A; Graham, K; Nation, N; Strayer, D; McFadden, G

    1992-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYX) is a leporipoxvirus of rabbits that induces a lethal syndrome characterized by disseminated tumorlike lesions, generalized immunosuppression, and secondary gram-negative bacterial infection. A MYX deletion mutant (vMYX-GF- delta M11L) was constructed to remove the entire myxoma growth factor (MGF) coding sequence and that for the C-terminal five amino acids of the partially overlapping upstream gene, M11L. Unexpectedly, this deletion completely abrogates the capacity of MYX to cause the characteristic disease symptoms of myxomatosis. Upon inoculation of rabbits with vMYX-GF- delta M11L, recipient animals developed only a benign, localized nodule reminiscent of a Shope fibroma virus-induced tumor in which a single primary lesion appeared at the site of injection and then completely regressed within 14 days, leaving the animals resistant to challenge with wild-type MYX. No evidence of the purulent conjunctivitis and rhinitis that always accompany wild-type MYX infection was observed. To ascertain whether the attenuation observed in vMYX-GF- delta M11L was due to a combined effect of the MGF deletion and alteration of the upstream M11L gene, two additional MYX recombinants were constructed: an MGF- virus (vMYX-GF-) containing an intact M11L gene and an M11L- virus (vMYX-M11L-) containing an intact MGF gene. Infection with vMYX-GF- resulted in moderated symptoms of myxomatosis, but all clinical stages of the disease were still detectable. In contrast, disruption of M11L alone dramatically reduced the virus virulence, resulting in a nonlethal syndrome whose clinical course was nevertheless distinct from that of vMYX-GF- delta M11L. Upon inoculation with vMYX-M11L-, rabbits developed primary and secondary tumors which were larger and more circumscribed than those of wild-type MYX recipients. Whereas wild-type MYX infection always includes severe, purulent conjunctivitis and rhinitis, vMYX-M11L- recipients remained healthy and displayed only minimal

  12. Deletion of mouse FXR gene disturbs multiple neurotransmitter systems and alters neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Wang, Tingting; Lan, Yunyi; Yang, Li; Pan, Weihong; Zhu, Yonghui; Lv, Boyang; Wei, Yuting; Shi, Hailian; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jie; Duan, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhibi; Wu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in bile acid synthesis and homeostasis. Dysfunction of FXR is involved in cholestasis and atherosclerosis. FXR is prevalent in liver, gallbladder, and intestine, but it is not yet clear whether it modulates neurobehavior. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that mouse FXR deficiency affects a specific subset of neurotransmitters and results in an unique behavioral phenotype. The FXR knockout mice showed less depressive-like and anxiety-related behavior, but increased motor activity. They had impaired memory and reduced motor coordination. There were changes of glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, and norepinephrinergic neurotransmission in either hippocampus or cerebellum. FXR deletion decreased the amount of the GABA synthesis enzyme GAD65 in hippocampus but increased GABA transporter GAT1 in cerebral cortex. FXR deletion increased serum concentrations of many bile acids, including taurodehydrocholic acid, taurocholic acid, deoxycholic acid (DCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), tauro-α-muricholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, and hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA). There were also changes in brain concentrations of taurocholic acid, taurodehydrocholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, tauro-β-muricholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and lithocholic acid (LCA). Taken together, the results from studies with FXR knockout mice suggest that FXR contributes to the homeostasis of multiple neurotransmitter systems in different brain regions and modulates neurobehavior. The effect appears to be at least partially mediated by bile acids that are known to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) inducing potential neurotoxicity. PMID:25870546

  13. Symptomatic female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): genetic and clinical characterization.

    PubMed

    Giliberto, Florencia; Radic, Claudia Pamela; Luce, Leonela; Ferreiro, Verónica; de Brasi, Carlos; Szijan, Irene

    2014-01-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene and is characterized by muscle degeneration and death. DMD affects males; females being asymptomatic carriers of mutations. However, some of them manifest symptoms due to a translocation between X chromosome and an autosome or to a heterozygous mutation leading to inactivation of most of their normal X chromosome. Six symptomatic female carriers and two asymptomatic were analyzed by: I) Segregation of STRs-(CA)n and MLPA assays to detect a hemizygous alteration, and II) X chromosome inactivation pattern to uncover the reason for symptoms in these females. The symptomatic females shared mild but progressive muscular weakness and increased serum creatin kinase (CK) levels. Levels of dystrophin protein were below normal or absent in many fibers. Segregation of STRs-(CA)n revealed hemizygous patterns in three patients, which were confirmed by MLPA. In addition, this analysis showed a duplication in another patient. X chromosome inactivation assay revealed a skewed X inactivation pattern in the symptomatic females and a random inactivation pattern in the asymptomatic ones. Our results support the hypothesis that the DMD phenotype in female carriers of a dystrophin mutation has a direct correlation with a skewed X-chromosome inactivation pattern.

  14. Feasibility of establishing deletion of the late cornified envelope genes LCE3B and LCE3C as a susceptibility factor for psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Safia; Hassan, Iffat; Majid, Sabhiya; Bhat, Yasmeen Jabeen; Farooq, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a chronic hyperproliferative inflammatory disease of the skin, genetic predisposition to which is well-established. The late cornified envelope genes LCE3B and LCE3C are involved in maintaining the integrity of skin barrier especially following skin barrier disruption. The deletion of these genes would lead to an impaired epidermal response following damage to the skin barrier thus predisposing to psoriatic lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the common deletion of late cornified envelope genes (LCE 3B/3C) in psoriasis patients of Kashmiri ethnic population of North India. Materials and Methods: It was a hospital-based, case-control study which included 100 psoriasis cases and an equal number of controls. Blood samples were obtained, and DNA was extracted from all the samples by a kit-based method. To determine the LCE3C_LCE3B-del genotype, a three-primer polymerase chain reaction assay was performed. Results: The genotype for the common LCE3C_LCE3B deletion in 100 psoriasis patients and 100 controls was determined. Among the cases, 17 cases were homozygous for insertion genotype (I/I), 40 cases were heterozygous for insertion/deletion genotype (I/D) and 43 cases were homozygous for deletion genotype (D/D), compared to controls where 20 cases were homozygous for insertion genotype (I/I), 45 cases were heterozygous for insertion/deletion genotype (I/D), and 35 cases were homozygous for deletion genotype (D/D). The del/del frequency was higher among psoriatic patients compared to controls (43% vs. 35%) although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.507). Conclusion: We hereby infer that LCE3C_LCE3B deletion does not appear to be associated with the risk of psoriasis in our population. PMID:27376048

  15. Speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein gene deletion in ovarian cancer: Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of a tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    HU, XIAOYU; YANG, ZHU; ZENG, MANMAN; LIU, YI; YANG, XIAOTAO; LI, YANAN; LI, XU; YU, QIUBO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the status of speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein (SPOP) gene located on chromosome 17q21 in ovarian cancer (OC). The present study evaluated a tissue microarray, which contained 90 samples of ovarian cancer and 10 samples of normal ovarian tissue, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH is a method where a SPOP-specific DNA red fluorescence probe was used for the experimental group and a centromere-specific DNA green fluorescence probe for chromosome 17 was used for the control group. The present study demonstrated that a deletion of the SPOP gene was observed in 52.27% (46/88) of the ovarian cancer tissues, but was not identified in normal ovarian tissues. Simultaneously, monosomy 17 was frequently identified in the ovarian cancer tissues, but not in the normal ovarian tissues. Furthermore, the present data revealed that the ovarian cancer histological subtype and grade were significantly associated with a deletion of the SPOP gene, which was assessed by the appearance of monosomy 17 in the ovarian cancer samples; the deletion of the SPOP gene was observed in a large proportion of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (41/61; 67.21%), particularly in grade 3 (31/37; 83.78%). In conclusion, deletion of the SPOP gene on chromosome 17 in ovarian cancer samples, which results from monosomy 17, indicates that the SPOP gene may serve as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer. PMID:27347196

  16. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A.; Morris, M. A.

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  17. Resistance to gemcitabine in a human follicular lymphoma cell line is due to partial deletion of the deoxycytidine kinase gene

    PubMed Central

    Galmarini, Carlos María; Clarke, Marilyn L; Jordheim, Lars; Santos, Cheryl L; Cros, Emeline; Mackey, John R; Dumontet, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Background Gemcitabine is an analogue of deoxycytidine with activity against several solid tumors. In order to elucidate the mechanisms by which tumor cells become resistant to gemcitabine, we developed the resistant subline RL-G from the human follicular lymphoma cell line RL-7 by prolonged exposure of parental cells to increasing concentrations of gemcitabine. Results In vitro, the IC50 increased from 0.015 μM in parental RL-7 cells to 25 μM in the resistant variant, RL-G. Xenografts of both cell lines developed in nude mice were treated with repeated injections of gemcitabine. Under conditions of gemcitabine treatment which totally inhibited the development of RL-7 tumors, RL-G derived tumors grew similarly to those of untreated animals, demonstrating the in vivo resistance of RL-G cells to gemcitabine. HPLC experiments showed that RL-G cells accumulated and incorporated less gemcitabine metabolites into DNA and RNA than RL-7 cells. Gemcitabine induced an S-phase arrest in RL-7 cells but not in RL-G cells. Exposure to gemcitabine induced a higher degree of apoptosis in RL-7 than in RL-G cells, with poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage in RL-7 cells. No modifications of Bcl-2 nor of Bax expression were observed in RL-7 or RL-G cells exposed to gemcitabine. These alterations were associated with the absence of the deoxycytidine kinase mRNA expression observed by quantitative RT-PCR in RL-G cells. PCR amplification of désoxycytidine kinase gene exons showed a partial deletion of the dCK gene in RL-G cells. Conclusions These results suggest that partial deletion of the dCK gene observed after selection in the presence of gemcitabine is involved with resistance to this agent both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15157282

  18. A two base pair deletion in the PQBP1 gene is associated with microphthalmia, microcephaly, and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Garay, Isabel; Tomás, Miguel; Oltra, Silvestre; Ramser, Juliane; Moltó, Maria D; Prieto, Félix; Meindl, Alfons; Kutsche, Kerstin; Martínez, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    X-linked mental retardation has been traditionally divided into syndromic (S-XLMR) and non-syndromic forms (NS-XLMR), although the borderlines between these phenotypes begin to vanish and mutations in a single gene, for example PQBP1, can cause S-XLMR as well as NS-XLMR. Here, we report two maternal cousins with an apparently X-linked phenotype of mental retardation (MR), microphthalmia, choroid coloboma, microcephaly, renal hypoplasia, and spastic paraplegia. By multipoint linkage analysis with markers spanning the entire X-chromosome we mapped the disease locus to a 28-Mb interval between Xp11.4 and Xq12, including the BCOR gene. A missense mutation in BCOR was described in a family with Lenz microphthalmia syndrome, a phenotype showing substantial overlapping features with that described in the two cousins. However, no mutation in the BCOR gene was found in both patients. Subsequent mutation analysis of PQBP1, located within the delineated linkage interval in Xp11.23, revealed a 2-bp deletion, c.461_462delAG, that cosegregated with the disease. Notably, the same mutation is associated with the Hamel cerebropalatocardiac syndrome, another form of S-XLMR. Haplotype analysis suggests a germline mosaicism of the 2-bp deletion in the maternal grandmother of both affected individuals. In summary, our findings demonstrate for the first time that mutations in PQBP1 are associated with an S-XLMR phenotype including microphthalmia, thereby further extending the clinical spectrum of phenotypes associated with PQBP1 mutations. PMID:17033686

  19. Diminished dosage of 22q11 genes disrupts neurogenesis and cortical development in a mouse model of 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Tucker, Eric S.; Maynard, Thomas M.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The 22q11 deletion (or DiGeorge) syndrome (22q11DS), the result of a 1.5- to 3-megabase hemizygous deletion on human chromosome 22, results in dramatically increased susceptibility for “diseases of cortical connectivity” thought to arise during development, including schizophrenia and autism. We show that diminished dosage of the genes deleted in the 1.5-megabase 22q11 minimal critical deleted region in a mouse model of 22q11DS specifically compromises neurogenesis and subsequent differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Proliferation of basal, but not apical, progenitors is disrupted, and subsequently, the frequency of layer 2/3, but not layer 5/6, projection neurons is altered. This change is paralleled by aberrant distribution of parvalbumin-labeled interneurons in upper and lower cortical layers. Deletion of Tbx1 or Prodh (22q11 genes independently associated with 22q11DS phenotypes) does not similarly disrupt basal progenitors. However, expression analysis implicates additional 22q11 genes that are selectively expressed in cortical precursors. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage disrupts cortical neurogenesis and interneuron migration. Such developmental disruption may alter cortical circuitry and establish vulnerability for developmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism. PMID:19805316

  20. [New recurrent extended deletion, including GJB2 and GJB6 genes, results in isolated sensorineural hearing impairment with autosomal recessive type of inheritance].

