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Sample records for dna complexes probed

  1. Enoxacin-Tb3+ complex as an environmentally friendly fluorescence probe for DNA and its application.

    PubMed

    Tong, Changlun; Hu, Zhou; Liu, Weiping

    2007-02-15

    The fluorescence intensity of the enoxacin (ENX)-Tb(3+) complex enhanced by DNA was studied. On the basis of this study, an environmentally friendly fluorescence probe of enoxacin-Tb(3+) for the determination of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA was developed. Under the optimal conditions, the enhanced fluorescence intensity was in proportion to the concentration of DNA in the range of 2.0x10(-8) to 2.0x10(-6)g mL(-1) for hsDNA, 1.0x10(-8) to 1.0x10(-6)g mL(-1) for ctDNA and 5.0x10(-9) to 1.0x10(-6)g mL(-1) for thermally denatured ctDNA. The detection limits (S/N=3) were 5.0, 9.0 and 3.0ng mL(-1), respectively. The interaction modes between ENX-Tb(3+) and DNA and the mechanism of the fluorescence enhancement were also discussed in details. The experimental results from UV absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and the competing combination tests between the ENX-Tb(3+) complex and EB probe indicated that the possible interaction modes between enoxacin-Tb(3+) complex and DNA had at least two different binding modes: the electrostatic binding and the intercalation binding. Additionally, this fluorescence probe was used to study the interaction between heavy metals and DNA.

  2. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  3. Serum Albumin Binding Inhibits Nuclear Uptake of Luminescent Metal-Complex-Based DNA Imaging Probes.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Ashley; Gill, Martin R; McKenzie, Luke; Glover, Caroline; Mowll, Rachel; Weinstein, Julia A; Su, Xiaodi; Smythe, Carl; Thomas, Jim A

    2015-08-10

    The DNA binding and cellular localization properties of a new luminescent heterobimetallic Ir(III) Ru(II) tetrapyridophenazine complex are reported. Surprisingly, in standard cell media, in which its tetracationic, isostructural Ru(II) Ru(II) analogue is localized in the nucleus, the new tricationic complex is poorly taken up by live cells and demonstrates no nuclear staining. Consequent cell-free studies reveal that the Ir(III) Ru(II) complex binds bovine serum albumin, BSA, in Sudlow's Site I with a similar increase in emission and binding affinity to that observed with DNA. Contrastingly, in serum-free conditions the complex is rapidly internalized by live cells, where it localizes in cell nuclei and functions as a DNA imaging agent. The absence of serum proteins also greatly alters the cytotoxicity of the complex, where high levels of oncosis/necrosis are observed due to this enhanced uptake. This suggests that simply increasing the lipophilicity of a DNA imaging probe to enhance cellular uptake can be counterproductive as, due to increased binding to serum albumin protein, this strategy can actually disrupt nuclear targeting.

  4. Dinuclear Ruthenium(II) Complexes as Two-Photon, Time-Resolved Emission Microscopy Probes for Cellular DNA**

    PubMed Central

    Baggaley, Elizabeth; Gill, Martin R; Green, Nicola H; Turton, David; Sazanovich, Igor V; Botchway, Stanley W; Smythe, Carl; Haycock, John W; Weinstein, Julia A; Thomas, Jim A

    2014-01-01

    The first transition-metal complex-based two-photon absorbing luminescence lifetime probes for cellular DNA are presented. This allows cell imaging of DNA free from endogenous fluorophores and potentially facilitates deep tissue imaging. In this initial study, ruthenium(II) luminophores are used as phosphorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (PLIM) probes for nuclear DNA in both live and fixed cells. The DNA-bound probes display characteristic emission lifetimes of more than 160 ns, while shorter-lived cytoplasmic emission is also observed. These timescales are orders of magnitude longer than conventional FLIM, leading to previously unattainable levels of sensitivity, and autofluorescence-free imaging. PMID:24458590

  5. The Anopheles punctulatus complex: DNA probes for identifying the Australian species using isotopic, chromogenic, and chemiluminescence detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.; Cooper, R.D.; Burkot, T.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Isotopic and enzyme-labeled species-specific DNA probes were made for the three known members of the Anopheles punctulatus complex of mosquitoes in Australia (Anopheles farauti Nos. 1, 2, and 3). Species-specific probes were selected by screening total genomic libraries made from the DNA of individual species with 32P-labeled DNA of homologous and heterologous mosquito species. The 32P-labeled probes for A. farauti Nos. 1 and 2 can detect less than 0.2 ng of DNA while the 32P-labeled probe for A. farauti No. 3 has a sensitivity of 1.25 ng of DNA. Probes were then enzyme labeled for chromogenic and chemiluminescence detection and compared to isotopic detection using 32P-labeled probes. Sequences of the probe repeat regions are presented. Species identifications can be made from dot blots or squashes of freshly killed mosquitoes or mosquitoes stored frozen, dried, and held at room temperature or fixed in isopropanol or ethanol with isotopic, chromogenic, or chemiluminescence detection systems. The use of nonisotopic detection systems will enable laboratories with minimal facilities to identify important regional vectors.

  6. Probing heterobivalent binding to the endocytic AP-2 adaptor complex by DNA-based spatial screening.

    PubMed

    Diezmann, F; von Kleist, L; Haucke, V; Seitz, O

    2015-08-01

    The double helical DNA scaffold offers a unique set of properties, which are particularly useful for studies of multivalency in biomolecular interactions: (i) multivalent ligand displays can be formed upon nucleic acid hybridization in a self-assembly process, which facilitates spatial screening (ii) valency and spatial arrangement of the ligand display can be precisely controlled and (iii) the flexibility of the ligand display can be adjusted by integrating nick sites and unpaired template regions. Herein we describe the use of DNA-based spatial screening for the characterization of the adaptor complex 2 (AP-2), a central interaction hub within the endocytic protein network in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. AP-2 is comprised of a core domain and two, so-called appendage domains, the α- and the β2-ear, which associate with cytoplasmatic proteins required for the formation or maturation of clathrin/AP-2 coated pits. Each appendage domain has two binding grooves which recognize distinct peptide motives with micromolar affinity. This provides opportunities for enhanced interactions with protein molecules that contain two (or more) different peptide motives. To determine whether a particular, spatial arrangement of binding motifs is required for high affinity binding we probed the distance-affinity relationships by means of DNA-programmed spatial screening with self-assembled peptide-DNA complexes. By using trimolecular and tetramolecular assemblies two different peptides were positioned in 2-22 nucleotide distance. The binding data obtained with both recombinant protein in well-defined buffer systems and native AP-2 in brain extract suggests that the two binding sites of the AP-2 α-appendage can cooperate to provide up to 40-fold enhancement of affinity compared to the monovalent interaction. The distance between the two recognized peptide motives was less important provided that the DNA duplex segments were connected by flexible, single strand segments. By

  7. Ligand-incorporation site in 5-methylcytosine-detection probe modulating the site of osmium complexation with the target DNA.

    PubMed

    Sugizaki, Kaori; Nakamura, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2012-09-01

    ICON Probes, short DNA strands containing an adenine linked to a bipyridine ligand, formed an interstrand cross-link with 5-methylcytosine located opposite the modified adenine in the presence of an osmium oxidant. The location of a bipyridine-tethered adenine in the probes varied the selectivity of the reactive base. An ICON probe where the modified adenine was located at the probe center showed a 5-methylcytosine-selective osmium complexation, whereas an ICON probe with the modified adenine at the strand end exhibited high reactivity towards thymine as well as 5-methylcytosine. The modulation of reactive bases by the incorporation of a bipyridine-tethered adenine site made facilitates design of ICON probes for the fluorometric detection of 5-methylcytosine.

  8. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  9. Luminescent platinum(II) complexes with functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene or diphosphine selectively probe mismatched and abasic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Sin Ki; Zou, Taotao; Cao, Bei; Chen, Tianfeng; To, Wai-Pong; Yang, Chen; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The selective targeting of mismatched DNA overexpressed in cancer cells is an appealing strategy in designing cancer diagnosis and therapy protocols. Few luminescent probes that specifically detect intracellular mismatched DNA have been reported. Here we used Pt(II) complexes with luminescence sensitive to subtle changes in the local environment and report several Pt(II) complexes that selectively bind to and identify DNA mismatches. We evaluated the complexes' DNA-binding characteristics by ultraviolet/visible absorption titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. These Pt(II) complexes show up to 15-fold higher emission intensities upon binding to mismatched DNA over matched DNA and can be utilized for both detecting DNA abasic sites and identifying cancer cells and human tissue samples with different levels of mismatch repair. Our work highlights the potential of luminescent Pt(II) complexes to differentiate between normal cells and cancer cells which generally possess more aberrant DNA structures. PMID:26883164

  10. Interaction between tryptophan-Sm(III) complex and DNA with the use of a acridine orange dye fluorophor probe.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao Li; Zhao, Na; Wang, Xing Ming

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of the Trp-Sm(III) complex with herring sperm DNA (hs-DNA) was investigated with the use of acridine orange (AO) dye as a spectral probe for UV-vis spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results showed that the both the Trp-Sm(III) complex and the AO molecule could intercalate into the double helix of the DNA. The Sm(III)-(Trp)3 complex was stabilized by intercalation into the DNA with binding constants: K(Ө)25°C  = 7.14 × 10(5)  L·mol(-1) and K(Ө) 37°C  = 5.28 × 10(4)  L·mol(-1), and it could displace the AO dye from the AO-DNA complex in a competitive reaction. Computation of the thermodynamic functions demonstrates that Δr Hm (Ө) is the primary driving power of the interaction between the Sm(III)(Trp)3 complex and the DNA. The results from Scatchard and viscometry methods suggested that the interaction mode between the Sm(III)(Trp)3 complex and the hs-DNA is groove binding and weak intercalation binding.

  11. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  12. Formation of alkali labile linkages in DNA by hedamycin and use of hedamycin as a probe of protein-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, G N

    1982-01-01

    Hedamycin forms a stable complex with DNA and introduces alkali labile linkages in the DNA. These labile linkages are located at deoxyguanosine residues and are cleaved by the treatment used for breakage at bases alkylated by dimethyl sulfate. The reaction of hedamycin with all G residues in the chain is not uniform, and certain positions, particularily those in TG tracts, are especially reactive. The reaction of hedamycin with DNA can be inhibited by ethidium bromide, suggesting that intercalation is important in positioning the reactive group of hedamycin near to the base which is modified. The low amount of hedamycin needed to produce observable breakage, its specificity for reaction with DNA and its ability to react with DNA under mild conditions make it suitable for use as a probe of protein-DNA complexes. This was shown by the ability of lac repressor and RNA polymerase to block reaction of hedamycin with the DNA of the lac regulatory region. Images PMID:7133991

  13. Domain–domain interactions in full-length p53 and a specific DNA complex probed by methyl NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bista, Michal; Freund, Stefan M.; Fersht, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a homotetramer of 4 × 393 residues. Its core domain and tetramerization domain are linked and flanked by intrinsically disordered sequences, which hinder its full structural characterization. There is an outstanding problem of the state of the tetramerization domain. Structural studies on the isolated tetramerization domain show it is in a folded tetrameric conformation, but there are conflicting models from electron microscopy of the full-length protein, one of which proposes that the domain is not tetramerically folded and the tetrameric protein is stabilized by interactions between the N and C termini. Here, we present methyl-transverse relaxation optimized NMR spectroscopy (methyl-TROSY) investigations on the full-length and separate domains of the protein with its methionine residues enriched with 13C to probe its quaternary structure. We obtained high-quality spectra of both the full-length tetrameric p53 and its DNA complex, observing the environment at 11 specific methyl sites. The tetramerization domain was as tetramerically folded in the full-length constructs as in the isolated domain. The N and C termini were intrinsically disordered in both the full-length protein and its complex with a 20-residue specific DNA sequence. Additionally, we detected in the interface of the core (DNA-binding) and N-terminal parts of the protein a slow conformational exchange process that was modulated by specific recognition of DNA, indicating allosteric processes. PMID:22972749

  14. Solution Structures of 2 : 1 And 1 : 1 DNA Polymerase - DNA Complexes Probed By Ultracentrifugation And Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, K.H.; Niebuhr, M.; Aulabaugh, A.; Tsai, M.D.; /Ohio State U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    We report small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and sedimentation velocity (SV) studies on the enzyme-DNA complexes of rat DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) and African swine fever virus DNA polymerase X (ASFV Pol X) with one-nucleotide gapped DNA. The results indicated formation of a 2 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA complex, whereas only 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complex was observed. Three-dimensional structural models for the 2 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA and 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complexes were generated from the SAXS experimental data to correlate with the functions of the DNA polymerases. The former indicates interactions of the 8 kDa 5{prime}-dRP lyase domain of the second Pol {beta} molecule with the active site of the 1 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA complex, while the latter demonstrates how ASFV Pol X binds DNA in the absence of DNA-binding motif(s). As ASFV Pol X has no 5{prime}-dRP lyase domain, it is reasonable not to form a 2 : 1 complex. Based on the enhanced activities of the 2 : 1 complex and the observation that the 8 kDa domain is not in an optimal configuration for the 5{prime}-dRP lyase reaction in the crystal structures of the closed ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes, we propose that the asymmetric 2 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA complex enhances the function of Pol {beta}.

  15. Solution structures of 2 : 1 and 1 : 1 DNA polymerase-DNA complexes probed by ultracentrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Niebuhr, Marc; Aulabaugh, Ann; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2008-03-25

    We report small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and sedimentation velocity (SV) studies on the enzyme-DNA complexes of rat DNA polymerase β (Pol β) and African swine fever virus DNA polymerase X (ASFV Pol X) with one-nucleotide gapped DNA. The results indicated formation of a 2 : 1 Pol β-DNA complex, whereas only 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complex was observed. Three-dimensional structural models for the 2 : 1 Pol β-DNA and 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complexes were generated from the SAXS experimental data to correlate with the functions of the DNA polymerases. The former indicates interactions of the 8 kDa 5'-dRP lyase domain of the second Pol β molecule with the active site of the 1 : 1 Pol β-DNA complex, while the latter demonstrates how ASFV Pol X binds DNA in the absence of DNA-binding motif(s). As ASFV Pol X has no 5'-dRP lyase domain, it is reasonable not to form a 2 : 1 complex. Based on the enhanced activities of the 2 : 1 complex and the observation that the 8 kDa domain is not in an optimal configuration for the 5'-dRP lyase reaction in the crystal structures of the closed ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes, we propose that the asymmetric 2 : 1 Pol β-DNA complex enhances the function of Pol β.

  16. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    SciTech Connect

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. )

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  17. Using AFM to probe the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids mediated by Ca(2+): the role of surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Sánchez-Treviño, Alda Yadira; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-28

    Complexation of DNA with lipids is currently being developed as an alternative to classical vectors based on viruses. Most of the research to date focuses on cationic lipids owing to their spontaneous complexation with DNA. Nonetheless, recent investigations have revealed that cationic lipids induce a large number of adverse effects on DNA delivery. Precisely, the lower cytotoxicity of anionic lipids accounts for their use as a promising alternative. However, the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids (mediated by cations) is still in early stages and is not yet well understood. In order to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the complexation of anionic lipids and DNA we proposed a combined methodology based on the surface pressure-area isotherms, Gibbs elasticity and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These techniques allow elucidation of the role of the surface pressure in the complexation and visualization of the interfacial aggregates for the first time. We demonstrate that the DNA complexes with negatively charged model monolayers (DPPC/DPPS 4 : 1) only in the presence of Ca(2+), but is expelled at very high surface pressures. Also, according to the Gibbs elasticity plot, the complexation of lipids and DNA implies a whole fluidisation of the monolayer and a completely different phase transition map in the presence of DNA and Ca(2+). AFM imaging allows identification for the first time of specific morphologies associated with different packing densities. At low surface coverage, a branched net like structure is observed whereas at high surface pressure fibers formed of interfacial aggregates appear. In summary, Ca(2+) mediates the interaction between DNA and negatively charged lipids and also the conformation of the ternary system depends on the surface pressure. Such observations are important new generic features of the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids. PMID:24668321

  18. Time-resolved fluorescence of 2-aminopurine as a probe of base flipping in M.HhaI–DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Robert K.; Daujotyte, Dalia; Grazulis, Saulius; Magennis, Steven W.; Dryden, David T. F.; Klimašauskas, Saulius; Jones, Anita C.

    2005-01-01

    DNA base flipping is an important mechanism in molecular enzymology, but its study is limited by the lack of an accessible and reliable diagnostic technique. A series of crystalline complexes of a DNA methyltransferase, M.HhaI, and its cognate DNA, in which a fluorescent nucleobase analogue, 2-aminopurine (AP), occupies defined positions with respect the target flipped base, have been prepared and their structures determined at higher than 2 Å resolution. From time-resolved fluorescence measurements of these single crystals, we have established that the fluorescence decay function of AP shows a pronounced, characteristic response to base flipping: the loss of the very short (∼100 ps) decay component and the large increase in the amplitude of the long (∼10 ns) component. When AP is positioned at sites other than the target site, this response is not seen. Most significantly, we have shown that the same clear response is apparent when M.HhaI complexes with DNA in solution, giving an unambiguous signal of base flipping. Analysis of the AP fluorescence decay function reveals conformational heterogeneity in the DNA–enzyme complexes that cannot be discerned from the present X-ray structures. PMID:16340006

  19. Quantitative analysis of binding of transcription factor complex to biotinylated DNA probe by a streptavidin-agarose pulldown assay.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wu-Guo; Zhu, Ying; Montero, Alberto; Wu, Kenneth K

    2003-12-01

    Gene expression is regulated by a large complex of proteins that bind to the promoter/enhancer region of a gene. We determined whether a streptavidin-bead binding assay might be useful in detecting individual proteins in the complex comprising transactivators, coactivators, mediators, and general transcription factors. We used biotinylated cyclooxygenase-2 promoter probes as a model. Nuclear extracts obtained from human fibroblasts treated with or without an agonist were incubated with a 5(')-biotinylated probe and streptavidin-agarose beads at room temperature for 1h. After centrifugation, the pellet was washed and proteins in the complex were assessed by immunoblots. An array of transcription factors was detectable concurrently in the same batch of pellets at basal state. p300 and its associated factor PCAF levels but not Srb7, Med7, or TFII(B) were increased by phorbol ester or tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulation. Only trace of CREB-binding protein was detected. These results suggest that p300 and PCAF are the predominant coactivators for COX-2 promoter activation. Our findings indicate that the streptavidin-bead pulldown assay is valuable for determining the binding of a large number of transcription factors to promoter/enhancer and evaluating the relationship of protein binding with regulation of gene expression.

  20. Study of the VirE2-ssT-DNA complex formation by scanning probe microscopy and gel electrophoresis- T-complex visualization.

    PubMed

    Volokhina, Irina; Chumakov, Mikhail

    2007-02-01

    The recombinant virulence protein VirE2, capable of forming a complex with single-stranded T-DNA during transfer into plant cells, was isolated, purified, and used for interactions with ssT-DNA. The in vitro interaction of VirE2 and ss-binding protein from Escherichia coli with single-stranded DNA (phage lambda) was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis by the formation of high-molecular-weight complexes after preliminary coincubation of purified protein preparations with ssDNA. We show that VirE2 binds to single-stranded DNA and protects it against nuclease S1 degradation much better than does E. coli SSB protein. We for first time observed the VirE2-ssT-DNA complex by using atomic force microscopy. The complex observed by atomic force microscopy after ssT-DNA and VirE2 protein mixing has a length of about 800 nm and a 5-8 nm width in sites with attached VirE2 protein. PMID:17234037

  1. Probe and method for DNA detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James Henry; Sharma, Jaswinder Kumar; Martinez, Jennifer Suzanne

    2013-07-02

    A hybridization probe containing two linear strands of DNA lights up upon hybridization to a target DNA using silver nanoclusters that have been templated onto one of the DNA strands. Hybridization induces proximity between the nanoclusters on one strand and an overhang on the other strand, which results in enhanced fluorescence emission from the nanoclusters.

  2. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  3. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  4. SERS gene probe for DNA diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, David L.; Allain, Leonardo R.; Isola, Narayana R.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-07-01

    We describe the development of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering gene (SERGen) probe technology for rapid screening for diseases and pathogens through DNA hybridization assays. The technology combines the use of gene probes labeled with SERS-active markers, and nanostructured metallic platforms for inducing the SERS effect. As a result, SERGen-based methods can offer the spectral selectivity and sensitivity of SERS as well as the molecular specificity of DNA sequence hybridization. Furthermore, these new probe s preclude the use of radioactive labels. As illustrated herein, SERGen probes have been used as primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications of specific DNA sequences, hence further boosting the sensitivity of the technology. We also describe several approaches to developing SERS-active DNA assay platforms, addressing the challenges of making the SERGen technology accessible and practical for clinical settings. The usefulness of the SERGen approach has been demonstrated in the detection of HIV, BRCA1 breast cancer, and BAX genes. There is great potential for the use of numerous SERGen probes for multiplexed detection of multiple biological targets.

  5. Universal microbial diagnostics using random DNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Aghazadeh, Amirali; Lin, Adam Y.; Sheikh, Mona A.; Chen, Allen L.; Atkins, Lisa M.; Johnson, Coreen L.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Baraniuk, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of pathogens is essential for limiting development of therapy-resistant pathogens and mitigating infectious disease outbreaks. Most bacterial detection schemes use target-specific probes to differentiate pathogen species, creating time and cost inefficiencies in identifying newly discovered organisms. We present a novel universal microbial diagnostics (UMD) platform to screen for microbial organisms in an infectious sample, using a small number of random DNA probes that are agnostic to the target DNA sequences. Our platform leverages the theory of sparse signal recovery (compressive sensing) to identify the composition of a microbial sample that potentially contains novel or mutant species. We validated the UMD platform in vitro using five random probes to recover 11 pathogenic bacteria. We further demonstrated in silico that UMD can be generalized to screen for common human pathogens in different taxonomy levels. UMD’s unorthodox sensing approach opens the door to more efficient and universal molecular diagnostics. PMID:27704040

  6. Biophysical probing of the binding properties of a Cu(II) complex with G-quadruplex DNA: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Verdian-Doghaei, Asma

    2016-02-01

    Telomerase inhibition through G-quadruplex stabilization by small molecules is of great interest as a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy. Here, we show that newly synthesized Cu-complex binds to G-quadruplex DNA and induces changes in its stability. This biophysical interaction was investigated in vitro using spectroscopic, voltammetric and computational techniques. The binding constant for this complex to G-quadruplex using spectroscopic and electrochemical methods is in the order of 10(5) . The binding stoichiometry was investigated using spectroscopic techniques and corresponded to a ratio of 1: 1. Fluorescence titration results reveal that Cu-complex is quenched in the presence of G-quadruplex DNA. Analysis of the fluorescence emission at different temperatures shows that ΔH° > 0, ΔS° > 0 and ΔG° < 0, and indicates that hydrophobic interactions played a major role in the binding processes. MD simulation results suggested that this ligand could stabilize the G-quadruplex structure. An optimized docked model of the G-quadruplex-ligand mixture confirmed the experimental results. Based on the results, we conclude that Cu-complex as an anticancer candidate can bind and stabilize the G-quadruplex DNA structure.

  7. Complexities of bloom dynamics in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense revealed through DNA measurements by imaging flow cytometry coupled with species-specific rRNA probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Farzan, Shahla; Keafer, Bruce A.; Sosik, Heidi M.; Olson, Robert J.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the DNA content of different protist populations can shed light on a variety of processes, including cell division, sex, prey ingestion, and parasite invasion. Here, we modified an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a custom-built flow cytometer that records images of microplankton, to measure the DNA content of large dinoflagellates and other high-DNA content species. The IFCB was also configured to measure fluorescence from Cy3-labeled rRNA probes, aiding the identification of Alexandrium fundyense (syn. A. tamarense Group I), a photosynthetic dinoflagellate that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The modified IFCB was used to analyze samples from the development, peak and termination phases of an inshore A. fundyense bloom (Salt Pond, Eastham, MA, USA), and from a rare A. fundyense ‘red tide’ that occurred in the western Gulf of Maine, offshore of Portsmouth, NH (USA). Diploid or G2 phase (‘2C’) A. fundyense cells were frequently enriched at the near-surface, suggesting an important role for aggregation at the air-sea interface during sexual events. Also, our analysis showed that large proportions of A. fundyense cells in both the Salt Pond and red tide blooms were planozygotes during bloom decline, highlighting the importance of sexual fusion to bloom termination. At Salt Pond, bloom decline also coincided with a dramatic rise in infections by the parasite genus Amoebophrya. The samples that were most heavily infected contained many large cells with higher DNA-associated fluorescence than 2C vegetative cells, but these cells' nuclei were also frequently consumed by Amoebophrya trophonts. Neither large cell size nor increased DNA-associated fluorescence could be replicated by infecting an A. fundyense culture of vegetative cells. Therefore, we attribute these characteristics of the large Salt Pond cells to planozygote maturation rather than Amoebophrya infection, though an interaction between infection and planozygote maturation may

  8. Probe DNA-Cisplatin Interaction with Solid-State Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Ying; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Pengye; Bai, Xuedong; Shan, Xinyan; Lu, Xinghua; Nanopore Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of DNA-cisplatin interaction is essential for clinical application and novel drug design. As an emerging single-molecule technology, solid-state nanopore has been employed in biomolecule detection and probing DNA-molecule interactions. Herein, we reported a real-time monitoring of DNA-cisplatin interaction by employing solid-state SiN nanopores. The DNA-cisplatin interacting process is clearly classified into three stages by measuring the capture rate of DNA-cisplatin adducts. In the first stage, the negative charged DNA molecules were partially discharged due to the bonding of positive charged cisplatin and forming of mono-adducts. In the second stage, forming of DNA-cisplatin di-adducts with the adjacent bases results in DNA bending and softening. The capture rate increases since the softened bi-adducts experience a lower barrier to thread into the nanopores. In the third stage, complex structures, such as micro-loop, are formed and the DNA-cisplatin adducts are aggregated. The capture rate decreases to zero as the aggregated adduct grows to the size of the pore. The characteristic time of this stage was found to be linear with the diameter of the nanopore and this dynamic process can be described with a second-order reaction model. We are grateful to Laboratory of Microfabrication, Dr. Y. Yao, and Prof. R.C. Yu (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for technical assistance.

  9. DNA probes and PCR for diagnosis of parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, J B

    1995-01-01

    DNA probe and PCR-based assays to identify and detect parasites are technically complex; however, they have high sensitivity, directly detect parasites independent of the immunocompetence or previous clinical history of the patient, and can distinguish between organisms that are morphologically similar. Diagnosis of parasites is often based on direct detection by microscopy, which is insensitive and laborious and can lack specificity. Most PCR-based assays were more sensitive than DNA probe assays. The development of PCR-based diagnostic assays requires multiple steps following the initial selection of oligonucleotide primers and reporter probe. Generally, the ability to detect the DNA of one parasite was attained by PCR; however, advances in the preparation of samples for PCR (extraction of DNA while removing PCR inhibitors) will be required to achieve that sensitivity with human specimens. Preliminary PCR systems have been developed for many different parasites, yet few have been evaluated with a large number of clinical specimens and/or under field conditions. Those evaluations are essential for determination of clinical and field utility and performance and of the most appropriate application of the assay. Several situations in which PCR-based diagnosis will result in epidemiologic, medical, or public health advances have been identified. PMID:7704890

  10. A chiroptical photoswitchable DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Mammana, Angela; Carroll, Gregory T; Areephong, Jetsuda; Feringa, Ben L

    2011-10-13

    The interesting structural, electronic, and optical properties of DNA provide fascinating opportunities for developing nanoscale smart materials by integrating DNA with opto-electronic components. In this article we demonstrate the electrostatic binding of an amine-terminated dithienylethene (DET) molecular switch to double-stranded synthetic polynucleotides. The DET switch can undergo photochemical ring-closure and opening reactions. Circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis spectroscopy show that both the open, 1o, and the closed, 1c, forms of the switch bind to DNA. Upon addition of DNA to a solution of 1o or 1c, the UV-vis spectrum displays a hypochromic effect, indicative of an interaction between the switch and the DNA. The chirality of the DNA double-helix is transmitted to the switching unit which displays a well-defined CD signal upon supramolecular complexation to the DNA. Additionally, the CD signal of the DNA attenuates, demonstrating that both components of the complex mutually influence each other's structure; the DNA induces chirality in the switch, and the switch modifies the structure of the DNA. Modulation of the chiroptical properties of the complex is achieved by photochemically switching the DET between its ring open and closed isomers. A pH dependence study of the binding shows that when the pH is increased the switches lose their binding ability, indicating that electrostatic interactions between protonated amines and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are the dominant driving force for binding to the DNA. A comparison of poly(deoxyguanylic-deoxycytidylic) acid [poly(dGdC)(2)] polynucleotides with poly(deoxyadenylic-deoxythymidylic) acid [poly(dAdT)(2)] shows distinct differences in the CD spectra of the complexes. PMID:21879715

  11. Probing the DNA structural requirements for facilitated diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hedglin, Mark; Zhang, Yaru; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-01-20

    DNA glycosylases perform a genome-wide search to locate damaged nucleotides among a great excess of undamaged nucleotides. Many glycosylases are capable of facilitated diffusion, whereby multiple sites along the DNA are sampled during a single binding encounter. Electrostatic interactions between positively charged amino acids and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are crucial for facilitated diffusion, but the extent to which diffusing proteins rely on the double-helical structure DNA is not known. Kinetic assays were used to probe the DNA searching mechanism of human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and to test the extent to which diffusion requires B-form duplex DNA. Although AAG excises εA lesions from single-stranded DNA, it is not processive on single-stranded DNA because dissociation is faster than N-glycosidic bond cleavage. However, the AAG complex with single-stranded DNA is sufficiently stable to allow for DNA annealing when a complementary strand is added. This observation provides evidence of nonspecific association of AAG with single-stranded DNA. Single-strand gaps, bubbles, and bent structures do not impede the search by AAG. Instead, these flexible or bent structures lead to the capture of a nearby site of damage that is more efficient than that of a continuous B-form duplex. The ability of AAG to negotiate these helix discontinuities is inconsistent with a sliding mode of diffusion but can be readily explained by a hopping mode that involves microscopic dissociation and reassociation. These experiments provide evidence of relatively long-range hops that allow a searching protein to navigate around DNA binding proteins that would serve as obstacles to a sliding protein.

  12. Monoclonals and DNA probes in diagnostic and preventative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Della Povta, G.; Albertini, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Use of DNA Probes for Prenatal and Carrier Diagnosis of Hemophilia and Fragile X Mental Retardation; The Application of DNA Probes to Diagnosis and Research of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Clinical Trial, New Probes and Deletion Mapping; Molecular Genetics of the Human Collagens; Molecular Genetics of Human Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Genes; Detection of Hepatitis B Virus DNA and Hepatitis Delta Virus RNA: Implications in Diagnosis and Pathogenesis; and DNA Probes to Evaluate the Possible Association of Papovaviruses with Human Tumors.

  13. DNA probes for the detection of mycoplasmas in genital specimens.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M C; Hooton, M; Stamm, W; Holmes, K K; Kenny, G E

    1987-06-01

    The utility of whole-genomic DNA probes for the detection of infections by genital mycoplasmas was investigated in 220 men attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic. In 144 patients, probe results were compared with quantitative culture results. The prevalence of Mycoplasma hominis was 11% by culture, whereas the prevalence of ureaplasmas was 38%. The M. hominis DNA probe detected 9 of 16 M. hominis culture-positive specimens and 2 of 128 culture-negative specimens. The Ureaplasma urealyticum DNA probe detected 36 of 57 U. urealyticum culture-positive specimens and 18 of 87 culture-negative specimens. Most of the probe-negative culture-positive specimens had colony counts of less than 10(3) organisms/ml of specimen. The DNA probe does not require viable organisms, and the probe-positive, culture-negative specimens suggest that false-negative cultures occurred, perhaps due to specimen handling or insensitivity of culture methods for some strains of mycoplasmas.

  14. Complex DNA structures and structures of DNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chazin, W.J.; Carlstroem, G.; Shiow-Meei Chen; Miick, S.; Gomez-Paloma, L.; Smith, J.; Rydzewski, J.

    1994-12-01

    Complex DNA structures (for example, triplexes, quadruplexes, junctions) and DNA-ligand complexes are more difficult to study by NMR than standard DNA duplexes are because they have high molecular weights, show nonstandard or distorted local conformations, and exhibit large resonance linewidths and severe {sup 1}H spectral overlap. These systems also tend to have limited solubility and may require specialized solution conditions to maintain favorable spectral characteristics, which adds to the spectroscopic difficulties. Furthermore, with more atoms in the system, both assignment and structure calculation become more challenging. In this article, we focus on demonstrating the current status of NMR studies of such systems and the limitations to further progress; we also indicate in what ways isotopic enrichment can be useful.

  15. Directly labeled fluorescent DNA probes for chromosome mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Deaven, L.L.; Chen, D.J.; Park, Min S.; MacInnes, M.A.; Salzman, G.C.; Yoshida, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A new strategy is briefly described for employing nucleic acid probes that are directly labeled with fluorochromes in fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. These probes will permit the detection, quantitation, and high-precision spatial analysis of multiple DNA sequences along a single chromosome using video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing and analysis. Potential advantages of direct labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization far surpass currently available, indirect DNA probe labeling techniques in ease of use, versatility, and increased signal- to-noise ratio.

  16. An anticancer drug to probe non-specific protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Abhigyan; Koninti, Raj Kumar; Gavvala, Krishna; Ballav, Nirmalya; Hazra, Partha

    2014-03-01

    A visible fluorescence switch of an eminent anti-carcinogen, ellipticine has been used to probe non-specific protein-DNA interaction. The unique pattern of protein-DNA complexation is depicted for the first time through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images and spectroscopic techniques.

  17. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay.

  18. Structural complexity of DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Tseng, Shen-Han; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Huai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results. PMID:23662161

  19. Structural Complexity of DNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Huai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results. PMID:23662161

  20. Probing microstructures in double-helical DNA with chiral metal complexes: Recognition of changes in base-pair propeller twisting in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Pyle, A.M.; Morii, Takashi; Barton, J.K. )

    1990-12-05

    That DNA base pairs are propeller twisted in a sequence-dependent manner has been evident only in viewing crystal structures of oligonucleotides. Here the authors report that shape-selective DNA-binding molecules can recognize and distinguish propeller twisted DNA sites in solution on the basis of shape and symmetry. Enantioselective discrimination is apparent in photocleavage by Rh(phen){sub 2}phi{sup 3+} (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; phi = 9,10-phenanthrenequinone diimine) at 5{prime}-pyr-pyr-pur-3{prime} steps which are characterized by a high degree of differential propeller twist but not at homopyrimidine-homopurine segments. Neither isomer targets 5{prime}-pur-pyr-3{prime} steps.

  1. Platinum(II) complexes as spectroscopic probes for biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ratilla, E.

    1990-09-21

    The use of platinum(II) complexes as tags and probes for biomolecules is indeed advantageous for their reactivities can be selective for certain purposes through an interplay of mild reaction conditions and of the ligands bound to the platinum. The use of {sup 195}Pt NMR as a method of detecting platinum and its interactions with biomolecules was carried out with the simplest model of platinum(II) tagging to proteins. Variable-temperature {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy proved useful in studying the stereodynamics of complex thioethers like methionine. The complex, Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}, with its chromophore has a greater potential for probing proteins. It is a noninvasive and selective tag for histidine and cysteine residues on the surface of cytochrome c at pH 5. The protein derivatives obtained are separable, and the tags are easily quantitated and differentiated through the metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands which are sensitive to the environment of the tag. Increasing the pH to 7.0 led to the modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}of Arg 91 in cytochrome c. Further studies with guanidine-containing ligands as models for arginine modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +} showed that guanidine can act as a terminal ligand and as a bridging ligand. Owing to the potential utility of Pt(trpy)L{sup n+} as electron dense probes of nucleic acid structure, interactions of this bis-Pt(trpy){sup 2+} complex with nucleic acids was evaluated. Indeed, the complex interacts non-covalently with nucleic acids. Its interactions with DNA are not exactly the same as those of its precedents. Most striking is its ability to form highly immobile bands of DNA upon gel electrophoresis. 232 refs.

  2. Eddy Current Flexible Probes for Complex Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles-Pascaud, C.; Decitre, J. M.; Vacher, F.; Fermon, C.; Pannetier, M.; Cattiaux, G.

    2006-03-01

    The inspection of materials used in aerospace, nuclear or transport industry is a critical issue for the safety of components exposed to stress or/and corrosion. The industry claims for faster, more sensitive, and more flexible techniques. Technologies based on Eddy Current (EC) flexible array probe and magnetic sensor with high sensitivity such as giant magneto-resistance (GMR) could be a good solution to detect surface-breaking flaws in complex shaped surfaces. The CEA has recently developed, with support from the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), a flexible array probe based on micro-coils etched on Kapton. The probe's performances have been assessed for the inspection of reactor residual heat removal pipes, and for aeronautical applications within the framework of the European project VERDICT. The experimental results confirm the very good detection of narrow cracks on plane and curve shaped surfaces. This paper also describes the recent progresses concerning the application of GMR sensors to EC testing, and the results obtained for the detection of small surface breaking flaws.

  3. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries.

    PubMed

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-Ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection-based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization.

  4. Chemical method for introducing haptens on to DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, G.H.; Cumming, C.U.; Huang, D.P.; Manak, M.M.; Ting, R.

    1988-05-01

    The authors developed a versatile chemical method of attaching hapten moieties onto DNA, for the construction of nonisotopic DNA probes. The DNA is reacted with N-bromosuccinimide at alkaline pH, resulting in bromination of a fraction of the thymine, guanine, and cytosine residues, with adenine modified to a lesser extent. The bromine is subsequently displaced by a primary amino group, attached to a linker arm. The other end of the linker arm has a detectable group preattached to it. They have labeled cloned hepatitis B viral (HBV) DNA with the hapten 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) and used it in combination with a high affinity rabbit anti-DNP antibody, for the detection of hepatitis B DNA by slot blotting. This probe was sensitive enough to specifically detect 1 x 10/sup -17/ mol (1 x 10/sup 6/ copies) of HBV DNA in total DNA from human serum.

  5. Complex kinetics of DNA condensation revealed through DNA twist tracing.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wong, Wei Juan; Lim, Ci Ji; Ju, Hai-Peng; Li, Ming; Yan, Jie; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-08-01

    Toroid formation is an important mechanism for DNA condensation in cells. The length change during DNA condensation was investigated in previous single-molecule experiments. However, DNA twist is key to understanding the topological kinetics of DNA condensation. In this study, DNA twist as well as DNA length was traced during the DNA condensation by the freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and the tilted magnetic tweezers combined with Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results disclose the complex relationship between DNA extension and backbone rotation. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the toroid formation follows a wiggling pathway which leads to the complex DNA backbone rotation as revealed in our experiments. These findings provide the complete description of multivalent cation-dependent DNA toroid formation under tension.

  6. Detection of toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Sun, Bo; Zheng, Guo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a microscopic parasite that may infect humans, so there is an increasing concern on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. We currently report a rapid and sensitive method for Toxoplasma gondii based on molecular beacon (MB) probe. The probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with a stem-loop DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with CdTe/ZnS quantum dots (energy donor) at 5' end and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) at 3' end, respectively. The probe was synthesized in PBS buffer at pH 8.2, room temperature for 24 h. Then target DNA was injected under the condition of 37°C, hybridization for 2 h, in Tris-HCl buffer. The data from fluorescence spectrum (FS) showed that ca 65% of emitted fluorescence was quenched, and about 50% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed after adding target DNA, which indicated that the target DNA was successfully detected by MB probe. The detecting limitation was determined as ca 5 nM. Moreover, specificity of the probe was investigated by adding target DNA with one-base-pair mismatch, the low fluorescence recovery indicated the high specificity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  7. Mechanisms of small molecule-DNA interactions probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almaqwashi, Ali A; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C

    2016-05-19

    There is a wide range of applications for non-covalent DNA binding ligands, and optimization of such interactions requires detailed understanding of the binding mechanisms. One important class of these ligands is that of intercalators, which bind DNA by inserting aromatic moieties between adjacent DNA base pairs. Characterizing the dynamic and equilibrium aspects of DNA-intercalator complex assembly may allow optimization of DNA binding for specific functions. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies have recently revealed new details about the molecular mechanisms governing DNA intercalation. These studies can provide the binding kinetics and affinity as well as determining the magnitude of the double helix structural deformations during the dynamic assembly of DNA-ligand complexes. These results may in turn guide the rational design of intercalators synthesized for DNA-targeted drugs, optical probes, or integrated biological self-assembly processes. Herein, we survey the progress in experimental methods as well as the corresponding analysis framework for understanding single molecule DNA binding mechanisms. We discuss briefly minor and major groove binding ligands, and then focus on intercalators, which have been probed extensively with these methods. Conventional mono-intercalators and bis-intercalators are discussed, followed by unconventional DNA intercalation. We then consider the prospects for using these methods in optimizing conventional and unconventional DNA-intercalating small molecules. PMID:27085806

  8. Superior structure stability and selectivity of hairpin nucleic acid probes with an L-DNA stem.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmi; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2007-01-01

    Hairpin nucleic acid probes have been highly useful in many areas, especially for intracellular and in vitro nucleic acid detection. The success of these probes can be attributed to the ease with which their conformational change upon target binding can be coupled to a variety of signal transduction mechanisms. However, false-positive signals arise from the opening of the hairpin due mainly to thermal fluctuations and stem invasions. Stem invasions occur when the stem interacts with its complementary sequence and are especially problematic in complex biological samples. To address the problem of stem invasions in hairpin probes, we have created a modified molecular beacon that incorporates unnatural enantiomeric l-DNA in the stem and natural d-DNA or 2'-O-Me-modified RNA in the loop. l-DNA has the same physical characteristics as d-DNA except that l-DNA cannot form stable duplexes with d-DNA. Here we show that incorporating l-DNA into the stem region of a molecular beacon reduces intra- and intermolecular stem invasions, increases the melting temperature, improves selectivity to its target, and leads to enhanced bio-stability. Our results suggest that l-DNA is useful for designing functional nucleic acid probes especially for biological applications.

  9. [Cu(phen)2](2+) acts as electrochemical indicator and anchor to immobilize probe DNA in electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Xi; Yan, Songling; Ren, Yinna; Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Peng; Dong, Yulin; Zhang, Chaocan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel protocol for sensitive in situ label-free electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization based on copper complex ([Cu(phen)2](2+), where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and graphene (GR) modified glassy carbon electrode. Here, [Cu(phen)2](2+) acted advantageously as both the electrochemical indicator and the anchor for probe DNA immobilization via intercalative interactions between the partial double helix structure of probe DNA and the vertical aromatic groups of phen. GR provided large density of docking site for probe DNA immobilization and increased the electrical conductivity ability of the electrode. The modification procedure was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Square-wave voltammetry (SWV) was used to explore the hybridization events. Under the optimal conditions, the designed electrochemical DNA biosensor could effectively distinguish different mismatch degrees of complementary DNA from one-base mismatch to noncomplementary, indicating that the biosensor had high selectivity. It also exhibited a reasonable linear relationship. The oxidation peak currents of [Cu(phen)2](2+) were linear with the logarithm of the concentrations of complementary target DNA ranging from 1 × 10(-12) to 1 × 10(-6) M with a detection limit of 1.99 × 10(-13) M (signal/noise = 3). Moreover, the stability of the electrochemical DNA biosensor was also studied.

  10. [Cu(phen)2](2+) acts as electrochemical indicator and anchor to immobilize probe DNA in electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Xi; Yan, Songling; Ren, Yinna; Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Peng; Dong, Yulin; Zhang, Chaocan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel protocol for sensitive in situ label-free electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization based on copper complex ([Cu(phen)2](2+), where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and graphene (GR) modified glassy carbon electrode. Here, [Cu(phen)2](2+) acted advantageously as both the electrochemical indicator and the anchor for probe DNA immobilization via intercalative interactions between the partial double helix structure of probe DNA and the vertical aromatic groups of phen. GR provided large density of docking site for probe DNA immobilization and increased the electrical conductivity ability of the electrode. The modification procedure was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Square-wave voltammetry (SWV) was used to explore the hybridization events. Under the optimal conditions, the designed electrochemical DNA biosensor could effectively distinguish different mismatch degrees of complementary DNA from one-base mismatch to noncomplementary, indicating that the biosensor had high selectivity. It also exhibited a reasonable linear relationship. The oxidation peak currents of [Cu(phen)2](2+) were linear with the logarithm of the concentrations of complementary target DNA ranging from 1 × 10(-12) to 1 × 10(-6) M with a detection limit of 1.99 × 10(-13) M (signal/noise = 3). Moreover, the stability of the electrochemical DNA biosensor was also studied. PMID:26403602

  11. Dual fluorophore PNA FIT-probes--extremely responsive and bright hybridization probes for the sensitive detection of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Socher, Elke; Knoll, Andrea; Seitz, Oliver

    2012-09-28

    Fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides are commonly employed as probes to detect specific DNA or RNA sequences in homogeneous solution. Useful probes should experience strong increases in fluorescent emission upon hybridization with the target. We developed dual labeled peptide nucleic acid probes, which signal the presence of complementary DNA or RNA by up to 450-fold enhancements of fluorescence intensity. This enabled the very sensitive detection of a DNA target (40 pM LOD), which was detectable at less than 0.1% of the beacon concentration. In contrast to existing DNA-based molecular beacons, this PNA-based method does not require a stem sequence to enforce dye-dye communication. Rather, the method relies on the energy transfer between a "smart" thiazole orange (TO) nucleotide, which requires formation of the probe-target complex in order to become fluorescent, and terminally appended acceptor dyes. To improve upon fluorescence responsiveness the energy pathways were dissected. Hydrophobic, spectrally mismatched dye combinations allowed significant (99.97%) decreases of background emission in the absence of a target. By contrast, spectral overlap between TO donor emission and acceptor excitation enabled extremely bright FRET signals. This and the large apparent Stokes shift (82 nm) suggests potential applications in the detection of specific RNA targets in biogenic matrices without the need of sample pre-processing prior to detection.

  12. Direct electronic probing of biological complexes formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Magliulo, Maria; Manoli, Kyriaki; Giordano, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Functional bio-interlayer organic field - effect transistors (FBI-OFET), embedding streptavidin, avidin and neutravidin as bio-recognition element, have been studied to probe the electronic properties of protein complexes. The threshold voltage control has been achieved modifying the SiO2 gate diaelectric surface by means of the deposition of an interlayer of bio-recognition elements. A threshold voltage shift with respect to the unmodified dielectric surface toward more negative potential values has been found for the three different proteins, in agreement with their isoelectric points. The relative responses in terms of source - drain current, mobility and threshold voltage upon exposure to biotin of the FBI-OFET devices have been compared for the three bio-recognition elements.

  13. Probing the elastic limit of DNA bending

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tung T.; Kim, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Sharp bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) plays an essential role in genome structure and function. However, the elastic limit of dsDNA bending remains controversial. Here, we measured the opening rates of small dsDNA loops with contour lengths ranging between 40 and 200 bp using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer. The relationship of loop lifetime to loop size revealed a critical transition in bending stress. Above the critical loop size, the loop lifetime changed with loop size in a manner consistent with elastic bending stress, but below it, became less sensitive to loop size, indicative of softened dsDNA. The critical loop size increased from ∼60 bp to ∼100 bp with the addition of 5 mM magnesium. We show that our result is in quantitative agreement with the kinkable worm-like chain model, and furthermore, can reproduce previously reported looping probabilities of dsDNA over the range between 50 and 200 bp. Our findings shed new light on the energetics of sharply bent dsDNA. PMID:25122748

  14. Small DNA circles as probes of DNA topology.

    PubMed

    Bates, Andrew D; Noy, Agnes; Piperakis, Michael M; Harris, Sarah A; Maxwell, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Small DNA circles can occur in Nature, for example as protein-constrained loops, and can be synthesized by a number of methods. Such small circles provide tractable systems for the study of the structure, thermodynamics and molecular dynamics of closed-circular DNA. In the present article, we review the occurrence and synthesis of small DNA circles, and examine their utility in studying the properties of DNA and DNA-protein interactions. In particular, we highlight the analysis of small circles using atomistic simulations.

  15. Utilizing Gold Nanoparticle Probes to Visually Detect DNA Methylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kui; Zhang, Mingyi; Chang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Lin; Gu, Weihong; Qin, Yanxia; Li, Juan; Cui, Suxia; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-06-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect endows gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with the ability to visualize biomolecules. In the present study, we designed and constructed a GNP probe to allow the semi-quantitative analysis of methylated tumor suppressor genes in cultured cells. To construct the probe, the GNP surfaces were coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by forming Au-S bonds. The ssDNA contains a thiolated 5'-end, a regulatory domain of 12 adenine nucleotides, and a functional domain with absolute pairing with methylated p16 sequence (Met- p16). The probe, paired with Met- p16, clearly changed the color of aggregating GNPs probe in 5 mol/L NaCl solution. Utilizing the probe, p16 gene methylation in HCT116 cells was semi-quantified. Further, the methylation of E-cadherin, p15, and p16 gene in Caco2, HepG2, and HCT116 cell lines were detected by the corresponding probes, constructed with three domains. This simple and cost-effective method was useful for the diagnosis of DNA methylation-related diseases.

  16. Mechanisms of small molecule–DNA interactions probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Almaqwashi, Ali A.; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide range of applications for non-covalent DNA binding ligands, and optimization of such interactions requires detailed understanding of the binding mechanisms. One important class of these ligands is that of intercalators, which bind DNA by inserting aromatic moieties between adjacent DNA base pairs. Characterizing the dynamic and equilibrium aspects of DNA-intercalator complex assembly may allow optimization of DNA binding for specific functions. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies have recently revealed new details about the molecular mechanisms governing DNA intercalation. These studies can provide the binding kinetics and affinity as well as determining the magnitude of the double helix structural deformations during the dynamic assembly of DNA–ligand complexes. These results may in turn guide the rational design of intercalators synthesized for DNA-targeted drugs, optical probes, or integrated biological self-assembly processes. Herein, we survey the progress in experimental methods as well as the corresponding analysis framework for understanding single molecule DNA binding mechanisms. We discuss briefly minor and major groove binding ligands, and then focus on intercalators, which have been probed extensively with these methods. Conventional mono-intercalators and bis-intercalators are discussed, followed by unconventional DNA intercalation. We then consider the prospects for using these methods in optimizing conventional and unconventional DNA-intercalating small molecules. PMID:27085806

  17. Colorimetric DNA detection of transgenic plants using gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourisaeid, Elham; Mousavi, Amir; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a DNA colorimetric detection system based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes was prepared and evaluated. We investigated the hybridization efficiency of the L-shaped probes and studied the effect of nanoparticle size and the L-shaped DNA probe length on the performance of the as-prepared system. Probes were attached to the surface of gold nanoparticles using an adenine sequence. An optimal sequence of 35S rRNA gene promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus, which is frequently used in the development of transgenic plants, and the two complementary ends of this gene were employed as model target strands and probe molecules, respectively. The spectrophotometric properties of the as-prepared systems indicated that the large NPs show better changes in the absorption spectrum and consequently present a better performance. The results of this study revealed that the probe/Au-NPs prepared using a vertical spacer containing 5 thymine oligonucleotides exhibited a stronger spectrophotometric response in comparison to that of larger probes. These results in general indicate the suitable performance of the L-shaped DNA probe-functionalized Au-NPs, and in particular emphasize the important role of the gold nanoparticle size and length of the DNA probes in enhancing the performance of such a system.

  18. Probing specific DNA sequences with luminescent semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Jason R.; Nie, Shuming

    2001-06-01

    The development of new fluorescent probes has impacted many areas of research such as medical diagnostics, high-speed drug screening, and basic molecular biology. Main limitations to traditional organic fluorophores are their relatively weak intensities, short life times (eg., photobleaching), and broad emission spectra. The desire for more intense fluorescent probes with higher quality photostability and narrow emission wavelengths has led to the development and utilization of semiconductor quantum dots as a new label. In this work, we have modified semicondutor quantum dots (QD's) with synthetic oligonucleotides to probe a specific DNA target sequence both in solution as well as immobilized on a solid substrate. In the first approach, specific target sequences are detected in solution by using short oligonucleotide probes, which are covalently linked to semiconductor quantum dots. In the second approach, DNA target sequences are covalently attached to a glass substrate and detected using oligonucleotides linked to semiconductor quantum dots.

  19. Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Gerald; Essex, Jonathan W.; Neylon, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    The microscopic flexibility of DNA is a key ingredient for understanding its interaction with proteins and drugs but is still poorly understood and technically challenging to measure. Several experimental methods probe very long DNA samples, but these miss local flexibility details. Others mechanically disturb or modify short molecules and therefore do not obtain flexibility properties of unperturbed and pristine DNA. Here, we show that it is possible to extract very detailed flexibility information about unmodified DNA from melting temperatures with statistical physics models. We were able to retrieve, from published melting temperatures, several established flexibility properties such as the presence of highly flexible TATA regions of genomic DNA and support recent findings that DNA is very flexible at short length scales. New information about the nanoscale Na+ concentration dependence of DNA flexibility was determined and we show the key role of ApT and TpA steps when it comes to ion-dependent flexibility and melting temperatures.

  20. Probing Minor Groove Hydrogen Bonding Interactions between RB69 DNA Polymerase and DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Shuangluo; Christian, Thomas D.; Wang, Jimin; Konigsberg, William H.

    2012-09-17

    Minor groove hydrogen bonding (HB) interactions between DNA polymerases (pols) and N3 of purines or O2 of pyrimidines have been proposed to be essential for DNA synthesis from results obtained using various nucleoside analogues lacking the N3 or O2 contacts that interfered with primer extension. Because there has been no direct structural evidence to support this proposal, we decided to evaluate the contribution of minor groove HB interactions with family B pols. We have used RB69 DNA pol and 3-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine (3DA), an analogue of 2-deoxyadenosine, which has the same HB pattern opposite T but with N3 replaced with a carbon atom. We then determined pre-steady-state kinetic parameters for the insertion of dAMP opposite dT using primer/templates (P/T)-containing 3DA. We also determined three structures of ternary complexes with 3DA at various positions in the duplex DNA substrate. We found that the incorporation efficiency of dAMP opposite dT decreased 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}-fold even when only one minor groove HB interaction was missing. Our structures show that the HB pattern and base pair geometry of 3DA/dT is exactly the same as those of dA/dT, which makes 3DA an optimal analogue for probing minor groove HB interactions between a DNA polymerase and a nucleobase. In addition, our structures provide a rationale for the observed 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}-fold decrease in the rate of nucleotide incorporation. The minor groove HB interactions between position n-2 of the primer strand and RB69pol fix the rotomer conformations of the K706 and D621 side chains, as well as the position of metal ion A and its coordinating ligands, so that they are in the optinal orientation for DNA synthesis.

  1. Rapid identification of veterinary-relevant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species using 16S rDNA, IS6110 and Regions of Difference-targeted dual-labelled hydrolysis probes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Amaro, Ana; Ferreira, Ana S; Machado, Diana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Couto, Isabel; Botelho, Ana; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) are causative agents of tuberculosis (TB) in both humans and animals. MTC species are genetically very similar but may differ in their epidemiology, namely geographic distribution and host preferences, virulence traits and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. However, the conventional laboratory diagnosis does not routinely differentiate between the species of the MTC. In this work we describe a rapid and robust two-step five-target probe-based real-time PCR identification algorithm, based on genomic deletion analysis, to identify the MTC species most commonly associated with TB in livestock and other animals. The first step allows the confirmation of the cultures as MTC members, by targeting their IS6110 element, or as a mycobacterial species, if only a 16S rDNA product is detected in the duplex amplification reaction. If a MTC member is identified, the second amplification step allows the assessment of the presence or absence of the RD1, RD4 and RD9 genomic regions. The correspondent pattern allows us to infer the species of the isolate as M. tuberculosis (if all RDs are present), Mycobacterium caprae (if only RD1 and RD4 are present) and Mycobacterium bovis (if only RD1 is present). The identification algorithm developed presented an almost perfect agreement with the results of the routine bacteriological analysis, with a kappa coefficient of 0.970 (CI(P95%) 0.929-1.000). The assay is able to be adaptable to automation and implementation in the routine diagnostic framework of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, with a particular focus for reference laboratories.

  2. Dynamics of DNA bending/unbending in complex with DNA-bending protein IHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Anjum; Vivas, Paula; Kuznetsov, Serguei

    2007-03-01

    Kinetics of conformational changes in proteins and DNA that lead to precise recognition of specific DNA binding sites are difficult to observe with the limited time-resolution of stop-flow and single-molecule techniques. Here we use a ˜10 ns laser T-jump apparatus to probe the kinetics of a ˜35-bp DNA substrate bound to E. coli Integration Host Factor (IHF) and end-labeled with a FRET pair. These T-jump measurements, in combination with stop-flow, provide the first direct observation of the DNA bending/unbending kinetics in a protein-DNA complex (Sugimura and Crothers, PNAS, in press; Kuznetsov et al., PNAS, in press). The rates and activation energy of DNA bending are similar to that of a single A:T base pair opening inside uncomplexed DNA, suggesting that spontaneous thermal disruption in base-pairing nucleated at an A:T site may be sufficient to overcome the free energy barrier needed to partially bend/kink DNA. An unusual salt dependence of the binding affinity observed previously for IHF/DNA complex, and explained in terms of DNA binding coupled with disruption of a network of salt bridges within the protein (Holbrook et al., 2001, JMB, 310, 379), is reflected in the salt dependence of the observed bending rates. These results suggest that salt-dependent protein conformational changes may be playing a role in the DNA bending process.

  3. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfin, Najmul; Yadav, Avinash Chand; Bohidar, H. B.

    2013-11-01

    The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012)] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement ⟨R2⟩ exhibits a scaling with time as ⟨R2⟩ ˜ tα, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t), which follows the scaling, S(t) ˜ tβ/ln (t). Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  4. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    SciTech Connect

    Arfin, Najmul; Yadav, Avinash Chand; Bohidar, H. B.

    2013-11-15

    The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012)] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement 〈R{sup 2}〉 exhibits a scaling with time as 〈R{sup 2}〉 ∼ t{sup α}, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t), which follows the scaling, S(t) ∼ t{sup β}/ln (t). Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  5. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  6. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  7. Probing DNA-lipid membrane interactions with a lipopeptide nanopore.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Andrey; Takemoto, Jon Y; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-04-24

    Association of DNA molecules with lipid bilayer membranes is of considerable interest for a large variety of applications in biotechnology. Here we introduce syringomycin E (SRE), a small pore-forming lipopeptide produced by the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, as a facile sensor for the detection of DNA interactions with lipid membranes. SRE forms highly reproducible pores in cellular and artificial membranes. The pore structure involves bilayer lipids, which have a pronounced influence on open channel conductance and gating. SRE channels act as ionic diodes that serve as current rectifiers sensitive to the charge of the bilayer. We employ this intrinsic property to electronically monitor the association of DNA molecules with the membrane in a variety of different settings. We show that SRE can be used for quantitatively probing electrostatic interactions of DNA and DNA-cholesterol conjugates with a lipid membrane. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SRE channels allow monitoring of hybridization reactions between lipid-anchored probe strands and complementary strands in solution. In the presence of double-stranded DNA, SRE channels display a particularly high degree of rectification. Finally, the formation of multilayered structures assembled from poly-(L)-lysine and DNA oligonucleotides on the membrane was precisely monitored with SRE. PMID:22424398

  8. DNA probes for the identification of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, L M; Shayegani, M; Waring, A L; Bopp, L H

    1989-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi ATCC 33922, a virulent, well-characterized strain, was used to construct a genomic library in a bacteriophage expression vector. Three DNA fragments were selected for use as probes on the basis of their ability to encode H. ducreyi-specific proteins, as demonstrated by reactivity with rabbit polyclonal antiserum. With DNA-DNA hybridization, the three probes, labeled with 32P, reacted strongly with 16 strains of H. ducreyi obtained from a variety of sources. Thirty-seven other bacterial isolates, representing 33 different species and including organisms likely to be encountered in the urogenital tract, were also tested with the three probes. Twenty-eight of these isolates, including the genital pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, showed no hybridization with the probes. In addition, herpes simplex virus-infected tissue culture cells and Treponema pallidum-infected rabbit testicular fluid were also completely nonreactive. Nine isolates, six belonging to other Haemophilus species and three belonging to Pasteurella species, reacted weakly with the probes when approximately 3.0 x 10(7) to 6.0 x 10(7) CFU was tested. When 10(5) to 10(6) CFU of these organisms was tested, the weak reactions could no longer be seen. Yet this number of H. ducreyi still reacted strongly. In fact, the three probes consistently detected 10(4) CFU of H. ducreyi in pure and mixed cultures and even produced a weak signal when only 10(3) CFU was present. It is clear from our results that use of these probes will greatly facilitate the laboratory diagnosis of this genital pathogen. Images PMID:2788660

  9. Probe mapping to facilitate transposon-based DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Strausbaugh, L.D.; Bourke, M.T.; Sommer, M.T.; Coon, M.E.; Berg, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    A promising strategy for DNA sequencing exploits transposons to provide mobile sites for the binding of sequencing primers. For such a strategy to be maximally efficient, the location and orientation of the transposon must be readily determined and the insertion sites should be randomly distributed. The authors demonstrate an efficient probe-based method for the localization and orientation of transposon-borne primer sites, which is adaptable to large-scale sequencing strategies. This approach requires no prior restriction enzyme mapping or knowledge of the cloned sequence and eliminates the inefficiency inherent in totally random sequencing methods. To test the efficiency of probe mapping, 49 insertions of the transposon {gamma}{delta} (Tn1000) in a cloned fragment of Drosophila melanogaster DNA were mapped and oriented. In addition, oligonucleotide primers specific for unique subterminal {gamma}{delta} segments were used to prime dideoxynucleotide double-stranded sequencing. These data provided an opportunity to rigorously examine {gamma}{delta} insertion sites. The insertions were quire randomly distributed, even though the target DNA fragment had both A+T-rich and G+C-rich regions; in G+C-rich DNA, the insertions were found in A+T-rich valleys. These data demonstrate that {gamma}{delta} is an excellent choice for supplying mobile primer binding sites to cloned DNA and that transposon-based probe mapping permits the sequences of large cloned segments to be determined without any subcloning.

