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Sample records for dna damage tolerance

  1. Homologous recombination maintenance of genome integrity during DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The DNA strand exchange protein Rad51 provides a safe mechanism for the repair of DNA breaks using the information of a homologous DNA template. Homologous recombination (HR) also plays a key role in the response to DNA damage that impairs the advance of the replication forks by providing mechanisms to circumvent the lesion and fill in the tracks of single-stranded DNA that are generated during the process of lesion bypass. These activities postpone repair of the blocking lesion to ensure that DNA replication is completed in a timely manner. Experimental evidence generated over the last few years indicates that HR participates in this DNA damage tolerance response together with additional error-free (template switch) and error-prone (translesion synthesis) mechanisms through intricate connections, which are presented here. The choice between repair and tolerance, and the mechanism of tolerance, is critical to avoid increased mutagenesis and/or genome rearrangements, which are both hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27308329

  2. DNA damage tolerance by recombination: Molecular pathways and DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2016-08-01

    Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways, which are crucial to promote replication completion and to prevent fork breakage, a leading cause of genome instability. One mode of DDT uses translesion synthesis polymerases, which however can also introduce mutations. The other DDT mode involves recombination-mediated mechanisms, which are generally accurate. DDT occurs prevalently postreplicatively, but in certain situations homologous recombination is needed to restart forks. Fork reversal can function to stabilize stalled forks, but may also promote error-prone outcome when used for fork restart. Recent years have witnessed important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and DNA structures that mediate recombination-mediated damage-bypass and highlighted principles that regulate DDT pathway choice locally and temporally. In this review we summarize the current knowledge and paradoxes on recombination-mediated DDT pathways and their workings, discuss how the intermediate DNA structures may influence genome integrity, and outline key open questions for future research. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Eukaryotic Translesion Polymerases and Their Roles and Regulation in DNA Damage Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Lauren S.; Minesinger, Brenda K.; Wiltrout, Mary Ellen; D'Souza, Sanjay; Woodruff, Rachel V.; Walker, Graham C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance machineries are crucial to overcome the vast array of DNA damage that a cell encounters during its lifetime. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge about the eukaryotic DNA damage tolerance pathway translesion synthesis (TLS), a process in which specialized DNA polymerases replicate across from DNA lesions. TLS aids in resistance to DNA damage, presumably by restarting stalled replication forks or filling in gaps that remain in the genome due to the presence of DNA lesions. One consequence of this process is the potential risk of introducing mutations. Given the role of these translesion polymerases in mutagenesis, we discuss the significant regulatory mechanisms that control the five known eukaryotic translesion polymerases: Rev1, Pol ζ, Pol κ, Pol η, and Pol ι. PMID:19258535

  4. Phosphorylation of human INO80 is involved in DNA damage tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Dai; Waki, Mayumi; Umezawa, Masaki; Aoki, Yuka; Utsugi, Takahiko; Ohtsu, Masaya; Murakami, Yasufumi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced PCNA ubiquitination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced nuclear dots intensity of RAD18 after UV irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Western blot analyses showed phosphorylated hINO80 C-terminus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of phosphorylation mutant hINO80 reduced PCNA ubiquitination. -- Abstract: Double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious type of DNA damage. DSBs can be generated directly by exposure to ionizing radiation or indirectly by replication fork collapse. The DNA damage tolerance pathway, which is conserved from bacteria to humans, prevents this collapse by overcoming replication blockages. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex plays an important role in the DNA damage response. The yeast INO80 complex participates in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. The mechanisms regulating yINO80 complex are not fully understood, but yeast INO80 complex are necessary for efficient proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) ubiquitination and for recruitment of Rad18 to replication forks. In contrast, the function of the mammalian INO80 complex in DNA damage tolerance is less clear. Here, we show that human INO80 was necessary for PCNA ubiquitination and recruitment of Rad18 to DNA damage sites. Moreover, the C-terminal region of human INO80 was phosphorylated, and overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of human INO80 resulted in decreased ubiquitination of PCNA during DNA replication. These results suggest that the human INO80 complex, like the yeast complex, was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway and that phosphorylation of human INO80 was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. These findings provide new insights into the DNA damage tolerance pathway in mammalian cells.

  5. DNA damage tolerance and a web of connections with DNA repair at Yale.

    PubMed

    Wood, Richard D

    2013-12-13

    This short article summarizes some of the research carried out recently by my laboratory colleagues on the function of DNA polymerase zeta (polζ) in mammalian cells. Some personal background is also described, relevant to research associations with Yale University and its continuing influence. Polζ is involved in the bypass of many DNA lesions by translesion DNA synthesis and is responsible for the majority of DNA damage-induced point mutagenesis in mammalian cells (including human cells), as well as in yeast. We also found that the absence of this enzyme leads to gross chromosomal instability in mammalian cells and increased spontaneous tumorigenesis in mice. Recently, we discovered a further unexpectedly critical role for polζ: it plays an essential role in allowing continued rapid proliferation of cells and tissues. These observations and others indicate that polζ engages frequently during DNA replication to bypass and tolerate DNA lesions or unusual DNA structures that are barriers for the normal DNA replication machinery.

  6. DNA Damage Tolerance and a Web of Connections with DNA Repair at Yale

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    This short article summarizes some of the research carried out recently by my laboratory colleagues on the function of DNA polymerase zeta (polζ) in mammalian cells. Some personal background is also described, relevant to research associations with Yale University and its continuing influence. Polζ is involved in the bypass of many DNA lesions by translesion DNA synthesis and is responsible for the majority of DNA damage-induced point mutagenesis in mammalian cells (including human cells), as well as in yeast. We also found that the absence of this enzyme leads to gross chromosomal instability in mammalian cells and increased spontaneous tumorigenesis in mice. Recently, we discovered a further unexpectedly critical role for polζ: it plays an essential role in allowing continued rapid proliferation of cells and tissues. These observations and others indicate that polζ engages frequently during DNA replication to bypass and tolerate DNA lesions or unusual DNA structures that are barriers for the normal DNA replication machinery. PMID:24348215

  7. Modulation of inflammation and disease tolerance by DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed

    Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Luis F

    2017-03-01

    The accurate replication and repair of DNA is central to organismal survival. This process is challenged by the many factors that can change genetic information such as replication errors and direct damage to the DNA molecule by chemical and physical agents. DNA damage can also result from microorganism invasion as an integral step of their life cycle or as collateral damage from host defense mechanisms against pathogens. Here we review the complex crosstalk of DNA damage response and immune response pathways that might be evolutionarily connected and argue that DNA damage response pathways can be explored therapeutically to induce disease tolerance through the activation of tissue damage control processes. Such approach may constitute the missing pillar in the treatment of critical illnesses caused by multiple organ failure, such as sepsis and septic shock. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Genomic assay reveals tolerance of DNA damage by both translesion DNA synthesis and homology-dependent repair in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Izhar, Lior; Ziv, Omer; Cohen, Isadora S; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Livneh, Zvi

    2013-04-16

    DNA lesions can block replication forks and lead to the formation of single-stranded gaps. These replication complications are mitigated by DNA damage tolerance mechanisms, which prevent deleterious outcomes such as cell death, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis. The two main tolerance strategies are translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), in which low-fidelity DNA polymerases bypass the blocking lesion, and homology-dependent repair (HDR; postreplication repair), which is based on the homologous sister chromatid. Here we describe a unique high-resolution method for the simultaneous analysis of TLS and HDR across defined DNA lesions in mammalian genomes. The method is based on insertion of plasmids carrying defined site-specific DNA lesions into mammalian chromosomes, using phage integrase-mediated integration. Using this method we show that mammalian cells use HDR to tolerate DNA damage in their genome. Moreover, analysis of the tolerance of the UV light-induced 6-4 photoproduct, the tobacco smoke-induced benzo[a]pyrene-guanine adduct, and an artificial trimethylene insert shows that each of these three lesions is tolerated by both TLS and HDR. We also determined the specificity of nucleotide insertion opposite these lesions during TLS in human genomes. This unique method will be useful in elucidating the mechanism of DNA damage tolerance in mammalian chromosomes and their connection to pathological processes such as carcinogenesis.

  9. DNA damage tolerance pathway involving DNA polymerase ι and the tumor suppressor p53 regulates DNA replication fork progression

    PubMed Central

    Hampp, Stephanie; Kiessling, Tina; Buechle, Kerstin; Mansilla, Sabrina F.; Thomale, Jürgen; Rall, Melanie; Ahn, Jinwoo; Pospiech, Helmut; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance facilitates the progression of replication forks that have encountered obstacles on the template strands. It involves either translesion DNA synthesis initiated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen monoubiquitination or less well-characterized fork reversal and template switch mechanisms. Herein, we characterize a novel tolerance pathway requiring the tumor suppressor p53, the translesion polymerase ι (POLι), the ubiquitin ligase Rad5-related helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), and the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit (SNF2) translocase zinc finger ran-binding domain containing 3 (ZRANB3). This novel p53 activity is lost in the exonuclease-deficient but transcriptionally active p53(H115N) mutant. Wild-type p53, but not p53(H115N), associates with POLι in vivo. Strikingly, the concerted action of p53 and POLι decelerates nascent DNA elongation and promotes HLTF/ZRANB3-dependent recombination during unperturbed DNA replication. Particularly after cross-linker–induced replication stress, p53 and POLι also act together to promote meiotic recombination enzyme 11 (MRE11)-dependent accumulation of (phospho-)replication protein A (RPA)-coated ssDNA. These results implicate a direct role of p53 in the processing of replication forks encountering obstacles on the template strand. Our findings define an unprecedented function of p53 and POLι in the DNA damage response to endogenous or exogenous replication stress. PMID:27407148

  10. The Regulation of DNA Damage Tolerance by Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-Like Modifiers.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Lina; Maffia, Antonio; Bertoletti, Federica; Sabbioneda, Simone

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is an extremely complex process that needs to be executed in a highly accurate manner in order to propagate the genome. This task requires the coordination of a number of enzymatic activities and it is fragile and prone to arrest after DNA damage. DNA damage tolerance provides a last line of defense that allows completion of DNA replication in the presence of an unrepaired template. One of such mechanisms is called post-replication repair (PRR) and it is used by the cells to bypass highly distorted templates caused by damaged bases. PRR is extremely important for the cellular life and performs the bypass of the damage both in an error-free and in an error-prone manner. In light of these two possible outcomes, PRR needs to be tightly controlled in order to prevent the accumulation of mutations leading ultimately to genome instability. Post-translational modifications of PRR proteins provide the framework for this regulation with ubiquitylation and SUMOylation playing a pivotal role in choosing which pathway to activate, thus controlling the different outcomes of damage bypass. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the DNA clamp for replicative polymerases, plays a central role in the regulation of damage tolerance and its modification by ubiquitin, and SUMO controls both the error-free and error-prone branches of PRR. Furthermore, a significant number of polymerases are involved in the bypass of DNA damage possess domains that can bind post-translational modifications and they are themselves target for ubiquitylation. In this review, we will focus on how ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications can regulate the DNA damage tolerance systems and how they control the recruitment of different proteins to the replication fork.

  11. New discoveries linking transcription to DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Walker, Graham C

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the transcription elongation factor NusA is associated with all elongating RNA polymerases where it functions in transcription termination and antitermination. Here, we review our recent results implicating NusA in the recruitment of DNA repair and damage tolerance mechanisms to sites of stalled transcription complexes.

  12. DNA lesion identity drives choice of damage tolerance pathway in murine cell chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Isadora S.; Bar, Carmit; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Ainbinder, Elena; Leopold, Karoline; de Wind, Niels; Geacintov, Nicholas; Livneh, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    DNA-damage tolerance (DDT) via translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) or homology-dependent repair (HDR) functions to bypass DNA lesions encountered during replication, and is critical for maintaining genome stability. Here, we present piggyBlock, a new chromosomal assay that, using piggyBac transposition of DNA containing a known lesion, measures the division of labor between the two DDT pathways. We show that in the absence of DNA damage response, tolerance of the most common sunlight-induced DNA lesion, TT-CPD, is achieved by TLS in mouse embryo fibroblasts. Meanwhile, BP-G, a major smoke-induced DNA lesion, is bypassed primarily by HDR, providing the first evidence for this mechanism being the main tolerance pathway for a biologically important lesion in a mammalian genome. We also show that, far from being a last-resort strategy as it is sometimes portrayed, TLS operates alongside nucleotide excision repair, handling 40% of TT-CPDs in repair-proficient cells. Finally, DDT acts in mouse embryonic stem cells, exhibiting the same pattern—mutagenic TLS included—despite the risk of propagating mutations along all cell lineages. The new method highlights the importance of HDR, and provides an effective tool for studying DDT in mammalian cells. PMID:25589543

  13. DNA lesion identity drives choice of damage tolerance pathway in murine cell chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Isadora S; Bar, Carmit; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Ainbinder, Elena; Leopold, Karoline; de Wind, Niels; Geacintov, Nicholas; Livneh, Zvi

    2015-02-18

    DNA-damage tolerance (DDT) via translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) or homology-dependent repair (HDR) functions to bypass DNA lesions encountered during replication, and is critical for maintaining genome stability. Here, we present piggyBlock, a new chromosomal assay that, using piggyBac transposition of DNA containing a known lesion, measures the division of labor between the two DDT pathways. We show that in the absence of DNA damage response, tolerance of the most common sunlight-induced DNA lesion, TT-CPD, is achieved by TLS in mouse embryo fibroblasts. Meanwhile, BP-G, a major smoke-induced DNA lesion, is bypassed primarily by HDR, providing the first evidence for this mechanism being the main tolerance pathway for a biologically important lesion in a mammalian genome. We also show that, far from being a last-resort strategy as it is sometimes portrayed, TLS operates alongside nucleotide excision repair, handling 40% of TT-CPDs in repair-proficient cells. Finally, DDT acts in mouse embryonic stem cells, exhibiting the same pattern—mutagenic TLS included—despite the risk of propagating mutations along all cell lineages. The new method highlights the importance of HDR, and provides an effective tool for studying DDT in mammalian cells.

  14. USP7 is essential for maintaining Rad18 stability and DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zlatanou, A; Sabbioneda, S; Miller, E S; Greenwalt, A; Aggathanggelou, A; Maurice, M M; Lehmann, A R; Stankovic, T; Reverdy, C; Colland, F; Vaziri, C; Stewart, G S

    2016-02-25

    Rad18 functions at the cross-roads of three different DNA damage response (DDR) pathways involved in protecting stressed replication forks: homologous recombination repair, DNA inter-strand cross-link repair and DNA damage tolerance. Although Rad18 serves to facilitate replication of damaged genomes by promoting translesion synthesis (TLS), this comes at a cost of potentially error-prone lesion bypass. In contrast, loss of Rad18-dependent TLS potentiates the collapse of stalled forks and leads to incomplete genome replication. Given the pivotal nature with which Rad18 governs the fine balance between replication fidelity and genome stability, Rad18 levels and activity have a major impact on genomic integrity. Here, we identify the de-ubiquitylating enzyme USP7 as a critical regulator of Rad18 protein levels. Loss of USP7 destabilizes Rad18 and compromises UV-induced PCNA mono-ubiquitylation and Pol η recruitment to stalled replication forks. USP7-depleted cells also fail to elongate nascent daughter strand DNA following UV irradiation and show reduced DNA damage tolerance. We demonstrate that USP7 associates with Rad18 directly via a consensus USP7-binding motif and can disassemble Rad18-dependent poly-ubiquitin chains both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these observations identify USP7 as a novel component of the cellular DDR involved in preserving the genome stability.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide induces oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in a sulfide-tolerant marine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L; Stein, Jenny R; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (0-3 mmol L(-1) for 1 h) showed dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress (as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence) and superoxide production (as dihydroethidine fluorescence). Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (up to 0.73 mmol L(-1) for 2 h) also acquired increased oxidative damage to RNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) and DNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine). Worms exposed in vivo to sulfide (0-10 mmol L(-1) for 24 h) acquired elevated oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in both coelomocytes and body wall tissue. While the consequences of RNA and DNA oxidative damage are poorly understood, oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine bases preferentially bind thymine, causing G-T transversions and potentially causing heritable point mutations. This suggests that sulfide can be an environmental mutagen in sulfide-tolerant invertebrates.

  16. Regulation of Rad6/Rad18 Activity During DNA Damage Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hedglin, Mark; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Replicative polymerases (pols) cannot accommodate damaged template bases, and these pols stall when such offenses are encountered during S phase. Rather than repairing the damaged base, replication past it may proceed via one of two DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways, allowing replicative DNA synthesis to resume. In translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), a specialized TLS pol is recruited to catalyze stable, yet often erroneous, nucleotide incorporation opposite damaged template bases. In template switching, the newly synthesized sister strand is used as a damage-free template to synthesize past the lesion. In eukaryotes, both pathways are regulated by the conjugation of ubiquitin to the PCNA sliding clamp by distinct E2/E3 pairs. Whereas monoubiquitination by Rad6/Rad18 mediates TLS, extension of this ubiquitin to a polyubiquitin chain by Ubc13-Mms2/Rad5 routes DDT to the template switching pathway. In this review, we focus on the monoubiquitination of PCNA by Rad6/Rad18 and summarize the current knowledge of how this process is regulated.