    PubMed

    Bliznets, E A; Makienko, O N; Okuneva, E G; Markova, T G; Poliakov, A V

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary hearing loss with the autosomal recessive type of inheritance of the DFNB 1 genetic type, caused by mutations in the GJB2 gene, is the main reason of innate non-syndromal hearing impairment in most developed countries of the world (including Russia). Intragenic point mutations prevail among the GJB2 gene defectors; however, extended deletions in the DFNB1 locus are also found with considerable frequency in some populations (for example, Spain, Great Britain, France, United States, and Brazil). Among the four known extended deletions, only one deletion affects directly the GJB2 gene sequence and was described in a single family. A new extended deletion in the GJB2 and GJB6 gene sequences (approximately 101 kb in size; NC_000013.10:g.20,757,021_20,858,394del), detected in three unrelated Russian patients, was described and characterized. Ingush origin of this mutation is assumed. If the new deletion is frequent, its detection is very important for the genetic consulting of families with hereditary hearing impairment. PMID:25715449

  1. Large deletions in the CBF gene cluster at the Fr-B2 locus are associated with reduced frost tolerance in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Stephen; Zhu, Jie; Boldizsár, Ákos; Vágújfalvi, Attila; Burke, Adrienne; Garland-Campbell, Kimberley; Galiba, Gábor; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Wheat plants which are exposed to periods of low temperatures (cold acclimation) exhibit increased survival rates when they are subsequently exposed to freezing temperatures. This process is associated with large-scale changes in the transcriptome which are modulated by a set of tandemly duplicated CBF (C-repeat Binding Factor) transcription factors located at the Fr-2 (Frost Resistance-2) locus. While Arabidopsis has three tandemly duplicated CBF genes, the CBF family in wheat has undergone an expansion and at least 15 CBF genes have been identified, eleven of which are present at the Fr-2 loci on homoeologous group 5 chromosomes. We report here the discovery of three large deletions which eliminate six, nine, and all eleven CBF genes from the Fr-B2 locus in tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. In wild emmer wheat, the Fr-B2 deletions were found only among the accessions from the southern sub-populations. Among cultivated wheats, the Fr-B2 deletions were more common among varieties with a spring growth habit than among those with a winter growth habit. Replicated freezing tolerance experiments showed that both the deletion of nine CBF genes in tetraploid wheat and the complete Fr-B2 deletion in hexaploid wheat are associated with significant reductions in survival after exposure to freezing temperatures. Our results suggest that selection for the wild type Fr-B2 allele may be beneficial for breeders selecting for varieties with improved frost tolerance. PMID:23884601

  2. Deletion of cavin genes reveals tissue-specific mechanisms for morphogenesis of endothelial caveolae

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Carsten Gram; Shvets, Elena; Howard, Gillian; Riento, Kirsi; Nichols, Benjamin James

    2013-01-01

    Caveolae are abundant in endothelial cells and are thought to have important roles in endothelial cell biology. The cavin proteins are key components of caveolae, and are expressed at varied amounts in different tissues. Here we use knockout mice to determine the roles of cavins 2 and 3 in caveolar morphogenesis in vivo. Deletion of cavin 2 causes loss of endothelial caveolae in lung and adipose tissue, but has no effect on the abundance of endothelial caveolae in heart and other tissues. Changes in the morphology of endothelium in cavin 2 null mice correlate with changes in caveolar abundance. Cavin 3 is not required for making caveolae in the tissues examined. Cavin 2 determines the size of cavin complexes, and acts to shape caveolae. Cavin 1, however, is essential for normal oligomerization of caveolin 1. Our data reveal that endothelial caveolae are heterogeneous, and identify cavin 2 as a determinant of this heterogeneity. PMID:23652019

  3. Deletion of the mouse homolog of KCNAB2, a gene linked to monosomy 1p36, results in associative memory impairments and amygdala hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Perkowski, John J; Murphy, Geoffrey G

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of the distal end of the short arm of chromosome 1 [1p36 deletion syndrome (1p36DS)] is one of the most commonly occurring terminal deletion syndromes in humans, occurring in ∼1 in 5000 newborns. Subjects with 1p36DS manifest a wide range of clinical features including growth delay, congenital heart defects, and craniofacial dysmorphism. In addition, individuals with 1p36DS often exhibit some form of neurological abnormality and are typically cognitively impaired. Although there is significant variability with regard to the extent of the deletion, several genes have been mapped to region 1p36 that are known to regulate neuronal function. One such gene--KCNAB2--encodes the potassium channel auxiliary subunit Kvβ2, which has been previously shown to modulate voltage-gated potassium currents in heterologous expression systems. Here, we present experiments characterizing mice in which the ortholog of KCNAB2 was deleted. We find that deletion of Kcnab2 in mice leads to deficits in associative learning and memory. In addition, using whole-cell current-clamp, we find that deletion of Kcnab2 leads to a reduction in the slow afterhyperpolarization following a burst of action potentials and a concomitant increase in neuronal excitability in projection neurons in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala. Our results suggest that loss of Kvβ2 likely contributes to the cognitive and neurological impairments observed in 1p36DS patients.

  4. A novel deletion and two recurrent substitutions on type VII collagen gene in seven Iranian patients with epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Armita Kakavand; Moghaddam, Mohammad; Hatamnejadian, Nasim; Ebrahimi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Epidermolysis bullosa is one of the most important series of mechano-bullous heritable skin disorders which is categorized into four major types according to the layer that bullae forms within basement membrane zone. In dystrophic form of the disease, blisters are made in the sublamina densa zone, at the level of type VII collagen protein which produce anchoring fibrils. Type VII collagen gene is the only responsible gene for this form. The aim of this study was to survey causative mutations of type VII collagen gene among Iranian patients with epidermolysis bullosa. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, exons 73-75 were investigated by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing. Results: In current study, we found three different point mutations in type VII collagen alleles in 7 out of 50 patients. Four patients were homozygous for a new deletion which resulted in frame shift (p.Pro2089fs). Two patients were homozygous for a recurrent glycine substitution (p.G2031S) and one patient was detected with an allele carrying a substitution (p.R2069C). Conclusion: The results emphasized heterogeneity in the type VII collagen gene and will provide a sign for early diagnosis and future study of the disease pathogenesis. PMID:27746867

  5. Deletion and Down-Regulation of HRH4 Gene in Gastric Carcinomas: A Potential Correlation with Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiana; Yang, Yang; Liu, Li; Wang, Wen; Wang, Luo; Li, Manhui; Fang, Zhengyu

    2012-01-01

    Background Histamine is an established growth factor for gastrointestinal malignancies. The effect of histamine is largely determined locally by the histamine receptor expression pattern. Histamine receptor H4 (HRH4), the newest member of the histamine receptor family, is positively expressed on the epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract, and its function remains to be elucidated. Previously, we reported the decreased expression of HRH4 in colorectal cancers and revealed its correlation with tumor proliferation. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the abnormalities of HRH4 gene in gastric carcinomas (GCs). Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed H4R expression in collected GC samples by quantitative PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunostaining. Our results showed that the protein and mRNA levels of HRH4 were reduced in some GC samples, especially in advanced GC samples. Copy number decrease of HRH4 gene was observed (17.6%, 23 out of 131), which was closely correlated with the attenuated expression of H4R. In vitro studies, using gastric cancer cell lines, showed that the alteration of HRH4 expression on gastric cancer cells influences tumor growth upon exposure to histamine. Conclusions/Significance We show for the first time that deletion of HRH4 gene is present in GC cases and is closely correlated with attenuated gene expression. Down-regulation of HRH4 in gastric carcinomas plays a role in histamine-mediated growth control of GC cells. PMID:22363581

  6. Cell-Type Specific Oxytocin Gene Expression from AAV Delivered Promoter Deletion Constructs into the Rat Supraoptic Nucleus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Makoto; Gainer, Harold

    2012-01-01

    The magnocellular neurons (MCNs) in the hypothalamus selectively express either oxytocin (OXT) or vasopressin (AVP) neuropeptide genes, a property that defines their phenotypes. Here we examine the molecular basis of this selectivity in the OXT MCNs by stereotaxic microinjections of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors that contain various OXT gene promoter deletion constructs using EGFP as the reporter into the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON). Two weeks following injection of the AAVs, immunohistochemical assays of EGFP expression from these constructs were done to determine whether the EGFP reporter co-localizes with either the OXT- or AVP-immunoreactivity in the MCNs. The results show that the key elements in the OT gene promoter that regulate the cell-type specific expression the SON are located −216 to −100 bp upstream of the transcription start site. We hypothesize that within this 116 bp domain a repressor exists that inhibits expression specifically in AVP MCNs, thereby leading to the cell-type specific expression of the OXT gene only in the OXT MCNs. PMID:22363799

  7. Gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis is sex dependent in mice with growth hormone receptor deletion in liver.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Ilona; Masternak, Michal M; List, Edward O; Stout, Michael B; Berryman, Darlene E; Lewinski, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Gesing, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an essential process for cell viability. Mice with disruption of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene (Ghr gene) in the liver (LiGHRKO), in contrast to long-lived mice with global deletion of the Ghr gene (GHRKO), are characterized by lack of improved insulin sensitivity and severe hepatic steatosis. Tissue-specific disruption of the GHR in liver results in a mouse model with dramatically altered GH/IGF1 axis. We have previously shown increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis in insulin-sensitive GHRKO mice. The aim of the present study is to assess, using real-time PCR, the gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2) and a marker of mitochondrial activity (CoxIV) in brains, kidneys and livers of male and female LiGHRKO and wild-type (WT) mice. There were significant differences between males and females. In the brain, expression of Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2 was lower in pooled females compared to pooled males. In the kidneys, expression of Ampk and Sirt1 was also lower in female mice. In the liver, no differences between males and females were observed. Sexual dimorphism may play an important role in regulating the biogenesis of mitochondria. PMID:25855408

  8. Zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) gene deletion reduces spinal cord white matter damage and motor deficits in a murine MOG-induced multiple sclerosis model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bo Young; Kim, In Yeol; Kim, Jin Hee; Kho, A Ra; Lee, Song Hee; Lee, Bo Eun; Sohn, Min; Koh, Jae-Young; Suh, Sang Won

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) on multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease model of multiple sclerosis, was induced by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55) in female mice. Three weeks after the initial immunization, demyelination, immune cell infiltration and blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the spinal cord were analyzed. Clinical signs of EAE first appeared on day 11 and reached a peak level on day 19 after the initial immunization. ZnT3 gene deletion profoundly reduced the daily clinical score of EAE. The ZnT3 gene deletion-mediated inhibition of the clinical course of EAE was accompanied by suppression of inflammation and demyelination in the spinal cord. The motor deficit accompanying neuropathological changes associated with EAE were mild in ZnT3 gene deletion mice. This reduction in motor deficit was accompanied by coincident reductions in demyelination and infiltration of encephalitogenic immune cells including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD20+ B cells and F4/80+ microglia in the spinal cord. These results demonstrate that ZnT3 gene deletion inhibits the clinical features and neuropathological changes associated with EAE. ZnT3 gene deletion also remarkably inhibited formation of EAE-associated aberrant synaptic zinc patches, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) activation and BBB disruption. Therefore, amelioration of EAE-induced clinical and neuropathological changes by ZnT3 gene deletion suggests that vesicular zinc may be involved in several steps of MS pathogenesis.

  9. Dietary MicroRNA Database (DMD): An Archive Database and Analytic Tool for Food-Borne microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kevin; Shu, Jiang; Zempleni, Janos; Cui, Juan

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of high throughput technology, a huge amount of microRNA information has been added to the growing body of knowledge for non-coding RNAs. Here we present the Dietary MicroRNA Databases (DMD), the first repository for archiving and analyzing the published and novel microRNAs discovered in dietary resources. Currently there are fifteen types of dietary species, such as apple, grape, cow milk, and cow fat, included in the database originating from 9 plant and 5 animal species. Annotation for each entry, a mature microRNA indexed as DM0000*, covers information of the mature sequences, genome locations, hairpin structures of parental pre-microRNAs, cross-species sequence comparison, disease relevance, and the experimentally validated gene targets. Furthermore, a few functional analyses including target prediction, pathway enrichment and gene network construction have been integrated into the system, which enable users to generate functional insights through viewing the functional pathways and building protein-protein interaction networks associated with each microRNA. Another unique feature of DMD is that it provides a feature generator where a total of 411 descriptive attributes can be calculated for any given microRNAs based on their sequences and structures. DMD would be particularly useful for research groups studying microRNA regulation from a nutrition point of view. The database can be accessed at http://sbbi.unl.edu/dmd/.

  10. The optical-mechanical design of DMD modulation imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianting; Xu, Xiping; Qiao, Yang; Li, Lei; Pan, Yue

    2014-09-01

    In order to avoid the phenomenon of some image information were lost, which is due to the jamming signals, such as incident laser, make the pixels dot on CCD saturated. In this article a device of optical-mechanical structure was designed, which utilized the DMD (Digital Micro mirror Device) to modulate the image. The DMD reflection imaging optical system adopts the telecentric light path. However, because the design is not only required to guarantee a 66° angle between the optical axis of the relay optics and the DMD, but also to ensure that the optical axis of the projection system keeps parallel with the perpendicular bisector of the micro-mirror which is in the "flat" state, so the TIR prism is introduced,and making the relay optics and the DMD satisfy the optical institution's requirements. In this paper, a mechanical structure of the imaging optical system was designed and at the meanwhile the lens assembly has been well connected and fixed and fine-tuned by detailed structural design, which included the tilt decentered lens, wedge flanges, prisms. By optimizing the design, the issues of mutual restraint between the inverting optical system and the projecting system were well resolved, and prevented the blocking of the two systems. In addition, the structure size of the whole DMD reflection imaging optical system was minimized; it reduced the energy loss and ensured the image quality.

  11. Parallel detection experiment of fluorescence confocal microscopy using DMD.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gui, Kun; Guo, Hanming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-05-01

    Parallel detection of fluorescence confocal microscopy (PDFCM) system based on Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is reported in this paper in order to realize simultaneous multi-channel imaging and improve detection speed. DMD is added into PDFCM system, working to take replace of the single traditional pinhole in the confocal system, which divides the laser source into multiple excitation beams. The PDFCM imaging system based on DMD is experimentally set up. The multi-channel image of fluorescence signal of potato cells sample is detected by parallel lateral scanning in order to verify the feasibility of introducing the DMD into fluorescence confocal microscope. In addition, for the purpose of characterizing the microscope, the depth response curve is also acquired. The experimental result shows that in contrast to conventional microscopy, the DMD-based PDFCM system has higher axial resolution and faster detection speed, which may bring some potential benefits in the biology and medicine analysis. SCANNING 38:234-239, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26331288

  12. X-linked late-onset sensorineural deafness caused by a deletion involving OA1 and a novel gene containing WD-40 repeats.