  10. Rapid antigen testing for group A Streptococcus by DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Heelan, J S; Wilbur, S; Depetris, G; Letourneau, C

    1996-02-01

    The Gen-probe group A Streptococcus direct test (GASD), a nucleic acid probe assay for detecting GAS from throat swabs, has recently been developed. The test uses an acridium ester-labeled DNA probe which is complementary to the rRNA of Streptococcus pyogenes. In this study, 318 single culturette throat swabs were tested by this method using culture as a "gold standard." After plating onto trypticase soy agar plates with 5% sheep blood, swabs were stored at 4 degrees C for no more than 72 h before the probe assay was performed. Our patient population consisted of symptomatic outpatients seen in the Memorial Hospital Emergency Department and in the Family Care Center. After discrepancy testing, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 91.4%, 97%, 91.4%, and 97%. The GASD is a rapid, easy-to-perform method for batch screening for streptococcal pharyngitis.

  11. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich-Bode, Karin; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas; Weier, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli

    2008-12-16

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-?B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  12. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas P.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-12-04

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-{kappa}B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  13. A DNA--silver nanocluster probe that fluoresces upon hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Sharma, Jaswinder; Han, Jason J; Martinez, Jennifer S; Werner, James H

    2010-08-11

    DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs) are an emerging set of fluorophores that are smaller than semiconductor quantum dots and can have better photostability and brightness than commonly used organic dyes. Here we find the red fluorescence of DNA/Ag NCs can be enhanced 500-fold when placed in proximity to guanine-rich DNA sequences. On the basis of this new phenomenon, we have designed a DNA detection probe (NanoCluster Beacon, NCB) that "lights up" upon target binding. Since NCBs do not rely on Forster energy transfer for quenching, they can easily reach high (>100) signal-to-background ratios (S/B ratios) upon target binding. Here, in a separation-free assay, we demonstrate NCB detection of an influenza target with a S/B ratio of 175, a factor of 5 better than a conventional molecular beacon probe. Since the observed fluorescence enhancement is caused by intrinsic nucleobases, our detection technique is simple, inexpensive, and compatible with commercial DNA synthesizers.

  14. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne', Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  15. Photonic Crystal Biosensor with In-Situ Synthesized DNA Probes for Enhanced Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shuren; Zhao, Y.; Retterer, Scott T; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Weiss, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    We report on a nearly 8-fold increase in multi-hole defect photonic crystal biosensor response by incorporating in-situ synthesis of DNA probes, as compared to the conventional functionalization method employing pre-synthesized DNA probe immobilization.

  16. Copper(II)-quenched oligonucleotide probes for fluorescent DNA sensing.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Jens; Kraemer, Roland

    2004-10-27

    A copper(II)-quenched molecular beacon was prepared by attaching fluorescein to the 3'-end and a copper(II) complex to the 5'-end of DNA. In the presence of complementary DNA, copper(II) and dye are spatially separated in the duplex and fluorescence increases up to 15-fold, with excellent discrimination of single base mismatches.

  17. Sensitive determination of DNA based on the interaction between prulifloxacin-terbium(III) complex and DNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting; Fang, Biyun; Chang, Lin; Liu, Min; Chen, Fang

    2013-01-01

    A simple spectrofluorimetric method is described for the determination of DNA, based on its enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of prulifloxacin (PUFX)-Tb(3+). The luminescence intensity of the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex increased up to 10-fold after adding DNA. The excitation and emission wavelengths were 345 and 545 nm, respectively. Under optimum conditions, variations in the fluorescence intensity showed a good linear relationship with the concentration of hsDNA in the range of 3.0 × 10(-9) to 1.0 × 10(-6) g/mL, with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.997, and the detection limit was 2.1 × 10(-9) g/mL. The method was successfully applied to the determination of DNA in synthetic samples, and recoveries were in the range 97.3-102.0%. The mechanism of fluorescence enhancement of the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex by DNA is also discussed. The mechanism may involve formation of a ternary complex mainly by intercalation binding together with weak electrostatic interaction, which will increase the energy transition from ligand to Tb(3+), increasing the rigidity of the complex, and decreasing the radiationless energy loss through O-H vibration of the H2O molecule in the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex. Compared with the previous DNA probes, the proposed method is not only more robust and friendly to the environment, but also of relatively higher sensitivity.

  18. Probing the structure of nucleic acids with Ni(II) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoying.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of nucleic acids determines their biological function. Interest in the development of novel probes from structures of nucleic acid has led to the discovery of conformation-specific oxidation of guanine sites in DNA and RNA using Ni(II) complexes. The reaction is highly dependent upon the nature of Ni(II) complexes with the most important feature of a strong in-plane ligand field. The unique properties of Ni(II) complexes combining redox and coordination features provide sensitive probes for nucleic acid conformation. One of these nickel complexes, NiCR, has been shown to selectively promote cleavage of DNA at guanine sites held accessible through the formation of unusual secondary structures such as ends, mismatches, bulges and loops. An unique mechanism for the base and conformation-specific oxidation of DNA promoted by Ni(II) complexes is proposed, involving direct ligation of nickel to N-7 of guanine delivering a non-diffusible oxidizing species. NiCR has been proved to be a sensitive and predictable probe for the tertiary structure of RNAs. The specific sites of oxidation of tRNS[sup phe] promoted by NiCR correspond to the most accessible guanine residues determined by theoretic calculations. NiCR has also been successfully applied to probe the tertiary structure of self-splicing Tetrahymena pre-rRNA intron, and has provided important information about the folding of this intron, especially in the region of the catalytic core.

  19. DNA detection using water-soluble conjugated polymers and peptide nucleic acid probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaylord, Brent S.; Heeger, Alan J.; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2002-08-01

    The light-harvesting properties of cationic conjugated polymers are used to sensitize the emission of a dye on a specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence for the purpose of homogeneous, "real-time" DNA detection. Signal transduction is controlled by hybridization of the neutral PNA probe and the negative DNA target. Electrostatic interactions bring the hybrid complex and cationic polymer within distances required for Förster energy transfer. Conjugated polymer excitation provides fluorescein emission >25 times higher than that obtained by exciting the dye, allowing detection of target DNA at concentrations of 10 pM with a standard fluorometer. A simple and highly sensitive assay with optical amplification that uses the improved hybridization behavior of PNA/DNA complexes is thus demonstrated.

  20. Evaluation of the Gen-Probe DNA probe for the detection of legionellae in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, P.H.

    1986-03-01

    A commercial DNA probe kit designed to detect rRNA from legionellae was evaluated for its ability to correctly discriminate between legionellae and non-legionellae taken from culture plates. The probe kit, made by the Gen-Probe Corp. (San Diego, Calif.), was radiolabeled with /sup 125/I, and probe bacterial RNA hybridization, detected in a simple one-tube system hybridization assay, was quantitated with a gamma counter. A total of 156 Legionella sp. strains were tested, of which 125 were Legionella pneumophila and the remainder were strains from 21 other Legionella spp. A total of 106 gram-negative non-legionellae, isolated from human respiratory tract (81%) and other body site (19%) specimens, were also tested; 14 genera and 28 species were represented. The probe easily distinguished all of the legionellae from the non-legionellae. The average legionellae/non-legionellae hybridization ratio was 42:1, and the lowest ratio was 2:1; a minor modification in the procedure increased the lowest ratio to 5:1. In addition to correctly identifying all Legionella species, the probe was able to separate some of the various species of Legionella. L. pneumophila strains hybridized more completely to the probe than did the other Legionella spp.; L. wadsworthii and L. oakridgensis hybridized only about 25% of the probe relative to L. pneumophila. Some strains of phenotypically identified L. pneumophila had much lower hybridization to the probe than other members of the species and may represent a new Legionella species. The simplicity of the technique and specificity of the probe make it a good candidate for confirming the identity of legionellae in culture.

  1. Direct observation of DNA bending/unbending kinetics in complex with DNA-bending protein IHF

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Sugimura, Sawako; Vivas, Paula; Crothers, Donald M.; Ansari, Anjum

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression involves formation of specific protein–DNA complexes in which the DNA is often bent or sharply kinked. Kinetics measurements of DNA bending when in complex with the protein are essential for understanding the molecular mechanism that leads to precise recognition of specific DNA-binding sites. Previous kinetics measurements on several DNA-bending proteins used stopped-flow techniques that have limited time resolution of few milliseconds. Here we use a nanosecond laser temperature-jump apparatus to probe, with submillisecond time resolution, the kinetics of bending/unbending of a DNA substrate bound to integration host factor (IHF), an architectural protein from Escherichia coli. The kinetics are monitored with time-resolved FRET, with the DNA substrates end-labeled with a FRET pair. The temperature-jump measurements, in combination with stopped-flow measurements, demonstrate that the binding of IHF to its cognate DNA site involves an intermediate state with straight or, possibly, partially bent DNA. The DNA bending rates range from ≈2 ms−1 at ≈37°C to ≈40 ms−1 at ≈10°C and correspond to an activation energy of ≈14 ± 3 kcal/mol. These rates and activation energy are similar to those of a single A:T base pair opening inside duplex DNA. Thus, our results suggest that spontaneous thermal disruption in base-paring, nucleated at an A:T site, may be sufficient to overcome the free energy barrier needed to partially bend/kink DNA before forming a tight complex with IHF. PMID:17124171

  2. The kinetic complexity of Acetabularia chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, U; Green, B R

    1978-11-21

    The kinetic complexity of Acetabularia cliftonii chloroplast DNA is 1.52 +/- 0.26 . 10(9) daltons, compared to 0.2 .10(9) daltons for Chlamydomonas chloroplast DNA. There is an average of three genomes per chloroplast. The unusually large size of the Acetabularia genome may reflect the ancient evolutionary history of this organism.

  3. Electrostatics of DNA complexes with cationic lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey

    2007-03-01

    We present the exact solutions of the linear Poisson-Boltzmann theory for several problems relevant to electrostatics of DNA complexes with cationic lipids. We calculate the electrostatic potential and energy for lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases, concentrating on the effects of water-membrane dielectric boundaries. Our results for the complex energy agree qualitatively well with the known numerical solutions of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Using the solution for the lamellar phase, we calculate its compressibility modulus and compare our findings with experimental data available suggesting a new scaling dependence on DNA-DNA separations in the complex. Also, we treat analytically charge-charge electrostatic interactions across, along, and in between two low-dielectric membranes. We obtain an estimate for the strength of electrostatic interactions of 1D DNA smectic layers across a lipid membrane. We discuss also some aspects of 2D DNA condensation and DNA-DNA attraction in DNA-lipid lamellar phase in the presence of di- and tri-valent cations and analyze the equilibrium intermolecular separations using the recently developed theory of electrostatic interactions of DNA helical charge motifs.

  4. Synthesis of PCR-derived, single-stranded DNA probes suitable for in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hannon, K; Johnstone, E; Craft, L S; Little, S P; Smith, C K; Heiman, M L; Santerre, R F

    1993-08-01

    We report the novel synthesis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-derived single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes and their subsequent application in in situ hybridizations. Serial transverse sections of an 11.5-day postcoitum mouse embryo were hybridized to a 33P-ssDNA, 33P-RNA, or 35S-RNA probe corresponding to the same 181-bp sequence in the myogenin cDNA. Signal obtained using 33P-ssDNA was more intense than that using 33P-RNA probe, while signal/noise ratios obtained with both 33P-probes were far superior to those obtained with 35S-probe. Digoxigenin-labeled chicken growth hormone (GH) ssDNA gave slightly more intense signal than did digoxigenin-labeled chicken GH RNA when hybridized to chicken pituitary sections. 32P-ssDNA probes were found to be suitable for Northern blot hybridization. Advantages of using ssDNA probes for in situ hybridization include: (1) The ssDNA technique is rapid and simple. There was no need to clone a DNA template into a special RNA vector or order special T7-containing PCR primers. ssDNA probes can be synthesized in less than 1 day using any primers which currently exist in a laboratory (optimal probe length for in situ hybridization is between 50 and 200 bp). (2) In three separate in situ experiments, ssDNA probes yielded more intense signal than RNA probes. (3) ssDNA probes are potentially more stable than RNA probes. (4) Since the RNAse rinse is eliminated, posthybridization rinses are shortened when hybridizing with ssDNA probes. The ssDNA probes produced by this protocol can be labeled with a variety of different isotopes (both radioactive and nonradioactive), and are excellent probes for use in in situ hybridizations.

  5. Bis-pyrene-labeled molecular beacon: a monomer-excimer switching probe for the detection of DNA base alteration.

    PubMed

    Yamana, Kazushige; Ohshita, Yoshikazu; Fukunaga, Yudai; Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    A new bis-pyrene-labeled oligonucleotide probe (BP-probe) has been designed for the detection of a single base mismatch in single strand (ss) DNA as a target. The sequence of BP-probe was chosen to form stem-loop structure similar to a molecular beacon (MB-probe), yielding bis-pyrene-labeled molecular beacon (BP-MB-probe). Partially double stranded (ds) BP-MB-probes were prepared by complexation with oligonucleotides whose sequences are complementary to the loop segment but not to the stem and exchangeable with the target DNA. The partially ds BP-MB-probes were shown to exhibit monomer fluorescence as major fluorescence, while the ss BP-MB-probe in the stem-loop form displays strong excimer fluorescence. The strand exchange reactions between partially ds BP-MB-probe and target ss DNA in the presence of cationic comb-type copolymer as a catalyst were monitored by the excimer fluorescence changes. The existence of a mismatched base can be determined by the slower PASE rates compared with fully matched DNA.

  6. Label-free potentiometry for detecting DNA hybridization using peptide nucleic acid and DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-02-07

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  7. PCR-derived ssDNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization to HIV-1 RNA.

    PubMed

    Knuchel, M C; Graf, B; Schlaepfer, E; Kuster, H; Fischer, M; Weber, R; Cone, R W

    2000-02-01

    We developed a simple and rapid technique to synthesize single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization (ISH) to human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RNA. The target HIV-1 regions were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and were simultaneously labeled with dUTP. This product served as template for an optimized asymmetric PCR (one-primer PCR) that incorporated digoxigenin (dig)-labeled dUTP. The input DNA was subsequently digested by uracil DNA glycosylase, leaving intact, single-stranded, digoxigenin-labeled DNA probe. A cocktail of ssDNA probes representing 55% of the HIV-1 genome was hybridized to HIV-1-infected 8E5 T-cells and uninfected H9 T-cells. For comparison, parallel hybridizations were done with a plasmid-derived RNA probe mix covering 85% of the genome and a PCR-derived RNA probe mix covering 63% of the genome. All three probe types produced bright signals, but the best signal-to-noise ratios and the highest sensitivities were obtained with the ssDNA probe. In addition, the ssDNA probe syntheses generated large amounts of probe (0.5 to 1 microg ssDNA probe per synthesis) and were easier to perform than the RNA probe syntheses. These results suggest that ssDNA probes may be preferable to RNA probes for fluorescent ISH. (J Histochem Cytochem 48:285-293, 2000)

  8. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    PubMed Central

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity. PMID:27230125

  9. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  10. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing.

    PubMed

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-27

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  11. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  12. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Labeled DNA for Graphene Oxide-Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingcheng; Zhou, Yuyang; Li, Yingying; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Jian

    2016-02-01

    There has been growing interest in utilizing highly photostable iridium(III) complexes as new luminescent probes for biotechnology and life science. Herein, iridium(III) complex with carboxyl group was synthesized and activated with N-hydroxysuccinimide, followed by tagging to the amino terminate of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The Ir-ssDNA probe was further combined with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets to develop a GO-based biosensor for target ssDNA detection. The quenching efficiency of GO, and the photostability of iridium(III) complex and GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor, were also investigated. On the basis of the high luminescence quenching efficiency of GO toward iridium(III) complex, the GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor exhibited minimal background signals, while strong emission was observed when Ir-ssDNA desorbed from GO nanosheets and formed a double helix with the specific target, leading to a high signal-to-background ratio. Moreover, it was found that luminescent intensities of iridium(III) complex and GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor were around 15 and 3 times higher than those of the traditional carboxyl fluorescein (FAM) dye and the GO-FAM-ssDNA biosensor after UV irradiation, respectively. Our study suggested the sensitive and selective Ir-ssDNA probe was suitable for the development of highly photostable GO-based detection platforms, showing promise for application beyond the OLED (organic light emitting diode) area. PMID:26753824

  13. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cun; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Teilin; Zi, Yan; Liang, Chu; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a kind of microscopic parasite that may infect humans, and there are increasing concerns on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. This research highlights a new type of molecular beacon (MB) fluorescent probe for Toxoplasma DNA testing. We combined high-efficiency fluorescent inorganic core-shell quantum dots-CdTe/ZnS (as fluorescent energy donor) and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) to the single-strand DNA of Toxoplasma gondii, and a molecular beacon sensing system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was achieved. Core-shell quantum dots CdTe/ZnS was firstly prepared in aqueous solution, and the influencing factor of its fluorescent properties, including CdTe/Na2S/Zn(CH3COO)2 (v/v), dependence of reaction time, temperature, and pH, is investigated systematically. The synthesized quantum dots and molecular beacon were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis), fluorescent spectrophotometer (FS), respectively. The TEM results showed that CdTe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots is ~11nm in size, and the quantum dots is water-soluble well. The sensing ability of target DNA of assembled MB was investigated, and results showed that the target Toxoplasma gonddi DNA can be successfully detected by measuring the change of fluorescence intensity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  14. Sensitive detection of multiple pathogens using a single DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Noordiana; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Jaafar; Radu, Son; Hushiarian, Roozbeh

    2016-12-15

    A simple but promising electrochemical DNA nanosensor was designed, constructed and applied to differentiate a few food-borne pathogens. The DNA probe was initially designed to have a complementary region in Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VP) genome and to make different hybridization patterns with other selected pathogens. The sensor was based on a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) modified with polylactide-stabilized gold nanoparticles (PLA-AuNPs) and methylene blue (MB) was employed as the redox indicator binding better to single-stranded DNA. The immobilization and hybridization events were assessed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The fabricated biosensor was able to specifically distinguish complementary, non-complementary and mismatched oligonucleotides. DNA was measured in the range of 2.0×10(-9)-2.0×10(-13)M with a detection limit of 5.3×10(-12)M. The relative standard deviation for 6 replications of DPV measurement of 0.2µM complementary DNA was 4.88%. The fabricated DNA biosensor was considered stable and portable as indicated by a recovery of more than 80% after a storage period of 6 months at 4-45°C. Cross-reactivity studies against various food-borne pathogens showed a reliably sensitive detection of VP. PMID:27414245

  15. Homo- and Heterobimetallic Ruthenium(II) and Osmium(II) Complexes Based on a Pyrene-Biimidazolate Spacer as Efficient DNA-Binding Probes in the Near-Infrared Domain.

    PubMed

    Mardanya, Sourav; Karmakar, Srikanta; Mondal, Debiprasad; Baitalik, Sujoy

    2016-04-01

    We report in this work a new family of homo- and heterobimetallic complexes of the type [(bpy)2M(Py-Biimz)M'(II)(bpy)2](2+) (M = M' = Ru(II) or Os(II); M = Ru(II) and M' = Os(II)) derived from a pyrenyl-biimidazole-based bridge, 2-imidazolylpyreno[4,5-d]imidazole (Py-BiimzH2). The homobimetallic Ru(II) and Os(II) complexes were found to crystallize in monoclinic form with space group P21/n. All the complexes exhibit strong absorptions throughout the entire UV-vis region and also exhibit luminescence at room temperature. For osmium-containing complexes (2 and 3) both the absorption and emission band stretched up to the NIR region and thus afford more biofriendly conditions for probable applications in infrared imaging and phototherapeutic studies. Detailed luminescence studies indicate that the emission originates from the respective (3)MLCT excited state mainly centered in the [M(bpy)2](2+) moiety of the complexes and is only slightly affected by the pyrene moiety. The bimetallic complexes show two successive one-electron reversible metal-centered oxidations in the positive potential window and several reduction processes in the negative potential window. An efficient intramolecular electronic energy transfer is found to occur from the Ru center to the Os-based component in the heterometallic dyad. The binding studies of the complexes with DNA were thoroughly studied through different spectroscopic techniques such as UV-vis absorption, steady-state and time-resolved emission, circular dichroism, and relative DNA binding study using ethidium bromide. The intercalative mode of binding was suggested to be operative in all cases. Finally, computational studies employing DFT and TD-DFT were also carried out to interpret the experimentally observed absorption and emission bands of the complexes. PMID:27011117

  16. Titration of integrated simian virus 40 DNA sequences, using highly radioactive, single-stranded DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Marchionni, M A; Roufa, D J

    1981-04-01

    Nick-translated simian virus 40 (SV40) [32P]DNA fragments (greater than 2 X 10(8) cpm/micrograms) were resolved into early- and late-strand nucleic acid sequences by hybridization with asymmetric SV40 complementary RNA. Both single-stranded DNA fractions contained less than 0.5% self-complementary sequences; both included [32P]-DNA sequences that derived from all regions of the SV40 genome. In contrast to asymmetric SV40 complementary RNA, both single-stranded [32P]DNAs annealed to viral [3H]DNA at a rate characteristic of SV40 DNA reassociation. Kinetics of reassociation between the single-stranded [32P]DNAs indicated that the two fractions contain greater than 90% of the total nucleotide sequences comprising the SV40 genome. These preparations were used as hybridization probes to detect small amounts of viral DNA integrated into the chromosomes of Chinese hamster cells transformed by SV40. Under the conditions used for hybridization titrations in solution (i.e., 10- to 50-fold excess of radioactive probe), as little as 1 pg of integrated SV40 DNA sequence was assayed quantitatively. Among the transformed cells analyzed, three clones contained approximately one viral genome equivalent of SV40 DNA per diploid cell DNA complement; three other clones contained between 1.2 and 1.6 viral genome equivalents of SV40 DNA; and one clone contained somewhat more than two viral genome equivalents of SV40 DNA. Preliminary restriction endonuclease maps of the integrated SV40 DNAs indicated that four clones contained viral DNA sequences located at a single, clone-specific chromosomal site. In three clones, the SV40 DNA sequences were located at two distinct chromosomal sites.

  17. DNA Interactions with Ruthenium(ll) Polypyridine Complexes Containing Asymmetric Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hui

    2005-01-01

    In an attempt to probe nucleic acid structures, numerous Ru(II) complexes with different ligands have been synthesized and investigated. In this contribution we focus on the DNA-binding properties of ruthenium(II) complexes containing asymmetric ligands that have attracted little attention in the past decades. The influences of the shape and size of the ligand on the binding modes, affinity, enantioselectivities and photocleavage of the complexes to DNA are described. PMID:18365086

  18. Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to probe for genetic markers on single-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Benjamin; Leotaud, John; McCarty, Gregory S.

    2010-03-01

    Methods capable of quickly and inexpensively collecting genetic information are of increasing importance. We report a method of using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to probe single-stranded DNA for genetic markers. This unique approach is used to analyze unmodified genes of moderate length for genetic markers by hybridizing native test oligonucleotides into a surface-enhanced Raman complex, vastly increasing detection sensitivity as compared to traditional Raman spectroscopy. The Raman complex is formed by sandwiching the test DNA between 40-nm gold nanoparticles and a photolithographically defined gold surface. With this design, we are able to collect characteristic Raman spectra about the test DNA and to detect genetic markers such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and polymorphic regions. Results show that strands containing one of three different types of polymorphism can be differentiated using statistically significant trends regarding Raman intensity.

  19. Dust Particle Probes in a Complex Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Angela; Hyde, Truell; Matthews, Lorin; Pope, Michael; Smith, Bernard

    2009-11-01

    In dusty plasma experiments within a GEC rf reference cell, the confining potential is generally assumed to be parabolic. The validity of this assumption can be tested in a number of ways. One noninvasive method is to utilize the particles themselves as system probes. In this experiment a cw laser (0.1-5W, 532nm) was used to apply a radiation pressure force on a single MF particle. The particle's trajectory while the laser was on and off was recorded and the confining potential calculated. System power, pressure, DC bias, and cutout size of the plate placed on the powered electrode were varied in order to better understand their effects on the shape of the confining potential.

  20. Simulation-Guided DNA Probe Design for Consistently Ultraspecific Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches for analyzing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of reaction conditions have been used to enable discrimination of single nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximate 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 different target single nucleotide variants sequences showed between 200- and 3000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wildtype sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach we developed probes which, in combination with PCR amplification, we use to detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA. PMID:26100802

  1. Simulation-guided DNA probe design for consistently ultraspecific hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-07-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches to analysing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of the reaction conditions have been used to enable the discrimination of single-nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximately 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 sequences of different target single-nucleotide variants showed between a 200- and 3,000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wild-type sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach, we developed probes that, in combination with PCR amplification, detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA.

  2. Transcription initiation complex structures elucidate DNA opening.

    PubMed

    Plaschka, C; Hantsche, M; Dienemann, C; Burzinski, C; Plitzko, J; Cramer, P

    2016-05-19

    Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes begins with assembly of the RNA polymerase (Pol) II initiation complex and promoter DNA opening. Here we report cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of yeast initiation complexes containing closed and open DNA at resolutions of 8.8 Å and 3.6 Å, respectively. DNA is positioned and retained over the Pol II cleft by a network of interactions between the TATA-box-binding protein TBP and transcription factors TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIIE, and TFIIF. DNA opening occurs around the tip of the Pol II clamp and the TFIIE 'extended winged helix' domain, and can occur in the absence of TFIIH. Loading of the DNA template strand into the active centre may be facilitated by movements of obstructing protein elements triggered by allosteric binding of the TFIIE 'E-ribbon' domain. The results suggest a unified model for transcription initiation with a key event, the trapping of open promoter DNA by extended protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts.

  3. Phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis of Neisseria meningitidis using DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, H.; Knight, A. I.; Cartwright, K. A.; McFadden, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    The genetic relationships between various serotypes and serogroups of meningococcal strains were investigated by restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis using a number of random DNA probes and a probe containing a truncated copy of the meningococcal insertion sequence IS1106. The data were used to estimate genetic distance between all pairs of strains and to construct phylogenetic trees for meningococcal strains. B15:P1.16R strains isolated from cases of systemic meningococcal disease in two health districts with a high incidence of disease were clonal in contrast to similar strains from cases occurring in other parts of the UK. Strains from these areas, which contain a similar genomic deletion, were found to be derived from two distinct lineages within the B15:P1.16R phylogenetic group. RFLP data demonstrated that present serological typing systems for the meningococcus do not necessarily reflect true genetic relationships. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1356820

  4. Human DNA polymerase α in binary complex with a DNA:DNA template-primer

    PubMed Central

    Coloma, Javier; Johnson, Robert E.; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2016-01-01

    The Polα/primase complex assembles the short RNA-DNA fragments for priming of lagging and leading strand DNA replication in eukaryotes. As such, the Polα polymerase subunit encounters two types of substrates during primer synthesis: an RNA:DNA helix and a DNA:DNA helix. The engagement of the polymerase subunit with the DNA:DNA helix has been suggested as the of basis for primer termination in eukaryotes. However, there is no structural information on how the Polα polymerase subunit actually engages with a DNA:DNA helix during primer synthesis. We present here the first crystal structure of human Polα polymerase subunit in complex with a DNA:DNA helix. Unexpectedly, we find that portion of the DNA:DNA helix in contact with the polymerase is not in a B-form but in a hybrid A-B form. Almost all of the contacts observed previously with an RNA primer are preserved with a DNA primer – with the same set of polymerase residues tracking the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA or RNA primer. Thus, rather than loss of specific contacts, the free energy cost of distorting DNA from B- to hybrid A-B form may augur the termination of primer synthesis in eukaryotes. PMID:27032819

  5. Creating complex molecular topologies by configuring DNA four-way junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Di; Chen, Gang; Akhter, Usman; Cronin, Timothy M.; Weizmann, Yossi

    2016-10-01

    The realization of complex topologies at the molecular level represents a grand challenge in chemistry. This necessitates the manipulation of molecular interactions with high precision. Here we show that single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) knots and links can be created by utilizing the inherent topological properties that pertain to the DNA four-way junction, at which the two helical strands form a node and can be configured conveniently and connected for complex topological construction. Using this strategy, we produced series of ssDNA topoisomers with the same sequences. By finely designing the curvature and torsion, double-stranded DNA knots were accessed by hybridizing and ligating the complementary strands with the knotted ssDNA templates. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of a constructed ssDNA knot both to probe the topological conversion catalysed by DNA topoisomerase and to study the DNA replication under topological constraint.

  6. Creating complex molecular topologies by configuring DNA four-way junctions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Chen, Gang; Akhter, Usman; Cronin, Timothy M; Weizmann, Yossi

    2016-10-01

    The realization of complex topologies at the molecular level represents a grand challenge in chemistry. This necessitates the manipulation of molecular interactions with high precision. Here we show that single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) knots and links can be created by utilizing the inherent topological properties that pertain to the DNA four-way junction, at which the two helical strands form a node and can be configured conveniently and connected for complex topological construction. Using this strategy, we produced series of ssDNA topoisomers with the same sequences. By finely designing the curvature and torsion, double-stranded DNA knots were accessed by hybridizing and ligating the complementary strands with the knotted ssDNA templates. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of a constructed ssDNA knot both to probe the topological conversion catalysed by DNA topoisomerase and to study the DNA replication under topological constraint. PMID:27657865

  7. Intercalation processes of copper complexes in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The family of anticancer complexes that include the transition metal copper known as Casiopeínas® shows promising results. Two of these complexes are currently in clinical trials. The interaction of these compounds with DNA has been observed experimentally and several hypotheses regarding the mechanism of action have been developed, and these include the generation of reactive oxygen species, phosphate hydrolysis and/or base-pair intercalation. To advance in the understanding on how these ligands interact with DNA, we present a molecular dynamics study of 21 Casiopeínas with a DNA dodecamer using 10 μs of simulation time for each compound. All the complexes were manually inserted into the minor groove as the starting point of the simulations. The binding energy of each complex and the observed representative type of interaction between the ligand and the DNA is reported. With this extended sampling time, we found that four of the compounds spontaneously flipped open a base pair and moved inside the resulting cavity and four compounds formed stacking interactions with the terminal base pairs. The complexes that formed the intercalation pocket led to more stable interactions. PMID:25958394

  8. Brightness enhanced DNA FIT-probes for wash-free RNA imaging in tissue.

    PubMed

    Hövelmann, Felix; Gaspar, Imre; Ephrussi, Anne; Seitz, Oliver

    2013-12-18

    Fluorogenic oligonucleotides enable RNA imaging in cells and tissues. A high responsiveness of fluorescence is required when unbound probes cannot be washed away. Furthermore, emission should be bright in order to enable detection against autofluorescent background. The development of fluorescence-quenched hybridization probes has led to remarkable improvement of fluorescence responsiveness. Yet, comparably little attention has been paid to the brightness of smart probes. We describe hybridization probes that combine responsiveness with a high brightness of the measured signal. The method relies upon quencher-free DNA forced intercalation (FIT)-probes, in which two (or more) intercalator dyes of the thiazole orange (TO) family serve as nucleobase surrogates. Initial experiments on multi-TO-labeled probes led to improvements of responsiveness, but self-quenching limited their brightness. To enhance both brightness and responsiveness the highly responsive TO nucleoside was combined with the highly emissive oxazolopyridine analogue JO. Single-stranded TO/JO FIT-probes are dark. In the probe-target duplex, quenching caused by torsional twisting and dye-dye contact is prevented. The TO nucleoside appears to serve as a light collector that increases the extinction coefficient and transfers excitation energy to the JO emitter. This leads to very bright JO emission upon hybridization (F/F0 = 23, brightness = 43 mL mol(-1) cm(-1) at λex = 516 nm). TO/JO FIT-probes allowed the direct fluorescence microscopic imaging of oskar mRNA within a complex tissue. Of note, RNA imaging was feasible under wide-field excitation conditions. The described protocol enables rapid RNA imaging in tissue without the need for cutting-edge equipment, time-consuming washing, or signal amplification.

  9. DNA hybridization activity of single-stranded DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles used as probes for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kosuke; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have potential applications in bio-sensing technologies as labels or signal enhancers. In order to meet demands for a development of biomolecular assays by a quantitative understanding of single-molecule, it is necessary to regulate accuracy of the NPs probes modified with biomolecules to optimize the characteristics of NPs. However, to our knowledge, there is little information about the structural effect of conjugated biomolecules to the NPs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of a density of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugating gold NP to hybridization activity. Hybridization activity decreased in accordance with increases in the density of attached ssDNAs, likely due to electrostatic repulsion generated by negatively charged phosphate groups in the ssDNA backbone. These results highlight the importance of controlling the density of ssDNAs attached to the surface of NPs used as DNA detection probes.

  10. Cationic lipids and cationic ligands induce DNA helix denaturation: detection of single stranded regions by KMnO4 probing.

    PubMed

    Prasad, T K; Gopal, Vijaya; Rao, N Madhusudhana

    2003-09-25

    Cationic lipids and cationic polymers are widely used in gene delivery. Using 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as a cationic lipid, we have investigated the stability of the DNA in DOTAP:DNA complexes by probing with potassium permanganate (KMnO4). Interestingly, thymidines followed by a purine showed higher susceptibility to cationic ligand-mediated melting. Similar studies performed with other water-soluble cationic ligands such as polylysine, protamine sulfate and polyethyleneimine also demonstrated melting of the DNA but with variations. Small cations such as spermine and spermidine and a cationic detergent, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, also rendered the DNA susceptible to modification by KMnO4. The data presented here provide direct proof for melting of DNA upon interaction with cationic lipids. Structural changes subsequent to binding of cationic lipids/ligands to DNA may lead to instability and formation of DNA bubbles in double-stranded DNA.

  11. [Principle and application of DNA-based stable isotope probing---a review].

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhongjun

    2011-12-01

    Microbial communities are the engines that drive the global biogeochemical cycle of carbon and nitrogen essential for life on Earth. However, microorganisms have evolved as a result of complex interactions with other organisms and environments. Deciphering the metabolism of microorganisms at the community level in nature will be crucial for a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to the enormous divergence of microbial ecophysiology. Due to the immense number of uncultivated microbial species and the complexity of microbial communities, delineating community metabolism proves a virtually insurmountable hurdle. By tracing the heavy isotope flow of key elements such as carbon and nitrogen, DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) can provide unequivocal evidence for substrate assimilation by microorganisms in complex environments. The essential prerequisite for a successful DNA-SIP is the identification, with confidence, of isotopically enriched 13C-DNA, of which the amount is generally too low to allow the direct measurement of 13C atom percent of nucleic acid. The methodological considerations for obtaining unambiguous DNA highly enriched in heavy isotope are presented with emphasis on next-generation sequencing technology and metagenomics.

  12. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1991-07-02

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. The probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations. No Drawings

  13. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. Probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations.

  14. CMM probe compensation methods for measuring complex screw surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yang, Tianlong; Yin, Xiyun

    2013-01-01

    At present, probe compensation is the key problem in measuring geometric parameters of complex screw surface with CMM due to its complicated 3D shape, aiming at this problem, some new measurement methods are proposed based on geometric feature models, expressing the screw surface and its offset surface separately. Supposing the parameter lead of a screw surface is known, it's realized by scanning one single profile to complete probe compensation and calculate out all parameters, and the probe compensation is done by two improved methods, named as modified cross product and offset surface virtual measurement respectively, the theory and detailed process of which are discussed in this paper. After performing systematic experiments of profile scan, probe compensation and error evaluation, results show that the new measurement methods provide higher precision, stability and realizability.

  15. Geant4-DNA simulations using complex DNA geometries generated by the DnaFabric tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meylan, S.; Vimont, U.; Incerti, S.; Clairand, I.; Villagrasa, C.

    2016-07-01

    Several DNA representations are used to study radio-induced complex DNA damages depending on the approach and the required level of granularity. Among all approaches, the mechanistic one requires the most resolved DNA models that can go down to atomistic DNA descriptions. The complexity of such DNA models make them hard to modify and adapt in order to take into account different biological conditions. The DnaFabric project was started to provide a tool to generate, visualise and modify such complex DNA models. In the current version of DnaFabric, the models can be exported to the Geant4 code to be used as targets in the Monte Carlo simulation. In this work, the project was used to generate two DNA fibre models corresponding to two DNA compaction levels representing the hetero and the euchromatin. The fibres were imported in a Geant4 application where computations were performed to estimate the influence of the DNA compaction on the amount of calculated DNA damage. The relative difference of the DNA damage computed in the two fibres for the same number of projectiles was found to be constant and equal to 1.3 for the considered primary particles (protons from 300 keV to 50 MeV). However, if only the tracks hitting the DNA target are taken into account, then the relative difference is more important for low energies and decreases to reach zero around 10 MeV. The computations were performed with models that contain up to 18,000 DNA nucleotide pairs. Nevertheless, DnaFabric will be extended to manipulate multi-scale models that go from the molecular to the cellular levels.

  16. Electrochemical techniques for characterization of stem-loop probe and linear probe-based DNA sensors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Rebecca Y; Walker, Bryce; Stormberg, Kent; Zaitouna, Anita J; Yang, Weiwei

    2013-12-15

    Here we present a summary of the sensor performance of the stem-loop probe (SLP) and linear probe (LP) electrochemical DNA sensors when interrogated using alternating current voltammetry (ACV), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Specifically, we identified one critical parameter for each voltammetric technique that can be adjusted for optimal sensor performance. Overall, the SLP sensor displayed good sensor performance (i.e., 60+% signal attenuation in the presence of the target) over a wider range of experimental conditions when compared to the LP sensor. When used with ACV, the optimal frequency range was found to be between 5 and 5000 Hz, larger than the 5-100 Hz range observed with the LP sensor. A similar trend was observed for the two sensors in CV; the LP sensor was operational only at scan rates between 30 and 100 V/s, whereas the SLP sensor performed well at scan rates between 1 and 1000 V/s. Unlike ACV and CV, DPV has demonstrated to be a more versatile sensor interrogation technique for this class of sensors. Despite the minor differences in total signal attenuation upon hybridization to the target DNA, both SLP and LP sensors performed optimally under most pulse widths used in this study. More importantly, when used with longer pulse widths, both sensors showed "signal-on" behavior, which is generally more desirable for sensor applications.

  17. Monitoring molecular beacon DNA probe hybridization at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Fang, Xiaohong; Yokota, Hiroaki; Yanagida, Toshio; Tan, Weihong

    2003-11-21

    We have monitored the reaction dynamics of the DNA hybridization process on a liquid/solid interface at the single-molecule level by using a hairpin-type molecular beacon DNA probe. Fluorescence images of single DNA probes were recorded by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence signal of single DNA probes during the hybridization to individual complementary DNA probes was monitored over time. Among 400 molecular beacon DNA probes that we tracked, 349 molecular beacons (87.5 %) were hybridized quickly and showed an abrupt fluorescence increase, while 51 probes (12.5 %) reacted slowly, resulting in a gradual fluorescence increase. This ratio stayed about the same when varying the concentrations of cDNA in MB hybridization on the liquid/surface interface. Statistical data of the 51 single-molecule hybridization images showed that there was a multistep hybridization process. Our results also showed that photostability for the dye molecules associated with the double-stranded hybrids was better than that for those with the single-stranded molecular beacon DNA probes. Our results demonstrate the ability to obtain a better understanding of DNA hybridization processes using single-molecule techniques, which will improve biosensor and biochip development where surface-immobilized molecular beacon DNA probes provide unique advantages in signal transduction.

  18. DNA Photonics — Probing Light-Induced Dynamics in DNA on the Femtosecond Timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Fiebig, Torsten

    In Chap. 10, Wang and Fiebig discuss about a new field, DNA photonics that is important to understand the role of DNA as a functional building block in molecular nanoscale devices, and is also expected to shed light on the complex interactions between structural and electronic properties of DNA. The latter is important for biomedical applications such as DNA-targeted drug design. In this chapter, the authors present experimental data from several different classes of functionalized DNA systems and illustrate the relationship between the structural dynamics and charge injection/migration using state-of-the art femtosecond broadband spectroscopy. They also highlight the importance of the initial electronic excitation for modelling electron transfer rates and point out that ultrafast electronic energy migration, dissipation, and (de)localization must be included into the theoretical description of light-induced dynamics in DNA.

  19. DNA based computing for understanding complex shapes.

    PubMed

    Ullah, A M M Sharif; D'Addona, Doriana; Arai, Nobuyuki

    2014-03-01

    This study deals with a computing method called DNA based computing (DBC) that takes inspiration from the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology. The proposed DBC uses a set of user-defined rules to create a DNA-like sequence from a given piece of problem-relevant information (e.g., image data) in a dry-media (i.e., in an ordinary computer). It then uses another set of user-defined rules to create an mRNA-like sequence from the DNA. Finally, it uses the genetic code to translate the mRNA (or directly the DNA) to a protein-like sequence (a sequence of amino acids). The informational characteristics of the protein (entropy, absence, presence, abundance of some selected amino acids, and relationships among their likelihoods) can be used to solve problems (e.g., to understand complex shapes from their image data). Two case studies ((1) fractal geometry generated shape of a fern-leaf and (2) machining experiment generated shape of the worn-zones of a cutting tool) are presented elucidating the shape understanding ability of the proposed DBC in the presence of a great deal of variability in the image data of the respective shapes. The implication of the proposed DBC from the context of Internet-aided manufacturing system is also described. Further study can be carried out in solving other complex computational problems by using the proposed DBC and its derivatives. PMID:24447435

  20. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  1. Probing protein-DNA interactions by unzipping a single DNA double helix.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Steven J; Shundrovsky, Alla; Jantzen, Benjamin C; Wang, Michelle D

    2002-01-01

    We present unzipping force analysis of protein association (UFAPA) as a novel and versatile method for detection of the position and dynamic nature of protein-DNA interactions. A single DNA double helix was unzipped in the presence of DNA-binding proteins using a feedback-enhanced optical trap. When the unzipping fork in a DNA reached a bound protein molecule we observed a dramatic increase in the tension in the DNA, followed by a sudden tension reduction. Analysis of the unzipping force throughout an unbinding "event" revealed information about the spatial location and dynamic nature of the protein-DNA complex. The capacity of UFAPA to spatially locate protein-DNA interactions is demonstrated by noncatalytic restriction mapping on a 4-kb DNA with three restriction enzymes (BsoBI, XhoI, and EcoRI). A restriction map for a given restriction enzyme was generated with an accuracy of approximately 25 bp. UFAPA also allows direct determination of the site-specific equilibrium association constant (K(A)) for a DNA-binding protein. This capability is demonstrated by measuring the cation concentration dependence of K(A) for EcoRI binding. The measured values are in good agreement with previous measurements of K(A) over an intermediate range of cation concentration. These results demonstrate the potential utility of UFAPA for future studies of site-specific protein-DNA interactions. PMID:12124289

  2. Probing nanoparticle effect in protein-surfactant complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-01

    SANS experiments have been carried to probe the role of anionic silica nanoparticles in the anionic BSA protein-cationic DTAB surfactant complexes. In protein-surfactant complex, surfactant molecules aggregate to form micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The nanoparticle aggregation mediated by oppositely charged protein-surfactant complex coexists with the free protein-surfactant complexes in the nanoparticle-protein-surfactant system. There is rearrangement of micelles in adsorbed protein-surfactant complex on nanoparticles in leading to their (nanoparticle) aggregation. On the other hand, the unfolding of protein in free protein-surfactant complex is found to be significantly enhanced in presence of nanoparticles.

  3. Detection of Alu sequences and mtDNA in comets using padlock probes.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Larsson, Chatarina; Henriksson, Sara; Collins, Andrew; Nilsson, Mats

    2006-07-01

    Single cell gel electrophoresis, or the comet assay, is widely used to measure DNA damage and repair. However, the behaviour of the DNA under the conditions used for the comet assay is not fully understood. In developing a method for studying specific gene sequences within comets, using 'padlock probes' (circularizable oligonucleotide probes), we have first applied probes that hybridize to Alu repetitive elements and to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). During the sequence of stages in the comet assay, mtDNA progressively disperses into the surrounding agarose gel, showing no tendency to remain with nuclear DNA in the comets. In contrast, Alu probes remain associated with both tail and head DNA. PMID:16940044

  4. Method and apparatus for synthesis of arrays of DNA probes

    DOEpatents

    Cerrina, Francesco; Sussman, Michael R.; Blattner, Frederick R.; Singh-Gasson, Sangeet; Green, Roland

    2002-04-23

    The synthesis of arrays of DNA probes sequences, polypeptides, and the like is carried out using a patterning process on an active surface of a substrate. An image is projected onto the active surface of the substrate utilizing an image former that includes a light source that provides light to a micromirror device comprising an array of electronically addressable micromirrors, each of which can be selectively tilted between one of at least two positions. Projection optics receives the light reflected from the micromirrors along an optical axis and precisely images the micromirrors onto the active surface of the substrate, which may be used to activate the surface of the substrate. The first level of bases may then be applied to the substrate, followed by development steps, and subsequent exposure of the substrate utilizing a different pattern of micromirrors, with further repeats until the elements of a two dimensional array on the substrate surface have an appropriate base bound thereto. The micromirror array can be controlled in conjunction with a DNA synthesizer supplying appropriate reagents to a flow cell containing the active substrate to control the sequencing of images presented by the micromirror array in coordination of the reagents provided to the substrate.

  5. Effect of a Dual Charge on the DNA-Conjugated Redox Probe on DNA Sensing by Short Hairpin Beacons Tethered to Gold Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kékedy-Nagy, László; Shipovskov, Stepan; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2016-08-16

    Charges of redox species can critically affect both the interfacial state of DNA and electrochemistry of DNA-conjugated redox labels and, as a result, the electroanalytical performance of those systems. Here, we show that the kinetics of electron transfer (ET) between the gold electrode and methylene blue (MB) label conjugated to a double-stranded (ds) DNA tethered to gold strongly depend on the charge of the MB molecule, and that affects the performance of genosensors exploiting MB-labeled hairpin DNA beacons. Positively charged MB binds to dsDNA via electrostatic and intercalative/groove binding, and this binding allows the DNA-mediated electrochemistry of MB intercalated into the duplex and, as a result, a complex mode of the electrochemical signal change upon hairpin hybridization to the target DNA, dominated by the "on-off" signal change mode at nanomolar levels of the analyzed DNA. When MB bears an additional carboxylic group, the negative charge provided by this group prevents intimate interactions between MB and DNA, and then the ET in duplexes is limited by the diffusion of the MB-conjugated dsDNA (the phenomenon first shown in Farjami , E. ; Clima , L. ; Gothelf , K. ; Ferapontova , E. E. Anal. Chem. 2011 , 83 , 1594 ) providing the robust "off-on" nanomolar DNA sensing. Those results can be extended to other intercalating redox probes and are of strategic importance for design and development of electrochemical hybridization sensors exploiting DNA nanoswitchable architectures. PMID:27441419

  6. Radiation damage to DNA-protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, M.; Davídková, M.

    2011-01-01

    We review here the advances in understanding the effects of ionizing radiations on DNA, proteins and their complexes, resulting from the collaboration of the authors' teams. It concerns the preponderant indirect effect of low LET ionizing radiations, thus the attack of the macromolecules in aqueous solution by the most aggressive product of water radiolysis, the hydroxyl radical. A model of simulation of the reaction of these radicals with the macromolecules (called RADACK) was developed and was used for calculating the probabilities of damage of each constituent of DNA or proteins (nucleotide or amino-acid). The calculations allowed to draw conclusions from electrophoresis, mutagenesis, spectroscopic (fluorescence, circular dichroïsm) and mass spectrometry experiments. Thus we have shown that the extent and location of the lesions are strongly dependent on the 3D structure of the macromolecules, which in turns is modulated by their sequence and by the binding of some ligands. Molecular dynamics simulation completed our studies in showing the consequences of each lesion on the stability and structure of the proteins and their complexes with DNA.

  7. Coordination ligand exchange of a xanthene probe-Ce(III) complex for selective fluorescence sensing of inorganic pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Kittiloespaisan, Ekkachai; Takashima, Ippei; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Wongkongkatep, Jirarut; Ojida, Akio

    2014-02-28

    A fluorescence sensing system for inorganic pyrophosphate based on ligand exchange of the Ce(III) complex of a xanthene-type probe is developed. This sensing system is successfully applied to the fluorescence detection of polymerase-catalyzed DNA amplification using loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

  8. Development of the excimer probe responsible for DNA target bearing the silylated pyrenes at base moiety.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Tomohisa; Ichimura, Mayumi; Kato, Mitsuhisa; Suzuki, Kenya; Takahashi, Yuki; Shinozuka, Kazuo

    2014-09-15

    For the development of the excimer probe responsible for DNA target, the deoxyuridine phosphoramidite derivative bearing the silylated pyrene attached at the C-5 position was prepared and incorporated into oligonucleotides. The modified oligonucleotides showed the excimer emission in the absence of the target DNA, on the other hands, the excimer emission was quenched in the presence of the target DNA. For the utilization of the fluorescence behavior, the novel molecular beacon probe containing the silylated pyrene-modified nucleoside at the stem region was designed and the fluorescence property of the probe found to show the responsibility for DNA target.

  9. Use of a species-specific DNA hybridization probe for enumerating Bacteroides vulgatus in human feces.

    PubMed Central

    Kuritza, A P; Salyers, A A

    1985-01-01

    pBV-1, a recombinant plasmid that contains a chromosomal DNA fragment from Bacteroides vulgatus, hybridized to DNA from B. vulgatus but not to DNA from other colonic Bacteroides species. This plasmid was used as a DNA probe to detect and enumerate B. vulgatus in pure culture, in mixed cultures, and in a bacterial fraction from human feces. Bacteria in a pure or mixed culture were lysed by heating the culture in NaOH. The DNA in the disrupted cell suspension was then trapped on nitrocellulose paper by vacuum filtration. If fecal samples were used instead of pure or mixed cultures, it was first necessary to partially purify the DNA by low-speed centrifugation (2,000 X g) and phenol-chloroform extraction before filtering. When 32P-labeled pBV-1 was incubated with filters containg B. vulgatus DNA, the amount of radioactivity that bound to the filters was proportional to the number of B. vulgatus filtered as long as the filtering capacity of the nitrocellulose was not exceeded. Using this procedure, we obtained a value for the concentration of B. vulgatus in human feces (2 X 10(10) to 3 X 10(10) per g of dry weight) that is similar to values obtained by other investigators using conventional bacteriological techniques (3 X 10(10) to 6 X 10(10) per g of dry weight). The advantage of the DNA hybridization method over conventional techniques is that it is not necessary to isolate pure cultures of bacteria from complex specimens such as feces. Furthermore, our method bypasses the cumbersome set of biochemical tests normally used to identify anaerobic bacteria. The major limitation of our method is its sensitivity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4083890

  10. Mitochondrial respiratory complex I probed by delayed luminescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baran, Irina; Ionescu, Diana; Privitera, Simona; Scordino, Agata; Mocanu, Maria Magdalena; Musumeci, Francesco; Grasso, Rosaria; Gulino, Marisa; Iftime, Adrian; Tofolean, Ioana Teodora; Garaiman, Alexandru; Goicea, Alexandru; Irimia, Ruxandra; Dimancea, Alexandru; Ganea, Constanta

    2013-12-01

    The role of mitochondrial complex I in ultraweak photon-induced delayed photon emission [delayed luminescence (DL)] of human leukemia Jurkat T cells was probed by using complex I targeting agents like rotenone, menadione, and quercetin. Rotenone, a complex I-specific inhibitor, dose-dependently increased the mitochondrial level of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), decreased clonogenic survival, and induced apoptosis. A strong correlation was found between the mitochondrial levels of NADH and oxidized flavin mononucleotide (FMNox) in rotenone-, menadione- and quercetin-treated cells. Rotenone enhanced DL dose-dependently, whereas quercetin and menadione inhibited DL as well as NADH or FMNox. Collectively, the data suggest that DL of Jurkat cells originates mainly from mitochondrial complex I, which functions predominantly as a dimer and less frequently as a tetramer. In individual monomers, both pairs of pyridine nucleotide (NADH/reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) sites and flavin (FMN-a/FMN-b) sites appear to bind cooperatively their specific ligands. Enhancement of delayed red-light emission by rotenone suggests that the mean time for one-electron reduction of ubiquinone or FMN-a by the terminal Fe/S center (N2) is 20 or 284 μs, respectively. All these findings suggest that DL spectroscopy could be used as a reliable, sensitive, and robust technique to probe electron flow within complex I in situ.

  11. Multilamellar structures of DNA complexes with cationic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Dan, N

    1997-10-01

    Studies of DNA complexes with cationic liposomes are prompted by the search for nonviral DNA carriers for gene therapy. Recent experiments have identified a stable multilamellar phase in which ordered smectic layers of DNA alternate with cationic bilayers. In this paper we identify the forces governing DNA adsorption on cationic lamellae, including a membrane-induced attraction between the adsorbed DNA. Calculating the DNA interhelical spacing as a function of system composition, the model successfully explains recent surprising observations.

  12. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  13. Value of a DNA probe assay (Gen-Probe) compared with that of culture for diagnosis of gonococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Vlaspolder, F; Mutsaers, J A; Blog, F; Notowicz, A

    1993-01-01

    The Gen-Probe PACE 2 system for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GP), which uses a chemiluminescently labeled DNA probe, was compared with conventional culture as the method of reference. A total of 1,750 specimens were collected from 496 females and 623 males visiting the outpatient clinic of the Sexually Transmitted Diseases Department of the Westeinde Hospital, The Hague, The Netherlands, during the year 1991. The prevalences of gonorrhea culture-positive men and women were 14.9 and 7.7%, respectively. The overall positive rate was 8.7%. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of GP were 97.1, 99.1, 90.6, and 99.8%, respectively. A total of 12 of 13 patients with positive GP results and negative cultures may have had a gonococcal infection, a conclusion based on clinical symptoms, positive methylene blue smears, and high relative light unit ratios. The DNA probe test can be useful as a suitable screening and diagnostic test for gonorrheal infection in men and women. An advantage of using this DNA probe technique is that simultaneous testing for Chlamydia trachomatis of the same specimen is possible. We also examined whether (all) rRNA had disappeared after adequate treatment for gonococcal and/or chlamydial infection in 30 patients. None of those positive patients showed a positive result in the DNA probe assay after treatment.

  14. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence genes: invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes

    PubMed Central

    Jahandeh, Nadia; Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pathotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause different types of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The presence of a wide range of virulence genes in UPEC enables us to design appropriate DNA microarray probes. These probes, which are used in DNA microarray technology, provide us with an accurate and rapid diagnosis and definitive treatment in association with UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. The main goal of this article is to introduce the UPEC virulence genes as invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes. Material and methods Main search engines such as Google Scholar and databases like NCBI were searched to find and study several original pieces of literature, review articles, and DNA gene sequences. In parallel with in silico studies, the experiences of the authors were helpful for selecting appropriate sources and writing this review article. Results There is a significant variety of virulence genes among UPEC strains. The DNA sequences of virulence genes are fabulous patterns for designing microarray probes. The location of virulence genes and their sequence lengths influence the quality of probes. Conclusions The use of selected virulence genes for designing microarray probes gives us a wide range of choices from which the best probe candidates can be chosen. DNA microarray technology provides us with an accurate, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnostic method which is facilitated by designing microarray probes. Via these tools, we are able to have an accurate diagnosis and a definitive treatment regarding UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. PMID:26855801

  15. Vertical-probe-induced asymmetric dust oscillation in complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Harris, B J; Matthews, L S; Hyde, T W

    2013-05-01

    A complex plasma vertical oscillation experiment which modifies the bulk is presented. Spherical, micron-sized particles within a Coulomb crystal levitated in the sheath above the powered lower electrode in a GEC reference cell are perturbed using a probe attached to a Zyvex S100 Nanomanipulator. By oscillating the probe potential sinusoidally, particle motion is found to be asymmetric, exhibiting superharmonic response in one case. Using a simple electric field model for the plasma sheath, including a nonzero electric field at the sheath edge, dust particle charges are found by employing a balance of relevant forces and emission analysis. Adjusting the parameters of the electric field model allowed the change predicted in the levitation height to be compared with experiment. A discrete oscillator Green's function is applied using the derived force, which accurately predicts the particle's motion and allows the determination of the electric field at the sheath edge. PMID:23767645

  16. Drug-induced DNA repair: X-ray structure of a DNA-ditercalinium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Q; Williams, L D; Egli, M; Rabinovich, D; Chen, S L; Quigley, G J; Rich, A

    1991-01-01

    Ditercalinium is a synthetic anticancer drug that binds to DNA by bis-intercalation and activates DNA repair processes. In prokaryotes, noncovalent DNA-ditercalinium complexes are incorrectly recognized by the uvrABC repair system as covalent lesions on DNA. In eukaryotes, mitochondrial DNA is degraded by excess and futile DNA repair. Using x-ray crystallography, we have determined, to 1.7 A resolution, the three-dimensional structure of a complex of ditercalinium bound to the double-stranded DNA fragment [d(CGCG)]2. The DNA in the complex with ditercalinium is kinked (by 15 degrees) and severely unwound (by 36 degrees) with exceptionally wide major and minor grooves. Recognition of the DNA-ditercalinium complex by uvrABC in prokaryotes, and by mitochondrial DNA repair systems in eukaryotes, might be related to drug-induced distortion of the DNA helix. Images PMID:2006181

  17. Detecting the effects of toxic agents on spermatogenesis using DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, N.B.

    1987-10-01

    Advances in the molecular biology of spermatogenesis suggest that DNA probes can be used to monitor the effects of toxic agents in male germ cells of mammals. Molecular hybridization analyses with DNA probes can provide a reproducible methodology capable of detecting changes ranging from massive deletions to single base pair substitutions in the genome of exposed individuals. A constantly increasing number of DNA probes that can be used to detect such alterations in human sperm DNA exist for both ubiquitously expressed proteins and for genes solely expressed in the testis. In this chapter, the currently available testicular stage-specific and/or cell type-specific DNA probes and the techniques by which they can be utilized in reproductive toxicology studies are discussed. The advantages, limitations, and future technological advances of this novel biological marker system for the human male reproductive system are also considered.