  17. Regulation of Rad6/Rad18 Activity During DNA Damage Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hedglin, Mark; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Replicative polymerases (pols) cannot accommodate damaged template bases, and these pols stall when such offenses are encountered during S phase. Rather than repairing the damaged base, replication past it may proceed via one of two DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways, allowing replicative DNA synthesis to resume. In translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), a specialized TLS pol is recruited to catalyze stable, yet often erroneous, nucleotide incorporation opposite damaged template bases. In template switching, the newly synthesized sister strand is used as a damage-free template to synthesize past the lesion. In eukaryotes, both pathways are regulated by the conjugation of ubiquitin to the PCNA sliding clamp by distinct E2/E3 pairs. Whereas monoubiquitination by Rad6/Rad18 mediates TLS, extension of this ubiquitin to a polyubiquitin chain by Ubc13-Mms2/Rad5 routes DDT to the template switching pathway. In this review, we focus on the monoubiquitination of PCNA by Rad6/Rad18 and summarize the current knowledge of how this process is regulated. PMID:26098514

  18. Ongoing evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 sublines complicates studies of DNA damage repair and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, Julia; Jatsenko, Tatjana; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-03-01

    Sublines of the major P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 are derivatives of the original PAO1 isolate, which are maintained in laboratories worldwide. These sublines display substantial genomic and phenotypic variation due to ongoing microevolution. Here, we examined four sublines, MPAO1, PAO1-L, PAO1-DSM and PAO1-UT, originated from different laboratories, and six DNA polymerase-deficient mutants from the P. aeruginosa MPAO1 transposon library for their employment in elucidation of DNA damage repair and tolerance mechanisms in P. aeruginosa. We found that PAO1 subline PAO1-UT carries a large deletion encompassing the DNA damage inducible imuA-imuB-imuC cassette (PA0669-PA0671), which is implied in mutagenesis in several species. Furthermore, the genetic changes leading to variation in the functionality of the MexEF-OprN efflux system contributed largely to the phenotypic discordance between P. aeruginosa PAO1 sublines. Specifically, we identified multiple mutations in the mexT gene, which encodes a transcriptional regulator of the mexEF-oprN genes, mutations in the mexF, and complete absence of these genes. Of the four tested sublines, MPAO1 was the only subline with the functional MexEF-OprN multidrug efflux system. Active efflux through MexEF-OprN rendered MPAO1 highly resistant to chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, the functions of specialized DNA polymerase IV and nucleotide excision repair (NER) in 4-NQO-induced DNA damage tolerance appeared to be masked in MPAO1, while were easily detectable in other sublines. Finally, the frequencies of spontaneous and MMS-induced Rif(r) mutations were also significantly lower in MPAO1 in comparison to the PAO1 sublines with impaired MexEF-OprN efflux system. The MexEF-OprN-attributed differences were also observed between MPAO1 and MPAO1-derived transposon mutants from the two-allele transposon mutant collection. Thus, the accumulating mutations and discordant phenotypes of the PAO1 derivatives challenge the

  19. Homologous Recombination and Translesion DNA Synthesis Play Critical Roles on Tolerating DNA Damage Caused by Trace Levels of Hexavalent Chromium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Youjun; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Neo, Dayna; Clement, Jean; Takata, Minoru; Takeda, Shunichi; Sale, Julian; Wright, Fred A.; Swenberg, James A.; Nakamura, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of potentially carcinogenic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in the drinking water is a major public health concern worldwide. However, little information is available regarding the biological effects of a nanomoler amount of Cr(VI). Here, we investigated the genotoxic effects of Cr(VI) at nanomoler levels and their repair pathways. We found that DNA damage response analyzed based on differential toxicity of isogenic cells deficient in various DNA repair proteins is observed after a three-day incubation with K2CrO4 in REV1-deficient DT40 cells at 19.2 μg/L or higher as well as in TK6 cells deficient in polymerase delta subunit 3 (POLD3) at 9.8 μg/L or higher. The genotoxicity of Cr(VI) decreased ~3000 times when the incubation time was reduced from three days to ten minutes. TK mutation rate also significantly decreased from 6 day to 1 day exposure to Cr(VI). The DNA damage response analysis suggest that DNA repair pathways, including the homologous recombination and REV1- and POLD3-mediated error-prone translesion synthesis pathways, are critical for the cells to tolerate to DNA damage caused by trace amount of Cr(VI). PMID:27907204

  20. DNA damage, apoptosis and langerhans cells--Activators of UV-induced immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Timares, Laura; Katiyar, Santosh K; Elmets, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Solar UVR is highly mutagenic but is only partially absorbed by the outer stratum corneum of the epidermis. UVR can penetrate into the deeper layers of the epidermis, depending on melanin content, where it induces DNA damage and apoptosis in epidermal cells, including those in the germinative basal layer. The cellular decision to initiate either cellular repair or undergo apoptosis has evolved to balance the acute need to maintain skin barrier function with the long-term risk of retaining precancerous cells. Langerhans cells (LCs) are positioned suprabasally, where they may sense UV damage directly, or indirectly through recognition of apoptotic vesicles and soluble mediators derived from surrounding keratinocytes. Apoptotic vesicles will contain UV-induced altered proteins that may be presented to the immune system as foreign. The observation that UVR induces immune tolerance to skin-associated antigens suggests that this photodamage response has evolved to preserve the skin barrier by protecting it from autoimmune attack. LC involvement in this process is not clear and controversial. We will highlight some basic concepts of photobiology and review recent advances pertaining to UV-induced DNA damage, apoptosis regulation, novel immunomodulatory mechanisms and the role of LCs in generating antigen-specific regulatory T cells.

  1. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  2. Cell cycle stage-specific roles of Rad18 in tolerance and repair of oxidative DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Durando, Michael; Smith-Roe, Stephanie L.; Sproul, Chris; Greenwalt, Alicia M.; Kaufmann, William; Oh, Sehyun; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2013-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Rad18 mediates tolerance of replication fork-stalling bulky DNA lesions, but whether Rad18 mediates tolerance of bulky DNA lesions acquired outside S-phase is unclear. Using synchronized cultures of primary human cells, we defined cell cycle stage-specific contributions of Rad18 to genome maintenance in response to ultraviolet C (UVC) and H2O2-induced DNA damage. UVC and H2O2 treatments both induced Rad18-mediated proliferating cell nuclear antigen mono-ubiquitination during G0, G1 and S-phase. Rad18 was important for repressing H2O2-induced (but not ultraviolet-induced) double strand break (DSB) accumulation and ATM S1981 phosphorylation only during G1, indicating a specific role for Rad18 in processing of oxidative DNA lesions outside S-phase. However, H2O2-induced DSB formation in Rad18-depleted G1 cells was not associated with increased genotoxin sensitivity, indicating that back-up DSB repair mechanisms compensate for Rad18 deficiency. Indeed, in DNA LigIV-deficient cells Rad18-depletion conferred H2O2-sensitivity, demonstrating functional redundancy between Rad18 and non-homologous end joining for tolerance of oxidative DNA damage acquired during G1. In contrast with G1-synchronized cultures, S-phase cells were H2O2-sensitive following Rad18-depletion. We conclude that although Rad18 pathway activation by oxidative lesions is not restricted to S-phase, Rad18-mediated trans-lesion synthesis by Polη is dispensable for damage-tolerance in G1 (because of back-up non-homologous end joining-mediated DSB repair), yet Rad18 is necessary for damage tolerance during S-phase. PMID:23295675

  3. The Functions of Serine 687 Phosphorylation of Human DNA Polymerase η in UV Damage Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoxia; You, Changjun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-06-01

    DNA polymerase η (polη) is a Y-family translesion synthesis polymerase that plays a key role in the cellular tolerance toward UV irradiation-induced DNA damage. Here, we identified, for the first time, the phosphorylation of serine 687 (Ser(687)), which is located in the highly conserved nuclear localization signal (NLS) region of human polη and is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). We also showed that this phosphorylation is stimulated in human cells upon UV light exposure and results in diminished interaction of polη with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the phosphorylation of Ser(687) in polη confers cellular protection from UV irradiation and increases the efficiency in replication across a site-specifically incorporated cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in human cells. Based on these results, we proposed a mechanistic model where Ser(687) phosphorylation functions in the reverse polymerase switching step of translesion synthesis: The phosphorylation brings negative charges to the NLS of polη, which facilitates its departure from PCNA, thereby resetting the replication fork for highly accurate and processive DNA replication. Thus, our study, together with previous findings, supported that the posttranslational modifications of NLS of polη played a dual role in polymerase switching, where Lys(682) deubiquitination promotes the recruitment of polη to PCNA immediately prior to lesion bypass and Ser(687) phosphorylation stimulates its departure from the replication fork immediately after lesion bypass. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  5. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  6. DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Jatsenko, Tatjana; Sidorenko, Julia; Saumaa, Signe; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis. PMID:28118378

  7. DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Jatsenko, Tatjana; Sidorenko, Julia; Saumaa, Signe; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis.

  8. Cariporide Enhances the DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Acid-tolerable Malignant Mesothelioma H-2452 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Bae, Jin-Ho; Kim, Soo-A; Kim, Sung-Ho; Woo, Kee-Min; Nam, Hae-Seon; Cho, Moon-Kyun; Lee, Sang-Han

    2017-08-01

    The Na(+)/H(+) exchanger is responsible for maintaining the acidic tumor microenvironment through its promotion of the reabsorption of extracellular Na(+) and the extrusion of intracellular H(+). The resultant increase in the extracellular acidity contributes to the chemoresistance of malignant tumors. In this study, the chemosensitizing effects of cariporide, a potent Na(+)/H(+)-exchange inhibitor, were evaluated in human malignant mesothelioma H-2452 cells preadapted with lactic acid. A higher basal level of phosphorylated (p)-AKT protein was found in the acid-tolerable H-2452AcT cells compared with their parental acid-sensitive H-2452 cells. When introduced in H-2452AcT cells with a concentration that shows only a slight toxicity in H-2452 cells, cariporide exhibited growth-suppressive and apoptosis-promoting activities, as demonstrated by an increase in the cells with pyknotic and fragmented nuclei, annexin V-PE(+) staining, a sub-G0/G1 peak, and a G2/M phase-transition delay in the cell cycle. Preceding these changes, a cariporide-induced p-AKT down-regulation, a p53 up-regulation, an ROS accumulation, and the depolarization of the mitochondrial-membrane potential were observed. A pretreatment with the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 markedly augmented the DNA damage caused by the cariporide, as indicated by a much greater extent of comet tails and a tail moment with increased levels of the p-histone H2A.X, p-ATM(Ser1981), p-ATR(Ser428), p-CHK1(Ser345), and p-CHK2(Thr68), as well as a series of pro-apoptotic events. The data suggest that an inhibition of the PI3K/AKT signaling is necessary to enhance the cytotoxicity toward the acid-tolerable H-2452AcT cells, and it underlines the significance of proton-pump targeting as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome the acidic-microenvironment-associated chemotherapeutic resistance.

  9. Rad18 confers hematopoietic progenitor cell DNA damage tolerance independently of the Fanconi Anemia pathway in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Poe, Jonathan C; Yang, Lisong; Fedoriw, Andrew; Desai, Siddhi; Magnuson, Terry; Li, Zhiguo; Fedoriw, Yuri; Araki, Kimi; Gao, Yanzhe; Tateishi, Satoshi; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2016-05-19

    In cultured cancer cells the E3 ubiquitin ligase Rad18 activates Trans-Lesion Synthesis (TLS) and the Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway. However, physiological roles of Rad18 in DNA damage tolerance and carcinogenesis are unknown and were investigated here. Primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) co-expressed RAD18 and FANCD2 proteins, potentially consistent with a role for Rad18 in FA pathway function during hematopoiesis. However, hematopoietic defects typically associated with fanc-deficiency (decreased HSPC numbers, reduced engraftment potential of HSPC, and Mitomycin C (MMC) -sensitive hematopoiesis), were absent in Rad18(-/-) mice. Moreover, primary Rad18(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) retained robust Fancd2 mono-ubiquitination following MMC treatment. Therefore, Rad18 is dispensable for FA pathway activation in untransformed cells and the Rad18 and FA pathways are separable in hematopoietic cells. In contrast with responses to crosslinking agents, Rad18(-/-) HSPC were sensitive to in vivo treatment with the myelosuppressive agent 7,12 Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Rad18-deficient fibroblasts aberrantly accumulated DNA damage markers after DMBA treatment. Moreover, in vivo DMBA treatment led to increased incidence of B cell malignancy in Rad18(-/-) mice. These results identify novel hematopoietic functions for Rad18 and provide the first demonstration that Rad18 confers DNA damage tolerance and tumor-suppression in a physiological setting. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Identification of β Clamp-DNA Interaction Regions That Impair the Ability of E. coli to Tolerate Specific Classes of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Nanfara, Michael T.; Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Ghazy, Mohamed A.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    The E. coli dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein plays a pivotal role in managing the actions on DNA of the 5 bacterial DNA polymerases, proteins involved in mismatch repair, as well as several additional proteins involved in DNA replication. Results of in vitro experiments indicate that the loading of β clamp onto DNA relies on both the DnaX clamp loader complex as well as several discrete sliding clamp-DNA interactions. However, the importance of these DNA interactions to E. coli viability, as well as the ability of the β clamp to support the actions of its numerous partner proteins, have not yet been examined. To determine the contribution of β clamp-DNA interactions to the ability of E. coli to cope with different classes of DNA damage, we used alanine scanning to mutate 22 separate residues mapping to 3 distinct β clamp surfaces known or nearby those known to contact the DNA template, including residues P20-L27 (referred to here as loop I), H148-Y154 (loop II) and 7 different residues lining the central pore of the β clamp through which the DNA template threads. Twenty of these 22 dnaN mutants supported bacterial growth. While none of these 20 conferred sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide or ultra violet light, 12 were sensitized to NFZ, 5 were sensitized to MMS, 8 displayed modestly altered frequencies of DNA damage-induced mutagenesis, and 2 may be impaired for supporting hda function. Taken together, these results demonstrate that discrete β clamp-DNA interaction regions contribute to the ability of E. coli to tolerate specific classes of DNA damage. PMID:27685804

  11. Identification of β Clamp-DNA Interaction Regions That Impair the Ability of E. coli to Tolerate Specific Classes of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Nanfara, Michael T; Babu, Vignesh M P; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Sutton, Mark D

    The E. coli dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein plays a pivotal role in managing the actions on DNA of the 5 bacterial DNA polymerases, proteins involved in mismatch repair, as well as several additional proteins involved in DNA replication. Results of in vitro experiments indicate that the loading of β clamp onto DNA relies on both the DnaX clamp loader complex as well as several discrete sliding clamp-DNA interactions. However, the importance of these DNA interactions to E. coli viability, as well as the ability of the β clamp to support the actions of its numerous partner proteins, have not yet been examined. To determine the contribution of β clamp-DNA interactions to the ability of E. coli to cope with different classes of DNA damage, we used alanine scanning to mutate 22 separate residues mapping to 3 distinct β clamp surfaces known or nearby those known to contact the DNA template, including residues P20-L27 (referred to here as loop I), H148-Y154 (loop II) and 7 different residues lining the central pore of the β clamp through which the DNA template threads. Twenty of these 22 dnaN mutants supported bacterial growth. While none of these 20 conferred sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide or ultra violet light, 12 were sensitized to NFZ, 5 were sensitized to MMS, 8 displayed modestly altered frequencies of DNA damage-induced mutagenesis, and 2 may be impaired for supporting hda function. Taken together, these results demonstrate that discrete β clamp-DNA interaction regions contribute to the ability of E. coli to tolerate specific classes of DNA damage.

  12. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  13. Ultraviolet-B-induced DNA damage and ultraviolet-B tolerance mechanisms in species with different functional groups coexisting in subalpine moorlands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Wei; Kamiyama, Chiho; Hidema, Jun; Hikosaka, Kouki

    2016-08-01

    High doses of ultraviolet-B (UV-B; 280-315 nm) radiation can have detrimental effects on plants, and especially damage their DNA. Plants have DNA repair and protection mechanisms to prevent UV-B damage. However, it remains unclear how DNA damage and tolerance mechanisms vary among field species. We studied DNA damage and tolerance mechanisms in 26 species with different functional groups coexisting in two moorlands at two elevations. We collected current-year leaves in July and August, and determined accumulation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) as UV-B damage and photorepair activity (PRA) and concentrations of UV-absorbing compounds (UACs) and carotenoids (CARs) as UV-B tolerance mechanisms. DNA damage was greater in dicot than in monocot species, and higher in herbaceous than in woody species. Evergreen species accumulated more CPDs than deciduous species. PRA was higher in Poaceae than in species of other families. UACs were significantly higher in woody than in herbaceous species. The CPD level was not explained by the mechanisms across species, but was significantly related to PRA and UACs when we ignored species with low CPD, PRA and UACs, implying the presence of another effective tolerance mechanism. UACs were correlated negatively with PRA and positively with CARs. Our results revealed that UV-induced DNA damage significantly varies among native species, and this variation is related to functional groups. DNA repair, rather than UV-B protection, dominates in UV-B tolerance in the field. Our findings also suggest that UV-B tolerance mechanisms vary among species under evolutionary trade-off and synergism.

  14. Omega-3 improves glucose tolerance but increases lipid peroxidation and DNA damage in hepatocytes of fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Gabriela Salim Ferreira; dos Santos, Raquel Alves; Portari, Guilherme Vannucchi; Jordão, Alceu Afonso; Vannucchi, Helio

    2012-04-01

    The high consumption of fructose is linked to the increase in various characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. Fish oil is beneficial for the treatment of these comorbidities, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the consequences of the administration of fish oil concomitant to fructose ingestion during the experiment (45 days) and during the final 15 days in high-fructose-fed rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: control; those receiving 10% fish oil (FO); those receiving 60% fructose (Fr); those receiving 60% fructose and 10% fish oil for 45 days (FrFO); and those receiving fructose plus soybean oil for 30 days and fish oil for the final 15 days of the study (FrFO15). There was an increase in triacylglycerol, serum total cholesterol, and hepatic volume in the Fr group. The FO and FrFO groups experienced an increase in lipid peroxidation and a decrease in serum reduced glutathione. The FrFO group suffered greater hepatic injury, with increased alanine aminotransferase levels and DNA damage. Marked n-3 incorporation occurred in the groups receiving fish oil, favoring a better response to the oral glucose tolerance test. Fructose induced comorbidities of the metabolic syndrome, and the use of fish oil promoted a better glucose tolerance, although it was accompanied by more hepatocyte damage.

  15. Essential Roles of the Smc5/6 Complex in Replication through Natural Pausing Sites and Endogenous DNA Damage Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Menolfi, Demis; Delamarre, Axel; Lengronne, Armelle; Pasero, Philippe; Branzei, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Summary The essential functions of the conserved Smc5/6 complex remain elusive. To uncover its roles in genome maintenance, we established Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-cycle-regulated alleles that enable restriction of Smc5/6 components to S or G2/M. Unexpectedly, the essential functions of Smc5/6 segregated fully and selectively to G2/M. Genetic screens that became possible with generated alleles identified processes that crucially rely on Smc5/6 specifically in G2/M: metabolism of DNA recombination structures triggered by endogenous replication stress, and replication through natural pausing sites located in late-replicating regions. In the first process, Smc5/6 modulates remodeling of recombination intermediates, cooperating with dissolution activities. In the second, Smc5/6 prevents chromosome fragility and toxic recombination instigated by prolonged pausing and the fork protection complex, Tof1-Csm3. Our results thus dissect Smc5/6 essential roles and reveal that combined defects in DNA damage tolerance and pausing site-replication cause recombination-mediated DNA lesions, which we propose to drive developmental and cancer-prone disorders. PMID:26698660

  16. Replicating damaged DNA in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail.

  17. Rad5 Template Switch Pathway of DNA Damage Tolerance Determines Synergism between Cisplatin and NSC109268 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dilip; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    The success of cisplatin (CP) based therapy is often hindered by acquisition of CP resistance. We isolated NSC109268 as a compound altering cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Previous investigation revealed an enhancement of CP sensitivity by NSC109268 in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae and CP-sensitive and -resistant cancer cell lines that correlated with a slower S phase traversal. Here, we extended these studies to determine the target pathway(s) of NSC109268 in mediating CP sensitization, using yeast as a model. We reasoned that mutants defective in the relevant target of NSC109268 should be hypersensitive to CP and the sensitization effect by NSC109268 should be absent or strongly reduced. A survey of various yeast deletion mutants converged on the Rad5 pathway of DNA damage tolerance by template switching as the likely target pathway of NSC109268 in mediating cellular sensitization to CP. Additionally, cell cycle delays following CP treatment were not synergistically influenced by NSC109268 in the CP hypersensitive rad5Δ mutant. The involvement of the known inhibitory activities of NSC109268 on 20S proteasome and phosphatases 2Cα and 2A was tested. In the CP hypersensitive ptc2Δptc3Δpph3Δ yeast strain, deficient for 2C and 2A-type phosphatases, cellular sensitization to CP by NSC109268 was greatly reduced. It is therefore suggested that NSC109268 affects CP sensitivity by inhibiting the activity of unknown protein(s) whose dephosphorylation is required for the template switch pathway. PMID:24130896