    PubMed

    Bassi, M T; Ramesar, R S; Caciotti, B; Winship, I M; De Grandi, A; Riboni, M; Townes, P L; Beighton, P; Ballabio, A; Borsani, G

    1999-06-01

    We have identified a novel gene, transducin (beta)-like 1 (TBL1), in the Xp22.3 genomic region, that shows high homology with members of the WD-40-repeat protein family. The gene contains 18 exons spanning approximately 150 kb of the genomic region adjacent to the ocular albinism gene (OA1) on the telomeric side. However, unlike OA1, TBL1 is transcribed from telomere to centromere. Northern analysis indicates that TBL1 is ubiquitously expressed, with two transcripts of approximately 2.1 kb and 6.0 kb. The open reading frame encodes a 526-amino acid protein, which shows the presence of six beta-transducin repeats (WD-40 motif) in the C-terminal domain. The homology with known beta-subunits of G proteins and other WD-40-repeat containing proteins is restricted to the WD-40 motif. Genomic analysis revealed that the gene is either partly or entirely deleted in patients carrying Xp22.3 terminal deletions. The complexity of the contiguous gene-syndrome phenotype shared by these patients depends on the number of known disease genes involved in the deletions. Interestingly, one patient carrying a microinterstitial deletion involving the 3' portion of both TBL1 and OA1 shows the OA1 phenotype associated with X-linked late-onset sensorineural deafness. We postulate an involvement of TBL1 in the pathogenesis of the ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness phenotype.

  13. The effects of upaB deletion and the double/triple deletion of upaB, aatA, and aatB genes on pathogenicity of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu-Ge, Xiang-Kai; Pan, Zi-Hao; Tang, Fang; Mao, Xiang; Hu, Lin; Wang, Shao-Hui; Xu, Bin; Lu, Cheng-Ping; Fan, Hong-Jie; Dai, Jian-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are associated with pathogenesis of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). The molecular characterization of APEC ATs can provide insights about their relevance to APEC pathogenesis. Here, we characterized a conventional autotransporter UpaB in APEC DE205B genome. The upaB existed in 41.9 % of 236 APEC isolates and was predominantly associated with ECOR B2 and D. Our studies showed that UpaB mediates the DE205B adhesion in DF-1 cells, and enhances autoaggregation and biofilm formation of fimbria-negative E. coli AAEC189 (MG1655Δfim) in vitro. Deletion of upaB of DE205B attenuates the virulence in duck model and early colonization in the duck lungs during APEC systemic infection. Furthermore, double and triple deletion of upaB, aatA, and aatB genes cumulatively attenuated DE205B adhesion in DF-1 cells, accompanying with decreased 50 % lethal dose (LD50) in duck model and the early colonization in the duck lungs. However, DE205BΔupaB/ΔaatA/ΔaatB might "compensate" the influence of gene deletion by upregulating the expression of fimbrial adhesin genes yqiL, yadN, and vacuolating autotransporter vat during early colonization of APEC. Finally, we demonstrated that vaccination with recombinant UpaB, AatA, and AatB proteins conferred protection against colisepticemia caused by DE205B infection in duck model.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of acetic-acid-treated yeast cells identifies a large set of genes whose overexpression or deletion enhances acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeji; Nasution, Olviyani; Choi, Eunyong; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibits the metabolic activities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, a better understanding of how S. cerevisiae cells acquire the tolerance to acetic acid is of importance to develop robust yeast strains to be used in industry. To do this, we examined the transcriptional changes that occur at 12 h post-exposure to acetic acid, revealing that 56 and 58 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively. Functional categorization of them revealed that 22 protein synthesis genes and 14 stress response genes constituted the largest portion of the upregulated and downregulated genes, respectively. To evaluate the association of the regulated genes with acetic acid tolerance, 3 upregulated genes (DBP2, ASC1, and GND1) were selected among 34 non-protein synthesis genes, and 54 viable mutants individually deleted for the downregulated genes were retrieved from the non-essential haploid deletion library. Strains overexpressing ASC1 and GND1 displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid, whereas a strain overexpressing DBP2 was sensitive. Fifty of 54 deletion mutants displayed enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Three chosen deletion mutants (hsps82Δ, ato2Δ, and ssa3Δ) were also tolerant to benzoic acid but not propionic and sorbic acids. Moreover, all those five (two overexpressing and three deleted) strains were more efficient in proton efflux and lower in membrane permeability and internal hydrogen peroxide content than controls. Individually or in combination, those physiological changes are likely to contribute at least in part to enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Overall, information of our transcriptional profile was very useful to identify molecular factors associated with acetic acid tolerance.

  15. Anophthalmia-esophageal atresia syndrome caused by an SOX2 gene deletion in monozygotic twin brothers with markedly discordant phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Perez-Cano, Hector J; Aguinaga, Monica

    2006-09-15

    The clinical combination of anophthalmia/microphthalmia and esophageal atresia was first recognized in 1988 as a distinct variable multi-system malformation syndrome and since then at least 17 cases of the disease have been described, all of them sporadic in occurrence. We report a heterozygous SOX2 gene mutation underlying the syndrome of anophthalmia/microphthalmia-esophageal atresia and demonstrate that this entity can be associated to considerable clinical variability as shown by the discordant ocular phenotype observed in monozygotic twin brothers carrying an SOX2 deletion. This is the first report describing a strikingly discordant eye phenotype in monozygotic twins with the condition, with one of our patients being the first reported individual carrying an SOX2 lesion associated with unilateral eye defect. We discuss the probable sources for this remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity of the anophthalmia/microphthalmia syndrome in individuals with an identical genetic constitution.

  16. Deletion of the von Hippel-Lindau gene causes sympathoadrenal cell death and impairs chemoreceptor-mediated adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Macías, David; Fernández-Agüera, Mary Carmen; Bonilla-Henao, Victoria; López-Barneo, José

    2014-12-01

    Mutations of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene are associated with pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, but the role of VHL in sympathoadrenal homeostasis is unknown. We generated mice lacking Vhl in catecholaminergic cells. They exhibited atrophy of the carotid body (CB), adrenal medulla, and sympathetic ganglia. Vhl-null animals had an increased number of adult CB stem cells, although the survival of newly generated neuron-like glomus cells was severely compromised. The effects of Vhl deficiency were neither prevented by pharmacological inhibition of prolyl hydroxylases or selective genetic down-regulation of prolyl hydroxylase-3, nor phenocopied by hypoxia inducible factor overexpression. Vhl-deficient animals appeared normal in normoxia but survived for only a few days in hypoxia, presenting with pronounced erythrocytosis, pulmonary edema, and right cardiac hypertrophy. Therefore, in the normal sympathoadrenal setting, Vhl deletion does not give rise to tumors but impairs development and plasticity of the peripheral O₂-sensing system required for survival in hypoxic conditions.

  17. Complement factor I deficiency: a not so rare immune defect. Characterization of new mutations and the first large gene deletion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Complement Factor I (CFI) is a serine protease with an important role in complement alternative pathway regulation. Complete factor I deficiency is strongly associated with severe infections. Approximately 30 families with this deficiency have been described worldwide. Patients and methods We have studied five new Spanish families suffering from CFI deficiency. From 19 screened people, 7 homozygous, 10 heterozygous and 2 healthy subjects were identified. Clinical, biochemical and genetic descriptions are included. Results Molecular studies demonstrated 4 novel mutations in the screened individuals; amongst them, we describe here the first great gene deletion reported in the CFI locus, which includes full exon 2 and part of the large intron 1. Conclusion CFI deficiency is possibly an underestimated defect and the eventual existence of this deficiency should be tested in those patients exhibiting low C3 and recurrent bacterial infections. We propose a simple diagnostic flowchart to help clinicians in the identification and correct diagnosis of such patients. PMID:22710145

  18. Immune response and mitochondrial metabolism are commonly deregulated in DMD and aging skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Baron, Daniel; Magot, Armelle; Ramstein, Gérard; Steenman, Marja; Fayet, Guillemette; Chevalier, Catherine; Jourdon, Philippe; Houlgatte, Rémi; Savagner, Frédérique; Pereon, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a complex process involving multiple pathways downstream of the primary genetic insult leading to fatal muscle degeneration. Aging muscle is a multifactorial neuromuscular process characterized by impaired muscle regeneration leading to progressive atrophy. We hypothesized that these chronic atrophying situations may share specific myogenic adaptative responses at transcriptional level according to tissue remodeling. Muscle biopsies from four young DMD and four AGED subjects were referred to a group of seven muscle biopsies from young subjects without any neuromuscular disorder and explored through a dedicated expression microarray. We identified 528 differentially expressed genes (out of 2,745 analyzed), of which 328 could be validated by an exhaustive meta-analysis of public microarray datasets referring to DMD and Aging in skeletal muscle. Among the 328 validated co-expressed genes, 50% had the same expression profile in both groups and corresponded to immune/fibrosis responses and mitochondrial metabolism. Generalizing these observed meta-signatures with large compendia of public datasets reinforced our results as they could be also identified in other pathological processes and in diverse physiological conditions. Focusing on the common gene signatures in these two atrophying conditions, we observed enrichment in motifs for candidate transcription factors that may coordinate either the immune/fibrosis responses (ETS1, IRF1, NF1) or the mitochondrial metabolism (ESRRA). Deregulation in their expression could be responsible, at least in part, for the same transcriptome changes initiating the chronic muscle atrophy. This study suggests that distinct pathophysiological processes may share common gene responses and pathways related to specific transcription factors.

  19. Single nucleotide deletion of cqm1 gene results in the development of resistance to Bacillus sphaericus in Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing-yun; Cai, Quan-xin; Yan, Jian-ping; Hu, Xiao-min; Zheng, Da-sheng; Yuan, Zhi-ming

    2013-09-01

    The entomopathogen Bacillus sphaericus is one of the most effective biolarvicides used to control the Culex species of mosquito. The appearance of resistance in mosquitoes to this bacterium, however, remains a threat to its continuous use in integrated mosquito control programs. Previous work showed that the resistance to B. sphaericus in Culex colonies was associated with the absence of the 60-kDa binary toxin receptor (Cpm1/Cqm1), an alpha-glucosidase present in the larval midgut microvilli. In this work, we studied the molecular basis of the resistance developed by Culex quinquefasciatus to B. sphaericus C3-41. The cqm1 genes were cloned from susceptible (CqSL) and resistant (CqRL/C3-41) colonies, respectively. The sequence of the cDNA and genomic DNA derived from CqRL/C3-41 colony differed from that of CqSL one by a one-nucleotide deletion which resulted in a premature stop codon, leading to production of a truncated protein. Recombinant Cqm1S from the CqSL colony expressed in Escherichia coli specifically bound to the Bin toxin and had α-glucosidase activity, whereas the Cqm1R from the CqRL/C3-41 colony, with a deletion of three quarters of the receptor's C-terminal lost its α-glucosidase activity and could not bind to the binary toxin. Immunoblotting experiments showed that Cqm1 was undetectable in CqRL/C3-41 larvae, although the gene was correctly transcribed. Thus, the cqm1R represents a new allele in C. quinquefasciatus that confers resistance to B. sphaericus. PMID:23871751

  20. Heterozygous Hfe gene deletion leads to impaired glucose homeostasis, but not liver injury in mice fed a high-calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Britton, Laurence; Jaskowski, Lesley; Bridle, Kim; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Reiling, Janske; Musgrave, Nick; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell

    2016-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the Hfe gene have been proposed as cofactors in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Homozygous Hfe deletion previously has been shown to lead to dysregulated hepatic lipid metabolism and accentuated liver injury in a dietary mouse model of NAFLD We sought to establish whether heterozygous deletion of Hfe is sufficient to promote liver injury when mice are exposed to a high-calorie diet (HCD). Eight-week-old wild-type and Hfe(+/-) mice received 8 weeks of a control diet or HCD Liver histology and pathways of lipid and iron metabolism were analyzed. Liver histology demonstrated that mice fed a HCD had increased NAFLD activity score (NAS), steatosis, and hepatocyte ballooning. However, liver injury was unaffected by Hfe genotype. Hepatic iron concentration (HIC) was increased in Hfe(+/-) mice of both dietary groups. HCD resulted in a hepcidin-independent reduction in HIC Hfe(+/-) mice demonstrated raised fasting serum glucose concentrations and HOMA-IR score, despite unaltered serum adiponectin concentrations. Downstream regulators of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (pAKT, SREBP-1, Fas, Scd1) and fatty acid oxidation (AdipoR2, Pparα, Cpt1) were largely unaffected by genotype. In summary, heterozygous Hfe gene deletion is associated with impaired iron and glucose metabolism. However, unlike homozygous Hfe deletion, heterozygous gene deletion did not affect lipid metabolism pathways or liver injury in this model.