  18. Imaging of DNA and Protein–DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of DNA structure and dynamics and protein–DNA complexes, including recent advances in the visualization of protein–DNA complexes with the use of cutting-edge, high-speed AFM. Special emphasis is given to direct nanoscale visualization of dynamics of protein–DNA complexes. In the area of DNA structure and dynamics, structural studies of local non-B conformations of DNA and the interplay of local and global DNA conformations are reviewed. The application of time-lapse AFM nanoscale imaging of DNA dynamics is illustrated by studies of Holliday junction branch migration. Structure and dynamics of protein–DNA interactions include problems related to site-specific DNA recombination, DNA replication, and DNA mismatch repair. Studies involving the structure and dynamics of chromatin are also described. PMID:27278886

  19. Merging Two Strategies for Mixed-Sequence Recognition of Double-Stranded DNA: Pseudocomplementary Invader Probes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brooke A; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2016-04-15

    The development of molecular strategies that enable recognition of specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) regions has been a longstanding goal as evidenced by the emergence of triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), minor groove binding polyamides, and--more recently--engineered proteins such as CRISPR/Cas9. Despite this progress, an unmet need remains for simple hybridization-based probes that recognize specific mixed-sequence dsDNA regions under physiological conditions. Herein, we introduce pseudocomplementary Invader probes as a step in this direction. These double-stranded probes are chimeras between pseudocomplementary DNA (pcDNA) and Invader probes, which are activated for mixed-sequence dsDNA-recognition through the introduction of pseudocomplementary base pairs comprised of 2-thiothymine and 2,6-diaminopurine, and +1 interstrand zipper arrangements of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides, respectively. We demonstrate that certain pseudocomplementary Invader probe designs result in very efficient and specific recognition of model dsDNA targets in buffers of high ionic strength. These chimeric probes, therefore, present themselves as a promising strategy for mixed-sequence recognition of dsDNA targets for applications in molecular biology and nucleic acid diagnostics.

  20. Probing Evolutionary Patterns in Neotropical Birds through DNA Barcodes

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Kevin C. R.; Lijtmaer, Darío A.; Barreira, Ana S.; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Tubaro, Pablo L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The Neotropical avifauna is more diverse than that of any other biogeographic region, but our understanding of patterns of regional divergence is limited. Critical examination of this issue is currently constrained by the limited genetic information available. This study begins to address this gap by assembling a library of mitochondrial COI sequences, or DNA barcodes, for Argentinian birds and comparing their patterns of genetic diversity to those of North American birds. Methodology and Principal Findings Five hundred Argentinian species were examined, making this the first major examination of DNA barcodes for South American birds. Our results indicate that most southern Neotropical bird species show deep sequence divergence from their nearest-neighbour, corroborating that the high diversity of this fauna is not based on an elevated incidence of young species radiations. Although species ages appear similar in temperate North and South American avifaunas, patterns of regional divergence are more complex in the Neotropics, suggesting that the high diversity of the Neotropical avifauna has been fueled by greater opportunities for regional divergence. Deep genetic splits were observed in at least 21 species, though distribution patterns of these lineages were variable. The lack of shared polymorphisms in species, even in species with less than 0.5M years of reproductive isolation, further suggests that selective sweeps could regularly excise ancestral mitochondrial polymorphisms. Conclusions These findings confirm the efficacy of species delimitation in birds via DNA barcodes, even when tested on a global scale. Further, they demonstrate how large libraries of a standardized gene region provide insight into evolutionary processes. PMID:19194495

  1. DNA probe modified with 3-iron bis(dicarbollide) for electrochemical determination of DNA sequence of Avian Influenza Virus H5N1.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Iwona; Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka; Olejniczak, Agnieszka B; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J; Radecki, Jerzy; Radecka, Hanna

    2014-01-15

    In this work, we report on oligonucleotide probes bearing metallacarborane [3-iron bis(dicarbollide)] redox label, deposited on gold electrode for electrochemical determination of DNA sequence derived from Avian Influenza Virus (AIV), type H5N1. The oligonucleotide probes containing 5'-terminal NH2 group were covalently attached to the electrode, via NHS/EDC coupling to 3-mercaptopropionic acid SAM, previously deposited on the surface of gold. The changes in redox activity of Fe(III) centre of the metallacarborane complex before and after hybridization process was used as analytical signal. The signals generated upon hybridization with targets such as complementary or non-complementary 20-mer ssDNA or various PCR products consisting of 180-190 bp (dsDNA) were recorded by Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV). The developed system was very sensitive towards targets containing sequence complementary to the probe with the detection limit estimated as 0.03 fM (S/N=3.0) and 0.08 fM (S/N=3.0) for 20-mer ssDNA and for dsDNA (PCR product), respectively. The non-complementary targets generated very weak responses. Furthermore, the proposed genosensor was suitable for discrimination of PCR products with different location of the complementarity region.

  2. Use of Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA as a Means of Developing Genus- and Strain-Specific Streptomyces DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mark A.; Crawford, Don L.

    2000-01-01

    We have analyzed 20 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers against 36 Streptomyces strains, including 17 taxonomically undefined strains, 25 nonstreptomycete actinomycetes, and 12 outgroups consisting of gram-positive and -negative species. Most of the primers were useful in identifying unique DNA polymorphisms of all strains tested. We have used RAPD techniques to develop a genus-specific probe, one not necessarily targeting the ribosomal gene, for Streptomyces, and a strain-specific probe for the biological control agent Streptomyces lydicus WYEC108. In the course of these investigations, small-scale DNA isolations were also developed for efficiently isolating actinomycete DNA. Various modifications of isolation procedures for soil DNA were compared, and the reliability and specificity of the RAPD methodology were tested by specifically detecting the S. lydicus WYEC108 in DNA isolated from soil. PMID:10831438

  3. A Microfluidic Microbeads Fluorescence Assay with Quantum Dots-Bead-DNA Probe.

    PubMed

    Ankireddy, S R; Kim, Jongsung

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for the detection of tumor causing N-Ras genes using quantum dots has been developed. Presently, quantum dots-bead-DNA probe based hybridization detection methods are often called as 'bead based assays' and their success is substantially influenced by the dispensing and manipulation capability of the microfluidic technology. This study reports the detection of N-Ras cancer gene by fluorescence quenching of quantum dots immobilized on the surface of polystyrene beads. A microfluidic chip was constructed in which the quantum dots-bead-DNA probes were packed in the channel. The target DNA flowed across the beads and hybridized with immobilized probe sequences. The target DNA can be detected by the fluorescence quenching of the quantum dots due to their transfer of emission energy to intercalation dye after DNA hybridization. The mutated gene also induces fluorescence quenching but with less degree than the perfectly complementary target DNA.

  4. Effect of salts, solvents and buffer on miRNA detection using DNA silver nanocluster (DNA/AgNCs) probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun; Waaben Thulstrup, Peter; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ahn, Jong Cheol; Choi, Suk Won; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Yang, Seong Wook

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs (size ˜21 nt to ˜25 nt) which regulate a variety of important cellular events in plants, animals and single cell eukaryotes. Especially because of their use in diagnostics of human diseases, efforts have been directed towards the invention of a rapid, simple and sequence selective detection method for miRNAs. Recently, we reported an innovative method for the determination of miRNA levels using the red fluorescent properties of DNA/silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs). Our method is based on monitoring the emission drop of a DNA/AgNCs probe in the presence of its specific target miRNA. Accordingly, the accuracy and efficiency of the method relies on the sensitivity of hybridization between the probe and target. To gain specific and robust hybridization between probe and target, we investigated a range of diverse salts, organic solvents, and buffer to optimize target sensing conditions. Under the newly adjusted conditions, the target sensitivity and the formation of emissive DNA/AgNCs probes were significantly improved. Also, fortification of the Tris-acetate buffer with inorganic salts or organic solvents improved the sensitivity of the DNA/AgNC probes. On the basis of these optimizations, the versatility of the DNA/AgNCs-based miRNA detection method can be expanded.

  5. MHF complex senses branched DNA via binding a pair of crossover DNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Saro, Dorina; Sachpatzidis, Aristidis; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Schlingman, Daniel; Zheng, Xiao-Feng; Mack, Andrew; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Mochrie, Simon; Regan, Lynne; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Sung, Patrick; Xiong, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The conserved MHF1-MHF2 (MHF) complex functions in the activation of the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway of DNA damage response, in regulating homologous recombination, and in DNA replication fork maintenance. MHF facilitates the processing of multiple types of branched DNAs by the FA DNA translocase FANCM. Here we report the crystal structure of a human MHF-DNA complex that reveals the DNA binding mode of MHF. The structure suggests an MHF preference for branched DNA over double stranded DNA through engaging two duplex arms, which is supported by single molecule studies. Biochemical analyses verify that MHF preferentially engage DNA forks or various four-way junctions independent of the junction-site structure. Genetic experiments provide evidence that the observed DNA-binding interface of MHF is important for cellular resistance to DNA damage. These results provide insights into how the MHF complex recognizes branched DNA and stimulates FANCM activity at such a structure to promote genome maintenance. PMID:24390579

  6. Invader probes: Harnessing the energy of intercalation to facilitate recognition of chromosomal DNA for diagnostic applications†

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Dale C.; Anderson, Grace H.; Karmakar, Saswata; Anderson, Brooke A.; Didion, Bradley A.; Guo, Wei; Verstegen, John P.; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Development of probes capable of recognizing specific regions of chromosomal DNA has been a long-standing goal for chemical biologists. Current strategies such as PNA, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and polyamides are subject to target choice limitations and/or necessitate non-physiological conditions, leaving a need for alternative approaches. Toward this end, we have recently introduced double-stranded oligonucleotide probes that are energetically activated for DNA recognition through modification with +1 interstrand zippers of intercalator-functionalized nucleotide monomers. Here, probes with different chemistries and architectures – varying in the position, number, and distance between the intercalator zippers – are studied with respect to hybridization energetics and DNA-targeting properties. Experiments with model DNA targets demonstrate that optimized probes enable efficient (C50 < 1 μM), fast (t50 < 3h), kinetically stable (> 24h), and single nucleotide specific recognition of DNA targets at physiologically relevant ionic strengths. Optimized probes were used in non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments for detection of gender-specific mixed-sequence chromosomal DNA target regions. These probes present themselves as a promising strategy for recognition of chromosomal DNA, which will enable development of new tools for applications in molecular biology, genomic engineering and nanotechnology. PMID:26240741

  7. Immunodetection of human topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complexes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anand G; Flatten, Karen S; Peterson, Kevin L; Beito, Thomas G; Schneider, Paula A; Perkins, Angela L; Harki, Daniel A; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2016-04-01

    A number of established and investigational anticancer drugs slow the religation step of DNA topoisomerase I (topo I). These agents induce cytotoxicity by stabilizing topo I-DNA covalent complexes, which in turn interact with advancing replication forks or transcription complexes to generate lethal lesions. Despite the importance of topo I-DNA covalent complexes, it has been difficult to detect these lesions within intact cells and tumors. Here, we report development of a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes covalent topo I-DNA complexes, but not free topo I or DNA, by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence or flow cytometry. Utilizing this antibody, we demonstrate readily detectable topo I-DNA covalent complexes after treatment with camptothecins, indenoisoquinolines and cisplatin but not nucleoside analogues. Topotecan-induced topo I-DNA complexes peak at 15-30 min after drug addition and then decrease, whereas indotecan-induced complexes persist for at least 4 h. Interestingly, simultaneous staining for covalent topo I-DNA complexes, phospho-H2AX and Rad51 suggests that topotecan-induced DNA double-strand breaks occur at sites distinct from stabilized topo I-DNA covalent complexes. These studies not only provide new insight into the action of topo I-directed agents, but also illustrate a strategy that can be applied to study additional topoisomerases and their inhibitors in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Probing Resonances of the Dirac Equation with Complex Momentum Representation.

    PubMed

    Li, Niu; Shi, Min; Guo, Jian-You; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Liang, Haozhao

    2016-08-01

    Resonance plays critical roles in the formation of many physical phenomena, and several methods have been developed for the exploration of resonance. In this work, we propose a new scheme for resonance by solving the Dirac equation in the complex momentum representation, in which the resonant states are exposed clearly in the complex momentum plane and the resonance parameters can be determined precisely without imposing unphysical parameters. Combined with the relativistic mean-field theory, this method is applied to probe the resonances in ^{120}Sn with the energies, widths, and wave functions being obtained. Compared to other methods, this method is not only very effective for narrow resonances, but also can be reliably applied to broad resonances. PMID:27541464

  9. Probing Resonances of the Dirac Equation with Complex Momentum Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Niu; Shi, Min; Guo, Jian-You; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Liang, Haozhao

    2016-08-01

    Resonance plays critical roles in the formation of many physical phenomena, and several methods have been developed for the exploration of resonance. In this work, we propose a new scheme for resonance by solving the Dirac equation in the complex momentum representation, in which the resonant states are exposed clearly in the complex momentum plane and the resonance parameters can be determined precisely without imposing unphysical parameters. Combined with the relativistic mean-field theory, this method is applied to probe the resonances in 120120 with the energies, widths, and wave functions being obtained. Compared to other methods, this method is not only very effective for narrow resonances, but also can be reliably applied to broad resonances.

  10. Study on the SPR responses of various DNA probe concentrations by parallel scan spectral SPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Suihua; Liu, Le; Lu, Weiping; Zhang, Yaou; He, Yonghong; Guo, Jihua

    2008-12-01

    SPR sensors have become a high sensitive and label free method for characterizing and quantifying chemical and biochemical interactions. However, the relations between the SPR refractive index response and the property (such as concentrations) of biochemical probes are still lacking. In this paper, an experimental study on the SPR responses of varies concentrations of Legionella pneumophila mip DNA probes is presented. We developed a novel two-dimensional SPR sensing technique-parallel scan spectral SPR imaging-to detect an array of mip gene probes. This technique offers quantitative refractive index information with a high sensing throughput. By detecting mip DNA probes with different concentrations, we obtained the relations between the SPR refractive index response and the concentrations of mip DNA probes. These results are valuable for design and developing SPR based mip gene biochips.

  11. Luminescent chiral lanthanide(III) complexes as potential molecular probes

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    This perspective gives an introduction into the design of luminescent lanthanide(III)-containing complexes possessing chiral properties and used to probe biological materials. The first part briefly describes general principles, focusing on the optical aspect (i.e. lanthanide luminescence, sensitization processes) of the most emissive trivalent lanthanide ions, europium and terbium, incorporated into molecular luminescent edifices. This is followed by a short discussion on the importance of chirality in the biological and pharmaceutical fields. The second part is devoted to the assessment of the chiroptical spectroscopic tools available (typically circular dichroism and circularly polarized luminescence) and the strategies used to introduce a chiral feature into luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes (chiral structure resulting from a chiral arrangement of the ligand molecules surrounding the luminescent center or presence of chiral centers in the ligand molecules). Finally, the last part illustrates these fundamental principles with recent selected examples of such chiral luminescent lanthanide-based compounds used as potential probes of biomolecular substrates. PMID:19885510

  12. Genetic mapping and characterization of sorghum and related crops by means of maize DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, S H; Richter, T E; Axtell, J D; Bennetzen, J L

    1990-01-01

    Cloned DNA fragments from 14 characterized maize genes and 91 random fragments used for genetic mapping in maize were tested for their ability to hybridize and detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms in sorghum and other related crop species. Most DNA fragments tested hybridized strongly to DNA from sorghum, foxtail millet, Johnsongrass, and sugarcane. Hybridization to pearl millet DNA was generally weaker, and only a few probes hybridized to barley DNA under the conditions used. Patterns of hybridization of low-copy sequences to maize and sorghum DNA indicated that the two genomes are very similar. Most probes detected two loci in maize; these usually detected two loci in sorghum. Probes that detected one locus in maize generally detected a single locus in sorghum. However, maize repetitive DNA sequences present on some of the genomic clones did not hybridize to sorghum DNA. Most of the probes tested detected polymorphisms among a group of seven diverse sorghum lines tested; over one-third of the probes detected polymorphism in a single F2 population from two of these lines. Cosegregation analysis of 55 F2 individuals enabled several linkage groups to be constructed and compared with the linkage relationships of the same loci in maize. The linkage relationships of the polymorphic loci in the two species were usually conserved, but several rearrangements were detected. Images PMID:1971947

  13. Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Luminescent Binary Probe for DNA Detection Based on Spin-Forbidden Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Angel A.; Puckett, Cindy A.; Dyer, Joanne; Stevens, Nathan; Jockusch, Steffen; Ju, Jingyue; Barton, Jacqueline K.; Turro, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the design of new fluorescent binary probe sensors for DNA detection based on spin-forbidden resonance energy transfer (SF-RET). Binary probes consist of a donor and acceptor fluorophores that are attached to two different oligonucleotides and serve as resonance energy transfer (RET) donor-acceptor pair when hybridized to adjacent sites of a target sequence. In the absence of target, excitation of the donor results in fluorescence only from the donor, but when the probes hybridize to target, the fluorophores are brought into close proximity favoring RET, yielding fluorescence mainly from the acceptor fluorophore. These new binary probes use the metal complex Ru(bpy′)(DIP)22+ as the energy donor and an organic fluorophore (Cy5) as the energy acceptor. Energy transfer from the MLCT state of the Ru complex to singlet Cy5 is spin forbidden and produces a delayed fluorescence of Cy5. This paper demonstrate that fluorescence delay of Cy5 can be used to time resolve the emission of the probe from the intense fluorescence background of a model system for cellular background; this provides the reported system to overcome intense autofluorescence, an important and general advantage over “classical” spin-allowed steady-state probes. PMID:17592843

  14. Identification of high-stringency DNA hairpin probes by partial gene folding.

    PubMed

    Strohsahl, Christopher M; Krauss, Todd D; Miller, Benjamin L

    2007-09-30

    Hairpin DNA sequences are widely used as probes for oligonucleotides in a broad range of assays, often as "molecular beacons". A potential disadvantage of the standard methodology for molecular beacon design is the need to add several self-complementary bases to each end of the probe, since these do not correspond to the target sequence. We describe a conceptually new method of hairpin DNA probe identification, in which a secondary structure prediction algorithm is employed to identify oligonucleotide sequences within an expressed gene having the requisite hairpin structure. Intuitively, such probes should have significantly improved performance over "traditional" hairpin probes, because they are fully complementary with the target. We present experimental evidence verifying this hypothesis for a series of hairpin probes targeting the pag gene of Bacillus anthracis.

  15. Immobilization-free electrochemical DNA detection with anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Kongpeth, Jutatip; Jampasa, Sakda; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Chailapakul, Orawon; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical detection provides a simple, rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method for DNA detection. In traditional electrochemical DNA biosensors, the probe is immobilized onto the electrode. Hybridization with the DNA target causes a change in electrochemical signal, either from the intrinsic signal of the probe/target or through a label or a redox indicator. The major drawback of this approach is the requirement for probe immobilization in a controlled fashion. In this research, we take the advantage of different electrostatic properties between PNA and DNA to develop an immobilization-free approach for highly sequence-specific electrochemical DNA sensing on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) using a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) technique. Anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (AQ-PNA) was employed as a probe together with an SPCE that was modified with a positively-charged polymer (poly quaternized-(dimethylamino-ethyl)methacrylate, PQDMAEMA). The electrostatic attraction between the negatively-charged PNA-DNA duplex and the positively-charged modified SPCE attributes to the higher signal of PNA-DNA duplex than that of the electrostatically neutral PNA probe, resulting in a signal change. The calibration curve of this proposed method exhibited a linear range between 0.35 and 50 nM of DNA target with a limit of detection of 0.13 nM (3SD(blank)/Slope). The sub-nanomolar detection limit together with a small sample volume required (20 μL) allowed detection of <10 fmol (<1 ng) of DNA. With the high specificity of the pyrrolidinyl PNA probe used, excellent discrimination between complementary and various single-mismatched DNA targets was obtained. An application of this new platform for a sensitive and specific detection of isothermally-amplified shrimp's white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) DNA was successfully demonstrated. PMID:26695270

  16. Immobilization-free electrochemical DNA detection with anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Kongpeth, Jutatip; Jampasa, Sakda; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Chailapakul, Orawon; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical detection provides a simple, rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method for DNA detection. In traditional electrochemical DNA biosensors, the probe is immobilized onto the electrode. Hybridization with the DNA target causes a change in electrochemical signal, either from the intrinsic signal of the probe/target or through a label or a redox indicator. The major drawback of this approach is the requirement for probe immobilization in a controlled fashion. In this research, we take the advantage of different electrostatic properties between PNA and DNA to develop an immobilization-free approach for highly sequence-specific electrochemical DNA sensing on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) using a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) technique. Anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (AQ-PNA) was employed as a probe together with an SPCE that was modified with a positively-charged polymer (poly quaternized-(dimethylamino-ethyl)methacrylate, PQDMAEMA). The electrostatic attraction between the negatively-charged PNA-DNA duplex and the positively-charged modified SPCE attributes to the higher signal of PNA-DNA duplex than that of the electrostatically neutral PNA probe, resulting in a signal change. The calibration curve of this proposed method exhibited a linear range between 0.35 and 50 nM of DNA target with a limit of detection of 0.13 nM (3SD(blank)/Slope). The sub-nanomolar detection limit together with a small sample volume required (20 μL) allowed detection of <10 fmol (<1 ng) of DNA. With the high specificity of the pyrrolidinyl PNA probe used, excellent discrimination between complementary and various single-mismatched DNA targets was obtained. An application of this new platform for a sensitive and specific detection of isothermally-amplified shrimp's white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) DNA was successfully demonstrated.

  17. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays for Protein–DNA Complexes Involved in DNA Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun; Smider, Vaughn; Hwang, Byung Joon; Chu, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) can be used to study proteins that bind to DNA structures created by DNA-damaging agents. UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB), which is involved in nucleotide excision repair, binds to DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation or the anticancer drug cisplatin. Ku, XRCC4/Ligase IV, and DNA–PKcs, which are involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining, assemble in complexes at DNA ends. This chapter will describe several EMSA protocols for detecting different DNA repair protein–DNA complexes. To obtain additional information, one can apply variations of the EMSA, which include the reverse EMSA to detect binding of 35S-labeled protein to damaged DNA, and the antibody supershift assay to detect the presence of a specific protein in the protein–DNA complex. PMID:22941596

  18. One-pot approach for examining the DNA methylation patterns using an engineered methyl-probe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Eun; Chang, Matthew; Yuan, Chongli

    2014-08-15

    Aberrant DNA methylation is a common observation in various types of human cancers, i.e., breast and lung cancers. Nevertheless, the current DNA methylation detection approaches require bisulfite treatments and are laborious or costly to perform. To address these challenges, we developed a methyl-probe based on the MBD1 protein. Combined with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, our probe can sensitively detect the existence of DNA methylation at concentrations above 20nM in a one-pot assay. The probe can quantify the total amount of methylated CG dinucleotides above ~20nM, independent of DNA sequence contexts, concentrations (20-1900nM) and methylation levels (5-100%). Our detection platform offers a simple and cheap alternative DNA methylation detection approach.

  19. Redox polymer and probe DNA tethered to gold electrodes for enzyme-amplified amperometric detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Paul; Leech, Dónal

    2006-04-15

    The detection of nucleic acids based upon recognition surfaces formed by co-immobilization of a redox polymer mediator and DNA probe sequences on gold electrodes is described. The recognition surface consists of a redox polymer, [Os(2,2'-bipyridine)2(polyvinylimidazole)(10)Cl](+/2+), and a model single DNA strand cross-linked and tethered to a gold electrode via an anchoring self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of cysteamine. Hybridization between the immobilized probe DNA of the recognition surface and a biotin-conjugated target DNA sequence (designed from the ssrA gene of Listeria monocytogenes), followed by addition of an enzyme (glucose oxidase)-avidin conjugate, results in electrical contact between the enzyme and the mediating redox polymer. In the presence of glucose, the current generated due to the catalytic oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone is measured, and a response is obtained that is binding-dependent. The tethering of the probe DNA and redox polymer to the SAM improves the stability of the surface to assay conditions of rigorous washing and high salt concentration (1 M). These conditions eliminate nonspecific interaction of both the target DNA and the enzyme-avidin conjugate with the recognition surfaces. The sensor response increases linearly with increasing concentration of target DNA in the range of 1 x 10(-9) to 2 x 10(-6) M. The detection limit is approximately 1.4 fmol, (corresponding to 0.2 nM of target DNA). Regeneration of the recognition surface is possible by treatment with 0.25 M NaOH solution. After rehybridization of the regenerated surface with the target DNA sequence, >95% of the current is recovered, indicating that the redox polymer and probe DNA are strongly bound to the surface. These results demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach. PMID:16615783

  20. Preparation of plasmid DNA in transfection complexes for fluorescence and electron spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Malecki, M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop procedures necessary to study mechanisms of receptor mediated gene transfer by means of integrated microscopy. Plasmid DNA was incorporated into a transfection complex consisting of poly(L)lysine and transferrin to which the nuclear localization signal was conjugated. This complex was presented to cultured glioma cells. Preparation of the transfected DNA for imaging was pursued by two methods. In the first method tetramethylrhodamine, nanogold, and ferritin were linked through streptavidin to the biotinylated plasmid DNA. Trafficking of the fluorescent derivatives was studied in living cells with fluorescence microscopy. Then, selected cells were rapidly cryo-immobilized. Ultra-structural distribution of the transfected DNA was imaged with energy filtering transmission electron microscopy. In the second method, the unmodified transfected DNA was detected in cryo-immobilized cells by in situ polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. For laser scanning fluorescence microscopy probes were labeled with tetramethylrhodamine. For ultrastructural analysis by electron spectroscopic imaging, probes containing incorporated digoxigenin were labeled with anti-digoxigenin boronated antibodies. Based upon the developed procedures, it has been demonstrated that the presence of the nuclear localization signal in the transfection complex resulted in rapid nuclear import of the transfected DNA. PMID:9601525

  1. Development of a specific DNA probe and PCR for the detection of Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Ghadersohi, A; Coelen, R J; Hirst, R G

    1997-05-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is responsible for several production diseases in cattle, including mastitis, arthritis, pneumonia, abortion and infertility. Current methodologies for detecting and identifying M. bovis are time consuming and difficult. Tests which rely on antigen or antibody detection have poor sensitivity and specificity. In this paper associated protocols for the development of a hybridization probe and PCR are described. A genomic library (SauIIIA digested) was prepared from M. bovis DNA (Colindale Reference Strain: NC10131:02) and cloned into pUC19. Colony hybridization, using a probe preparation made from purified M. bovis DNA, was used to identify colonies of interest. M. bovis DNA fragments were retrieved from recombinant plasmids by digestion with EcoRI and HindIII. This DNA was used to prepare randomly primed probes for dot blot hybridization analysis with immobilized DNA from M. bovis (two strains), M. dispar, M. agalactiae, M. bovigenitalium (two strains), M. ovipneumoniae, a Group 7 strain, M. arginini and bacteria belonging to different genera. Four probes were found to hybridize only with M. bovis and M. ovipneumoniae DNA, whereas one probe reacted with genomic DNA from only one of the two M. bovis strains. The level of sensitivity of the dot blot hybridization assay was 200 CFU (colony forming units)/mL. To enhance the sensitivity further, an M. bovis-specific PCR assay was developed. The primers were designed using sequences obtained from the probe DNA which discriminated M. bovis from all other Mycoplasma DNA tested. The minimum amount of target DNA that could be detected by the PCR assay was that isolated from 10-20 CFU/mL. The PCR assay was therefore 10 times more sensitive than dot blot hybridization.

  2. Fluorescence determination of DNA with 1-pyrenebutyric acid nanoparticles coated with β-cyclodextrin as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lun; Bian, Guirong; Wang, Leyu; Dong, Ling; Chen, Hongqi; Xia, Tingting

    2005-04-01

    A novel ultrasonication method has been successfully developed for the preparation of 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBAC)/β-cyclodextrin(β-CD) complex nanoparticles. The as-prepared nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy. Complex nanoparticles prepared with ultrasonication are smaller and better dispersed than single PBAC nanoparticles. At pH 3.0, the relative fluorescence intensity of complex nanoparticles of PBAC/β-CD can be quenched by the concentration of DNA. Based on this, a novel fluorimetric method has been developed for rapid determination of DNA. In comparison with single organic fluorophores, these nanoparticle probes are better water-solubility, more stable and do not suffer from blinking. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range 0.2-15 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.3-12 μg mL -1 for fish sperm DNA (fs-DNA). The corresponding detection limit is 0.01 μg mL -1 for ct-DNA and 0.02 μg mL -1 for fs-DNA. The relative standard deviation of seven replicate measurements is 1.2% for 2.0 μg mL -1 ct-DNA and 1.4% for 2.0 μg mL -1 fs-DNA, respectively. The method is simple and sensitive. The recovery and relative standard deviation are very satisfactory. A mechanism proposed to explain the process also has been studied.

  3. Photophysical properties of hydroxyphenyl benzazoles and their applications as fluorescent probes to study local environment in DNA, protein and lipid.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Saba A J; Al-Rasbi, Ghalia S; Abou-Zied, Osama K

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence techniques have drawn increasing attention because they provide crucial information about molecular interactions in protein-ligand systems beyond that obtained by other methods. The advantage of fluorescence spectroscopy stems from the fact that the majority of molecules in biological systems do not exhibit fluorescence, making fluorescent probes useful with high sensitivity. Also, the fluorescence emission is highly sensitive to the local environment, providing a valuable tool to investigate the nature of binding sites in macromolecules. In this review, we discuss some of the important applications of a class of molecules that have been used as fluorescent probes in a variety of studies. Hydroxyphenyl benzazoles (HBXs) show distinct spectroscopic features that make them suitable probes for the study of certain biological mechanisms in DNA, protein and lipid. In particular, the complex photophysics of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and the distinguished fluorescence signatures of its different tautomeric forms make this molecule a useful probe in several applications. Among these are probing the DNA local environment, study of the flexibility and specificity of protein-binding sites, and detecting the heterogeneity and ionization ability of the head groups of different lipidic phases. The spectroscopy of HBX molecules and some of their chemically modified structures is also reviewed.

  4. Probing the role of water in the tryptophan repressor-operator complex.

    PubMed

    Brown, M P; Grillo, A O; Boyer, M; Royer, C A

    1999-06-01

    The Escherichia coli tryptophan repressor protein (TR) represses the transcription of several genes in response to the concentration of tryptophan in the environment. In the co-crystal structure of TR bound to a DNA fragment containing its target very few direct contacts between TR and the DNA were observed. In contrast, a number of solvent mediated contacts were apparent. NMR solution structures, however, did not resolve any solvent mediated bonds at the complex interface. To probe for the role of water in TR operator recognition, the effect of osmolytes on the interactions between TR and a target oligonucleotide bearing the operator site was examined. In the absence of specific solvent mediated hydrogen bonding interactions between the protein and the DNA, increasing osmolyte concentration is expected to strongly stabilize the TR operator interaction due to the large amount of macromolecular surface area buried upon complexation. The results of our studies indicate that xylose did not alter the binding affinity significantly, while glycerol and PEG had a small stabilizing effect. A study of binding as a function of betaine concentration revealed that this osmolyte at low concentration results in a stabilization of the 1:1 TR/operator complex, but at higher concentrations leads to a switching between binding modes to favor tandem binding. Analysis of the effects of betaine on the 1:1 complex suggest that this osmolyte has about 78% of the expected effect. If one accepts the analysis in terms of the number of water molecules excluded upon complexation, these results suggest that about 75 water molecules remain at the interface of the 1:1 dimer/DNA complex. This value is consistent with the number of water molecules found at the interface in the crystallographically determined structure and supports the notion that interfacial waters play an important thermodynamic role in the specific complexation of one TR dimer with its target DNA. However, the complexity of the

  5. A sensitive and specific DNA probe for the oyster pathogen Haplosporidium nelsoni.

    PubMed

    Stokes, N A; Burreson, E M

    1995-01-01

    Haplosporidium nelsoni is a pathogen of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, along the middle Atlantic coast of the U.S. Genomic DNA was extracted from H. nelsoni plasmodia and small subunit (SSU) rDNA was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. The sequence of H. nelsoni SSU rDNA was aligned with that of another haplosporidian, Minchinia teredinis, and with SSU rDNA data of C. virginica and various protists in GenBank. A 21-base oligonucleotide unique to H. nelsoni, designated MSX1347, was commercially synthesized and tested for sensitivity and specificity. In dot blot hybridizations the probe detected 100 pg of cloned H. nelsoni rDNA and the presence of H. nelsoni in 1 microgram of genomic DNA from an infected oyster. It did not hybridize with 1 microgram of genomic DNA from uninfected C. virginica or with cloned SSU rDNA of M. teredinis. The probe was further tested for specificity with in situ hybridizations on AFA-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. The probe hybridized well with H. nelsoni plasmodia and immature spores, but poorly with mature spores. The probe did not hybridize with oyster tissue, with other common oyster parasites such as P. marinus or Nematopsis sp., or with the haplosporidians Haplosporidium louisiana from mud crabs (Panopeus spp.), Haplosporidium costale from C. virginica or M. teredinis from shipworms (Teredo spp.).

  6. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  7. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Ahmad, Haslina; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-01

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+, (bpy = 2,2'bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  8. Rapid detection of Streptococcus pyogenes in pediatric patient specimens by DNA probe.

    PubMed Central

    Steed, L L; Korgenski, E K; Daly, J A

    1993-01-01

    A chemiluminescent DNA probe test (Group A Streptococcus Direct Test; Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, Calif.) for rapid, direct detection of cRNA of Streptococcus pyogenes in throat swabs was compared with conventional culture and identification techniques. Throat swabs from 277 patients suspected of having streptococcal pharyngitis were examined. By DNA probe alone, 10 specimens were positive, 51 were positive by both assays, and 8 were positive by culture alone. Thus, DNA probe sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 86, 95, 84, and 96%, respectively. Including an indeterminate category, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 89, 96, 86, and 97%, respectively. After discrepancy testing, these values for the raw data improved to 90, 98, 93, and 97%, respectively. None of the 24 specimens that grew non-S. pyogenes beta-hemolytic streptococci in culture were positive by the DNA probe. Because mucoid S. pyogenes strains are more virulent than nonmucoid strains, 24 isolates were retrospectively tested with the DNA probe to ensure that both types would be detected equally well. Isolates were examined in pure cultures as well as mixed with representative normal oral flora. There was no statistical difference in detection of any of the four groups. Group A Streptococcus Direct Test is a rapid, sensitive, and specific test for S. pyogenes. PMID:8263185

  9. Probing Persistence in DNA Curvature Properties with Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukhtar, J.; Fontaine, E.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.; Arneodo, A.

    2007-04-01

    We elaborate on a mean-field extension of the wormlike chain model that accounts for the presence of long-range correlations (LRC) in the intrinsic curvature disorder of genomic DNA, the stronger the LRC, the smaller the persistence length. The comparison of atomic force microscopy imaging of straight, uncorrelated virus and correlated human DNA fragments with DNA simulations confirms that the observed decrease in persistence length for human DNA more likely results from a sequence-induced large-scale intrinsic curvature than from some increased flexibility.

  10. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O'Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  11. Specific Photocrosslinking of DNA-Protein Complexes: Identification of Contacts Between Integration Host Factor and Its Target DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu-Wei; Nash, Howard A.

    1994-12-01

    Azide moieties have been specifically placed in the backbone of DNA by chemical coupling between azidophenacyl bromide and uniquely positioned phosphorothioate residues. The derivatized DNA forms specific complexes with a DNA-binding protein and, following irradiation with 302-nm light, makes specific crosslinks to the protein. Isolation of this covalent complex, followed by tryptic digestion and Edman degradation of the resulting crosslinked peptide, identifies the portion of the protein that is near the derivatized segment of the target DNA. We use this method to probe the interaction between a specific DNA sequence and integration host factor (IHF) protein. A single IHF heterodimer is known to contact >25 bp of DNA and thereby introduce a sharp bend. Two segments of a typical IHF site were derivatized with aryl azide. Although the segments were separated by only 5 bp, they crosslinked to different subunits of IHF. The locations of the crosslinks support our current view for the way IHF protein binds to and bends its specific targets.

  12. Probing neutral atmospheric collision complexes with anion photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrold, Caroline

    Photodetachment of anionic precursors of neutral collision complexes offers a way to probe the effects of symmetry-breaking collision events on the electronic structure of normally transparent molecules. We have measured the anion photoelectron imaging (PEI) spectra of a series of O2- X complexes, where X is a volatile organic molecule with atmospheric relevance, to determine how the electronic properties of various X molecules affect the low-lying electronic structure of neutral O2 undergoing O2 - X collisons. The study was motivated by the catalog of vibrational and electronic absorption lines induced by O2 - O2, O2 - N2, and other collisions. The energies of electronic features observed in the anion PEI spectra of O2- X (X = hexane, hexene, isoprene and benzene) relative to O2- PEI spectroscopic features indicate that photodetachment of the anion does indeed access a repulsive part of the O2 - X potential. In addition, the spectra of the various complexes show an interesting variation in the intensities of transitions to the excited O2(1Δg) . X and O2(1Σg+) . X states relative to the ground O2(3Σg-) . X state. With X = non-polar species such as hexane, the relative intensities of transitions to the triplet and singlet states of O2 . X are very similar to those of isolated O2, while the relative intensity of the singlet band decreases and becomes lower in energy relative to the triplet band for X = polar molecules. A significant enhancement in the intensities of the singlet bands is observed for complexes with X = isoprene and benzene, both of which have low-lying triplet states. The role of the triplet states in isoprene and benzene, and the implications for induced electronic absorption in O2 undergoing collisions with these molecules, are explored. National Science Foundation NSF CHE 1265991.

  13. Thermodynamically modulated partially double-stranded linear DNA probe design for homogeneous real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shihai; Salituro, John; Tang, Ning; Luk, Ka-Cheung; Hackett, John; Swanson, Priscilla; Cloherty, Gavin; Mak, Wai-Bing; Robinson, John; Abravaya, Klara

    2007-01-01

    Real-time PCR assays have recently been developed for diagnostic and research purposes. Signal generation in real-time PCR is achieved with probe designs that usually depend on exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase (e.g. TaqMan probe) or oligonucleotide hybridization (e.g. molecular beacon). Probe design often needs to be specifically tailored either to tolerate or to differentiate between sequence variations. The conventional probe technologies offer limited flexibility to meet these diverse requirements. Here, we introduce a novel partially double-stranded linear DNA probe design. It consists of a hybridization probe 5'-labeled with a fluorophore and a shorter quencher oligo of complementary sequence 3'-labeled with a quencher. Fluorescent signal is generated when the hybridization probe preferentially binds to amplified targets during PCR. This novel class of probe can be thermodynamically modulated by adjusting (i) the length of hybridization probe, (ii) the length of quencher oligo, (iii) the molar ratio between the two strands and (iv) signal detection temperature. As a result, pre-amplification signal, signal gain and the extent of mismatch discrimination can be reliably controlled and optimized. The applicability of this design strategy was demonstrated in the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay.

  14. Detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus infected cells with cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, E

    1992-01-01

    A genomic library of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) DNA BamH1 fragments was prepared and two cloned fragments were evaluated for their potential as probes for the detection of ILTV infected cells. The virus was purified by a modified sucrose density gradient procedure for the isolation of pure ILTV DNA. A genomic library was constructed using BamH1-digested ILTV DNA and pGEM7 as a vector. A 1.1 kb cloned BamH1 fragment of ILTV DNA was tested in a slot or dot blot assay for the detection of ILTV infected cells. The limit of detection for this probe was at least 0.12 ng of pure ILTV DNA. The probe was able to identify both chicken embryo liver (CELi) cells and choriallantoic membranes infected with ILTV. Chicken embryo liver cells infected with several field isolates and a vaccine strain of ILTV were positive by dot blot analysis using this probe. Some qualitative differences in the degree of hybridization to cells infected by different ILTV isolates were observed. Uninfected cells and cells infected with fowlpox virus, turkey herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus or Newcastle disease virus were negative by the same assay. Compared with the 1.1 kb fragment, a larger 6 kb cloned BamH1 fragment of ILTV DNA showed a stronger hybridization signal to DNA from ILTV infected cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1316798

  15. DNA delivery systems based on complexes of DNA with synthetic polycations and their copolymers.

    PubMed

    Oupický, D; Konák, C; Ulbrich, K; Wolfert, M A; Seymour, L W

    2000-03-01

    Block and graft copolymers of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) with 2-(trimethylammonio)ethyl methacrylate were synthesised and used for preparation of polyelectrolyte complexes with calf thymus DNA intended for targeted delivery of genes in vivo. In this study the effects of the speed of component mixing, total concentration of polymers, ionic strength of solvents, copolymer structure and content of HPMA in the copolymers on parameters of the polyelectrolyte complexes was investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering methods were used as a main tool for characterising these complexes. The presence of HPMA units in the polycation had no significant effect on its ability to form complexes with DNA, but did affect molecular parameters and aggregation (precipitation) of the complexes. The size of the complexes increases whereas their molecular weight decreases with increasing content of HPMA units. The density of the complexes decreases with increasing HPMA content independently of the copolymer structure. In order to prepare stable DNA complexes containing single DNA molecule, the following rules should be observed: (1) copolymers should have a content of HPMA units higher than 40%; (2) the DNA concentrations in solutions should be kept below 4 x 10(-5) g/ml and (3) both components should be mixed together in deionized water. The stability of the complexes against precipitation in 0.15 M NaCl and the resistance of the complexed DNA to the action of nucleases was also studied. Whereas DNA complexes of all copolymers showed very good nuclease stability, the presence of a sufficiently high content of HPMA is necessary for their good stability in 0.15 M NaCl. The investigation of the stability and the interaction of DNA complexes in aqueous solutions of serum albumin and dilute human blood serum revealed adsorption of biomacromolecules on DNA complexes accompanied by significant changes in the zeta-potential which finally resulted in formation of a "protein

  16. Comet-FISH with rDNA probes for the analysis of mutagen-induced DNA damage in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Kwasniewska, Jolanta; Grabowska, Marta; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Kolano, Bozena

    2012-06-01

    We used comet-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the model plant species Crepis capillaris following exposure of seedlings to maleic hydrazide (MH). FISH with 5S and 25S rDNA probes was applied to comets obtained under alkaline conditions to establish whether these DNA regions were preferentially involved in comet tail formation. MH treatment induced significant fragmentation of nuclear DNA and of rDNA loci. A 24-h post-treatment recovery period allowed a partial reversibility of MH-induced damage on nuclear and rDNA regions. Analyses of FISH signals demonstrated that rDNA sequences were always involved in tail formation and that 5S rDNA was more frequently present in the tail than 25S rDNA, regardless of treatment. The involvement of 25S rDNA in nucleolus formation and differences in chromatin structure between the two loci may explain the different susceptibility of the 25S and 5S rDNA regions to migrate into the tail. This work is the first report on the application of FISH to comet preparations from plants to analyze the distribution and repair of DNA damage within specific genomic regions after mutagenic treatment. Moreover, our work suggests that comet-FISH in plants may be a useful tool for environmental monitoring assessment. PMID:22556029

  17. Chiral heterobimetallic complexes targeting human DNA-topoisomerase Iα.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Asim, Ahmad; Khan, Rais Ahmad; Hussain, Zahid; Srivastav, Saurabh; Srikrishna, Saripella; Arjmand, Farukh

    2013-12-28

    The chiral monometallic Cu(II) (1) and Zn(II) (2) and heterobimetallic Cu(II)-Sn(IV) and Zn(II)-Sn(IV) complexes with tridentate chiral Schiff base -ONO-ligand in the presence of nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligand imidazole; were prepared and characterized by various physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. Preliminary complex-DNA interaction studies employing optical methods revealed that 3 displayed a higher propensity towards the drug target DNA double helix and recommended predominantly an electrostatic mode of interaction as well as a groove binding affinity of the complex with CT-DNA. This was quantified by Kb and KSV values of complexes 1-4, which demonstrated a multifold increase in complex 3 binding to CT DNA and clearly demonstrates its potency to act as a chemotherapeutic agent. Furthermore, the gel electrophoretic patterns of supercoiled pBR322 DNA with varying concentrations of complex 3 exhibits the ability to cleave DNA and follow a freely diffusible radical mechanism. The antiproliferative effects of complex 3 on human hepatoma cancer cells (Huh7) was investigated. Human Topo I inhibition assay by complex 3 was performed and results confirmed significantly good activity at lower concentrations than some of the classical Topo I inhibitors. Additionally, complex 3 was investigated for the expression of MMP-2 and TGF-β by real time PCR. The cellular uptake of complex 3 by HeLa cells was studied by confocal microscopy. PMID:24077532

  18. Self-quenching DNA probes based on aggregation of fluorescent dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Gabriela; Muller, Matthias; Hafner, Bernhard; Habl, Gregor; Nolte, Oliver; Marme, Nicole; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2005-04-01

    Here we present a novel class of self-quenching, double-labeled DNA probes based on the formation of non fluorescent H-type dye dimers. We therefore investigated the aggregation behavior of the red-absorbing oxazine derivative MR121 and found a dimerization constant of about 3000 M-1. This dye was successfully used to develop hairpin-structured as well as linear self-quenching DNA probes that report the presence of the target DNA by an increase of the fluorescence intensity by a factor of 3 to 12. Generally fluorescence quenching of the hairpin-structure probes is more efficient compared to the linear probes, whereas the kinetic of the fluorescence increase is significantly slower. The new probes were used for the identification of different mycobacteria and their antibiotic resistant species. As a test system a probe for the identification of a DNA sequence specific for the Mycobacterium xenopi was synthesized differing from the sequence of the Mycobacterium fortuitum by 6 nucleotides. Furthermore we developed a method for the discrimination between the sequences of the wild type and an antibiotic resistant species of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both sequences differ by just 2 nucleotides and were detected specifically by the use of competing olignonucleotides.

  19. New hairpin-structured DNA probes: alternatives to classical molecular beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Achim; Habl, Gregor; Sauer, Markus; Wolfrum, Jürgen; Hoheisel, Jörg; Marmé, Nicole; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2007-02-01

    In this article we report on two different classes of self-quenching hairpin-structured DNA probes that can be used as alternatives to Molecular Beacons. Compared to other hairpin-structured DNA probes, the so-called smart probes are labeled with only one extrinsic dye. The fluorescence of this dye is efficiently quenched by intrinsic guanine bases via a photo-induced electron transfer reaction in the closed hairpin. After hybridization to a target DNA, the distance between dye and the guanines is enlarged and the fluorescence is restored. The working mechanism of the second class of hairpin DNA probes is similar, but the probe oligonucleotide is labeled at both ends with an identical chromophore and thus the fluorescence of the closed hairpin is reduced due to formation of non-fluorescent dye dimers. Both types of probes are appropriate for the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms and in combination with confocal single-molecule spectroscopy sensitivities in the picomolar range can be achieved.

  20. Proceedings of "Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments"

    SciTech Connect

    Sension, R; Tokmakoff, A

    2008-04-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the symposium on Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments, which organized as part of the 235th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans, LA from April 6 to 10, 2008. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time ƒresolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time resolved spectroscopy is central to all of DOEs grand challenges for fundamental energy science. This symposium brought together leaders in the field of ultrafast spectroscopy, including experimentalists, theoretical chemists, and simulators, to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. DOE support for this conference was used to help young US and international scientists travel to the meeting. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, optical, and xray spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  1. Time-resolved probes based on guanine/thymine-rich DNA-sensitized luminescence of terbium(III).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we have developed a novel strategy to highly sensitize the luminescence of terbium(III) (Tb(3+)) using a designed guanine/thymine-rich DNA (5'-[G3T]5-3') as an antenna ligand, in which [G3T]5 improved the luminescence of Tb(3+) by 3 orders of magnitude due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to Tb(3+) (i.e., antenna effect). Furthermore, label-free probes for the luminescent detection of biothiols, Ag(+), and sequence-specific DNA in an inexpensive, simple, and mix-and-read format are presented based on the [G3T]5-sensitized luminescence of Tb(3+) (GTSLT). The long luminescence lifetime of the probes readily enables time-resolved luminescence (TRL) experiments. Hg(2+) can efficiently quench the luminescence of Tb(3+) sensitized by [G3T]5 (Tb(3+)/[G3T]5); however, biothiols are readily applicable to selectively grab Hg(2+) for restoration of the luminescence of Tb(3+)/[G3T]5 initially quenched by Hg(2+), which can be used for "turn on" detection of biothiols. With the use of cytosine (C)-rich oligonucleotide c[G3T]5 complementary to [G3T]5, the formed [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex cannot sensitize the luminescence of Tb(3+). However, in the presence of Ag(+), Ag(+) can combine the C base of c[G3T]5 to form C-Ag(+)-C complexes, leading to the split of the [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex and then release of [G3T]5. The released [G3T]5 acts as an antenna ligand for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+). Therefore, the Tb(3+)/[G3T]5/c[G3T]5 probe can be applied to detect Ag(+) in a "turn on" format. Moreover, recognition of target DNA via hybridization to a molecular beacon (MB)-like probe (MB-[G3T]5) can unfold the MB-[G3T]5 to release the [G3T]5 for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of target DNA of interest. This allows the development of a fascinating label-free MB probe for DNA sensing based on the luminescence of Tb(3+). Results and methods reported here suggest that a guanine/thymine-rich DNA

  2. Time-resolved probes based on guanine/thymine-rich DNA-sensitized luminescence of terbium(III).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we have developed a novel strategy to highly sensitize the luminescence of terbium(III) (Tb(3+)) using a designed guanine/thymine-rich DNA (5'-[G3T]5-3') as an antenna ligand, in which [G3T]5 improved the luminescence of Tb(3+) by 3 orders of magnitude due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to Tb(3+) (i.e., antenna effect). Furthermore, label-free probes for the luminescent detection of biothiols, Ag(+), and sequence-specific DNA in an inexpensive, simple, and mix-and-read format are presented based on the [G3T]5-sensitized luminescence of Tb(3+) (GTSLT). The long luminescence lifetime of the probes readily enables time-resolved luminescence (TRL) experiments. Hg(2+) can efficiently quench the luminescence of Tb(3+) sensitized by [G3T]5 (Tb(3+)/[G3T]5); however, biothiols are readily applicable to selectively grab Hg(2+) for restoration of the luminescence of Tb(3+)/[G3T]5 initially quenched by Hg(2+), which can be used for "turn on" detection of biothiols. With the use of cytosine (C)-rich oligonucleotide c[G3T]5 complementary to [G3T]5, the formed [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex cannot sensitize the luminescence of Tb(3+). However, in the presence of Ag(+), Ag(+) can combine the C base of c[G3T]5 to form C-Ag(+)-C complexes, leading to the split of the [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex and then release of [G3T]5. The released [G3T]5 acts as an antenna ligand for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+). Therefore, the Tb(3+)/[G3T]5/c[G3T]5 probe can be applied to detect Ag(+) in a "turn on" format. Moreover, recognition of target DNA via hybridization to a molecular beacon (MB)-like probe (MB-[G3T]5) can unfold the MB-[G3T]5 to release the [G3T]5 for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of target DNA of interest. This allows the development of a fascinating label-free MB probe for DNA sensing based on the luminescence of Tb(3+). Results and methods reported here suggest that a guanine/thymine-rich DNA

  3. Cryo-EM Imaging of DNA-PK DNA Damage Repair Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Phoebe L. Stewart

    2005-06-27

    Exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that must be repaired for cell survival. Higher eukaryotes respond to DSBs by arresting the cell cycle, presumably to repair the DNA lesions before cell division. In mammalian cells, the nonhomologous end-joining DSB repair pathway is mediated by the 470 kDa DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) together with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. Mouse knock-out models of these three proteins are all exquisitely sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. In the presence of DNA ends, Ku binds to the DNA and then recruits DNA-PKcs. After formation of the complex, the kinase activity associated with DNA-PKcs becomes activated. This kinase activity has been shown to be essential for repairing DNA DSBs in vivo since expression of a kinase-dead form of DNA-PKcs in a mammalian cell line that lacks DNA-PKcs fails to complement the radiosensitive phenotype. The immense size of DNA-PKcs suggests that it may also serve as a docking site for other DNA repair proteins. Since the assembly of the DNA-PK complex onto DNA is a prerequisite for DSB repair, it is critical to obtain structural information on the complex. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle reconstruction methods provide a powerful way to image large macromolecular assemblies at near atomic (10-15 ?) resolution. We have already used cryo-EM methods to examine the structure of the isolated DNA-PKcs protein. This structure reveals numerous cavities throughout the protein that may allow passage of single or double-stranded DNA. Pseudo two-fold symmetry was found for the monomeric protein, suggesting that DNA-PKcs may interact with two DNA ends or two Ku heterodimers simultaneously. Here we propose to study the structure of the cross-linked DNA-PKcs/Ku/DNA complex. Difference imaging with our published DNA-PKcs structure will enable us to elucidate the architecture of the complex. A second

  4. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA. PMID:25486562

  5. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA.

  6. Probing the Conformational Distributions of Sub-Persistence Length DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mastroianni, Alexander; Sivak, David; Geissler, Phillip; Alivisatos, Paul

    2009-06-08

    We have measured the bending elasticity of short double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) chains through small-angle X-ray scattering from solutions of dsDNA-linked dimers of gold nanoparticles. This method, which does not require exertion of external forces or binding to a substrate, reports on the equilibrium distribution of bending fluctuations, not just an average value (as in ensemble FRET) or an extreme value (as in cyclization), and in principle provides a more robust data set for assessing the suitability of theoretical models. Our experimental results for dsDNA comprising 42-94 basepairs (bp) are consistent with a simple worm-like chain model of dsDNA elasticity, whose behavior we have determined from Monte Carlo simulations that explicitly represent nanoparticles and their alkane tethers. A persistence length of 50 nm (150 bp) gave a favorable comparison, consistent with the results of single-molecule force-extension experiments on much longer dsDNA chains, but in contrast to recent suggestions of enhanced flexibility at these length scales.

  7. Synthesis of a non-radioactive hepatitis B virus DNA probe from human serum by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Frías, F; Arranz, J A; Buti, M; Esteban, R; Jardí, R

    1994-05-01

    A method for synthesizing probes for detecting hepatitis B virus DNA in serum was developed. It uses DNA extracted from the serum of an hepatitis B virus carrier as target, and digoxigenin-11-dUTP incorporated in DNA sequences during the polymerase chain reaction as tracer. Using a spot hybridization assay, the sensitivity and specificity of the digoxigenin-labelled DNA probe were compared with two standard hepatitis B virus DNA probes, synthesized with cloned hepatitis B virus DNA and labelled either with digoxigenin or 32P by random priming. Data obtained from the three methods showed an excellent correlation. Thus, hepatitis B virus DNA extracted from human serum and labelled by polymerase chain reaction may be considered a suitable alternative to cloned DNA. It provides reliable probes and eliminates the need for facilities and personnel dedicated to the manipulation of clones. These advantages will allow a wider application of hepatitis B virus DNA testing in clinical practice.

  8. Electrochemical DNA probe for Hg(2+) detection based on a triple-helix DNA and Multistage Signal Amplification Strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Zhang, Yihe; Ma, Hongmin; Ren, Xiang; Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Qin

    2016-12-15

    In this work, an ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor was developed for detection of Hg(2+). Gold nanoparticles decorated bovine serum albumin reduction of graphene oxide (AuNP-BSA-rGO) were used as subsurface material for the immobilization of triple-helix DNA. The triple-helix DNA containing a thiol labelled single-stranded DNA (sDNA) and a thymine-rich DNA (T-rich DNA), which could be unwinded in the present of Hg(2+) to form more stable thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) complex. T-Hg(2+)-T complex was then removed and the sDNA was left on the electrode. At this time, gold nanoparticle carrying thiol labelled cytosine-rich complementary DNA (cDNA-AuNP) could bind with the free sDNA. Meanwhile, the other free cDNA on AuNP could bind with each other in the present of Ag(+) to form the stable cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine (C-Ag(+)-C) complex and circle amplification. Plenty of C-Ag(+)-C could form silver nanoclusters by electrochemical reduction and the striping signal of Ag could be measured for purpose of the final electrochemical detection of Hg(2+). This sensor could detect Hg(2+) over a wide concentration range from 0.1 to 130nM with a detection limit of 0.03nM.

  9. Resonance scattering spectral detection of ultratrace Hg(II) using herring sperm DNA modified nanogold probe as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guiqing; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang; Liao, Xianjiu; Li, Jianfu; Jiang, Hesheng

    2010-01-01

    Herring sperm DNA (hsDNA) was used to modify 10 nm nanogold to obtain a resonance scattering (RS) probe (AuhsDNA) for detection of Hg(2+). In the presence of salt, Hg(2+) interacts with AuhsDNA to form stable Hg(2+)-hsDNA complexes, and releases nanogold particles to form larger nanogold clusters that can be removed by membrane filtration. The excess AuhsDNA in the filtrate solution exhibits a catalytic effect on the reaction between hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) and Cu(II). The excess AuhsDNA decreased with the addition of Hg(2+), which led the RS intensity at 602 nm to decrease. The decreased RS intensity (Δl(602 nm)) had a linear response to Hg(2+) concentration in the range of 0.4-400 nM, with a detection limit of 0.2 nM Hg(2+). This RS method was applied for the detection of Hg(2+) in water samples, with sensitivity, selectivity and simplicity.

  10. Site-Specific DNA Structural and Dynamic Features Revealed by Nucleotide-Independent Nitroxide Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Anna; Kalai, Tamas; Hideg, Kalman; Qin, Peter Z.

    2009-09-15

    In site-directed spin labeling, a covalently attached nitroxide probe containing a chemically inert unpaired electron is utilized to obtain information on the local environment of the parent macromolecule. Studies presented here examine the feasibility of probing local DNA structural and dynamic features using a class of nitroxide probes that are linked to chemically substituted phosphorothioate positions at the DNA backbone. Two members of this family, designated as R5 and R5a, were attached to eight different sites of a dodecameric DNA duplex without severely perturbing the native B-form conformation. Measured X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which report on nitroxide rotational motions, were found to vary depending on the location of the label (e.g., duplex center vs termini) and the surrounding DNA sequence. This indicates that R5 and R5a can provide information on the DNA local environment at the level of an individual nucleotide. As these probes can be attached to arbitrary nucleotides within a nucleic acid sequence, they may provide a means to “scan” a given DNA molecule in order to interrogate its local structural and dynamic features.

  11. Immobilization of human papillomavirus DNA probe for surface plasmon resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Xinyuan; Ji, Yanhong; Ma, Suihua; Liu, Le; Liu, Zhiyi; Li, Yao; He, Yonghong; Guo, Jihua

    2009-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a kind of double-stranded DNA virus whose subspecies have diversity. Near 40 kinds of subspecies can invade reproductive organ and cause some high risk disease, such as cervical carcinoma. In order to detect the type of the subspecies of the HPV DNA, we used the parallel scan spectral surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging technique, which is a novel type of two- dimensional bio-sensing method based on surface plasmon resonance and is proposed in our previous work, to study the immobilization of the HPV DNA probes on the gold film. In the experiment, four kinds of the subspecies of the HPV DNA (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV58) probes are fixed on one gold film, and incubate in the constant temperature condition to get a HPV DNA probe microarray. We use the parallel scan spectral SPR imaging system to detect the reflective indices of the HPV DNA subspecies probes. The benefits of this new approach are high sensitive, label-free, strong specificity and high through-put.

  12. Comparison of a DNA probe with culture for detecting Chlamydia trachomatis directly from genital specimens.

    PubMed

    Gratton, C A; Lim-Fong, R; Prasad, E; Kibsey, P C

    1990-02-01

    A study was conducted to compare results between culture methods and the Gen-Probe (Gen-Probe Inc. San Diego, California) chemiluminescent technique of nucleic acid hybridization to identify Chlamydia trachomatis from genital specimens from 117 females and 70 males. Specimens collected from sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and infertility clinics were randomized as to whether probe or culture swabs were collected first. The Gen-Probe demonstrated a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 75% in the female population and a sensitivity of 68% and a specificity of 75% in the male population when compared to the reference culture method using cycloheximide-treated McCoy cells. Gen-Probe had an overall sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 75% when the two groups were combined. Chlamydiazyme (Abbott Labs) results were obtained on 135 specimens; 90 of which correlated with probe and culture. The remaining 45 specimens had varying combinations of probe, culture and Chlamydiazyme results. MicroTrak (Syva) was done on 49 specimens; 35 of which correlated with probe and culture. The remaining 14 specimens had varying combinations of probe, culture and MicroTrak results. The apparent lack of sensitivity of the DNA probe is a major drawback of this system. PMID:2179711

  13. Real-time observation of DNA repair: 2-aminopurine as a molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Rajagopal; Butcher, Christina E.; Oh, Dennis H.