  18. Gap-filling and bypass at the replication fork are both active mechanisms for tolerance of low-dose ultraviolet-induced DNA damage in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Quinet, Annabel; Vessoni, Alexandre T; Rocha, Clarissa R R; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Biard, Denis; Sarasin, Alain; Menck, Carlos F M; Stary, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage are removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) or can be tolerated by specialized translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases, such as Polη. TLS may act at stalled replication forks or through an S-phase independent gap-filling mechanism. After UVC irradiation, Polη-deficient (XP-V) human cells were arrested in early S-phase and exhibited both single-strand DNA (ssDNA) and prolonged replication fork stalling, as detected by DNA fiber assay. In contrast, NER deficiency in XP-C cells caused no apparent defect in S-phase progression despite the accumulation of ssDNA and a G2-phase arrest. These data indicate that while Polη is essential for DNA synthesis at ongoing damaged replication forks, NER deficiency might unmask the involvement of tolerance pathway through a gap-filling mechanism. ATR knock down by siRNA or caffeine addition provoked increased cell death in both XP-V and XP-C cells exposed to low-dose of UVC, underscoring the involvement of ATR/Chk1 pathway in both DNA damage tolerance mechanisms. We generated a unique human cell line deficient in XPC and Polη proteins, which exhibited both S- and G2-phase arrest after UVC irradiation, consistent with both single deficiencies. In these XP-C/Polη(KD) cells, UVC-induced replicative intermediates may collapse into double-strand breaks, leading to cell death. In conclusion, both TLS at stalled replication forks and gap-filling are active mechanisms for the tolerance of UVC-induced DNA damage in human cells and the preference for one or another pathway depends on the cellular genotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of DNA polymerase ν function in meiotic recombination, immunoglobulin class-switching, and DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kei-ichi; Yousefzadeh, Matthew J.; Zelazowski, Maciej J.; Bhetawal, Sarita; Lowery, Megan G.; Sandoval, Maria; Takata, Yoko; Lu, Yue; Lin, Kevin; Shen, Jianjun; Kusewitt, Donna F.; McBride, Kevin M.; Cole, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    DNA polymerase ν (pol ν), encoded by the POLN gene, is an A-family DNA polymerase in vertebrates and some other animal lineages. Here we report an in-depth analysis of pol ν–defective mice and human cells. POLN is very weakly expressed in most tissues, with the highest relative expression in testis. We constructed multiple mouse models for Poln disruption and detected no anatomic abnormalities, alterations in lifespan, or changed causes of mortality. Mice with inactive Poln are fertile and have normal testis morphology. However, pol ν–disrupted mice have a modestly reduced crossover frequency at a meiotic recombination hot spot harboring insertion/deletion polymorphisms. These polymorphisms are suggested to generate a looped-out primer and a hairpin structure during recombination, substrates on which pol ν can operate. Pol ν-defective mice had no alteration in DNA end-joining during immunoglobulin class-switching, in contrast to animals defective in the related DNA polymerase θ (pol θ). We examined the response to DNA crosslinking agents, as purified pol ν has some ability to bypass major groove peptide adducts and residues of DNA crosslink repair. Inactivation of Poln in mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not alter cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C, cisplatin, or aldehydes. Depletion of POLN from human cells with shRNA or siRNA did not change cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C or alter the frequency of mitomycin C-induced radial chromosomes. Our results suggest a function of pol ν in meiotic homologous recombination in processing specific substrates. The restricted and more recent evolutionary appearance of pol ν (in comparison to pol θ) supports such a specialized role. PMID:28570559

  20. Mdt1, a Novel Rad53 FHA1 Domain-Interacting Protein, Modulates DNA Damage Tolerance and G2/M Cell Cycle Progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Brietta L.; Yongkiettrakul, Suganya; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    The Rad53 kinase plays a central role in yeast DNA damage checkpoints. Rad53 contains two FHA phosphothreonine-binding domains that are required for Rad53 activation and possibly downstream signaling. Here we show that the N-terminal Rad53 FHA1 domain interacts with the RNA recognition motif, coiled-coil, and SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein Mdt1 (YBl051C). The interaction of Rad53 and Mdt1 depends on the structural integrity of the FHA1 phosphothreonine-binding site as well as threonine-305 of Mdt1. Mdt1 is constitutively threonine phosphorylated and hyperphosphorylated in response to DNA damage in vivo. DNA damage-dependent Mdt1 hyperphosphorylation depends on the Mec1 and Tel1 checkpoint kinases, and Mec1 can directly phosphorylate a recombinant Mdt1 SQ/TQ domain fragment. MDT1 overexpression is synthetically lethal with a rad53 deletion, whereas mdt1 deletion partially suppresses the DNA damage hypersensitivity of checkpoint-compromised strains and generally improves DNA damage tolerance. In the absence of DNA damage, mdt1 deletion leads to delayed anaphase completion, with an elongated cell morphology reminiscent of that of G2/M cell cycle mutants. mdt1-dependent and DNA damage-dependent cell cycle delays are not additive, suggesting that they act in the same pathway. The data indicate that Mdt1 is involved in normal G2/M cell cycle progression and is a novel target of checkpoint-dependent cell cycle arrest pathways. PMID:15024067

  1. A genetic study based on PCNA-ubiquitin fusions reveals no requirement for PCNA polyubiquitylation in DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gervai, Judit Z; Gálicza, Judit; Szeltner, Zoltán; Zámborszky, Judit; Szüts, Dávid

    2017-06-01

    Post-translational modifications of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) play a key role in regulating the bypass of DNA lesions during DNA replication. PCNA can be monoubiquitylated at lysine 164 by the RAD6-RAD18 ubiquitin ligase complex. Through this modification, PCNA can interact with low fidelity Y family DNA polymerases to promote translesion synthesis. Monoubiquitylated PCNA can be polyubiquitylated on lysine 63 of ubiquitin by a further ubiquitin-conjugating complex. This modification promotes a template switching bypass process in yeast, while its role in higher eukaryotes is less clear. We investigated the function of PCNA ubiquitylation using a PCNA(K164R) mutant DT40 chicken B lymphoblastoma cell line, which is hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), cisplatin or ultraviolet radiation (UV) due to the loss of PCNA modifications. In the PCNA(K164R) mutant we also detected cell cycle arrest following UV treatment, a reduced rate of damage bypass through translesion DNA synthesis on synthetic UV photoproducts, and an increased rate of genomic mutagenesis following MMS treatment. PCNA-ubiquitin fusion proteins have been reported to mimic endogenous PCNA ubiquitylation. We found that the stable expression of a PCNA(K164R)-ubiquitin fusion protein fully or partially rescued the observed defects of the PCNA(K164R) mutant. The expression of a PCNA(K164R)-ubiquitin(K63R) fusion protein, on which the formation of lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains is not possible, similarly rescued the cell cycle arrest, DNA damage sensitivity, reduction of translesion synthesis and increase of MMS-induced genomic mutagenesis. Template switching bypass was not affected by the genetic elimination of PCNA polyubiquitylation, but it was reduced in the absence of the recombination proteins BRCA1 or XRCC3. Our study found no requirement for PCNA polyubiquitylation to protect cells from replication-stalling DNA damage. Copyright © 2017

  2. Resistance to UV-B induced DNA damage in extreme-tolerant cryptoendolithic Antarctic fungi: detection by PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Selbmann, Laura; Isola, Daniela; Zucconi, Laura; Onofri, Silvano

    2011-10-01

    Cryptoendolithic Antarctic black fungi are adapted to the harshest terrestrial conditions as in the ice-free area of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. Recently, surviving space simulated conditions proves their bewildering extremotolerance. In order to investigate the potential DNA damage and their response after UV-B exposition, two strains of Antarctic cryptoendolithic black fungi, Cryomyces antarcticus CCFEE 534 and Cryomyces minteri CCFEE 5187, were irradiated at different UV-B doses. Since conventional methods cannot be applied to these organisms, the effect on the genome was assessed by RAPD and rDNA amplification PCR based assays; the results were compared with the responses of Saccharomyces pastorianus DBVPG 6283 treated with the same conditions. Results showed that template activity was drastically inhibited in S. pastorianus after irradiation. Dramatic changes in the RAPD profiles showed after 30 min of exposure while the rDNA amplification of SSU, LSU, and ITS portions failed after 30, 60, and 90 min of exposure respectively. No alteration was detected in the templates of the Antarctic strains where both RAPD profiles and rDNA PCR amplifications were unaffected even after 240 min of exposure. The electroferograms of the rDNA portions of Cryomyces strains were perfectly readable and conserved whilst the analyses revealed a marked alteration in S. pastorianus confirming the high resistance of the Antarctic strains to UV-B exposure.

  3. Condensin II Alleviates DNA Damage and Is Essential for Tolerance of Boron Overload Stress in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takuya; Inui, Yayoi Tsujimoto; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Mastui, Minami; Umeda, Masaaki; Fukui, Kiichi; Fujiwara, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Although excess boron (B) is known to negatively affect plant growth, its molecular mechanism of toxicity is unknown. We previously isolated two Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, hypersensitive to excess B (heb1-1 and heb2-1). In this study, we found that HEB1 and HEB2 encode the CAP-G2 and CAP-H2 subunits, respectively, of the condensin II protein complex, which functions in the maintenance of chromosome structure. Growth of Arabidopsis seedlings in medium containing excess B induced expression of condensin II subunit genes. Simultaneous treatment with zeocin, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and aphidicolin, which blocks DNA replication, mimicked the effect of excess B on root growth in the heb mutants. Both excess B and the heb mutations upregulated DSBs and DSB-inducible gene transcription, suggesting that DSBs are a cause of B toxicity and that condensin II reduces the incidence of DSBs. The Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant atr-2, which is sensitive to replication-blocking reagents, was also sensitive to excess B. Taken together, these data suggest that the B toxicity mechanism in plants involves DSBs and possibly replication blocks and that plant condensin II plays a role in DNA damage repair or in protecting the genome from certain genotoxic stressors, particularly excess B. PMID:21917552

  4. Mechanisms of DNA damage, repair, and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Walker, Graham C

    2017-06-01

    Living organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of DNA damaging agents that can impact health and modulate disease-states. However, robust DNA repair and damage-bypass mechanisms faithfully protect the DNA by either removing or tolerating the damage to ensure an overall survival. Deviations in this fine-tuning are known to destabilize cellular metabolic homeostasis, as exemplified in diverse cancers where disruption or deregulation of DNA repair pathways results in genome instability. Because routinely used biological, physical and chemical agents impact human health, testing their genotoxicity and regulating their use have become important. In this introductory review, we will delineate mechanisms of DNA damage and the counteracting repair/tolerance pathways to provide insights into the molecular basis of genotoxicity in cells that lays the foundation for subsequent articles in this issue. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:235-263, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Damage Tolerance: Assessment Handbook. Volume 2: Airframe Damage Tolerance Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Airframe Damage Tolerance Evaluation NJ 084u5 DTIC FLE 15 1994 Research and Special Programs Administration John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems...permission of John Wiley and Sons, New York, N.Y.] (4-5] CORRODED END Magnes;um Magnesium alloys Zinc Galvanized steel or galvanized wrought iron Aluminum...Reprinted from M M. Ratwani and D.P. Wilhem , iDeelopment andEvaluation of Methods of Plane Strain Fractuire Analysis, Northrop Corporation, AFFDL-TR-73-42

  6. DNA damage and mutation. Types of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakarov, Stoyan; Petkova, Rumena; Russev, George Ch; Zhelev, Nikolai

    2014-02-01

    This review outlines the basic types of DNA damage caused by exogenous and endogenous factors, analyses the possible consequences of each type of damage and discusses the need for different types of DNA repair. The mechanisms by which a minor damaging event to DNA may eventually result in the introduction of heritable mutation/s are reviewed. The major features of the role of DNA damage in ageing and carcinogenesis are outlined and the role of iatrogenic DNA damage in human health and disease (with curative intent as well as a long-term adverse effect of genotoxic therapies) are discussed in detail.

  7. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage. PMID:25692233

  8. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage.

  9. Chloroplast-targeted bacterial RecA proteins confer tolerance to chloroplast DNA damage by methyl viologen or UV-C radiation in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyesung; Jin, Yong-Mei; Choi, Mi Hwa; Lee, Hyeyun; Kim, Minkyun

    2013-02-01

    The nature and importance of the DNA repair system in the chloroplasts of higher plants under oxidative stress or UV radiation-induced genotoxicity was investigated via gain-of-functional approaches exploiting bacterial RecAs. For this purpose, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants and cell suspensions overexpressing Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa RecA fused to a chloroplast-targeting transit peptide were first produced. The transgenic tobacco plants maintained higher amounts of chloroplast DNA compared with wild-type (WT) upon treatments with methyl viologen (MV), a herbicide that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in chloroplasts. Consistent with these results, the transgenic tobacco leaves showed less bleaching than WT following MV exposure. Similarly, the MV-treated transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the chloroplast RecA homologue RECA1 showed weak bleaching, while the recA1 mutant showed opposite results upon MV treatment. In addition, when exposed to UV-C radiation, the dark-grown E. coli RecA-overexpressing transgenic tobacco cell suspensions, but not their WT counterparts, resumed growth and greening after the recovery period under light conditions. Measurements of UV radiation-induced chloroplast DNA damage using DraI assays (Harlow et al. 1994) with the chloroplast rbcL DNA probe and quantitative PCR analyses showed that the transgenic cell suspensions better repaired their UV-C radiation-induced chloroplast DNA lesions compared with WT. Taken all together, it was concluded that RecA-overexpressing transgenic plants are endowed with an increased chloroplast DNA maintenance capacity and enhanced repair activities, and consequently have a higher survival tolerance to genotoxic stresses. These observations are made possible by the functional compatibility of the bacterial RecAs in chloroplasts. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  10. Damage Tolerance of Large Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of large shell structures is investigated. A computer model is used for the assessment of structural response, progressive fracture resistance, and defect/damage tolerance characteristics. Critical locations of a stiffened conical shell segment are identified. Defective and defect-free computer models are simulated to evaluate structural damage/defect tolerance. Safe pressurization levels are assessed for the retention of structural integrity at the presence of damage/ defects. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulations. Damage propagation and burst pressures for defective and defect-free shells are compared to evaluate damage tolerance. Design implications with regard to defect and damage tolerance of a large steel pressure vessel are examined.

  11. Certification of damage tolerant composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapoff, Andrew J.; Dill, Harold D.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    A reliability based certification testing methodology for impact damage tolerant composite structure was developed. Cocured, adhesively bonded, and impact damaged composite static strength and fatigue life data were statistically analyzed to determine the influence of test parameters on the data scatter. The impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of various structural configurations were characterized through the analysis of an industry wide database of impact test results. Realistic impact damage certification requirements were proposed based on actual fleet aircraft data. The capabilities of available impact damage analysis methods were determined through correlation with experimental data. Probabilistic methods were developed to estimate the reliability of impact damaged composite structures.

  12. DNA damage and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer D; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is intimately related to the accumulation of DNA damage, and repair failures (including mutation prone repair and hyperactive repair systems). This article relates current clinical categories for breast cancer and their common DNA damage repair defects. Information is included on the potential for accumulation of DNA damage in the breast tissue of a woman during her lifetime and the role of DNA damage in breast cancer development. We then cover endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damage, types of DNA damage repair and basic signal transduction pathways for three gene products involved in the DNA damage response system; namely BRCA1, BRIT1 and PARP-1. These genes are often considered tumor suppressors because of their roles in DNA damage response and some are under clinical investigation as likely sources for effective new drugs to treat breast cancers. Finally we discuss some of the problems of DNA damage repair systems in cancer and the conundrum of hyper-active repair systems which can introduce mutations and confer a survival advantage to certain types of cancer cells. PMID:21909479

  13. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-09-18

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span.

  14. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span. PMID:26385091

  15. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Experiments are proposed to examine the molecular mechanism by which mustard chemical warfare agents induce neuronal cell death . DNA damage is the...proposed underlying mechanism of mustard-induced neuronal cell death . We propose a novel research strategy to test this hypothesis by using mice with...perturbed DNA repair to explore the relationship between mustard-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death . Initial in vitro studies (Years 1, 2 & 3

  16. 77 FR 4890 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation for Composite Rotorcraft Structures, and Damage Tolerance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... static strength of composite rotorcraft structures using a damage tolerance evaluation, or a fatigue... regulations to require evaluation of fatigue and residual static strength of composite rotorcraft...

  17. Optical detection of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Apostol, A.; Cembrano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for oxidative damage to calf thymus DNA is reported. A decrease in the transition temperature for strand separation resulted from exposure of the DNA to the reactive decomposition products of 3- morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (i.e., nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals). A decrease in melting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius was indicative of oxidative damage including single strand chain breaks. Double stranded (ds) and single stranded (ss) forms of DNA were determined using the indicator dyes ethidium bromide and PicoGreen. The change in DNA 'melting' curves was dependant on the concentration of SIN-1 and was most pronounced at 75 degrees Celsius. This chemically induced damage was significantly inhibited by sodium citrate, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ethylenediamine tetraacietic acid (EDTA), or deferoxamine. Lowest observable effect level for SIN-1-induced damage was 200 (mu) M.

  18. Deciphering the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2015-09-10

    This year's Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award honors Evelyn Witkin and Stephen J. Elledge, two pioneers in elucidating the DNA damage response, whose contributions span more than 40 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA Repair by Reversal of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors constantly challenge cellular DNA, generating cytotoxic and/or mutagenic DNA adducts. As a result, organisms have evolved different mechanisms to defend against the deleterious effects of DNA damage. Among these diverse repair pathways, direct DNA-repair systems provide cells with simple yet efficient solutions to reverse covalent DNA adducts. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the field of direct DNA repair, namely, photolyase-, alkyltransferase-, and dioxygenase-mediated repair processes. We present specific examples to describe new findings of known enzymes and appealing discoveries of new proteins. At the end of this article, we also briefly discuss the influence of direct DNA repair on other fields of biology and its implication on the discovery of new biology. PMID:23284047

  20. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stelow, R B

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10/sup 4/ fold.

  1. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  2. A Novel Approach to Rotorcraft Damage Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Everett, Richard A.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Damage-tolerance methodology is positioned to replace safe-life methodologies for designing rotorcraft structures. The argument for implementing a damage-tolerance method comes from the fundamental fact that rotorcraft structures typically fail by fatigue cracking. Therefore, if technology permits prediction of fatigue-crack growth in structures, a damage-tolerance method should deliver the most accurate prediction of component life. Implementing damage-tolerance (DT) into high-cycle-fatigue (HCF) components will require a shift from traditional DT methods that rely on detecting an initial flaw with nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods. The rapid accumulation of cycles in a HCF component will result in a design based on a traditional DT method that is either impractical because of frequent inspections, or because the design will be too heavy to operate efficiently. Furthermore, once a HCF component develops a detectable propagating crack, the remaining fatigue life is short, sometimes less than one flight hour, which does not leave sufficient time for inspection. Therefore, designing a HCF component will require basing the life analysis on an initial flaw that is undetectable with current NDI technology.

  3. Types and Consequences of DNA Damage

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review provides a concise overview of the types of DNA damage and the molecular mechanisms by which a cell senses DNA damage, repairs the damage, converts the damage into a mutation, or dies as a consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Such information is important in consid...

  4. Types and Consequences of DNA Damage

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review provides a concise overview of the types of DNA damage and the molecular mechanisms by which a cell senses DNA damage, repairs the damage, converts the damage into a mutation, or dies as a consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Such information is important in consid...

  5. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-06-22

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis.

  6. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  7. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease.