  1. Heterozygous Hfe gene deletion leads to impaired glucose homeostasis, but not liver injury in mice fed a high-calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Britton, Laurence; Jaskowski, Lesley; Bridle, Kim; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Reiling, Janske; Musgrave, Nick; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell

    2016-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the Hfe gene have been proposed as cofactors in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Homozygous Hfe deletion previously has been shown to lead to dysregulated hepatic lipid metabolism and accentuated liver injury in a dietary mouse model of NAFLD We sought to establish whether heterozygous deletion of Hfe is sufficient to promote liver injury when mice are exposed to a high-calorie diet (HCD). Eight-week-old wild-type and Hfe(+/-) mice received 8 weeks of a control diet or HCD Liver histology and pathways of lipid and iron metabolism were analyzed. Liver histology demonstrated that mice fed a HCD had increased NAFLD activity score (NAS), steatosis, and hepatocyte ballooning. However, liver injury was unaffected by Hfe genotype. Hepatic iron concentration (HIC) was increased in Hfe(+/-) mice of both dietary groups. HCD resulted in a hepcidin-independent reduction in HIC Hfe(+/-) mice demonstrated raised fasting serum glucose concentrations and HOMA-IR score, despite unaltered serum adiponectin concentrations. Downstream regulators of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (pAKT, SREBP-1, Fas, Scd1) and fatty acid oxidation (AdipoR2, Pparα, Cpt1) were largely unaffected by genotype. In summary, heterozygous Hfe gene deletion is associated with impaired iron and glucose metabolism. However, unlike homozygous Hfe deletion, heterozygous gene deletion did not affect lipid metabolism pathways or liver injury in this model. PMID:27354540

  2. Prevalence of pfhrp2 and/or pfhrp3 Gene Deletion in Plasmodium falciparum Population in Eight Highly Endemic States in India

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Praveen Kumar; Chandel, Himanshu Singh; Ahmad, Amreen; Krishna, Sri; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Singh, Neeru

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum encoded histidine rich protein (HRP2) based malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are used in India. Deletion of pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 genes contributes to false negative test results, and large numbers of such deletions have been reported from South America, highlighting the importance of surveillance to detect such deletions. Methods This is the first prospective field study carried out at 16 sites located in eight endemic states of India to assess the performance of PfHRP2 based RDT kits used in the national malaria control programme. In this study, microscopically confirmed P. falciparum but RDT negative samples were assessed for presence of pfhrp2, pfhrp3, and their flanking genes using PCR. Results Among 1521 microscopically positive P. falciparum samples screened, 50 were negative by HRP2 based RDT test. Molecular testing was carried out using these 50 RDT negative samples by assuming that 1471 RDT positive samples carried pfhrp2 gene. It was found that 2.4% (36/1521) and 1.8% (27/1521) of samples were negative for pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 genes, respectively. However, the frequency of pfhrp2 deletions varied between the sites ranging from 0–25% (2.4, 95% CI; 1.6–3.3). The frequency of both pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 gene deletion varied from 0–8% (1.6, 95% CI; 1.0–2.4). Conclusion This study provides evidence for low level presence of pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 deleted P. falciparum parasites in different endemic regions of India, and periodic surveillance is warranted for reliable use of PfHRP2 based RDTs. PMID:27518538

  3. Na+ dependent acid-base transporters in the choroid plexus; insights from slc4 and slc9 gene deletion studies

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Henriette L.; Nguyen, An T.; Pedersen, Fredrik D.; Damkier, Helle H.

    2013-01-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is located in the ventricular system of the brain, where it secretes the majority of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that fills the ventricular system and surrounds the central nervous system. The CPE is a highly vascularized single layer of cuboidal cells with an unsurpassed transepithelial water and solute transport rate. Several members of the slc4a family of bicarbonate transporters are expressed in the CPE. In the basolateral membrane the electroneutral Na+ dependent Cl−/HCO3− exchanger, NCBE (slc4a10) is expressed. In the luminal membrane, the electrogenic Na+:HCO3− cotransporter, NBCe2 (slc4a5) is expressed. The electroneutral Na+:HCO3− cotransporter, NBCn1 (slc4a7), has been located in both membranes. In addition to the bicarbonate transporters, the Na+/H+ exchanger, NHE1 (slc9a1), is located in the luminal membrane of the CPE. Genetically modified mice targeting slc4a2, slc4a5, slc4a7, slc4a10, and slc9a1 have been generated. Deletion of slc4a5, 7 or 10, or slc9a1 has numerous impacts on CP function and structure in these mice. Removal of the transporters affects brain ventricle size (slc4a5 and slc4a10) and intracellular pH regulation (slc4a7 and slc4a10). In some instances, removal of the proteins from the CPE (slc4a5, 7, and 10) causes changes in abundance and localization of non-target transporters known to be involved in pH regulation and CSF secretion. The focus of this review is to combine the insights gathered from these knockout mice to highlight the impact of slc4 gene deletion on the CSF production and intracellular pH regulation resulting from the deletion of slc4a5, 7 and 10, and slc9a1. Furthermore, the review contains a comparison of the described human mutations of these genes to the findings in the knockout studies. Finally, the future perspective of utilizing these proteins as potential targets for the treatment of CSF disorders will be discussed. PMID:24155723

  4. A recombination outside the BB deletion refines the location of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa locus RP3

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.; Bingham, E.; Forsythe, P.; McHenry, C.

    1996-07-01

    Genetic loci for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) have been mapped between Xp11.22 and Xp22.13 (RP2, RP3, RP6, and RP15). The RP3 gene, which is responsible for the predominant form of XLRP in most Caucasian populations, has been localized to Xp21.1 by linkage analysis and the map positions of chromosomal deletions associated with the disease. Previous linkage studies have suggested that RP3 is flanked by the markers DXS1110 (distal) and OTC (proximal). Patient BB was though to have RP because of a lesion at the RP3 locus, in addition to chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), mild mental retardation, and the McLeod phenotype. This patient carried a deletion extending {approximately}3 Mb from DMD in Xp21.3 to Xp21.1, with the proximal breakpoint located {approximately}40 kb centromeric to DXS1110. The RP3 gene, therefore, is believed to reside between DXS1110 and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. In order to refine the location of RP3 and to ascertain patients with RP3, we have been analyzing several XLRP families for linkage to Xp markers. Linkage analysis in an American family of 27 individuals demonstrates segregation of XLRP with markers in Xp21.1, consistent with the RP3 subtype. One affected male shows a recombination event proximal to DXS1110. Additional markers within the DXS1110-OTC interval show that the crossover is between two novel polymorphic markers, DXS8349 and M6, both of which are present in BB DNA and lie centromeric to the proximal breakpoint. This recombination places the XLRP mutation in this family outside the BB deletion and redefines the location of RP3. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Screening of point mutations by multiple SSCP analysis in the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lasa, A.; Baiget, M.; Gallano, P.

    1994-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked neuromuscular disorder. The population frequency of DMD is one in approximately 3500 boys, of which one third is thought to be a new mutant. The DMD gene is the largest known to date, spanning over 2,3 Mb in band Xp21.2; 79 exons are transcribed into a 14 Kb mRNA coding for a protein of 427 kD which has been named dystrophin. It has been shown that about 65% of affected boys have a gene deletion with a wide variation in localization and size. The remaining affected individuals who have no detectable deletions or duplications would probably carry more subtle mutations that are difficult to detect. These mutations occur in several different exons and seem to be unique to single patients. Their identification represents a formidable goal because of the large size and complexity of the dystrophin gene. SSCP is a very efficient method for the detection of point mutations if the parameters that affect the separation of the strands are optimized for a particular DNA fragment. The multiple SSCP allows the simultaneous study of several exons, and implies the use of different conditions because no single set of conditions will be optimal for all fragments. Seventy-eight DMD patients with no deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene were selected for the multiple SSCP analysis. Genomic DNA from these patients was amplified using the primers described for the diagnosis procedure (muscle promoter and exons 3, 8, 12, 16, 17, 19, 32, 45, 48 and 51). We have observed different mobility shifts in bands corresponding to exons 8, 12, 43 and 51. In exons 17 and 45, altered electrophoretic patterns were found in different samples identifying polymorphisms already described.

  6. A four base pair deletion 5' to the A gamma T gene is associated not only with decreased expression of the A gamma T-globin gene, but also of the G gamma-globin gene in cis.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M B; Adams, J G; Steinberg, M H; Winter, W P

    1994-12-01

    A four base pair deletion 5' to A gamma T-globin gene at positions -222 to -225 has been reported to reduce the expression of this gene. To evaluate the prevalence and effect of this deletion, PCR-based methods were employed. The deletion had a gene frequency of 0.06 in a sample of African-American individuals with sickle cell trait, 0.18 in adult African-Americans with normal Hb AA, and 0.36 in caucasians. Seventy cord blood samples from African-American newborns with Hb AA were evaluated by both HPLC and PCR. The frequency of the A gamma T allele was 0.13. The A gamma T-globin chain was always present in a lower proportion than the A gamma I allele (70% of A gamma I), but the percentage of A gamma-globin was the same whether or not A gamma T was present. The total percentage of Hb F, however, was significantly lower in the group with the A gamma T allele (77.1% vs. 87.4%, P < 0.01). These results indicate that the four base pair deletion is not only associated with reduced expression of the A gamma T allele, but also of the G gamma allele in cis, further suggesting a possible role of this region in the modulation of the expression of the linked gamma-globin genes.

  7. An efficient deletion mutant packaging system for defective herpes simplex virus vectors: Potential applications to human gene therapy and neuronal physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, A.I.; Keyomarsi, K.; Bryan, J.; Pardee, A.B. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors have previously described a defective herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vector system that permits that introduction of virtually any gene into nonmitotic cells. pHSVlac, the prototype vector, stably expresses Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase from a constitutive promoter in many human cell lines, in cultured rat neurons from throughout the nervous system, and in cells in the adult rat brain. HSV-1 vectors expressing other genes may prove useful for studying neuronal physiology or performing human gene therapy for neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease or brain tumors. A HSV-1 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant, ts K, has been used as helper virus; ts mutants revert to wild type. In contrast, HSV-1 deletion mutants essentially cannot revert to wild type; therefore, use of a deletion mutant as helper virus might permit human gene therapy with HSV-1 vectors. They now report an efficient packaging system for HSV-1 VECTORS USING A DELETION MUTANT, d30EBA, as helper virus; virus is grown on the complementing cell line M64A. pHSVlac virus prepared using the deletion mutant packaging system stably expresses {beta}-galactosidase in cultured rat sympathetic neurons and glia. Both D30EBA and ts K contain a mutation in the IE3 gene of HSV-1 strain 17 and have the same phenotype; therefore, changing the helper virus from ts K to D30EBA does not alter the host range or other properties of the HSV-1 vector system.

  8. Systematic screening for PRKAR1A gene rearrangement in Carney complex: identification and functional characterization of a new in-frame deletion

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, S B; Libé, R; Dambrun, M; Chevalier, C; Nigou, M; Auzan, C; North, M O; Sa, J; Gomes, L; Salpea, P; Horvath, A; Stratakis, C A; Hamzaoui, N; Bertherat, J; Clauser, E

    2016-01-01

    Background Point mutations of the PRKAR1A gene are a genetic cause of Carney complex (CNC) and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), but in 30% of the patients no mutation is detected. Objective Set up a routine-based technique for systematic detection of large deletions or duplications of this gene and functionally characterize these mutations. Methods Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) of the 12 exons of the PRKAR1A gene was validated and used to detect large rearrangements in 13 typical CNC and 39 confirmed or putative PPNAD without any mutations of the gene. An in-frame deletion was characterized by western blot and bioluminescence resonant energy transfer technique for its interaction with the catalytic subunit. Results MLPA allowed identification of exons 3–6 deletion in three patients of a family with typical CNC. The truncated protein is expressed, but rapidly degraded, and does not interact with the protein kinase A catalytic subunit. Conclusions MLPA is a powerful technique that may be used following the lack of mutations detected by direct sequencing in patients with bona fide CNC or PPNAD. We report here one such new deletion, as an example. However, these gene defects are not a frequent cause of CNC or PPNAD. PMID:24144965

  9. Complete deletion of the proteolipid protein gene (PLP) in a family with X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease.

    PubMed Central

    Raskind, W H; Williams, C A; Hudson, L D; Bird, T D

    1991-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked neurologic disorder characterized by dysmyelination in the central nervous system. Proteolipid protein (PLP), a major structural protein of myelin, is coded on the X chromosome. It has been postulated that a defect in the PLP gene is responsible for PMD. Different single-nucleotide substitutions have been found in conserved regions of the PLP gene of four unrelated PMD patients. Novel Southern blot patterns suggested a complex rearrangement in a fifth family. Linkage to PLP has been shown in others. We evaluated the PLP locus in a four-generation family with two living males affected with X-linked PMD. Analysis of DNA from the affected males revealed complete absence of a band, with PLP probes encompassing the promoter region, the entire coding region, and the 3' untranslated region and spanning at least 29 kb of genomic DNA. DNA from unaffected relatives gave the expected band pattern. Two obligate and one probable carrier women were hemizygous for the PLP locus by dosage analysis. Although it is unlikely, the previously described point mutations in PLP could represent polymorphisms. The finding of complete deletion of the PLP gene in our family is a stronger argument that mutations in PLP are responsible for X-linked PMD. Images Figure 3 PMID:1720927

  10. Constitutional de novo deletion of the FBXW7 gene in a patient with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and multiple primitive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Roversi, Gaia; Picinelli, Chiara; Bestetti, Ilaria; Crippa, Milena; Perotti, Daniela; Ciceri, Sara; Saccheri, Fabiana; Collini, Paola; Poliani, Pietro L.; Catania, Serena; Peissel, Bernard; Pagni, Fabio; Russo, Silvia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Finelli, Palma

    2015-01-01

    Multiple primary malignant neoplasms are rare entities in the clinical setting, but represent an important issue in the clinical management of patients since they could be expression of a genetic predisposition to malignancy. A high resolution genome wide array CGH led us to identify the first case of a de novo constitutional deletion confined to the FBXW7 gene, a well known tumor suppressor, in a patient with a syndromic phenotype characterized by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and multiple primary early/atypical onset tumors, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Wilms tumor and breast cancer. Other genetic defects may be associated with patient’s phenotype. In this light, constitutional mutations at BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, PALB2 and WT1 genes were excluded by performing sequencing and MLPA analysis; similarly, we ruled out constitutional abnormalities at the imprinted 11p15 region by methylation specific -MLPA assay. Our observations sustain the role of FBXW7 as cancer predisposition gene and expand the spectrum of its possible associated diseases. PMID:26482194

  11. A candidate gene approach to identify modifiers of the palatal phenotype in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Widdershoven, Josine C.C.; Bowser, Mark; Sheridan, Molly B.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Solot, Cynthia B.; Kirschner, Richard E.; Beemer, Frits A.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Devoto, Marcella; Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Palatal anomalies are one of the identifying features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) affecting about one third of patients. To identify genetic variants that increase the risk of cleft or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients, we performed a candidate gene association study in 101 patients with 22q11.2DS genotyped with the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0. Methods Patients from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, USA and Wilhelmina Children's Hospital Utrecht, The Netherlands were stratified based on palatal phenotype (overt cleft, submucosal cleft, bifid uvula). SNPs in 21 candidate genes for cleft palate were analyzed for genotype-phenotype association. In addition, TBX1 sequencing was carried out. Quality control and association analyses were conducted using the software package PLINK. Results Genotype and phenotype data of 101 unrelated patients (63 non-cleft subjects (62.4%), 38 cleft subjects (37.6%)) were analyzed. A Total of 39 SNPs on 10 genes demonstrated a p-value ≤0.05 prior to correction. The most significant SNPs were found on FGF10. However none of the SNPs remained significant after correcting for multiple testing. Conclusions Although these results are promising, analysis of additional samples will be required to confirm that variants in these regions influence risk for cleft palate or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients. PMID:23121717

  12. Deletion of genes involved in glutamate metabolism to improve poly-gamma-glutamic acid production in B. amyloliquefaciens LL3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; He, Yulian; Gao, Weixia; Feng, Jun; Cao, Mingfeng; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang; Wang, Shufang

    2015-02-01

    Here, we attempted to elevate poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production by modifying genes involved in glutamate metabolism in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LL3. Products of rocR, rocG and gudB facilitate the conversion from glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in Bacillus subtillis. The gene odhA is responsible for the synthesis of a component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A. In-frame deletions of these four genes were performed. In shake flask experiments the gudB/rocG double mutant presented enhanced production of γ-PGA, a 38 % increase compared with wild type. When fermented in a 5-L fermenter with pH control, the γ-PGA yield of the rocR mutant was increased to 5.83 g/L from 4.55 g/L for shake flask experiments. The gudB/rocG double mutant produced 5.68 g/L γ-PGA compared with that of 4.03 g/L for the wild type, a 40 % increase. Those results indicated the possibility of improving γ-PGA production by modifying glutamate metabolism, and identified potential genetic targets to improve γ-PGA production.