    2008-02-01

    Triplex forming oligos (TFOs) that target psoralen photoadducts to specific DNA sequences have generated interest as a potential agent in gene therapy. TFOs also offer an opportunity to study the mechanism of DNA repair in detail. In an effort to understand the mechanism of DNA repair at a specific DNA sequence in real-time, we have designed a plasmid containing a psoralen reaction site adjacent to a TFO binding site corresponding to a sequence within the human interstitial collagenase gene. Two 2-aminopurine residues incorporated into the purine-rich strand of the TFO binding site and located within six nucleotides of the psoralen reaction site serve as molecular probes for excision repair events involving the psoralen photoadducts on that DNA strand. In duplex DNA, the 2-aminopurine fluorescence is quenched. However, upon thermal or formamide-induced denaturation of duplex DNA to single stranded DNA, the 2-aminopurine fluorescence increases by eight fold. These results suggest that monitoring 2-aminopurine fluorescence from plasmids damaged by psoralen TFOs may be a method for measuring excision of single-stranded damaged DNA from the plasmid in cells. A fluorescence-based molecular probe to the plasmid may significantly simplify the real-time observation of DNA repair in both populations of cells as well as single cells.

  14. Threading of Binuclear Ruthenium Complex Through DNA Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Westerlund, Fredrik; McCauley, Micah; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Due to steric constraints the dumb-bell shaped binuclear ruthenium complex can only intercalate DNA by threading, which requires local melting of the DNA to occur. By mechanically manipulating a single DNA molecule held with optical tweezers, we lower the barrier to threading compared to bulk experiments. Stretching single DNA molecules with different drug concentrations and holding a constant force allows the binding to reach equilibrium. We can obtain the equilibrium fractional ligand binding and length of DNA at saturation. Fitting these results yields quantitative measurements of the binding thermodynamics and kinetics. In addition, we obtain the minimum binding site size, which may be determined by either electrostatic repulsion or steric constraints.

  15. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  16. Construction of logic gates with the fluorene-based small molecule/DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Wang, Ting; Yang, Renqiang

    2012-09-01

    Fluorene-based small molecules (FSMs) have optical properties and can interact with DNA. In this paper, the integrated "INH" and "AND" gates operating in parallel are developed with the fluorene-based small molecule (FSM)/DNA probe. They are activated by taking advantage of the two-step fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process and the sequence-recognition mechanism of DNA. Then, a "NOT" gate is obtained with a molecular beacon-like probe (FSM-MB) by using the FSM as the fluorophore. Moreover, the "NOT" gate based on the FSM-MB probe can be used as a biosensor and has potential applications in label-free detection of target molecules.

  17. Effective delivery of DNA into tumor cells and tissues by electroporation of polymer-DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Toita, Riki; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2008-07-01

    Electroporation is a useful means for non-viral gene delivery. Here, we investigated the use of electroporation to deliver polymer-DNA complexes into living cells using a protein kinase C (PKC)alpha-responsive polymer. The polymer was complexed with a luciferase-encoding DNA and electroporated into B16 melanoma cells. Gene expression from polymer-DNA complexes was 3- to 5-fold higher than from naked DNA. Moreover, after introduction of the polymer-DNA complex into tissues, luciferase levels were >2-fold higher in B16 melanoma tumors than in normal skin tissue. These results suggest that the combination of our polymer and electroporation is useful for the effective delivery of DNA into tumors. PMID:18375054

  18. A DNA minor groove binder shows high effectiveness as a quencher for FRET probes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei-Jia; Jin, Da-Zhi; Luo, Yun; Li, Hui; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Zheng; Gu, Hua; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2014-08-15

    A non-fluorescent quencher based on thiazole orange was incorporated into oligonucleotides. Fluorimetry and fluorogenic real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments demonstrated that the quencher is effective for fluorescein amidite dyes. The thiazole orange quencher also increased the melting temperature of DNA duplexes, which may facilitate the design of shorter and more discriminatory probes. The effectiveness of the quencher in TaqMan probes was also demonstrated.

  19. Fluoroquinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes: two modes of drug binding.

    PubMed

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-05-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys(466) gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly(81) and GyrB-Glu(466) residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases. PMID:24497635

  20. Fluoroquinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes: two modes of drug binding.

    PubMed

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-05-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys(466) gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly(81) and GyrB-Glu(466) residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases.

  1. 2-Aminopurine hairpin probes for the detection of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2012-05-13

    Nucleic acid exposure to radiation and chemical insults leads to damage and disease. Thus, detection and understanding DNA damage is important for elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease. However, current methods of DNA damage detection are either time-consuming, destroy the sample, or are too specific to be used for generic detection of damage. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence sensor of 2-aminopurine (2AP), a fluorescent analogue of adenine, incorporated in the loop of a hairpin probe for the quantification of ultraviolet (UV) C-induced nucleic acid damage. Our results show that the selectivity of the 2AP hairpin probe to UV-induced nucleic acid damage is comparable to molecular beacon (MB) probes of DNA damage. The calibration curve for the 2AP hairpin probe shows good linearity (R(2)=0.98) with a limit of detection of 17.2 nM. This probe is a simple, fast and economic fluorescence sensor for the quantification of UV-induced damage in DNA.

  2. Microarray long oligo probe designing for Escherichia coli: an in-silico DNA marker extraction

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Najafi, Ali; Behzadi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract infections are predominant diseases which may be caused by different pathogenic microorganisms, particularly Escherichia coli (E.coli). DNA microarray technology is an accurate, rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnostic tool which may lead to definite diagnosis and treatment of several infectious diseases. DNA microarray is a multi-process method in which probe designing plays an important. Therefore, the authors of the present study have tried to design a range of effective and proper long oligo microarray probes for detection and identification of different strains of pathogenic E.coli and in particular, uropathogenic E.coli (UPEC). Material and methods E.coli O26 H11 11368 uid41021 was selected as the standard strain for probe designing. This strain encompasses the largest nucleotide sequence and the most number of genes among other pathogenic strains of E.coli. For performing this in silico survey, NCBI database, GReview Server, PanSeq Server, Oligoanalyzer tool, and AlleleID 7.7 were used to design accurate, appropriate, effective, and flexible long oligo microarray probes. Moreover, the genome of E.coli and its closely related microorganisms were compared. Results In this study, 15 long oligo microarray probes were designed for detecting and identifying different strains of E.coli such as UPEC. These probes possessed the best physico-chemical characteristics. The functional and structural properties of the designed probes were recognized by practical tools and softwares. Conclusions The use of reliable advanced technologies and methodologies for probe designing guarentees the high quality of microarray probes and makes DNA microarray technology more flexible and an effective diagnostic technique. PMID:27123336

  3. Use of Ti Plasmid DNA Probes for Determining Tumorigenicity of Agrobacterium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Thomas J.; Norelli, John L.; Katz, Barbara H.; Bishop, Andrew L.

    1990-01-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two 32P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 106 CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains. Images PMID:16348218

  4. Use of Ti plasmid DNA probes for determining tumorigenicity of agrobacterium strains

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.J.; Norelli, J.L.; Katz, B.H.; Bishop, A.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two {sup 32}P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 10{sup 6} CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains.

  5. Evaluation of a chemiluminescent DNA probe assay for the rapid confirmation of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Okwumabua, O; Swaminathan, B; Edmonds, P; Wenger, J; Hogan, J; Alden, M

    1992-02-01

    A Listeria monocytogenes-specific, acridinium-ester-labelled DNA probe was evaluated in a chemiluminescent homogeneous protection assay (HPA) for the rapid confirmation of suspect L. monocytogenes colonies from blood agar plates. The HPA uses an acridinium-ester-labelled chemiluminescent DNA probe in a free-solution hybridization format. After the DNA probe hybridized with the target ribosomal RNA, the acridinium label on the unhybridized probe was inactivated by a chemical differential hydrolysis step. Formation of a hybrid between probe and target was detected in a luminometer after the addition of a detection reagent. The assay can be completed in 30 to 45 min and allows for simultaneous processing of several (50-100) samples. The probe showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for L. monocytogenes when evaluated in the HPA against L. monocytogenes, other Listeria species and other Gram-positive bacteria. The lower detection limit of the HPA was between 10(4) and 10(5) cells. In an evaluation with 296 bacterial colonies isolated from food, the HPA colony confirmation showed 100% agreement with conventional biochemical characterization. HPA will be useful for the rapid confirmation of L. monocytogenes isolated from food and clinical specimens.

  6. Characterization of honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) chromosomes using repetitive DNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Beye, M; Moritz, R F

    1995-01-01

    Two different repetitive DNA probes of Apis mellifera and ribosomal DNA from Drosophila melanogaster were used to characterize the chromosomal set of the honeybee (n = 16). The probes were hybridized to chromosome preparations of haploid testis tissue from drone larvae using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The honeybee probes hybridized to the telomeric (Alu I family) and centromeric region (Ava I family) of most chromosomes. The rDNA probe labeled two chromosomes only. Combination of the three probes yielded labeled patterns allowing us to identify each chromosome of the honeybee individually. This is the first report of an unambiguous identification of the chromosomal set of the honeybee, since classical banding techniques failed to yield clear patterns for identification. The consensus sequence of the centromeric reiterated probe (Ava I family) has a length of about 550 nucleotides and shows no homology to other known sequences. However, the structural organization of a 130-nucleotides long motif forming the unusually homogeneous 550 nucleotides repeat is similar to those found in mammals' repetitive DNAs.

  7. DNA binding, antioxidant activity, and DNA damage protection of chiral macrocyclic Mn(III) salen complexes.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Nirali; Khan, Noor-ul H; Prathap, K Jeya; Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Abdi, Sayed H R; Mishra, Sandhya; Bajaj, Hari C

    2012-12-01

    We are reporting the synthesis, characterization, and calf thymus DNA binding studies of novel chiral macrocyclic Mn(III) salen complexes S-1, R-1, S-2, and R-2. These chiral complexes showed ability to bind with DNA, where complex S-1 exhibits the highest DNA binding constant 1.20 × 10(6) M(-1). All the compounds were screened for superoxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities; among them, complex S-1 exhibited significant activity with IC(50) 1.36 and 2.37 μM, respectively. Further, comet assay was used to evaluate the DNA damage protection in white blood cells against the reactive oxygen species wherein complex S-1 was found effective in protecting the hydroxyl radicals mediated plasmid and white blood cells DNA damage.

  8. Using Amino-Labeled Nucleotide Probes for Simultaneous Single Molecule RNA-DNA FISH

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Shao, Fangwei; Zhang, Li-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Using amino-labeled oligonucleotide probes, we established a simple, robust and low-noise method for simultaneous detection of RNA and DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization, a highly useful tool to study the large pool of long non-coding RNAs being identified in the current research. With probes either chemically or biologically synthesized, we demonstrate that the method can be applied to study a wide range of RNA and DNA targets at the single-cell and single-molecule level in cellular contexts. PMID:25226542

  9. A DNA immunoprecipitation assay used in quantitative detection of in vitro DNA-protein complex binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Young; Chae, Ji Hyung; Oh, Chang-Ho; Kim, Chul Geun

    2013-10-15

    To begin gene transcription, several transcription factors must bind to specific DNA sequences to form a complex via DNA-protein interactions. We established an in vitro method for specific and sensitive analyses of DNA-protein interactions based on a DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP) method. We verified the accuracy and efficiency of the DIP assay in quantitatively measuring DNA-protein binding using transcription factor CP2c as a model. With our DIP assay, we could detect specific interactions within a DNA-CP2c complex, with reproducible and quantitative binding values. In addition, we were able to effectively measure the changes in DNA-CP2c binding by the addition of a small molecule, FQI1 (factor quinolinone inhibitor 1), previously identified as a specific inhibitor of this binding. To identify a new regulator of DNA-CP2c binding, we analyzed several CP2c binding peptides and found that only one class of peptide severely inhibits DNA-CP2c binding. These data show that our DIP assay is very useful in quantitatively detecting the binding dynamics of DNA-protein complex. Because DNA-protein interaction is very dynamic in different cellular environments, our assay can be applied to the detection of active transcription factors, including promoter occupancy in normal and disease conditions. Moreover, it may be used to develop a targeted regulator of specific DNA-protein interaction.

  10. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event. PMID:26678946

  11. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  12. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection.

    PubMed

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-18

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single 'complex peak' in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  13. Stability, specificity and fluorescence brightness of multiply-labeled fluorescent DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, J B; Waggoner, A S

    1997-01-01

    In this work, we studied the fluorescence and hybridization of multiply-labeled DNA probes which have the hydrophilic fluorophore 1-(straightepsilon-carboxypentynyl)-1'-ethyl- 3,3,3', 3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine-5,5'-disulfonate (Cy3) attached via either a short or long linker at the C-5 position of deoxyuridine. We describe the effects of labeling density, fluorophore charge and linker length upon five properties of the probe: fluorescence intensity, the change in fluorescence upon duplex formation, the quantum yield of fluorescence (Phif), probe-target stability and specificity. For the hydrophilic dye Cy3, we have demonstrated that the fluorescence intensity andPhifare maximized when labeling every 6th base using the long linker. With a less hydrophilic dye, a labeling density this high could not be achieved without serious quenching of the fluorescence. The target specificity of multiply-labeled DNA probes was just as high as compared to the unmodified control probe, however, a less stable probe-target duplex is formed that exhibits a lower melting temperature. A mechanism that accounts for this destabilization is proposed which is consistent with our data. It involves dye-dye and dye-nucleotide interactions which appear to stabilize a single-stranded conformation of the probe. PMID:9207044

  14. Study of concentration of HPV DNA probe immobilization for cervical cancer detection based IDE biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshila, M. L.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.

    2016-07-01

    This paper mainly illustrates regarding the detection process of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA probe. HPV is the most common virus that infected to human by a sexually transmitted virus. The most common high-risk HPV are 16 and 18. Interdigitated electrode (IDE) device used as based of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) acts as inorganic surface, where by using APTES as a linker between inorganic surface and organic surface. A strategy of rapid and sensitive for the HPV detection was proposed by integrating simple DNA extraction with a gene of DNA. The extraction of the gene of DNA will make an efficiency of the detection process. It will depend on the sequence of the capture probes and the way to support their attached. The fabrication, surface modification, immobilization and hybridization processes are characterized by current voltage (I-V) measurement by using KEITHLEY 6487. This strategy will perform a good sensitivity of HPV detection.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of DNA-polycation complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebarth, Jesse; Wang, Yongmei

    2008-03-01

    A necessary step in the preparation of DNA for use in gene therapy is the packaging of DNA with a vector that can condense DNA and provide protection from degrading enzymes. Because of the immunoresponses caused by viral vectors, there has been interest in developing synthetic gene therapy vectors, with polycations emerging as promising candidates. Molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA duplex CGCGAATTCGCG in the presence of 20 monomer long sequences of the polycations, poly-L-lysine (PLL) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), with explicit counterions and TIP3P water, are performed to provide insight into the structure and formation of DNA polyplexes. After an initial separation of approximately 50 å, the DNA and polycation come together and form a stable complex within 10 ns. The DNA does not undergo any major structural changes upon complexation and remains in the B-form. In the formed complex, the charged amine groups of the polycation mainly interact with DNA phosphate groups, and rarely occupy electronegative sites in either the major or minor grooves. Differences between complexation with PEI and PLL will be discussed.

  16. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex. PMID:27668216

  17. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  18. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Oliva, María A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex. PMID:27668216

  19. Complexation Between Cationic Diblock Copolymers and Plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seyoung; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), as polyanions, can spontaneously bind with polycations to form polyelectrolyte complexes. When the polycation is a diblock copolymer with one cationic block and one uncharged hydrophilic block, the polyelectrolyte complexes formed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) are often colloidally stable, and show great promise in the field of polymeric gene therapy. While the resulting properties (size, stability, and toxicity to biological systems) of the complexes have been studied for numerous cationic diblocks, the fundamentals of the pDNA-diblock binding process have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we report how the cationic block content of a diblock influences the pDNA-diblock interactions. pDNA with 7164 base pairs and poly(2-deoxy-2-methacrylamido glucopyranose)-block-poly(N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide) (PMAG-b-PAEMA) are used as the model pDNA and cationic diblock, respectively. To vary the cationic block content, two PMAG-b-PAEMA copolymers with similar PMAG block lengths but distinct PAEMA block lengths and a PAEMA homopolymer are utilized. We show that the enthalpy change from pDNA-diblock interactions is dependent on the cationic diblock composition, and is closely associated with both the binding strength and the pDNA tertiary structure.

  20. DNA-Dye-Conjugates: Conformations and Spectra of Fluorescence Probes

    PubMed Central

    Beierlein, Frank R.; Paradas Palomo, Miguel; Sharapa, Dmitry I.; Zozulia, Oleksii; Mokhir, Andriy; Clark, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Extensive molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to investigate DNA-dye and DNA-photosensitizer conjugates, which act as reactants in templated reactions leading to the generation of fluorescent products in the presence of specific desoxyribonucleic acid sequences (targets). Such reactions are potentially suitable for detecting target nucleic acids in live cells by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. The simulations show how the attached dyes/photosensitizers influence DNA structure and reveal the relative orientations of the chromophores with respect to each other. Our results will help to optimize the reactants for the templated reactions, especially length and structure of the spacers used to link reporter dyes or photosensitizers to the oligonucleotides responsible for target recognition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the structural ensembles obtained from the simulations can be used to calculate steady-state UV-vis absorption and emission spectra. We also show how important quantities describing the quenching of the reporter dye via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be calculated from the simulation data, and we compare these for different relative chromophore geometries. PMID:27467071

  1. DNA-Dye-Conjugates: Conformations and Spectra of Fluorescence Probes.

    PubMed

    Beierlein, Frank R; Paradas Palomo, Miguel; Sharapa, Dmitry I; Zozulia, Oleksii; Mokhir, Andriy; Clark, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Extensive molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to investigate DNA-dye and DNA-photosensitizer conjugates, which act as reactants in templated reactions leading to the generation of fluorescent products in the presence of specific desoxyribonucleic acid sequences (targets). Such reactions are potentially suitable for detecting target nucleic acids in live cells by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. The simulations show how the attached dyes/photosensitizers influence DNA structure and reveal the relative orientations of the chromophores with respect to each other. Our results will help to optimize the reactants for the templated reactions, especially length and structure of the spacers used to link reporter dyes or photosensitizers to the oligonucleotides responsible for target recognition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the structural ensembles obtained from the simulations can be used to calculate steady-state UV-vis absorption and emission spectra. We also show how important quantities describing the quenching of the reporter dye via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be calculated from the simulation data, and we compare these for different relative chromophore geometries. PMID:27467071

  2. Effects of DNA probe and target flexibility on the performance of a "signal-on" electrochemical DNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2014-09-01

    We report the effect of the length and identity of a nontarget binding spacer in both the probe and target sequences on the overall performance of a folding-based electrochemical DNA sensor. Six near-identical DNA probes were used in this study; the main differences between these probes are the length (6, 10, or 14 bases) and identity (thymine (T) or adenine (A)) of the spacer connecting the two target binding domains. Despite the differences, the signaling mechanism of these sensors remains essentially the same. The methylene blue (MB)-modified probe assumes a linear unstructured conformation in the absence of the target; upon hybridization to the target, the probe adopts a "close" conformation, resulting in an increase in the MB current. Among the six sensors, the T14 and A14 sensors showed the largest signal increase upon target hybridization, highlighting the significance of probe flexibility on sensor performance. In addition to the target without a midsequence spacer, 12 other targets, each with a different oligo-T or oligo-A spacer, were used to elucidate the effect of target flexibility on the sensors' signaling capacity. For all six sensors, hybridization to targets with a 2- or 3-base spacer resulted in the largest signal increase. Higher signal enhancement was also observed with targets with an oligo-A spacer. For this sensor design, addition of a long nontarget binding spacer to the probe sequence is advantageous, as it provides flexibility for optimal target capture. The length of the spacer in the target sequence, however, should be adequately long to enable efficient hybridization yet does not introduce undesirable electrostatic and crowding effects.

  3. Absolute and direct microRNA quantification using DNA-gold nanoparticle probes.

    PubMed

    Degliangeli, Federica; Kshirsagar, Prakash; Brunetti, Virgilio; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Fiammengo, Roberto

    2014-02-12

    DNA-gold nanoparticle probes are implemented in a simple strategy for direct microRNA (miRNA) quantification. Fluorescently labeled DNA-probe strands are immobilized on PEGylated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In the presence of target miRNA, DNA-RNA heteroduplexes are formed and become substrate for the endonuclease DSN (duplex-specific nuclease). Enzymatic hydrolysis of the DNA strands yields a fluorescence signal due to diffusion of the fluorophores away from the gold surface. We show that the molecular design of our DNA-AuNP probes, with the DNA strands immobilized on top of the PEG-based passivation layer, results in nearly unaltered enzymatic activity toward immobilized heteroduplexes compared to substrates free in solution. The assay, developed in a real-time format, allows absolute quantification of as little as 0.2 fmol of miR-203. We also show the application of the assay for direct quantification of cancer-related miR-203 and miR-21 in samples of extracted total RNA from cell cultures. The possibility of direct and absolute quantification may significantly advance the use of microRNAs as biomarkers in the clinical praxis.

  4. Computational and analytical modeling of cationic lipid-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Farago, Oded; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2007-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the physical properties of cationic lipid-DNA (CL-DNA) complexes--a promising synthetically based nonviral carrier of DNA for gene therapy. The study is based on a coarse-grained molecular model, which is used in Monte Carlo simulations of mesoscopically large systems over timescales long enough to address experimental reality. In the present work, we focus on the statistical-mechanical behavior of lamellar complexes, which in Monte Carlo simulations self-assemble spontaneously from a disordered random initial state. We measure the DNA-interaxial spacing, d(DNA), and the local cationic area charge density, sigma(M), for a wide range of values of the parameter (c) representing the fraction of cationic lipids. For weakly charged complexes (low values of (c)), we find that d(DNA) has a linear dependence on (c)(-1), which is in excellent agreement with x-ray diffraction experimental data. We also observe, in qualitative agreement with previous Poisson-Boltzmann calculations of the system, large fluctuations in the local area charge density with a pronounced minimum of sigma(M) halfway between adjacent DNA molecules. For highly-charged complexes (large (c)), we find moderate charge density fluctuations and observe deviations from linear dependence of d(DNA) on (c)(-1). This last result, together with other findings such as the decrease in the effective stretching modulus of the complex and the increased rate at which pores are formed in the complex membranes, are indicative of the gradual loss of mechanical stability of the complex, which occurs when (c) becomes large. We suggest that this may be the origin of the recently observed enhanced transfection efficiency of lamellar CL-DNA complexes at high charge densities, because the completion of the transfection process requires the disassembly of the complex and the release of the DNA into the cytoplasm. Some of the structural properties of the system are also predicted by a continuum

  5. General method for cloning amplified DNA by differential screening with genomic probes.

    PubMed Central

    Brison, O; Ardeshir, F; Stark, G R

    1982-01-01

    Mutant Syrian hamster cell lines resistant to N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate, a potent and specific inhibitor of aspartate transcarbamylase, have amplified the gene coding for the multifunctional protein (CAD) that includes this activity. The average amount of DNA amplified is approximately 500 kilobases per gene copy, about 20 times the length of the CAD gene itself. A differential screening method which uses genomic DNAs as probes was developed to isolate recombinant phage containing fragments of amplified DNA. One probe was prepared by reassociating fragments of total genomic DNA from 165-28, a mutant cell line with 190 times the wild-type complement of CAD genes, until all of the sequences repeated about 200 times were annealed and then isolating the double-stranded DNA with hydroxyapatite.This DNA was highly enriched in sequences from the entire amplified region, whereas the same sequences were very rare in DNA prepared similarly from wild-type cells. After both DNAs were labeled by nick translation, highly repeated sequences were removed by hybridization to immobilized total genomic DNA from wild-type cells. A library of cloned DNA fragments from mutant 165-28 was screened with both probes, and nine independent fragments containing about 165 kilobases of amplified DNA, including the CAD gene, have been isolated so far. These cloned DNAs can be used to study the structure of the amplified region, to evaluate the nature of the amplification event, and to investigate gene expression from the amplified DNA. For example, one amplified fragment included a gene coding for a 3.8-kilobase, cytoplasmic, polyadenylated RNA which was overproduced greatly in cells resistant to N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate. The method for cloning amplified DNA is general and can be used to evaluate the possible involvement of gene amplification in phenomena such as drug resistance, transformation, or differentiation. DNA fragments corresponding to any region amplified about 10-fold or

  6. UniPROBE, update 2011: expanded content and search tools in the online database of protein-binding microarray data on protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Robasky, Kimberly; Bulyk, Martha L

    2011-01-01

    The Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide-Binding Evaluation (UniPROBE) database is a centralized repository of information on the DNA-binding preferences of proteins as determined by universal protein-binding microarray (PBM) technology. Each entry for a protein (or protein complex) in UniPROBE provides the quantitative preferences for all possible nucleotide sequence variants ('words') of length k ('k-mers'), as well as position weight matrix (PWM) and graphical sequence logo representations of the k-mer data. In this update, we describe >130% expansion of the database content, incorporation of a protein BLAST (blastp) tool for finding protein sequence matches in UniPROBE, the introduction of UniPROBE accession numbers and additional database enhancements. The UniPROBE database is available at http://uniprobe.org.

  7. Probing Interactions in Complex Molecular Systems through Ordered Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, J J; Bartelt, M C; Orme, C A; Villacampa, A; Weeks, B L; Miller, A E

    2002-01-31

    Emerging from the machinery of epitaxial science and chemical synthesis, is a growing emphasis on development of self-organized systems of complex molecular species. The nature of self-organization in these systems spans the continuum from simple crystallization of large molecules such as dendrimers and proteins, to assembly into large organized networks of nanometer-scale structures such as quantum dots or nanoparticles. In truth, self-organization in complex molecular systems has always been a central feature of many scientific disciplines including fields as diverse as structural biology, polymer science and geochemistry. But over the past decade, changes in those fields have often been marked by the degree to which researchers are using molecular-scale approaches to understand the hierarchy of structures and processes driven by this ordered assembly. At the same time, physical scientists have begun to use their knowledge of simple atomic and molecular systems to fabricate synthetic self-organized systems. This increasing activity in the field of self-organization is testament to the success of the physical and chemical sciences in building a detailed understanding of crystallization and epitaxy in simple atomic and molecular systems, one that is soundly rooted in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. One of the fundamental challenges of chemistry and materials science in the coming decades is to develop a similarly well-founded physical understanding of assembly processes in complex molecular systems. Over the past five years, we have successfully used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the physical controls on single crystal epitaxy from solutions for a wide range of molecular species. More recently, we have combined this method with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and kinetic Monte Carlo modeling in order to relate morphology to surface atomic structure and processes. The purpose of this proposal was to extend this approach to assemblies

  8. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, Ryan C.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes—a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  9. Sensitivity comparison of real-time PCR probe designs on a model DNA plasmid.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Blasic, J R; Holden, M J; Pires, R

    2005-09-15

    We investigated three probe design strategies used in quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for sensitivity in detection of the PCR amplicon. A plasmid with a 120-bp insert served as the DNA template. The probes were TaqMan, conventional molecular beacon (MB), and shared-stem molecular beacon (ATssMB and GCssMB). A shared-stem beacon probe combines the properties of a TaqMan probe and a conventional molecular beacon. It was found that the overall sensitivities for the four PCR probes are in the order of MB>ATssMB>GCssMB>TaqMan. The fluorescence quantum yield measurements indicate that incomplete or partial enzymatic cleavage catalyzed by Taq polymerase is the likely cause of the low sensitivities of two shared-stem beacons when compared with the conventional beacon probe. A high-fluorescence background associated with the current TaqMan probe sequence contributes to the relatively low detection sensitivity and signal-to-background ratio. The study points out that the nucleotide environment surrounding the reporting fluorophore can strongly affect the probe performance in real-time PCR.

  10. Use of DNA probes to study tetracycline resistance determinants in gram-negative bacteria from swine

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.Y.

    1989-01-01

    Specific {sup 32}P-labeled DNA probes were prepared and used to evaluate the distribution of tetracycline resistance determinants carried by gram-negative enteric bacteria isolated from pigs in 3 swine herds with different histories of antibiotic exposure. Plasmid DNA, ranging in size from 2.1 to 186 Kb, was observed in over 84% of 114 isolates studied. Two of 78 tetracycline resistant strains did not harbor plasmids. The DNA probes were isolated from plasmids pSL18, pRT29/Tn10, pBR322 and pSL106, respectively, and they represented class A, B, C and D tetracycline resistance determinants. Hybridization conditions using 0.5X SSPE at 65{degrees}C minimize cross-hybridization between the different class of tetracycline resistance genes. Cross-hybridization between class A and class C determinants could be distinguished by simultaneous comparison of the intensity of their hybridization signals. Plasmids from over 44% of the tetracycline resistant isolates did not hybridize to DNA probes for the determinants tested. Class B determinant occurred more frequently than class A or C. None of the isolates hybridized with the class D probe.

  11. Stable isotope probing with 15N achieved by disentangling the effects of genome G+C content and isotope enrichment on DNA density.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Daniel H; Huangyutitham, Varisa; Hsu, Shi-Fang; Nelson, Tyrrell A

    2007-05-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool that can identify the functional capabilities of noncultivated microorganisms as they occur in microbial communities. While it has been suggested previously that nucleic acid SIP can be performed with 15N, nearly all applications of this technique to date have used 13C. Successful application of SIP using 15N-DNA (15N-DNA-SIP) has been limited, because the maximum shift in buoyant density that can be achieved in CsCl gradients is approximately 0.016 g ml-1 for 15N-labeled DNA, relative to 0.036 g ml-1 for 13C-labeled DNA. In contrast, variation in genome G+C content between microorganisms can result in DNA samples that vary in buoyant density by as much as 0.05 g ml-1. Thus, natural variation in genome G+C content in complex communities prevents the effective separation of 15N-labeled DNA from unlabeled DNA. We describe a method which disentangles the effects of isotope incorporation and genome G+C content on DNA buoyant density and makes it possible to isolate 15N-labeled DNA from heterogeneous mixtures of DNA. This method relies on recovery of "heavy" DNA from primary CsCl density gradients followed by purification of 15N-labeled DNA from unlabeled high-G+C-content DNA in secondary CsCl density gradients containing bis-benzimide. This technique, by providing a means to enhance separation of isotopically labeled DNA from unlabeled DNA, makes it possible to use 15N-labeled compounds effectively in DNA-SIP experiments and also will be effective for removing unlabeled DNA from isotopically labeled DNA in 13C-DNA-SIP applications.

  12. Stable Isotope Probing with 15N Achieved by Disentangling the Effects of Genome G+C Content and Isotope Enrichment on DNA Density▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Daniel H.; Huangyutitham, Varisa; Hsu, Shi-Fang; Nelson, Tyrrell A.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool that can identify the functional capabilities of noncultivated microorganisms as they occur in microbial communities. While it has been suggested previously that nucleic acid SIP can be performed with 15N, nearly all applications of this technique to date have used 13C. Successful application of SIP using 15N-DNA (15N-DNA-SIP) has been limited, because the maximum shift in buoyant density that can be achieved in CsCl gradients is approximately 0.016 g ml−1 for 15N-labeled DNA, relative to 0.036 g ml−1 for 13C-labeled DNA. In contrast, variation in genome G+C content between microorganisms can result in DNA samples that vary in buoyant density by as much as 0.05 g ml−1. Thus, natural variation in genome G+C content in complex communities prevents the effective separation of 15N-labeled DNA from unlabeled DNA. We describe a method which disentangles the effects of isotope incorporation and genome G+C content on DNA buoyant density and makes it possible to isolate 15N-labeled DNA from heterogeneous mixtures of DNA. This method relies on recovery of “heavy” DNA from primary CsCl density gradients followed by purification of 15N-labeled DNA from unlabeled high-G+C-content DNA in secondary CsCl density gradients containing bis-benzimide. This technique, by providing a means to enhance separation of isotopically labeled DNA from unlabeled DNA, makes it possible to use 15N-labeled compounds effectively in DNA-SIP experiments and also will be effective for removing unlabeled DNA from isotopically labeled DNA in 13C-DNA-SIP applications. PMID:17369331

  13. Synthesis, Characterization and Fluorescence Properties of Zn(II) and Cu(II) Complexes: DNA Binding Study of Zn(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Lavaee, Parirokh; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Mague, Joel T; Esmaeili, Abbas Ali; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes containing Schiff base, 2- methoxy-6((E)-(phenylimino) methyl) phenol ligand (HL) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The fluorescence properties and quantum yield of zinc complex were studied. Our data showed that Zn complex could bind to DNA grooves with Kb = 10(4) M(-1). Moreover, Zn complex could successfully be used in staining of DNA following agarose gel electrophoresis. MTT assay showed that Zn complex was not cytotoxic in MCF-7 cell line. Here, we introduce a newly synthesized fluorescence probe that can be used for single and double stranded DNA detection in both solution and agarose gels.

  14. Synthesis, Characterization and Fluorescence Properties of Zn(II) and Cu(II) Complexes: DNA Binding Study of Zn(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Lavaee, Parirokh; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Mague, Joel T; Esmaeili, Abbas Ali; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes containing Schiff base, 2- methoxy-6((E)-(phenylimino) methyl) phenol ligand (HL) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The fluorescence properties and quantum yield of zinc complex were studied. Our data showed that Zn complex could bind to DNA grooves with Kb = 10(4) M(-1). Moreover, Zn complex could successfully be used in staining of DNA following agarose gel electrophoresis. MTT assay showed that Zn complex was not cytotoxic in MCF-7 cell line. Here, we introduce a newly synthesized fluorescence probe that can be used for single and double stranded DNA detection in both solution and agarose gels. PMID:26538363

  15. Probing DNA Stiffness through Optical Fluctuation Analysis of Plasmon Rulers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianhong; Hong, Yan; Reinhard, Björn M

    2015-08-12

    The distance-dependent plasmon coupling between biopolymer tethered gold or silver nanoparticles forms the foundation for the so-called plasmon rulers. While conventional plasmon ruler applications focus on the detection of singular events in the far-field spectrum, we perform in this Letter a ratiometric analysis of the continuous spectral fluctuations arising from thermal interparticle separation variations in plasmon rulers confined to fluid lipid membranes. We characterized plasmon rulers with different DNA tethers and demonstrate the ability to detect and quantify differences in the plasmon ruler potential and tether stiffness. The influence of the nature of the tether (single-stranded versus double-stranded DNA) and the length of the tether is analyzed. The characterization of the continuous variation of the interparticle separation in individual plasmon rulers through optical fluctuation analysis provides additional information about the conformational flexibility of the tether molecule(s) located in the confinement of the deeply subdiffraction limit interparticle gap and enhances the versatility of plasmon rulers as a tool in Biophysics and Nanotechnology.

  16. DNA-based digital tension probes reveal integrin forces during early cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Ge, Chenghao; Zhu, Cheng; Salaita, Khalid

    2014-10-01

    Mechanical stimuli profoundly alter cell fate, yet the mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction remain obscure because of a lack of methods for molecular force imaging. Here to address this need, we develop a new class of molecular tension probes that function as a switch to generate a 20- to 30-fold increase in fluorescence upon experiencing a threshold piconewton force. The probes employ immobilized DNA hairpins with tunable force response thresholds, ligands and fluorescence reporters. Quantitative imaging reveals that integrin tension is highly dynamic and increases with an increasing integrin density during adhesion formation. Mixtures of fluorophore-encoded probes show integrin mechanical preference for cyclized RGD over linear RGD peptides. Multiplexed probes with variable guanine-cytosine content within their hairpins reveal integrin preference for the more stable probes at the leading tip of growing adhesions near the cell edge. DNA-based tension probes are among the most sensitive optical force reporters to date, overcoming the force and spatial resolution limitations of traction force microscopy.

  17. Combination probes with intercalating anchors and proximal fluorophores for DNA and RNA detection

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jieqiong; Wilson, Adam; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2016-01-01

    A new class of modified oligonucleotides (combination probes) has been designed and synthesised for use in genetic analysis and RNA detection. Their chemical structure combines an intercalating anchor with a reporter fluorophore on the same thymine nucleobase. The intercalator (thiazole orange or benzothiazole orange) provides an anchor, which upon hybridisation of the probe to its target becomes fluorescent and simultaneously stabilizes the duplex. The anchor is able to communicate via FRET to a proximal reporter dye (e.g. ROX, HEX, ATTO647N, FAM) whose fluorescence signal can be monitored on a range of analytical devices. Direct excitation of the reporter dye provides an alternative signalling mechanism. In both signalling modes, fluorescence in the unhybridised probe is switched off by collisional quenching between adjacent intercalator and reporter dyes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and RNA targets are identified by differences in the duplex melting temperature, and the use of short hybridization probes, made possible by the stabilisation provided by the intercalator, enhances mismatch discrimination. Unlike other fluorogenic probe systems, placing the fluorophore and quencher on the same nucleobase facilitates the design of short probes containing multiple modifications. The ability to detect both DNA and RNA sequences suggests applications in cellular imaging and diagnostics. PMID:27369379

  18. Combination probes with intercalating anchors and proximal fluorophores for DNA and RNA detection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jieqiong; Wilson, Adam; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2016-09-30

    A new class of modified oligonucleotides (combination probes) has been designed and synthesised for use in genetic analysis and RNA detection. Their chemical structure combines an intercalating anchor with a reporter fluorophore on the same thymine nucleobase. The intercalator (thiazole orange or benzothiazole orange) provides an anchor, which upon hybridisation of the probe to its target becomes fluorescent and simultaneously stabilizes the duplex. The anchor is able to communicate via FRET to a proximal reporter dye (e.g. ROX, HEX, ATTO647N, FAM) whose fluorescence signal can be monitored on a range of analytical devices. Direct excitation of the reporter dye provides an alternative signalling mechanism. In both signalling modes, fluorescence in the unhybridised probe is switched off by collisional quenching between adjacent intercalator and reporter dyes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and RNA targets are identified by differences in the duplex melting temperature, and the use of short hybridization probes, made possible by the stabilisation provided by the intercalator, enhances mismatch discrimination. Unlike other fluorogenic probe systems, placing the fluorophore and quencher on the same nucleobase facilitates the design of short probes containing multiple modifications. The ability to detect both DNA and RNA sequences suggests applications in cellular imaging and diagnostics. PMID:27369379

  19. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    PubMed

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  20. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-01-01

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress. PMID:26113155

  1. Mechanism of DNA release from cationic liposome/DNA complexes used in cell transfection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Szoka, F C

    1996-05-01

    To understand how DNA is released from cationic liposome/DNA complexes in cells, we investigated which biomolecules mediate release of DNA from a complex with cationic liposomes. Release from monovalent[1,2-dioleoyl-3(1)-1(trimethylammonio)propane] or multivalent (dioctadecylamidoglycylspermine) lipids was quantified by an increase of ethidium bromide (EtBr) fluorescence. Plasmid sensitivity to DNAse I degradation was examined using changes in plasmid migration on agarose gel electrophoresis. Physical separation of the DNA from the cationic lipid was confirmed and quantified on sucrose density gradients. Anionic liposomes containing compositions that mimic the cytoplasmic-facing monolayer of the plasma membrane (e.g. phosphatidylserine) rapidly released DNA from the complex. Release occurred near a 1/1 charge ratio (-/+) and was unaffected by ionic strength or ion type. Water soluble molecules with a high negative linear charge density such as dextran sulfate or heparin also released DNA. However, ionic water soluble molecules such as ATP, tRNA, DNA, poly(glutamic acid), spermidine, spermine, or histone did not, even at 100-fold charge excess (-/+). On the basis of these results, we propose that after the cationic lipid/DNA complex is internalized into cells by endocytosis it destabilizes the endosomal membrane. Destabilization induces flip-flop of anionic lipids from the cytoplasmic-facing monolayer, which laterally diffuse into the complex and form a charge neutral ion pair with the cationic lipids. This results in displacement of the DNA from the cationic lipid and release of the DNA into cytoplasm. This mechanism accounts for a variety of observations on cationic lipid/DNA complex-cell interactions.

  2. Statistical mechanics of topologically constrained DNA and nucleoprotein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovan, Stefan Michael

    A complex connection exists between the 3 dimensional topological state of DNA in living organisms and biological processes including gene expression, DNA replication, recombination and repair. A significant limitation in developing a detailed, quantitative understanding of this connection is due to a lack of rigorous methods to calculate statistical mechanical properties of DNA molecules with complex topologies, including supercoiling, looping and knotting. This dissertation's main focus is on developing such methods and applying them to realistic DNA and nucleoprotein models. In chapter 2, a method is presented to calculate free energies and J factors of protein mediated DNA loops by normal mode analysis (NMA). This method is similar to calculations performed previously but with several significant advances. We apply the method to the specific case of DNA looping mediated by Cre recombinase protein. J factors calculated by our method are compared to experimental measurements to extract geometric and elastic properties of the Cre-DNA synaptic complex. In particular, the results suggest the existence of a synaptic complex that is more flexible than previously expected and may be explained by a stable intermediate in the reaction pathway that deviates significantly from the planar crystal structure. Calculating free energies of DNA looping is difficult in general, especially when considering intermediate length scales such as plasmid sized DNA which may readily adopt multiple topological states. In chapter 3, a novel method is presented to obtain free energies of semiflexible biopolymers with fixed topologies and arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. High accuracy is demonstrated by calculating free energies of specific DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex

  3. Programmed self-assembly of complex DNA nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Cheng

    DNA has served as an excellent building block to self-assemble into a wide range of one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structures with the bottom-up method. Due to the specificity of base pairing, the DNA assembly system is predictable and robust. These DNA structures with higher diversity and complexity have potential applications as templates to organize guest molecules or nanoparticles for the nanofabrication, as biosensors for the genetic diagnosis and environmental detection, and as nanocarriers to deliver and release drugs for the therapy. My major researches focus on designing a novel building block and assembly strategies to self-assemble DNA into complex nanostructures to increase the diversity and complexity. A novel building block was first constructed, which is a parallel, left-handed DNA helix containing multiple domains of half-turn-long standard B-DNA. Such a structure can be used to introduce left-handed crossings in order to increase the diversity and complexity of DNA nanostructures, and can be taken into consideration when predicting the secondary structure of DNA/RNA molecules in cells. In addition, a tile-based directed self-assembly strategy was developed to construct DNA nanocages. In this strategy, directing building blocks were employed to control the self-assembly process of assembly building blocks. This strategy greatly expands the scope of accessible DNA nanostructures and would facilitate technological applications such as nano-guest encapsulation, drug delivery, and nanoparticle organization. As the complexity of DNA nanostructures increases, more errors might be involved in the assembly process. Therefore, a simplified design system based on T-junction was designed to build DNA arrays and minimize the assembly errors. In such system, due to the sequence symmetry, only one DNA single strand is employed and assembled into predesigned 1D and 2D arrays. This design system can be applied to assemble a

  4. Probing Y-shaped DNA structure with time-resolved FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Lee, Jong Bum; Valappil, Nikesh V.; Luo, Dan; Menon, Vinod M.

    2012-02-01

    Self-assembly based on nucleic acid systems has become highly attractive for bottom-up fabrication of programmable matter due to the highly selective molecular recognition property of biomolecules. In this context, Y-shaped DNA (Y-DNA) provides an effective building block for forming unique self-assembled large-scale architectures. The dimension and growth of the nano- and microstructures depend significantly on the configurational stability of Y-DNA as a building block. Here we present structural studies of Y-DNA systems using a time-resolved FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) technique. A fluorophore (Alexa 488) and an acceptor (DABCYL) were placed at two different ends of Y-DNA, and the lifetime of the fluorophore was measured to probe the relative distance between the donor and acceptor. Our results confirmed different distances between the arms of the Y-DNA and highlighted the overall structural integrity of the Y-DNA system as a leading building block for molecular self-assembly. Temperature dependent lifetime measurements indicated configurational changes in the overall Y-DNA nanoarchitecture above 40 °C.Self-assembly based on nucleic acid systems has become highly attractive for bottom-up fabrication of programmable matter due to the highly selective molecular recognition property of biomolecules. In this context, Y-shaped DNA (Y-DNA) provides an effective building block for forming unique self-assembled large-scale architectures. The dimension and growth of the nano- and microstructures depend significantly on the configurational stability of Y-DNA as a building block. Here we present structural studies of Y-DNA systems using a time-resolved FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) technique. A fluorophore (Alexa 488) and an acceptor (DABCYL) were placed at two different ends of Y-DNA, and the lifetime of the fluorophore was measured to probe the relative distance between the donor and acceptor. Our results confirmed different distances between

  5. DNase-activatable fluorescence probes visualizing the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Shi, Bihua; Zhang, Pengfei; Hu, Dehong; Zheng, Mingbin; Zheng, Cuifang; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2012-03-01

    This work presents a method to visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells using a novel type of activatable fluorescence imaging probe. Deoxyribonuclease (DNase)-activatable fluorescence probes (DFProbes) are composed of double strands deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) which is labeled with fluorophore (ROX or Cy3) and quencher on the end of one of its strands, and stained with SYBR Green I. In the absence of DNase, DFProbes produce the green fluorescence signal of SYBR Green I. In the presence of DNase, SYBR Green I is removed from the DFProbes and the labeled fluorophore is separated from the quencher owing to the degradation of DFProbes by DNase, resulting in the decrease of the green fluorescence signal and the occurrence of a red fluorescence signal due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). DNase in biological samples was detected using DFProbes and the fluorescence imaging in living cells was performed using DFprobe-modified Au nanoparticles. The results show that DFProbes have good responses to DNase, and can clearly visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in cells in real time. The well-designed probes might be useful in tracing the dynamic changes of exogenous DNA and nanocarriers in vitro and in vivo.This work presents a method to visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells using a novel type of activatable fluorescence imaging probe. Deoxyribonuclease (DNase)-activatable fluorescence probes (DFProbes) are composed of double strands deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) which is labeled with fluorophore (ROX or Cy3) and quencher on the end of one of its strands, and stained with SYBR Green I. In the absence of DNase, DFProbes produce the green fluorescence signal of SYBR Green I. In the presence of DNase, SYBR Green I is removed from the DFProbes and the labeled fluorophore is separated from the quencher owing to the degradation of DFProbes by DNase, resulting in the decrease of the green fluorescence signal and the

  6. A universal design for a DNA probe providing ratiometric fluorescence detection by generation of silver nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Vong, Daniel; Pennathur, Sumita; Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    2016-07-01

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the presence of Ag+ ions. The utility of AgNC-MBs has been limited, however, because changing the target binding sequence unpredictably alters cluster fluorescence. Here we show that the original AgNC-MB design depends on bases in the target-binding (loop) domain to stabilize its AgNC. We then rationally alter the design to overcome this limitation. By separating and lengthening the AgNC-stabilizing domain, we create an AgNC-hairpin probe with consistent performance for arbitrary target sequence. This new design supports ratiometric fluorescence measurements of DNA target concentration, thereby providing a more sensitive, responsive and stable signal compared to turn-on AgNC probes. Using the new design, we demonstrate AgNC-MBs with nanomolar sensitivity and singe-nucleotide specificity, expanding the breadth of applicability of these cost-effective probes for biomolecular detection.DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the

  7. Anionic solid lipid nanoparticles supported on protamine/DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jiesheng; Wang, Aihua; Liu, Chunxi; Chen, Zhijin; Zhang, Na

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to design novel anionic ternary nanoparticles for gene delivery. These ternary nanoparticles were equipped with protamine/DNA binary complexes (150-200 nm) as the support, and the anionic formation was achieved by absorption of anionic solid lipid nanoparticles (<=20 nm) onto the surface of the binary complexes. The small solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared by a modified film dispersion-ultrasonication method, and adsorption of the anionic SLNs onto the binary complexes was typically carried out in water via electrostatic interaction. The formulated ternary nanoparticles were found to be relatively uniform in size (257.7 ± 10.6 nm) with a 'bumpy' surface, and the surface charge inversion from 19.28 ± 1.14 mV to -17.16 ± 1.92 mV could be considered as evidence of the formation of the ternary nanoparticles. The fluorescence intensity measurements from three batches of the ternary nanoparticles gave a mean adsorption efficiency of 96.75 ± 1.13%. Circular dichroism spectra analysis showed that the protamine/DNA complexes had been coated by small SLNs, and that the anionic ternary nanoparticles formed did not disturb the construction of the binary complexes. SYBR Green I analysis suggested that the ternary nanoparticles could protect the DNA from nuclease degradation, and cell viability assay results showed that they exhibit lower cytotoxicity to A549 cells compared with the binary complexes and lipofectamine. The transfection efficiency of the ternary nanoparticles was better than that of naked DNA and the binary complexes, and almost equal to that of lipofectamine/DNA complexes, as revealed by inversion fluorescence microscope observation. These results indicated that the anionic ternary nanoparticles could facilitate gene transfer in cultured cells, and might alleviate the drawbacks of the conventional cationic vector/DNA complexes for gene delivery in vivo.

  8. A universal design for a DNA probe providing ratiometric fluorescence detection by generation of silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Vong, Daniel; Pennathur, Sumita; Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    2016-08-14

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the presence of Ag(+) ions. The utility of AgNC-MBs has been limited, however, because changing the target binding sequence unpredictably alters cluster fluorescence. Here we show that the original AgNC-MB design depends on bases in the target-binding (loop) domain to stabilize its AgNC. We then rationally alter the design to overcome this limitation. By separating and lengthening the AgNC-stabilizing domain, we create an AgNC-hairpin probe with consistent performance for arbitrary target sequence. This new design supports ratiometric fluorescence measurements of DNA target concentration, thereby providing a more sensitive, responsive and stable signal compared to turn-on AgNC probes. Using the new design, we demonstrate AgNC-MBs with nanomolar sensitivity and singe-nucleotide specificity, expanding the breadth of applicability of these cost-effective probes for biomolecular detection. PMID:27406901

  9. A universal design for a DNA probe providing ratiometric fluorescence detection by generation of silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Vong, Daniel; Pennathur, Sumita; Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    2016-08-14

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the presence of Ag(+) ions. The utility of AgNC-MBs has been limited, however, because changing the target binding sequence unpredictably alters cluster fluorescence. Here we show that the original AgNC-MB design depends on bases in the target-binding (loop) domain to stabilize its AgNC. We then rationally alter the design to overcome this limitation. By separating and lengthening the AgNC-stabilizing domain, we create an AgNC-hairpin probe with consistent performance for arbitrary target sequence. This new design supports ratiometric fluorescence measurements of DNA target concentration, thereby providing a more sensitive, responsive and stable signal compared to turn-on AgNC probes. Using the new design, we demonstrate AgNC-MBs with nanomolar sensitivity and singe-nucleotide specificity, expanding the breadth of applicability of these cost-effective probes for biomolecular detection.

  10. Structure of Cationic Liposome DNA Complexes Incorporating PEG Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Kathrin; Subramanian, G.; Safinya, C. R.

    1998-03-01

    DNA cationic liposome complexes with PEG lipids are promising candidates for efficient transfection of DNA in vivo. The presence of PEG confers (a) colloidal stability and (b) increased circulation time of the complexes in the blood stream leading to long term transfection activity. However, there has been no elucidation of the structure of these complexes which is crucial for correlating the structure and transfection efficiency. We have carried out a systematic structural investigation of complexes incorporating PEG lipids using X-ray scattering. We have studied the structure of complexes made from DOTAP (a cationic lipid), DOPC (a neutral lipid), PEG-DMPE and λ-DNA both as a function of the PEG-DMPE and neutral lipid concentrations. We have produced stable complexes which form a multilamellar structure with alternating lipid bilayers and DNA molecules. The DNA molecules are ordered in a 2-D smectic array whose spacing is controlled by the concentrations of PEG-DMPE and the neutral lipid. Supported by NSF-DMR-9624091, PRF-31352-AC7, and Los Alamos-STB/UC:96-108.

  11. DNA with Damage in Both Strands as Affinity Probes and Nucleotide Excision Repair Substrates.

    PubMed

    Lukyanchikova, N V; Petruseva, I O; Evdokimov, A N; Silnikov, V N; Lavrik, O I

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multistep process of recognition and elimination of a wide spectrum of damages that cause significant distortions in DNA structure, such as UV-induced damage and bulky chemical adducts. A series of model DNAs containing new bulky fluoro-azidobenzoyl photoactive lesion dC(FAB) and well-recognized nonnucleoside lesions nFlu and nAnt have been designed and their interaction with repair proteins investigated. We demonstrate that modified DNA duplexes dC(FAB)/dG (probe I), dC(FAB)/nFlu+4 (probe II), and dC(FAB)/nFlu-3 (probe III) have increased (as compared to unmodified DNA, umDNA) structure-dependent affinity for XPC-HR23B (Kdum > KdI > KdII ≈ KdIII) and differentially crosslink to XPC and proteins of NER-competent extracts. The presence of dC(FAB) results in (i) decreased melting temperature (ΔTm = -3°C) and (ii) 12° DNA bending. The extended dC(FAB)/dG-DNA (137 bp) was demonstrated to be an effective NER substrate. Lack of correlation between the affinity to XPC-HR23B and substrate properties of the model DNA suggests a high impact of the verification stage on the overall NER process. In addition, DNAs containing closely positioned, well-recognized lesions in the complementary strands represent hardly repairable (dC(FAB)/nFlu+4, dC(FAB)/nFlu-3) or irreparable (nFlu/nFlu+4, nFlu/nFlu-3, nAnt/nFlu+4, nAnt/nFlu-3) structures. Our data provide evidence that the NER system of higher eukaryotes recognizes and eliminates damaged DNA fragments on a multi-criterion basis. PMID:27262196

  12. Scanning probe microscopy investigation of complex-oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Feng

    Advances in the growth of precisely tailored complex-oxide heterostructures have led to new emergent behavior and associated discoveries. One of the most successful examples consists of an ultrathin layer of LaAlO 3 (LAO) deposited on TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 (STO), where a high mobility quasi-two dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) is formed at the interface. Such 2DEL demonstrates a variety of novel properties, including field tunable metal-insulator transition, superconductivity, strong spin-orbit coupling, magnetic and ferroelectric like behavior. Particularly, for 3-unit-cell (3 u.c.) LAO/STO heterostructures, it was demonstrated that a conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) tip can be used to "write" or "erase" nanoscale conducting channels at the interface, making LAO/STO a highly flexible platform to fabricate novel nanoelectronics. This thesis is focused on scanning probe microscopy studies of LAO/STO properties. We investigate the mechanism of c-AFM lithography over 3 u.c. LAO/STO in controlled ambient conditions by using a vacuum AFM, and find that the water molecules dissociated on the LAO surface play a critical role during the c-AFM lithography process. We also perform electro-mechanical response measurements over top-gated LAO/STO devices. Simultaneous piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and capacitance measurements reveal a correlation between LAO lattice distortion and interfacial carrier density, which suggests that PFM could not only serve as a powerful tool to map the carrier density at the interface but also provide insight into previously reported frequency dependence of capacitance enhancement of top-gated LAO/STO structures. To study magnetism at the LAO/STO interface, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and magnetoelectric force microscopy (MeFM) are carried out to search for magnetic signatures that depend on the carrier density at the interface. Results demonstrate an electronicallycontrolled ferromagnetic phase on top-gated LAO

  13. Molecular detection of bacterial pathogens using microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Mach, Kathleen E; Mohan, Ruchika; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-08-15

    Rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens is essential toward clinical management of infectious diseases. Traditional approaches for pathogen detection, however, often require time-intensive bacterial culture and amplification procedures. Herein, a microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probe is demonstrated for rapid species-specific detection of bacterial 16S rRNA. In this molecular assay, the binding of the target sequence to the fluorophore conjugated probe thermodynamically displaces the quencher probe and allows the fluorophore to fluoresce. By incorporation of streptavidin-coated microparticles to localize the biotinylated probes, the sensitivity of the assay can be improved by 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection of the assay is as few as eight bacteria without target amplification and is highly specific against other common pathogens. Its applicability toward clinical diagnostics is demonstrated by directly identifying bacterial pathogens in urine samples from patients with urinary tract infections.

  14. DNA binding activity of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer probed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, So Young; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Kim, Doseok

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is believed to be a major player in the photo-signal transduction cascade, which is triggered by Anabaena sensory rhodopsin. Here, we characterized DNA binding activity of ASRT probed by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We observed clear decrease of diffusion coefficient of DNA upon binding of ASRT. The dissociation constant, K(D), of ASRT to 20 bp-long DNA fragments lied in micro-molar range and varied moderately with DNA sequence. Our results suggest that ASRT may interact with several different regions of DNA with different binding affinity for global regulation of several genes that need to be activated depending on the light illumination.

  15. Molecular beacon probes for the detection of cisplatin-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Shire, Zahra J; Loppnow, Glen R

    2012-04-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)) causes crosslinking of DNA at AG and GG sites in cellular DNA, inhibiting replication, and making it a useful anti-cancer drug. Several techniques have been used previously to detect nucleic acid damage but most of these tools are labour-intensive, time-consuming, and/or expensive. Here, we describe a sensitive, robust, and quantitative tool for detecting cisplatin-induced DNA damage by using fluorescent molecular beacon probes (MB). Our results show a decrease of fluorescence in the presence of cisplatin-induced DNA damage, confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The decrease in fluorescence upon damage scales with the number of AG and GG sites, indicating the ability of MB to quantitatively detect DNA damage by cisplatin.

  16. The isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA based on a double-stranded fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Shang, Fanjin; Pan, Mei; Liu, Sen; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-06-15

    Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) based on double-stranded fluorescence probe (ds-probe). Target dsDNA repeatedly generated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with polymerase and nicking enzyme. The ds-probe as a primer hybridized with ssDNA and extended to its 5'-end. The displaced ssDNA served as a new detection target to initiate above-described reaction. Meanwhile, the extended ds-probe could dynamically dissociate from ssDNA and self-hybridize, converting into a turn-back structure to initiate another amplification reaction. In particular, the ds-probe played a key role in the entire experimental process, which not only was as a primer but also produced the fluorescent signal by an extension and displacement reaction. Our method could detect the pBluescript II KS(+) plasmid with a detection limit of 2.3 amol, and it was also verified to exhibit a high specificity, even one-base mismatch. Overall, it was a true isothermal dsDNA detection strategy with a strongly anti-jamming capacity and one-pot, only requiring one ds-probe, which greatly reduced the cost and the probability of contamination. With its advantages, the approach of dsDNA detection will offer a promising tool in the field of point-of-care testing (POCT).

  17. The isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA based on a double-stranded fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Shang, Fanjin; Pan, Mei; Liu, Sen; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-06-15

    Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) based on double-stranded fluorescence probe (ds-probe). Target dsDNA repeatedly generated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with polymerase and nicking enzyme. The ds-probe as a primer hybridized with ssDNA and extended to its 5'-end. The displaced ssDNA served as a new detection target to initiate above-described reaction. Meanwhile, the extended ds-probe could dynamically dissociate from ssDNA and self-hybridize, converting into a turn-back structure to initiate another amplification reaction. In particular, the ds-probe played a key role in the entire experimental process, which not only was as a primer but also produced the fluorescent signal by an extension and displacement reaction. Our method could detect the pBluescript II KS(+) plasmid with a detection limit of 2.3 amol, and it was also verified to exhibit a high specificity, even one-base mismatch. Overall, it was a true isothermal dsDNA detection strategy with a strongly anti-jamming capacity and one-pot, only requiring one ds-probe, which greatly reduced the cost and the probability of contamination. With its advantages, the approach of dsDNA detection will offer a promising tool in the field of point-of-care testing (POCT). PMID:26803414

  18. Probing the kinetic landscape of Hox transcription factor-DNA binding in live cells by massively parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Krmpot, Aleksandar J; Nikolić, Stanko N; Krautz, Robert; Terenius, Lars; Tomancak, Pavel; Rigler, Rudolf; Gehring, Walter J; Vukojević, Vladana

    2015-11-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that control the formation of body structures, segment-specifically along the anterior-posterior axis of metazoans. Hox transcription factors bind nuclear DNA pervasively and regulate a plethora of target genes, deploying various molecular mechanisms that depend on the developmental and cellular context. To analyze quantitatively the dynamics of their DNA-binding behavior we have used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), single-point fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). We show that the Hox transcription factor Sex combs reduced (Scr) forms dimers that strongly associate with its specific fork head binding site (fkh250) in live salivary gland cell nuclei. In contrast, dimers of a constitutively inactive, phospho-mimicking variant of Scr show weak, non-specific DNA-binding. Our studies reveal that nuclear dynamics of Scr is complex, exhibiting a changing landscape of interactions that is difficult to characterize by probing one point at a time. Therefore, we also provide mechanistic evidence using massively parallel FCS (mpFCS). We found that Scr dimers are predominantly formed on the DNA and are equally abundant at the chromosomes and an introduced multimeric fkh250 binding-site, indicating different mobilities, presumably reflecting transient binding with different affinities on the DNA. Our proof-of-principle results emphasize the advantages of mpFCS for quantitative characterization of fast dynamic processes in live cells.