  8. Chromatin structure and DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation examines the structure and structural transitions of chromatin in relation to DNA damage. The ability of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers to fold into higher ordered structures in vitro was examined following DNA photodamage introduced by two different agents. (1) 254-nm UV radiation and (2) trimethylpsoralen (plus near-UV radiation). Both agents are highly specific for DNA and form adducts predicted to cause different degrees of distortion in the DNA helix. The salt-induced structural transitions of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers were monitored by both analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering. Our results show that even in the presence of extremely large, nonphysiological amounts of photodamage by either agent the ability of chromatin to fold into higher ordered structures is not affected. The compact, 30 nm fiber must therefore be able to accommodate a large amount of DNA damage without any measurable changes in the overall size or degree of compaction of this structure. The distribution of pyrimidine dimers was mapped at the single nucleotide level in nucleosome core DNA from UV-irradiated mononucleosomes, chromatin fibers, and human cells in culture using the 3' ..-->.. 5' exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase.

  9. Damage-tolerance strategies for nacre tablets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengnan; Zhu, Xinqiao; Li, Qiyang; Wang, Rizhi; Wang, Xiaoxiang

    2016-05-01

    Nacre, a natural armor, exhibits prominent penetration resistance against predatory attacks. Unraveling its hierarchical toughening mechanisms and damage-tolerance design strategies may provide significant inspiration for the pursuit of high-performance artificial armors. In this work, relationships between the structure and mechanical performance of nacre were investigated. The results show that other than their brick-and-mortar structure, individual nacre tablets significantly contribute to the damage localization of nacre. Affected by intracrystalline organics, the tablets exhibit a unique fracture behavior. The synergistic action of the nanoscale deformation mechanisms increases the energy dissipation efficiency of the tablets and contributes to the preservation of the structural and functional integrity of the shell.

  10. Durability and Damage Tolerance of Aluminum Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    casting alloys A357 and A201. On completion of the program, revisions to material, process, and DADT specifications will be recommended, if necessary...and the effects of process variables on the properties of A357 -T6 and A201-T7 castings were described. This second interim report covers additional...damage tolerance properties of A357 -T6 and A201-T7 produced using the specifications selected earlier [1] in Task 2 were determined. These alloys were

  11. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  12. Damage Tolerance and Durability of Material Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifsnider, Kenneth L.; Case, Scott W.

    2002-04-01

    A daring, original approach to understanding and predicting the mechanical behavior of materials "Damage is an abstraction . . . Strength is an observable, an independent variable that can be measured, with clear and familiar engineering definitions." -from the Preface to Damage Tolerance and Durability of Material Systems Long-term behavior is one of the most challenging and important aspects of material engineering. There is a great need for a useful conceptual or operational framework for measuring long-term behavior. As much a revolution in philosophy as an engineering text, Damage Tolerance and Durability of Material Systems postulates a new mechanistic philosophy and methodology for predicting the remaining strength and life of engineering material. This philosophy associates the local physical changes in material states and stress states caused by time-variable applied environments with global properties and performance. There are three fundamental issues associated with the mechanical behavior of engineering materials and structures: their stiffness, strength, and life. Treating these issues from the standpoint of technical difficulty, time, and cost for characterization, and relationship to safety, reliability, liability, and economy, the authors explore such topics as: * Damage tolerance and failure modes * Factors that determine composite strength * Micromechanical models of composite stiffness and strength * Stiffness evolution * Strength evolution during damage accumulation * Non-uniform stress states * Lifetime prediction With a robust selection of example applications and case studies, this book takes a step toward the fulfillment of a vision of a future in which the prediction of physical properties from first principles will make possible the creation and application of new materials and material systems at a remarkable cost savings.

  13. DNA damage response and transcription.

    PubMed

    Lagerwerf, Saskia; Vrouwe, Mischa G; Overmeer, René M; Fousteri, Maria I; Mullenders, Leon H F

    2011-07-15

    A network of DNA damage surveillance systems is triggered by sensing of DNA lesions and the initiation of a signal transduction cascade that activates genome-protection pathways including nucleotide excision repair (NER). NER operates through coordinated assembly of repair factors into pre- and post-incision complexes. Recent work identifies RPA as a key regulator of the transition from dual incision to repair-synthesis in UV-irradiated non-cycling cells, thereby averting the generation of unprocessed repair intermediates. These intermediates could lead to recombinogenic events and trigger a persistent ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling. It is now evident that DNA damage signaling is not limited to NER proficient cells. ATR-dependent checkpoint activation also occurs in UV-exposed non-cycling repair deficient cells coinciding with the formation of endonuclease APE1-mediated DNA strand breaks. In addition, the encounter of elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPIIo) with DNA damage lesions and its persistent stalling provides a strong DNA damage signaling leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and increased mutagenesis. The mechanism underlying the strong and strand specific induction of UV-induced mutations in NER deficient cells has been recently resolved by the finding that gene transcription itself increases UV-induced mutagenesis in a strand specific manner via increased deamination of cytosines. The cell removes the RNAPIIo-blocking DNA lesions by transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER) without displacement of the DNA damage stalled RNAPIIo. Deficiency in TC-NER associates with mutations in the CSA and CSB genes giving rise to the rare human disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS). CSB functions as a repair coupling factor to attract NER proteins, chromatin remodelers and the CSA-E3-ubiquitin ligase complex to the stalled RNAPIIo; CSA is dispensable for attraction of NER proteins, yet in cooperation with CSB is required to recruit XAB2, the nucleosomal binding protein HMGN1

  14. 75 FR 11734 - Damage Tolerance Data for Repairs and Alterations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 26 RIN 2120-AI32 Damage Tolerance Data for Repairs and... make damage tolerance data for repairs and alterations to fatigue critical airplane structure available... of design approvals to make available to operators damage tolerance (DT) data for repairs and...

  15. Damage Tolerance of Integral Structure in Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Urban, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The rotorcraft industry has rapidly implemented integral structures into aircraft to benefit from the weight and cost advantages over traditionally riveted structure. The cost to manufacture an integral structure, where the entire component is machined from a single plate of material, is about one-fifth that of a riveted structure. Furthermore, the integral structure can weigh only one-half that of a riveted structure through optimal design of stiffening structure and part reduction. Finally, inspection and repair of damage in the field can be less costly than riveted structure. There are no rivet heads to inspect under, reducing inspection time, and damage can be removed or patched readily without altering the primary structure, reducing replacement or repair costs. In this paper, the authors will investigate the damage tolerance implications of fielding an integral structure manufactured from thick plate aluminum.

  16. Damage Tolerance of Composite Laminates from an Empirical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2009-01-01

    Damage tolerance consists of analysis and experimentation working together. Impact damage is usually of most concern for laminated composites. Once impacted, the residual compression strength is usually of most interest. Other properties may be of more interest than compression (application dependent). A damage tolerance program is application specific (not everyone is building aircraft). The "Building Block Approach" is suggested for damage tolerance. Advantage can be taken of the excellent fatigue resistance of damaged laminates to save time and costs.

  17. DNA damage by various radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Yoshioka, H.

    1997-01-01

    In an attempt to shed light on the influence of tritiated water on DNA we have investigated the post-irradiation damage with a simple plasmid DNA, pBR322 and pUC18. The survival of covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA form was directly followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The survival percentage of DNA in tritiated water was almost the same as with the irradiation with X-rays at the same absorbed dose. For irradiation with γ-rays, on the other hand, the decay rate was larger than those observed with both tritiated water and X-rays. The percentages of breakage for DNA in tritiated water, X-rays and γ-rays were found to be 34, 38 and 33% at 100 Gy of absorbed dose. The effect of dose rate was not observed for irradiation with tritiated water, X-rays and γ-rays. In order to study protection of DNA against radiation, we investigated the protecting effect of tea catechin which is the main component of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg). The protection mechanism for DNA against radiation-induced scission has been studied using ESR spin-trapping method.

  18. Could Shift Work Damage Your DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_166904.html Could Shift Work Damage Your DNA? Small study raises questions about daytime sleep and ... less capacity to repair everyday damage to cells' DNA, a small study hints. The research found that ...

  19. Sphingolipids in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Brittany; Donaldson, Jane Catalina; Obeid, Lina

    2015-05-01

    Recently, sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes have emerged as important targets of many chemotherapeutics and DNA damaging agents and therefore play significant roles in mediating the physiological response of the cell to DNA damage. In this review we will highlight points of connection between the DNA damage response (DDR) and sphingolipid metabolism; specifically how certain sphingolipid enzymes are regulated in response to DNA damage and how the bioactive lipids produced by these enzymes affect cell fate. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Sphingolipids in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Brittany; Donaldson, Cat; Obeid, Lina

    2014-01-01

    Recently, sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes have emerged as important targets of many chemotherapeutics and DNA damaging agents and therefore play significant roles in mediating the physiological response of the cell to DNA damage. In this review we will highlight points of connection between the DNA damage response (DDR) and sphingolipid metabolism; specifically how certain sphingolipid enzymes are regulated in response to DNA damage and how the bioactive lipids produced by these enzymes affect cell fate. PMID:25434743

  1. Hierarchical Damage Tolerant Controllers for Smart Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    AFWAL-TR-89- 3009 (N HIERARCHICAL DAMAGE TOLERANT CONTROLLERS FOR SMART STRUCTURES C A.K. Caglayan, S.M. Allen, and S.J. Edwards Charles River...unlimited. 4 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) S. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) AFWAL-TR-89- 3009 6a. NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 6o...F33615-88- C -3212 8c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 10. SOURCE OF FUNDING NUMBERS ELEMENT NO. NO. NO ACCESSION NO ..... _ _ _ __-_ __,_ 65502F 3005

  2. Noncatalytic, N-terminal Domains of DNA Polymerase Lambda Affect Its Cellular Localization and DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Anthony A; Taggart, David J; Suo, Zucai

    2017-04-13

    Specialized DNA polymerases, such as DNA polymerase lambda (Polλ), are important players in DNA damage tolerance and repair pathways. Knowing how DNA polymerases are regulated and recruited to sites of DNA damage is imperative to understanding these pathways. Recent work has suggested that Polλ plays a role in several distinct DNA damage tolerance and repair pathways. In this paper, we report previously unknown roles of the N-terminal domains of human Polλ for modulating its involvement in DNA damage tolerance and repair. By using Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and cell survival assays, we found that the BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) and proline/serine-rich (PSR) domains of Polλ affect its cellular localization and DNA damage responses. The nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Polλ was necessary to overcome the impediment of its nuclear localization caused by its BRCT and PSR domains. Induction of DNA damage resulted in recruitment of Polλ to chromatin, which was controlled by its BRCT and PSR domains. In addition, the presence of both domains was required for Polλ-mediated tolerance of oxidative DNA damage but not DNA methylation damage. These findings suggest that the N-terminal domains of Polλ are important for regulating its responses to DNA damage.

  3. Damage tolerant design using collapse techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new approach to the design of structures for improved global damage tolerance is presented. In its undamaged condition the structure is designed subject to strength, displacement and buckling constraints. In the damaged condition the only constraint is that the structure will not collapse. The collapse load calculation is formulated as a maximization problem and solved by an interior extended penalty function. The design for minimum weight subject to constraints on the undamaged structure and a specified level of the collapse load is a minimization problem which is also solved by a penalty function formulation. Thus the overall problem is of a nested or multilevel optimization. Examples are presented to demonstrate the difference between the present and more traditional approaches.

  4. Environmental Effects on Impact Damage Tolerance of Hybrid Composite Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-28

    A TRIDENT SCHOLAR q 3m PROJECT REPORT NO. ., 140 *I ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON IMPACT DAMAGE TOLERANCE OF HYBRID COMPOSITE MATERIAL. DTICSELECTE SEP 0... damage growth of the test material. Impact damage evaluations showed the initial crack tolerance of the hybrid materials was better than that of...Environmental Effects on Impact Damage Tolerance of Hybrid Composite Material Lawrence E. Wood United States Naval Academy ABSTRACT The behavior of an

  5. Design Manual for Impact Damage Tolerant Aircraft Structure. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    LATLANTIQUE NORD) AGARDograph No.238 Addendum to DESIGN MANUAL FOR IMPACT DAMAGE TOLERANT AIRCRAFI TSTRUCFURE by MJJacobson Northrop Corporation Aircraft... Damage Tolerant Aircraft Structure In 1981 the Structures and Maeril kPae of AGARD published a Design Manual for Impact Damage Tolerant Aircraft...Structures (AG 23S) Since thad date, theme have been aiguifcant advances in design to resit impact damage . The Panel has therior considered it appropriate

  6. CHK2 kinase in the DNA damage response and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zannini, Laura; Delia, Domenico; Buscemi, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase CHK2 is a key component of the DNA damage response. In human cells, following genotoxic stress, CHK2 is activated and phosphorylates >20 proteins to induce the appropriate cellular response, which, depending on the extent of damage, the cell type, and other factors, could be cell cycle checkpoint activation, induction of apoptosis or senescence, DNA repair, or tolerance of the damage. Recently, CHK2 has also been found to have cellular functions independent of the presence of nuclear DNA lesions. In particular, CHK2 participates in several molecular processes involved in DNA structure modification and cell cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the activity of CHK2 in response to DNA damage and in the maintenance of the biological functions in unstressed cells. These activities are also considered in relation to a possible role of CHK2 in tumorigenesis and, as a consequence, as a target of cancer therapy. PMID:25404613

  7. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries. PMID:26400671

  8. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.

  9. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; ...

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratiomore » is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.« less

  10. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.

  11. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; ...

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratiomore » is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.« less

  12. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro-chemo-mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.

  13. Interactions between DNA damage, repair, and transcription.

    PubMed

    Khobta, Andriy; Epe, Bernd

    2012-08-01

    This review addresses a variety of mechanisms by which DNA repair interacts with transcription and vice versa. Blocking of transcriptional elongation is the best studied of these mechanisms. Transcription recovery after damage therefore has often been used as a surrogate marker of DNA repair in cells. However, it has become evident that relationships between DNA damage, repair, and transcription are more complex due to various indirect effects of DNA damage on gene transcription. These include inhibition of transcription by DNA repair intermediates as well as regulation of transcription and of the epigenetic status of the genes by DNA repair-related mechanisms. In addition, since transcription is emerging as an important endogenous source of DNA damage in cells, we briefly summarise recent advances in understanding the nature of co-transcriptionally induced DNA damage and the DNA repair pathways involved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrochemical DNA Sensors for Detection of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Diculescu, Victor Constantin; Paquim, Ana-Maria Chiorcea; Brett, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical devices have received particular attention due to their rapid detection and great sensitivity for the evaluation of DNA-hazard compounds interaction mechanisms. Several types of bioanalytical method use nucleic acids probes to detect DNA damage. This article reviews current directions and strategies in the development and applications of electrochemical DNA sensors for the detection of DNA damage.

  15. Rapid Approaches Towards DNA Damage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Crews, N.; Paidipalli, Manasa

    2013-01-01

    The severe effects of DNA damage on human health have led to a tremendous amount of research being focused. Owing to the importance of damage detection, different approaches for the detection and quantification of the damaged DNA will be presented. In this work, we have modeled DNA damage using well-known mutagens: UV radiation to create photoproducts and restriction enzyme digestion to create double strand breaks. We will show that quantitative PCR (qPCR), a widely known measure of detecting the presence of the target DNA can be used to quantify photoproducts/intramolecular DNA damage. Our results indicate that a comparison of the initial concentration available in the undamaged and the damaged samples can be used to reveal the effect of damaged DNA in its amplification. By analyzing multiple regions using this technique, their relative susceptibility to damage can be measured. We also show that high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA), a measure of the bond energy between two DNA strands, can be used to quantify double strand breaks. The strand breaks resulted in a change in the overall distribution of the bond energy thus causing variations in the melting profile. HRMA has also been examined to compare DNA damage resulting from UV-A, UV-B and UV-C irradiation. The evaluation techniques demonstrated can potentially be extended to various types of DNA damage.

  16. Histone modifications in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lin-Lin; Shen, Changchun; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2016-03-01

    DNA damage is a relatively common event in eukaryotic cell and may lead to genetic mutation and even cancer. DNA damage induces cellular responses that enable the cell either to repair the damaged DNA or cope with the damage in an appropriate way. Histone proteins are also the fundamental building blocks of eukaryotic chromatin besides DNA, and many types of post-translational modifications often occur on tails of histones. Although the function of these modifications has remained elusive, there is ever-growing studies suggest that histone modifications play vital roles in several chromatin-based processes, such as DNA damage response. In this review, we will discuss the main histone modifications, and their functions in DNA damage response.

  17. Using DNA damage to monitor water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liyan; Huang, Ying; Liu, Guangxing

    2005-09-01

    DNA damage of aquatic organisms living in polluted environments can be used as a biomarker of the genotoxicity of toxic agents to organisms. This technique has been playing an important role in ecotoxicological study and environmental risk assessment. In this article, main types of DNA damage caused by pollutants in water environments were reviewed; methods of detecting DNA damage were also documented for water environmental monitoring.

  18. Tolerizing DNA vaccines for autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Peggy P; Higgins, John P; Kidd, Brian A; Tomooka, Beren; Digennaro, Carla; Lee, Lowen Y; de Vegvar, Henry E Neuman; Steinman, Lawrence; Robinson, William H

    2006-12-01

    Current therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases non-specifically suppress immune function, and there is great need for fundamental approaches such as antigen-specific tolerizing therapy. In this paper we describe development of antigen-specific tolerizing DNA vaccines to treat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice, and use of protein microarrays to monitor response to therapy and to identify potential additional autoimmune targets for next generation vaccines. We demonstrate that tolerizing DNA vaccines encoding type II collagen (CII) reduced the incidence and severity of CIA. Atorvastatin, a statin drug found to reduce the severity of autoimmunity, potentiated the effect of DNA vaccines encoding CII. Analysis of cytokines produced by collagen-reactive T cells derived from mice receiving tolerizing DNA encoding CII, as compared to control vaccines, revealed reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Arthritis microarray analysis demonstrated reduced spreading of autoantibody responses in mice treated with DNA encoding CII. The development of tolerizing DNA vaccines, and the use of antibody profiling to guide design of and to monitor therapeutic responses to such vaccines, represents a promising approach for the treatment of RA and other autoimmune diseases.

  19. DNA damage response, redox status and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Cary N; Ito, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    The ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to self-renew and differentiate into progenitors is essential for homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. The longevity of HSCs makes them vulnerable to accumulating DNA damage, which may be leukemogenic or result in senescence and cell death. Additionally, the ability of HSCs to self-renew and differentiate allows DNA damage to spread throughout the hematologic system, leaving the organism vulnerable to disease. In this review we discuss cell fate decisions made in the face of DNA damage and other cellular stresses, and the role of reactive oxygen species in the long-term maintenance of HSCs and their DNA damage response.