  13. Constitutional de novo deletion of the FBXW7 gene in a patient with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and multiple primitive tumors.

    PubMed

    Roversi, Gaia; Picinelli, Chiara; Bestetti, Ilaria; Crippa, Milena; Perotti, Daniela; Ciceri, Sara; Saccheri, Fabiana; Collini, Paola; Poliani, Pietro L; Catania, Serena; Peissel, Bernard; Pagni, Fabio; Russo, Silvia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Finelli, Palma

    2015-01-01

    Multiple primary malignant neoplasms are rare entities in the clinical setting, but represent an important issue in the clinical management of patients since they could be expression of a genetic predisposition to malignancy. A high resolution genome wide array CGH led us to identify the first case of a de novo constitutional deletion confined to the FBXW7 gene, a well known tumor suppressor, in a patient with a syndromic phenotype characterized by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and multiple primary early/atypical onset tumors, including Hodgkin's lymphoma, Wilms tumor and breast cancer. Other genetic defects may be associated with patient's phenotype. In this light, constitutional mutations at BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, PALB2 and WT1 genes were excluded by performing sequencing and MLPA analysis; similarly, we ruled out constitutional abnormalities at the imprinted 11p15 region by methylation specific -MLPA assay. Our observations sustain the role of FBXW7 as cancer predisposition gene and expand the spectrum of its possible associated diseases. PMID:26482194

  14. Deletion of xylR gene enhances expression of xylose isomerase in Streptomyces lividans TK24.

    PubMed

    Heo, Gun-Young; Kim, Won-Chan; Joo, Gil-Jae; Kwak, Yun-Young; Shin, Jae-Ho; Roh, Dong-Hyun; Park, Heui-Dong; Rhee, In-Koo

    2008-05-01

    Glucose (xylose) isomerases from Streptomyces sp. have been used for the production of high fructose corn syrup for industrial purposes. An 11-kb DNA fragment containing the xyl gene cluster was isolated from Streptomyces lividans TK24 and its nucleotide sequences were analyzed. It was found that the xyl gene cluster contained a putative transcriptional repressor (xylR), xylulokinase (xylB), and xylose isomerase (xylA) genes. The transcriptional directions of the xylB and xylA genes were divergent, which is consistent to those found in other streptomycetes. A gene encoding XylR was located downstream of the xylB gene in the same direction, and its mutant strain produced xylose isomerase regardless of xylose in the media. The enzyme expression level in the mutant was 4.6 times higher than that in the parent strain under xylose-induced condition. Even in the absence of xylose, the mutant strain produce over 60% of enzyme compared with the xylose-induced condition. Gel mobility shift assay showed that XylR was able to bind to the putative xyl promoter, and its binding was inhibited by the addition of xylose in vitro. This result suggested that XylR acts as a repressor in the S. lividans xylose operon.

  15. Delimitation of the Earliness per se D1 (Eps-D1) flowering gene to a subtelomeric chromosomal deletion in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Zikhali, Meluleki; Wingen, Luzie U; Griffiths, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Earliness per se (Eps) genes account for the variation in flowering time when vernalization and photoperiod requirements are satisfied. Genomics and bioinformatics approaches were used to describe allelic variation for 40 Triticum aestivum genes predicted, by synteny with Brachypodium distachyon, to be in the 1DL Eps region. Re-sequencing 1DL genes revealed that varieties carrying early heading alleles at this locus, Spark and Cadenza, carry a subtelomeric deletion including several genes. The equivalent region in Rialto and Avalon is intact. A bimodal distribution in the segregating Spark X Rialto single seed descent (SSD) populations enabled the 1DL QTL to be defined as a discrete Mendelian factor, which we named Eps-D1. Near isogenic lines (NILs) and NIL derived key recombinants between markers flanking Eps-D1 suggest that the 1DL deletion contains the gene(s) underlying Eps-D1. The deletion spans the equivalent of the Triticum monoccocum Eps-A (m) 1 locus, and hence includes MODIFIER OF TRANSCRIPTION 1 (MOT1) and FTSH PROTEASE 4 (FTSH4), the candidates for Eps-A (m) 1. The deletion also contains T. aestivum EARLY FLOWERING 3-D1 (TaELF3-D1) a homologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock gene EARLY FLOWERING 3. Eps-D1 is possibly a homologue of Eps-B1 on chromosome 1BL. NILs carrying the Eps-D1 deletion have significantly reduced total TaELF3 expression and altered TaGIGANTEA (TaGI) expression compared with wild type. Altered TaGI expression is consistent with an ELF3 mutant, hence we propose TaELF3-D1 as the more likely candidate for Eps-D1. This is the first direct fine mapping of Eps effect in bread wheat.

  16. Delimitation of the Earliness per se D1 (Eps-D1) flowering gene to a subtelomeric chromosomal deletion in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    PubMed Central

    Zikhali, Meluleki; Wingen, Luzie U.; Griffiths, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Earliness per se (Eps) genes account for the variation in flowering time when vernalization and photoperiod requirements are satisfied. Genomics and bioinformatics approaches were used to describe allelic variation for 40 Triticum aestivum genes predicted, by synteny with Brachypodium distachyon, to be in the 1DL Eps region. Re-sequencing 1DL genes revealed that varieties carrying early heading alleles at this locus, Spark and Cadenza, carry a subtelomeric deletion including several genes. The equivalent region in Rialto and Avalon is intact. A bimodal distribution in the segregating Spark X Rialto single seed descent (SSD) populations enabled the 1DL QTL to be defined as a discrete Mendelian factor, which we named Eps-D1. Near isogenic lines (NILs) and NIL derived key recombinants between markers flanking Eps-D1 suggest that the 1DL deletion contains the gene(s) underlying Eps-D1. The deletion spans the equivalent of the Triticum monoccocum Eps-A m 1 locus, and hence includes MODIFIER OF TRANSCRIPTION 1 (MOT1) and FTSH PROTEASE 4 (FTSH4), the candidates for Eps-A m 1. The deletion also contains T. aestivum EARLY FLOWERING 3-D1 (TaELF3-D1) a homologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock gene EARLY FLOWERING 3. Eps-D1 is possibly a homologue of Eps-B1 on chromosome 1BL. NILs carrying the Eps-D1 deletion have significantly reduced total TaELF3 expression and altered TaGIGANTEA (TaGI) expression compared with wild type. Altered TaGI expression is consistent with an ELF3 mutant, hence we propose TaELF3-D1 as the more likely candidate for Eps-D1. This is the first direct fine mapping of Eps effect in bread wheat. PMID:26476691

  17. Virtual reality 3D headset based on DMD light modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Evans, Allan; Tang, Edward

    2014-06-13

    We present the design of an immersion-type 3D headset suitable for virtual reality applications based upon digital micro-mirror devices (DMD). Our approach leverages silicon micro mirrors offering 720p resolution displays in a small form-factor. Supporting chip sets allow rapid integration of these devices into wearable displays with high resolution and low power consumption. Applications include night driving, piloting of UAVs, fusion of multiple sensors for pilots, training, vision diagnostics and consumer gaming. Our design is described in which light from the DMD is imaged to infinity and the user’s own eye lens forms a real image on the user’s retina.

  18. The Fundamentals of Using the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD(TM)) for Projection Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Lars A.

    1995-01-01

    Developed by Texas Instruments (TI) the digital micromirror device (DMD(tm)) is a quickly emerging and highly useful micro-electro-mechanical structures (MEMS) device. Using standard semiconductor fabrication technology, the DMD's simplicity in concept and design will provide advantageous solutions for many different applications. At the rudimentary level, the DMD is a precision, semiconductor light switch. In the initial commercial development of DMD technology, TI has concentrated on projection display and hardcopy. This paper will focus on how the DMD is used for projection display. Other application areas are being explored and evaluated to find appropriate and beneficial uses for the DMD.

  19. A Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Hot Spot Mutation in Dystrophin-Deficient Cavalier King Charles Spaniels Is Amenable to Exon 51 Skipping

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Gemma L.; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Fernandez-Fuente, Marta; Burke, Margaret M.; Nagel, Nicole; Holder, Angela; Stanley, Rachael; Chandler, Kate; Marks, Stanley L.; Muntoni, Francesco; Shelton, G. Diane; Piercy, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which afflicts 1 in 3500 boys, is one of the most common genetic disorders of children. This fatal degenerative condition is caused by an absence or deficiency of dystrophin in striated muscle. Most affected patients have inherited or spontaneous deletions in the dystrophin gene that disrupt the reading frame resulting in unstable truncated products. For these patients, restoration of the reading frame via antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach. The major DMD deletion “hot spot” is found between exons 45 and 53, and skipping exon 51 in particular is predicted to ameliorate the dystrophic phenotype in the greatest number of patients. Currently the mdx mouse is the most widely used animal model of DMD, although its mild phenotype limits its suitability in clinical trials. The Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) model has a severe phenotype, but due to its large size, is expensive to use. Both these models have mutations in regions of the dystrophin gene distant from the commonly mutated DMD “hot spot”. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the severe phenotype, histopathological findings, and molecular analysis of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy (CKCS-MD). The dogs harbour a missense mutation in the 5′ donor splice site of exon 50 that results in deletion of exon 50 in mRNA transcripts and a predicted premature truncation of the translated protein. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated skipping of exon 51 in cultured myoblasts from an affected dog restored the reading frame and protein expression. Conclusions/Significance Given the small size of the breed, the amiable temperament and the nature of the mutation, we propose that CKCS-MD is a valuable new model for clinical trials of antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping and other therapeutic approaches for DMD. PMID:20072625

  20. Prolidase Deficiency in a Mexican-American Patient Identified by Array CGH Reveals a Novel and the Largest PEPD Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Hintze, Jonathan P.; Kirby, Amelia; Torti, Erin; Batanian, Jacqueline R.

    2016-01-01

    Prolidase deficiency (PD) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the peptidase D (PEPD) gene, affecting collagen degradation. Features include lower extremity ulcers, facial dysmorphism, frequent respiratory infections, and intellectual disability, though there is significant intra- and interfamilial variability. Twenty-eight mutations have been previously reported, all either small deletions/duplications or point mutations discovered by enzyme or DNA assays. PD has been reported in patients of various ethnic backgrounds, but never in the Mexican-American population. We describe the first Mexican-American patient with PD, who presented with typical facial features, developmental delay, microcephaly, and xerosis. Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) revealed a homozygous deletion in the region of 19q13.11, estimated to be between 124.79 and 195.72 kb in size, representing the largest PEPD gene deletion reported to date and the first discovered by CMA. PMID:27385964

  1. Prolidase Deficiency in a Mexican-American Patient Identified by Array CGH Reveals a Novel and the Largest PEPD Gene Deletion.