  19. Electrochemical spectroscopic investigations on the interaction of an ytterbium complex with DNA and their analytical applications such as biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ilkhani, Hoda; Ganjali, Mohamad Reza; Arvand, Majid; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid; Azimi, Fateme; Norouzi, Parviz

    2011-12-01

    Metal ion-DNA interactions are important in nature, often changing the genetic material's structure and function. A new Yb complex of YbCl(3) (tris(8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid) ytterbium) was synthesized and utilized as an electrochemical indicator for the detection of DNA oligonucleotide based on its interaction with Yb(QS)(3). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to investigate the interaction of Yb(QS)(3) with ds-DNA. It was revealed that Yb(QS)(3) presented an excellent electrochemical activity on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and could intercalate into the double helix of double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA). The binding mechanism of interaction was elucidated on glassy carbon electrode dipped in DNA solution and DNA modified carbon paste electrode by using differential pulse voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry. The binding ratio between this complex and ds-DNA was calculated to be 1:1. The extent of hybridization was evaluated on the basis of the difference between signals of Yb(QS)(3) with probe DNA before and after hybridization with complementary DNA. With this approach, this DNA could be quantified over the range from 1 × 10(-8) to 1.1 × 10(-7)M. The interaction mode between Yb(QS)(3) and DNA was found to be mainly intercalative interaction. These results were confirmed with fluorescence experiments.

  20. DNA release from cationic liposome/DNA complexes by anionic lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Pozzi, Daniela; Caminiti, Ruggero; Marchini, Cristina; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2006-12-01

    The authors found that recently developed multicomponent cationic liposome DNA complexes (lipoplexes) exhibit higher transfection efficiency with respect to usually employed binary lipoplexes in NIH 3T3 and A17 cell lines. Interaction of lipoplexes with anionic liposomes (model of cellular membranes) was investigated by synchrotron small angle x-ray diffraction. The authors used one-dimensional DNA packing density to estimate the molar fraction of DNA released from lipoplexes by anionic lipids.

  1. A novel Dual Probe Complex Trial Protocol for detection of concealed information.

    PubMed

    Labkovsky, Elena; Rosenfeld, J Peter

    2014-11-01

    In simply guilty (SG), countermeasure-using guilty (CM), and innocent (IN) subjects, a new concealed information test, the P300-based Dual Probe Complex Trial Protocol was tested in a mock crime scenario. It combines an oddball protocol with two stimuli (probe, irrelevant) and another with three stimuli (probe, irrelevant, target) into one trial, doubling detected mock crime information per unit time, compared to previous protocols. Probe-irrelevant amplitude differences were significant in SG and CM, but not IN subjects. On a measure from both two and three stimulus protocol parts of the Dual Probe Complex Trial Protocol trial, accuracy was 94.7% (based on a .9 bootstrap criterion). The criterion-independent area (AUC) under the receiver operating characteristic (from signal detection theory) measuring SG and CM versus IN discriminability averaged .92 (in a range of 0.5-1.0). Countermeasures enhanced irrelevant (not probe) P300s in CM groups. PMID:24981064

  2. Crystal Structure of the Vaccinia Virus Uracil-DNA Glycosylase in Complex with DNA.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Wim P; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Fender, Pascal; Contesto-Richefeu, Céline; Peyrefitte, Christophe N; Iseni, Frédéric

    2015-07-17

    Vaccinia virus polymerase holoenzyme is composed of the DNA polymerase catalytic subunit E9 associated with its heterodimeric co-factor A20·D4 required for processive genome synthesis. Although A20 has no known enzymatic activity, D4 is an active uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG). The presence of a repair enzyme as a component of the viral replication machinery suggests that, for poxviruses, DNA synthesis and base excision repair is coupled. We present the 2.7 Å crystal structure of the complex formed by D4 and the first 50 amino acids of A20 (D4·A201-50) bound to a 10-mer DNA duplex containing an abasic site resulting from the cleavage of a uracil base. Comparison of the viral complex with its human counterpart revealed major divergences in the contacts between protein and DNA and in the enzyme orientation on the DNA. However, the conformation of the dsDNA within both structures is very similar, suggesting a dominant role of the DNA conformation for UNG function. In contrast to human UNG, D4 appears rigid, and we do not observe a conformational change upon DNA binding. We also studied the interaction of D4·A201-50 with different DNA oligomers by surface plasmon resonance. D4 binds weakly to nonspecific DNA and to uracil-containing substrates but binds abasic sites with a Kd of <1.4 μm. This second DNA complex structure of a family I UNG gives new insight into the role of D4 as a co-factor of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase and allows a better understanding of the structural determinants required for UNG action.

  3. DNA twisting flexibility and the formation of sharply looped protein-DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, T. E.; Widom, J.

    2005-03-01

    Gene-regulatory complexes often require that pairs of DNA-bound proteins interact by looping-out short (often 100-bp) stretches of DNA. The loops can vary in detailed length and sequence and, thus, in total helical twist, which radically alters their geometry. How this variability is accommodated structurally is not known. Here we show that the inherent twistability of 89- to 105-bp DNA circles exceeds theoretical expectation by up to 400-fold. These results can be explained only by greatly enhanced DNA flexibility, not by permanent bends. They invalidate the use of classic theories of flexibility for understanding sharp DNA looping but support predictions of two recent theories. Our findings imply an active role for DNA flexibility in loop formation and suggest that variability in the detailed helical twist of regulatory loops is accommodated naturally by the inherent twistability of the DNA. activation | gene regulation | repression

  4. Effectiveness, against tuberculosis, of pseudo-ternary complexes: peptide-DNA-cationic liposome.

    PubMed

    Rosada, Rogério Silva; Silva, Célio Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade; Nakaie, Clóvis Ryuichi; de la Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2012-05-01

    We report the effects of a synthetic peptide designed to act as a nuclear localization signal on the treatment of tuberculosis. The peptide contains 21 amino acid residues with the following specific domains: nuclear localization signal from SV 40T, cationic shuttle sequence, and cysteamide group at the C-terminus. The peptide was complexed with the plasmid DNAhsp65 and incorporated into cationic liposomes, forming a pseudo-ternary complex. The same cationic liposomes, composed of egg chicken L-α-phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (2:1:1M), were previously evaluated as a gene carrier for tuberculosis immunization protocols with DNAhsp65. The pseudo-ternary complex presented a controlled size (250 nm), spherical-like shape, and various lamellae in liposomes as evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. An assay of fluorescence probe accessibility confirmed insertion of the peptide/DNA into the liposome structure. Peptide addition conferred no cytotoxicity in vitro, and similar therapeutic effects against tuberculosis were seen with four times less DNA compared with naked DNA treatment. Taken together, the results indicate that the pseudo-ternary complex is a promising gene vaccine for tuberculosis treatment. This work contributes to the development of multifunctional nanostructures in the search for strategies for in vivo DNA delivery. PMID:21999959

  5. Structure determination of uracil-DNA N-glycosylase from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with DNA.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Hege Lynum; Johnson, Kenneth A; McVey, Colin E; Leiros, Ingar; Moe, Elin

    2015-10-01

    Uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) is a DNA-repair enzyme in the base-excision repair (BER) pathway which removes uracil from DNA. Here, the crystal structure of UNG from the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans (DrUNG) in complex with DNA is reported at a resolution of 1.35 Å. Prior to the crystallization experiments, the affinity between DrUNG and different DNA oligonucleotides was tested by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). As a result of this analysis, two 16 nt double-stranded DNAs were chosen for the co-crystallization experiments, one of which (16 nt AU) resulted in well diffracting crystals. The DNA in the co-crystal structure contained an abasic site (substrate product) flipped into the active site of the enzyme, with no uracil in the active-site pocket. Despite the high resolution, it was not possible to fit all of the terminal nucleotides of the DNA complex into electron density owing to disorder caused by a lack of stabilizing interactions. However, the DNA which was in contact with the enzyme, close to the active site, was well ordered and allowed detailed analysis of the enzyme-DNA interaction. The complex revealed that the interaction between DrUNG and DNA is similar to that in the previously determined crystal structure of human UNG (hUNG) in complex with DNA [Slupphaug et al. (1996). Nature (London), 384, 87-92]. Substitutions in a (here defined) variable part of the leucine loop result in a shorter loop (eight residues instead of nine) in DrUNG compared with hUNG; regardless of this, it seems to fulfil its role and generate a stabilizing force with the minor groove upon flipping out of the damaged base into the active site. The structure also provides a rationale for the previously observed high catalytic efficiency of DrUNG caused by high substrate affinity by demonstrating an increased number of long-range electrostatic interactions between the enzyme and the DNA. Interestingly, specific interactions between residues

  6. Nanopore-based DNA-probe sequence-evolution method unveiling characteristics of protein-DNA binding phenomena in a nanoscale confined space.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nannan; Yang, Zekun; Lou, Xiaoding; Wei, Benmei; Zhang, Juntao; Gao, Pengcheng; Hou, Ruizuo; Xia, Fan

    2015-04-01

    Almost all of the important functions of DNA are realized by proteins which interact with specific DNA, which actually happens in a limited space. However, most of the studies about the protein-DNA binding are in an unconfined space. Here, we propose a new method, nanopore-based DNA-probe sequence-evolution (NDPSE), which includes up to 6 different DNA-probe systems successively designed in a nanoscale confined space which unveil the more realistic characteristics of protein-DNA binding phenomena. There are several features; for example, first, the edge-hindrance and core-hindrance contribute differently for the binding events, and second, there is an equilibrium between protein-DNA binding and DNA-DNA hybridization.

  7. DNA packing in stable lipid complexes designed for gene transfer imitates DNA compaction in bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Schmutz, M.; Durand, D.; Debin, A.; Palvadeau, Y.; Etienne, A.; Thierry, A. R.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of complexes made from DNA and suitable lipids (lipoplex, Lx) was examined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM). We observed a distinct concentric ring-like pattern with striated shells when using plasmid DNA. These spherical multilamellar particles have a mean diameter of 254 nm with repetitive spacing of 7.5 nm with striation of 5.3 nm width. Small angle x-ray scattering revealed repetitive ordering of 6.9 nm, suggesting a lamellar structure containing at least 12 layers. This concentric and lamellar structure with different packing regimes also was observed by cryoEM when using linear double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and oligodeoxynucleotides. DNA chains could be visualized in DNA/lipid complexes. Such specific supramolecular organization is the result of thermodynamic forces, which cause compaction to occur through concentric winding of DNA in a liquid crystalline phase. CryoEM examination of T4 phage DNA packed either in T4 capsides or in lipidic particles showed similar patterns. Small angle x-ray scattering suggested an hexagonal phase in Lx-T4 DNA. Our results indicate that both lamellar and hexagonal phases may coexist in the same Lx preparation or particle and that transition between both phases may depend on equilibrium influenced by type and length of the DNA used. PMID:10535915

  8. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  9. Condensation of nonstochiometric DNA/polycation complexes by divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Budker, Vladimir; Trubetskoy, Vladimir; Wolff, Jon A

    2006-12-15

    This study found that divalent cations induced the further condensation of partially condensed DNA within nonstochiometric polycation complexes. The addition of a few mmol of a divalent cation such as calcium reduced by half the inflection point at which DNA became fully condensed by poly-L-lysine (PLL) and a variety of other polycations. The effect on DNA condensation was initially observed using a new method, which is based on the concentration-dependent self-quenching of fluorescent moieties (e.g., rhodamine) covalently linked to the DNA backbone at relatively high densities. Additional analyses, which employed ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, agarose gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy, confirmed the effect of divalent cations. These results provide an additional accounting of the process by which divalent cations induce greater chromatin compaction that is based on the representation of chromatin fibers as a nonstoichiometric polyelectrolyte complex. They also offer a new approach to assemble nonviral vectors for gene therapy.

  10. Local THz time domain spectroscopy of duplex DNA via fluorescence of an embedded probe.

    PubMed

    Dallmann, André; Pfaffe, Matthias; Mügge, Clemens; Mahrwald, Rainer; Kovalenko, Sergey A; Ernsting, Nikolaus P

    2009-11-26

    We demonstrate that THz vibrational activity of a biopolymer can be measured locally, on the effective length scale for polar solvation, with an embedded molecular probe. For this purpose, the polarity probe 2-hydroxy-7-nitrofluorene was linked into a 13mer DNA duplex opposite an abasic site. The NMR solution structure shows that the fluorene moiety occupies a well-defined position in place of a base pair but can flip around the long axis on a millisecond time scale. Femtosecond optical pump-probe experiments are used to measure the time-resolved Stokes shift of emission from the probe. The dynamic shifts for solution in H(2)O and D(2)O are quantified. Their difference is much larger than that expected for free water, implying that only bound water is observed. A weak 26 cm(-1) spectral oscillation of the emission band is observed, which is not present when the probe is free in solution and is therefore caused by the supramolecular structure (DNA and hydration water). PMID:19764701

  11. Folding complex DNA nanostructures from limited sets of reusable sequences

    PubMed Central

    Niekamp, Stefan; Blumer, Katy; Nafisi, Parsa M.; Tsui, Kathy; Garbutt, John; Douglas, Shawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Scalable production of DNA nanostructures remains a substantial obstacle to realizing new applications of DNA nanotechnology. Typical DNA nanostructures comprise hundreds of DNA oligonucleotide strands, where each unique strand requires a separate synthesis step. New design methods that reduce the strand count for a given shape while maintaining overall size and complexity would be highly beneficial for efficiently producing DNA nanostructures. Here, we report a method for folding a custom template strand by binding individual staple sequences to multiple locations on the template. We built several nanostructures for well-controlled testing of various design rules, and demonstrate folding of a 6-kb template by as few as 10 unique strand sequences binding to 10 ± 2 locations on the template strand. PMID:27036861

  12. DNA-Cationic Lipid Complexes: Lamellar and Inverted Hexagonal Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltover, I.; Salditt, T.; Raedler, J.; Safinya, C.

    1998-03-01

    Cationic lipid-DNA (CL-DNA) complexes can be efficient non-viral vectors for gene therapy. However, it is not known why transfection rates vary widely for complexes with different lipid compositions. We have discovered a transition between two distinct liquid crystalline (LC) structures of the complex by varying the lipid composition: a lamellar structure ( J. Raedler, I. Koltover, T. Salditt, C. Safinya, Science 275, 810 (1997)) and a novel LC phase with DNA double-strands surrounded by lipid monolayers arranged on a regular hexagonal lattice. The CL-DNA complexes with the two structures interact differently with giant negatively charged liposomes, which represent the simplest model of cellular membranes. We demonstrate the generality of the lamellar-hexagonal transformation by observing it in complexes of cationic lipid with two other negatively charged biopolymers - polyglutamic acid (PGA), a model polypeptide and poly-thymine (polyT), a model single-stranded oligo-nucleotide. We identify the interactions leading to the transformations between the two complex phases for the three different polyelectrolytes. Supported by NSF DMR-9624091 and a Los Alamos CULAR grant No.STB/UC:95-146.

  13. Light scattering from metal sol labels on high-density DNA probe arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trulson, Mark O.; Walton, Ian D.; Suseno, Audrey D.; Matsuzaki, Hajime; Stern, David

    1998-04-01

    We have been exploring the use of light scattering as a means to detect the binding of nucleic acids to high density DNA probe arrays. Initial work has concentrated on the use of 100 nanometer gold particles conjugated to monoclonal antibodies. A probe array scanner that utilizes an arc lamp source and a `photocopier grade' linear CCD detector has been developed. The optical configuration of the scanner maximizes dynamic range and minimizes optical backgrounds. Initial development of light scattering detection for the p53 cancer gene application shows that functional performance may be obtained that is essentially equivalent to existing fluorescence detection methodology.

  14. An osmium-DNA interstrand complex: application to facile DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuo; Tainaka, Kazuki; Umemoto, Tadashi; Nomura, Akiko; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2007-11-21

    Nucleic acids often acquire new functions by forming a variety of complexes with metal ions. Osmium, in an oxidized state, also reacts with C5-methylated pyrimidines. However, control of the sequence specificity of osmium complexation with DNA is still immature, and the value of the resulting complexes is unknown. We have designed a bipyridine-attached adenine derivative for sequence-specific osmium complexation. Sequence-specific osmium complexation was achieved by hybridization of a short DNA molecule containing this functional nucleotide to a target DNA sequence and resulted in the formation of a cross-linked structure. The interstrand cross-link clearly distinguished methylated cytosines from unmethylated cytosines and was used to quantify the degree of methylation at a specific cytosine in the genome.

  15. LL37-DNA complexes and auto-immune diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Fan; Sanders, Lori K.; Xian, Wujing; Gilliet, Michel; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Department of Immunology, University of Texas, Houston Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    LL37 is an alpha-helical host defense peptide in humans. Recent work has shown that Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9), an intracellular receptor in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) of the immune system that normally responds to pathogen nucleic acids, can be pathologically triggered by self DNA in the form of DNA-LL37 complexes. Synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements reveal an unanticipated form of self-assembly between DNA and this positively charged macroion. We examine the generality of this with other macroions, and propose a new geometric criterion for immune cell activation.

  16. Physical properties of inner histone-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, P N; Wright, E B; Hsie, M H; Olins, A L; Olins, D E

    1978-01-01

    Chicken-erythrocyte inner histone tetramer has been complexed with several natural and synthetic DNA duplexes by salt-gradient dialysis at various protein/DNA ratios. The resulting complexes, in low-ionic-strength buffer, have been examined by electron microscopy, circular dichroism, and thermal denaturation. Electron microscopy reveals nucleosomes (nu bodies) randomly arranged along DNA fibers, including poly(dA-dT)-poly(dA-dT), poly(dI-dC)-poly(dI-dC), but not poly(dA)-poly(dT). Circular dichroism studies showed prominent histone alpha-helix and "suppression" of nucleic acid ellipticity (lambda less than 240 nm). Thermal denaturation experiments revealed Tm behavior comparable to that of H1- (or H5-) depleted chromatin. Tm III and Tm IV increased linearly with G + C%(natural DNAs), but were virtually independent of the histone/DNA ratio; therefore, the melting of nucleosomes along a DNA chain is insensitive to adjacent "spacer" DNA lengths. This suggests that Tm III and Tm IV arise from the melting of different domains of DNA associated with the core nu body. Images PMID:214760

  17. Application of Anomalous Diffraction Methods to the Study of DNA and DNA-Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Derrick; Moulaei, Tinoush; Komeda, Seiji; Williams, Loren Dean

    2012-01-24

    Anomalous scattering is commonly used to solve X-ray structures. As discussed here, anomalous scattering is also useful for characterizing complex systems with mixed and partial occupancies, where true electron density is represented by unresolvable ensemble averages. The solvent environment surrounding nucleic acids is an example of such a system, as are some DNA-ligand systems. The atomic number and wavelength dependencies of anomalous scattering allow one to filter out the electron densities of C, N, and O, and to cleanly visualize the electron densities of heavier atoms. Therefore, anomalous scattering can make beacons of selected atoms. In addition, anomalous scattering provides a model-independent method for determining atomic identities. Here, we describe applications of anomalous scattering to the structure determination of DNA-platinum complexes and in cation associations of free DNA, of DNA-anthracycline complexes, of chemically modified DNA, and of DNA-protein complexes. The utility of Rb{sup +} and Tl{sup +} as K{sup +} substitutes is supported by similarities in Rb{sup +} and Tl{sup +} association with DNA.

  18. Intrinsic Dynamics of DNA-Polymer Complexes: a Mechanism for DNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Prevette, Lisa E.; Nikolova, Evgenia N.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of genetic material into cells using non-viral vectors offers unique potential for therapeutics; however, the efficacy of delivery depends upon a poorly understood, multistep pathway, limiting the prospects for successful gene delivery. Mechanistic insight into DNA association and release has been hampered by a lack of atomic resolution structural and dynamic information for DNA-polymer complexes (polyplexes). Here, we report a dendrimer-based polyplex system containing poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) arms that is suitable for atomic-level characterization by solution NMR spectroscopy. NMR chemical shift, linewidth, and proton transverse relaxation rate measurements reveal that free and dendrimer-bound polyplex DNA exchange rapidly relative to the NMR timescale (< millisecond). The dendrimers retain a high degree of mobility in the polyplex, whereas the DNA shows restrained mobility, suggesting that the polyplex is a highly dynamic complex with a rapidly exchanging dendrimer atmosphere around a more rigid DNA framework. PMID:22823140

  19. Bioinformatic Tools Identify Chromosome-Specific DNA Probes and Facilitate Risk Assessment by Detecting Aneusomies in Extra-embryonic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Jingly F; Wang, Mei; Kassabian, Haig J; Polyzos, Aris A; Baumgartner, Adolf; O’Brien, Benjamin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G

    2012-01-01

    Despite their non-diseased nature, healthy human tissues may show a surprisingly large fraction of aneusomic or aneuploid cells. We have shown previously that hybridization of three to six non-isotopically labeled, chromosome-specific DNA probes reveals different proportions of aneuploid cells in individual compartments of the human placenta and the uterine wall. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that human invasive cytotrophoblasts isolated from anchoring villi or the uterine wall had gained individual chromosomes. Chromosome losses in placental or uterine tissues, on the other hand, were detected infrequently. A more thorough numerical analysis of all possible aneusomies occurring in these tissues and the investigation of their spatial as well as temporal distribution would further our understanding of the underlying biology, but it is hampered by the high cost of and limited access to DNA probes. Furthermore, multiplexing assays are difficult to set up with commercially available probes due to limited choices of probe labels. Many laboratories therefore attempt to develop their own DNA probe sets, often duplicating cloning and screening efforts underway elsewhere. In this review, we discuss the conventional approaches to the preparation of chromosome-specific DNA probes followed by a description of our approach using state-of-the-art bioinformatics and molecular biology tools for probe identification and manufacture. Novel probes that target gonosomes as well as two autosomes are presented as examples of rapid and inexpensive preparation of highly specific DNA probes for applications in placenta research and perinatal diagnostics. PMID:23450259

  20. Sex typing of forensic DNA samples using male- and female-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Naito, E; Dewa, K; Yamanouchi, H; Kominami, R

    1994-07-01

    Forensic DNA samples have been examined to ascertain the feasibility of a sex-typing procedure that we have recently developed. This uses two sets of primers complementary to the DXZ4 and SRY genes for polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR target in the DXZ4, an 80-bp sequence within the 130-bp fragment specific to females, is generated from inactive chromosome X by the DNA digestion with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme, HpaII. Therefore, the DXZ4 amplification and subsequent agarose gel electrophoresis detect the 80-bp fragment from female DNA. On the other hand, the SRY probe identifies a male-specific sequence on chromosome Y. Testing DNAs from fresh Turner's blood and from postmortem tissues exhibited band-signals confirming the sex identification. Degraded DNAs isolated from severely decomposed specimens were also identifiable when high-molecular-weight DNA was isolated before the assay. This demonstrates the usefulness of this method in forensic identification.

  1. Visualization of DNA and protein-DNA complexes with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Gall, Alexander A; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S

    2014-01-01

    This article describes sample preparation techniques for AFM imaging of DNA and protein-DNA complexes. The approach is based on chemical functionalization of the mica surface with aminopropyl silatrane (APS) to yield an APS-mica surface. This surface binds nucleic acids and nucleoprotein complexes in a wide range of ionic strengths, in the absence of divalent cations, and in a broad range of pH. The chapter describes the methodologies for the preparation of APS-mica surfaces and the preparation of samples for AFM imaging. The protocol for synthesis and purification of APS is also provided. The AFM applications are illustrated with examples of images of DNA and protein-DNA complexes.

  2. Visualization of DNA and Protein-DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Gall, Alexander A.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes sample preparation techniques for AFM imaging of DNA and protein–DNA complexes. The approach is based on chemical functionalization of the mica surface with aminopropyl silatrane (APS) to yield an APS-mica surface. This surface binds nucleic acids and nucleoprotein complexes in a wide range of ionic strengths, in the absence of divalent cations, and in a broad range of pH. The chapter describes the methodologies for the preparation of APS-mica surfaces and the preparation of samples for AFM imaging. The protocol for synthesis and purifi cation of APS is also provided. The AFM applications are illustrated with examples of images of DNA and protein–DNA complexes. PMID:24357372

  3. Design and Fabrication of Nanostructures Based on DNA Ring-Protein Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Hideki; Endo, Tatsuro; Yanagida, Yasuko; Hatsuzawa, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    In this report, we describe the design and fabrication of DNA nanostructures (“DNA glasses”, “DNA serial rings”, and “DNA chains”) using DNA ring-protein complexes. An experiment was performed to fabricate DNA ring-conjugated biotin using two types of DNA (“vector DNA” and “insert DNA”). The vector DNA was obtained by cutting plasmid DNA with restriction enzymes. The insert DNA (DNA conjugated with biotin) was obtained using a DNA synthesizer. After ligation and the introduction of streptavidin-modified gold nanoparticles, DNA structures were obtained. Subsequently, the DNA structures were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  4. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods from complex phototrophic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ferrera, Isabel; Massana, Ramon; Balagué, Vanessa; Pedrós-Alió, Carles; Sánchez, Olga; Mas, Jordi

    2010-04-01

    Phototrophic biofilms are used in a variety of biotechnological and industrial processes. Understanding their structure, ie microbial composition, is a necessary step for understanding their function and, ultimately, for the success of their application. DNA analysis methods can be used to obtain information on the taxonomic composition and relative abundance of the biofilm members. The potential bias introduced by DNA extraction methods in the study of the diversity of a complex phototrophic sulfide-oxidizing biofilm was examined. The efficiency of eight different DNA extraction methods combining physical, mechanical and chemical procedures was assessed. Methods were compared in terms of extraction efficiency, measured by DNA quantification, and detectable diversity (16S rRNA genes recovered), evaluated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Significant differences were found in DNA yields ranging from 116 +/- 12 to 1893 +/- 96 ng of DNA. The different DGGE fingerprints ranged from 7 to 12 bands. Methods including phenol-chloroform extraction after enzymatic lysis resulted in the greatest DNA yields and detectable diversity. Additionally, two methods showing similar yields and retrieved diversity were compared by cloning and sequencing. Clones belonging to members of the Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma- proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria and to the Firmicutes were recovered from both libraries. However, when bead-beating was applied, clones belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria were also recovered, as well as plastid signatures. Phenol-chloroform extraction after bead-beating and enzymatic lysis was therefore considered to be the most suitable method for DNA extraction from such highly diverse phototrophic biofilms.

  5. Template synthesis of novel carboxamide dinuclear copper (II) complex: spectral characterization and reactivity towards calf-thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Suvigya; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2008-06-01

    Dinuclear complexes Bis [aqua 1,8-(1,2-dicarboxamido benzene) 3,6-diazaoctane copper (II)/nickel (II)] tetrachloride (1 and 2) were synthesized by a two component one-pot metal template condensation between phthalic anhydride and 1,8-diamino 3,6-diazaoctane. Elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, electronic absorption, infra-red, electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, atomic absorption, and electron spray mass spectral studies have been performed to probe the nature and structure of the complexes. The interaction of copper (II) complex with calf thymus (CT-DNA) has been studied by using absorption, emission and circular dichoric spectral methods, viscometry, and cyclic voltammetry. A strong hyperchromism along with a red shift in UV bands and hypochromism in the ligand field band of the complex 1 on interaction with CT-DNA imply a covalent mode of DNA binding. This is further confirmed by studying the reactivity of complex 1 using circular dichroism and viscosity measurements. The variation in relative emission intensity of DNA-bound ethidium bromide observed upon treatment with the complex 1 parallel the trend of DNA binding studies. Cyclic voltammetry studies reveal that the complex 1 prefers to bind to DNA in Cu(II) rather than Cu(I) oxidation state.

  6. Complexation of heterocyclic ligands with DNA in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranovskii, S. F.; Bolotin, P. A.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Chernyshev, D. N.

    2008-03-01

    We have used spectrophotometry to study self-association and complexation with DNA by organic heterocyclic compounds in the acridine and phenothiazine series: proflavin, thionine, and methylene blue. Based on the experimental concentration dependences of the molar absorption coefficient of the molecules in an aqueous buffer solution (0.01 M NaCl, 0.01 M Na2EDTA, 0.01 M Tris, pH 7.4, T = 298 K), we have determined the equilibrium dimerization constants for the dyes and the DNA complexation parameters using the Scatchard and McGhee-von Hippel models. The observed increase in the cooperativity parameters as the dimerization constants of the ligands increase allowed us to hypothesize that the same interactions occur between dye molecules adsorbed on DNA as in their self-association. The equilibrium DNA-binding constants for the ligands, obtained using the McGhee-von Hippel cooperative model, are (20.9 ± 2.7)·103 M-1 for proflavin and (33.8 ± 4.1)·103 M-1 for thionine. Using the Scatchard model, taking into account intercalation and “external” binding of ligands with DNA, we determined the DNA complexation constants for methylene blue: (26.4 ± 4.6)·103 and (96 ± 17)·103 M-1 respectively. Based on analysis of the data obtained, we hypothesized that the predominant type of binding with DNA is intercalation binding in the case of proflavin and thionine, and “external” binding with the DNA surface in the case of methylene blue.

  7. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  8. [Study on molecular hybridization with biotin-labelled HPV 16 DNA probe in human cervical carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Huang, G Q; Mao, T; Huang, Y F; Xiao, H Y; Liu, B L

    1989-09-01

    Biotin-labelled human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 type DNA probe was prepared by the techniques of molecular biology. And dot hybridization technique was used to detect the HPV 16 homologous sequences in the tissues DNA of human cervical carcinoma. The results indicated that 16 cases out of 28 of the human cervical carcinoma tissues were positive. The positive rate was 57%. The other 4 cases of normal uterine cervix tissues were negative. Only 1 in 4 chronic cervicitis tissues showed positive. The HPV 16 plasmid DNA, as the positive control group, showed strong positive, while lambda-phage DNA was negative. The results have shown that the genome of the HPV actually exists in the tissue of the cervical carcinoma and that there is a close relationship between the cervical carcinoma and HPV infection. This experiment adopted the Biotin-labelled HPV 16 DNA probe. And it may provide us with a quick and sensitive method for investigation of the infection of HPV and its role in the carcinogenesis of cervical carcinoma. PMID:2560458

  9. Recognition of DNA abasic site nanocavity by fluorophore-switched probe: Suitable for all sequence environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Yuehua; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Lihua; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Xiaoshun; Shao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Removal of a damaged base in DNA produces an abasic site (AP site) nanocavity. If left un-repaired in vivo by the specific enzyme, this nanocavity will result in nucleotide mutation in the following DNA replication. Therefore, selective recognition of AP site nanocavity by small molecules is important for identification of such DNA damage and development of genetic drugs. In this work, we investigate the fluorescence behavior of isoquinoline alkaloids including palmatine (PAL), berberine (BER), epiberberine (EPI), jatrorrhizine (JAT), coptisine (COP), coralyne (COR), worenine (WOR), berberrubine (BEU), sanguinarine (SAN), chelerythrine (CHE), and nitidine (NIT) upon binding with the AP nanocavity. PAL is screened out as the most efficient fluorophore-switched probe to recognize the AP nanocavity over the fully matched DNA. Its fluorescence enhancement occurs for all of the AP nanocavity sequence environments, which has not been achieved by the previously used probes. The bridged π conjugation effect should partially contribute to the AP nanocavity-specific fluorescence, as opposed to the solvent effect. Due to the strong binding with the AP nanocavity, PAL will find wide applications in the DNA damage recognition and sensor development.

  10. Effect of oligonucleotide probes substituted by deoxyinosines on the specificity of SNP detection on the DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoting; Pu, Dan; Liu, Bicheng; Xiao, Pengfeng

    2015-01-01

    One of the main factors that can affect the quality of microarray results is the microarray hybridization specificity. The key factor that affects hybridization specificity is the design of the probes. In this paper, we described a novel oligonucleotide probe containing deoxyinosines aimed at improving DNA hybridization specificity. We compared different probes to determine the distance between deoxyinosine base and SNPs site and the number of deoxyinosine bases. The new probe sequences contained two set of deoxyinosines (each set had two deoxyinosines), in which the interval between SNP site and each set of deoxyinosines was two bases. The new probes could obtain the highest hybridization specificity. The experimental results showed that probes containing deoxyinosines hybridized effectively to the perfectly matched target and improved the hybridization specificity of DNA microarray. By including a simple washing step after hybridization, these probes could distinguish matched targets from single-base-mismatched sequences perfectly. For the probes containing deoxyinosines, the fluorescence intensity of a match sequence was more than eight times stronger than that of a mismatch. However, the intensity ratio was only 1.3 times or less for the probes without deoxyinosines. Finally, using hybridization of the PCR product microarrays, we successfully genotyped SNP of 140 samples using these new labeled probes. Our results show that this is a useful new strategy for modifying oligonucleotide probes for use in DNA microarray analysis.

  11. Probe classification of on-off type DNA microarray images with a nonlinear matching measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Munho; Kim, Jong Dae; Min, Byoung Goo; Kim, Jongwon; Kim, Y. Y.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a nonlinear matching measure, called counting measure, as a signal detection measure that is defined as the number of on pixels in the spot area. It is applied to classify probes for an on-off type DNA microarray, where each probe spot is classified as hybridized or not. The counting measure also incorporates the maximum response search method, where the expected signal is obtained by taking the maximum among the measured responses of the various positions and sizes of the spot template. The counting measure was compared to existing signal detection measures such as the normalized covariance and the median for 2390 patient samples tested on the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA chip. The counting measure performed the best regardless of whether or not the maximum response search method was used. The experimental results showed that the counting measure combined with the positional search was the most preferable.

  12. Detection of bovine trichomoniasis with a specific DNA probe and PCR amplification system.

    PubMed

    Ho, M S; Conrad, P A; Conrad, P J; LeFebvre, R B; Perez, E; BonDurant, R H

    1994-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is a widespread, economically important venereal disease of cattle which causes infertility and abortion. Effective control of trichomoniasis has been impeded by the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic procedures, which require the isolation and cultivation of the parasite, Tritrichomonas foetus, from infected cattle. We developed a 0.85-kb T. foetus DNA probe by identifying conserved sequences in DNAs from T. foetus that were isolated from cattle in California, Idaho, Nevada, and Costa Rica. The probe hybridized specifically to DNAs of T. foetus isolates from different geographic areas but not to DNA preparations of Trichomonas vaginalis, bovine cells, or a variety of bacteria from cattle. The probe detected DNA from a minimum of 10(5) T. foetus organisms. To improve sensitivity, a partial sequence of the probe was used to identify oligonucleotide primers (TF1 and TF2) which could be used to amplify a 162-bp product from T. foetus DNAs by PCR. A chemiluminescent internal T. foetus sequence probe was hybridized to Southern blots of the amplification product. This system detected as few as one T. foetus organism in culture media or 10 parasites in samples containing bovine preputial smegma. Analysis of 52 clinical samples showed that 47 (90.4%) of the 52 samples were correctly identified, with no false-positive reactions. In comparison, the traditional cultivation method detected 44 (84.6%) of the 52 samples from T. foetus-infected and uninfected bulls. These results indicate that the PCR-based amplification system could be a useful alternative method for the diagnosis of bovine trichomoniasis.

  13. Complexes of nitracrine with DNA. Stoichiometry of binding.

    PubMed

    Szmigiero, L; Gniazdowski, M

    1981-01-01

    In the presence of sulfhydryl compounds, an anticancer drug 1-nitro-9-(3-N,N-dimethylaminopropylamino) acridine (nitracrine, Ledakrin) forms irreversible complexes of decreased template activity with DNA. Stoichiometry of the complexes was estimated using the drug labelled with 14C in the acridine ring or in the propyl chain and with 3H in the acridine ring. Up to 50 irreversibly bound 14C-nitracrine molecules were found per 10(3) nucleotides of calf thymus DNA in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT). Considerably lower binding observed using 3H-labelled drug, particularly when the complexes were formed in the presence of mercaptoethanol (ME) indicates that substitution of tritium atoms occurred during the reaction. Relationship between stoichiometry and template activity in RNA synthesis in vitro system of the complexes was estimated in the paper. PMID:7198467

  14. Characterization of an In Vivo Z-DNA Detection Probe Based on a Cell Nucleus Accumulating Intrabody.

    PubMed

    Gulis, Galina; Silva, Izabel Cristina Rodrigues; Sousa, Herdson Renney; Sousa, Isabel Garcia; Bezerra, Maryani Andressa Gomes; Quilici, Luana Salgado; Maranhao, Andrea Queiroz; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo

    2016-09-01

    Left-handed Z-DNA is a physiologically unstable DNA conformation, and its existence in vivo can be attributed to localized torsional distress. Despite evidence for the existence of Z-DNA in vivo, its precise role in the control of gene expression is not fully understood. Here, an in vivo probe based on an anti-Z-DNA intrabody is proposed for native Z-DNA detection. The probe was used for chromatin immunoprecipitation of potential Z-DNA-forming sequences in the human genome. One of the isolated putative Z-DNA-forming sequences was cloned upstream of a reporter gene expression cassette under control of the CMV promoter. The reporter gene encoded an antibody fragment fused to GFP. Transient co-transfection of this vector along with the Z-probe coding vector improved reporter gene expression. This improvement was demonstrated by measuring reporter gene mRNA and protein levels and the amount of fluorescence in co-transfected CHO-K1 cells. These results suggest that the presence of the anti-Z-DNA intrabody can interfere with a Z-DNA-containing reporter gene expression. Therefore, this in vivo probe for the detection of Z-DNA could be used for global correlation of Z-DNA-forming sequences and gene expression regulation.

  15. A probe-based mapping strategy for DNA sequencing with mobile primers. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Strausbaugh, L.D.; Berg, C.M.

    1991-12-31

    Research on DNA sequencing continued. The specific areas of research targeted for the period of this Progress Report included three general phases: (1) optimization of probe-mapping by both the development of new transposons and the design of stream-lined methods for mapping; (2) application of transposon-based methods to larger plasmids and cosmids; and (3) initiation of PCR-based applications of transposons.

  16. A probe-based mapping strategy for DNA sequencing with mobile primers

    SciTech Connect

    Strausbaugh, L.D.; Berg, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Research on DNA sequencing continued. The specific areas of research targeted for the period of this Progress Report included three general phases: (1) optimization of probe-mapping by both the development of new transposons and the design of stream-lined methods for mapping; (2) application of transposon-based methods to larger plasmids and cosmids; and (3) initiation of PCR-based applications of transposons.

  17. Response of base excision repair enzymes to complex DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, M; Rasouli-Nia, A; Chaudhry, M A; Britten, R A

    2001-11-01

    There is now increasing evidence that ionizing radiation generates complex DNA damage, i.e. two or more lesions--single-strand breaks or modified nucleosides--located within one to two helical turns on the same strand or on opposite strands. Double-strand breaks are the most readily recognizable clustered lesions, but they may constitute a relatively minor fraction of the total. It is anticipated that clustered lesions may play a significant role in cellular response to ionizing radiation since they may present a major challenge to the DNA repair machinery. The degree of lesion complexity increases with increasing LET. This has potential implications for space travel because of exposure to high-LET cosmic radiation. It is therefore critical that we begin to understand the consequences of such damaged sites, including their influence on DNA repair enzymes. This paper presents a short review of our current knowledge of the action of purified DNA repair enzymes belonging to the base excision repair pathway, including DNA glycosylases and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases, on model complex lesions.

  18. Molecular docking studies of curcumin natural derivatives with DNA topoisomerase I and II-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Bora, Utpal

    2014-12-01

    DNA topoisomerase I (topo I) and II (topo II) are essential enzymes that solve the topological problems of DNA by allowing DNA strands or double helices to pass through each other during cellular processes such as replication, transcription, recombination, and chromatin remodeling. Their critical roles make topoisomerases an attractive drug target against cancer. The present molecular docking study provides insights into the inhibition of topo I and II by curcumin natural derivatives. The binding modes suggested that curcumin natural derivatives docked at the site of DNA cleavage parallel to the axis of DNA base pairing. Cyclocurcumin and curcumin sulphate were predicted to be the most potent inhibitors amongst all the curcumin natural derivatives docked. The binding modes of cyclocurcumin and curcumin sulphate were similar to known inhibitors of topo I and II. Residues like Arg364, Asn722 and base A113 (when docked to topo I-DNA complex) and residues Asp479, Gln778 and base T9 (when docked to topo II-DNA complex) seem to play important role in the binding of curcumin natural derivatives at the site of DNA cleavage.

  19. HMG1-related DNA-binding protein isolated with V-(D)-J recombination signal probes.

    PubMed Central

    Shirakata, M; Hüppi, K; Usuda, S; Okazaki, K; Yoshida, K; Sakano, H

    1991-01-01

    In order to isolate cDNA clones for DNA-binding components of the V-(D)-J recombinase, phage libraries from a pre-B-cell line were screened with a radiolabeled probe containing recombination signal sequences (RSS). Among prospective clones, cDNA T160 was analyzed further. It produced a protein of 80.6 kDa which bound to DNA containing RSS but not to DNA in which the RSS had been mutated. A search of a data base revealed that the T160 protein has significant sequence homology (56%) to the nonhistone chromosomal protein HMG1 within the C-terminal region of 80 amino acids. DNA-binding analysis with truncated proteins showed that the HMG homology region is responsible for DNA binding. Using restriction fragment length polymorphisms, the T160 gene was mapped at the proximal end of mouse chromosome 2. Evidence was obtained for genetic linkage between the T160 gene and the recombination activator genes RAG-1 and RAG-2. Images PMID:1678855

  20. An AFLP-based procedure for the efficient mapping of mutations and DNA probes in barley.

    PubMed Central

    Castiglioni, P; Pozzi, C; Heun, M; Terzi, V; Müller, K J; Rohde, W; Salamini, F

    1998-01-01

    A strategy based upon AFLP markers for high-efficiency mapping of morphological mutations and DNA probes to linkage groups in barley is presented. First, 511 AFLP markers were placed on the linkage map derived from the cross Proctor x Nudinka. Second, loci controlling phenotypic traits were assigned to linkage groups by AFLP analysis, using F2 populations consisting of 30-50 mutant plants derived from crosses of the type "mutant x Proctor" and "mutant x Nudinka." To map DNA probes, 67 different wild-type barley lines were selected to generate F2 populations by crossing with Proctor and Nudinka. F2 plants that were polymorphic for a given RFLP fragment were classified into genotypic classes. Linkage of the RFLP polymorphism to 1 of the 511 AFLP loci was indicated by cosegregation. The use of the strategy is exemplified by the mapping of the mutation branched-5 to chromosome 2 and of the DNA probes Bkn2 and BM-7 to chromosomes 5 and 1, respectively. Map expansion and marker order in map regions with dense clustering of markers represented a particular problem. A discussion considering the effect of noncanonical recombinant products on these two parameters is provided. PMID:9691056

  1. BaitFisher: A Software Package for Multispecies Target DNA Enrichment Probe Design.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christoph; Sann, Manuela; Donath, Alexander; Meixner, Martin; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Peters, Ralph S; Petersen, Malte; Meusemann, Karen; Liere, Karsten; Wägele, Johann-Wolfgang; Misof, Bernhard; Bleidorn, Christoph; Ohl, Michael; Niehuis, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Target DNA enrichment combined with high-throughput sequencing technologies is a powerful approach to probing a large number of loci in genomes of interest. However, software algorithms that explicitly consider nucleotide sequence information of target loci in multiple reference species for optimizing design of target enrichment baits to be applicable across a wide range of species have not been developed. Here we present an algorithm that infers target DNA enrichment baits from multiple nucleotide sequence alignments. By applying clustering methods and the combinatorial 1-center sequence optimization to bait design, we are able to minimize the total number of baits required to efficiently probe target loci in multiple species. Consequently, more loci can be probed across species with a given number of baits. Using transcript sequences of 24 apoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae, Sphecidae) from the 1KITE project and the gene models of Nasonia vitripennis, we inferred 57,650, 120-bp-long baits for capturing 378 coding sequence sections of 282 genes in apoid wasps. Illumina reduced-representation library sequencing confirmed successful enrichment of the target DNA when applying these baits to DNA of various apoid wasps. The designed baits furthermore enriched a major fraction of the target DNA in distantly related Hymenoptera, such as Formicidae and Chalcidoidea, highlighting the baits' broad taxonomic applicability. The availability of baits with broad taxonomic applicability is of major interest in numerous disciplines, ranging from phylogenetics to biodiversity monitoring. We implemented our new approach in a software package, called BaitFisher, which is open source and freely available at https://github.com/cmayer/BaitFisher-package.git.

  2. BaitFisher: A Software Package for Multispecies Target DNA Enrichment Probe Design.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christoph; Sann, Manuela; Donath, Alexander; Meixner, Martin; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Peters, Ralph S; Petersen, Malte; Meusemann, Karen; Liere, Karsten; Wägele, Johann-Wolfgang; Misof, Bernhard; Bleidorn, Christoph; Ohl, Michael; Niehuis, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Target DNA enrichment combined with high-throughput sequencing technologies is a powerful approach to probing a large number of loci in genomes of interest. However, software algorithms that explicitly consider nucleotide sequence information of target loci in multiple reference species for optimizing design of target enrichment baits to be applicable across a wide range of species have not been developed. Here we present an algorithm that infers target DNA enrichment baits from multiple nucleotide sequence alignments. By applying clustering methods and the combinatorial 1-center sequence optimization to bait design, we are able to minimize the total number of baits required to efficiently probe target loci in multiple species. Consequently, more loci can be probed across species with a given number of baits. Using transcript sequences of 24 apoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae, Sphecidae) from the 1KITE project and the gene models of Nasonia vitripennis, we inferred 57,650, 120-bp-long baits for capturing 378 coding sequence sections of 282 genes in apoid wasps. Illumina reduced-representation library sequencing confirmed successful enrichment of the target DNA when applying these baits to DNA of various apoid wasps. The designed baits furthermore enriched a major fraction of the target DNA in distantly related Hymenoptera, such as Formicidae and Chalcidoidea, highlighting the baits' broad taxonomic applicability. The availability of baits with broad taxonomic applicability is of major interest in numerous disciplines, ranging from phylogenetics to biodiversity monitoring. We implemented our new approach in a software package, called BaitFisher, which is open source and freely available at https://github.com/cmayer/BaitFisher-package.git. PMID:27009209

  3. Electrochemical detection of DNA binding by tumor suppressor p53 protein using osmium-labeled oligonucleotide probes and catalytic hydrogen evolution at the mercury electrode.

    PubMed

    Němcová, Kateřina; Sebest, Peter; Havran, Luděk; Orság, Petr; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present an electrochemical DNA-protein interaction assay based on a combination of protein-specific immunoprecipitation at magnetic beads (MBIP) with application of oligonucleotide (ON) probes labeled with an electroactive oxoosmium complex (Os,bipy). We show that double-stranded ONs bearing a dT20 tail labeled with Os,bipy are specifically recognized by the tumor suppressor p53 protein according to the presence or absence of a specific binding site (p53CON) in the double-stranded segment. We demonstrate the applicability of the Os,bipy-labeled probes in titration as well as competition MBIP assays to evaluate p53 relative affinity to various sequence-specific or structurally distinct unlabeled DNA substrates upon modulation of the p53-DNA binding by monoclonal antibodies used for the immunoprecipitation. To detect the p53-bound osmium-labeled probes, we took advantage of a catalytic peak yielded by Os,bipy-modified DNA at the mercury-based electrodes, allowing facile determination of subnanogram quantities of the labeled oligonucleotides. Versatility of the electrochemical MBIP technique and its general applicability in studies of any DNA-binding protein is discussed.

  4. Lanthanide complexes as luminogenic probes to measure sulfide levels in industrial samples.

    PubMed

    Thorson, Megan K; Ung, Phuc; Leaver, Franklin M; Corbin, Teresa S; Tuck, Kellie L; Graham, Bim; Barrios, Amy M

    2015-10-01

    A series of lanthanide-based, azide-appended complexes were investigated as hydrogen sulfide-sensitive probes. Europium complex 1 and Tb complex 3 both displayed a sulfide-dependent increase in luminescence, while Tb complex 2 displayed a decrease in luminescence upon exposure to NaHS. The utility of the complexes for monitoring sulfide levels in industrial oil and water samples was investigated. Complex 3 provided a sensitive measure of sulfide levels in petrochemical water samples (detection limit ∼ 250 nM), while complex 1 was capable of monitoring μM levels of sulfide in partially refined crude oil. PMID:26482000

  5. Direct identification of bacterial isolates in blood cultures by using a DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Davis, T E; Fuller, D D

    1991-10-01

    This study involved the rapid, direct identification of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Enterococcus sp., and Streptococcus agalactiae from positive blood culture bottles (BACTEC, Johnston Laboratories, Inc.) by using the AccuProbe (Gen-Probe, San Diego, Calif.) culture confirmation test. This method uses a chemiluminescent DNA probe that detects the rRNA of the target organisms. The manufacturer's instructions were modified to use a pellet of bacteria made directly from positive blood culture broth rather than a colony from an agar plate. Two separate procedures of selective centrifugation were employed in order to obtain the pellet. The first utilized a routine clinical centrifuge and a large volume of broth (10 to 12 ml) from the blood culture bottle. The second method used a microcentrifuge and less volume (1 to 1.5 ml). A total of 196 clinical specimens taken directly from positive blood culture broths were correctly identified by AccuProbe from pellets made by using the clinical centrifuge technique, while 166 clinical specimens used as negative controls failed to show hybridization. The microcentrifuge technique for obtaining pellets was performed on 105 patient specimens, and all were correctly identified. When combined with the microcentrifuge technique for pellet preparation, the AccuProbe test has several advantages: (i) direct identification of bacteria from blood culture broths, (ii) rapid turn-around time (30 min), (iii) simplicity of the procedure, and (iv) relative low cost.

  6. Development of enzymatic probes of oxidative and nitrosative DNA damage caused by reactive nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Dong, Min; Vongchampa, Viengsai; Gingipalli, Lakshmaiah; Cloutier, Jean-Francois; Kow, Yoke W; O'Connor, Timothy; Dedon, Peter C

    2006-02-22

    Chronic inflammation is associated with a variety of human diseases, including cancer, with one possible mechanistic link involving over-production of nitric oxide (NO*) by activated macrophages. Subsequent reaction of NO* with superoxide in the presence of carbon dioxide yields nitrosoperoxycarbonate (ONOOCO2-), a strong oxidant that reacts with guanine in DNA to form a variety of oxidation and nitration products, such 2'-deoxy-8-oxoguanosine. Alternatively, the reaction of NO and O2 leads to the formation of N2O3, a nitrosating agent that causes nucleobase deamination to form 2'-deoxyxanthosine (dX) and 2'-deoxyoxanosine (dO) from dG; 2'-deoxyinosine (dI) from dA; and 2'-deoxyuridine (dU) from dC, in addition to abasic sites and dG-dG cross-links. The presence of both ONOOCO2- and N2O3 at sites of inflammation necessitates definition of the relative roles of oxidative and nitrosative DNA damage in the genetic toxicology of inflammation. To this end, we sought to develop enzymatic probes for oxidative and nitrosative DNA lesions as a means to quantify the two types of DNA damage in in vitro DNA damage assays, such as the comet assay and as a means to differentially map the lesions in genomic DNA by the technique of ligation-mediated PCR. On the basis of fragmentary reports in the literature, we first systematically assessed the recognition of dX and dI by a battery of DNA repair enzymes. Members of the alkylpurine DNA glycosylase family (E. coli AlkA, murine Aag, and human MPG) all showed repair activity with dX (k(cat)/Km 29 x 10(-6), 21 x 10(-6), and 7.8 x 10(-6) nM(-1) min(-1), respectively), though the activity was considerably lower than that of EndoV (8 x 10(-3) nM(-1) min(-1)). Based on these results and other published studies, we focused the development of enzymatic probes on two groups of enzymes, one with activity against oxidative damage (formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg); endonuclease III (EndoIII)) and the other with activity against

  7. Development of a simple and rapid assay for methylase activity based on DNA hairpin probe and Sybr Green I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yi; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2012-03-01

    Methylase is vital for a large number of biological reactions. Here we developed a new method for DNA methylase activity analysis. In this paper, a DNA hairpin probe with a sequence of 5'-GATC-3' in the stem region was designed. The 5'-GATC-3' sequence was targeted by Dam MTase and was methylated. Subsequently, restriction enzyme Dpnl recognized the site and cut it. Then the haipin probe was transformed into three single stranded DNA. This enzymatic process can be monitored by the change of SYBR green I fluorescence. The current label free assay is an useful tool for DNA methylase activity analysis due to its simplicity, speedability, and low cost.

  8. Development of a simple and rapid assay for methylase activity based on DNA hairpin probe and Sybr Green I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yi; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2011-11-01

    Methylase is vital for a large number of biological reactions. Here we developed a new method for DNA methylase activity analysis. In this paper, a DNA hairpin probe with a sequence of 5'-GATC-3' in the stem region was designed. The 5'-GATC-3' sequence was targeted by Dam MTase and was methylated. Subsequently, restriction enzyme Dpnl recognized the site and cut it. Then the haipin probe was transformed into three single stranded DNA. This enzymatic process can be monitored by the change of SYBR green I fluorescence. The current label free assay is an useful tool for DNA methylase activity analysis due to its simplicity, speedability, and low cost.

  9. A biostatistical study into the efficiency of individualism using nonisotopic chemiluminescent-enhanced NICE multilocus DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Hau, P P; Watt, E H; Hau, C M

    1997-10-01

    The efficiency of individualisation using nonisotopic chemiluminescent- enhanced probes (NICE) was investigated by analysing DNA fingerprints obtained from 190 unrelated Caucasians. Novel analysis of the scoring procedure enabled us to include the comparison of 585 pairs of samples for each of two probes. When the results of NICE probes 33.6 and 33.15 were combined, the mean percentage band share between two unrelated individuals was 16.8% and the mean number of bands identified in an individual DNA fingerprint was 54.8. Results were compared with those obtained using isotopically labelled probes and suggest that the two labelling systems gave similar efficiencies for differentiating between individuals. Analysis of DNA fingerprints from 37 family trios (mother, child and father groups) gave a mutation rate of 0.10% when using NICE probes. The two labelling systems compared were equally efficient in establishing family relationships.

  10. Crystal structure of DnaT84–153-dT10 ssDNA complex reveals a novel single-stranded DNA binding mode

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Chen, Peng; Wang, Xuejuan; Cai, Gang; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    DnaT is a primosomal protein that is required for the stalled replication fork restart in Escherichia coli. As an adapter, DnaT mediates the PriA-PriB-ssDNA ternary complex and the DnaB/C complex. However, the fundamental function of DnaT during PriA-dependent primosome assembly is still a black box. Here, we report the 2.83 Å DnaT84–153-dT10 ssDNA complex structure, which reveals a novel three-helix bundle single-stranded DNA binding mode. Based on binding assays and negative-staining electron microscopy results, we found that DnaT can bind to phiX 174 ssDNA to form nucleoprotein filaments for the first time, which indicates that DnaT might function as a scaffold protein during the PriA-dependent primosome assembly. In combination with biochemical analysis, we propose a cooperative mechanism for the binding of DnaT to ssDNA and a possible model for the assembly of PriA-PriB-ssDNA-DnaT complex that sheds light on the function of DnaT during the primosome assembly and stalled replication fork restart. This report presents the first structure of the DnaT C-terminal complex with ssDNA and a novel model that explains the interactions between the three-helix bundle and ssDNA. PMID:25053836

  11. A novel DNA tetrahedron-hairpin probe for in situ"off-on" fluorescence imaging of intracellular telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiu-Mei; Zhu, Meng-Jiao; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-04-21

    A novel three-dimensionally structured DNA probe is reported to realize in situ"off-on" imaging of intracellular telomerase activity. The probe consists of a DNA tetrahedron and a hairpin DNA on one of the vertices of the DNA tetrahedron. It is composed of four modified DNA segments: S1-Au nanoparticle (NP) inserting a telomerase strand primer (TSP) and S2-S4, three Cy5 dye modified DNA segments. Fluorescence of Cy5 at three vertices of the DNA tetrahedron is quenched by the Au NP at the other vertex due to the effective fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) ("off" state). When the probe meets telomerase, the hairpin structure changes to rod-like through complementary hybridization with the telomerase-triggered stem elongation product, resulting in a large distance between the Au NP and Cy5 and the recovery of Cy5 fluorescence ("on" state). The molar ratio of 3 : 1 between the reporter (Cy5) and the target related TSP makes the probe show high sensitivity and recovery efficiency of Cy5 in the presence of telomerase extracted from HeLa cells. Given the functional and compact nanostructure, the mechanically stable and noncytotoxic nature of the DNA tetrahedron, this FRET-based probe provides more opportunities for biosensing, molecular imaging and drug delivery.

  12. Simultaneous detection of DNA from 10 food allergens by ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Alexandra; Demmel, Anja; Hupfer, Christine; Busch, Ulrich; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2009-04-01

    The simultaneous detection of DNA from different allergenic food ingredients by a ligation-dependent probe amplification (LPA) system is described. The approach allows detection of several targets in a one-tube assay. Synthetic oligonucleotides were designed to detect DNA from peanuts, cashews, pecans, pistachios, hazelnuts, sesame seeds, macadamia nuts, almonds, walnuts and brazil nuts. The specificity of the system was tested with DNA from more than 50 plant and animal species. The sensitivity of the method was suitable to detect allergenic ingredients in the low mg kg(-1) range. The limit of detection (LOD) for single allergens in different food matrices was 5 mg kg(-1). The novel analytical strategy represents a useful tool for the surveillance of established legislation on food allergens within the European Union.

  13. Using microchip gel electrophoresis to probe DNA-drug binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Nan; Ugaz, Victor M

    2014-01-01

    Binding of small molecules with DNA plays an important role in many biological functions such as DNA replication, repair, and transcription. These interactions also offer enormous potential as targets for diagnostics and therapeutics, leading to intense interest in development of methods to probe the underlying binding events. In this chapter, we present a new approach to investigate the structural changes that accompany binding of DNA and small molecules. Instead of relying on conventional yet delicate single-molecule imaging methods, we show how a single microchip gel electrophoresis experiment incorporating both constant electric field and on-off actuation over a specific frequency range enables fundamental structural parameters (e.g., contour and persistence lengths) to be simultaneously determined. The microchip format offers an attractive combination of simplicity and scale-up potential that makes it amenable for high-throughput screening. PMID:24162976

  14. Simultaneous detection of DNA from 10 food allergens by ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Alexandra; Demmel, Anja; Hupfer, Christine; Busch, Ulrich; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2009-04-01

    The simultaneous detection of DNA from different allergenic food ingredients by a ligation-dependent probe amplification (LPA) system is described. The approach allows detection of several targets in a one-tube assay. Synthetic oligonucleotides were designed to detect DNA from peanuts, cashews, pecans, pistachios, hazelnuts, sesame seeds, macadamia nuts, almonds, walnuts and brazil nuts. The specificity of the system was tested with DNA from more than 50 plant and animal species. The sensitivity of the method was suitable to detect allergenic ingredients in the low mg kg(-1) range. The limit of detection (LOD) for single allergens in different food matrices was 5 mg kg(-1). The novel analytical strategy represents a useful tool for the surveillance of established legislation on food allergens within the European Union. PMID:19680915

  15. Complex formation between phage phi 29 single-stranded DNA binding protein and DNA.

    PubMed

    Soengas, M S; Esteban, J A; Salas, M; Gutiérrez, C

    1994-06-01

    Bacteriophage phi 29 gene 5 encodes a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein (SSB) which stimulates viral DNA replication. In the present study, a structural characterization of the complex between ssDNA and the phi 29 SSB was carried out using electron microscopy, band-shift assays and nuclease digestion as well as by monitoring changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of phi 29 SSB upon binding. Phage phi 29 SSB behaves as a monomer in solution and forms complexes with ssDNA which have a homogeneous structure, as if they consist of a continuous array of protein bound to DNA. Interaction of phi 29 SSB with ssDNA leads to a quenching of its tyrosine-dependent intrinsic fluorescence. This fluorescence quenching was directly proportional to the amount of phi 29 SSB bound to the ssDNA and the maximal quenching upon binding was very high (Qmax = 94.6 +/- 3.5%). Direct titration experiments have allowed us to estimate that the stoichiometry (n) of binding to ssDNA was 3.4(+/- 0.3) nucleotides per phi 29 SSB monomer. Both Qmax and n are independent of the salt concentration, suggesting the existence of only one major binding mode. At low salt concentrations, the effective binding constant (Keff = K omega) to poly(dT) was 2.2 x 10(5) M-1, the intrinsic binding constant (K) and the cooperativity parameter (omega) being 4.3 x 10(3) M-1 and 51, respectively. At increasing salt concentrations, the Keff exhibited a small, but significant, decrease. The possible functional significance of the binding parameters of phi 29 SSB during viral DNA replication is discussed.