  20. Superoxide and the production of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Keyer, K; Gort, A S; Imlay, J A

    1995-01-01

    The conventional model of oxidative DNA damage posits a role for superoxide (O2-) as a reductant for iron, which subsequently generates a hydroxyl radical by transferring the electron to H2O2. The hydroxyl radical then attacks DNA. Indeed, mutants of Escherichia coli that lack superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 10-fold more vulnerable to DNA oxidation by H2O2 than were wild-type cells. Even the pace of DNA damage by endogenous oxidants was great enough that the SOD mutants could not tolerate air if enzymes that repair oxidative DNA lesions were inactive. However, DNA oxidation proceeds in SOD-proficient cells without the involvement of O2-, as evidenced by the failure of SOD overproduction or anaerobiosis to suppress damage by H2O2. Furthermore, the mechanism by which excess O2- causes damage was called into question when the hypersensitivity of SOD mutants to DNA damage persisted for at least 20 min after O2- had been dispelled through the imposition of anaerobiosis. That behavior contradicted the standard model, which requires that O2- be present to rereduce cellular iron during the period of exposure to H2O2. Evidently, DNA oxidation is driven by a reductant other than O2-, which leaves the mechanism of damage promotion by O2- unsettled. One possibility is that, through its well-established ability to leach iron from iron-sulfur clusters, O2- increases the amount of free iron that is available to catalyze hydroxyl radical production. Experiments with iron transport mutants confirmed that increases in free-iron concentration have the effect of accelerating DNA oxidation. Thus, O2- may be genotoxic only in doses that exceed those found in SOD-proficient cells, and in those limited circumstances it may promote DNA damage by increasing the amount of DNA-bound iron. PMID:7592468

  1. Oxidative DNA damage & repair: An introduction.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2017-06-01

    This introductory article should be viewed as a prologue to the Free Radical Biology & Medicine Special Issue devoted to the important topic of Oxidatively Damaged DNA and its Repair. This special issue is dedicated to Professor Tomas Lindahl, co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his seminal discoveries in the area repair of oxidatively damaged DNA. In the past several years it has become abundantly clear that DNA oxidation is a major consequence of life in an oxygen-rich environment. Concomitantly, survival in the presence of oxygen, with the constant threat of deleterious DNA mutations and deletions, has largely been made possible through the evolution of a vast array of DNA repair enzymes. The articles in this Oxidatively Damaged DNA & Repair special issue detail the reactions by which intracellular DNA is oxidatively damaged, and the enzymatic reactions and pathways by which living organisms survive such assaults by repair processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. DNA damage signalling prevents deleterious telomere addition at DNA breaks

    PubMed Central

    Makovets, Svetlana; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2009-01-01

    The response to DNA damage involves regulation of multiple essential processes to maximize the accuracy of DNA damage repair and cell survival 1. Telomerase has the potential to interfere with repair by inappropriately adding telomeres to DNA breaks. It was unknown whether cells modulate telomerase in response to DNA damage, to increase the accuracy of repair. Here we report that telomerase action is regulated as a part of the cellular response to a DNA double-strand break (DSB). Using yeast, we show that the major ATR/Mec1 DNA damage signalling pathway regulates telomerase action at DSBs. Upon DNA damage, MEC1-RAD53-DUN1-dependent phosphorylation of the telomerase inhibitor Pif1 occurs. Utilizing a separation of function PIF1 mutation, we show that this phosphorylation is required for the Pif1-mediated telomerase inhibition that takes place specifically at DNA breaks, but not telomeres. Hence DNA damage signalling down-modulates telomerase action at a DNA break via Pif1 phosphorylation, thus preventing aberrant healing of broken DNA ends by telomerase. These findings uncover a novel regulatory mechanism that coordinates competing DNA end-processing activities and thereby promotes DNA repair accuracy and genome integrity. PMID:19838171

  3. Impact Damage Tolerance of a Carbon Fibre Composite Laminate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    design of composite structures. 8 CONCLUSIONS These carbon fibre/ epoxy resin laminates are susceptible :: low e ;rt., - .. impact damage, especially...ROYAL AIRCRAFT ESTABLISHMENT0 Technical Report 84049 May 1984 GARTEUR/TP-007 IMPACT DAMAGE TOLERANCE OF A CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE LAMINATE by DTIC G...007 Received for printing 3 May 1984 IMPACT DAMAGE TOLERANCE OF A CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE LAMINATE by G. Dorey P. Sigety* K. Stellbrink** W. G. J. ’t

  4. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  5. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  6. DNA Damage in Plant Herbarium Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Staats, Martijn; Cuenca, Argelia; Richardson, James E.; Vrielink-van Ginkel, Ria; Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole; Bakker, Freek T.

    2011-01-01

    Dried plant herbarium specimens are potentially a valuable source of DNA. Efforts to obtain genetic information from this source are often hindered by an inability to obtain amplifiable DNA as herbarium DNA is typically highly degraded. DNA post-mortem damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of DNA post-mortem damage is essential to determine the accuracy of molecular data from herbarium specimens. In this study we present an assessment of DNA damage as miscoding lesions in herbarium specimens using 454-sequencing of amplicons derived from plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear DNA. In addition, we assess DNA degradation as a result of strand breaks and other types of polymerase non-bypassable damage by quantitative real-time PCR. Comparing four pairs of fresh and herbarium specimens of the same individuals we quantitatively assess post-mortem DNA damage, directly after specimen preparation, as well as after long-term herbarium storage. After specimen preparation we estimate the proportion of gene copy numbers of plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear DNA to be 2.4–3.8% of fresh control DNA and 1.0–1.3% after long-term herbarium storage, indicating that nearly all DNA damage occurs on specimen preparation. In addition, there is no evidence of preferential degradation of organelle versus nuclear genomes. Increased levels of C→T/G→A transitions were observed in old herbarium plastid DNA, representing 21.8% of observed miscoding lesions. We interpret this type of post-mortem DNA damage-derived modification to have arisen from the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine during long-term herbarium storage. Our results suggest that reliable sequence data can be obtained from herbarium specimens. PMID:22163018

  7. DNA damage in major psychiatric diseases

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Muhammad Ummear; Tufan, Turan; Wang, Yan; Hill, Christopher; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Human cells are exposed to exogenous insults and continuous production of different metabolites. These insults and unwanted metabolic products might interfere with the stability of genomic DNA. Recently many studies demonstrated that different psychiatric disorders show substantially high level of oxidative DNA damage in the brain accompanied with morphological and functional alterations. It reveals that damaged genomic DNA may contribute to the pathophysiology of these mental illnesses. Here we review the role of oxidative damage and reduced antioxidant ability in some vastly studied psychiatric disorders and emphasize the inclusion of treatment options involving DNA repair. In addition, while most currently used antidepressants are based on the manipulation of the neurotransmitter regulation in managing different mental abnormalities, they are able to prevent or reverse neurotoxin-induced DNA damage. Therefore, it may be plausible to target on genomic DNA alterations for psychiatric therapies, which is of pivotal importance for future anti-psychiatric drug development. PMID:27126805

  8. FF483–484 motif of human Polη mediates its interaction with the POLD2 subunit of Polδ and contributes to DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Baldeck, Nadège; Janel-Bintz, Régine; Wagner, Jérome; Tissier, Agnès; Fuchs, Robert P.; Burkovics, Peter; Haracska, Lajos; Despras, Emmanuelle; Bichara, Marc; Chatton, Bruno; Cordonnier, Agnès M.

    2015-01-01

    Switching between replicative and translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases are crucial events for the completion of genomic DNA synthesis when the replication machinery encounters lesions in the DNA template. In eukaryotes, the translesional DNA polymerase η (Polη) plays a central role for accurate bypass of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, the predominant DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet irradiation. Polη deficiency is responsible for a variant form of the Xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV) syndrome, characterized by a predisposition to skin cancer. Here, we show that the FF483–484 amino acids in the human Polη (designated F1 motif) are necessary for the interaction of this TLS polymerase with POLD2, the B subunit of the replicative DNA polymerase δ, both in vitro and in vivo. Mutating this motif impairs Polη function in the bypass of both an N-2-acetylaminofluorene adduct and a TT-CPD lesion in cellular extracts. By complementing XPV cells with different forms of Polη, we show that the F1 motif contributes to the progression of DNA synthesis and to the cell survival after UV irradiation. We propose that the integrity of the F1 motif of Polη, necessary for the Polη/POLD2 interaction, is required for the establishment of an efficient TLS complex. PMID:25662213

  9. FF483-484 motif of human Polη mediates its interaction with the POLD2 subunit of Polδ and contributes to DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Baldeck, Nadège; Janel-Bintz, Régine; Wagner, Jérome; Tissier, Agnès; Fuchs, Robert P; Burkovics, Peter; Haracska, Lajos; Despras, Emmanuelle; Bichara, Marc; Chatton, Bruno; Cordonnier, Agnès M

    2015-02-27

    Switching between replicative and translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases are crucial events for the completion of genomic DNA synthesis when the replication machinery encounters lesions in the DNA template. In eukaryotes, the translesional DNA polymerase η (Polη) plays a central role for accurate bypass of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, the predominant DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet irradiation. Polη deficiency is responsible for a variant form of the Xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV) syndrome, characterized by a predisposition to skin cancer. Here, we show that the FF483-484 amino acids in the human Polη (designated F1 motif) are necessary for the interaction of this TLS polymerase with POLD2, the B subunit of the replicative DNA polymerase δ, both in vitro and in vivo. Mutating this motif impairs Polη function in the bypass of both an N-2-acetylaminofluorene adduct and a TT-CPD lesion in cellular extracts. By complementing XPV cells with different forms of Polη, we show that the F1 motif contributes to the progression of DNA synthesis and to the cell survival after UV irradiation. We propose that the integrity of the F1 motif of Polη, necessary for the Polη/POLD2 interaction, is required for the establishment of an efficient TLS complex.

  10. Concepts for improving the damage tolerance of composite compression panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Williams, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of graphite-epoxy composite compression panel impact damage tolerance and damage propagation arrest concepts are reported. The tests were conducted on flat plate specimens and blade-stiffened structural panels such as those used in commercial aircraft wings, and the residual strength of damaged specimens and their sensitivity to damage while subjected to in-plane compression loading were determined. Results suggest that matrix materials that fail by delamination have the lowest damage tolerance, and it is concluded that alternative matrix materials with transverse reinforcement to suppress the delamination failure mode and yield the higher-strain value transverse shear crippling mode should be developed.

  11. Dyskeratosis congenita and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, Michael; Beswick, Richard; Walne, Amanda J; Hossain, Upal; Casimir, Colin; Vulliamy, Tom; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2011-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a heterogeneous bone marrow failure disorder with known mutations in components of telomerase and telomere shelterin. Recent work in a mouse model with a dyskerin mutation has implicated an increased DNA damage response as part of the cellular pathology, while mouse models with Terc and Tert mutations displayed a normal response. To clarify how these contradictory results might apply to DC pathology in humans, we studied the cellular phenotype in primary cells from DC patients of several genetic subtypes, focussing on T lymphocytes to remain close to the haematopoietic system. We observed novel cell cycle abnormalities in conjunction with impaired growth and an increase in apoptosis. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy we examined induction of the DNA damage proteins γ-H2AX and 53BP1 and the cell cycle protein TP53 (p53). We found an increase in damage foci at telomeres in lymphocytes and an increase in the basal level of DNA damage in fibroblasts, but crucially no increased response to DNA damaging agents in either cell type. As the response to induced DNA damage was normal and levels of global DNA damage were inconsistent between cell types, DNA damage may contribute differently to the pathology in different tissues. PMID:21477209

  12. Apoptosis and DNA damage in human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, R John; Koppers, Adam J

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage is frequently encountered in spermatozoa of subfertile males and is correlated with a range of adverse clinical outcomes including impaired fertilization, disrupted preimplantation embryonic development, increased rates of miscarriage and an enhanced risk of disease in the progeny. The etiology of DNA fragmentation in human spermatozoa is closely correlated with the appearance of oxidative base adducts and evidence of impaired spermiogenesis. We hypothesize that oxidative stress impedes spermiogenesis, resulting in the generation of spermatozoa with poorly remodelled chromatin. These defective cells have a tendency to default to an apoptotic pathway associated with motility loss, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine exteriorization and the activation of free radical generation by the mitochondria. The latter induces lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage, which then leads to DNA fragmentation and cell death. The physical architecture of spermatozoa prevents any nucleases activated as a result of this apoptotic process from gaining access to the nuclear DNA and inducing its fragmentation. It is for this reason that a majority of the DNA damage encountered in human spermatozoa seems to be oxidative. Given the important role that oxidative stress seems to have in the etiology of DNA damage, there should be an important role for antioxidants in the treatment of this condition. If oxidative DNA damage in spermatozoa is providing a sensitive readout of systemic oxidative stress, the implications of these findings could stretch beyond our immediate goal of trying to minimize DNA damage in spermatozoa as a prelude to assisted conception therapy. PMID:20802502

  13. Damage Tolerance Analysis of a Pressurized Liquid Oxygen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Harvin, Stephen F.; Gregory, Peyton B.; Mason, Brian H.; Thompson, Joe E.; Hoffman, Eric K.

    2006-01-01

    A damage tolerance assessment was conducted of an 8,000 gallon pressurized Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank. The LOX tank is constructed of a stainless steel pressure vessel enclosed by a thermal-insulating vacuum jacket. The vessel is pressurized to 2,250 psi with gaseous nitrogen resulting in both thermal and pressure stresses on the tank wall. Finite element analyses were performed on the tank to characterize the stresses from operation. Engineering material data was found from both the construction of the tank and the technical literature. An initial damage state was assumed based on records of a nondestructive inspection performed on the tank. The damage tolerance analyses were conducted using the NASGRO computer code. This paper contains the assumptions, and justifications, made for the input parameters to the damage tolerance analyses and the results of the damage tolerance analyses with a discussion on the operational safety of the LOX tank.

  14. The DNA damage response during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2013-10-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  15. Surviving the breakup: the DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jacob C; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    In response to even a single chromosomal double-strand DNA break, cells enact the DNA damage checkpoint. This checkpoint triggers cell cycle arrest, providing time for the cell to repair damaged chromosomes before entering mitosis. This mechanism helps prevent the segregation of damaged or mutated chromosomes and thus promotes genomic stability. Recent work has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying several critical steps in checkpoint activation, notably the recruitment of the upstream checkpoint kinases of the ATM and ATR families to different damaged DNA structures and the molecular events through which these kinases activate their effectors. Chromatin modification has emerged as one important component of checkpoint activation and maintenance. Following DNA repair, the checkpoint pathway is inactivated in a process termed recovery. A related but genetically distinct process, adaptation, controls cell cycle re-entry in the face of unrepairable damage.

  16. Ubiquitylation, neddylation and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica S.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Failure of accurate DNA damage sensing and repair mechanisms manifests as a variety of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, immunodeficiency, infertility and cancer. The accuracy and efficiency of DNA damage detection and repair, collectively termed the DNA damage response (DDR), requires the recruitment and subsequent post-translational modification (PTM) of a complex network of proteins. Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) SUMO have established roles in regulating the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). A role for other UBLs, such as NEDD8, is also now emerging. This article provides an overview of the DDR, discusses our current understanding of the process and function of PTM by ubiquitin and NEDD8, and reviews the literature surrounding the role of ubiquitylation and neddylation in DNA repair processes, focusing particularly on DNA DSB repair. PMID:25833379

  17. Ubiquitylation, neddylation and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica S; Jackson, Stephen P

    2015-04-01

    Failure of accurate DNA damage sensing and repair mechanisms manifests as a variety of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, immunodeficiency, infertility and cancer. The accuracy and efficiency of DNA damage detection and repair, collectively termed the DNA damage response (DDR), requires the recruitment and subsequent post-translational modification (PTM) of a complex network of proteins. Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) SUMO have established roles in regulating the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). A role for other UBLs, such as NEDD8, is also now emerging. This article provides an overview of the DDR, discusses our current understanding of the process and function of PTM by ubiquitin and NEDD8, and reviews the literature surrounding the role of ubiquitylation and neddylation in DNA repair processes, focusing particularly on DNA DSB repair.

  18. Progressive Fracture and Damage Tolerance of Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1997-01-01

    Structural performance (integrity, durability and damage tolerance) of fiber reinforced composite pressure vessels, designed for pressured shelters for planetary exploration, is investigated via computational simulation. An integrated computer code is utilized for the simulation of damage initiation, growth, and propagation under pressure. Aramid fibers are considered in a rubbery polymer matrix for the composite system. Effects of fiber orientation and fabrication defect/accidental damages are investigated with regard to the safety and durability of the shelter. Results show the viability of fiber reinforced pressure vessels as damage tolerant shelters for planetary colonization.

  19. Delamination, durability and damage tolerance of laminated composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    Research exploring the role of delamination on the durability and damage tolerance of advanced composite materials is reviewed. Recent studies on the characterization of composite delamination are summarized. Recent analytical solutions for interlaminar stresses and strain energy release rates associated with common sources of delamination are also reviewed. The role of delamination in low velocity impact, residual compression strength, and in fatigue is highlighted. Delamination is shown to be the common damage mode observed in all of these problems. A Damage Threshold/Fail-safety concept for addressing composite damage tolerance is discussed.

  20. Triplex-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Faye A; Tiwari, Meetu Kaushik

    2013-12-13

    Cellular DNA damage response is critical to preserving genomic integrity following exposure to genotoxic stress. A complex series of networks and signaling pathways become activated after DNA damage and trigger the appropriate cellular response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. The response elicited is dependent upon the type and extent of damage sustained, with the ultimate goal of preventing propagation of the damaged DNA. A major focus of our studies is to determine the cellular pathways involved in processing damage induced by altered helical structures, specifically triplexes. Our lab has demonstrated that the TFIIH factor XPD occupies a central role in triggering apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA strand breaks. We have shown that XPD co-localizes with γH2AX, and its presence is required for the phosphorylation of H2AX tyrosine142, which stimulates the signaling pathway to recruit pro-apoptotic factors to the damage site. Herein, we examine the cellular pathways activated in response to triplex formation and discuss our finding that suggests that XPD-dependent apoptosis plays a role in preserving genomic integrity in the presence of excessive structurally induced DNA damage.

  1. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  2. Damage tolerance certification of a fighter horizontal stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jia-Yen; Tsai, Ming-Yang; Chen, Jong-Sheng; Ong, Ching-Long

    1995-05-01

    A review of the program for the damage tolerance certification test of a composite horizontal stabilizer (HS) of a fighter is presented. The object of this program is to certify that the fatigue life and damage tolerance strength of a damaged composite horizontal stabilizer meets the design requirements. According to the specification for damage tolerance certification, a test article should be subjected to two design lifetimes of flight-by-flight load spectra simulating the in-service fatigue loading condition for the aircraft. However, considering the effect of environmental change on the composite structure, one additional lifetime test was performed. In addition, to evaluate the possibilities for extending the service life of the structure, one more lifetime test was carried out with the spectrum increased by a factor of 1.4. To assess the feasibility and reliability of repair technology on a composite structure, two damaged areas were repaired after two lifetimes of damage tolerance test. On completion of four lifetimes of the damage tolerance test, the static residual strength was measured to check whether structural strength after repair met the requirements. Stiffness and static strength of the composite HS with and without damage were evaluated and compared.

  3. Multiaxial and thermomechanical fatigue considerations in damage tolerant design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leese, G. E.; Bill, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    In considering damage tolerant design concepts for gas turbine hot section components, several challenging concerns arise: Complex multiaxial loading situations are encountered; Thermomechanical fatigue loading involving very wide temperature ranges is imposed on components; Some hot section materials are extremely anisotropic; and coatings and environmental interactions play an important role in crack propagation. The effects of multiaxiality and thermomechanical fatigue are considered from the standpoint of their impact on damage tolerant design concepts. Recently obtained research results as well as results from the open literature are examined and their implications for damage tolerant design are discussed. Three important needs required to advance analytical capabilities in support of damage tolerant design become readily apparent: (1) a theoretical basis to account for the effect of nonproportional loading (mechanical and mechanical/thermal); (2) the development of practical crack growth parameters that are applicable to thermomechanical fatigue situations; and (3) the development of crack growth models that address multiple crack failures.