    PubMed

    Hintze, Jonathan P; Kirby, Amelia; Torti, Erin; Batanian, Jacqueline R

    2016-05-01

    Prolidase deficiency (PD) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the peptidase D (PEPD) gene, affecting collagen degradation. Features include lower extremity ulcers, facial dysmorphism, frequent respiratory infections, and intellectual disability, though there is significant intra- and interfamilial variability. Twenty-eight mutations have been previously reported, all either small deletions/duplications or point mutations discovered by enzyme or DNA assays. PD has been reported in patients of various ethnic backgrounds, but never in the Mexican-American population. We describe the first Mexican-American patient with PD, who presented with typical facial features, developmental delay, microcephaly, and xerosis. Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) revealed a homozygous deletion in the region of 19q13.11, estimated to be between 124.79 and 195.72 kb in size, representing the largest PEPD gene deletion reported to date and the first discovered by CMA. PMID:27385964

  2. Genomic deletions correlate with underexpression of novel candidate genes at six loci in pediatric pilocytic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Potter, Nicola; Karakoula, Aikaterini; Phipps, Kim P; Harkness, William; Hayward, Richard; Thompson, Dominic N P; Jacques, Thomas S; Harding, Brian; Thomas, David G T; Palmer, Rodger W; Rees, Jeremy; Darling, John; Warr, Tracy J

    2008-08-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of pediatric pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is not well defined. Previous cytogenetic and molecular studies have not identified nonrandom genetic aberrations. To correlate differential gene expression and genomic copy number aberrations (CNAs) in PA, we have used Affymetrix GeneChip HG_U133A to generate gene expression profiles of 19 pediatric patients and the SpectralChip 2600 to investigate CNAs in 11 of these tumors. Hierarchical clustering according to expression profile similarity grouped tumors and controls separately. We identified 1844 genes that showed significant differential expression between tumor and normal controls, with a large number clearly influencing phosphatidylinositol and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in PA. Most CNAs identified in this study were single-clone alterations. However, a small region of loss involving up to seven adjacent clones at 7q11.23 was observed in seven tumors and correlated with the underexpression of BCL7B. Loss of four individual clones was also associated with reduced gene expression including SH3GL2 at 9p21.2-p23, BCL7A (which shares 90% sequence homology with BCL7B) at 12q24.33, DRD1IP at 10q26.3, and TUBG2 and CNTNAP1 at 17q21.31. Moreover, the down-regulation of FOXG1B at 14q12 correlated with loss within the gene promoter region in most tumors. This is the first study to correlate differential gene expression with CNAs in PA. PMID:18670637

  3. Murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah) gene is disrupted by a neonatally lethal albino deletion that defines the hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation 1 (hsdr-1) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Klebig, M.L. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN ); Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M. )

    1992-02-15

    Homozygous deletion of the hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation 1 (hsdr-1) locus in mouse chromosome 7 results in perinatal death and a pleiotropic syndrome characterized by ultrastructural abnormalities of the liver and kidney, failure of induction of a number of specific transcription units in the liver and kidney during late gestation, and marked overexpression of an enzyme that defends against oxidative stress. Previously, the breakpoints of two albino (c) deletions (c{sup 14CoS} and c{sup IFAFyh}) that genetically define hsdr-1 were localized, on a long-range map, in the vicinity of the distal breakpoint of a viable albino deletion (c{sup 24R75M}) that breaks proximally within the c locus. Here the authors report the use of a probe derived from a deletion breakpoint fusion fragment cloned from c{sup 24R75M}/c{sup 24R75M} DNA to clone a breakpoint fusion fragment caused by the c{sup 14CoS} deletion. The proximal breakpoint of the c{sup 14CoS} deletion was discovered to disrupt a gene (Fah) encoding fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine degradation pathway. These mouse mutants may also provide models for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia, which is associated with fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency and liver and kidney dysfunction.

  4. Conditional deletion of Msx homeobox genes in the uterus inhibits blastocyst implantation by altering uterine receptivity.

    PubMed

    Daikoku, Takiko; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Tranguch, Susanne; Xie, Huirong; Fujita, Tomoko; Hirota, Yasushi; Lydon, John; DeMayo, Francesco; Maxson, Robert; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2011-12-13

    An effective bidirectional communication between an implantation-competent blastocyst and the receptive uterus is a prerequisite for mammalian reproduction. The blastocyst will implant only when this molecular cross-talk is established. Here we show that the muscle segment homeobox gene (Msh) family members Msx1 and Msx2, which are two highly conserved genes critical for epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during development, also play crucial roles in embryo implantation. Loss of Msx1/Msx2 expression correlates with altered uterine luminal epithelial cell polarity and affects E-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation through the control of Wnt5a expression. Application of Wnt5a in vitro compromised blastocyst invasion and trophoblast outgrowth on cultured uterine epithelial cells. The finding that Msx1/Msx2 genes are critical for conferring uterine receptivity and readiness to implantation could have clinical significance, because compromised uterine receptivity is a major cause of pregnancy failure in IVF programs.

  5. Gene deletions in patients with haemophilia B and anti-factor IX antibodies.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, F; Choo, K H; Rees, D J; Boyd, Y; Rizza, C R; Brownlee, G G

    Christmas disease, or haemophilia B, is an inherited X-linked haemorrhagic disease which at present occurs in 798 known cases in the United Kingdom, corresponding to a frequency of about 1 in 30,000 males. Patients are deficient in the intrinsic clotting factor IX and are treated by replacement of this protein prepared from pooled plasma obtained from normal individuals. Occasionally treatment is complicated by the appearance of specific anti-factor IX antibodies. It seemed to us that this might be due to the absence of 'self' factor IX causing the immune system to regard the infused normal factor IX as foreign. The absence of all or part of the factor IX gene was an obvious possible reason for this, which we have now tested using our previously isolated gene probe. We have found four patients with gross gene defects.

  6. Conditional gene deletion reveals functional redundancy of GABAB receptors in peripheral nociceptors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    deletion of GABAB receptors from peripheral nociceptive neurons in vivo. This lets us conclude that GABAB receptors in the peripheral nervous system play a less important role than those in the central nervous system in the regulation of pain. PMID:19925671

  7. Combined metabonomic and quantitative real-time PCR analyses reveal systems metabolic changes of Fusarium graminearum induced by Tri5 gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Zhang, Jingtao; Song, Xiushi; Yang, Jian; Li, Heping; Tang, Huiru; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2011-05-01

    Fusarium graminearum (FG) is a serious plant pathogen causing huge losses in global production of wheat and other cereals. Tri5-gene encoded trichodiene synthase is the first key enzyme for biosynthesis of trichothecene mycotoxins in FG. To further our understandings of FG metabolism which is essential for developing novel strategies for controlling FG, we conducted a comprehensive investigation on the metabolic changes caused by Tri5-deletion by comparing metabolic differences between the wild-type FG5035 and an FG strain, Tri5(-), with Tri5 deleted. NMR methods identified more than 50 assigned fungal metabolites. Combined metabonomic and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that Tri5 deletion caused significant and comprehensive metabolic changes for FG apart from mycotoxin biosynthesis. These changes involved both carbon and nitrogen metabolisms including alterations in GABA shunt, TCA cycle, shikimate pathway, and metabolisms of lipids, amino acids, inositol, choline, pyrimidine, and purine. The hexose transporter has also been affected. These findings have shown that Tri5 gene deletion induces widespread changes in FG primary metabolism and demonstrated the combination of NMR-based metabonomics and qRT-PCR analyses as a useful way to understand the systems metabolic changes resulting from a single specific gene knockout in an eukaryotic genome and thus Tri5 gene functions. PMID:21413710

  8. Secondary EWSR1 Gene Abnormalities in SMARCB1-Deficient Tumors with 22q11-12 Regional Deletions: Potential Pitfalls in Interpreting EWSR1 FISH Results

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P.; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2016-01-01

    SMARCB1 inactivation occurs in a variety of tumors, being caused by various genetic mechanisms. Since SMARCB1 and EWSR1 genes are located close to each other on chromosome 22, larger SMARCB1 deletions may encompass the EWSR1 locus. Herein, we report four cases with SMARCB1-deletions showing concurrent EWSR1 gene abnormalities by FISH, which lead initially to misinterpretations as EWSR1-rearranged tumors. Our study group included various morphologies: a poorly differentiated chordoma, an extrarenal rhabdoid tumor, a myoepithelial carcinoma, and a proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma. All cases showed loss of SMARCB1 (INI1) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and displayed characteristic histologic features for the diagnoses. The SMARCB1 FISH revealed homozygous or heterozygous deletions in three and one case, respectively. The co-hybridized EWSR1 probes demonstrated either unbalanced split signals or heterozygous deletion in two cases each. The former suggested bona fide rearrangement, while the latter resembled an unbalanced translocation. However, all the FISH patterns were quite complex and distinct from the simple and uniform split signals seen in typical EWSR1 rearrangements. We conclude that in the context of 22q11-12 regional alterations present in SMARCB1-deleted tumors, simultaneous EWSR1 involvement may be misinterpreted as equivalent to EWSR1 rearrangement. A detailed clinicopathologic correlation and supplementing the EWSR1 FISH assay with complementary methodology is mandatory for correct diagnosis. PMID:27218413

  9. Secondary EWSR1 gene abnormalities in SMARCB1-deficient tumors with 22q11-12 regional deletions: Potential pitfalls in interpreting EWSR1 FISH results.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-10-01

    SMARCB1 inactivation occurs in a variety of tumors, being caused by various genetic mechanisms. Since SMARCB1 and EWSR1 genes are located close to each other on chromosome 22, larger SMARCB1 deletions may encompass the EWSR1 locus. Herein, we report four cases with SMARCB1-deletions showing concurrent EWSR1 gene abnormalities by FISH, which lead initially to misinterpretations as EWSR1-rearranged tumors. Our study group included various morphologies: a poorly differentiated chordoma, an extrarenal rhabdoid tumor, a myoepithelial carcinoma, and a proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma. All cases showed loss of SMARCB1 (INI1) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and displayed characteristic histologic features for the diagnoses. The SMARCB1 FISH revealed homozygous or heterozygous deletions in three and one case, respectively. The co-hybridized EWSR1 probes demonstrated either unbalanced split signals or heterozygous deletion in two cases each. The former suggested bona fide rearrangement, while the latter resembled an unbalanced translocation. However, all the FISH patterns were quite complex and distinct from the simple and uniform split signals seen in typical EWSR1 rearrangements. We conclude that in the context of 22q11-12 regional alterations present in SMARCB1-deleted tumors, simultaneous EWSR1 involvement may be misinterpreted as equivalent to EWSR1 rearrangement. A detailed clinicopathologic correlation and supplementing the EWSR1 FISH assay with complementary methodology is mandatory for correct diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218413

  10. Glyoxalase I Gene Deletion Mutants of Leishmania donovani Exhibit Reduced Methylglyoxal Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Swati C.; Madhubala, Rentala

    2009-01-01

    Background Glyoxalase I is a metalloenzyme of the glyoxalase pathway that plays a central role in eliminating the toxic metabolite methyglyoxal. The protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani possesses a unique trypanothione dependent glyoxalase system. Principal Findings Analysis of the L. donovani GLOI sequence predicted a mitochondrial targeting sequence, suggesting that the enzyme is likely to be targeted to the mitochondria. In order to determine definitively the intracellular localization of GLOI in L. donovani, a full-length GLOI gene was fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene to generate a chimeric construct. Confocal microscopy of L. donovani promastigotes carrying this chimeric construct and immunofluorescence microscopy using anti-GLOI antibodies demonstrated that GLOI is localized in the kinetoplast of the parasite apart from the cytosol. To study the physiological role of GLOI in Leishmania, we first created promastigote mutants heterozygous for GLOI by targeted gene replacement using either hygromycin or neomycin phosphotransferases as selectable markers. Heterozygous mutants of L. donovani display a slower growth rate, have lower glyoxalase I activity and have reduced ability to detoxify methylglyoxal in comparison to the wild-type parasites. Complementation of the heterozygous mutant with an episomal GLOI construct showed the restoration of heterozygous mutant phenotype nearly fully to that of the wild-type. Null mutants were obtained only after GLOI was expressed from an episome in heterozygous mutants. Conclusions We for the first time report localization of GLOI in L. donovani in the kinetoplast. To study the physiological role of GLOI in Leishmania, we have generated GLOI attenuated strains by targeted gene replacement and report that GLOI is likely to be an important gene since GLOI mutants in L. donovani showed altered phenotype. The present data supports that the GLOI plays an essential role in the survival of this pathogenic organism and

  11. Virulence Associated Genes-Deleted Salmonella Montevideo Is Attenuated, Highly Immunogenic and Confers Protection against Virulent Challenge in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Lee, John H.

    2016-01-01

    To construct a novel live vaccine against Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo (SM) infection in chickens, two important bacterial regulatory genes, lon and cpxR, which are associated with invasion and virulence, were deleted from the wild type SM genome. Attenuated strains, JOL1625 (Δlon), JOL1597 (ΔcpxR), and JOL1599 (ΔlonΔcpxR) were thereby generated. Observations with scanning electron microscopy suggested that JOL1625 and JOL1599 cells showed increased ruffled surface which may be related to abundant extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production. JOL1597 depicted milder ruffled surface but showed increased surface corrugation. ConA affinity-based fluorometric quantification and fluorescence microscopy revealed significant increases in EPS production in JOL1625 and JOL1599. Four weeks old chickens were used for safety and immunological studies. The mutants were not observed in feces beyond day 3 nor in spleen and cecum beyond day 7, whereas wild type SM was detected for at least 2 weeks in spleen and cecum. JOL1599 was further evaluated as a vaccine candidate. Chickens immunized with JOL1599 showed strong humoral responses, as indicated by systemic IgG and secretory IgA levels, as well as strong cell-mediated immune response, as indicated by increased lymphocyte proliferation. JOL1599-immunized groups also showed significant degree of protection against wild type challenge. Our results indicate that Δlon- and/or ΔcpxR-deleted SM exhibited EPS-enhanced immunogenicity and attenuation via reduced bacterial cell intracellular replication, conferred increased protection, and possess safety qualities favorable for effective vaccine development against virulent SM infections. PMID:27785128

  12. Effects of deletion of different PP2C protein phosphatase genes on stress responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Dilruba; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    A key mechanism of signal transduction in eukaryotes is reversible protein phosphorylation, mediated through protein kinases and protein phosphatases (PPases). Modulation of signal transduction by this means regulates many biological processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has 40 PPases, including seven protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C PPase) genes (PTC1-PTC7). However, their precise functions remain poorly understood. To elucidate their cellular functions and to identify those that are redundant, we constructed 127 strains with deletions of all possible combinations of the seven PP2C PPase genes. All 127 disruptants were viable under nutrient-rich conditions, demonstrating that none of the combinations induced synthetic lethality under these conditions. However, several combinations exhibited novel phenotypes, e.g. the Δptc5Δptc7 double disruptant and the Δptc2Δptc3Δptc5Δptc7 quadruple disruptant exhibited low (13°C) and high (37°C) temperature-sensitive growth, respectively. Interestingly, the septuple disruptant Δptc1Δptc2Δptc3Δptc4Δptc5Δptc6Δptc7 showed an essentially normal growth phenotype at 37°C. The Δptc2Δptc3Δptc5Δptc7 quadruple disruptant was sensitive to LiCl (0.4 m). Two double disruptants, Δptc1Δptc2 and Δptc1Δptc4, displayed slow growth and Δptc1Δptc2Δptc4 could not grow on medium containing 1.5 m NaCl. The Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant showed increased sensitivity to caffeine, congo red and calcofluor white compared to each single deletion. Our observations indicate that S. cerevisiae PP2C PPases have a shared and important role in responses to environmental stresses. These disruptants also provide a means for exploring the molecular mechanisms of redundant PTC gene functions under defined conditions.