  16. Photocatalytic probing of DNA sequence by using TiO{sub 2}/dopamine-DNA triads.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; de la Garza, L.; Zhang, L.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Zuo, X.; Tiede, D. M.; Rajh, T.

    2007-10-15

    A method to control charge transfer reaction in DNA using hybrid nanometer-sized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was developed. In this system extended charge separation reflects the sequence of DNA and was measured using metallic silver deposition or by photocurrent response. Light-induced extended charge separation in these systems was found to be dependent on the DNA-bridge length and sequence. The yield of photocatalytic deposition of silver was studied in systems having GG accepting sites imbedded in AT runs at varying distances from the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle surface. Weak distance dependence of charge separation indicative of a hole hopping through mediating adenine (A) sites was found. The quantum yield of silver deposition in the system having a GG accepting site placed 8.5 {angstrom} from the nanoparticle surface was found to be {Phi} = 0.70 (70%) and {Phi} = 0.56 (56%) for (A){sub n} and (AT){sub n/2} bridge, respectively. Hole injection to GG trapping sites as far as 70 {angstrom} from a nanoparticle surface in the absence of G hopping sites was measured. Introduction of G hopping sites increased the efficiency of hole injection. The efficiency of photocatalytic deposition of metallic silver was found to be sensitive to the presence of a single nucleobase mismatch in the DNA sequence.

  17. Simple horizontal magnetic tweezers for micromanipulation of single DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Christopher P; Tyson, Christopher; Zischkau, Joseph; Mehl, Patrick; Tuma, Pamela L; Pegg, Ian L; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a simple-to-implement magnetic force transducer that can apply a wide range of piconewton (pN) scale forces on single DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes in the horizontal plane. The resulting low-noise force-extension data enable very high-resolution detection of changes in the DNA tether's extension: ~0.05 pN in force and <10 nm change in extension. We have also verified that we can manipulate DNA in near equilibrium conditions through the wide range of forces by ramping the force from low to high and back again, and observing minimal hysteresis in the molecule's force response. Using a calibration technique based on Stokes' drag law, we have confirmed our force measurements from DNA force-extension experiments obtained using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem applied to transverse fluctuations of the magnetic microsphere. We present data on the force-distance characteristics of a DNA molecule complexed with histones. The results illustrate how the tweezers can be used to study DNA binding proteins at the single molecule level.

  18. Single-Stranded DNA Catalyzes Hybridization of PCR-Products to Microarray Capture Probes

    PubMed Central

    Dally, Simon; Rupp, Steffen; Lemuth, Karin; Hartmann, Stefan C.; Hiller, Ekkehard; Bailer, Susanne M.; Knabbe, Cornelius; Weile, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Since its development, microarray technology has evolved to a standard method in the biotechnological and medical field with a broad range of applications. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism of the hybridization process of PCR-products to microarray capture probes is still not completely understood, and several observed phenomena cannot be explained with current models. We investigated the influence of several parameters on the hybridization reaction and identified ssDNA to play a major role in the process. An increase of the ssDNA content in a hybridization reaction strongly enhanced resulting signal intensities. A strong influence could also be observed when unlabeled ssDNA was added to the hybridization reaction. A reduction of the ssDNA content resulted in a massive decrease of the hybridization efficiency. According to these data, we developed a novel model for the hybridization mechanism. This model is based on the assumption that single stranded DNA is necessary as catalyst to induce the hybridization of dsDNA. The developed hybridization model is capable of giving explanations for several yet unresolved questions regarding the functionality of microarrays. Our findings not only deepen the understanding of the hybridization process, but also have immediate practical use in data interpretation and the development of new microarrays. PMID:25025686

  19. Ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy to probe lac repressor-DNA interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monico, Carina; Capitanio, Marco; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-06-01

    We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap capable to probe, under controlled force, bimolecular interactions with unprecedented temporal resolution. Here we present the technique in the framework of protein-DNA interactions, specifically on Lactose repressor protein (LacI). The high temporal resolution of the method reveals the kinetics of both short- and long-lived interactions of LacI along the DNA template (from ˜100 μs to tens of seconds), as well the dependence on force of such interaction kinetics. The two kinetically well-distinct populations of interactions observed clearly represent specific interactions with the operator sequences and a fast scanning of LacI along non-cognate DNA. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method to study the sequence-dependent affinity of DNA-binding proteins along the DNA and the effects of force on a wide range of interaction durations, including μs time scales not accessible to other single-molecule methods. This improvement in time resolution provides also important means of investigation on the long-puzzled mechanism of target search on DNA and possible protein conformational changes occurring upon target recognition.

  20. Stable-Isotope Probing Identifies Uncultured Planctomycetes as Primary Degraders of a Complex Heteropolysaccharide in Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Sharp, Christine E; Jones, Gareth M; Grasby, Stephen E; Brady, Allyson L; Dunfield, Peter F

    2015-07-01

    The exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by some bacteria are potential growth substrates for other bacteria in soil. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify aerobic soil bacteria that assimilated the cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus or the EPS produced by Beijerinckia indica. The latter is a heteropolysaccharide comprised primarily of l-guluronic acid, d-glucose, and d-glycero-d-mannoheptose. (13)C-labeled EPS and (13)C-labeled cellulose were purified from bacterial cultures grown on [(13)C]glucose. Two soils were incubated with these substrates, and bacteria actively assimilating them were identified via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes recovered from (13)C-labeled DNA. Cellulose C was assimilated primarily by soil bacteria closely related (93 to 100% 16S rRNA gene sequence identities) to known cellulose-degrading bacteria. However, B. indica EPS was assimilated primarily by bacteria with low identities (80 to 95%) to known species, particularly by different members of the phylum Planctomycetes. In one incubation, members of the Planctomycetes made up >60% of all reads in the labeled DNA and were only distantly related (<85% identity) to any described species. Although it is impossible with SIP to completely distinguish primary polysaccharide hydrolyzers from bacteria growing on produced oligo- or monosaccharides, the predominance of Planctomycetes suggested that they were primary degraders of EPS. Other bacteria assimilating B. indica EPS included members of the Verrucomicrobia, candidate division OD1, and the Armatimonadetes. The results indicate that some uncultured bacteria in soils may be adapted to using complex heteropolysaccharides for growth and suggest that the use of these substrates may provide a means for culturing new species. PMID:25934620

  1. Stable-Isotope Probing Identifies Uncultured Planctomycetes as Primary Degraders of a Complex Heteropolysaccharide in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Sharp, Christine E.; Jones, Gareth M.; Grasby, Stephen E.; Brady, Allyson L.

    2015-01-01

    The exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by some bacteria are potential growth substrates for other bacteria in soil. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify aerobic soil bacteria that assimilated the cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus or the EPS produced by Beijerinckia indica. The latter is a heteropolysaccharide comprised primarily of l-guluronic acid, d-glucose, and d-glycero-d-mannoheptose. 13C-labeled EPS and 13C-labeled cellulose were purified from bacterial cultures grown on [13C]glucose. Two soils were incubated with these substrates, and bacteria actively assimilating them were identified via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes recovered from 13C-labeled DNA. Cellulose C was assimilated primarily by soil bacteria closely related (93 to 100% 16S rRNA gene sequence identities) to known cellulose-degrading bacteria. However, B. indica EPS was assimilated primarily by bacteria with low identities (80 to 95%) to known species, particularly by different members of the phylum Planctomycetes. In one incubation, members of the Planctomycetes made up >60% of all reads in the labeled DNA and were only distantly related (<85% identity) to any described species. Although it is impossible with SIP to completely distinguish primary polysaccharide hydrolyzers from bacteria growing on produced oligo- or monosaccharides, the predominance of Planctomycetes suggested that they were primary degraders of EPS. Other bacteria assimilating B. indica EPS included members of the Verrucomicrobia, candidate division OD1, and the Armatimonadetes. The results indicate that some uncultured bacteria in soils may be adapted to using complex heteropolysaccharides for growth and suggest that the use of these substrates may provide a means for culturing new species. PMID:25934620

  2. VCD spectroscopy as an excellent probe of chiral metal complexes containing a carbon monoxide vibrational chromophore.

    PubMed

    Fusè, Marco; Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Longhi, Giovanna; Abbate, Sergio; Zerla, Daniele; Rimoldi, Isabella; Contini, Alessandro; Cesarotti, Edoardo

    2015-06-01

    Vibrational circular dichroism, VCD, gives evidence that the carbon monoxide chromophore in a heteroleptic cyclopentadienyl Ru(ii)-carbonyl complex is very sensitive to the chirality of the metal centre and becomes an excellent probe to define the configuration of chiral metal complexes.

  3. Hybridization studies with a DNA probe derived from the virulence region of the 60 Mdal plasmid of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; Curtiss, R; Gulig, P A; Gyles, C L

    1989-01-01

    Plasmid DNA of 68 strains of Salmonella that belonged to 18 serovars and exhibited 48 different plasmid profiles was examined for hybridization with a 32P-labelled DNA probe which consisted of a 3750 base pairs (bp) HindIII-HindIII fragment derived from the virulence region of the 60 megadalton (Mdal) plasmid of Salmonella typhimurium. The 32 Mdal plasmid of S. cholerae-suis, the 50 Mdal plasmid of S. dublin, the 36 Mdal plasmid of S. enteritidis, the 60 Mdal plasmid of S. gallinarum, the 60 Mdal plasmid of S. pullorum, and the 60 Mdal plasmid of S. typhimurium, plasmids that have been associated with virulence, all hybridized with the probe. Digestion of plasmid DNA of these strains with PvuII and hybridization with the probe revealed that the plasmids of strains of all six serovars contained fragments of approximately 2520 and 1520 bp that hybridized with the probe. Similarly, hybridization with BglI digests of DNA of the virulence-associated plasmids of strains of these six serovars showed that all six plasmids contained a fragment of approximately 3690 bp that hybridized with the probe. No other plasmids of these strains nor any plasmids of 12 other Salmonella serovars hybridized with the probe. Chromosomal DNA did not hybridize with the probe. The 60 Mdal plasmids of S. gallinarum and S. pullorum showed similar digestion patterns with restriction endonucleases BglI, BglII and PvuII. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2686827

  4. DNA-poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) complexation and transfection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Alatorre-Meda, Manuel; Taboada, Pablo; Krajewska, Barbara; Willemeit, Markus; Deml, Alexander; Klösel, Roland; Rodríguez, Julio R

    2010-07-29

    The present work assesses the influence of the cationic charge density (CD) and the cationic valence of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (pDADMAC) on the DNA compaction and subsequent transfection. Four homopolymers (CD = 1, with different valences) and one copolymer, poly(acrylamide-co-diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (coDADMAC) (CD < 1, equivalent in valence to one of the homopolymers), were studied. The characterization of the DNA-pDADMAC complexes (polyplexes) as a function of the polycation nitrogen to DNA phosphate molar ratios, N/P, was done by means of conductometry, electrophoretic mobility (zeta-potential), dynamic light scattering (DLS), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and beta-galactosidase (ONPG) and luciferase expression assays at 25 degrees C and physiological pH. In general, all polyplexes rendered compact and stable structures (R(H) approximately 100 nm) with positive surface charges ( approximately 11 mV) but low transfection efficiencies. As revealed by ITC, the DNA-pDADMAC complexation was characterized by a high binding affinity, the process being entropically driven. In particular, two characteristic ratios ((N/P)c and (N/P)*) were detected. Conductometry and ITC data demonstrated that the DNA compaction ratio, (N/P)c, was mainly governed by CD. Meanwhile the ratio from which the polyplex size remained constant, (N/P)*, was found to be valence-dependent as revealed by DLS. On the other hand, the low transfer rate of the polyplexes appeared to be correlated with the high binding affinity observed throughout the complexation process and with a core-shell structure the complexes presumably adopt.

  5. Intercalation between antitumor anthracyclines and DNA as probed by resonance and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smulevich, G.; Mantini, A. R.; Casu, M.; Marzocchi, M. P.

    1991-05-01

    The antiturnor anthracyclincs, idarubicin (IDA ), adrianiycin (ADM), epirubicin (EPI), carminomycin (CAR) and 1 1-deoxycarminornycin (DCM), whose siructural formula includes a substituted hydroxyanthraquirionc chrornophore and a sugar residue, form intercalation complexes with DNA. The stacking interaction between the chromophore and the base-pairs of DNA gives rise to noticeable ciTects on resonance Raman (RR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) scattering as well as on the absorption (ABS), its second derivative (D2) and fluorescence emission (FEM) spectra.

  6. DNA gyrase-mediated wrapping of the DNA strand is required for the replication fork arrest by the DNA gyrase-quinolone-DNA ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Hiasa, H; Shea, M E

    2000-11-01

    The ability of DNA gyrase (Gyr) to wrap the DNA strand around itself allows Gyr to introduce negative supercoils into DNA molecules. It has been demonstrated that the deletion of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of the GyrA subunit abolishes the ability of Gyr to wrap the DNA strand and catalyze the supercoiling reaction (Kampranis, S. C., and Maxwell, A. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 93, 14416-14421). By using this mutant Gyr, Gyr (A59), we have studied effects of Gyr-mediated wrapping of the DNA strand on its replicative function and its interaction with the quinolone antibacterial drugs. We find that Gyr (A59) can support oriC DNA replication in vitro. However, Gyr (A59)-catalyzed decatenation activity is not efficient enough to complete the decatenation of replicating daughter DNA molecules. As is the case with topoisomerase IV, the active cleavage and reunion activity of Gyr is required for the formation of the ternary complex that can arrest replication fork progression in vitro. Although the quinolone drugs stimulate the covalent Gyr (A59)-DNA complex formation, the Gyr (A59)-quinolone-DNA ternary complexes do not arrest the progression of replication forks. Thus, the quinolone-induced covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex formation is necessary but not sufficient to cause the inhibition of DNA replication. We also assess the stability of ternary complexes formed with Gyr (A59), the wild type Gyr, or topoisomerase IV. The ternary complexes formed with Gyr (A59) are more sensitive to salt than those formed with either the wild type Gyr or topoisomerase IV. Furthermore, a competition experiment demonstrates that the ternary complexes formed with Gyr (A59) readily disassociate from the DNA, whereas the ternary complexes formed with either the wild type Gyr or topoisomerase IV remain stably bound. Thus, Gyr-mediated wrapping of the DNA strand is required for the formation of the stable Gyr-quinolone-DNA ternary complex that can arrest replication fork

  7. DNA-osmium complexes: recent developments in the operative chemical analysis of DNA epigenetic modifications.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2014-09-01

    The development of a reaction for the detection of one epigenetic modification in a long DNA strand is a chemically and biologically challenging research subject. Herein, we report and discuss the formation of 5-methylcytosine-osmium complexes that are used as the basis for a bisulfite-free chemical assay for DNA methylation analysis. Osmium in the oxidized state reacts with C5-methylated pyrimidines in the presence of a bipyridine ligand to give a stable ternary complex. On the basis of this reaction, an adenine derivative with a tethered bipyridine moiety has been designed for sequence-specific osmium complex formation. Osmium complexation is then achieved by hybridization of a short DNA molecule containing this functional nucleotide to a target DNA sequence and results in the formation of a cross-linked structure. This novel concept of methylation-specific reaction, based on a straightforward chemical process, expands the range of methods available for the analysis of epigenetic modifications. Advantages of the described method include amplification-insensitive detection, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine complexation, and visualization through methylation-specific in situ hybridization.

  8. High-performance analysis of single interphase cells with custom DNA probes spanning translocation break points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Munne, S.; Lersch, Robert A.; Marquez, C.; Wu, J.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fung, Jingly

    1999-06-01

    The chromatin organization of interphase cell nuclei, albeit an object of intense investigation, is only poorly understood. In the past, this has hampered the cytogenetic analysis of tissues derived from specimens where only few cells were actively proliferating or a significant number of metaphase cells could be obtained by induction of growth. Typical examples of such hard to analyze cell systems are solid tumors, germ cells and, to a certain extent, fetal cells such as amniocytes, blastomeres or cytotrophoblasts. Balanced reciprocal translocations that do not disrupt essential genes and thus do not led to disease symptoms exit in less than one percent of the general population. Since the presence of translocations interferes with homologue pairing in meiosis, many of these individuals experience problems in their reproduction, such as reduced fertility, infertility or a history of spontaneous abortions. The majority of translocation carriers enrolled in our in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs carry simple translocations involving only two autosomes. While most translocations are relatively easy to spot in metaphase cells, the majority of cells biopsied from embryos produced by IVF are in interphase and thus unsuitable for analysis by chromosome banding or FISH-painting. We therefore set out to analyze single interphase cells for presence or absence of specific translocations. Our assay, based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of breakpoint-spanning DNA probes, detects translocations in interphase by visual microscopic inspection of hybridization domains. Probes are prepared so that they span a breakpoint and cover several hundred kb of DNA adjacent to the breakpoint. On normal chromosomes, such probes label a contiguous stretch of DNA and produce a single hybridization domain per chromosome in interphase cells. The translocation disrupts the hybridization domain and the resulting two fragments appear as physically separated hybridization domains in

  9. Small molecule probes finely differentiate between various ds- and ss-DNA and RNA by fluorescence, CD and NMR response.

    PubMed

    Crnolatac, Ivo; Rogan, Iva; Majić, Boris; Tomić, Sanja; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Horvat, Gordan; Makuc, Damjan; Plavec, Janez; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Piantanida, Ivo

    2016-10-12

    Two small molecules showed intriguing properties of analytical multipurpose probes, whereby one chromophore gives different signal for many different DNA/RNA by application of several highly sensitive spectroscopic methods. Dyes revealed pronounced fluorescence ratiomeric differentiation between ds-AU-RNA, AT-DNA and GC-DNA in approximate order 10:8:1. Particularly interesting, dyes showed specific fluorimetric response for poly rA even at 10-fold excess of any other ss-RNA, and moreover such emission selectivity is preserved in multicomponent ss-RNA mixtures. The dyes also showed specific chiral recognition of poly rU in respect to the other ss-RNA by induced CD (ICD) pattern in visible range (400-500 nm), which was attributed to the dye-side-chain contribution to binding (confirmed by absence of any ICD band for reference compound lacking side-chain). Most intriguingly, minor difference in the side-chain attached to dye chromophore resulted in opposite sign of dye-ICD pattern, whereby differences in NMR NOESY contacts and proton chemical shifts between two dye/oligo rU complexes combined with MD simulations and CD calculations attributed observed bisignate ICD to the dimeric dye aggregate within oligo rU.

  10. Small molecule probes finely differentiate between various ds- and ss-DNA and RNA by fluorescence, CD and NMR response.

    PubMed

    Crnolatac, Ivo; Rogan, Iva; Majić, Boris; Tomić, Sanja; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Horvat, Gordan; Makuc, Damjan; Plavec, Janez; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Piantanida, Ivo

    2016-10-12

    Two small molecules showed intriguing properties of analytical multipurpose probes, whereby one chromophore gives different signal for many different DNA/RNA by application of several highly sensitive spectroscopic methods. Dyes revealed pronounced fluorescence ratiomeric differentiation between ds-AU-RNA, AT-DNA and GC-DNA in approximate order 10:8:1. Particularly interesting, dyes showed specific fluorimetric response for poly rA even at 10-fold excess of any other ss-RNA, and moreover such emission selectivity is preserved in multicomponent ss-RNA mixtures. The dyes also showed specific chiral recognition of poly rU in respect to the other ss-RNA by induced CD (ICD) pattern in visible range (400-500 nm), which was attributed to the dye-side-chain contribution to binding (confirmed by absence of any ICD band for reference compound lacking side-chain). Most intriguingly, minor difference in the side-chain attached to dye chromophore resulted in opposite sign of dye-ICD pattern, whereby differences in NMR NOESY contacts and proton chemical shifts between two dye/oligo rU complexes combined with MD simulations and CD calculations attributed observed bisignate ICD to the dimeric dye aggregate within oligo rU. PMID:27662767

  11. Orientation of non-blue cupric complexes on DNA fibers.

    PubMed

    Chikira, M; Sato, T; Antholine, W E; Petering, D H

    1991-02-15

    Three different orientations of non-blue, type 2 cupric complexes on DNA fibers are obtained from EPR data. The cupric complex of bleomycin, CuBlm, binds as described previously (Shields, H., McGlumphy,C., and Hamrick, P., J., Jr. (1982) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 697, 113-120), except possibly with more restricted motion. The square plane of CuBlm makes an angle of about 65 degrees with the fiber axis. The tridentate complex 2-formylpyridine monothiosemicarbazonato Cu2+ binds with its planar structure perpendicular to the fiber axis. In contrast, other tridentate cupric complexes of tripeptides, CuGHK and CuGHG, bind with the square plane parallel to the fiber axis. The bound forms of Cu(GHK) and Cu(GHG) are determined mostly by the GH moiety in the complex; the contribution of lysine in defining the orientation of the copper moiety is minimal. Thus, the structure of the ligand determines the orientation of these complexes on DNA. PMID:1704368

  12. Zn(2+)-cyclen-based complex enable a selective detection of single-stranded thymine-rich DNA in aqueous buffer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zece; Wang, Sheng; Wei, Danqing; Yang, Chuluo

    2016-11-15

    It is a big challenge to develop fluorescent probes for selective detection of DNA with specific sequences in aqueous buffers. We report a new tetraphenylethene-based Zn(2+)-cyclen complex (TPECyZn), and a chemo-sensing ensemble of the Zn complex with phenol red. TPECyZn showed significant fluorescence enhancement upon binding to thymine-rich DNA in HEPES buffers. But its selectivity was not high enough to eliminate the interference from some random DNA. By constructing the chemo-sensing ensemble of TPECyZn with phenol red, the background fluorescence was eliminated due to the energy transfer from TPECyZn to phenol red. Moreover, this chemo-sensing ensemble revealed high selectivity in detecting thymine-rich single-stranded DNA over other DNA in aqueous buffer. It can detect poly deoxythymidylic acid sequence as short as 2 nt. This detection in aqueous media makes this probe feasible in real application. PMID:27288711

  13. Probing nuclear pore complex architecture with proximity-dependent biotinylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae In; Birendra, K C; Zhu, Wenhong; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Doye, Valérie; Roux, Kyle J

    2014-06-17

    Proximity-dependent biotin identification (BioID) is a method for identifying protein associations that occur in vivo. By fusing a promiscuous biotin ligase to a protein of interest expressed in living cells, BioID permits the labeling of proximate proteins during a defined labeling period. In this study we used BioID to study the human nuclear pore complex (NPC), one of the largest macromolecular assemblies in eukaryotes. Anchored within the nuclear envelope, NPCs mediate the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of numerous cellular components. We applied BioID to constituents of the Nup107-160 complex and the Nup93 complex, two conserved NPC subcomplexes. A strikingly different set of NPC constituents was detected depending on the position of these BioID-fusion proteins within the NPC. By applying BioID to several constituents located throughout the extremely stable Nup107-160 subcomplex, we refined our understanding of this highly conserved subcomplex, in part by demonstrating a direct interaction of Nup43 with Nup85. Furthermore, by using the extremely stable Nup107-160 structure as a molecular ruler, we defined the practical labeling radius of BioID. These studies further our understanding of human NPC organization and demonstrate that BioID is a valuable tool for exploring the constituency and organization of large protein assemblies in living cells.

  14. Probing Potential Energy Surface Exploration Strategies for Complex Systems.

    PubMed

    N'Tsouaglo, Gawonou Kokou; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand; Pochet, Pascal

    2015-04-14

    The efficiency of minimum-energy configuration searching algorithms is closely linked to the energy landscape structure of complex systems, yet these algorithms often include a number of steps of which the effect is not always clear. Decoupling these steps and their impacts can allow us to better understand both their role and the nature of complex energy landscape. Here, we consider a family of minimum-energy algorithms based, directly or indirectly, on the well-known Bell-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) principle. Comparing trajectories generated with BEP-based algorithms to kinetically correct off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo schemes allow us to confirm that the BEP principle does not hold for complex systems since forward and reverse energy barriers are completely uncorrelated. As would be expected, following the lowest available energy barrier leads to rapid trapping. This is why BEP-based methods require also a direct handling of visited basins or barriers. Comparing the efficiency of these methods with a thermodynamical handling of low-energy barriers, we show that most of the efficiency of the BEP-like methods lie first and foremost in the basin management rather than in the BEP-like step. PMID:26574398

  15. Probing Potential Energy Surface Exploration Strategies for Complex Systems.

    PubMed

    N'Tsouaglo, Gawonou Kokou; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand; Pochet, Pascal

    2015-04-14

    The efficiency of minimum-energy configuration searching algorithms is closely linked to the energy landscape structure of complex systems, yet these algorithms often include a number of steps of which the effect is not always clear. Decoupling these steps and their impacts can allow us to better understand both their role and the nature of complex energy landscape. Here, we consider a family of minimum-energy algorithms based, directly or indirectly, on the well-known Bell-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) principle. Comparing trajectories generated with BEP-based algorithms to kinetically correct off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo schemes allow us to confirm that the BEP principle does not hold for complex systems since forward and reverse energy barriers are completely uncorrelated. As would be expected, following the lowest available energy barrier leads to rapid trapping. This is why BEP-based methods require also a direct handling of visited basins or barriers. Comparing the efficiency of these methods with a thermodynamical handling of low-energy barriers, we show that most of the efficiency of the BEP-like methods lie first and foremost in the basin management rather than in the BEP-like step.

  16. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1–40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1–40 peptide on the basis of their emission response. PMID:26419607

  17. New insights into the transition pathway from nonspecific to specific complex of DNA with Escherichia coli integration host factor.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Paula; Kuznetsov, Serguei V; Ansari, Anjum

    2008-05-15

    To elucidate the nature of the transition-state ensemble along the reaction pathway from a nonspecific protein-DNA complex to the specific complex, we have carried out measurements of DNA bending/unbending dynamics on a cognate DNA substrate in complex with integration host factor (IHF), an architectural protein from E. coli that bends its cognate site by approximately 180 degrees . We use a laser temperature jump to perturb the IHF-DNA complex and monitor the relaxation kinetics with time-resolved FRET measurements on DNA substrates end-labeled with a FRET pair. Previously, we showed that spontaneous bending/kinking of DNA, from thermal disruption of base-pairing/-stacking interactions, may be the rate-limiting step in the formation of the specific complex (Kuznetsov, S. V.; Sugimura, S.; Vivas, P.; Crothers, D. M.; Ansari, A. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2006, 103, 18515). Here, we probe the effect of varying [KCl], which affects the stability of the complex, on this rate-limiting step. We find that below approximately 250 mM KCl, the observed relaxation kinetics are from the unimolecular bending/unbending of DNA, and the relaxation rate kr is independent of [KCl]. Above approximately 300 mM KCl, dissociation of the IHF-DNA complex becomes significant, and the observed relaxation process includes contributions from the association/dissociation step, with kr decreasing with increasing [KCl]. The DNA bending step occurs with a positive activation enthalpy, despite the large negative enthalpy change reported for the specific IHF-DNA complex (Holbrook, J. A.; Tsodikov, O. V.; Saecker, R. M.; Record, M. T., Jr. J. Mol. Biol. 2001, 310, 379). Our conclusion from these studies is that in the uphill climb to the transition state, the DNA is kinked, but with no release of ions, as indicated by the salt-independent behavior of k(r) at low [KCl]. Any release of ions in the unimolecular process, together with conformational changes in the protein-DNA complex that facilitate

  18. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics at interfaces: fluorescent DNA probes at the dodecane/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licari, Giuseppe; Vauthey, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Although the interfaces between two isotropic media are of primary importance in many areas of science and technology, their properties are only partially understood. Our strategy to obtain an insight into these properties is to investigate the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of environment-sensitive molecular probes at liquid interfaces using time-resolved surface second harmonic generation, and to compare it with the dynamics of the same molecules in bulk solutions. Additionally, this approach gives rich information on how the chemical reactivity may change when going from the bulk phase to the interface. This is illustrated by an investigation performed with a series of fluorescent DNA probes at the dodecane/water interface without and with the presence of DNA in the aqueous phase. Substantial differences in the conformation of these cyanine dyes (aggregated or not) and in the excited-state dynamics are observed when going from bulk solutions to the interface. Moreover, the presence of double-stranded DNA in the aqueous phase induces some chirality at the interface.

  19. Using molecular beacons to probe molecular interactions between lactate dehydrogenase and single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Fang, X; Li, J J; Tan, W

    2000-07-15

    The interactions between two key macromolecular species, nucleic acids and proteins, control many important biological processes. There have been limited effective methodologies to study these interactions in real time. In this work, we have applied a newly developed molecular beacon (MB) DNA probe for the analysis of an enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and for the investigation of its properties of binding with single-stranded DNA. Molecular beacons are single-stranded oligonucleotide probes designed to report the presence of specific complementary nucleic acids by fluorescence detection. The interaction between LDH and MB has resulted in a significant fluorescence signal enhancement, which is used for the elucidation of MB/LDH binding properties. The processes of binding between MB and different isoenzymes of LDH have been studied. The results show that the stoichiometry of LDH-5/MB binding is 1:1, and the binding constant is 1.9 x 10(-7) M(-1). We have also studied salt effects, binding sites, temperature effects, pH effects, and the binding specificities for different isoenzymes. Our results demonstrate that MB can be effectively used for sensitive protein quantitation and for efficient protein-DNA interaction studies. MB has a signal transduction mechanism built within the molecule and can thus be used for the development of rapid protein assays and for real-time measurements.

  20. In situ molecular hybridization for detection of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus DNA by using strand-specific probes: identification of target cells for viral replication in cell cultures and in mink kits with virus-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E; Wolfinbarger, J; Race, R E

    1987-08-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were utilized in in situ molecular hybridization specifically to localize replicative form DNA of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Throughout in vitro infection, duplex replicative form DNA of ADV was located in the cell nuclei. Single-stranded virion DNA and capsid proteins were present in the nuclei early in infection, but were later translocated to the cytoplasm. In neonatal mink, ADV causes acute interstitial pneumonia, and replicative forms of viral DNA were found predominantly in alveolar type II cells of the lung. Viral DNA was also found in other organs, but strand-specific probes made it possible to show that most of this DNA represented virus sequestration. In addition, glomerular immune complexes containing intact virions were detected, suggesting that ADV virions may have a role in the genesis of ADV-induced glomerulonephritis.

  1. Probing Complexity using the LCLS and the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Berrah, Nora

    2015-02-19

    The goal of our research program is to investigate fundamental interactions between photons and molecular/nano-systems to advance our quantitative understanding of electron correlations, charge transfer and many body phenomena. Our research projects focus on probing, on a femtosecond time-scale, multi-electron interactions and tracing nuclear motion in order to understand, and ultimately control energy flow and charge transfer processes from electromagnetic radiation to matter. The experiments will be carried out with state of the art instrumentation built by the P.I. team with funds from a DoE "Single Investigator and Small Group Research" (SISGR) grant. The research projects carried out the past three years consisted of first experiments using the linac coherent light source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility at the SLAC National Laboratory, as well as the study of correlated processes in select anions using the ALS. A report for the past cycle is described in section II. These studies have paved the way for our renewal application for the next three years. Our research interests for the next three years extend our past and present research by carrying out time-resolved measurements described in section III. They will consist of: a) The study of molecular dynamics that happen on ultrafast time scales, using pump-probe schemes and the study of non-linear physics in the x-ray regime via multi-photon absorption from the LCLS. This will be achieved by measuring and examining both electronic and nuclear dynamics subsequent to the interaction of molecules and nano-systems with LCLS pulses of various wavelength, intensity and pulse duration as described in section III.A. b) The study of molecular dynamics and correlated processes via absorption of vuv-soft x-rays from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide single-photon ionization baseline results for LCLS studies. In addition, we will study the photodetachment of anions

  2. Ag-DNA Emitter: Metal Nanorod or Supramolecular Complex?

    PubMed

    Ramazanov, Ruslan R; Sych, Tomash S; Reveguk, Zakhar V; Maksimov, Dmitriy A; Vdovichev, Artem A; Kononov, Alexei I

    2016-09-15

    Ligand-stabilized luminescent metal clusters, in particular, DNA-based Ag clusters, are now employed in a host of applications such as sensing and bioimaging. Despite their utility, the nature of their excited states as well as detailed structures of the luminescent metal-ligand complexes remain poorly understood. We apply a new joint experimental and theoretical approach based on QM/MM-MD simulations of the fluorescence excitation spectra for three Ag clusters synthesized on a 12-mer DNA. Contrary to a previously proposed "rod-like" model, our results show that (1) three to four Ag atoms suffice to form a partially oxidized nanocluster emitting in visible range; (2) charge transfer from Ag cluster to DNA contributes to the excited states of the complexes; and (3) excitation spectra of the clusters are strongly affected by the bonding of Ag atoms to DNA bases. The presented approach can also provide a practical way to determine the structure and properties of other luminescent metal clusters. PMID:27564452

  3. Tunable DFB lasers based on DNA-surfactant-dye complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Toshifumi; Kawabe, Yutaka

    2012-10-01

    We succeeded to observe fluorescence enhancement and tunable laser emission from spin coated films of DNAcetyltrimetylammonium (CTMA) complex doped with weakly fluorescent cyanine dyes, DiQC2(1) and DiQC2(3) which were optically excited by interfering two beams forming a induced dynamic grating. Wavelength tuning of the laser emission was achieved by varying the angle between the pumping beams determining the grating period on the film. Degradation processes of the dye-doped films of DNA complex and PMMA were investigated and compared by monitoring absorption spectra after continuous excitation with a pulsed laser. Roles of DNA for fluorescence enhancement and improved durability were confirmed for these cyanine dyes.

  4. Onchocerca volvulus DNA probe classification correlates with epidemiologic patterns of blindness.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, P A; Dadzie, K Y; De Sole, G; Remme, J; Alley, E S; Unnasch, T R

    1992-05-01

    Onchocerciasis, or river blindness, results from infection with Onchocerca volvulus. The parasite is endemic to West Africa, in both rain forest and savanna bioclimes. Several lines of evidence suggest that different strains of the parasite exist in the rain forest and savanna. Furthermore, epidemiologic evidence indicates that ocular onchocerciasis is most severe in savanna regions. This has led to the hypothesis that there is a strain association with ocular pathology. To test this hypothesis, parasites from villages in which severe and mild onchocerciasis were endemic were classified with two strain-specific DNA probes. A strong correlation (P less than .001) was found between disease severity and probe recognition, supporting the hypothesis that pathogenicity is strain related. The results suggest that pFS-1 and pSS-1BT may be used to predict the pathogenic potential of parasite populations throughout much of West Africa.

  5. Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) variants and carrier detection analyzed by DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Poon, M C; Chui, D H; Patterson, M; Starozik, D M; Dimnik, L S; Hoar, D I

    1987-04-01

    We have used two strategies to study 14 hemophilia B families from 11 kindreds for possible carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. First, we sequentially used the Factor IX probes (sequentially with restriction enzymes Taq I, Xmn I, and Dde I), and the linked probes p45h (Taq I), p45d (Pst I), and 52a (Taq I) for restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Second, we searched for useful variant Taq I digestion fragments using the Factor IX complementary DNA. Two separate new Taq I variants in exon VIII were identified. Using both strategies, 11 of 14 families (from 9 of 11 kindreds) were informative for further studies. In five kindreds studied in detail, the carrier status of all 11 at risk females was determined and prenatal diagnosis could be offered to the offsprings of each of the six carriers identified. Thus, in this study, we have identified a higher proportion of informative families than has previously been reported.

  6. Electrochemical detection of PCR amplicons of Escherichia coli genome based on DNA nanostructural probes and polyHRP enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanli; Wang, LeLe; Xu, Li; Li, Lanying; Ren, Suzhen; Cao, Chengming; Jia, Nengqin; Aldalbahi, Ali; Song, Shiping; Shi, Jiye; Xia, Jiaoyun; Liu, Gang; Zuo, Xiaolei

    2016-09-21

    Fast, portable and sensitive analysis of E. coli is becoming an important challenge in many critical fields (e.g., food safety, environmental monitoring and clinical diagnosis). Thus, electrochemical biosensing of PCR amplicons from the bacterial genome has attracted reasonable research attention. In this work, we utilized a 3D DNA tetrahedral probe to establish a "sandwich-type" electrochemical DNA biosensor for sensitive and specific analysis of a 250 bp unpurified PCR amplicon from the uidA gene of the E. coli genome. Asymmetric PCR was used to produce single-stranded PCR products. Streptavidin-polyHRP80 was employed to improve the signal gain during electrochemical detection. We optimized important experimental conditions for DNA sensing, including the streptavidin-polyHRP, the signal probe and the ion strength. Finally, we achieved a remarkable sensitivity of 10 fM synthetic DNA target, and successfully performed the analysis of PCR amplicons from as low as 0.2 pg μL(-1) of E. coli genome. Compared with traditional single stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe based detection, our present work demonstrated 3 orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity. In addition, our electrochemical DNA biosensor was 4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than normal electrophoretic analysis of PCR products. Our work made important progress in DNA nanostructured probe-based biosensors toward application in real applications. PMID:27460969

  7. Use of a D17Z1 oligonucleotide probe for human DNA quantitation prior to PCR analysis of polymorphic DNA markers

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, S.; Alavaren, M.; Varlaro, J.

    1994-09-01

    The alpha-satellite DNA locus D17Z1 contains primate-specific sequences which are repeated several hundred times per chromosome 17. A probe that was designed to hybridize to a subset of the D17Z1 sequence can be used for very sensitive and specific quantitation of human DNA. Sample human genomic DNA is immobilized on nylon membrane using a slot blot apparatus, and then hybridized with a biotinylated D17Z1 oligonucleotide probe. The subsequent binding of streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase to the bound probe allows for either calorimetric (TMB) or chemiluminescent (ECL) detection. Signals obtained for sample DNAs are then compared to the signals obtained for a series of human DNA standards. For either detection method, forty samples can be quantitated in less than two hours, with a sensitivity of 150 pg. As little as 20 pg of DNA can be quantitated when using chemiluminescent detection with longer film exposures. PCR analysis of several VNTR and STR markers has indicated that optimal typing results are generally obtained within a relatively narrow range of input DNA quantities. Too much input DNA can lead to PCR artifacts such as preferential amplification of smaller alleles, non-specific amplification products, and exaggeration of the DNA synthesis slippage products that are seen with STR markers. Careful quantitation of human genomic DNA prior to PCR can avoid or minimize these problems and ultimately give cleaner, more unambiguous PCR results.

  8. [Molecular dynamics of immune complex of photoadduct-containing DNA with Fab-Anti-DNA antibody fragment].

    PubMed

    Akberova, N I; Zhmurov, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to DNA play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of structural mechanisms of both the antigen recognition and the interaction of anti-DNA antibodies with DNA will help to understand the role of DNA-containing immune complexes in various pathologies and can provide a basis for new treatment modalities. Moreover, the DNA-antibody complex is an analog of specific intracellular DNA-protein interactions. In this work, we used in silico molecular dynamic simulations of bimolecular complexes of the dsDNA segment containing the Fab fragment of an anti-DNA antibody to obtain the detailed thermodynamic and structural characteristics of dynamic intermolecular interactions. Using computationally modified crystal structure of the Fab-DNA complex (PDB ID: 3VW3), we studied the equilibrium molecular dynamics of the 64M-5 antibody Fab fragment associated with the dsDNA fragment containing the thymine dimer, the product of DNA photodamage. Amino acid residues that constitute paratopes and the complementary nucleotide epitopes for the Fab-DNA construct were identified. Stacking and electrostatic interactions were found to play the main role in mediating the most specific antibody-dsDNA contacts, while hydrogen bonds were less significant. These findings may shed light on the formation and properties of pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus associated with skin photosensitivity and DNA photodamage.

  9. A sensitive DNA biosensor based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction for capture probe immobilization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingxiang; Ding, Yingtao; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Shulian; Zhang, Bin; Ni, Jiancong; Gao, Fei

    2013-07-25

    A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. First, the versatile sulfonic dye molecule of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonate (AN-SO3(-)) was electrodeposited on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to form a steady and ordered AN-SO3(-) layer. Then the amino-terminated capture probe was covalently grafted to the surface of SO3(-)-AN deposited GCE through the sulfamide coupling reaction between the amino groups in the probe DNA and the sulfonic groups in the AN-SO3(-). The step-by-step modification process was characterized by electrochemistry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Using Ru(NH3)6(3+) as probe, the probe density and the hybridization efficiency of the biosensor were determined to be 3.18×10(13) strands cm(-2) and 86.5%, respectively. The hybridization performance of the biosensor was examined by differential pulse voltammetry using Co(phen)3(3+/2+) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) as the indicator. The selectivity experiments showed that the biosensor presented distinguishable response after hybridization with the three-base mismatched, non-complementary and complementary sequences. Under the optimal conditions, the oxidation peak currents of Co(phen)3(3+/2+) increased linearly with the logarithm values of the concentration of the complementary sequences in the range from 1.0×10(-13)M to 1.0×10(-8)M with a regression coefficient of 0.9961. The detection limit was estimated to be 7.2×10(-14)M based on 3σ. PMID:23845495

  10. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    SciTech Connect

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Ahmad, Haslina; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-03

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+}, (bpy = 2,2′bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  11. Crystal Structure of a Bacterial Topoisomerase IB in Complex with DNA Reveals a Secondary DNA Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Asmita; Yakovleva, Lyudmila; Shuman, Stewart; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2010-10-22

    Type IB DNA topoisomerases (TopIB) are monomeric enzymes that relax supercoils by cleaving and resealing one strand of duplex DNA within a protein clamp that embraces a {approx}21 DNA segment. A longstanding conundrum concerns the capacity of TopIB enzymes to stabilize intramolecular duplex DNA crossovers and form protein-DNA synaptic filaments. Here we report a structure of Deinococcus radiodurans TopIB in complex with a 12 bp duplex DNA that demonstrates a secondary DNA binding site located on the surface of the C-terminal domain. It comprises a distinctive interface with one strand of the DNA duplex and is conserved in all TopIB enzymes. Modeling of a TopIB with both DNA sites suggests that the secondary site could account for DNA crossover binding, nucleation of DNA synapsis, and generation of a filamentous plectoneme. Mutations of the secondary site eliminate synaptic plectoneme formation without affecting DNA cleavage or supercoil relaxation.

  12. Cloning of a short HLA-DQ beta locus-specific cDNA probe: typing for DQw specificities.

    PubMed

    Sood, S K; McCusker, C T; Singal, D P

    1989-01-01

    A short HLA-DQ beta locus-specific (141 bp) probe was cloned from the full-length pII-beta-1 cDNA. Pst 1-digested genomic DNA from homozygous typing cell lines (HTC) was hybridized with this short DQ beta locus-specific, pDQ beta 141, probe. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns generated with this DQ beta locus-specific probe were compared with those obtained with the full-length (627 bp) DQ beta, pII-beta-1, probe. The results demonstrate that the RFLP patterns with the pDQ beta 141 probe were very simple, and no crossreacting DR beta and DX beta bands were observed. DQw1, 2, 3 and 4 specificities could each be identified by a single RFLP. PMID:2467193

  13. DNA sequence determinants controlling affinity, stability and shape of DNA complexes bound by the nucleoid protein Fis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hancock, Stephen P.; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C.; Leng, Fenfei

    2016-03-09

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequencesmore » in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. Lastly, the affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions.« less

  14. DNA Sequence Determinants Controlling Affinity, Stability and Shape of DNA Complexes Bound by the Nucleoid Protein Fis

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Stephen P.; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C.

    2016-01-01

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequences in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. The affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions. PMID:26959646

  15. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods to investigate the interaction between 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural and calf thymus DNA using ethidium bromide as a probe.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinhua; Chen, Lanlan; Dong, Yingying; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Xiuhua

    2014-04-24

    In this work, the interaction of 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) under simulated physiological conditions (Tris-HCl buffer of pH 7.40), was explored by UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling method, using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescence probe of DNA. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of EB-ctDNA by 5-HMF was confirmed to be a static quenching, which derived from the formation of a new complex. The binding constants of 5-HMF with DNA in the presence of EB were calculated to be 2.17×10(3), 4.24×10(3) and 6.95×10(3) L mol(-1) at 300, 305 and 310 K, respectively. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change ΔH and entropy change ΔS, suggested that both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds played a predominant role in the binding of 5-HMF to DNA. According to the UV absorption spectroscopy and melting temperature (Tm) curve results, the binding mode of 5-HMF with DNA was indicative of a non-intercalative binding, which was supposed to be a groove binding. The molecular modeling results showed that 5-HMF could bind into the hydrophobic region of ctDNA and supported the conclusions obtained from the above experiments.

  16. Orientation of DNA Minicircles Balances Density and Topological Complexity in Kinetoplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yuanan; Rodriguez, Victor; Klingbeil, Michele; Arsuaga, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), a unique mitochondrial structure common to trypanosomatid parasites, contains thousands of DNA minicircles that are densely packed and can be topologically linked into a chain mail-like network. Experimental data indicate that every minicircle in the network is, on average, singly linked to three other minicircles (i.e., has mean valence 3) before replication and to six minicircles in the late stages of replication. The biophysical factors that determine the topology of the network and its changes during the cell cycle remain unknown. Using a mathematical modeling approach, we previously showed that volume confinement alone can drive the formation of the network and that it induces a linear relationship between mean valence and minicircle density. Our modeling also predicted a minicircle valence two orders of magnitude greater than that observed in kDNA. To determine the factors that contribute to this discrepancy we systematically analyzed the relationship between the topological properties of the network (i.e., minicircle density and mean valence) and its biophysical properties such as DNA bending, electrostatic repulsion, and minicircle relative position and orientation. Significantly, our results showed that most of the discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental observations can be accounted for by the orientation of the minicircles with volume exclusion due to electrostatic interactions and DNA bending playing smaller roles. Our results are in agreement with the three dimensional kDNA organization model, initially proposed by Delain and Riou, in which minicircles are oriented almost perpendicular to the horizontal plane of the kDNA disk. We suggest that while minicircle confinement drives the formation of kDNA networks, it is minicircle orientation that regulates the topological complexity of the network.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxic activities of Ru(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Thota, Sreekanth; Vallala, Srujana; Yerra, Rajeshwar; Rodrigues, Daniel Alencar; Raghavendra, Nulgumnalli Manjunathaiah; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of novel Ru(II) compounds (Ru-1 to Ru-8) bearing R-pdc, 4-Cl-pbinh ligands (where R=4-CF3, 4-F, 4-OH pdc=3-phenyl-5-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide, pbinh=phenoxybenzylidene isonicotinyl hydrazides) and their in vitro antitumor activity toward the cell lines murine leukemia L1210, human lymphocyte CEM, human epithelial cervical carcinoma HeLa, BEL-7402 and Molt4/C8. Some of the complexes exhibited more potent antiproliferative activity against cell lines than the standard drug cisplatin. Ruthenium complex Ru-2 displayed potent cytotoxicity with than that of cisplatin. DNA-binding, DNA cleavage and protein binding properties of ruthenium complexes with these ligands are reported. Interactions of these ruthenium complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Synchronous fluorescence spectra proved that the interaction of ruthenium complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) resulted in a conformational change of the latter.

  18. [THe use of a biotin-labelled DNA probe for detecting the causative agents of chronic urogenital infections].

    PubMed

    Kvasov, A V; Zhdanov, A V; Pis'menskaia, I V; Faĭzullina, N M; Faĭzullin, L Z; Sukhikh, G T

    1998-11-01

    DNA hybridization for detecting HSV, CMV, C. trachomatis, and U. urealyticum by biotin-labeled DNA probe was used for investigating clinical specimens from patients with infertility and chronic urogenital inflammations. High sensitivity and specificity of the method was confirmed by the results of PCR, ELISA, and immunofluorescent methods in 80-90% cases. DNA hybridization technique is a simple method requiring no sophisticated equipment, which recommends it for the diagnosis of sexually-transmitted diseases at clinical laboratories.

  19. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas. PMID:26972953

  20. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas.

  1. Absorption spectroscopic probe to investigate the interaction between Nd(III) and calf-thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Ch. Victory; Singh, N. Rajmuhon

    2011-03-01

    The interaction between Nd(III) and Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) has been studied using absorption spectroscopy involving 4f-4f transition spectra in different aquated organic solvents. Complexation with CT-DNA is indicated by the changes in absorption intensity following the subsequent changes in the oscillator strengths of different 4f-4f bands and Judd-Ofelt intensity ( Tλ) parameters. The other spectral parameters namely Slator-Condon ( Fk's), nephelauxetic effect ( β), bonding ( b1/2) and percent covalency ( δ) parameters are computed to correlate with the binding of Nd(III) with DNA. The absorption spectra of Nd(III) exhibited hyperchromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant, Kb has been determined by absorption measurement. The relative viscosity of DNA decreased with the addition of Nd(III). Thermodynamic parameters have been calculated according to relevant absorption data and Van't Hoff equation. The characterisation of bonding mode has been studied in detail. The results suggested that the major interaction mode between Nd(III) and DNA was external electrostatic binding.

  2. A 2,2"-bipyridine ligand for incorporation into oligodeoxynucleotides: synthesis, stability and fluorescence properties of ruthenium-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, K; McLaughlin, L W

    1999-06-15

    A non-nucleoside linker based upon the ligand 2,2'-bipyridine and ethylene glycol is prepared and placed into the backbone of a number of oligonucleo-tides. The bipyridine ligand is reacted with cis -dichloro bis(2,2'-bipyridyl) Ru(II) to generate the relatively substitutionally inert complex based upon the well-characterized tris -2,2'-bipyridyl Ru(II). The ruthenium-containing DNA complexes exhibited UV and fluorescence characteristics that are consistent with those previously observed for simple tris -2,2'-bipyridyl Ru(II) complexes. Oligonucleotides containing the ruthenium complex will form both DNA duplexes and triplexes with stabilities that are slightly better than those formed from simple tethered oligonucleotide probes in which the two hybridizing sequences are tethered by simple tri(ethylene glycol) or hexa(ethylene glycol) linkers.

  3. A Simple and Fast Semiautomatic Procedure for the Atomistic Modeling of Complex DNA Polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cassio; Iacovelli, Federico; Falconi, Mattia; Cardamone, Francesca; Morozzo Della Rocca, Blasco; de Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Desideri, Alessandro

    2016-05-23

    A semiautomatic procedure to build complex atomistic covalently linked DNA nanocages has been implemented in a user-friendly, free, and fast program. As a test set, seven different truncated DNA polyhedra, composed by B-DNA double helices connected through short single-stranded linkers, have been generated. The atomistic structures, including a tetrahedron, a cube, an octahedron, a dodecahedron, a triangular prism, a pentagonal prism, and a hexagonal prism, have been probed through classical molecular dynamics and analyzed to evaluate their structural and dynamical properties and to highlight possible building faults. The analysis of the simulated trajectories also allows us to investigate the role of the different geometries in defining nanocages stability and flexibility. The data indicate that the cages are stable and that their structural and dynamical parameters measured along the trajectories are slightly affected by the different geometries. These results demonstrate that the constraints imposed by the covalent links induce an almost identical conformational variability independently of the three-dimensional geometry and that the program presented here is a reliable and valid tool to engineer DNA nanostructures. PMID:27050675

  4. A Simple and Fast Semiautomatic Procedure for the Atomistic Modeling of Complex DNA Polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cassio; Iacovelli, Federico; Falconi, Mattia; Cardamone, Francesca; Morozzo Della Rocca, Blasco; de Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Desideri, Alessandro

    2016-05-23

    A semiautomatic procedure to build complex atomistic covalently linked DNA nanocages has been implemented in a user-friendly, free, and fast program. As a test set, seven different truncated DNA polyhedra, composed by B-DNA double helices connected through short single-stranded linkers, have been generated. The atomistic structures, including a tetrahedron, a cube, an octahedron, a dodecahedron, a triangular prism, a pentagonal prism, and a hexagonal prism, have been probed through classical molecular dynamics and analyzed to evaluate their structural and dynamical properties and to highlight possible building faults. The analysis of the simulated trajectories also allows us to investigate the role of the different geometries in defining nanocages stability and flexibility. The data indicate that the cages are stable and that their structural and dynamical parameters measured along the trajectories are slightly affected by the different geometries. These results demonstrate that the constraints imposed by the covalent links induce an almost identical conformational variability independently of the three-dimensional geometry and that the program presented here is a reliable and valid tool to engineer DNA nanostructures.

  5. Detection of supercoiled hepatitis B virus DNA and related forms by means of molecular hybridization to an oligonucleotide probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.J.; Chung, H.T.; Lai, C.L.; Leong, S.; Tam, O.S. )

    1989-12-01

    A novel assay for supercoiled and other fully double-stranded forms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in blood is presented that utilizes molecular hybridisation to a radiophosphorous-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The probe (5'-d(ACGTGCAGAGGTGAAGCGA)) is complementary to the S(+)-strand sequence furthest downstream, at the end of the gap. We examined blood specimens from 137 healthy HBsAg-positive individuals, applying the probe to dots representing 2-3.5 ml serum or plasma. We found that supercoiled HBV is present in many HBV DNA-positive blood specimens albeit in small quantities. Of the 104 specimens that were positive for HBV DNA of any form, 53 annealed to the probe. Serial specimens from the same subject taken over a period of months showed that the proportion of supercoil to other HBV DNA forms was variable. The presence of supercoil HBV DNA was not closely correlated with the level of serum HBV DNA polymerase. The supercoil is an HBV DNA form that can persist in the liver in the presence or absence of other replicative intermediates. This assay may enable further characterization of the status of HBV infection.

  6. DNA-templated Ag nanoclusters as fluorescent probes for sensing and intracellular imaging of hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Ru-Ping; Xiao, Sai-Jin; Bai, Jian-Mei; Zheng, Lin-Ling; Zhan, Lei; Zhao, Xi-Juan; Qiu, Jian-Ding; Huang, Cheng-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a simple, rapid and label-free sensor for the essential biological OH radicals based on the fluorescence quenching of DNA-templated Ag nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs). The OH radicals generated from the Fenton reagent attack and cleave the DNA template, which disturbs the microenvironments around Ag NCs, resulting in spontaneous aggregation due to the lack of stabilization and further the quenching of the Ag NCs fluorescence. These changes in fluorescence intensity allow sensing of OH radicals with good sensitivity and selectivity under optimal conditions. The sensor can be also applied for quantifying the radical scavenging action of antioxidants. Various characterizations including absorption spectra, fluorescence lifetimes, light scattering (LS) spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dark field light scattering imaging, and circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry have been employed to illustrate the proposed sensing mechanism. Further investigations demonstrate that the fluorescent probe could penetrate into intact cell membranes to selectively detect intracellular OH radicals induced by the phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation. These advantageous characteristics make the fluorescent DNA-Ag NCs potentially useful as a new candidate to monitor OH in broad biosystems. PMID:24274306

  7. Measuring complexity, nonextensivity and chaos in the DNA sequence of the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlos, G. P.; Karakatsanis, L. P.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Pavlos, E. G.; Xenakis, M. N.; Clark, Peter; Duke, Jamie; Monos, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    We analyze 4 Mb sequences of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), which is a DNA segment on chromosome 6 with high gene density, controlling many immunological functions and associated with many diseases. The analysis is based on modern theoretical and mathematical tools of complexity theory, such as nonlinear time series analysis and Tsallis non-extensive statistics. The results revealed that the DNA complexity and self-organization can be related to fractional dynamical nonlinear processes with low-dimensional deterministic chaotic and non-extensive statistical character, which generate the DNA sequences under the extremization of Tsallis q-entropy principle. While it still remains an open question as to whether the DNA walk is a fractional Brownian motion (FBM), a static anomalous diffusion process or a non-Gaussian dynamical fractional anomalous diffusion process, the results of this study testify for the latter, providing also a possible explanation for the previously observed long-range power law correlations of nucleotides, as well as the long-range correlation properties of coding and non-coding sequences present in DNA sequences.

  8. Development of an on-site rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction system and the characterization of suitable DNA polymerases for TaqMan probe technology.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Naruishi, Nahoko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Nagai, Hidenori

    2016-08-01

    On-site quantitative analyses of microorganisms (including viruses) by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system are significantly influencing medical and biological research. We have developed a remarkably rapid and portable real-time PCR system that is based on microfluidic approaches. Real-time PCR using TaqMan probes consists of a complex reaction. Therefore, in a rapid real-time PCR, the optimum DNA polymerase must be estimated by using actual real-time PCR conditions. In this study, we compared the performance of three DNA polymerases in actual PCR conditions using our rapid real-time PCR system. Although KAPA2G Fast HS DNA Polymerase has the highest enzymatic activity among them, SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase exhibited better performance to rapidly increase the fluorescence signal in an actual real-time PCR using TaqMan probes. Furthermore, we achieved rapid detection of Escherichia coli in 7 min by using SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase with the same sensitivity as that of a conventional thermal cycler.

  9. Development of an on-site rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction system and the characterization of suitable DNA polymerases for TaqMan probe technology.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Naruishi, Nahoko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Nagai, Hidenori

    2016-08-01

    On-site quantitative analyses of microorganisms (including viruses) by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system are significantly influencing medical and biological research. We have developed a remarkably rapid and portable real-time PCR system that is based on microfluidic approaches. Real-time PCR using TaqMan probes consists of a complex reaction. Therefore, in a rapid real-time PCR, the optimum DNA polymerase must be estimated by using actual real-time PCR conditions. In this study, we compared the performance of three DNA polymerases in actual PCR conditions using our rapid real-time PCR system. Although KAPA2G Fast HS DNA Polymerase has the highest enzymatic activity among them, SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase exhibited better performance to rapidly increase the fluorescence signal in an actual real-time PCR using TaqMan probes. Furthermore, we achieved rapid detection of Escherichia coli in 7 min by using SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase with the same sensitivity as that of a conventional thermal cycler. PMID:27271319

  10. A complex between replication factor A (SSB) and DNA helicase stimulates DNA synthesis of DNA polymerase alpha on double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Grosse, F

    1992-11-01

    A helicase-like DNA unwinding activity was found in highly purified fractions of the calf thymus single-stranded DNA binding protein (ctSSB), also known as replication protein A (RP-A) or replication factor A (RF-A). This activity depended on the hydrolysis of ATP or dATP, and used CTP with a lower efficiency. ctSSB promoted the homologous DNA polymerase alpha to perform DNA synthesis on double-stranded templates containing replication fork-like structures. The rate and amount of DNA synthesis was found to be dependent on the concentration of ctSSB. At a 10-fold mass excess of ctSSB over double-stranded DNA, products of 200-600 nucleotides in length were obtained. This comprises or even exceeds the length of a eukaryotic Okazaki fragment. The ctSSB-associated DNA helicase activity is most likely a distinct protein rather than an inherent property of SSB, as inferred from titration experiments between SSB and DNA. The association of a helicase with SSB and the stimulatory action of this complex to the DNA polymerase alpha-catalyzed synthesis of double-stranded DNA suggests a cooperative function of the three enzymatic activities in the process of eukaryotic DNA replication.