  4. DNA repair mechanisms and the bypass of DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-04-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage.

  5. DNA Repair Mechanisms and the Bypass of DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. PMID:23547164

  6. Design of highly damage-tolerant sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiel, Clement; Ishai, Ori

    The effects of different fabrication procedures to increase the damage tolerance of sandwich panels were studied. Baseline panels consisted of a 25.4 mm premolded core, surfaced with 177 C cure film adhesive and carbon-bismaleimide prepreg which were subsequently cocured onto the core. It was found that panels with a prefabricated skin, which was subsequently bonded onto the core with room temperature cure adhesive, showed greatly increased damage tolerance.

  7. Immunochemical detection of glyoxal DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Mistry, N; Evans, M D; Griffiths, H R; Kasai, H; Herbert, K E; Lunec, J

    1999-05-01

    The relevance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases is widely documented. Immunochemical detection of ROS DNA adducts has been developed, however, recognition of glyoxal-DNA adducts has not previously been described. We have generated a polyclonal antibody that has shown increased antibody binding to ROS-modified DNA in comparison to native DNA. In addition, dose-dependent antibody binding to DNA modified with ascorbate alone was shown, with significant inhibition by desferrioxamine, catalase, and ethanol. Minimal inhibition was observed with uric acid, 1,10-phenanthroline and DMSO. However, antibody binding in the presence of EDTA increased 3500-fold. The involvement of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical in ascorbate-mediated DNA damage is consistent with ascorbate acting as a reducing agent for DNA-bound metal ions. Glyoxal is known to be formed during oxidation of ascorbate. Glyoxylated DNA, that previously had been proposed as a marker of oxidative damage, was recognised in a dose dependent manner using the antibody. We describe the potential use of our anti-ROS DNA antibody, that detects predominantly Fenton-type mediated damage to DNA and report on its specificity for the recognition of glyoxal-DNA adducts.

  8. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  9. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  10. Aging: not all DNA damage is equal.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Wilbert P; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Pothof, Joris

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances have identified accumulation of DNA damage as a major driver of aging. However, there are numerous kinds of DNA lesions each with their own characteristics and cellular outcome, which highly depends on cellular context: proliferation (cell cycle), differentiation, propensity for survival/death, cell condition and systemic hormonal and immunological parameters. In addition, DNA damage is strongly influenced by cellular metabolism, anti-oxidant status and exogenous factors, consistent with the multi-factorial nature of aging. Notably, DNA lesions interfering with replication have very different outcomes compared to transcription. These considerations provide a conceptual framework in which different types of DNA damage and their setting contribute to the aging process in differential manners.

  11. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  12. Historical Perspective on the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality. PMID:26507443

  13. Historical perspective on the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Hanawalt, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality.

  14. Damage Tolerant Microstructures for Shock Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerreta, Ellen; Dennis-Koller, Darcie; Escobedo, Juan Pablo; Fensin, Saryu; Valone, Steve; Trujillo, Carl; Bronkhorst, Curt; Lebensohn, Ricardo

    While dynamic failure, due to shock loading, has been studied for many years, our current ability to predict and simulate evolving damage during dynamic loading remains limited. One reason for this is due to the lack of understanding for the linkages between process-induced as well as evolved microstructure and damage. To this end, the role of microstructure on the early stages of dynamic damage has been studied in high purity Ta and Cu. This work, which utilizes plate-impact experiments to interrogate these effects, has recently been extended to a subset to Cu-alloys (Cu-Pb, Cu-Nb, and Cu-Ag). These multi-length scale studies, have identified a number of linkages between damage nucleation and growth and microstructural features such as: grain boundary types, grain boundary orientation with respect to loading direction, grain orientation, and bi-metal interfaces. A combination of modeling and simulation techniques along with experimental observation has been utilized to examine the mechanisms for the ductile damage processes such as nucleation, growth and coalescence. This work has identified differing features of importance for damage nucleation in high purity and alloyed materials, lending insight into features of concern for mitigating shock induced damage in more complicated alloy systems.

  15. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  16. DNA DAMAGE BINDING PROTEIN2 Shapes the DNA Methylation Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Catherine; Kramdi, Amira; Ahmed, Ikhlak; Cognat, Valérie; Graindorge, Stéfanie; Bergdoll, Marc; Baumberger, Nicolas; Heintz, Dimitri; Bowler, Chris; Genschik, Pascal; Barneche, Fredy; Molinier, Jean

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA repair pathways help to maintain genome integrity and epigenomic patterns. However, the factors at the nexus of DNA repair and chromatin modification/remodeling remain poorly characterized. Here, we uncover a previously unrecognized interplay between the DNA repair factor DNA DAMAGE BINDING PROTEIN2 (DDB2) and the DNA methylation machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. Loss-of-function mutation in DDB2 leads to genome-wide DNA methylation alterations. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicate that at many repeat loci, DDB2 influences de novo DNA methylation by interacting with ARGONAUTE4 and by controlling the local abundance of 24-nucleotide short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). We also show that DDB2 regulates active DNA demethylation mediated by REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 and DEMETER LIKE3. Together, these findings reveal a role for the DNA repair factor DDB2 in shaping the Arabidopsis DNA methylation landscape in the absence of applied genotoxic stress. PMID:27531226

  17. Aging processes, DNA damage, and repair.

    PubMed

    Gilchrest, B A; Bohr, V A

    1997-04-01

    The second triennial FASEB Summer Research Conference on "Clonal Senescence and Differentiation" (August 17-22, 1996) focused on the interrelationships between aging processes and DNA damage and repair. The attendees represented a cross section of senior and junior investigators working in fields ranging from classic cellular gerontology to yeast and nematode models of aging to basic mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. The meeting opened with a keynote address by Dr. Bruce Ames that emphasized the documented relationships between oxidative damage, cancer, and aging. This was followed by eight platform sessions, one poster discussion, one featured presentation, and an after-dinner address. The following sections highlight the key points discussed.

  18. Some Examples of the Relations Between Processing and Damage Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2012-01-01

    Most structures made of laminated polymer matrix composites (PMCs) must be designed to some damage tolerance requirement that includes foreign object impact damage. Thus from the beginning of a part s life, impact damage is assumed to exist in the material and the part is designed to carry the required load with the prescribed impact damage present. By doing this, some processing defects may automatically be accounted for in the reduced design allowable due to these impacts. This paper will present examples of how a given level of impact damage and certain processing defects affect the compression strength of a laminate that contains both. Knowledge of the impact damage tolerance requirements, before processing begins, can broaden material options and processing techniques since the structure is not being designed to pristine properties.

  19. Damage tolerance and structural monitoring for wind turbine blades

    PubMed Central

    McGugan, M.; Pereira, G.; Sørensen, B. F.; Toftegaard, H.; Branner, K.

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a methodology for reliable design and maintenance of wind turbine rotor blades using a condition monitoring approach and a damage tolerance index coupling the material and structure. By improving the understanding of material properties that control damage propagation it will be possible to combine damage tolerant structural design, monitoring systems, inspection techniques and modelling to manage the life cycle of the structures. This will allow an efficient operation of the wind turbine in terms of load alleviation, limited maintenance and repair leading to a more effective exploitation of offshore wind. PMID:25583858

  20. Damage tolerance and structural monitoring for wind turbine blades.

    PubMed

    McGugan, M; Pereira, G; Sørensen, B F; Toftegaard, H; Branner, K

    2015-02-28

    The paper proposes a methodology for reliable design and maintenance of wind turbine rotor blades using a condition monitoring approach and a damage tolerance index coupling the material and structure. By improving the understanding of material properties that control damage propagation it will be possible to combine damage tolerant structural design, monitoring systems, inspection techniques and modelling to manage the life cycle of the structures. This will allow an efficient operation of the wind turbine in terms of load alleviation, limited maintenance and repair leading to a more effective exploitation of offshore wind.

  1. Polyphenols and DNA Damage: A Mixed Blessing

    PubMed Central

    Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are a very broad group of chemicals, widely distributed in plant foods, and endowed with antioxidant activity by virtue of their numerous phenol groups. They are widely studied as putative cancer-protective agents, potentially contributing to the cancer preventive properties of fruits and vegetables. We review recent publications relating to human trials, animal experiments and cell culture, grouping them according to whether polyphenols are investigated in whole foods and drinks, in plant extracts, or as individual compounds. A variety of assays are in use to study genetic damage endpoints. Human trials, of which there are rather few, tend to show decreases in endogenous DNA damage and protection against DNA damage induced ex vivo in blood cells. Most animal experiments have investigated the effects of polyphenols (often at high doses) in combination with known DNA-damaging agents, and generally they show protection. High concentrations can themselves induce DNA damage, as demonstrated in numerous cell culture experiments; low concentrations, on the other hand, tend to decrease DNA damage. PMID:27918471

  2. Polyphenols and DNA Damage: A Mixed Blessing.

    PubMed

    Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew

    2016-12-03

    Polyphenols are a very broad group of chemicals, widely distributed in plant foods, and endowed with antioxidant activity by virtue of their numerous phenol groups. They are widely studied as putative cancer-protective agents, potentially contributing to the cancer preventive properties of fruits and vegetables. We review recent publications relating to human trials, animal experiments and cell culture, grouping them according to whether polyphenols are investigated in whole foods and drinks, in plant extracts, or as individual compounds. A variety of assays are in use to study genetic damage endpoints. Human trials, of which there are rather few, tend to show decreases in endogenous DNA damage and protection against DNA damage induced ex vivo in blood cells. Most animal experiments have investigated the effects of polyphenols (often at high doses) in combination with known DNA-damaging agents, and generally they show protection. High concentrations can themselves induce DNA damage, as demonstrated in numerous cell culture experiments; low concentrations, on the other hand, tend to decrease DNA damage.

  3. Targeting the DNA Damage Response in Cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mark J

    2015-11-19

    An underlying hallmark of cancers is their genomic instability, which is associated with a greater propensity to accumulate DNA damage. Historical treatment of cancer by radiotherapy and DNA-damaging chemotherapy is based on this principle, yet it is accompanied by significant collateral damage to normal tissue and unwanted side effects. Targeted therapy based on inhibiting the DNA damage response (DDR) in cancers offers the potential for a greater therapeutic window by tailoring treatment to patients with tumors lacking specific DDR functions. The recent approval of olaparib (Lynparza), the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor for treating tumors harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, represents the first medicine based on this principle, exploiting an underlying cause of tumor formation that also represents an Achilles' heel. This review highlights the different concepts behind targeting DDR in cancer and how this can provide significant opportunities for DDR-based therapies in the future.

  4. Fern spore extracts can damage DNA

    PubMed Central

    Simán, S E; Povey, A C; Ward, T H; Margison, G P; Sheffield, E

    2000-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of the vegetative tissues of bracken fern (Pteridium) has long been established. More recently, the carcinogenic effects of the spores of bracken have also been recognized. Both vegetative tissues and spores of bracken can induce adducts in DNA in animal tissues, but the possible genotoxic or carcinogenic effects of spores from fern species other than bracken are unknown. The single-cell gel electrophoresis (‘comet’) assay was used to investigate whether fern spores can cause DNA damage in vitro. Extracts of spores from six fern species were administered to cultured human premyeloid leukaemia (K562) cells. Spore extracts of five fern species: Anemia phyllitidis, Dicksonia antarctica, Pteridium aquilinum, Pteris vittata and Sadleria pallida, induced significantly more DNA strand breaks than those in the control groups. Only in one species, Osmunda regalis, was the effect no different from that in the control groups. Using extracts from A. phyllitidis and P. vittata, the extent of DNA damage was increased by increasing the original dose 10 times, whereas an experiment in which exposure times were varied suggested that the highest levels of strand breaks appear after 2 h exposure. Simultaneous incubation with human S9 liver enzyme mix ablated the damaging effect of the extracts. Our data show that fern spore extracts can cause DNA damage in human cells in vitro. Considering the strong correlation between DNA damage and carcinogenic events, the observations made in this report may well have some implications for human health. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883670

  5. Damage Tolerance Issues as Related to Metallic Rotorcraft Dynamic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Elber, W.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper issues related to the use of damage tolerance in life managing rotorcraft dynamic components are reviewed. In the past, rotorcraft fatigue design has combined constant amplitude tests of full-scale parts with flight loads and usage data in a conservative manner to provide "safe life" component replacement times. In contrast to the safe life approach over the past twenty years the United States Air Force and several other NATO nations have used damage tolerance design philosophies for fixed wing aircraft to improve safety and reliability. The reliability of the safe life approach being used in rotorcraft started to be questioned shortly after presentations at an American Helicopter Society's specialist meeting in 1980 showed predicted fatigue lives for a hypothetical pitch-link problem to vary from a low of 9 hours to a high in excess of 2594 hours. This presented serious cost, weight, and reliability implications. Somewhat after the U.S. Army introduced its six nines reliability on fatigue life, attention shifted towards using a possible damage tolerance approach to the life management of rotorcraft dynamic components. The use of damage tolerance in life management of dynamic rotorcraft parts will be the subject of this paper. This review will start with past studies on using damage tolerance life management with existing helicopter parts that were safe life designed. Also covered will be a successful attempt at certifying a tail rotor pitch rod using damage tolerance, which was designed using the safe life approach. The FAA review of rotorcraft fatigue design and their recommendations along with some on-going U.S. industry research in damage tolerance on rotorcraft will be reviewed. Finally, possible problems and future needs for research will be highlighted.

  6. Interplay of space radiation and microgravity in DNA damage and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Villanueva, María; Wong, Michael; Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    In space, multiple unique environmental factors, particularly microgravity and space radiation, pose constant threat to the DNA integrity of living organisms. Specifically, space radiation can cause damage to DNA directly, through the interaction of charged particles with the DNA molecules themselves, or indirectly through the production of free radicals. Although organisms have evolved strategies on Earth to confront such damage, space environmental conditions, especially microgravity, can impact DNA repair resulting in accumulation of severe DNA lesions. Ultimately these lesions, namely double strand breaks, chromosome aberrations, micronucleus formation, or mutations, can increase the risk for adverse health effects, such as cancer. How spaceflight factors affect DNA damage and the DNA damage response has been investigated since the early days of the human space program. Over the years, these experiments have been conducted either in space or using ground-based analogs. This review summarizes the evidence for DNA damage induction by space radiation and/or microgravity as well as spaceflight-related impacts on the DNA damage response. The review also discusses the conflicting results from studies aimed at addressing the question of potential synergies between microgravity and radiation with regard to DNA damage and cellular repair processes. We conclude that further experiments need to be performed in the true space environment in order to address this critical question.

  7. DNA Damages as a Depolymerization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Juan G. Diaz; Wulkow, Michael

    The damage of DNA chains by environmental factors like radiation or chemical pollutants is a topic that has been frequently explored from an experimental and a theoretical perspective. Such damages, like the damage of the strands of a DNA chain, are toxic for the cell and can induce mutagenesis or apoptosis. Several models make strong assumptions for the distribution of damages; for instance a frequent supposition is that these damages are Poisson distributed. [L. Ma, J. J. Wagner, W. Hu, A. J. Levine and G. A. Stolovitzki, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.PNAS 102, 14266 (2005).] Only few models describe in detail the damage and the mechanisms associated to the formation and evolution of this damage distribution [H. Nikjoo, P. O'neill and D. T. Goodhead, Radiat. Res. 156, 577 (2001).] Nevertheless, such models do not include the repair processes which are continuously active inside the cell. In this work we present a novel model, based on a depolymerization process, describing the distribution of damages on DNA chains coupled to the dynamics associated to its repair processes. The central aim is not to give a final and comprehensive model, but a hint to represent in more detail the complex dynamics involved in the damage and repair of DNA. We show that there are critical parameters associated to this repair process, in particular we show how critical doses can be relevant in deciding whether the cell continues its repair process or starts apoptosis. We also find out that the damage concentration is related to the dose via a power law relation.

  8. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  9. On the enhancement of impact damage tolerance of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a thin layer of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) on the outer surface of carbon/epoxy composite materials as a method of improving impact resistance and damage tolerance through hybridization. Flat 16-ply laminates as well as honeycomb sandwich structures with eight-ply facesheets were tested in this study. Instrumented drop-weight impact testing was used to inflict damage upon the specimens. Evaluation of damage resistance included instrumented impact data, visual examination, C-scanning and compression after impact (CAI) testing. The results show that only one lamina of UHMWPE did not improve the damage tolerance (strength retention) of the 16-ply flat laminate specimens or the honeycomb sandwich beams, however, a modest gain in impact resistance (detectable damage) was found for the honeycomb sandwich specimens that contained an outer layer of UHMWPE.

  10. Delamination, durability, and damage tolerance of laminated composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1993-01-01

    Durability and damage tolerance may have different connotations to people from different industries and with different backgrounds. Damage tolerance always refers to a safety of flight issue where the structure must be able to sustain design limit loads in the presence of damage and return to base safely. Durability, on the other hand, is an economic issue where the structure must be able to survive a certain life under load before the initiation of observable damage. Delamination is typically the observable damage mechanism that is of concern for durability, and the growth and accumulation of delaminations through the laminate thickness is often the sequence of events that leads to failure and the loss of structural integrity.

  11. On the enhancement of impact damage tolerance of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a thin layer of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) on the outer surface of carbon/epoxy composite materials as a method of improving impact resistance and damage tolerance through hybridization. Flat 16-ply laminates as well as honeycomb sandwich structures with eight-ply facesheets were tested in this study. Instrumented drop-weight impact testing was used to inflict damage upon the specimens. Evaluation of damage resistance included instrumented impact data, visual examination, C-scanning and compression after impact (CAI) testing. The results show that only one lamina of UHMWPE did not improve the damage tolerance (strength retention) of the 16-ply flat laminate specimens or the honeycomb sandwich beams, however, a modest gain in impact resistance (detectable damage) was found for the honeycomb sandwich specimens that contained an outer layer of UHMWPE.

  12. DNA damage, oxidative mutagen sensitivity, and repair of oxidative DNA damage in nonmelanoma skin cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bendesky, Andrés; Michel, Alejandra; Sordo, Monserrat; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Salazar, Ana M; Podoswa, Nancy; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2006-08-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most frequent type of cancer in humans. Exposure to UV radiation is a major risk factor for NMSC, and oxidative DNA damage, caused either by UV radiation itself or by other agents, may be involved in its induction. Increased sensitivity to oxidative damage and an altered DNA repair capacity (DRC) increase the risk of many types of cancer; however, sensitivity to oxidizing agents has not been evaluated for NMSC, and results regarding DRC in NMSC are inconclusive. In the present study, we evaluated DNA damage and repair in leukocytes from 41 NMSC patients and 45 controls. The Comet assay was used to measure basal and H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage, as well as the DRC, while the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to measure the basal level of chromosome damage. Although basal DNA damage was higher for the controls than for the patients, this finding was mainly due to sampling more controls in the summer, which was associated with longer comet tails. In contrast, H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage was significantly higher in cases than in controls, and this parameter was not influenced by the season of the year. The DRC for the H(2)O(2)-induced damage was similar for cases and controls and unrelated to seasonality. Finally, the frequency of binucleated lymphocytes with micronuclei was similar for cases and controls. The results of this study indicate that NMSC patients are distinguished from controls by an increased sensitivity to oxidative DNA damage.