  13. Tissue-specific loss of fucosylated glycolipids in mice with targeted deletion of alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Iwamori, Masao; Domino, Steven E

    2004-01-01

    Glycolipids in epithelial tissues of the gastrointestinal tract act as receptors for enteric bacteria and are implicated in the activation of the intestinal immune system. To clarify the genes involved in the fucosylation of the major glycolipids, substrate glycolipids and fucosylated products were measured in tissues of wild-type and mutant mice lacking alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes FUT1 or FUT2. Quantitative determination was performed by TLC-immunostaining for GA1 (Gg4Cer), FGA1 (fucosyl GA1), GM1 (II3NeuAc-Gg4Cer), FGM1 (fucosyl GM1), and Forssman glycolipids. Both FGM1 and FGA1 completely disappeared from the antrum, cecum, and colon of FUT2-null mice, but not those of FUT1-null and wild-type mice. Precursor glycolipids, GM1 and GA1, accumulated in tissues of FUT2-null mice, indicating that the FUT2-encoded enzyme preferentially participates in the fucosylation of GA1 and GM1 in these tissues. Female reproductive organs were similarly found to utilize FUT2 for the fucosylation of glycolipids FGA1 (uterus and cervix), and FGM1 (ovary), due to their absence in FUT2-null mice. In FUT1-null mice FGA1 was lost from the pancreas, but was present in wild-type and FUT2-null mice, indicating that FUT1 is essential for fucosylation of GA1 in the pancreas. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I lectin histochemistry for alpha(1,2)fucose residues confirmed the absence of alpha(1,2)fucose residues from the apical surface of pancreatic acinar glands of FUT1-null mice. Ileum, epididymis, and testis retained specific fucosylated glycolipids, irrespective of targeted deletion of either gene, indicating either compensation for or redundancy of the alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes in these tissues. PMID:14967068

  14. Roles of the RecJ and RecQ proteins in spontaneous formation of deletion mutations in the Escherichia coli K12 endogenous tonB gene.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Kazumi; Kawata, Masakado; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2003-07-01

    The endogenous tonB gene of Escherichia coli was used as a target for spontaneous deletion mutations which were isolated from recJ(-) and recQ(-) cells. Large deletions, due to simultaneous mutations of the trp operon, were also isolated. The rates of tonB mutation were 2.77 x 10(-8), 4.13 x 10(-8) and 5.00 x 10(-8) for rec(+), recJ(-) and recQ(-) cells, respectively. We analyzed 94 and 99 tonB mutants from the recJ(-) and recQ(-) cells, respectively, by sequencing. We found that IS insertion dominated, followed by base substitutions, frameshifts and deletions in both recJ(-) and recQ(-) strains. We then analyzed 55 tonB-trp deletions, ranging in size from 5907 to 20,832 bp, from the recJ(-) strains and 47 tonB-trp deletions, ranging in size from 4,959 to 16,390 bp from the recQ(-) strains. About one-third of tonB-trp deletions from both the recJ(-) and the recQ(-) cells were found to have occurred between short sequence repeats at the deletion termini. About one-third of tonB-trp deletions from both mutants showed 2-4 bp repeats in the immediate vicinity of the endpoints, which appeared to indicate no clear association with deletion. The remaining one-third of tonB-trp deletions had no homology at the endpoint. These results were similar to those for the rec(+) cells. Hanada and colleagues demonstrated that structually similar rearrangements arising during lambda bio phage formation (illegitimate recombination) increased in the recQ(-) strain. To explain this discrepancy, we interpreted as distinctive the mechanism for rearrangement during transducing phage formation which is recQ-dependent and that for deletions formed in chromosomes which is recQ-independent. PMID:12840109

  15. DMD-based multi-object spectrograph on Galileo telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamkotsian, Frederic; Spano, Paolo; Lanzoni, Patrick; Bon, William; Riva, Marco; Nicastro, Luciano; Molinari, Emilio; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Zerbi, Filippo; Valenziano, Luca

    2013-03-01

    Next-generation infrared astronomical instrumentation for ground-based and space telescopes could be based on MOEMS programmable slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy (MOS). This astronomical technique is used extensively to investigate the formation and evolution of galaxies. We propose to develop a 2048x1080 DMD-based MOS instrument to be mounted on the Galileo telescope and called BATMAN. A two-arm instrument has been designed for providing in parallel imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. The two arms with F/4 on the DMD are mounted on a common bench, and an upper bench supports the detectors thanks to two independent hexapods. Very good optical quality on the DMD and the detectors will be reached. ROBIN, a BATMAN demonstrator, has been designed, realized and integrated. It permits to determine the instrument integration procedure, including optics and mechanics integration, alignment procedure and optical quality. First images have been obtained and measured. A DMD pattern manager has been developed in order to generate any slit mask according to the list of objects to be observed; spectra have been generated and measured. Observation strategies will be studied and demonstrated for the scientific optimization strategy over the whole FOV. BATMAN on the sky is of prime importance for characterizing the actual performance of this new family of MOS instruments, as well as investigating the operational procedures on astronomical objects. This instrument will be placed on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo at the beginning of next year, in 2014.

  16. Polymorphism of the human complement C4 and steroid 21-hydroxylase genes. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealing structural deletions, homoduplications, and size variants.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, P M; Carroll, M C; Alper, C A; Rittner, C; Whitehead, A S; Yunis, E J; Colten, H R

    1986-01-01

    Several autoimmune disorders as well as congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) are either associated or closely linked with genetic variants of the fourth component of complement (C4A and C4B) and the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase (21-OH). These proteins are encoded by genes that are located downstream from the genes for complement proteins, C2 and factor B (BF) between HLA-B and -DR in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Previous studies of variants and null alleles were based on electrophoretic mobility of C4 protein and linkage with disease phenotypes. These data did not permit analysis of the basis for the observed null alleles and duplicated variants. We studied this region of the MHC in 126 haplotypes for a structural analysis of the four adjacent loci, C4A, 21-OHA, C4B, and 21-OHB. About half of the C4 genes typed as C4 null are deleted and several unrecognized homoduplicated C4 alleles were detected. Hence the frequencies of different C4 structural variants must be recalculated based on a direct analysis of the genes. Analysis of the C4/21-OH genes of patients with the classical (salt-wasting) form of CAH showed that some involve a deletion of the C4B and 21-OHB genes; whereas for two only the 21-OHB gene is deleted, i.e., the C4B gene is present. Together, these data provide a better understanding of the mechanisms generating and importance of deleted C4 and 21-OH null alleles in human disease. Images PMID:3018042

  17. Molecular characterization of the breakpoints of a 12-kb deletion in the NF1 gene in a family showing germ-line mosaicism.

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro, C; Gaona, A; Lynch, M; Kruyer, H; Ravella, A; Estivill, X

    1995-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is caused by deletions, insertions, translocations, and point mutations in the NF1 gene, which spans 350 kb on the long arm of human chromosome 17. Although several point mutations have been described, large molecular abnormalities have rarely been characterized in detail. We describe here the molecular breakpoints of a 12-kb deletion of the NF1 gene, which is responsible for the NF1 phenotype in a kindred with two children affected because of germline mosaicism in the unaffected father, who has the mutation in 10% of his spermatozoa. The mutation spans introns 31-39, removing 12,021 nt and inserting 30 bp, of which 19 bp are a direct repetition of a sequence located in intron 31, just 4 bp before the 5' breakpoint. The 5' and 3' breakpoints contain the sequence TATTTTA, which could be involved in the generation of the deletion. The most plausible explanation for the mechanism involved in the generation of this 12-kb deletion is homologous/nonhomologous recombination. Since sperm of the father does not contain the corresponding insertion of the 12-kb deleted sequence, this deletion could have occurred within the NF1 chromosome through loop formation. RNA from lymphocytes of one of the NF1 patients showed similar levels of the mutated and normal transcripts, suggesting that the NF1-mRNA from mutations causing frame shifts of the reading frame or stop codons in this gene is not degraded during its processing. The mutation was not detected in fresh lymphocytes from the unaffected father by PCR analysis, supporting the case for true germ-line mosaicism. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7485153

  18. Heterozygous deletion of the LRFN2 gene is associated with working memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Julien; Souchay, Céline; Seabold, Gail K; Dygai-Cochet, Inna; Callier, Patrick; Gay, Sébastien; Corbin, Lucie; Duplomb, Laurence; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; El Chehadeh, Salima; Avila, Magali; Minot, Delphine; Guedj, Eric; Chancenotte, Sophie; Bonnet, Marlène; Lehalle, Daphne; Wang, Ya-Xian; Kuentz, Paul; Huet, Frédéric; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Marle, Nathalie; Petralia, Ronald S; Faivre, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Learning disabilities (LDs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases. Array-CGH and high-throughput sequencing have dramatically expanded the number of genes implicated in isolated intellectual disabilities and LDs, highlighting the implication of neuron-specific post-mitotic transcription factors and synaptic proteins as candidate genes. We report a unique family diagnosed with autosomal dominant learning disability and a 6p21 microdeletion segregating in three patients. The 870 kb microdeletion encompassed the brain-expressed gene LRFN2, which encodes for a synaptic cell adhesion molecule. Neuropsychological assessment identified selective working memory deficits, with borderline intellectual functioning. Further investigations identified a defect in executive function, and auditory-verbal processes. These data were consistent with brain MRI and FDG-PET functional brain imaging, which, when compared with controls, revealed abnormal brain volume and hypometabolism of gray matter structures implicated in working memory. We performed electron microscopy immunogold labeling demonstrating the localization of LRFN2 at synapses of cerebellar and hippocampal rat neurons, often associated with the NR1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Altogether, the combined approaches imply a role for LRFN2 in LD, specifically for working memory processes and executive function. In conclusion, the identification of familial cases of clinically homogeneous endophenotypes of LD might help in both the management of patients and genetic counseling for families.

  19. Nonrecurrent PMP22-RAI1 contiguous gene deletions arise from replication-based mechanisms and result in Smith-Magenis syndrome with evident peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Neira, Juanita; Gu, Shen; Harel, Tamar; Liu, Pengfei; Briceño, Ignacio; Elsea, Sarah H; Gómez, Alberto; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) are genomic disorders associated with deletion copy number variants involving chromosome 17p12 and 17p11.2, respectively. Nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR)-mediated recurrent deletions are responsible for the majority of HNPP and SMS cases; the rearrangement products encompass the key dosage-sensitive genes PMP22 and RAI1, respectively, and result in haploinsufficiency for these genes. Less frequently, nonrecurrent genomic rearrangements occur at this locus. Contiguous gene duplications encompassing both PMP22 and RAI1, i.e., PMP22-RAI1 duplications, have been investigated, and replication-based mechanisms rather than NAHR have been proposed for these rearrangements. In the current study, we report molecular and clinical characterizations of six subjects with the reciprocal phenomenon of deletions spanning both genes, i.e., PMP22-RAI1 deletions. Molecular studies utilizing high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization and breakpoint junction sequencing identified mutational signatures that were suggestive of replication-based mechanisms. Systematic clinical studies revealed features consistent with SMS, including features of intellectual disability, speech and gross motor delays, behavioral problems and ocular abnormalities. Five out of six subjects presented clinical signs and/or objective electrophysiologic studies of peripheral neuropathy. Clinical profiling may improve the clinical management of this unique group of subjects, as the peripheral neuropathy can be more severe or of earlier onset as compared to SMS patients having the common recurrent deletion. Moreover, the current study, in combination with the previous report of PMP22-RAI1 duplications, contributes to the understanding of rare complex phenotypes involving multiple dosage-sensitive genes from a genetic mechanistic standpoint.

  20. FBXW12, a novel F box protein-encoding gene, is deleted or methylated in some cases of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    De La Chesnaye, Elsa; Méndez, Juan Pablo; López-Romero, Ricardo; De Los Angeles Romero-Tlalolini, María; Vergara, María Dolores; Salcedo, Mauricio; Ojeda, Sergio R

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal of gynecological malignancies. Due to its lack of early symptoms, detection usually occurs when the tumor is no longer confined to the ovary. We previously identified Fbxw15, a gene encoding an F-box protein in the mouse ovary, and showed that its expression is developmentally regulated. Here we report the molecular analysis of its human homologue, FBXW12 in epithelial ovarian tumors. To search for FBXW12 gene mutations, we PCR-amplified and sequenced the coding region of FBXW12, the gene's 5-untranslated region and the proximal promoter in each of 30 EOC tumors. Promoter methylation was determined by DNA bisulfite conversion, followed by methylation specific PCR. FBXW12 intracellular localization was identified by means of immunohistochemistry. A complete deletion of the gene's coding region, the 5'-UTR and the proximal promoter, was observed in 3 EOC samples. Eight of the remaining 27, had a deletion of the 5'-UTR, and the proximal promoter. FBXW12 mRNA was detected in 2 of the 19 samples without deletions. The methylation specific PCR results demonstrated CpGs methylation in the FBXW12 proximal promoter. Immunohistochemistry assay revealed that within the normal ovary, FBXW12 has an oocyte specific expression, whereas in EOC samples it is present in the ovarian surface epithelium. Our results indicate that the FBXW12 gene is deleted in approximately ten percent of the EOC cases studied; such deletions comprised either the FBXW12 promoter or the mRNA-encoding region. Moreover, FBXW12 could be epigenetically silenced by CpGs methylation in some of these EOC cases.