  11. DNA-METAFECTENE PRO complexation: a physical chemistry study.

    PubMed

    Alatorre-Meda, Manuel; González-Pérez, Alfredo; Rodríguez, Julio R

    2010-07-21

    Complexes formed between cationic liposomes and DNA (also known as lipoplexes or genosomes) have proven, for years now, to be a suitable option for gene delivery to cells, transfection, however, some aspects regarding the liposome-DNA interaction mechanism and complex stability remain still unclear. This work aims to improve the understanding of the poorly defined mechanisms and structural conformation associated with the interaction of METAFECTENE PRO (MEP), a commercial liposomal transfection reagent, with poly-anion DNA at mass ratios around the mass ratio recommended for transfection (L/D congruent with 700). A physical chemistry characterization was conducted at a pH of 6.5 and at a temperature of 25 degrees C by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS), electrophoretic mobility (zeta-potential), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Five parameters important for transfection were determined for the lipoplexes: (i) the hydrodynamic radius, R(H), (ii) the stability with time, (iii) the mass ratio of at which both moieties start to interact, (L/D)(i), (iv) the overall charge, and (v) the morphology. Results in ensemble point to a "beads on a string" conformation, with the lipoplex formation occurring well below isoneutrality from (L/D)(i) congruent with 600. The lipoplexes were found to be stable within at least seven days presenting an average R(H) of 135 nm.

  12. Revisit an old problem -- Complexation between DNA and PEI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chi

    2009-03-01

    After revisiting the captioned problem by using a combination of chemical synthesis and physical methods, we studied the dynamics of the complexation between branched polyethyleneimine (bPEI) and plasmid DNA (pDNA) and characterized the structure, size and surface charge of the resultant DNA/PEI complexes (polyplexes). As expected, in order to reach a high efficiency in gene transfection into cells it is necessary to use a higher N:P ratio and make the polyplexes positively charged. Our results reveal that it is those uncomplexed bPEI chains free in the solution mixture that plays a vitally important role in enhancing the transfection efficiency, inspiring new thinking of how to correlate in vitro and in vivo studies so that we can improve the in vivo transfection efficiency. Increasing the N:P ratio normally results in a higher cytotoxicity, which is a catch-22 problem. Recently, we found that a proper modification of bPEI can greatly reduce its cytotoxicity without any suffering in the transfection efficiency. In this lecture, we will show that our properly modified bPEI is even much more effective and less cytotoxic in the gene transfection than those commercially available lipoflexes. Our recent breakthrough leads to a complete new direction in the development of non-viral vectors for molecular medicines, including gene transfection.

  13. Complex genomic organization of Indian muntjac centromeric DNA.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ya-Ming; Li, Tzai-Shiuan; Hsieh, Lie-Jiau; Hsu, Pei-Ching; Li, Yueh-Chun; Lin, Chyi-Chyang

    2009-01-01

    A 69-kb Indian muntjac bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone that screened positive for Cervid satellites I and IV was selected for complete sequence analysis and further characterization. The sequences of this BAC clone were found in the centromeres and in some interstitial sites of Indian muntjac chromosomes. Sequence analyses showed that the BAC clone contained a 14.5 kb Cervid satellite I-like DNA element and a 9 kb Cervid satellite IV-like DNA element. In addition, it contained 51 regions each organized in a complex fashion, with sequences homology to intersperse repetitive sequences such as LINEs, SINEs, LTRs, other published DNA elements, and unassigned sequences. The FISH patterns of seven non-satellite sequence elements generated from the BAC clone showed mainly specific to centromeres of the Indian muntjac representing novel centromeric DNAs of the species. Furthermore, FISH signals and Southern blot patterns of these elements suggest the existence of a not yet identified repetitive sequence with giant repeated monomers. Positive FISH signals of these elements were also detected in the centromeric regions of Formosan muntjac. This suggests that these newly identified non-Cervid satellite DNA sequences have been conserved in the centromere of the Formosan muntjac.

  14. HUBBLE PROBES THE COMPLEX HISTORY OF A DYING STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen, NGC 6543, nicknamed the 'Cat's Eye Nebula.' Hubble reveals surprisingly intricate structures including concentric gas shells, jets of high-speed gas and unusual shock-induced knots of gas. Estimated to be 1,000 years old, the nebula is a visual 'fossil record' of the dynamics and late evolution of a dying star. A preliminary interpretation suggests that the star might be a double-star system. The dynamical effects of two stars orbiting one another most easily explains the intricate structures, which are much more complicated than features seen in most planetary nebulae. (The two stars are too close together to be individually resolved by Hubble, and instead, appear as a single point of light at the center of the nebula.) According to this model, a fast 'stellar wind' of gas blown off the central star created the elongated shell of dense, glowing gas. This structure is embedded inside two larger lobes of gas blown off the star at an earlier phase. These lobes are 'pinched' by a ring of denser gas, presumably ejected along the orbital plane of the binary companion. The suspected companion star also might be responsible for a pair of high-speed jets of gas that lie at right angles to this equatorial ring. If the companion were pulling in material from a neighboring star, jets escaping along the companion's rotation axis could be produced. These jets would explain several puzzling features along the periphery of the gas lobes. Like a stream of water hitting a sand pile, the jets compress gas ahead of them, creating the 'curlicue' features and bright arcs near the outer edge of the lobes. The twin jets are now pointing in different directions than these features. This suggests the jets are wobbling, or precessing, and turning on and off episodically. The image was taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 on September 18, 1994. NGC 6543 is 3,000 light-years away in the

  15. Detection of hepatitis A virus in seeded estuarine samples by hybridization with cDNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Estes, M.K.; Metcalf, T.G.; Melnick, J.L

    1986-10-01

    The development and trials of a nucleic acid hybridization test for the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in estuarine samples within 48 h are described. Approximately 10/sup 4/ physical particlels of HAV per dot could be detected. Test sensitivity was optimized by the consideration of hydbridization stringency, /sup 32/P energy level, probe concentration, and nucleic acid binding to filters. Test specificity was shown by a lack of cross-hybridization with other enteroviruses and unrelated nucleic acids. Potential false-positive reactions between bacterial DNA in samples and residual vector DNA contamination of purified nucleotide sequences in probes were eliminated by DNase treatment of samples. Humic acid at concentrations of up to 100 mg/liter caused only insignificant decreases in test sensitivity. Interference with hybridization by organic components of virus-containing eluates was removed by proteinase K digestion followed by phenol extraction and ethanol precipitation. The test is suitable for detecting naturally occurring HAV in samples from polluted estuarine environments.

  16. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Early DNA Damage Response Proteins on Complex DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Frank; Löb, Daniel; Lengert, Nicor; Durante, Marco; Drossel, Barbara; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Jakob, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The response of cells to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is determined by the activation of multiple pathways aimed at repairing the injury and maintaining genomic integrity. Densely ionizing radiation induces complex damage consisting of different types of DNA lesions in close proximity that are difficult to repair and may promote carcinogenesis. Little is known about the dynamic behavior of repair proteins on complex lesions. In this study we use live-cell imaging for the spatio-temporal characterization of early protein interactions at damage sites of increasing complexity. Beamline microscopy was used to image living cells expressing fluorescently-tagged proteins during and immediately after charged particle irradiation to reveal protein accumulation at damaged sites in real time. Information on the mobility and binding rates of the recruited proteins was obtained from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Recruitment of the DNA damage sensor protein NBS1 accelerates with increasing lesion density and saturates at very high damage levels. FRAP measurements revealed two different binding modalities of NBS1 to damage sites and a direct impact of lesion complexity on the binding. Faster recruitment with increasing lesion complexity was also observed for the mediator MDC1, but mobility was limited at very high damage densities due to nuclear-wide binding. We constructed a minimal computer model of the initial response to DSB based on known protein interactions only. By fitting all measured data using the same set of parameters, we can reproduce the experimentally characterized steps of the DNA damage response over a wide range of damage densities. The model suggests that the influence of increasing lesion density accelerating NBS1 recruitment is only dependent on the different binding modes of NBS1, directly to DSB and to the surrounding chromatin via MDC1. This elucidates an impact of damage clustering on repair without the

  17. Kelvin probe force microscopy of DNA-capped nanoparticles for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Yang, Jaemoon; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoon, Dae Sung

    2016-07-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a chance to attenuate or augment the SP signal of DCNP without additional enhancement of instrumentation capabilities.Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a

  18. Crystal structure of a complex of a type IA DNA topoisomerase with a single-stranded DNA molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Changela, A.; Digate, R.J.; Mondragon, A.

    2010-03-05

    A variety of cellular processes, including DNA replication, transcription, and chromosome condensation, require enzymes that can regulate the ensuing topological changes occurring in DNA. Such enzymes - DNA topoisomerases - alter DNA topology by catalysing the cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), the passage of DNA through the resulting break, and the rejoining of the broken phosphodiester backbone. DNA topoisomerase III from Escherichia coli belongs to the type IA family of DNA topoisomerases, which transiently cleave ssDNA via formation of a covalent 5' phosphotyrosine intermediate. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.05 {angstrom} resolution, of an inactive mutant of E. coli DNA topoisomerase III in a non-covalent complex with an 8-base ssDNA molecule. The enzyme undergoes a conformational change that allows the oligonucleotide to bind within a groove leading to the active site. We note that the ssDNA molecule adopts a conformation like that of B-DNA while bound to the enzyme. The position of the DNA within the realigned active site provides insight into the role of several highly conserved residues during catalysis. These findings confirm various aspects of the type IA topoisomerase mechanism while suggesting functional implications for other topoisomerases and proteins that perform DNA rearrangements.

  19. Carrier-specific breakpoint-spanning DNA probes: an approach to preimplantation genetic diagnosis in interphase cells.

    PubMed

    Cassel, M J; Munné, S; Fung, J; Weier, H U

    1997-09-01

    Carriers of chromosomal inversions or other balanced rearrangements represent a significant fraction of patients in in-vitro fertilization (IVF) programmes due to recurrent reproductive problems. In most cases, chromosomal imbalance in fertilized oocytes is incompatible with embryo survival leading to increased rates of spontaneous abortions. Assuming that a fraction of the germ cells is karyotypically normal, these patients would greatly benefit from efficient procedures for generation and use of breakpoint-specific DNA hybridization probes in preconception and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). We describe the generation of such patient-specific probes to discriminate between normal and aberrant chromosomes in interphase cells. First, a large insert DNA library was screened for probes that bind adjacent to the chromosomal breakpoints or span them. Then, probe and hybridization parameters were optimized using white blood cells from the carrier to increase in hybridization signal intensity and contrast. Finally, the probes were tested on target cells (typically polar bodies or blastomeres) and a decision about the colour labelling scheme was made, before the probes can be used for preconception or preimplantation genetic analysis. Thus, it was demonstrated that cells with known structural abnormalities could be detected, based on hybridization of breakpoint spanning yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA probes in interphase cells.

  20. Design and testing of a functional group-specific DNA probe for the study of natural populations of acetogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, C R; Hui, Y

    1991-01-01

    The acetogens, although phylogenetically diverse, can be characterized by their possession of the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) pathway for autotrophic CO2 fixation. The gene encoding formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, a key enzyme of the acetyl-CoA pathway, was previously cloned from the thermophilic acetogen Clostridium thermoaceticum and has now been tested as a group-specific probe for acetogens. Stable hybrids were formed between the probe and single DNA fragments from eight known acetogens representing six genera. A hybrid was also formed between the probe and a DNA fragment from one sulfate reducer known to be capable of both autotrophic CO2 fixation and acetate catabolism. No such hybrid was formed between the probe and DNA from a homoacetate fermenter not known to use the acetyl-CoA pathway, with two known formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase-producing purine fermenters, or with DNA from 27 other species representing 16 genera of organisms that do not use the acetyl-CoA pathway. DNA purified from cells extracted from horse manure was also screened with the acetogen probe. Six hybrids, indicating at least six detectable acetogen "strains," were observed. Images PMID:1768134

  1. Probing the Run-On Oligomer of Activated SgrAI Bound to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Santosh; Sanchez, Jonathan; Stewart, Andrew; Piperakis, Michael M.; Cosstick, Richard; Nichols, Claire; Park, Chad K.; Ma, Xin; Wysocki, Vicki; Bitinaite, Jurate; Horton, Nancy C.

    2015-01-01

    SgrAI is a type II restriction endonuclease with an unusual mechanism of activation involving run-on oligomerization. The run-on oligomer is formed from complexes of SgrAI bound to DNA containing its 8 bp primary recognition sequence (uncleaved or cleaved), and also binds (and thereby activates for DNA cleavage) complexes of SgrAI bound to secondary site DNA sequences which contain a single base substitution in either the 1st/8th or the 2nd/7th position of the primary recognition sequence. This modulation of enzyme activity via run-on oligomerization is a newly appreciated phenomenon that has been shown for a small but increasing number of enzymes. One outstanding question regarding the mechanistic model for SgrAI is whether or not the activating primary site DNA must be cleaved by SgrAI prior to inducing activation. Herein we show that an uncleavable primary site DNA containing a 3’-S-phosphorothiolate is in fact able to induce activation. In addition, we now show that cleavage of secondary site DNA can be activated to nearly the same degree as primary, provided a sufficient number of flanking base pairs are present. We also show differences in activation and cleavage of the two types of secondary site, and that effects of selected single site substitutions in SgrAI, as well as measured collisional cross-sections from previous work, are consistent with the cryo-electron microscopy model for the run-on activated oligomer of SgrAI bound to DNA. PMID:25880668

  2. Two distinct DNA binding modes guide dual roles Of a CRISPR-Cas protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Westra, Edze R.; Vlot, Marnix; Künne, Tim; Sobota, Małgorzata; Dekker, Cees; Brouns, Stan J.J.; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Small RNA-guided protein complexes play an essential role in CRISPR-mediated immunity in prokaryotes. While these complexes initiate interference by flagging cognate invader DNA for destruction, recent evidence has implicated their involvement in new CRISPR memory formation, called priming, against mutated invader sequences. The mechanism by which the target recognition complex mediates these disparate responses—interference and priming—remains poorly understood. Using single-molecule FRET, we visualize how bona fide and mutated targets are differentially probed by E. coli Cascade. We observe that the recognition of bona fide targets is an ordered process that is tightly controlled for high fidelity. Mutated targets are recognized with low fidelity, which is featured by short-lived and PAM- and seed-independent binding by any segment of the crRNA. These dual roles of Cascade in immunity with distinct fidelities underpin CRISPR-Cas robustness, allowing for efficient degradation of bona fide targets and priming of mutated DNA targets. PMID:25752578

  3. Two distinct DNA binding modes guide dual roles of a CRISPR-Cas protein complex.

    PubMed

    Blosser, Timothy R; Loeff, Luuk; Westra, Edze R; Vlot, Marnix; Künne, Tim; Sobota, Małgorzata; Dekker, Cees; Brouns, Stan J J; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-04-01

    Small RNA-guided protein complexes play an essential role in CRISPR-mediated immunity in prokaryotes. While these complexes initiate interference by flagging cognate invader DNA for destruction, recent evidence has implicated their involvement in new CRISPR memory formation, called priming, against mutated invader sequences. The mechanism by which the target recognition complex mediates these disparate responses-interference and priming-remains poorly understood. Using single-molecule FRET, we visualize how bona fide and mutated targets are differentially probed by E. coli Cascade. We observe that the recognition of bona fide targets is an ordered process that is tightly controlled for high fidelity. Mutated targets are recognized with low fidelity, which is featured by short-lived and PAM- and seed-independent binding by any segment of the crRNA. These dual roles of Cascade in immunity with distinct fidelities underpin CRISPR-Cas robustness, allowing for efficient degradation of bona fide targets and priming of mutated DNA targets.

  4. Facile construction of a highly sensitive DNA biosensor by in-situ assembly of electro-active tags on hairpin-structured probe fragment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingxiang; Gao, Feng; Ni, Jiancong; Liao, Xiaolei; Zhang, Xuan; Lin, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasensitive DNA biosensor has been developed through in-situ labeling of electroactive melamine-Cu2+ complex (Mel-Cu2+) on the end of hairpin-like probe using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the signal amplification platform. The 3′-thiolated hairpin-like probe was first immobilized to the gold electrode surface by the Au-S bond. The AuNPs were then tethered on the free 5′-end of the immobilized probe via the special affinity between Au and the modified -NH2. Followed by, the Mel and Cu2+ were assembled on the AuNPs surface through Au-N bond and Cu2+-N bond, respectively. Due to the surface area and electrocatalytic effects of the AuNPs, the loading amount and electron transfer kinetic of the Mel-Cu2+ were enhanced greatly, resulting in significantly enhanced electrochemical response of the developed biosensor. Compared with the synthesis process of conventional electroactive probe DNA accomplished by homogeneous method, the method presented in this work is more reagent- and time-saving. The proposed biosensor showed high selectivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. This novel strategy could also be extended to the other bioanalysis platforms such as immunosensors and aptasensors. PMID:26931160

  5. Facile construction of a highly sensitive DNA biosensor by in-situ assembly of electro-active tags on hairpin-structured probe fragment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingxiang; Gao, Feng; Ni, Jiancong; Liao, Xiaolei; Zhang, Xuan; Lin, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasensitive DNA biosensor has been developed through in-situ labeling of electroactive melamine-Cu(2+) complex (Mel-Cu(2+)) on the end of hairpin-like probe using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the signal amplification platform. The 3'-thiolated hairpin-like probe was first immobilized to the gold electrode surface by the Au-S bond. The AuNPs were then tethered on the free 5'-end of the immobilized probe via the special affinity between Au and the modified -NH2. Followed by, the Mel and Cu(2+) were assembled on the AuNPs surface through Au-N bond and Cu(2+)-N bond, respectively. Due to the surface area and electrocatalytic effects of the AuNPs, the loading amount and electron transfer kinetic of the Mel-Cu(2+) were enhanced greatly, resulting in significantly enhanced electrochemical response of the developed biosensor. Compared with the synthesis process of conventional electroactive probe DNA accomplished by homogeneous method, the method presented in this work is more reagent- and time-saving. The proposed biosensor showed high selectivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. This novel strategy could also be extended to the other bioanalysis platforms such as immunosensors and aptasensors. PMID:26931160

  6. Non-DNA-binding cofactors enhance DNA-binding specificity of a transcriptional regulatory complex.

    PubMed

    Siggers, Trevor; Duyzend, Michael H; Reddy, Jessica; Khan, Sidra; Bulyk, Martha L

    2011-12-06

    Recruitment of cofactors to specific DNA sites is integral for specificity in gene regulation. As a model system, we examined how targeting and transcriptional control of the sulfur metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is governed by recruitment of the transcriptional co-activator Met4. We developed genome-scale approaches to measure transcription factor (TF) DNA-binding affinities and cofactor recruitment to >1300 genomic binding site sequences. We report that genes responding to the TF Cbf1 and cofactor Met28 contain a novel 'recruitment motif' (RYAAT), adjacent to Cbf1 binding sites, which enhances the binding of a Met4-Met28-Cbf1 regulatory complex, and that abrogation of this motif significantly reduces gene induction under low-sulfur conditions. Furthermore, we show that correct recognition of this composite motif requires both non-DNA-binding cofactors Met4 and Met28. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of an RYAAT motif next to a Cbf1 site, rather than Cbf1 binding affinity, specifies Cbf1-dependent sulfur metabolism genes. Our results highlight the need to examine TF/cofactor complexes, as novel specificity can result from cofactors that lack intrinsic DNA-binding specificity.

  7. Mutant Cockayne syndrome group B protein inhibits repair of DNA topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex.

    PubMed

    Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Saijo, Masafumi; Bay, Mui N; Lan, Li; Kuraoka, Isao; Brooks, Philip J; Honma, Masamitsu; Nohmi, Takehiko; Yasui, Akira; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2011-01-01

    Two UV-sensitive syndrome patients who have mild photosensitivity without detectable somatic abnormalities lack detectable Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) protein because of a homozygous null mutation in the CSB gene. In contrast, mutant CSB proteins are produced in CS-B patients with the severe somatic abnormalities of Cockayne syndrome and photosensitivity. It is known that the piggyBac transposable element derived 3 is integrated within the CSB intron 5, and that CSB-piggyBac transposable element derived 3 fusion (CPFP) mRNA is produced by alternative splicing. We found that CPFP or truncated CSB protein derived from CPFP mRNA was stably produced in CS-B patients, and that wild-type CSB, CPFP, and truncated CSB protein interacted with DNA topoisomerase I. We also found that CPFP inhibited repair of a camptothecin-induced topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex. The inhibition was suppressed by the presence of wild-type CSB, consistent with the autosomal recessive inheritance of Cockayne syndrome. These results suggested that reduced repair of a DNA topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex because of truncated CSB proteins is involved in the pathogenesis of CS-B. PMID:21143350

  8. DNA–DNA kissing complexes as a new tool for the assembly of DNA nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Anna; Kobbe, Daniela; Focke, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Kissing-loop annealing of nucleic acids occurs in nature in several viruses and in prokaryotic replication, among other circumstances. Nucleobases of two nucleic acid strands (loops) interact with each other, although the two strands cannot wrap around each other completely because of the adjacent double-stranded regions (stems). In this study, we exploited DNA kissing-loop interaction for nanotechnological application. We functionalized the vertices of DNA tetrahedrons with DNA stem-loop sequences. The complementary loop sequence design allowed the hybridization of different tetrahedrons via kissing-loop interaction, which might be further exploited for nanotechnology applications like cargo transport and logical elements. Importantly, we were able to manipulate the stability of those kissing-loop complexes based on the choice and concentration of cations, the temperature and the number of complementary loops per tetrahedron either at the same or at different vertices. Moreover, variations in loop sequences allowed the characterization of necessary sequences within the loop as well as additional stability control of the kissing complexes. Therefore, the properties of the presented nanostructures make them an important tool for DNA nanotechnology. PMID:26773051

  9. Development of Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the nucleotide sequences of a DNA probe Pig27.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Hwang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Jae-Yoon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the P. intermedia-specific DNA probe. The P. intermedia-specific DNA probe was screened by inverted dot blot hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. The nucleotide sequences of the species-specific DNA probes were determined using a chain termination method. Southern blot analysis showed that the DNA probe, Pig27, detected only the genomic DNA of P. intermedia strains. PCR showed that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, had species-specificity for P. intermedia. The detection limits of the PCR primer sets were 0.4pg of the purified genomic DNA of P. intermedia ATCC 49046. These results suggest that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as in the development of a PCR kit in epidemiological studies related to periodontal diseases. PMID:21192988

  10. Probing DNA in nanopores via tunneling: from sequencing to ``quantum'' analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2012-02-01

    Fast and low-cost DNA sequencing methods would revolutionize medicine: a person could have his/her full genome sequenced so that drugs could be tailored to his/her specific illnesses; doctors could know in advance patients' likelihood to develop a given ailment; cures to major diseases could be found faster [1]. However, this goal of ``personalized medicine'' is hampered today by the high cost and slow speed of DNA sequencing methods. In this talk, I will discuss the sequencing protocol we suggest which requires the measurement of the distributions of transverse currents during the translocation of single-stranded DNA into nanopores [2-5]. I will support our conclusions with a combination of molecular dynamics simulations coupled to quantum mechanical calculations of electrical current in experimentally realizable systems [2-5]. I will also discuss recent experiments that support these theoretical predictions. In addition, I will show how this relatively unexplored area of research at the interface between solids, liquids, and biomolecules at the nanometer length scale is a fertile ground to study quantum phenomena that have a classical counterpart, such as ionic quasi-particles, ionic ``quantized'' conductance [6,7] and Coulomb blockade [8]. Work supported in part by NIH. [4pt] [1] M. Zwolak, M. Di Ventra, Physical Approaches to DNA Sequencing and Detection, Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 141 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Zwolak and M. Di Ventra, Electronic signature of DNA nucleotides via transverse transport, Nano Lett. 5, 421 (2005).[0pt] [3] J. Lagerqvist, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Fast DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport, Nano Lett. 6, 779 (2006).[0pt] [4] J. Lagerqvist, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Influence of the environment and probes on rapid DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport, Biophys. J. 93, 2384 (2007).[0pt] [5] M. Krems, M. Zwolak, Y.V. Pershin, and M. Di Ventra, Effect of noise on DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport

  11. Development of cDNA probes for typing group A bovine rotaviruses on the basis of VP4 specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Parwani, A V; Rosen, B I; McCrae, M A; Saif, L J

    1992-01-01

    Dot and Northern (RNA) blot hybridization assays were developed for the P typing of group A bovine rotaviruses (BRV) by using cDNA probes prepared from gene segment 4. The probes were prepared by polymerase chain reaction amplification of hyperdivergent regions (nucleotides 211 to 686) of BRV strain UK, IND, NCDV, and Cr VP4 cDNA by using specific oligonucleotide primers. The probes were P type specific (VP4) and exhibited little or no cross-reactivity with double-stranded RNA from heterologous rotavirus P types. Our studies indicate that at least three P types, as defined by polymerase chain reaction-derived VP4 gene probes from the UK, NCDV, and Cr strains, exist among the seven BRV isolates tested. Images PMID:1383267

  12. Novel Phenanthrene-Degrading Bacteria Identified by DNA-Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chunling; Zhang, Dayi; Zhang, Gan

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms responsible for the degradation of phenanthrene in a clean forest soil sample were identified by DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). The soil was artificially amended with either 12C- or 13C-labeled phenanthrene, and soil DNA was extracted on days 3, 6 and 9. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) results revealed that the fragments of 219- and 241-bp in HaeIII digests were distributed throughout the gradient profile at three different sampling time points, and both fragments were more dominant in the heavy fractions of the samples exposed to the 13C-labeled contaminant. 16S rRNA sequencing of the 13C-enriched fraction suggested that Acidobacterium spp. within the class Acidobacteria, and Collimonas spp. within the class Betaproteobacteria, were directly involved in the uptake and degradation of phenanthrene at different times. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the genus Collimonas has the ability to degrade PAHs. Two PAH-RHDα genes were identified in 13C-labeled DNA. However, isolation of pure cultures indicated that strains of Staphylococcus sp. PHE-3, Pseudomonas sp. PHE-1, and Pseudomonas sp. PHE-2 in the soil had high phenanthrene-degrading ability. This emphasizes the role of a culture-independent method in the functional understanding of microbial communities in situ. PMID:26098417

  13. Padlock probe-mediated qRT-PCR for DNA computing answer determination.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fusheng; Frasch, Wayne D

    2011-06-01

    Padlock probe-mediated quantitative real time PCR (PLP-qRT-PCR) was adapted to quantify the abundance of sequential 10mer DNA sequences for use in DNA computing to identify optimal answers of traveling salesman problems. The protocol involves: (i) hybridization of a linear PLP with a target DNA sequence; (ii) PLP circularization through enzymatic ligation; and (iii) qRT-PCR amplification of the circularized PLP after removal of non-circularized templates. The linear PLP was designed to consist of two 10-mer sequence-detection arms at the 5' and 3' ends separated by a core sequence composed of universal PCR primers, and a qRT-PCR reporter binding site. Circularization of each PLP molecule is dependent upon hybridization with target sequence and high-fidelity ligation. Thus, the number of PLP circularized is determined by the abundance of target in solution. The amplification efficiency of the PLP was 98.7% within a 0.2 pg-20 ng linear detection range between thermal cycle threshold (C(t) value) and target content. The C(t) values derived from multiplex qRT-PCR upon three targets did not differ significantly from those obtained with singleplex assays. The protocol provides a highly sensitive and efficient means for the simultaneous quantification of multiple short nucleic acid sequences that has a wide range of applications in biotechnology.

  14. Molecular Zipper: a fluorescent probe for real-time isothermal DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jizu; Zhang, Wandi; Zhang, David Y

    2006-01-01

    Rolling-circle amplification (RCA) and ramification amplification (RAM, also known as hyperbranched RCA) are isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies that have gained a great application in in situ signal amplification, DNA and protein microarray assays, single nucleotide polymorphism detection, as well as clinical diagnosis. Real-time detection of RCA or RAM products has been a challenge because of most real-time detection systems, including Taqman and Molecular Beacon, are designed for thermal cycling-based DNA amplification technology. In the present study, we describe a novel fluorescent probe construct, termed molecular zipper, which is specially designed for quantifying target DNA by real-time monitoring RAM reactions. Our results showed that the molecular zipper has very low background fluorescence due to the strong interaction between two strands. Once it is incorporated into the RAM products its double strand region is opened by displacement, therefore, its fluorophore releases a fluorescent signal. Applying the molecular zipper in RAM assay, we were able to detect as few as 10 molecules within 90 min reaction. A linear relationship was observed between initial input of targets and threshold time (R2 = 0.985). These results indicate that molecular zipper can be applied to real-time monitoring and qualification of RAM reaction, implying an amenable method for automatic RAM-based diagnostic assays.

  15. A competition assay for DNA binding using the fluorescent probe ANS.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ian A; Kneale, G Geoff

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique frequently employed to study protein-nucleic acid interactions. Often, the intrinsic fluorescence emission spectrum of tryptophan residues in a nucleic-acid-binding protein is strongly perturbed upon interaction with a target DNA or RNA. These spectral changes can then be exploited in order to construct binding isotherms and the extract equilibrium association constant together with the stoichiometry of an interaction. However, when a protein contains many tryptophan residues that are not located in the proximity of the nucleic-acid-binding site, changes in the fluorescence emission spectrum may not be apparent or the magnitude too small to be useful. Here, we make use of an extrinsic fluorescence probe, the environmentally sensitive fluorophore 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid (1,8-ANS). Displacement by DNA of 1,8-ANS molecules from the nucleic-acid-binding site of the Type I modification methylase EcoR124I results in red shifting and an intensity decrease of the 1,8-ANS fluorescence emission spectrum. These spectral changes have been used to investigate the interaction of EcoR124I with DNA target recognition sequences.

  16. Molecular Zipper: a fluorescent probe for real-time isothermal DNA amplification

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jizu; Zhang, Wandi; Zhang, David Y.

    2006-01-01

    Rolling-circle amplification (RCA) and ramification amplification (RAM, also known as hyperbranched RCA) are isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies that have gained a great application in in situ signal amplification, DNA and protein microarray assays, single nucleotide polymorphism detection, as well as clinical diagnosis. Real-time detection of RCA or RAM products has been a challenge because of most real-time detection systems, including Taqman and Molecular Beacon, are designed for thermal cycling-based DNA amplification technology. In the present study, we describe a novel fluorescent probe construct, termed molecular zipper, which is specially designed for quantifying target DNA by real-time monitoring RAM reactions. Our results showed that the molecular zipper has very low background fluorescence due to the strong interaction between two strands. Once it is incorporated into the RAM products its double strand region is opened by displacement, therefore, its fluorophore releases a fluorescent signal. Applying the molecular zipper in RAM assay, we were able to detect as few as 10 molecules within 90 min reaction. A linear relationship was observed between initial input of targets and threshold time (R2 = 0.985). These results indicate that molecular zipper can be applied to real-time monitoring and qualification of RAM reaction, implying an amenable method for automatic RAM-based diagnostic assays. PMID:16822854

  17. A computer programme for estimation of genetic risk in X linked disorders, combining pedigree and DNA probe data with other conditional information.

    PubMed Central

    Sarfarazi, M; Williams, H

    1986-01-01

    A computer programme is presented for calculating the recurrence risk in X linked disorders, combining pedigree and DNA probe data with other conditional information such as carrier detection tests. The methods of computation are shown in the given examples. The programme can be used with either a single DNA probe or two 'flanking' DNA probes for both familial and isolated case pedigrees. For isolated case families the mutation rate at the disease locus can be taken into account in conjunction with the DNA probe data. PMID:3754009

  18. Use of a DNA probe to detect Salmonella typhi in the blood of patients with typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, F A; McWhirter, P D; Punjabi, N H; Lane, E; Sudarmono, P; Pulungsih, S P; Lesmana, M; Kumala, S; Kopecko, D J; Hoffman, S L

    1989-01-01

    A DNA probe was used to detect Salmonella typhi from blood samples from 14 of 33 patients with culture-confirmed typhoid fever, using the equivalent of 2.5 ml of blood. In contrast, S. typhi was detected in 17 of the same 33 patients by culture of 8 ml of blood. The probe hybridized to blood samples of 4 of 47 patients from whom S. typhi was not isolated. Images PMID:2745686

  19. A DNA topoisomerase VI-like complex initiates meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Vrielynck, Nathalie; Chambon, Aurélie; Vezon, Daniel; Pereira, Lucie; Chelysheva, Liudmila; De Muyt, Arnaud; Mézard, Christine; Mayer, Claudine; Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-02-26

    The SPO11 protein catalyzes the formation of meiotic DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and is homologous to the A subunit of an archaeal topoisomerase (topo VI). Topo VI are heterotetrameric enzymes comprising two A and two B subunits; however, no topo VIB involved in meiotic recombination had been identified. We characterized a structural homolog of the archaeal topo VIB subunit [meiotic topoisomerase VIB-like (MTOPVIB)], which is essential for meiotic DSB formation. It forms a complex with the two Arabidopsis thaliana SPO11 orthologs required for meiotic DSB formation (SPO11-1 and SPO11-2) and is absolutely required for the formation of the SPO11-1/SPO11-2 heterodimer. These findings suggest that the catalytic core complex responsible for meiotic DSB formation in eukaryotes adopts a topo VI-like structure.

  20. Probing a label-free local bend in DNA by single molecule tethered particle motion.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Annaël; Chevalier, Sébastien; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel; Rousseau, Philippe; Salhi, Maya; Salomé, Laurence; Tardin, Catherine

    2015-06-23

    Being capable of characterizing DNA local bending is essential to understand thoroughly many biological processes because they involve a local bending of the double helix axis, either intrinsic to the sequence or induced by the binding of proteins. Developing a method to measure DNA bend angles that does not perturb the conformation of the DNA itself or the DNA-protein complex is a challenging task. Here, we propose a joint theory-experiment high-throughput approach to rigorously measure such bend angles using the Tethered Particle Motion (TPM) technique. By carefully modeling the TPM geometry, we propose a simple formula based on a kinked Worm-Like Chain model to extract the bend angle from TPM measurements. Using constructs made of 575 base-pair DNAs with in-phase assemblies of one to seven 6A-tracts, we find that the sequence CA6CGG induces a bend angle of 19° ± 4°. Our method is successfully compared to more theoretically complex or experimentally invasive ones such as cyclization, NMR, FRET or AFM. We further apply our procedure to TPM measurements from the literature and demonstrate that the angles of bends induced by proteins, such as Integration Host Factor (IHF) can be reliably evaluated as well.

  1. Rapid sex determination on buccal smears using DNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldez, R.A.; Harris, C.

    1994-09-01

    Hybridization of dual-labeled DNA probes for the repetitive sequences on the X and Y chromosomes allows a fast, non-invasive, more reliable method for sex determination that current cytogenetic Barr body and Y chromatin assays. Scrapes of squamous epithelial cells were collected from the oral cavity of 14 subjects (5{male}, 9{female}) and smeared onto silanized slides. The smears were allowed to air dry. Samples were blinded and then fixed in 50% methanol/50% glacial acetic acid for 10 minutes, and allowed to dry. The slides were incubated in a pretreatment solution containing 30% sodium bisulfite at 45{degrees}C for 10 minutes. They were rinsed in 2XSSC pH 7.0 and then dehydrated through a series of 70%, 85%, and 100% ethanols at room temperature and allowed to air dry. A probe mixture (30 {mu}L containing 10 ng/{mu}L biotin-labeled DXZ1 and digoxigenin-labeled DYZ1/DYZ3 in 70% Formamide/2XSSC) was aliquoted onto each slide, coverslipped, and sealed with rubber cement. Probe and target DNA were simultaneously denatured at 72{degrees}C on a slide warmer for 6 minutes. Probe was allowed to hybridize overnight in a humidified chamber at 37{degrees}C. Slides were postwashed at 72{degrees}C in 0.5xSSC pH 7.0 for 5 minutes, then soaked at room temperature 1XPBD for 2 minutes, and detected with rhodamine/anti-digoxigenin-FITC/avidin for 15 minutes at 37{degrees}C. Slides were soaked 3X in 1XPBD and then counterstained with 15 {mu}L 0.05 {mu}g/mL DAP1/Antifade. 200 nuclei were scored for the presence of one green (X), two green (XX), one green and one red (XY), or a single red (Y) signal, using a fluorescent microscope equipped with a triple band pass filter. Greater than 90% of the hybridized nuclei from each of the 14 cases studied conformed to the sex chromosome pattern. The modal number in 9 cases showed two green signals (XX), and a green and a red signal (XY) in the other 5 cases; this was in complete agreement with the cytogenetic results.

  2. Comparison of peroxidase-labeled DNA probes with radioactive RNA probes for detection of human papillomaviruses by in situ hybridization in paraffin sections

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Kurman, R.J.; Kessis, T.D.; Shah, K.V. )

    1991-01-01

    A study comparing in situ hybridization using nonradioactive DNA probes directly conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and {sup 35}S-labeled antisense RNA probes for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6/11, 16, and 18 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 34 lesions of the cervix and vulva. These lesions included exophytic condylomas and intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms. HPV 6/11 was detected in two of four condylomata acuminata by both in situ techniques. HPV 16 was detected in 13 of 30 cases of intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms by both methods. Discordance between the two methods occurred in two instances. The radiolabeled probe but not the HRP probe detected HPV 16 in one case of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3), whereas the converse occurred in one case of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN 3). HPV 18 was not detected in any of the specimens by either method. This study demonstrates that nonradioactive HRP-labeled probes for the detection of specific HPV types are as sensitive as the more laborious and potentially hazardous radioactive probes.

  3. Repair synthesis step involving ERCC1-XPF participates in DNA repair of the Top1-DNA damage complex.

    PubMed

    Takahata, Chiaki; Masuda, Yuji; Takedachi, Arato; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2015-08-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) is the intercellular target of camptothecins (CPTs). CPT blocks DNA religation in the Top1-DNA complex and induces Top1-attached nick DNA lesions. In this study, we demonstrate that excision repair cross complementing 1 protein-xeroderma pigmentosum group F (ERCC1-XPF) endonuclease and replication protein A (RPA) participate in the repair of Top1-attached nick DNA lesions together with other nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors. ERCC1-XPF shows nuclease activity in the presence of RPA on a 3'-phosphotyrosyl bond nick-containing DNA (Tyr-nick DNA) substrate, which mimics a Top1-attached nick DNA lesion. In addition, ERCC1-XPF and RPA form a DNA/protein complex on the nick DNA substrate in vitro, and co-localize in CPT-treated cells in vivo. Moreover, the DNA repair synthesis of Tyr-nick DNA lesions occurred in the presence of NER factors, including ERCC1-XPF, RPA, DNA polymerase delta, flap endonuclease 1 and DNA ligase 1. Therefore, some of the NER repair machinery might be an alternative repair pathway for Top1-attached nick DNA lesions. Clinically, these data provide insights into the potential of ERCC1 as a biomarker during CPT regimens.

  4. Structure of an 'open' clamp type II topoisomerase-DNA complex provides a mechanism for DNA capture and transport.

    PubMed

    Laponogov, Ivan; Veselkov, Dennis A; Crevel, Isabelle M-T; Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L Mark; Sanderson, Mark R

    2013-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases regulate DNA supercoiling and chromosome segregation. They act as ATP-operated clamps that capture a DNA duplex and pass it through a transient DNA break in a second DNA segment via the sequential opening and closure of ATPase-, G-DNA- and C-gates. Here, we present the first 'open clamp' structures of a 3-gate topoisomerase II-DNA complex, the seminal complex engaged in DNA recognition and capture. A high-resolution structure was solved for a (full-length ParE-ParC55)2 dimer of Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV bound to two DNA molecules: a closed DNA gate in a B-A-B form double-helical conformation and a second B-form duplex associated with closed C-gate helices at a novel site neighbouring the catalytically important β-pinwheel DNA-binding domain. The protein N gate is present in an 'arms-wide-open' state with the undimerized N-terminal ParE ATPase domains connected to TOPRIM domains via a flexible joint and folded back allowing ready access both for gate and transported DNA segments and cleavage-stabilizing antibacterial drugs. The structure shows the molecular conformations of all three gates at 3.7 Å, the highest resolution achieved for the full complex to date, and illuminates the mechanism of DNA capture and transport by a type II topoisomerase.

  5. Selection of species-specific DNA probes which detect strain restriction polymorphism in four Bifidobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Mangin, I; Bourget, N; Simonet, J M; Decaris, B

    1995-01-01

    Randomly cloned fragments (in a size range 1 to 2.5 kb) of DNA from Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707, B. adolescentis CIP 64.59T, B. bifidum CIP 64.65 and B. animalis ATCC 25527 were used as hybridization probes to characterize strains of these species and distinguish them from closely related Bifidobacterium species. The fragments were screened for hybridization with native DNA from 41 different Bifidobacterium strains. For each species, a fragment hybridizing specifically with DNA from strains of the same species was isolated. Each fragment was then hybridized with restriction digests in order to study the genome polymorphism. In some of the tested B. longum strains including strain ATCC 15707, the species-specific fragment L6/45 hybridized with 2 fragments instead of one as expected. Sequence of the fragment revealed the presence of an ORF which had an amino acid sequence similar to the site-specific recombinases of lambda integrase family. Moreover, Southern analysis demonstrated that at least 3 copies of this fragment are present in the chromosome of B. longum ATCC 15707 and in some other B. longum strains. The species-specific fragment A6/17 of B. adolescentis hybridized with the same restriction fragment on the eight strains of this species tested. The B. bifidum-specific fragment hybridized with different DNA restriction fragments according to the strain. The restriction fragment an1 from B. animalis ATCC 25527 hybridized with the same restriction fragment from strain B. animalis ATCC 27536. However, these two strains could be differentiated by another restriction pattern. Thus, hybridization results highlight the genetic polymorphism which exists among Bifidobacterium strains of the same species.

  6. Nutrient amendments in soil DNA stable isotope probing experiments reduce the observed methanotroph diversity.

    PubMed

    Cébron, Aurélie; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Singer, Andrew C; Thompson, Ian P; Prosser, James I; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-02-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) can be used to analyze the active bacterial populations involved in a process by incorporating 13C-labeled substrate into cellular components such as DNA. Relatively long incubation times are often used with laboratory microcosms in order to incorporate sufficient 13C into the DNA of the target organisms. Addition of nutrients can be used to accelerate the processes. However, unnatural concentrations of nutrients may artificially change bacterial diversity and activity. In this study, methanotroph activity and diversity in soil was examined during the consumption of 13CH4 with three DNA-SIP experiments, using microcosms with natural field soil water conditions, the addition of water, and the addition of mineral salts solution. Methanotroph population diversity was studied by targeting 16S rRNA and pmoA genes. Clone library analyses, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting, and pmoA microarray hybridization analyses were carried out. Most methanotroph diversity (type I and type II methanotrophs) was observed in non-amended SIP microcosms. Although this treatment probably best reflected the in situ environmental conditions, one major disadvantage of this incubation was that the incorporation of 13CH4 was slow and some cross-feeding of 13C occurred, thereby leading to labeling of nonmethanotroph microorganisms. Conversely, microcosms supplemented with mineral salts medium exhibited rapid consumption of 13CH4, resulting in the labeling of a less diverse population of only type I methanotrophs. DNA-SIP incubations using water-amended microcosms yielded faster incorporation of 13C into active methanotrophs while avoiding the cross-feeding of 13C.

  7. Potential use of buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of autosomal trisomy or chromosomal sex in newborn infants using DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.; Clark, K.; Lazarski, K.; Wilkerson, C.; Meisner, L. |

    1994-12-01

    Buccal smears from 3 women and 1 man were probed with alpha satellite DNA probes for chromosomes 8, 18, X, and Y. Buccal smears were also collected from an adolescent phenotypic female with uterine agenesis, as well as from newborn infants with suspected trisomy 18 and trisomy 21. The clinical cases were confirmed with conventional cytogenetic studies of peripheral lymphocytes. Overall probe efficiency at detecting expected chromosome number in interphase cells was found to be 71% {+-} 6.8%. Higher than expected n-1 signal numbers may be due to karyopyknotic intermediate epithelial cells present in all collected samples. Overall probe efficiency was found to be consistent using alpha satellite and cosmid probes, both of which accurately reflected the modal copy number of the target chromosomes. False trisomy was less than 1%. This study suggests DNA probes can be used in buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of trisomies and chromosomal sex in newborns, but because of high rates of false hydropoploid signals, probed buccal smear specimens may not be accurate at diagnosing mosaicism. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The Preparation of Magnetic Silica Nanospheres and Incorporation of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-DNA Probe.

    PubMed

    Do, Youngjin; Kim, Jongsung

    2016-03-01

    Silica nanospheres containing magnetic particles were prepared, and CdSe/ZnS QDs functionalized with carboxyl group were incorporated into the silica nanospheres by EDC/NHS coupling reaction. The silica nanospheres were prepared by a co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric solutions followed by the sol-gel reaction of TEOS (tetraethoxysilane) and APTES (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane) using base catalyst. The size of magnetic silica nanospheres was confirmed by Transmission electron microscope (TEM). Thiol group modified single stranded oligonucleotides were immobilized on the surface of QDs and fluorescence quenching by intercalation dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization with target oligonucleotide was observed. The fluorescence from QDs could be quenched by intercalating dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization of target DNA to probe DNA. This shows that the magnetic silica-QD-DNA probe can be used to detect specific DNA. PMID:27455659

  9. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the grasshopper Sinipta dalmani: application of long-PCR to the development of a homologous probe.

    PubMed

    Pensel, S M; Vilardi, J C; Remis, M I

    2005-12-01

    RFLP analysis of mtDNA in natural populations is a valuable tool for phylogeographic and population genetic studies. The amplification of long DNA fragments using universal primers may contribute to the development of novel homologous probes in species for which no previous genomic information is available. Here we report how we obtained the complete mtDNA genome of Sinipta dalmani (Orthoptera) in 2 fragments (7 and 9 kb) using primers of conserved regions. The specificity of the PCR reactions was ultimately confirmed by several lines of evidence. These fragments were used as a probe for a mtDNA RFLP study in S. dalmani that analyzed the pattern of haplotype distribution and nucleotide diversity within and among chromosomally differentiated natural populations. Our results suggest that the restriction in gene flow detected at the molecular level may explain the chromosome differentiation detected previously and the maintenance of chromosome polymorphism in some areas of S. dalmani geographic distribution.

  10. The Preparation of Magnetic Silica Nanospheres and Incorporation of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-DNA Probe.

    PubMed

    Do, Youngjin; Kim, Jongsung

    2016-03-01

    Silica nanospheres containing magnetic particles were prepared, and CdSe/ZnS QDs functionalized with carboxyl group were incorporated into the silica nanospheres by EDC/NHS coupling reaction. The silica nanospheres were prepared by a co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric solutions followed by the sol-gel reaction of TEOS (tetraethoxysilane) and APTES (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane) using base catalyst. The size of magnetic silica nanospheres was confirmed by Transmission electron microscope (TEM). Thiol group modified single stranded oligonucleotides were immobilized on the surface of QDs and fluorescence quenching by intercalation dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization with target oligonucleotide was observed. The fluorescence from QDs could be quenched by intercalating dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization of target DNA to probe DNA. This shows that the magnetic silica-QD-DNA probe can be used to detect specific DNA.

  11. Binding interaction of differently charged fluorescent probes with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and the effect of β-cyclodextrin on the lipid-probe complexes: a fluorometric investigation.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Pronab; Ghosh, Saptarshi; Jana, Barnali; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of cationic phenosafranin (PSF), anionic 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) and non-ionic nile red (NR) have been studied with the zwitterionic phospholipid, egg yolk L-α-phosphatidylcholine (EYPC). The study reveals discernible binding interactions of the three fluorescent probes with the EYPC lipid vesicle. Once the binding of the probes with the lipid is established, the effect of cyclic oligosaccharide, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), on these lipid bound probes has been investigated. Different fluorometric techniques suggest that addition of β-CD to the probe-lipid complexes leads to the release of the probes from the lipid medium through the formation of probe-β-CD inclusion complexes. A competitive binding of the probes between β-cyclodextrin and the lipid is ascribed to be responsible for the effect. This provides an easy avenue for the removal of the probe molecules from the lipid environment. Extension of this work with drug molecules in cell membranes is expected to give rise to a strategy for the removal of adsorbed drugs from the cell membranes by the use of non-toxic β-cyclodextrin.

  12. Binding interaction of differently charged fluorescent probes with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and the effect of β-cyclodextrin on the lipid-probe complexes: A fluorometric investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Pronab; Ghosh, Saptarshi; Jana, Barnali; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of cationic phenosafranin (PSF), anionic 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) and non-ionic nile red (NR) have been studied with the zwitterionic phospholipid, egg yolk L-α-phosphatidylcholine (EYPC). The study reveals discernible binding interactions of the three fluorescent probes with the EYPC lipid vesicle. Once the binding of the probes with the lipid is established, the effect of cyclic oligosaccharide, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), on these lipid bound probes has been investigated. Different fluorometric techniques suggest that addition of β-CD to the probe-lipid complexes leads to the release of the probes from the lipid medium through the formation of probe-β-CD inclusion complexes. A competitive binding of the probes between β-cyclodextrin and the lipid is ascribed to be responsible for the effect. This provides an easy avenue for the removal of the probe molecules from the lipid environment. Extension of this work with drug molecules in cell membranes is expected to give rise to a strategy for the removal of adsorbed drugs from the cell membranes by the use of non-toxic β-cyclodextrin.

  13. Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance with an Intracardiac Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchetta, Mario Rigatelli, Gianluca; Pedon, Luigi; Zennaro, Marco; Ronsivalle, Salvatore; Maiolino, Pietro

    2003-09-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficacy of intravascular ultrasound guidance obtained by an intracardiac ultrasound probe during complex aortic endografting. Between November 1999 and July 2002, 19 patients (5 female, 14 male; mean age 73.5 {+-} 2.1 years) underwent endovascular repair of thoracic (n = 10), complex abdominal (n = 6) and concomitant thoraco-abdominal (n = 3) aortic aneurysm. The most suitable size and configuration of the stent-graft were chosen on the basis of preoperative computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Intraoperative intravascular ultrasound imaging was obtained using a 9 Fr, 9 MHz intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) probe, 110 cm in length, inserted through a 10 Fr precurved long sheath. The endografts were deployed as planned by CTA or MRA. Before stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to view the posterior aortic arch and descending thoraco-abdominal aorta without position-related artifacts, and to identify both sites of stent-graft positioning. After stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to detect the need for additional modular components to internally reline the aorta in 11 patients, and to discover 2 incomplete graft expansions subsequently treated with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. In 1 patient, the ICE probe supported the decision that the patient was ineligible for the endovascular exclusion procedure. The ICE probe provides accurate information on the anatomy of the posterior aortic arch and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and a rapid identification of attachment sites and stent-graft pathology, allowing refinement and improvement of the endovascular strategy.

  14. [Collection of low copy number repeats for use as probes in human DNA Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    To isolate novel families of repeated human sequences our basic plan is to (i) construct repeated sequence libraries, (ii) discard known repeats by hybridization and (iii) sort through the remaining clones to eliminate single copy sequences as well as known repeats that slipped through the first screening. During the previous grant period, we completed the library construction and initial screening. Six size selected sublibraries of renatured human DNA were constructed, e.g. sublibrary II contains 250 nt to 380 nt inserts. The released inserts were hybridized to Alu, L1, THE 1, [alpha] satellite and satellite M (which crosshybridizes to satellites I and H) hybridization probes. We have adopted two strategies to sort through these candidate clones.

  15. Identification of active aerobic methanotrophs in plateau wetlands using DNA stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongcui; Cui, Xiaoyong; Dumont, Marc G

    2016-08-01

    Sedge-dominated wetlands on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau are methane emission centers. Methanotrophs at these sites play a role in reducing methane emissions, but relatively little is known about the composition of active methanotrophs in these wetlands. Here, we used DNA stable isotope probing to identify the key active aerobic methanotrophs in three sedge-dominated wetlands on the plateau. We found that Methylocystis species were active in two peatlands, Hongyuan and Dangxiong. Methylobacter species were found to be active only in Dangxiong peat. Hongyuan peat had the highest methane oxidation rate, and cross-feeding of carbon from methanotrophs to methylotrophic Hyphomicrobium species was observed. Owing to a low methane oxidation rate during the incubation, the labeling of methanotrophs in Maduo wetland samples was not detected. Our results indicate that there are large differences in the activity of methanotrophs in the wetlands of this region. PMID:27369086

  16. Polyoma Viral DNA Replicated as a Nucleoprotein Complex in Close Association with the Host Cell Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Seebeck, Thomas; Weil, Roger

    1974-01-01

    Polyoma viral DNA is shown to be replicated in close association with the mouse cell chromatin. Two virus-specific nucleoprotein complexes, designated complex A and B, can be dissociated from the isolated chromatin by gentle homogenization in 0.5 M NaCl. Complex A contains only replicating polyoma (Py) DNA whereas complex B contains only mature Py DNA I. The results show, furthermore, that complex A, containing viral DNA in different stages of replication, and complex B are both nucleoproteins with the same buoyant density. The data presently available suggest that newly synthesized stretches of Py DNA are immediately complexed with mouse cell histones and that complex B becomes the “core” of progeny Py virions. These results suggested that Py-induced replication of the mouse cell chromatin may be necessary to provide replicating Py DNA with histones. PMID:4362862

  17. Sequential initiation of lagging and leading strand synthesis by two different polymerase complexes at the SV40 DNA replication origin.

    PubMed

    Tsurimoto, T; Melendy, T; Stillman, B

    1990-08-01

    Enzymatic synthesis of DNA from the simian virus 40 origin of DNA replication has been reconstituted in vitro with eight purified components. DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex first initiates DNA synthesis at the replication origin and continues as the lagging strand polymerase. Subsequently, the DNA polymerase delta complex initiates replication on the leading strand template. Some prokaryotic DNA polymerase complexes can replace the eukaryotic polymerase delta complex. A model for polymerase switching during initiation of DNA replication is presented.

  18. Cancer cell-targeted two-photon fluorescence probe for the real-time ratiometric imaging of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Kui; Xuan, Xiaopeng; Lv, Qingzhang; Nie, Yamin; Guo, Haiming

    2016-05-01

    Real-time imaging of DNA damage in cancer cells could provide valuable information on the formation and development of cancer. Herein, a two-photon fluorescence probe was discovered. Through sequential ICT processes, it allows successful in vivo visualization of DNA damage in cancer cells by one/two-photon microscopic imaging or by the unaided eye and a hand-held ultraviolet lamp. PMID:27087314

  19. Analyses of the FlashTrack DNA probe and UTIscreen bioluminescence tests for bacteriuria.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, C; Tick, L J; Hanna, B A

    1992-01-01

    Five hundred urine specimens were selected at random and screened for bacteriuria by a DNA probe method, FlashTrack (Gen-Probe, San Diego, Calif.), and an automated bioluminescence method, UTIscreen (Los Alamos Diagnostics, Los Alamos, N.M.), and the results were compared with those of the semiquantitative plate culture method. The performance of each test versus culturing was evaluated at colony counts of greater than or equal to 10(4), greater than or equal to 5 x 10(4), and greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml. Since the interpretive breakpoint of each test was user selectable, the results were reported as receiver operator characteristic curves. Optimum interpretive breakpoints were determined for each test at each colony count by calculating a performance index that emphasized sensitivity over specificity in a 70:30 ratio. Although both tests had less-than-optimal sensitivities and specificities, the performance of FlashTrack was significantly better than that of UTIscreen at two of the three colony counts (10(4) and 10(5) CFU/ml); however, FlashTrack costs more and is a labor-intensive procedure. Neither method was evaluated for the detection of colony counts of less than 10(4) CFU/ml. PMID:1537903

  20. A DNA probe for the detection of Dicrocoelium dendriticum in ants of Formica spp. and Lasius spp.

    PubMed

    Heussler, V; Kaufmann, H; Glaser, I; Ducommun, D; Müller, C; Dobbelaere, D

    1998-06-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences present in the genome of Dicrocoelium dendriticum were identified by hybridization of genomic DNA that had been digested with different restriction enzymes with 32P-labeled genomic D. dendriticum DNA. DNA fragments containing repetitive sequences were isolated from PstI-digested D. dendriticum DNA and were subcloned into a plasmid vector. Plasmids containing repetitive sequences were identified by colony hybridization. One of these plasmids, designated Ddr-IV, was isolated and used as a probe in further studies. Ddr-IV is specific for D. dendriticum since it does not hybridize to DNA isolated from other trematodes. In addition, Ddr-IV was capable of detecting D. dendriticum metacercariae in ants (Formica cunicularia, F. rufibarbis, and Lasius sp.), which act as second intermediate hosts in the parasite's life cycle. Since metacercariae constitute the infectious stage of the parasite for grazing animals, Ddr-IV will provide a useful tool for epidemiology studies of dicrocoeliosis.

  1. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander M.; Benson, Scott C.

    1999-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  2. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander M.; Benson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  3. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.N.; Benson, S.C.

    1997-07-08

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figs.

  4. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1997-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  5. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.M.; Benson, S.C.

    1998-06-16

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figs.

  6. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1995-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  7. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.N.; Benson, S.C.

    1995-03-28

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figures.

  8. DNA binding, photo-induced DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity studies of lomefloxacin and its transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragheb, Mohamed A.; Eldesouki, Mohamed A.; Mohamed, Mervat S.

    2015-03-01

    This work was focused on a study of the DNA binding and cleavage properties of lomefloxacin (LMF) and its ternary transition metal complexes with glycine. The nature of the binding interactions between compounds and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied by electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and thermal denaturation experiments. The obtained results revealed that LMF and its complexes could interact with CT-DNA via partial/moderate intercalative mode. Furthermore, the DNA cleavage activities of the compounds were investigated by gel electrophoresis. Mechanistic studies of DNA cleavage suggest that singlet oxygen (1O2) is likely to be the cleaving agent via an oxidative pathway, except for Cu(II) complex which proceeds via both oxidative and hydrolytic pathways. Antimicrobial and antitumor activities of the compounds were also studied against some kinds of bacteria, fungi and human cell lines.

  9. Characterization of DNA binding and pairing activities associated with the native SFPQ•NONO DNA repair protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Durga; Dynan, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We have previously shown that a complex of SFPQ (PSF) and NONO (p54nrb) cooperates with Ku protein at an early step of NHEJ, forming a committed preligation complex and stimulating end-joining activity by 10-fold or more. SFPQ and NONO show no resemblance to other repair factors, and their mechanism of action is uncertain. Here, we use an optimized microwell-based assay to characterize the in vitro DNA binding behavior of the native SFPQ•NONO complex purified from human (HeLa) cells. SFPQ•NONO and Ku protein bind independently to DNA, with little evidence of cooperativity and only slight mutual interference at high concentration. Whereas Ku protein requires free DNA ends for binding, SFPQ•NONO does not. Both Ku and SFPQ•NONO have pairing activity, as measured by the ability of DNA-bound protein to capture a second DNA fragment in a microwell-based assay. Additionally, SFPQ•NONO stimulates DNA-dependent protein kinase autophosphorylation, consistent with the ability to promote formation of a synaptic complex formation without occluding the DNA termini proper. These findings suggest that SFPQ•NONO promotes end joining by binding to internal DNA sequences and cooperating with other repair proteins to stabilize a synaptic pre-ligation complex. PMID:25998385

  10. Complex structural dynamics of nanocatalysts revealed in Operando conditions by correlated imaging and spectroscopy probes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Zakharov, D.; Zhao, S.; Tappero, R.; Jung, U.; Elsen, A.; Baumann, Ph.; Nuzzo, R. G.; Stach, E. A.; Frenkel, A. I.

    2015-06-29

    Understanding how heterogeneous catalysts change size, shape and structure during chemical reactions is limited by the paucity of methods for studying catalytic ensembles in working state, that is, in operando conditions. Here by a correlated use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy in operando conditions, we quantitatively describe the complex structural dynamics of supported Pt catalysts exhibited during an exemplary catalytic reaction—ethylene hydrogenation. This work exploits a microfabricated catalytic reactor compatible with both probes. The results demonstrate dynamic transformations of the ensemble of Pt clusters that spans a broad size range throughout changing reaction conditions. Lastly, this method is generalizable to quantitative operando studies of complex systems using a wide variety of X-ray and electron-based experimental probes.