  13. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy. PMID:26427872

  14. Ontogenetic contingency of tolerance mechanisms in response to apical damage

    PubMed Central

    Gruntman, Michal; Novoplansky, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants are able to tolerate tissue loss through vigorous branching which is often triggered by release from apical dominance and activation of lateral meristems. However, damage-induced branching might not be a mere physiological outcome of released apical dominance, but an adaptive response to environmental signals, such as damage timing and intensity. Here, branching responses to both factors were examined in the annual plant Medicago truncatula. Methods Branching patterns and allocation to reproductive traits were examined in response to variable clipping intensities and timings in M. truncatula plants from two populations that vary in the onset of reproduction. Phenotypic selection analysis was used to evaluate the strength and direction of selection on branching under the damage treatments. Key Results Plants of both populations exhibited an ontogenetic shift in tolerance mechanisms: while early damage induced greater meristem activation, late damage elicited investment in late-determined traits, including mean pod and seed biomass, and supported greater germination rates. Severe damage mostly elicited simultaneous development of multiple-order lateral branches, but this response was limited to early damage. Selection analyses revealed positive directional selection on branching in plants under early- compared with late- or no-damage treatments. Conclusions The results demonstrate that damage-induced meristem activation is an adaptive response that could be modified according to the plant's developmental stage, severity of tissue loss and their interaction, stressing the importance of considering these effects when studying plastic responses to apical damage. PMID:21873259

  15. Molecular Models for DNA Damaged by Photoreaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, David A.; Holbrook, Stephen R.; Pirkle, David H.; Kim, Sung-Hou

    1985-03-01

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells.

  16. Molecular models for DNA damaged by photoreaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, D.A.; Holbrook, S.R.; Pirkle, D.H.; Kim, S.H.

    1985-03-15

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells.

  17. Epigenome Maintenance in Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Dabin, Juliette; Fortuny, Anna; Polo, Sophie E

    2016-06-02

    Organism viability relies on the stable maintenance of specific chromatin landscapes, established during development, that shape cell functions and identities by driving distinct gene expression programs. Yet epigenome maintenance is challenged during transcription, replication, and repair of DNA damage, all of which elicit dynamic changes in chromatin organization. Here, we review recent advances that have shed light on the specialized mechanisms contributing to the restoration of epigenome structure and function after DNA damage in the mammalian cell nucleus. By drawing a parallel with epigenome maintenance during replication, we explore emerging concepts and highlight open issues in this rapidly growing field. In particular, we present our current knowledge of molecular players that support the coordinated maintenance of genome and epigenome integrity in response to DNA damage, and we highlight how nuclear organization impacts genome stability. Finally, we discuss possible functional implications of epigenome plasticity in response to genotoxic stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Epigenome maintenance in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Dabin, Juliette; Fortuny, Anna; Polo, Sophie E.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Organism viability relies on the stable maintenance of specific chromatin landscapes, established during development, that shape cell functions and identities by driving distinct gene expression programs. Yet, epigenome maintenance is challenged during transcription, replication and repair of DNA damage, all of which elicit dynamic changes in chromatin organization. Here, we review recent advances that have shed light on the specialized mechanisms contributing to the restoration of epigenome structure and function after DNA damage in the mammalian cell nucleus. By drawing a parallel with epigenome maintenance during replication, we explore emerging concepts and highlight open issues in this rapidly growing field. In particular, we present our current knowledge of molecular players that support the coordinated maintenance of genome and epigenome integrity in response to DNA damage, and we highlight how nuclear organization impacts genome stability. Finally, we discuss possible functional implications of epigenome plasticity in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27259203

  19. Damage Tolerance Characterisitics of Composite Sandwich Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    and very simplified modelling Unit of the EH-101 helicopter is made of a composite skeleton of the damage introduced by impact; second, the evaluation...the delamination boundary. The Multi Point Constraint If the delamination growth data from the teflon strip element of NASTRAN is used for modelling ...component level. These kinds of tests are composite sandwich structures used by the helicopter industry, carried out not only to verify load paths and

  20. Mechanical Data for Use in Damage Tolerance Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Newman, John A.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of a research program to determine the damage tolerance properties of metallic propeller materials. Three alloys were selected for investigation: 2025-T6 Aluminum, D6AC Steel and 4340 Steel. Mechanical response, fatigue (S-N) and fatigue crack growth rate data are presented for all of the alloys. The main conclusions that can be drawn from this study are as follows. The damage tolerant design of a propeller system will require a complete understanding of the fatigue crack growth threshold. There exists no experimental procedure to reliably develop the fatigue crack growth threshold data that is needed for damage tolerant design methods. Significant research will be required to fully understand the fatigue crack growth threshold. The development of alternative precracking methods, evaluating the effect of specimen configuration and attempting to identify micromechanical issues are simply the first steps to understanding the mechanics of the threshold.

  1. Expression of the PsMTA1 gene in white poplar engineered with the MAT system is associated with heavy metal tolerance and protection against 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine mediated-DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Balestrazzi, Alma; Botti, Silvia; Zelasco, Samantha; Biondi, Stefania; Franchin, Cinzia; Calligari, Paolo; Racchi, Milvia; Turchi, Adelaide; Lingua, Guido; Berta, Graziella; Carbonera, Daniela

    2009-08-01

    Marker-free transgenic white poplar (Populus alba L., cv 'Villafranca') plants, expressing the PsMT (A1) gene from Pisum sativum for a metallothionein-like protein, were produced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. The 35SCaMV-PsMT (A1)-NosT cassette was inserted into the ipt-type vector pMAT22. The occurrence of the abnormal ipt-shooty phenotype allowed the visual selection of transformants, while the yeast site-specific recombination R/RS system was responsible for the excision of the undesired vector sequences with the consequent recovery of normal marker-free transgenic plants. Molecular analyses confirmed the presence of the 35SCaMV-PsMT (A1)-NosT cassette and transgene expression. Five selected lines were further characterized, revealing the ability to withstand heavy metal toxicity. They survived 0.1 mM CuCl(2), a concentration which strongly affected the nontransgenic plants. Moreover, root development was only slightly affected by the ectopic expression of the transgene. Reactive oxygen species were accumulated to a lower extent in leaf tissues of multi-auto-transformation (MAT)-PsMT(A1) plants exposed to copper and zinc, compared to control plants. Tolerance to photo-oxidative stress induced by paraquat was another distinctive feature of the MAT-PsMT(A1) lines. Finally, low levels of DNA damage were detected by quantifying the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in leaf tissues of the transgenic plants exposed to copper.

  2. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J; O’Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways. PMID:27308403

  3. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Kevin J; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways.

  4. The RNA Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Giono, Luciana E; Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Dujardin, Gwendal; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-06-19

    Multicellular organisms must ensure genome integrity to prevent accumulation of mutations, cell death, and cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex network that senses, signals, and executes multiple programs including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. This entails regulation of a variety of cellular processes: DNA replication and transcription, RNA processing, mRNA translation and turnover, and post-translational modification, degradation, and relocalization of proteins. Accumulated evidence over the past decades has shown that RNAs and RNA metabolism are both regulators and regulated actors of the DDR. This review aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the many interactions between the DNA damage and RNA fields.

  5. DNA damage under simulated extraterrestrial conditions in bacteriophage T7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, A.; Kovács, G.; Hegedüs, M.; Módos, K.; Rontó, Gy.; Lammer, H.; Panitz, C.

    The experiment ``Phage and uracil response'' (PUR) will be accommodated in the EXPOSE facility of the ISS aiming to examine and quantify the effect of specific space conditions on bacteriophage T7 and isolated T7 DNA thin films. To achieve this new method was elaborated for the preparation of DNA and nucleoprotein thin films (1). During the EXPOSE Experiment Verification Tests (EVT) the samples were exposed to vacuum (10 -6 Pa), to monochromatic (254 nm) and polychromatic (200-400 nm) UV radiation in air as well in simulated space vacuum. Using neutral density (ND) filters dose-effect curves were performed in order to define the maximum doses tolerated, and we also studied the effect of temperature in vacuum as well as the influence of temperature fluctuations. We obtained substantial evidence that DNA lesions (e.g. strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, DNA-DNA cross-links) accumulate throughout exposure. DNA damage was determined by quantitative PCR using 555 bp and 3826 bp fragments of T7 DNA (2) and by neutral and alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis; the structural/chemical effects were analyzed by spectroscopic and microscopical methods. Characteristic changes in the absorption spectrum, in the electrophoretic pattern of DNA and the decrease of the amount of the PCR products have been detected indicating the damage of isolated and intraphage DNA. Preliminary results suggest a synergistic action of space vacuum and UV radiation with DNA being the critical target. Fekete et al. J. Luminescence 102-103, 469-475, 2003 Hegedüs et al. Photochem. Photobiol. 78, 213-219, 2003

  6. An Experimental Investigation of Damage Resistances and Damage Tolerance of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.

    2003-01-01

    The project included three lines of investigation, aimed at a better understanding of the damage resistance and damage tolerance of pultruded composites. The three lines of investigation were: (i) measurement of permanent dent depth after transverse indentation at different load levels, and correlation with other damage parameters such as damage area (from x-radiography) and back surface crack length, (ii) estimation of point stress and average stress characteristic dimensions corresponding to measured damage parameters, and (iii) an attempt to measure the damage area by a reflection photoelastic technique. All the three lines of investigation were pursued.

  7. Damage tolerant composite wing panels for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter J.; Wilson, Robert D.; Gibbins, M. N.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial aircraft advanced composite wing surface panels were tested for durability and damage tolerance. The wing of a fuel-efficient, 200-passenger airplane for 1990 delivery was sized using grahite-epoxy materials. The damage tolerance program was structured to allow a systematic progression from material evaluations to the optimized large panel verification tests. The program included coupon testing to evaluate toughened material systems, static and fatigue tests of compression coupons with varying amounts of impact damage, element tests of three-stiffener panels to evaluate upper wing panel design concepts, and the wing structure damage environment was studied. A series of technology demonstration tests of large compression panels is performed. A repair investigation is included in the final large panel test.

  8. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  9. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  10. Alternative DNA Damage Checkpoint Pathways in Eukaryotes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    checkpoint pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our hypothesis is that CHES1 does so by activating an alternative DNA damage-induced checkpoint pathway. The...difficulties, therefore we also tried the candidate gene and the yeast 2-hybrid approaches but with no success. In this report, we proposed alternative

  11. Profiling DNA damage response following mitotic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    S. Pedersen, Ronni; Karemore, Gopal; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Rask, Maj-Britt; Neumann, Beate; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Pepperkok, Rainer; Ellenberg, Jan; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Lukas, Jiri; Lukas, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Genome integrity relies on precise coordination between DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Whereas replication stress attracted much attention, the consequences of mitotic perturbations for genome integrity are less understood. Here, we knockdown 47 validated mitotic regulators to show that a broad spectrum of mitotic errors correlates with increased DNA breakage in daughter cells. Unexpectedly, we find that only a subset of these correlations are functionally linked. We identify the genuine mitosis-born DNA damage events and sub-classify them according to penetrance of the observed phenotypes. To demonstrate the potential of this resource, we show that DNA breakage after cytokinesis failure is preceded by replication stress, which mounts during consecutive cell cycles and coincides with decreased proliferation. Together, our results provide a resource to gauge the magnitude and dynamics of DNA breakage associated with mitotic aberrations and suggest that replication stress might limit propagation of cells with abnormal karyotypes. PMID:27976684

  12. Immunochemical detection of oxidatively damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Pavel; Sram, Radim J

    2012-04-01

    Oxidatively damaged DNA is implicated in various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases as well as aging. Several methods have been developed to detect oxidatively damaged DNA. They include chromatographic techniques, the Comet assay, (32)P-postlabelling and immunochemical methods that use antibodies to detect oxidized lesions. In this review, we discuss the detection of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-29-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), the most abundant oxidized nucleoside. This lesion is frequently used as a marker of exposure to oxidants, including environmental pollutants, as well as a potential marker of disease progression. We concentrate on studies published between the years 2000 and 2011 that used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry to detect 8-oxodG in humans, laboratory animals and in cell lines. Oxidative damage observed in these organisms resulted from disease, exposure to environmental pollutants or from in vitro treatment with various chemical and physical factors.

  13. Life assessment and damage tolerance of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanhill, R. J. H.

    1983-11-01

    Safe and durable operation of fatigue critical structures in high technology windmills, including safe life assessment and possible application of damage tolerance principles was surveyed. A research program to assist safe and durable operation of windmill rotors in the Netherlands is reviewed.

  14. Damage Tolerant Repair Techniques for Pressurized Aircraft Fuselages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    34Don’t fight forces, use them.’ R. Buckminster Fuller , Shelter (1932) The finite element analysis method was chosen to complement traditional direct...the model. 32 Damage Tolerant Repair Techniques for Pressurized Aircraft Fuselages 2.4.5 Finite Element Analysis Results The results give a fuller

  15. Damage Tolerance Applied to Design of Mid-Size Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Carlos Eduardo

    Most of the mid-size aircraft are certified according to FAA Part 25 requirements, and in order to comply with these requirements the majority of the aircraft structure must be damage tolerant. To assure damage tolerance, despite the overall structural behavior, one should look at the details. There is a great amount of analysis tasks and tests that must be carried out in order to guarantee the aircraft structural integrity. This paper presents an overview of Embraer experience with design and analysis for damage tolerance during the last 30 years. Aspects like DT analysis for metallic and composite structures, selection of appropriate materials, loads, definition of limits of validity and definition of inspection intervals will be addressed along this work. Selected structural tests that have been performed for validation of modeling predictions will be presented. Some aspects to be discussed are related to the design differences between commercial jets, which are usually subjected to high usage conditions, business jets and military aircraft. Further, the application of future technologies, such as structural health monitoring, and also of new materials and manufacturing processes that have been evaluated in order to improve the damage tolerance capability of the aircraft structures will be discussed.

  16. DNA Protection Protein, a Novel Mechanism of Radiation Tolerance: Lessons from Tardigrades

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takuma; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA stores all genetic information and is indispensable for maintenance of normal cellular activity and propagation. Radiation causes severe DNA lesions, including double-strand breaks, and leads to genome instability and even lethality. Regardless of the toxicity of radiation, some organisms exhibit extraordinary tolerance against radiation. These organisms are supposed to possess special mechanisms to mitigate radiation-induced DNA damages. Extensive study using radiotolerant bacteria suggested that effective protection of proteins and enhanced DNA repair system play important roles in tolerability against high-dose radiation. Recent studies using an extremotolerant animal, the tardigrade, provides new evidence that a tardigrade-unique DNA-associating protein, termed Dsup, suppresses the occurrence of DNA breaks by radiation in human-cultured cells. In this review, we provide a brief summary of the current knowledge on extremely radiotolerant animals, and present novel insights from the tardigrade research, which expand our understanding on molecular mechanism of exceptional radio-tolerability. PMID:28617314

  17. Heat tolerance of higher plants cenosis to damaging air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Sofya; Shklavtsova, Ekaterina

    Designing sustained biological-technical life support systems (BTLSS) including higher plants as a part of a photosynthesizing unit, it is important to foresee the multi species cenosis reaction on either stress-factors. Air temperature changing in BTLSS (because of failure of a thermoregulation system) up to the values leading to irreversible damages of photosynthetic processes is one of those factors. However, it is possible to increase, within the certain limits, the plant cenosis tolerance to the unfavorable temperatures’ effect due to the choice of the higher plants possessing resistance both to elevated and to lowered air temperatures. Besides, the plants heat tolerance can be increased when subjecting them during their growing to the hardening off temperatures’ effect. Thus, we have come to the conclusion that it is possible to increase heat tolerance of multi species cenosis under the damaging effect of air temperature of 45 (°) СC.

  18. Oxidative and alkylating damage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Glaucia R; Loureiro, Ana Paula M; Marques, Sabrina A; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Yamaguchi, Lydia F; Onuki, Janice; Almeida, Eduardo A; Garcia, Camila C M; Barbosa, Lívea F; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2003-11-01

    Modification of cellular DNA upon exposure to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is the likely initial event involved in the induction of the mutagenic and lethal effects of various oxidative stress agents. Evidence has been accumulated for the significant implication of singlet oxygen (1O(2)), generated as the result of UVA activation of endogenous photosensitizers as porphyrins and flavins. 7,8-Dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) has been shown to be the exclusive product of the reaction of 1O(2) with the guanine moiety of cellular DNA, in contrast to the hydroxyl radical, which reacts almost indifferently with all the nucleobases and the sugar moiety of DNA. Furthermore 8-oxodGuo is also produced by other oxidants and can be used as an ubiquitous biomarker of DNA oxidation but can not be a specific marker of any particular species. The role of DNA etheno adducts in mutagenic and carcinogenic processes triggered by known occupational and environmental carcinogens has also been studied. Much interest in etheno adducts resulted from the detection of increased levels of 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine and 3,N(4)-etheno-2'-deoxycytidine in DNA from human, rat and mouse tissues under pathophysiological conditions associated with oxidative stress. A method involving on-line HPLC with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry detection has been developed for the analysis of 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N(2)-epsilondGuo) in DNA. This methodology permits direct quantification of 20 fmol (7.4 adducts/10(8) dGuo) of the etheno adduct from approximately 350 microg of crude DNA hydrolysates. This method provides the first evidence of the occurrence of 1,N(2)-epsilondGuo as a basal endogenous lesion and may be utilized to better assess the biological consequences of etheno DNA damage under normal and pathological conditions. This work addresses the importance of isotope labeling associated with mass spectrometry technique for biomolecule damage studies.

  19. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy.

  20. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs.

    PubMed

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-02-27

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs.

  1. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiyong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Teng, Lisong; Legerski, Randy J.

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  2. Telomeres, histone code, and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Misri, S; Pandita, S; Kumar, R; Pandita, T K

    2008-01-01

    Genomic stability is maintained by telomeres, the end terminal structures that protect chromosomes from fusion or degradation. Shortening or loss of telomeric repeats or altered telomere chromatin structure is correlated with telomere dysfunction such as chromosome end-to-end associations that could lead to genomic instability and gene amplification. The structure at the end of telomeres is such that its DNA differs from DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to avoid nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is accomplished by forming a unique higher order nucleoprotein structure. Telomeres are attached to the nuclear matrix and have a unique chromatin structure. Whether this special structure is maintained by specific chromatin changes is yet to be thoroughly investigated. Chromatin modifications implicated in transcriptional regulation are thought to be the result of a code on the histone proteins (histone code). This code, involving phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and sumoylation of histones, is believed to regulate chromatin accessibility either by disrupting chromatin contacts or by recruiting non-histone proteins to chromatin. The histone code in which distinct histone tail-protein interactions promote engagement may be the deciding factor for choosing specific DSB repair pathways. Recent evidence suggests that such mechanisms are involved in DNA damage detection and repair. Altered telomere chromatin structure has been linked to defective DNA damage response (DDR), and eukaryotic cells have evolved DDR mechanisms utilizing proficient DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints in order to maintain genomic stability. Recent studies suggest that chromatin modifying factors play a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability. This review will summarize the role of DNA damage repair proteins specifically ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and its effectors and the telomere complex in maintaining genome stability.