  1. Nonrecurrent PMP22-RAI1 contiguous gene deletions arise from replication-based mechanisms and result in Smith-Magenis syndrome with evident peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Neira, Juanita; Gu, Shen; Harel, Tamar; Liu, Pengfei; Briceño, Ignacio; Elsea, Sarah H; Gómez, Alberto; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) are genomic disorders associated with deletion copy number variants involving chromosome 17p12 and 17p11.2, respectively. Nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR)-mediated recurrent deletions are responsible for the majority of HNPP and SMS cases; the rearrangement products encompass the key dosage-sensitive genes PMP22 and RAI1, respectively, and result in haploinsufficiency for these genes. Less frequently, nonrecurrent genomic rearrangements occur at this locus. Contiguous gene duplications encompassing both PMP22 and RAI1, i.e., PMP22-RAI1 duplications, have been investigated, and replication-based mechanisms rather than NAHR have been proposed for these rearrangements. In the current study, we report molecular and clinical characterizations of six subjects with the reciprocal phenomenon of deletions spanning both genes, i.e., PMP22-RAI1 deletions. Molecular studies utilizing high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization and breakpoint junction sequencing identified mutational signatures that were suggestive of replication-based mechanisms. Systematic clinical studies revealed features consistent with SMS, including features of intellectual disability, speech and gross motor delays, behavioral problems and ocular abnormalities. Five out of six subjects presented clinical signs and/or objective electrophysiologic studies of peripheral neuropathy. Clinical profiling may improve the clinical management of this unique group of subjects, as the peripheral neuropathy can be more severe or of earlier onset as compared to SMS patients having the common recurrent deletion. Moreover, the current study, in combination with the previous report of PMP22-RAI1 duplications, contributes to the understanding of rare complex phenotypes involving multiple dosage-sensitive genes from a genetic mechanistic standpoint. PMID:27386852

  2. Exon 45 skipping through U1-snRNA antisense molecules recovers the Dys-nNOS pathway and muscle differentiation in human DMD myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Cazzella, Valentina; Martone, Julie; Pinnarò, Chiara; Santini, Tiziana; Twayana, Shyam Sundar; Sthandier, Olga; D'Amico, Adele; Ricotti, Valeria; Bertini, Enrico; Muntoni, Francesco; Bozzoni, Irene

    2012-11-01

    Exon skipping has been demonstrated to be a successful strategy for the gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): the rational being to convert severe Duchenne forms into milder Becker ones. Here, we show the selection of U1 snRNA-antisense constructs able to confer effective rescue of dystrophin synthesis in a Δ44 Duchenne genetic background, through skipping of exon 45; moreover, we demonstrate that the resulting dystrophin is able to recover timing of myogenic marker expression, to relocalize neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and to rescue expression of miRNAs previously shown to be sensitive to the Dystrophin-nNOS-HDAC2 pathway. Becker mutations display different phenotypes, likely depending on whether the shorter protein is able to reconstitute the wide range of wild-type functions. Among them, efficient assembly of the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) and nNOS localization are important. Comparing different Becker deletions we demonstrate the correlation between the ability of the mutant dystrophin to relocalize nNOS and the expression levels of two miRNAs, miR-1 and miR29c, known to be involved in muscle homeostasis and to be controlled by the Dys-nNOS-HDAC2 pathway.

  3. Deletion mutations of the Bs-alpha gene in patients with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy: Possible mutation hot-spot in exon 7

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, L.S.; Hainline, B.E.; Schuster, V.

    1994-09-01

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by short stature, centripetal obesity, subcutaneous ossifications and focal brachydactyly. Patients with this disorder may have these features alone (pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism) or these features in association with resistance to multiple hormones which raise intracellular cAMP (pseudohypoparathyroidism, PHP). In most kindreds, affected members have decreased function of the G protein Gs and decreased levels of the Gs{alpha}-subunit. Heterozygous inactivating mutations of the Gs{alpha} gene have been previously identified in AHO. Exons 2-13 of the Gs{alpha} gene and their splice junctions were PCR-amplified and the products analyzed by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) and direct sequencing. Using this approach, a new heterozygous 2 bp deletion in exon 4 creating a premature stop codon was identified in 5 affected members of a previously reported family. The mutation was not present in an unaffected family member. We also have identified a previously reported 4 bp deletion in the coding region of exon 7 in 2 further unrelated sporadic cases of PHP. In one case, the mutation was absent in her siblings and in both parents, confirming that this is a de novo mutation in this patient. This specific 4 bp deletion has now been reported in 4 PHP patients, at least 3 of whom are unrelated. These results suggest that this region of the Gs{alpha} gene may be a hot-spot for deletions.

  4. Collecting duct carcinoma of the kidney is associated with CDKN2A deletion and SLC family gene up-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lei; Liu, Biao; Hu, Qiang; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Glenn, Sean T.; Costantini, Manuela; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Signoretti, Sabina; Choueiri, Toni; Gallucci, Michele; Sentinelli, Steno; Fazio, Vito M.; Poeta, Maria Luana; Liu, Song; Morrison, Carl; Pili, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The genetic landscape and molecular features of collecting duct carcinoma (CDC) of the kidney remain largely unknown. Herein, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES) and transcriptome sequencing (RNASeq) on 7 CDC samples (CDC1 −7). Among the 7 samples, 4 samples with matched non-tumor tissue were used for copy number analysis by SNP array data. No recurrent somatic SNVs were observed except for MLL, which was found to be mutated (p.V297I and p.F407C) in 2 samples. We identified somatic SNVs in 14 other cancer census genes including: ATM, CREBBP, PRDM1, CBFB, FBXW7, IKZF1, KDR, KRAS, NACA, NF2, NUP98, SS18, TP53, and ZNF521. SNP array data identified a CDKN2A homozygous deletion in 3 samples and SNV analysis showed a non-sense mutation of the CDKN2A gene with unknown somatic status. To estimate the recurrent rate of CDKN2A abnormalities, we performed FISH screening of additional samples and confirmed the frequent loss (62.5%) of CDKN2A expression. Since cisplatin based therapy is the common treatment option for CDC, we investigated the expression of solute carrier (SLC) family transporters and found 45% alteration. In addition, SLC7A11 (cystine transporter, xCT), a cisplatin resistance associated gene, was found to be overexpressed in 4 out of 5 (80%) cases of CDC tumors tested, as compared to matched non-tumor tissue. In summary, our study provides a comprehensive genomic analysis of CDC and identifies potential pathways suitable for targeted therapies. PMID:27144525

  5. A Deletion in the VLDLR Gene in Eurasier Dogs with Cerebellar Hypoplasia Resembling a Dandy-Walker-Like Malformation (DWLM)

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Martina; Fischer, Andrea; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Schmidt, Martin J.; Bernardino, Filipa; Manz, Eberhard; Matiasek, Kaspar; Rentmeister, Kai; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    Dandy-Walker-like malformation (DWLM) is the result of aberrant brain development and mainly characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia. DWLM affected dogs display a non-progressive cerebellar ataxia. Several DWLM cases were recently observed in the Eurasier dog breed, which strongly suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance in this breed. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 9 cases and 11 controls and found the best association of DWLM with markers on chromosome 1. Subsequent homozygosity mapping confirmed that all 9 cases were homozygous for a shared haplotype in this region, which delineated a critical interval of 3.35 Mb. We sequenced the genome of an affected Eurasier and compared it with the Boxer reference genome and 47 control genomes of dogs from other breeds. This analysis revealed 4 private non-synonymous variants in the critical interval of the affected Eurasier. We genotyped these variants in additional dogs and found perfect association for only one of these variants, a single base deletion in the VLDLR gene encoding the very low density lipoprotein receptor. This variant, VLDLR:c.1713delC is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon (p.W572Gfs*10). Variants in the VLDLR gene have been shown to cause congenital cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation in human patients and Vldlr knockout mice also display an ataxia phenotype. Our combined genetic data together with the functional knowledge on the VLDLR gene from other species thus strongly suggest that VLDLR:c.1713delC is indeed causing DWLM in Eurasier dogs. PMID:25668033

  6. A Williams syndrome patient with a familial t(6;7) translocation and deletion of the elastin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pober, B.R.; Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    Discovery of a {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} reciprocal translocation [46,XX,t(6;7)(q11.2;q11.23)] on routine amniocentesis prompted clinical and cytogenetic study of additional family members. The same t(6;7) translocation was found in the clincally normal father and in a sibling with Williams syndrome (WS). WS had been diagnosed previously according to clinical criteria including distinctive facial features, supravalvar aortic stenosis requiring surgical repair, dental abnormalties and developmental delay. A clinically normal female was delivered and the translocation was confirmed with a cord blood specimen. Hemizygosity for the gene, elastin, (which has been mapped to the chromosome 7 translocation breakpoint, 7q11.23, in this family) appears to be a cause of WS. We therefore investigated whether the t(6;7) in the phenotypically normal father represented more than a simple reciprocal translocation. FISH using a chromosome 7 specific library revealed no differences between the cytogenetically identical, yet phenotypically distinct, father and son. Hybridization with a cosmid MR127D4 containing elastin sequence showed that the WS patient was missing one allele from the derivative chromosome 7 whereas both his mother and father had two copies of the elastin gene. This family indicates that the de novo loss of one copy of the elastin gene produces the recognizable phenotype of Williams syndrome. Molecular characterization (with additional probes) of the extent of this de novo deletion near the translocation breakpoint is in progress. This information will be valuable for defining the WS-critical region and will lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis for WS.

  7. Collecting duct carcinoma of the kidney is associated with CDKN2A deletion and SLC family gene up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianmin; Papanicolau-Sengos, Antonios; Chintala, Sreenivasulu; Wei, Lei; Liu, Biao; Hu, Qiang; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Conroy, Jeffrey M; Glenn, Sean T; Costantini, Manuela; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Signoretti, Sabina; Choueiri, Toni; Gallucci, Michele; Sentinelli, Steno; Fazio, Vito M; Poeta, Maria Luana; Liu, Song; Morrison, Carl; Pili, Roberto

    2016-05-24

    The genetic landscape and molecular features of collecting duct carcinoma (CDC) of the kidney remain largely unknown. Herein, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES) and transcriptome sequencing (RNASeq) on 7 CDC samples (CDC1 -7). Among the 7 samples, 4 samples with matched non-tumor tissue were used for copy number analysis by SNP array data. No recurrent somatic SNVs were observed except for MLL, which was found to be mutated (p.V297I and p.F407C) in 2 samples. We identified somatic SNVs in 14 other cancer census genes including: ATM, CREBBP, PRDM1, CBFB, FBXW7, IKZF1, KDR, KRAS, NACA, NF2, NUP98, SS18, TP53, and ZNF521. SNP array data identified a CDKN2A homozygous deletion in 3 samples and SNV analysis showed a non-sense mutation of the CDKN2A gene with unknown somatic status. To estimate the recurrent rate of CDKN2A abnormalities, we performed FISH screening of additional samples and confirmed the frequent loss (62.5%) of CDKN2A expression. Since cisplatin based therapy is the common treatment option for CDC, we investigated the expression of solute carrier (SLC) family transporters and found 45% alteration. In addition, SLC7A11 (cystine transporter, xCT), a cisplatin resistance associated gene, was found to be overexpressed in 4 out of 5 (80%) cases of CDC tumors tested, as compared to matched non-tumor tissue. In summary, our study provides a comprehensive genomic analysis of CDC and identifies potential pathways suitable for targeted therapies.

  8. Bmp2 deletion causes an amelogenesis imperfecta phenotype via regulating enamel gene expression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Feng, Junsheng; Wang, Feng; Li, Wentong; Gao, Qingping; Chen, Zhuo; Shoff, Lisa; Donly, Kevin J; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; Chun, Yong Hee Patricia; Harris, Stephen E; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo.

  9. Bmp2 Deletion Causes an Amelogenesis Imperfecta Phenotype Via Regulating Enamel Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    GUO, FENG; FENG, JUNSHENG; WANG, FENG; LI, WENTONG; GAO, QINGPING; CHEN, ZHUO; SHOFF, LISA; DONLY, KEVIN J.; GLUHAK-HEINRICH, JELICA; CHUN, YONG HEE PATRICIA; HARRIS, STEPHEN E.; MACDOUGALL, MARY; CHEN, SHUO

    2015-01-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo. PMID:25545831

  10. Non-virulence of a recombinant shrimp nidovirus is associated with its non structural gene sequence and not a large structural gene deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Gangnonngiw, Warachin; Anantasomboon, Gun; Sang-oum, Wiwat; Sriurairatana, Siriporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Flegel, Timothy W.

    2009-03-01

    RT-PCR using a commercial kit for yellow head virus (YHV) detection in growth-retarded shrimp yielded an unusual 777 bp amplicon instead of expected amplicons of 277 bp for YHV type-1 (YHV-1) or 406 bp for YHV type-2 (YHV-2). Cloning and sequencing (GenBank (EU170438)) revealed approximately 80% identity to non-structural (NS) ORF1b sequences of both YHV-1 (GenBank (AA083987)) and YHV-2 (GenBank (AF227196)), indicating an atypical YHV type (A-YHV) phylogenetically equidistant from both types. An RT-PCR test specifically designed for A-YHV revealed that it was uncommon and that its occurrence in shrimp culture ponds did not correlate with growth retardation or mortality. By immunohistochemistry with YHV-specific monoclonal antibodies, the A-YHV gave positive reactions for envelope protein gp64 and capsid protein p20, but not for envelope protein gp116, even though gp116 and gp64 originate from a polyprotein of ORF3. Lack of gp116 immunoreactivity correlated with a large ORF3 deletion (GenBank (EU123854)) in the region of the protein targeted by an MAb against gp116. Transmission electron microscopy of A-YHV-infected shrimp revealed only unenveloped pre-virions. During manuscript revision, information received revealed that typing of YHV isolates based on sequences of ORF1b and ORF3 had yielded several geographical types, including one virulent type (YHV-1b) with an ORF3 deletion sequence that matched the sequence of A-YHV. Using these sequences and an additional A-YHV sequence ( (EU853170)) from the ORF1b typing region, A-YHV potentially represents a recombinant between type 1b and type 5. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis revealed that type 1b produced a gp116 deletion protein that did not bind with the MAb or polyclonal Ab to normal gp116. Overall, the information suggested that lack of A-YHV virulence was associated with the NS gene sequence linked to ORF1b rather than the deletion in ORF3.

  11. Ranbp1, Deleted in DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, is a Microcephaly Gene That Selectively Disrupts Layer 2/3 Cortical Projection Neuron Generation

    PubMed Central

    Paronett, Elizabeth M.; Meechan, Daniel W.; Karpin