  11. Complex structural dynamics of nanocatalysts revealed in Operando conditions by correlated imaging and spectroscopy probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Y.; Zakharov, D.; Zhao, S.; Tappero, R.; Jung, U.; Elsen, A.; Baumann, Ph.; Nuzzo, R. G.; Stach, E. A.; Frenkel, A. I.

    2015-06-29

    Understanding how heterogeneous catalysts change size, shape and structure during chemical reactions is limited by the paucity of methods for studying catalytic ensembles in working state, that is, in operando conditions. Here by a correlated use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy in operando conditions, we quantitatively describe the complex structural dynamics of supported Pt catalysts exhibited during an exemplary catalytic reaction—ethylene hydrogenation. This work exploits a microfabricated catalytic reactor compatible with both probes. The results demonstrate dynamic transformations of the ensemble of Pt clusters that spans a broad size range throughout changing reaction conditions. Lastly,more » this method is generalizable to quantitative operando studies of complex systems using a wide variety of X-ray and electron-based experimental probes.« less

  12. An Ultrasensitive High Throughput Screen for DNA Methyltransferase 1-Targeted Molecular Probes

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Rebecca L.; Wu, Meng; Chédin, Frédéric; Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is the enzyme most responsible for epigenetic modification of human DNA and the intended target of approved cancer drugs such as 5-aza-cytidine and 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. 5-aza nucleosides have complex mechanisms of action that require incorporation into DNA, and covalent trapping and proteolysis of DNMT isozymes. Direct DNMT inhibitors are needed to refine understanding of the role of specific DNMT isozymes in cancer etiology and, potentially, to improve cancer prevention and treatment. Here, we developed a high throughput pipeline for identification of direct DNMT1 inhibitors. The components of this screen include an activated form of DNMT1, a restriction enzyme-coupled fluorigenic assay performed in 384 well plates with a z-factor of 0.66, a counter screen against the restriction enzyme, a screen to eliminate DNA intercalators, and a differential scanning fluorimetry assay to validate direct binders. Using the Microsource Spectrum collection of 2320 compounds, this screen identified nine compounds with dose responses ranging from 300 nM to 11 µM, representing at least two different pharmacophores with DNMT1 inhibitory activity. Seven of nine inhibitors identified exhibited two to four-fold selectivity for DNMT1 versus DNMT3A. PMID:24236046

  13. Ultra-sensitive complex as phosphorescence probe for the determination of trace protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Jiang, Shu-Lian; Cui, Ma-Lin; Jiao, Li; Zhang, Li-Hong; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2013-02-01

    β-CD-HMTA-L-Tyr complex, formed in the host guest inclusion reaction carried out between host molecule β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in β-CD-HMTA (HMTA is methenamine) and guest molecule L-tryptophan (L-Tyr), possessing the characteristic of room temperature phosphorescence (RTP). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) reacted with L-Tyr to form a complex of cage structure bringing in the sharply RTP signal quenching of L-Tyr. Based on the above facts, a new ultra-sensitive solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (SSRTP) for the determination of trace protein has been established using β-CD-HMTA-L-Tyr complex as a phosphorescence probe. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range of this method was 0.0040-0.56 ag spot-1 with a detection limit (D.L.) as 0.92 zg spot-1, and the regression equations of working curve was ΔIp = 0.8239 + 162.5 mBSA (ag spot-1, n = 8) with the correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9994. The relatively standard deviation (RSD) and the recovery of SSRTP were 4.8-3.3% and 96.7-102%, respectively, indicating that this method had good repeatability. The proposed phosphorescence probe has been applied in the detection of protein in real samples and the results agreed well with those obtained with SSRTP using methylene blue-sodium tetraphenylborate as phosphorescence probe. Meanwhile, the reaction mechanism for the determination of trace protein with β-CD-HMTA-L-Tyr complex as phosphorescence probe has been discussed.

  14. The DnaB.DnaC complex: a structure based on dimers assembled around an occluded channel.

    PubMed

    Bárcena, M; Ruiz, T; Donate, L E; Brown, S E; Dixon, N E; Radermacher, M; Carazo, J M

    2001-03-15

    Replicative helicases are motor proteins that unwind DNA at replication forks. Escherichia coli DnaB is the best characterized member of this family of enzymes. We present the 26 A resolution three-dimensional structure of the DnaB hexamer in complex with its loading partner, DnaC, obtained from cryo-electron microscopy. Analysis of the volume brings insight into the elaborate way the two proteins interact, and provides a structural basis for control of the symmetry state and inactivation of the helicase by DnaC. The complex is arranged on the basis of interactions among DnaC and DnaB dimers. DnaC monomers are observed for the first time to arrange as three dumb-bell-shaped dimers that interlock into one of the faces of the helicase. This could be responsible for the freezing of DnaB in a C(3) architecture by its loading partner. The central channel of the helicase is almost occluded near the end opposite to DnaC, such that even single-stranded DNA could not pass through. We propose that the DnaB N-terminal domain is located at this face.

  15. Determining electron temperature for small spherical probes from network analyzer measurements of complex impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Fernsler, R. F.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2008-12-15

    In earlier work, using a network analyzer, it was shown that collisionless resistance (CR) exists in the sheath of a spherical probe when driven by a small rf signal. The CR is inversely proportional to the plasma density gradient at the location where the applied angular frequency equals the plasma frequency {omega}{sub pe}. Recently, efforts have concentrated on a study of the low-to-intermediate frequency response of the probe to the rf signal. At sufficiently low frequencies, the CR is beyond cutoff, i.e., below the plasma frequency at the surface of the probe. Since the electron density at the probe surface decreases as a function of applied (negative) bias, the CR will extend to lower frequencies as the magnitude of negative bias increases. Therefore to eliminate both CR and ion current contributions, the frequencies presently being considered are much greater than the ion plasma frequency, {omega}{sub pi}, but less than the plasma frequency, {omega}{sub pe}(r{sub 0}), where r{sub 0} is the probe radius. It is shown that, in this frequency regime, the complex impedance measurements made with a network analyzer can be used to determine electron temperature. An overview of the theory is presented along with comparisons to data sets made using three stainless steel spherical probes of different sizes in different experimental environments and different plasma parameter regimes. The temperature measurements made by this method are compared to those made by conventional Langmuir probe sweeps; the method shown here requires no curve fitting as is the usual procedure with Langmuir probes when a Maxwell-Boltzmann electron distribution is assumed. The new method requires, however, a solution of the Poisson equation to determine the approximate sheath dimensions and integrals to determine approximate plasma and sheath inductances. The solution relies on the calculation of impedance for a spherical probe immersed in a collisionless plasma and is based on a simple

  16. Species-specific identification of Candida krusei by hybridization with the CkF1,2 DNA probe.

    PubMed Central

    Carlotti, A; Couble, A; Domingo, J; Miroy, K; Villard, J

    1996-01-01

    The species specificity of the Candida krusei DNA fingerprinting probe CkF1,2 has been investigated. A total of 149 pathogenic and nonpathogenic fungal and bacterial DNAs were screened with CkF1,2. The probe was cold labeled with peroxidase, and its specificity was assessed by using Southern blot, dot blot, and colony blot hybridization. Its sensitivity was determined by dot blot hybridization. The CkF1,2 probe proved to be species specific. It hybridized with DNA for the 112 C. krusei strains studied, whereas it failed to hybridize under low-stringency conditions to 37 DNAs from 27 different yeast species, including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida norvegensis, Candida inconspicua, Candida tropicalis, Candida valida, Candida zeylanoides, and Yarrowia lipolytica, as well as DNAs from the filamentous fungi and bacteria tested. However, CkF1,2 hybridized strongly with DNA of the yeast species Issatchenkia orientalis, the putative ascogenous perfect state of C. krusei. Amounts as small as 60 to 120 ng of C. krusei target DNA were detected by dot blot hybridization with CkF1,2. It permitted the direct screening of colony blots for early identification. The CkF1,2 probe has potential value as a diagnostic reagent for identifying C. krusei. PMID:8784578

  17. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF TYPHA LATIFOLIA (TYPHACEAE) AND THE IMPACT OF POLLUTANTS EXAMINED WITH TANDEM-REPETITIVE DNA PROBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic diversity at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci was examined in the common cattail, Typha latifolia (Typhaceae), using three synthetic DNA probes composed of tandemly repeated "core" sequences (GACA, GATA, and GCAC). The principal objectives of this investigation w...

  18. Hyperpolarized 89Y complexes as pH sensitive NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Ashish K; Merritt, Matthew E; Suh, Eul Hyun; Malloy, Craig R; Sherry, A Dean; Kovács, Zoltán

    2010-02-17

    Hyperpolarization can increase the sensitivity of NMR/MRI experiments, but the primary limitation is the T(1) decay of magnetization. Due to its long T(1), the hyperpolarized (89)Y nucleus makes an excellent candidate as an in vivo spectroscopy/imaging probe. Here we report the (89)Y chemical shift dependence upon pH for two hyperpolarized (89)Y(III) complexes and demonstrate how such complexes can be used as sensitive spectroscopy/imaging agents to measure pH.

  19. FISH analysis of the arrangement of chromosomes in interphase nuclei using telomeric, centromeric, and DNA painting probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monajembashi, Shamci; Schmitt, Eberhard; Dittmar, Heike; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization is used to study the arrangement of chromosomes in interphase nuclei of unsynchronized human lymphocytes. DNA probes specific for telomeric DNA, centromeric (alpha) -satellite DNA and whole chromosomes 2, 7, 9 and X are employed. It is demonstrated that the shape of the chromosome territories is variable in cycling cells, for example, close to the metaphase chromosome homologues are arranged pairwise. Furthermore, the relative arrangement of chromosome homologues to each other is not spatially defined. Also, the relative orientation of centromeres and telomeres within a chromosome domain is variable.

  20. Electrochemical detection of peanut allergen Ara h 1 using a sensitive DNA biosensor based on stem-loop probe.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiulan; Guan, Lu; Shan, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yinzhi; Li, Zaijun

    2012-11-01

    A novel electrochemical DNA sensor was developed by using a stem-loop probe for peanut allergen Ara h 1 detection. The probe was modified with a thiol at its 5' end and a biotin at its 3' end. The biotin-tagged "molecular beacon"-like probe was attached to the surface of a gold electrode to form a stem-loop structure by self-assembly through facile gold-thiol affinity. 6-Mercaptohexanol (MCH) was used to cover the remnant bare region. The stem--loop probe was "closed" when the target was absent, and then the hybridization of the target induced the conformational change to "open", along with the biotin at its 3' end moved away from the electrode surface. The probe conformational change process was verified by circular dichroism (CD); meanwhile, electron-transfer efficiency changes between probe and electrode were proved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The detection limit of this method was 0.35 fM with the linear response ranging from 10(-15) to 10(-10) M. Moreover, a complementary target could be discriminated from one-base mismatch and noncomplementarity. The proposed strategy has been successfully applied to detect Ara h 1 in the peanut DNA extracts of peanut milk beverage, and the concentration of it was 3.2 × 10(-13) mol/L.

  1. Crystal Structure of the Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 1 (Chd1) DNA-binding Domain in Complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma A.; Heroux A.; Jenkins K. R.; Bowman G. D.

    2011-12-09

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-dependent machines that dynamically alter the chromatin packaging of eukaryotic genomes by assembling, sliding, and displacing nucleosomes. The Chd1 chromatin remodeler possesses a C-terminal DNA-binding domain that is required for efficient nucleosome sliding and believed to be essential for sensing the length of DNA flanking the nucleosome core. The structure of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain was recently shown to consist of a SANT and SLIDE domain, analogous to the DNA-binding domain of the ISWI family, yet the details of how Chd1 recognized DNA were not known. Here we present the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chd1 DNA-binding domain in complex with a DNA duplex. The bound DNA duplex is straight, consistent with the preference exhibited by the Chd1 DNA-binding domain for extranucleosomal DNA. Comparison of this structure with the recently solved ISW1a DNA-binding domain bound to DNA reveals that DNA lays across each protein at a distinct angle, yet contacts similar surfaces on the SANT and SLIDE domains. In contrast to the minor groove binding seen for Isw1 and predicted for Chd1, the SLIDE domain of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain contacts the DNA major groove. The majority of direct contacts with the phosphate backbone occur only on one DNA strand, suggesting that Chd1 may not strongly discriminate between major and minor grooves.

  2. Ultrafast Hydration Dynamics Probed by Tryptophan at Protein Surface and Protein-DNA Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yangzhong

    As we all live in a special water planet Earth, the significance of water to life has been universally recognized. The reason why water is so important to life has intrigued many researchers. This dissertation will focus on the ultrafast dynamics of protein surface water and protein-DNA interfacial water which have direct importance to the protein structure and function. Using tryptophan as an intrinsic fluorescence probe, combined with site-directed mutagenesis and ultrafast fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy, we can achieve single residue spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. We can also precisely determine the local hydration water dynamics by monitoring the Stokes shift of tryptophan one at a time. Previously, the protein surface hydration has been extensively studied by our group. In this thesis, we will provide more details on the methods we are using to extract the hydration dynamics, and also validate our methods from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. To further interrogate the interfacial water hydration dynamics relative to the protein surface hydration, we studied two DNA polymerases: DNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4) and DNA Polymerase Beta (Pol beta). Both proteins show typical surface hydration pattern with three distinct time components including: (i) the ultrafast sub-picosecond component reflects the bulk type water motion; (ii) a few picoseconds component shows the inner water relaxation mainly corresponding to the local libration and reorientation; (iii) the tens to hundred picoseconds component represents the water-protein coupled motion involving the whole water network reorganization. Dpo4, a loosely DNA binding protein, exhibits very flexible interfacial water which resembles its surface water yet with a significantly reduced ultrafast component. Such dynamic interfacial water not only maintains interfacial flexibility, but also contributes to the low fidelity of the protein. In contrast to the Dpo4, pol beta

  3. Experimental mapping of DNA duplex shape enabled by global lineshape analyses of a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Tham, Kenneth W.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-dependent variation in structure and dynamics of a DNA duplex, collectively referred to as ‘DNA shape’, critically impacts interactions between DNA and proteins. Here, a method based on the technique of site-directed spin labeling was developed to experimentally map shapes of two DNA duplexes that contain response elements of the p53 tumor suppressor. An R5a nitroxide spin label, which was covalently attached at a specific phosphate group, was scanned consecutively through the DNA duplex. X-band continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to monitor rotational motions of R5a, which report on DNA structure and dynamics at the labeling site. An approach based on Pearson's coefficient analysis was developed to collectively examine the degree of similarity among the ensemble of R5a spectra. The resulting Pearson's coefficients were used to generate maps representing variation of R5a mobility along the DNA duplex. The R5a mobility maps were found to correlate with maps of certain DNA helical parameters, and were capable of revealing similarity and deviation in the shape of the two closely related DNA duplexes. Collectively, the R5a probe and the Pearson's coefficient-based lineshape analysis scheme yielded a generalizable method for examining sequence-dependent DNA shapes. PMID:25092920

  4. Experimental mapping of DNA duplex shape enabled by global lineshape analyses of a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Tham, Kenneth W; Qin, Peter Z

    2014-10-01

    Sequence-dependent variation in structure and dynamics of a DNA duplex, collectively referred to as 'DNA shape', critically impacts interactions between DNA and proteins. Here, a method based on the technique of site-directed spin labeling was developed to experimentally map shapes of two DNA duplexes that contain response elements of the p53 tumor suppressor. An R5a nitroxide spin label, which was covalently attached at a specific phosphate group, was scanned consecutively through the DNA duplex. X-band continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to monitor rotational motions of R5a, which report on DNA structure and dynamics at the labeling site. An approach based on Pearson's coefficient analysis was developed to collectively examine the degree of similarity among the ensemble of R5a spectra. The resulting Pearson's coefficients were used to generate maps representing variation of R5a mobility along the DNA duplex. The R5a mobility maps were found to correlate with maps of certain DNA helical parameters, and were capable of revealing similarity and deviation in the shape of the two closely related DNA duplexes. Collectively, the R5a probe and the Pearson's coefficient-based lineshape analysis scheme yielded a generalizable method for examining sequence-dependent DNA shapes.

  5. Fluorescence in complexes based on quinolines-derivatives: a search for better fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Mecca, Carolina Z P; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Bagatin, Izilda A

    2016-11-01

    Quinoline-derived fluorescent complexes were designed; synthesized by the reaction of 5-nitro-8-hydroxyquinoline and 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline with Al(3+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), and Cd(2+) salts (1-8); and characterized. The (1)H NMR spectra of complexes 1 and 5, containing Al(3+), were consistent with an octahedral structure having approximate D3 symmetry, and the results supported the favored facial isomer (fac). Data for complexes 2-4 and 6-8 supported the formation of tetrahedral structures. Intense luminescence was detected for complexes 5-8, even with the naked eye, as indicated by quantum yield values of 0.087, 0.094, 0.051, and 0.021, respectively. Furthermore, in contrast to 5-nitro-8-hydroxyquinoline, the 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline ligand exhibited bands at different energies depending on the coordinated metal, which supported its potential application in ionic and biological probes, as well as in cell imaging. PMID:27288961

  6. Fluorescence in complexes based on quinolines-derivatives: a search for better fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Mecca, Carolina Z P; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Bagatin, Izilda A

    2016-11-01

    Quinoline-derived fluorescent complexes were designed; synthesized by the reaction of 5-nitro-8-hydroxyquinoline and 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline with Al(3+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), and Cd(2+) salts (1-8); and characterized. The (1)H NMR spectra of complexes 1 and 5, containing Al(3+), were consistent with an octahedral structure having approximate D3 symmetry, and the results supported the favored facial isomer (fac). Data for complexes 2-4 and 6-8 supported the formation of tetrahedral structures. Intense luminescence was detected for complexes 5-8, even with the naked eye, as indicated by quantum yield values of 0.087, 0.094, 0.051, and 0.021, respectively. Furthermore, in contrast to 5-nitro-8-hydroxyquinoline, the 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline ligand exhibited bands at different energies depending on the coordinated metal, which supported its potential application in ionic and biological probes, as well as in cell imaging.

  7. Fluorescence in complexes based on quinolines-derivatives: a search for better fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecca, Carolina Z. P.; Fonseca, Fernando L. A.; Bagatin, Izilda A.

    2016-11-01

    Quinoline-derived fluorescent complexes were designed; synthesized by the reaction of 5-nitro-8-hydroxyquinoline and 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline with Al3+, Mg2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ salts (1-8); and characterized. The 1H NMR spectra of complexes 1 and 5, containing Al3+, were consistent with an octahedral structure having approximate D3 symmetry, and the results supported the favored facial isomer (fac). Data for complexes 2-4 and 6-8 supported the formation of tetrahedral structures. Intense luminescence was detected for complexes 5-8, even with the naked eye, as indicated by quantum yield values of 0.087, 0.094, 0.051, and 0.021, respectively. Furthermore, in contrast to 5-nitro-8-hydroxyquinoline, the 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline ligand exhibited bands at different energies depending on the coordinated metal, which supported its potential application in ionic and biological probes, as well as in cell imaging.

  8. Hg(2+) detection using a phosphorothioate RNA probe adsorbed on graphene oxide and a comparison with thymine-rich DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; van Ballegooie, Courtney; Liu, Juewen

    2016-06-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic heavy metal and many DNA-based biosensors have been recently developed for Hg(2+) detection in water. Among them, thymine-rich DNA is the most commonly used for designing Hg(2+) sensors. However, the thymine-Hg(2+) interaction is strongly affected by the buffer conditions. We recently reported a molecular beacon containing phosphorothioate (PS)-modified RNA linkages that can be cleaved by Hg(2+). In this work, the fluorescence quenching and DNA adsorption properties of nano-sized graphene oxide (NGO) were used to develop a new sensor using the PS-RNA chemistry. Three DNA probes, containing one, three and five PS-RNA linkages, respectively, were tested. Finally, a fluorophore-labeled poly-A DNA with five PS-RNA linkages was selected and adsorbed by NGO. In the presence of Hg(2+), the fluorophore was released from NGO due to the cleavage reaction, resulting in a fluorescence enhancement. This sensor is highly selective for Hg(2+) with a detection limit of 8.5 nM Hg(2+). For comparison, a fluorophore-labeled poly-T DNA was also tested, which responded to Hg(2+) more slowly and was inhibited by high NaCl concentrations, while the PS-RNA probe was more tolerant to different buffer conditions. This work indicates a new method for interfacing DNA with NGO for Hg(2+) detection. PMID:26580137

  9. Hg(2+) detection using a phosphorothioate RNA probe adsorbed on graphene oxide and a comparison with thymine-rich DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; van Ballegooie, Courtney; Liu, Juewen

    2016-06-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic heavy metal and many DNA-based biosensors have been recently developed for Hg(2+) detection in water. Among them, thymine-rich DNA is the most commonly used for designing Hg(2+) sensors. However, the thymine-Hg(2+) interaction is strongly affected by the buffer conditions. We recently reported a molecular beacon containing phosphorothioate (PS)-modified RNA linkages that can be cleaved by Hg(2+). In this work, the fluorescence quenching and DNA adsorption properties of nano-sized graphene oxide (NGO) were used to develop a new sensor using the PS-RNA chemistry. Three DNA probes, containing one, three and five PS-RNA linkages, respectively, were tested. Finally, a fluorophore-labeled poly-A DNA with five PS-RNA linkages was selected and adsorbed by NGO. In the presence of Hg(2+), the fluorophore was released from NGO due to the cleavage reaction, resulting in a fluorescence enhancement. This sensor is highly selective for Hg(2+) with a detection limit of 8.5 nM Hg(2+). For comparison, a fluorophore-labeled poly-T DNA was also tested, which responded to Hg(2+) more slowly and was inhibited by high NaCl concentrations, while the PS-RNA probe was more tolerant to different buffer conditions. This work indicates a new method for interfacing DNA with NGO for Hg(2+) detection.

  10. Study of gene-specific DNA repair in the comet assay with padlock probes and rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Sara; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Nilsson, Mats; Collins, Andrew

    2011-04-25

    We used padlock probes to study the rate of gene specific repair of three genes, OGG1 (8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase-1), XPD (xeroderma pigmentosum group D), and HPRT (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase) in human lymphocytes, in relation to the repair rate of Alu repeats and total genomic DNA. Padlock probes offer highly specific detection of short target sequences by combining detection by ligation and signal amplification. In this approach only genes in sequences containing strand breaks, which become single-stranded in the tail, are available for hybridisation. Thus the total number of signals from the padlock probes per comet gives a direct measure of the amount of damage (strand-breaks) present and allows the repair process to be monitored. This method could provide insights on the organisation of genomic DNA in the comet tail. Alu repeat containing DNA was repaired rapidly in comparison with total genomic DNA, and the studied genes were generally repaired more rapidly than the Alu repeats.

  11. Development of Prevotella nigrescens-specific PCR primers based on the nucleotide sequence of a Pn23 DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Jae-Yoon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2011-02-01

    A previous study reported the cloning of a putative Prevotella nigrescens-specific DNA probe, Pn23, using random shotgun method. The present study evaluated the species-specificity of Pn23 for P. nigrescens using the clinical strains of Prevotella intermedia and P. nigrescens to develop P. nigrescens-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. Southern blot analysis showed that the DNA probe, Pn23, detected only the genomic DNA of P. nigrescens strains. PCR showed that the two sets of PCR primers, Pn23-F1/Pn23-R1 and Pn23-F2/Pn23-R2, had species-specificity for P. nigrescens. Interestingly, the two sets of PCR primers, Pn23-F6/Pn23-R6 and Pn23-F7/Pn23-R7, had strain-specificity for P. nigrescens ATCC 33563. The detection limits of the four primer sets were 40 or 4 pg of the purified genomic DNA of P. nigrescens ATCC 33563. These results suggest that the DNA probe, Pn23, and the two sets of PCR primers, Pn23-F1/Pn23-R1 and Pn23-F2/Pn23-R2, can be useful for the detection of P. nigrescens in the molecular epidemiological studies of oral infectious diseases. PMID:21184839

  12. [Genomic fingerprints of organisms from different taxonomic groups: the use of phage M13 DNA as a hybridization probe].

    PubMed

    Ryskov, A P; Dzhincharadze, A G; Prosnik, M I; Ivanov, P L; Limborskaia, S A

    1988-02-01

    Hypervariable polymorphic patterns were detected using wild-type M13 DNA as a probe in genomic DNAs of very different organisms ranging from procaryotes and lower eucaryotes to upper plants and animals, including human beings. Due to somatic stability of highly polymorphic patterns and their discrete inheritance, individual-specific restriction pattern analysis ("DNA fingerprinting") with this test probe was found to be useful in applied human genetics, in particular, for identifying paternity and maternity, and mapping of human genomes. The data obtained also demonstrate some possibilities of the DNA fingerprinting technology in genetics and selection of agricultural plants and animals, such as variety analysis, classification and registration of individual inbred lines and strains, as well as identification of bacterial strains.

  13. Mica functionalization for imaging of DNA and protein-DNA complexes with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S; Gall, Alexander A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is a key step for reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA and protein-DNA complexes with atomic force microscopy (AFM). This article describes the approaches for chemical functionalization of the mica surface. One approach utilizes 3-aminopropyl-trietoxy silane (APTES), enabling one to obtain a smooth surface termed AP-mica. This surface binds nucleic acids and nucleoprotein complexes in a wide range of ionic strengths, in the absence of divalent cations and in a broad range of pH. Another method utilizes aminopropyl silatrane (APS) to yield an APS-mica surface. The advantage of APS-mica compared with AP-mica is the ability to obtain reliable and reproducible time-lapse images in aqueous solutions. The chapter describes the methodologies for the preparation of AP-mica and APS-mica surfaces and the preparation of samples for AFM imaging. The protocol for synthesis and purification of APS is also provided. The applications are illustrated with a number of examples.

  14. Detection of human papillomavirus type 6/11 DNA in conjunctival papillomas by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, P.J.; McDonnell, J.M.; Kessis, T.; Green, W.R.; Shah, K.V.

    1987-11-01

    Twenty-three conjunctival papillomas and 28 conjunctival dysplasias were examined for human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA sequences by in situ hybridization with nick-translated /sup 35/S-labeled HPV probes. Adjacent paraffin sections were hybridized with HPV type 2, 6, 16, and 18 probes at Tm - 17 degrees C. Fifteen tissues, all papillomas, displayed positive hybridization with the HPV-6 probe. Infection with HPV-6 (or the closely related HPV-11) appeared to be responsible for most of the conjunctival papillomas of children and young adults. The presence of genital tract HPV-6 in these lesions suggests that some of the infections were acquired during passage through an infected birth canal. The lack of hybridization in adult conjunctival dysplasias indicates either that HPVs are not associated with this condition or that the probes and the technique utilized were not adequate for demonstration of this association.

  15. Photoinduced intercalation and coordination of a dirhodium complex to DNA: dual DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Alycia M; Burya, Scott J; Gallucci, Judith C; Turro, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Two new complexes, cis-H,H-[Rh2 (OCCH3 NH)2 (LL)(CH3 CN)2 ](2+) , where LL=bpy (2, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) and dppz (3, dppz=dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine), were prepared from the reaction of cis-H,H-[Rh2 (OCCH3 NH)2 (CH3 CN)6 ](2+) (1) with the corresponding bidentate ligand. The bpy and dppz ligands chelate to the same rhodium atom and are positioned trans to the amidato N atoms, as determined by the single crystal X-ray structure of 2. Irradiation of 2 and 3 with visible light in water results in the exchange of one CH3 CNeq ligand for an H2 O molecule with quantum yields, Φ400 , of 0.040 and 0.044, respectively (λirr =400 nm). The identities of the photoproducts of 2 and 3 were determined to be cis-H,H-[Rh2 (OCCH3 NH)2 (L)(H2 O)(CH3 CN)](2+) , where L is bpy (4) and dppz (5), respectively. Mobility shift assays show that 4 crosslinks double-stranded DNA, and ESI-MS experiments indicate that both 4 and 5 form covalent adducts with single-stranded DNA. In addition, relative viscosity and 2D NMR experiments show that the dppz ligand of 5 also intercalates into DNA upon irradiation, making 3 a dual-binding agent that both intercalates and covalently binds to DNA upon the absorption of visible light.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and DNA interaction studies of complexes of lanthanide nitrates with tris{2-[(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)imino]ethyl}amine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Yuan, Wen-bing; Zhang, Qi; Yan, Lan; Yang, Ru-dong

    2008-10-01

    A new tripodal, hydroxyl-rich ligand, tris{2-[(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)imino]ethyl}amine (L), and its complexes with lanthanide nitrates were synthesized. These complexes which are stable in air with the general formula of [LnL(NO 3) 2]NO 3·H 2O (Ln = La, Sm, Eu, Gd, Y) were characterized by molar conductivity, elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermal analysis. The NO 3- groups coordinated to lanthanide mono-dentately, and the coordination number in these complexes may be 8. The interaction of complexes with DNA were investigated by ultraviolet and fluorescent spectra, which showed that the binding mode of complexes with DNA was intercalation, and the binding affinity with DNA were La(III) complex > Sm(III) complex > Eu(III) complex > Gd(III) complex > Y(III) complex. Based on these results, it can be shown that the La(III)complex is promising candidate for therapeutic reagents and DNA probes.

  17. Surface modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels with DNA capture-probes for potential use in microfluidic DNA analysis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodakov, Dmitriy A.; Thredgold, Leigh D.; Lenehan, Claire E.; Andersson, Gunther A.; Kobus, Hilton; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2011-12-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is an elastomeric material used for microfluidic devices and is especially suited to medical and forensic applications. This is due to its relatively low cost, ease of fabrication, excellent optical transmission characteristics and its ability to support electroosmotic flow, required during electrophoretic separations. These aspects combined with its large range of surface modification chemistries, make PDMS an attractive substrate in microfluidic devices for, in particular, DNA separation. Here, we report the successful wet chemical surface modification of PDMS microchannels using a simple three step method to produce an isothiocyanate-terminated surface. Initially, PDMS was oxygen plasma treated to produce a silanol-terminated surface, this was then reacted with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with subsequent reaction of the now amine-terminated surface with p-phenylenediisothiocyanate. Water contact angle measurements both before and after modification showed a reduction in hydrophobicity from 101o for native PDMS to 94o for the isothiocyante-terminated PDMS. The isothiocyanate-terminated surface was then coupled with an amineterminated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide capture probe via a thiourea linkage. Confirmation of capture probe attachment was observed using fluorescent microscopy after hybridization of the capture probes with fluorescently labeled complimentary ssDNA oligonucleotides.

  18. A simple strategy of probe DNA immobilization by diazotization-coupling on self-assembled 4-aminothiophenol for DNA electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Chen, Wei; Dong, Pingjun; Zhang, Shusheng

    2009-03-15

    A novel and simple strategy for fabricating of DNA electrochemical biosensor was developed based on covalent coupling of probe NH(2)-ssDNA (S(1)) on Au electrode that had been functionalized by diazotization of assembled 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) monolayer. The thiol group of 4-ATP allowed the stable assembly of 4-ATP monolayer. The following diazotization reaction was directly performed to prepare functional diazo-ATP film for covalent coupling of probe S(1). Remarkably, it was noting that the diazo-ATP provided a surface with high conductibility for electron transfer. The complementary ssDNA was determined by using differential pulse voltammetry. The linear range of the developed biosensor was from 1.57 x 10(-9) to 4.52 x 10(-7)M with a detection limit of 3.26 x 10(-10)M. The fabricated biosensor possessed good selectivity and could be regenerated. The covalent immobilization of probe S(1) by simple diazotization-coupling on self-assembled 4-ATP monolayer could serve as a versatile platform for DNA immobilization and biosensors fabricating. PMID:19124235

  19. Exploring tight junction alteration using double fluorescent probe combination of lanthanide complex with gold nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinyi; Wang, Na; Yuan, Lan; Li, Na; Wang, Junxia; Yang, Xiaoda

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions play a key role in restricting or regulating passage of liquids, ions and large solutes through various biological barriers by the paracellular route. Changes in paracellular permeation indicate alteration of the tight junction. However, it is very difficult to obtain the structural change information by measuring paracellular flux based on transepithelial electrical resistance or using fluorescein-labeled dextrans. Here we show that the BSA and GSH stabilized gold nanoclusters exhibit marginal cytotoxicity and pass through the MDCK monolayer exclusively through the paracellular pathway. We propose a double fluorescence probe strategy, the combination of a proven paracellular indicator (europium complex) with fluorescent gold nanoclusters. We calculate changes of structural parameters in tight junctions based on determination of the diffusion coefficients of the probes. Two different types of tight junction openers are used to validate our strategy. Results show that EDTA disrupts tight junction structures and induces large and smooth paracellular pore paths with an average radius of 17 nm, but vanadyl complexes induce paths with the radius of 6 nm. The work suggests that the double fluorescence probe strategy is a useful and convenient approach for in vitro investigation of tight junction structural alternations caused by pharmacological or pathological events. PMID:27574102

  20. Exploring tight junction alteration using double fluorescent probe combination of lanthanide complex with gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyi; Wang, Na; Yuan, Lan; Li, Na; Wang, Junxia; Yang, Xiaoda

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions play a key role in restricting or regulating passage of liquids, ions and large solutes through various biological barriers by the paracellular route. Changes in paracellular permeation indicate alteration of the tight junction. However, it is very difficult to obtain the structural change information by measuring paracellular flux based on transepithelial electrical resistance or using fluorescein-labeled dextrans. Here we show that the BSA and GSH stabilized gold nanoclusters exhibit marginal cytotoxicity and pass through the MDCK monolayer exclusively through the paracellular pathway. We propose a double fluorescence probe strategy, the combination of a proven paracellular indicator (europium complex) with fluorescent gold nanoclusters. We calculate changes of structural parameters in tight junctions based on determination of the diffusion coefficients of the probes. Two different types of tight junction openers are used to validate our strategy. Results show that EDTA disrupts tight junction structures and induces large and smooth paracellular pore paths with an average radius of 17 nm, but vanadyl complexes induce paths with the radius of 6 nm. The work suggests that the double fluorescence probe strategy is a useful and convenient approach for in vitro investigation of tight junction structural alternations caused by pharmacological or pathological events. PMID:27574102

  1. Exploring tight junction alteration using double fluorescent probe combination of lanthanide complex with gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinyi; Wang, Na; Yuan, Lan; Li, Na; Wang, Junxia; Yang, Xiaoda

    2016-08-01

    Tight junctions play a key role in restricting or regulating passage of liquids, ions and large solutes through various biological barriers by the paracellular route. Changes in paracellular permeation indicate alteration of the tight junction. However, it is very difficult to obtain the structural change information by measuring paracellular flux based on transepithelial electrical resistance or using fluorescein-labeled dextrans. Here we show that the BSA and GSH stabilized gold nanoclusters exhibit marginal cytotoxicity and pass through the MDCK monolayer exclusively through the paracellular pathway. We propose a double fluorescence probe strategy, the combination of a proven paracellular indicator (europium complex) with fluorescent gold nanoclusters. We calculate changes of structural parameters in tight junctions based on determination of the diffusion coefficients of the probes. Two different types of tight junction openers are used to validate our strategy. Results show that EDTA disrupts tight junction structures and induces large and smooth paracellular pore paths with an average radius of 17 nm, but vanadyl complexes induce paths with the radius of 6 nm. The work suggests that the double fluorescence probe strategy is a useful and convenient approach for in vitro investigation of tight junction structural alternations caused by pharmacological or pathological events.

  2. Development of species-specific hybridization probes for marine luminous bacteria by using in vitro DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Wimpee, C.F.; Nadeau, T.L.; Nealson, K.H. )

    1991-05-01

    By using two highly conserved regions of the luxA gene as primers, polymerase chain reaction amplification methods were used to prepare species-specific probes against the luciferase gene from four major groups of marine luminous bacteria. Laboratory studies with test strains indicated that three of the four probes cross-reacted with themselves and with one or more of the other species at low stringencies but were specific for members of their own species at high stringencies. The fourth probe, generated from Vibrio harveyi DNA, a cross-reacted with DNAs from two closely related species, V. orientalis and V. vulnificus. When nonluminous cultures were tested with the species-specific probes, no false-positive results were observed, even at low stringencies. Two field isolates were correctly identified as Photobacterium phosphoreum by using the species-specific hybridization probes at high stringency. A mixed probe (four different hybridization probes) used at low stringency gave positive results with all of the luminous bacteria tested, including the terrestrial species Xenorhabdus luminescens, and the taxonomically distinct marine bacterial species Shewanella hanedai; minimal cross-hybridization with these species was seen at higher stringencies.

  3. Analytical methods to determine the comparative DNA binding studies of curcumin-Cu(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, Jegathalaprathaban; Rajasekaran, Marichamy; Rajagopal, Gurusamy; Athappan, Periakaruppan

    2012-11-01

    DNA interaction studies of two mononuclear [1:1(1); 1:2(2)] copper(II) complexes of curcumin have been studied. The interaction of these complexes with CT-DNA has been explored by physical methods to propose modes of DNA binding of the complexes. Absorption spectral titrations of complex 1 with CT-DNA shows a red-shift of 3 nm with the DNA binding affinity of Kb, 5.21 × 104 M-1 that are higher than that obtained for 2 (red-shift, 2 nm; Kb, 1.73 × 104 M-1) reveal that the binding occurs in grooves as a result of the interaction is via exterior phosphates. The CD spectra of these Cu(II) complexes show a red shift of 3-10 nm in the positive band with increase in intensities. This spectral change of induced CD due to the hydrophobic interaction of copper complexes with DNA is the characteristic of B to A conformational change. The EB displacement assay also reveals the same trend as observed in UV-Vis spectral titration. The addition of complexes 1 and 2 to the DNA bound ethidium bromide (EB) solutions causes an obvious reduction in emission intensities indicating that these complexes competitively bind to DNA with EB. The positive shift of both the Epc and E0' accompanied by reduction of peak currents in differential pulse voltammogram (DPV), upon adding different concentrations of DNA to the metal complexes, are obviously in favor of strong binding to DNA. The super coiled plasmid pUC18 DNA cleavage ability of Cu(II) complexes in the presence of reducing agent reveals the single strand DNA cleavage (ssDNA) is observed. The hydroxyl radical (HOrad ) and the singlet oxygen are believed to be the reactive species responsible for the cleavage.

  4. DNA binding and nuclease activity of a one-dimensional heterometallic nitrosyl complex.

    PubMed

    Selim, Md; Chowdhury, Sujoy Roy; Mukherjea, Kalyan K

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of a structurally characterized Sr-Fe nitrosyl complex with DNA has been studied by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, viscometric, and gel electrophoresis techniques. From the absorption titration studies the intrinsic binding constant of the complex with DNA was calculated to be 1.6x10(4)M(-1). Fluorimetric studies indicate that the complex compete with EB in binding to DNA. The complex shows nuclease activity on pUC19 supercoiled DNA in presence of H(2)O(2). PMID:17825903

  5. ATP-dependent DNA binding, unwinding, and resection by the Mre11/Rad50 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqi; Sung, Sihyun; Kim, Youngran; Li, Fuyang; Gwon, Gwanghyun; Jo, Aera; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Kim, Taeyoon; Song, Ok-Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Yunje

    2016-04-01

    ATP-dependent DNA end recognition and nucleolytic processing are central functions of the Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex in DNA double-strand break repair. However, it is still unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis primes the MR function and regulates repair pathway choice in cells. Here,Methanococcus jannaschii MR-ATPγS-DNA structure reveals that the partly deformed DNA runs symmetrically across central groove between two ATPγS-bound Rad50 nucleotide-binding domains. Duplex DNA cannot access the Mre11 active site in the ATP-free full-length MR complex. ATP hydrolysis drives rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain and induces the DNA melting so that the substrate DNA can access Mre11. Our findings suggest that the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in both DNA and the MR complex coordinate the melting and endonuclease activity. PMID:26717941

  6. ATP-dependent DNA binding, unwinding, and resection by the Mre11/Rad50 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqi; Sung, Sihyun; Kim, Youngran; Li, Fuyang; Gwon, Gwanghyun; Jo, Aera; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Kim, Taeyoon; Song, Ok-Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Yunje

    2016-04-01

    ATP-dependent DNA end recognition and nucleolytic processing are central functions of the Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex in DNA double-strand break repair. However, it is still unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis primes the MR function and regulates repair pathway choice in cells. Here,Methanococcus jannaschii MR-ATPγS-DNA structure reveals that the partly deformed DNA runs symmetrically across central groove between two ATPγS-bound Rad50 nucleotide-binding domains. Duplex DNA cannot access the Mre11 active site in the ATP-free full-length MR complex. ATP hydrolysis drives rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain and induces the DNA melting so that the substrate DNA can access Mre11. Our findings suggest that the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in both DNA and the MR complex coordinate the melting and endonuclease activity.

  7. Probing and quantifying DNA-protein interactions with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Jonathan; Schachermeyer, Samantha; Duan, Yaokai; Jimenez, Luis A; Zhong, Wenwan

    2014-09-01

    Tools capable of measuring binding affinities as well as amenable to downstream sequencing analysis are needed for study of DNA-protein interaction, particularly in discovery of new DNA sequences with affinity to diverse targets. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) is an open-channel separation technique that eliminates interference from column packing to the non-covalently bound complex and could potentially be applied for study of macromolecular interaction. The recovery and elution behaviors of the poly(dA)n strand and aptamers in AF4 were investigated. Good recovery of ssDNAs was achieved by judicious selection of the channel membrane with consideration of the membrane pore diameter and the radius of gyration (Rg) of the ssDNA, which was obtained with the aid of a Molecular Dynamics tool. The Rg values were also used to assess the folding situation of aptamers based on their migration times in AF4. The interactions between two ssDNA aptamers and their respective protein components were investigated. Using AF4, near-baseline resolution between the free and protein-bound aptamer fractions could be obtained. With this information, dissociation constants of ∼16nM and ∼57nM were obtained for an IgE aptamer and a streptavidin aptamer, respectively. In addition, free and protein-bound IgE aptamer was extracted from the AF4 eluate and amplified, illustrating the potential of AF4 in screening ssDNAs with high affinity to targets. Our results demonstrate that AF4 is an effective tool holding several advantages over the existing techniques and should be useful for study of diverse macromolecular interaction systems.

  8. High Performance DNA Probes for Perinatal Detection of Numerical Chromosome Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Kalistyn H; Weier, Jingly F; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Human reproduction is a tightly controlled process of stepwise evolution with multiple, mostly yet unknown milestones and checkpoints. Healthy halpoid gametes have to be produced by the parents, which will fuse to form the diploid zygote that implants in the female uterus and grows to become first an embryo, then a fetus and finally matures into a newborn. There are several known risk factors that interfere with normal production of gametes, spermatocytes or oocytes, and often cause embryonic mortality and fetal demise at an early stage. Yet some embryos with chomosomal abnormalities can develop beyond the critical first trimester of pregnancy and, while those with supernumary chromosomes in their hyperdiploid cells will be spontaneously aborted, a small fraction of fetuses with an extra chromosome continues to grow to term and will be delivered as a liveborn baby. While minor clinical symptoms displayed by children with trisomies are manageable for many parents, the burden of caring for a child with numerical chromosome abnormalities can be overwhelming to partners or individual families. It also poses a significant financial burden to the society and poses ethical dilemma. In this communication, we will review the progress that has been made in the development of molecular techniques to test individual fetal cells for chromosomal imbalances. We will focus our discussion on the direct visualization of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in live or fixed specimens using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and, more specifically, talk about the groundbreaking progress that in recent years has been achieved towards an improved diagnosis with novel, chromosome-specific DNA probes. PMID:26855976

  9. DNA-based stable isotope probing coupled with cultivation methods implicates Methylophaga in hydrocarbon degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mishamandani, Sara; Gutierrez, Tony; Aitken, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the oxidation and ultimate removal of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. Those with an almost exclusive ability to utilize hydrocarbons as a sole carbon and energy source have been found confined to just a few genera. Here we used stable isotope probing (SIP), a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in coastal North Carolina sea water (Beaufort Inlet, USA) with uniformly labeled [13C]n-hexadecane. The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from 13C-enriched bacterial DNA (from n-hexadecane enrichments) were identified to belong to the genus Alcanivorax, with ≤98% sequence identity to the closest type strain—thus representing a putative novel phylogenetic taxon within this genus. Unexpectedly, we also identified 13C-enriched sequences in heavy DNA fractions that were affiliated to the genus Methylophaga. This is a contentious group since, though some of its members have been proposed to degrade hydrocarbons, substantive evidence has not previously confirmed this. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Alcanivorax and Methylophaga to determine their abundance in incubations amended with unlabeled n-hexadecane. Both showed substantial increases in gene copy number during the experiments. Subsequently, we isolated a strain representing the SIP-identified Methylophaga sequences (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) and used it to show, for the first time, direct evidence of hydrocarbon degradation by a cultured Methylophaga sp. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the marine environment. PMID:24578702

  10. The DNA cleavage reaction of DNA gyrase. Comparison of stable ternary complexes formed with enoxacin and CcdB protein.

    PubMed

    Scheirer, K E; Higgins, N P

    1997-10-24

    The potent synthetic fluoroquinolones and the natural CcdB protein encoded by the F plasmid both inhibit bacterial growth by attacking DNA gyrase and by stimulating enzyme-induced breaks in bacterial DNA. The cleavage mechanisms of these structurally diverse compounds were analyzed by purifying and characterizing stable ternary complexes of enoxacin and CcdB protein with gyrase bound to a strong gyrase binding site from bacteriophage Mu. Three differences between enoxacin- and CcdB-derived complexes were discovered. 1) Enoxacin binds to the DNA active site and alters the breakage/reunion activity of the enzyme. CcdB binds gyrase-DNA complexes but does not influence enzymatic activity directly. 2) Complexes that produce DNA cleavage with enoxacin are reversible, whereas similar complexes made with CcdB protein are not. 3) Enoxacin stimulates cleavage of both relaxed and supercoiled forms of DNA in the absence of ATP, whereas CcdB induces cleavage only after many cycles of ATP-dependent breakage and reunion. These differences in mechanisms can be explained by a model in which enoxacin induces formation of a novel "cleavable" complex, whereas CcdB protein traps a very rare "cleaved" conformation of the enzyme.

  11. Further purification and characterization of a multienzyme complex for DNA synthesis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Cao, L G; Wang, Y L; Baril, E F

    1993-12-01

    The 21 S complex of enzymes for DNA synthesis in the combined low salt nuclear extract-post microsomal supernatant from HeLa cells [Malkas et al. (1990) Biochemistry 29:6362-6374] was purified by poly (ethylene glycol) precipitation, Q-Sepharose chromatography, Mono Q Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC), and velocity gradient centrifugation. The procedure gives purified enzyme complex at a yield of 45%. The 21 S enzyme complex remains intact and functional in the replication of simian virus 40 DNA throughout the purification. Sedimentation analysis showed that the 21 S enzyme complex exists in the crude HeLa cell extract and that simian virus 40 in vitro DNA replication activity in the cell extract resides exclusively with the 21 S complex. The results of enzyme and immunological analysis indicate that DNA polymerase alpha-primase, a 3',5' exonuclease, DNA ligase I, RNase H, and topoisomerase I are associated with the purified enzyme complex. Denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme complex showed the presence of about 30 polypeptides in the size range of 300 to 15 kDa. Immunofluorescent imaging analysis, with antibodies to DNA polymerase alpha,beta and DNA ligase I, showed that polymerase alpha and DNA ligase I are localized to granular-like foci within the nucleus during S-phase. In contrast, DNA polymerase beta, which is not associated with the 21 S complex, is diffusely distributed throughout the nucleoplasm. PMID:8300757

  12. Developing a qPCR method to quantify AhR-PCP-DNA complex for detection of environmental trace-level PCP.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Pang, Xiaoqian; Chaisuwan, Nuanapa

    2011-07-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP), a widely-used aseptic or biocide, is known as an environmental toxicant involved in endocrine disruption even at a trace level. In order to reliably and efficiently quantify environmental trace-quantity PCP, this study developed a novel PCP detection method using the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and fluorescence quantitative PCR (qPCR). DNA probe with AhR binding sites was synthesized by PCR before added into AhR-PCP complex. After AhR-PCP-DNA complex was digested with exonuclease, copy number of DNA probe was determined using fluorescence qPCR. To calculate PCP concentration in samples, a standard curve (PCP concentration versus Ct value) was constructed and the detection range was 10(-13) to 10(-9) M. PCP detection limit was 0.0089 ppt for the AhR-PCP-DNA complex assay and 8.8780 ppm for high performance liquid chromatography, demonstrating that the method developed in this study is more sensitive. These results suggest that AhR-PCP-DNA complex method may be successfully applicable in detection and quantification of environmental trace-level PCP. PMID:21503612

  13. Multiple DNA Extractions Coupled with Stable-Isotope Probing of Anthracene-Degrading Bacteria in Contaminated Soil▿†

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Maiysha D.; Singleton, David R.; Sun, Wei; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In many of the DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) studies published to date in which soil communities were investigated, a single DNA extraction was performed on the soil sample, usually using a commercial DNA extraction kit, prior to recovering the 13C-labeled (heavy) DNA by density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Recent evidence suggests, however, that a single extraction of a soil sample may not lead to representative recovery of DNA from all of the organisms in the sample. To determine whether multiple DNA extractions would affect the DNA yield, the eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number, or the identification of anthracene-degrading bacteria, we performed seven successive DNA extractions on the same aliquot of contaminated soil either untreated or enriched with [U-13C]anthracene. Multiple extractions were necessary to maximize the DNA yield and 16S rRNA gene copy number from both untreated and anthracene-enriched soil samples. Sequences within the order Sphingomonadales, but unrelated to any previously described genus, dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from 13C-enriched DNA and were designated “anthracene group 1.” Sequences clustering with Variovorax spp., which were also highly represented, and sequences related to the genus Pigmentiphaga were newly associated with anthracene degradation. The bacterial groups collectively identified across all seven extracts were all recovered in the first extract, although quantitative PCR analysis of SIP-identified groups revealed quantitative differences in extraction patterns. These results suggest that performing multiple DNA extractions on soil samples improves the extractable DNA yield and the number of quantifiable eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copies but have little qualitative effect on the identification of the bacterial groups associated with the degradation of a given carbon source by SIP. PMID:21398486

  14. Cultivation-independent detection of autotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria by DNA stable-isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Pumphrey, Graham M; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Spain, Jim C

    2011-07-01

    Knallgas bacteria are a physiologically defined group that is primarily studied using cultivation-dependent techniques. Given that current cultivation techniques fail to grow most bacteria, cultivation-independent techniques that selectively detect and identify knallgas bacteria will improve our ability to study their diversity and distribution. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify knallgas bacteria in rhizosphere soil of legumes and in a microbial mat from Obsidian Pool in Yellowstone National Park. When samples were incubated in the dark, incorporation of (13)CO(2) was H(2) dependent. SIP enabled the detection of knallgas bacteria that were not detected by cultivation, and the majority of bacteria identified in the rhizosphere soils were betaproteobacteria predominantly related to genera previously known to oxidize hydrogen. Bacteria in soil grew on hydrogen at concentrations as low as 100 ppm. A hydB homolog encoding a putative high-affinity NiFe hydrogenase was amplified from (13)C-labeled DNA from both vetch and clover rhizosphere soil. The results indicate that knallgas bacteria can be detected by SIP and populations that respond to different H(2) concentrations can be distinguished. The methods described here should be applicable to a variety of ecosystems and will enable the discovery of additional knallgas bacteria that are resistant to cultivation. PMID:21622787

  15. Cultivation-independent detection of autotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria by DNA stable-isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Pumphrey, Graham M; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Spain, Jim C

    2011-07-01

    Knallgas bacteria are a physiologically defined group that is primarily studied using cultivation-dependent techniques. Given that current cultivation techniques fail to grow most bacteria, cultivation-independent techniques that selectively detect and identify knallgas bacteria will improve our ability to study their diversity and distribution. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify knallgas bacteria in rhizosphere soil of legumes and in a microbial mat from Obsidian Pool in Yellowstone National Park. When samples were incubated in the dark, incorporation of (13)CO(2) was H(2) dependent. SIP enabled the detection of knallgas bacteria that were not detected by cultivation, and the majority of bacteria identified in the rhizosphere soils were betaproteobacteria predominantly related to genera previously known to oxidize hydrogen. Bacteria in soil grew on hydrogen at concentrations as low as 100 ppm. A hydB homolog encoding a putative high-affinity NiFe hydrogenase was amplified from (13)C-labeled DNA from both vetch and clover rhizosphere soil. The results indicate that knallgas bacteria can be detected by SIP and populations that respond to different H(2) concentrations can be distinguished. The methods described here should be applicable to a variety of ecosystems and will enable the discovery of additional knallgas bacteria that are resistant to cultivation.

  16. Detection and Quantitation of Heavy Metal Ions on Bona Fide DVDs Using DNA Molecular Beacon Probes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Wong, Jessica X H; Li, Xiaochun; Li, Yunchao; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and cost-effective method for the simultaneous quantitation of trace amounts of Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) in real-world samples has been developed using DNA molecular beacon probes bound to bona fide digital video discs (DVDs). With specially designed T-rich or G-rich loop sequences, the detection is based on the strong T-Hg(2+)-T coordination chemistry of Hg(2+) and the formation of G-quadruplexes induced by Pb(2+), respectively. In particular, the presence of metal cations leads to hairpin opening and exposure of the terminal biotin moiety for binding nanogold-streptavidin conjugates. The recognition signal was subsequently enhanced by gold nanoparticle-promoted silver deposition, which leads to quantifiable digital signals upon reading with a standard computer drive. This method exhibits a wide response range and low detection limits for both Hg(2+) and Pb(2+). In addition, the quantitative determination of heavy metals in food products (e.g., rice samples) has been demonstrated and the method compares favorably with other optical sensors developed recently.

  17. Design and synthesis of DNA-tethered ruthenium complexes that self-assemble into linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Kristen M; McLaughlin, Larry W

    2003-12-01

    Ruthenium(II) bis(terpyridine) complexes have been prepared with two triethylene glycol linkers to which DNA sequences have been attached; hybridization at various complex ratios results in linear arrays of varying lengths.

  18. DNA Double-Strand Break Rejoining in Complex Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Kuehne, Martin; Fricke, Andreas

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The clinical radiation responses of different organs vary widely and likely depend on the intrinsic radiosensitivities of their different cell populations. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious form of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the cells' capacity to rejoin radiation-induced DSBs is known to affect their intrinsic radiosensitivity. To date, only little is known about the induction and processing of radiation-induced DSBs in complex normal tissues. Using an in vivo model with repair-proficient mice, the highly sensitive {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence was established to investigate whether differences in DSB rejoining could account for the substantial differences in clinical radiosensitivity observed among normal tissues. Methods and Materials: After whole body irradiation of C57BL/6 mice (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy), the formation and rejoining of DSBs was analyzed by enumerating {gamma}H2AX foci in various organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding (lung, brain, heart, kidney) tissues. Results: The linear dose correlation observed in all analyzed tissues indicated that {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence allows for the accurate quantification of DSBs in complex organs. Strikingly, the various normal tissues exhibited identical kinetics for {gamma}H2AX foci loss, despite their clearly different clinical radiation responses. Conclusion: The identical kinetics of DSB rejoining measured in different organs suggest that tissue-specific differences in radiation responses are independent of DSB rejoining. This finding emphasizes the fundamental role of DSB repair in maintaining genomic integrity, thereby contributing to cellular viability and functionality and, thus, tissue homeostasis.

  19. Chemistry specificity of DNA-polycation complex salt response: a simulation study of DNA, polylysine and polyethyleneimine.

    PubMed

    Antila, Hanne S; Härkönen, Marc; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2015-02-21

    In this work, the chemistry specific stability determining factors of DNA-polycation complexes are examined by performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. To this end, we conduct a systematic variation of polycation line charge through polyethyleneimine (PEI) protonation and polycation chemistry via comparison with poly-l-lysine (PLL). Our simulations show that increasing line charge of the polycation alone does not lead to more salt tolerant complexes. Instead, the effective charge compensation by the polycation correlates with the increased stability of the complex against additional salt. The salt stability of PEI-DNA complexes also links to the proton sponge property of weak polycations, commonly assumed to be behind the effectivity of PEI as a gene delivery vector. Examination of the complexes reveals the mechanism behind this behaviour; more Cl(-) ions are attracted by the protonated complexes but, in contrast to the common depiction of the proton sponge behaviour, the ion influx does not cause swelling of the complex structure itself. However, PEI protonation leads to release of PEI while DNA remains tightly bound to the complex. Jointly, these findings shed light on the stability determining factors of DNA-polycation complexes, raise charge distribution as an important stability determining contributor, and indicate that the effectivity of PEI in gene delivery is likely to result from the freed PEI facilitating gene transfection.

  20. Imaging DNA Structure by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Alice L B; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a microscopy technique that uses a sharp probe to trace a sample surface at nanometre resolution. For biological applications, one of its key advantages is its ability to visualize substructure of single molecules and molecular complexes in an aqueous environment. Here, we describe the application of AFM to determine superstructure and secondary structure of surface-bound DNA. The method is also readily applicable to probe DNA-DNA interactions and DNA-protein complexes.

  1. Folic acid-conjugated europium complexes as luminescent probes for selective targeting of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Quici, Silvio; Casoni, Alessandro; Foschi, Francesca; Armelao, Lidia; Bottaro, Gregorio; Seraglia, Roberta; Bolzati, Cristina; Salvarese, Nicola; Carpanese, Debora; Rosato, Antonio

    2015-02-26

    We report the synthesis of three optical probes (Eu(3+)⊂1, Eu(3+)⊂2, and Eu(3+)⊂3) having a luminescent Eu complex (signaling unit) bonded in different positions to folic acid (FA), the folate receptor (FR) targeting unit. The structures of the two regioisomers Eu(3+)⊂1 and Eu(3+)⊂2 were assigned by mass spectrometric experiments. The optical properties and stability of these probes were assessed in phosphate-buffered saline, cell culture medium, rat serum, and cellular lysate, and results indicated that they are chemically and photophysically stable. Cytotoxicity was studied with ovarian cancer cells having high (SKOV-3), intermediate (OVCAR-3), low (IGROV-1), or null (A2780) expression of FRs. The internalized probe, evaluated in SKOV-3, IGROV-1, and A2780 cells, was in the order Eu(3+)⊂2 > Eu(3+)⊂1 > Eu(3+)⊂3. No internalization was observed for A2780 cells. Such results, together with those obtained in competition experiments of FA versus Eu(3+)⊂2 and FA or Eu(3+)⊂2 versus (3)H-FA, indicate that internalization is receptor-mediated and that Eu(3+)⊂2 shows high selectivity and specificity for FR.

  2. Hybridization of an ITS-based macroarray with ITS community probes for characterization of complex communities of fungi and fungal-like protists.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Antonio D; Mazzola, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The ability to characterize fungal community structure and dynamics in the environment is constantly challenged by the high levels of diversity that must be confronted. Large-scale oligonucleotide arrays for use in such analytical studies are currently under development; however, the implementation of this approach generally requires substantial time and financial resources. To address the need for a more accessible tool for fungal community profiling and broad diagnostics, we evaluated the potential utility of a reverse dot blot approach utilizing macroarray targets and probes that each consisted of a PCR product of the entire fungal ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 gene region. Samples used to generate the array targets included both culturable and non-culturable fungi and fungal-like protists representing a range of ecological functions. Tests performed using single-species probes within the genus Pythium demonstrated that taxonomic lineages could generally be distinguished when ITS DNA sequence similarity differed by greater than 5-10%. An artificially constructed community probe of known composition successfully detected eight of the 10 lineages contained on the array with only one clear false positive in 95 targets. The approach was also successfully applied to environmental samples. Taxa resident in the soil of a local orchard were identified using the array and matched those documented in previous studies. Closely related taxa from a previously uncharacterized and geographically distant orchard soil were also identified by the array and had affinities to Leptodontium, Cadophora, Zalerion, and Geomyces. These taxa were further confirmed to be present in the sample by cloning and DNA sequencing. A minority of lineages had DNA targets with low melting temperatures which were not detected on the arrays except under conditions that compromised specificity. Membrane-based ITS macroarrays coupled with community ITS probes possessed sufficient power to detect multiple genus