  3. Telomeres, histone code, and DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Misri, S.; Pandita, S.; Kumar, R.; Pandita, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    Genomic stability is maintained by telomeres, the end terminal structures that protect chromosomes from fusion or degradation. Shortening or loss of telomeric repeats or altered telomere chromatin structure is correlated with telomere dysfunction such as chromosome end-to-end associations that could lead to genomic instability and gene amplification. The structure at the end of telomeres is such that its DNA differs from DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to avoid nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is accomplished by forming a unique higher order nucleoprotein structure. Telomeres are attached to the nuclear matrix and have a unique chromatin structure. Whether this special structure is maintained by specific chromatin changes is yet to be thoroughly investigated. Chromatin modifications implicated in transcriptional regulation are thought to be the result of a code on the histone proteins (histone code). This code, involving phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and sumoylation of histones, is believed to regulate chromatin accessibility either by disrupting chromatin contacts or by recruiting non-histone proteins to chromatin. The histone code in which distinct histone tail-protein interactions promote engagement may be the deciding factor for choosing specific DSB repair pathways. Recent evidence suggests that such mechanisms are involved in DNA damage detection and repair. Altered telomere chromatin structure has been linked to defective DNA damage response (DDR), and eukaryotic cells have evolved DDR mechanisms utilizing proficient DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints in order to maintain genomic stability. Recent studies suggest that chromatin modifying factors play a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability. This review will summarize the role of DNA damage repair proteins specifically ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and its effectors and the telomere complex in maintaining genome stability. PMID:19188699

  4. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H.; Hsieh, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26704428

  5. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H; Hsieh, Peggy

    2016-02-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Immunofluorescence Imaging of DNA Damage Response Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian T.; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Knight, Kendall L.

    2013-01-01

    Immunofluorescence imaging has provided captivating visual evidence for numerous cellular events, from vesicular trafficking, organelle maturation and cell division to nuclear processes including the appearance of various proteins and chromatin components in distinct foci in response to DNA damaging agents. With the advent of new super-resolution microscope technologies such as 4Pi microscopy, standard immunofluorescence protocols deserve some reevaluation in order to take full advantage of these new technological accomplishments. Here we describe several methodological considerations that will help overcome some of the limitations that may result from the use of currently applied procedures, with particular attention paid to the analysis of possible colocalization of fluorescent signals. We conclude with an example of how application of optimized methods led to a breakthrough in super-resolution imaging of nuclear events occurring in response to DNA damage. PMID:19245833

  7. Optimization of Aerospace Structure Subject to Damage Tolerance Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to seek computationally efficient ways to optimize aerospace structures subject to damage tolerance criteria. Optimization was to involve sizing as well as topology optimization. The work was done in collaboration with Steve Scotti, Chauncey Wu and Joanne Walsh at the NASA Langley Research Center. Computation of constraint sensitivity is normally the most time-consuming step of an optimization procedure. The cooperative work first focused on this issue and implemented the adjoint method of sensitivity computation in an optimization code (runstream) written in Engineering Analysis Language (EAL). The method was implemented both for bar and plate elements including buckling sensitivity for the latter. Lumping of constraints was investigated as a means to reduce the computational cost. Adjoint sensitivity computation was developed and implemented for lumped stress and buckling constraints. Cost of the direct method and the adjoint method was compared for various structures with and without lumping. The results were reported in two papers. It is desirable to optimize topology of an aerospace structure subject to a large number of damage scenarios so that a damage tolerant structure is obtained. Including damage scenarios in the design procedure is critical in order to avoid large mass penalties at later stages. A common method for topology optimization is that of compliance minimization which has not been used for damage tolerant design. In the present work, topology optimization is treated as a conventional problem aiming to minimize the weight subject to stress constraints. Multiple damage configurations (scenarios) are considered. Each configuration has its own structural stiffness matrix and, normally, requires factoring of the matrix and solution of the system of equations. Damage that is expected to be tolerated is local and represents a small change in the stiffness matrix compared to the baseline (undamaged

  8. Dynamical signature of abasic damage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Furse, Kristina E; Corcelli, Steven A

    2011-02-02

    Time-dependent Stokes shift (TDSS) responses in proteins and DNA exhibit a broad range of long time scales (>10 ps) that are not present in bulk aqueous solution. The physical interpretation of the long TDSS time scales in biomolecular systems is a matter of considerable debate because of the many different components present in the sample (water, biomolecule, counterions), which have highly correlated motions and intrinsically different abilities to adapt to local perturbations. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to show that the surprisingly slow (∼10 ns) TDSS response of coumarin 102 (C102), a base pair replacement, reflects a distinct dynamical signature for DNA damage. When the C102 molecule is covalently incorporated into DNA, an abasic site is created on the strand opposite the C102 probe. The abasic sugar exhibits a reversible interchange between intra- and extrahelical conformations that are kinetically stable on a nanosecond time scale. This conformational change, only possible in damaged DNA, was found to be responsible for the long time scales in the measured TDSS response. For the first time, a TDSS measurement has been attributed to a specific biomolecular motion. This finding directly contradicts the prevailing notion that the TDSS response in biomolecular contexts is dominated by hydration dynamics. It also suggests that TDSS experiments can be used to study ultrafast biomolecular dynamics that are inaccessible to other techniques.

  9. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials. PMID:25906997

  10. Damage Tolerance and Reliability of Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a formal method to quantify structural damage tolerance and reliability in the presence of a multitude of uncertainties in turbine engine components. The method is based at the material behavior level where primitive variables with their respective scatter ranges are used to describe behavior. Computational simulation is then used to propagate the uncertainties to the structural scale where damage tolerance and reliability are usually specified. Several sample cases are described to illustrate the effectiveness, versatility, and maturity of the method. Typical results from this method demonstrate that it is mature and that it can be used to probabilistically evaluate turbine engine structural components. It may be inferred from the results that the method is suitable for probabilistically predicting the remaining life in aging or deteriorating structures, for making strategic projections and plans, and for achieving better, cheaper, faster products that give competitive advantages in world markets.

  11. The research and development of damage tolerant carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, John Armando

    This record of study takes a first hand look at corporate research and development efforts to improve the damage tolerance of two unique composite materials used in high performance aerospace applications. The professional internship with The Dow Chemical Company---Dow/United Technologies joint venture describes the intern's involvement in developing patentable process technologies for interleave toughening of high temperature resins and their composites. The subsequent internship with Hexcel Corporation describes the intern's involvement in developing the damage tolerance of novel and existing honeycomb sandwich structure technologies. Through the Doctor of Engineering professional internship experience this student exercised fundamental academic understanding and methods toward accomplishing the corporate objectives of the internship sponsors in a resource efficient and cost-effective manner. Also, the student gained tremendous autonomy through exceptional training in working in focused team environments with highly trained engineers and scientists in achieving important corporate objectives.

  12. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  13. Damage Tolerance and Reliability of Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1999-01-01

    A formal method is described to quantify structural damage tolerance and reliability in the presence of multitude of uncertainties in turbine engine components. The method is based at the materials behaviour level where primitive variables with their respective scatters are used to describe the behavior. Computational simulation is then used to propagate those uncertainties to the structural scale where damage tolerance and reliability are usually specified. Several sample cases are described to illustrate the effectiveness, versatility, and maturity of the method. Typical results from these methods demonstrate that the methods are mature and that they can be used for future strategic projections and planning to assure better, cheaper, faster, products for competitive advantages in world markets. These results also indicate that the methods are suitable for predicting remaining life in aging or deteriorating structures.

  14. Damage Tolerance and Reliability of Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1998-01-01

    A formal method is described to quantify structural damage tolerance and reliability in the presence of multitude of uncertainties in turbine engine components. The method is based at the materials behavior level where primitive variables with their respective scatters are used to describe that behavior. Computational simulation is then used to propagate those uncertainties to the structural scale where damage tolerance and reliability are usually specified. Several sample cases are described to illustrate the effectiveness, versatility, and maturity of the method. Typical results from these methods demonstrate that the methods are mature and that they can be used for future strategic projections and planning to assure better, cheaper, faster products for competitive advantages in world markets. These results also indicate that the methods are suitable for predicting remaining life in aging or deteriorating structures.

  15. Improved damage tolerance of titanium by adhesive lamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    Basic damage tolerance properties of Ti-6A1-4V titanium plate can be improved by laminating thin sheets of titanium with adhesives. Compact tension and center cracked tension specimens made from thick plate, thin sheet, and laminated plate (six plies of thin sheet) were tested. The fracture toughness of the laminated plate was 39 percent higher than the monolithic plate. The laminated plate's through the thickness crack growth rate was about 20 percent less than that of the monolithic plate. The damage tolerance life of the surface cracked laminate was 6 to over 15 times the life of a monolithic specimen. A simple method of predicting crack growth in a crack ply of a laminate is presented.

  16. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; ...

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from highmore » density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.« less

  17. Profiling oxidative DNA damage: effects of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Box, Harold C; Patrzyc, Helen B; Budzinski, Edwin E; Dawidzik, Jean B; Freund, Harold G; Zeitouni, Nathalie C; Mahoney, Martin C

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this research was to determine whether antioxidant usage could be correlated with changes in DNA damage levels. Liquid Chromatography-tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to simultaneously measure five different oxidatively-induced base modifications in the DNA of WBC. Measurements of the five modifications were made before and after an 8-week trial during which participants took the SU.VI.MAX supplement. Levels of the five DNA modifications were compared among different groupings: users versus non-users of antioxidant supplements, before versus after the supplement intervention and men versus women. The statistical significance of differences between groups was most significant for pyrimidine base modifications and the observed trends reflect trends reported in epidemiological studies of antioxidant usage. A combination of modifications derived from pyrimidine bases is suggested as a superior indicator of oxidative stress.

  18. DNA Damage, Homology-Directed Repair, and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, Tiziana; Morano, Annalisa; Lee, Bongyong; Pardo, Alba Di; Messina, Samantha; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Santillo, Maria R; Muller, Mark T; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2007-01-01

    To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes (DR-GFP). A total of 2%–4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR) and gene conversion. However, ~50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments. PMID:17616978

  19. Fiber composite structural durability and damage tolerance: Simplified predictive methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Ginty, Carol A.

    1987-01-01

    Simplified predictive methods and models (theory) to evaluate fiber/polymer-matrix composite material for determining structural durability and damage tolerance are presented and described. This theory includes equations for (1) fatigue and fracture of composites without and with defects, (2) impact resistance and residual strength after impact, (3) thermal fatigue, and (4) combined stress fatigue. Several examples are included to illustrate applications of the theory and to identify significant parameters and sensitivities. Comparisons with limited experimental data are made.

  20. The civil Damage Tolerance Requirements in theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broek, David

    This paper presents a brief review of the Damage Tolerance Requirements (DTR) for civil aircraft, and of their impact and significance for both newly developed and aging aircraft. Some improvements to the DTR are suggested. In principle, fracture control of aircraft is ensured by non-destructive inspection, although destructive inspection has been suggested for certain aging aircraft, as will be discussed briefly as well.

  1. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  2. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  3. Elastic properties, strength and damage tolerance of pultruded composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Mrinal Chandra

    Pultruded composites are candidate materials for civil engineering infrastructural applications due their higher corrosion resistance and lower life cycle cost. Efficient use of materials like structural members requires thorough understanding of the mechanism that affects their response. The present investigation addresses the modeling and characterization of E-glass fiber/polyester resin matrix pultruded composites in the form of sheets of various thicknesses. The elastic constants were measured using static, vibration and ultrasonic methods. Two types of piezoelectric crystals were used in ultrasonic measurements. Finally, the feasibility of using a single specimen, in the form of a circular disk, was shown in measuring all the elastic constants using ultrasonic technique. The effects of stress gradient on tensile strength were investigated. A large number of specimens, parallel and transverse to the pultrusion direction, were tested in tension, 3-point flexure, and 4-point flexure. A 2-parameter Weibull model was applied to predict the tensile strength from the flexure tests. The measured and Weibull-predicted ratios did not show consistent agreement. Microstructural observations suggested that the flaw distribution in the material was not uniform, which appears to be a basic requirement for the Weibull distribution. Compressive properties were measured using a short-block compression test specimen of 44.4-mm long and 25.4-mm wide. Specimens were tested at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° orientations. The compression test specimen was modeled using 4-noded isoparametric layered plate and shell elements. The predicted elastic properties for the roving layer and the continuous strand mat layer was used for the finite element study. The damage resistance and damage tolerance were investigated experimentally. Using a quasi-static indentation loading, damage was induced at various incrementally increased force levels to investigate the damage growth process. Damage

  4. DNA damage and innate immunity: links and trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Chatzinikolaou, Georgia; Karakasilioti, Ismene; Garinis, George A

    2014-09-01

    To counteract DNA damage, cells employ genome maintenance pathways that are directed inward, relentlessly to scan and repair the genome. Adaptive and innate immune mechanisms are often directed outward, protecting self against pathogens. Recent work has revealed direct links between innate immune signaling and the DNA damage response (DDR). Here we review current understanding of the mechanism by which cells sense damaged and foreign DNA. We examine the functional role of DNA damage signaling in immune activation and discuss the relevance of these processes to DNA damage-driven chronic inflammation in disease and in aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantifying grain boundary damage tolerance with atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Daniel; Tucker, Garritt J.

    2016-10-01

    Grain boundaries play a pivotal role in defect evolution and accommodation within materials. Irradiated metals have been observed to form defect denuded zones in the vicinity of grain boundaries. This is especially apparent in nanocrystalline metals, which have an increased grain boundary concentration, as compared to their polycrystalline counterparts. Importantly, the effect of individual grain boundaries on microstructural damage tolerance is related to the character or structural state of the grain boundary. In this work, the damage accommodation behavior of a variety of copper grain boundaries is studied using atomistic simulations. Damage accumulation behavior is found to reach a saturation point where both the free volume and energy of a grain boundary fluctuate within an elliptical manifold, which varies in size for different boundary characters. Analysis of the grain boundaries shows that extrinsic damage accommodation occurs due to localized atomic shuffling accompanied by free volume rearrangement within the boundary. Continuous damage accumulation leads to altered atomic structural states that oscillate around a mean non-equilibrium state, that is energetically metastable. Our results suggest that variation of grain boundary behavior, both from equilibrium and under saturation, is directly related to grain boundary equilibrium energy and some boundaries have a greater propensity to continually accommodate damage, as compared to others.

  6. Acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage in rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Klaunig, James E

    2006-10-01

    Chronic administration of acrylonitrile results in a dose-related increase in astrocytomas in rat brain, but the mechanism of acrylonitrile carcinogenicity is not fully understood. The potential of acrylonitrile or its metabolites to induce direct DNA damage as a mechanism for acrylonitrile carcinogenicity has been questioned, and recent studies indicate that the mechanism involves the induction of oxidative stress in rat brain. The present study examined the ability of acrylonitrile to induce DNA damage in the DI TNC1 rat astrocyte cell line using the alkaline Comet assay. Oxidized DNA damage also was evaluated using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase treatment in the modified Comet assay. No increase in direct DNA damage was seen in astrocytes exposed to sublethal concentrations of acrylonitrile (0-1.0 mM) for 24 hr. However, acrylonitrile treatment resulted in a concentration-related increase in oxidative DNA damage after 24 hr. Antioxidant supplementation in the culture media (alpha-tocopherol, (-)-epigallocathechin-3 gallate, or trolox) reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage. Depletion of glutathione using 0.1 mM DL-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine increased acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (22-46%), while cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 2.5 mM L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, a precursor for glutathione biosynthesis, significantly reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (7-47%). Cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 0.5 mM 1-aminobenzotriazole, a suicidal inhibitor of cytochrome P450, prevented the oxidative DNA damage produced by acrylonitrile. Cyanide (0.1-0.5 mM) increased oxidative DNA damage (44-160%) in astrocytes. These studies demonstrate that while acrylonitrile does not directly damage astrocyte DNA, it does increase oxidative DNA damage. The oxidative DNA damage following acrylonitrile exposure appears to arise mainly through the P450 metabolic pathway; moreover, glutathione depletion may contribute to the

  7. Mitochondrial DNA damage induced autophagy, cell death, and disease.

    PubMed

    Van Houten, Bennett; Hunter, Senyene E; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondria contain multiple small genomes. While these organelles have efficient base excision removal of oxidative DNA lesions and alkylation damage, many DNA repair systems that work on nuclear DNA damage are not active in mitochondria. What is the fate of DNA damage in the mitochondria that cannot be repaired or that overwhelms the repair system? Some forms of mitochondrial DNA damage can apparently trigger mitochondrial DNA destruction, either via direct degradation or through specific forms of autophagy, such as mitophagy. However, accumulation of certain types of mitochondrial damage, in the absence of DNA ligase III (Lig3) or exonuclease G (EXOG), can directly trigger cell death. This review examines the cellular effects of persistent damage to mitochondrial genomes and discusses the very different cell fates that occur in response to different kinds of damage.

  8. Eukaryotic DNA damage responses: Homologous recombination factors and ubiquitin modification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Soo; Kim, Soomi; Jung, Yong Woo; Kim, Hongtae

    2017-05-06

    To prevent genomic instability disorders, cells have developed a DNA damage response. The response involves various proteins that sense damaged DNA, transduce damage signals, and effect DNA repair. In addition, ubiquitin modifications modulate the signaling pathway depending on cellular context. Among various types of DNA damage, double-stranded breaks are highly toxic to genomic integrity. Homologous recombination (HR) repair is an essential mechanism that fixes DNA damage because of its high level of accuracy. Although factors in the repair pathway are well established, pinpointing the exact mechanisms of repair and devising therapeutic applications requires more studies. Moreover, essential functions of ubiquitin modification in the DNA damage signaling pathway have emerged. In this review, to explore the eukaryotic DNA damage response, we will mention the functions of main factors in the HR repair pathway and ubiquitin modification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Salicylic Acid Activates DNA Damage Responses to Potentiate Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shunping; Wang, Wei; Marqués, Jorge; Mohan, Rajinikanth; Saleh, Abdelaty; Durrant, Wendy E.; Song, Junqi; Dong, Xinnian

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA damage is normally detrimental to living organisms. Here we show that it can also serve as a signal to promote immune responses in plants. We found that the plant immune hormone salicylic acid (SA) can trigger DNA damage in the absence of a genotoxic agent. The DNA damage sensor proteins, RAD17 and ATR, are required for effective immune responses. These sensor proteins are negatively regulated by a key immune regulator SNI1 (suppressor of npr1-1, inducible 1), which we discovered as a missing subunit of the Structural Maintenance of Chromosome (SMC) 5/6 complex required for controlling DNA damage. Elevated DNA damage caused by the sni1 mutation or treatment with a DNA-damaging agent markedly enhances SA-mediated defense gene expression. Our study suggests that activation of DNA damage responses is an intrinsic component of the plant immune responses. PMID:24207055

  10. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J G; Adams, D O

    1987-01-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is thought that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. Many studies support the multistep nature of carcinogenesis, and a significant amount of evidence indicates that more than one genetic event is necessary for neoplastic transformation. Selective growth stimulation of initiated cells by TPA does not explain how further genetic events may occur by chronic exposure to this nongenotoxic agent. We and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H2O2 and oxidized lipid products. Furthermore, macrophage populations that release both H2O2 and metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) are more efficient at inducing oxidative DNA damage in surrounding cells than populations which only release H2O2 or metabolites of AA. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin than C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H2O2 and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 8. A FIGURE 8. B PMID:3129286

  11. The DNA-binding box of human SPARTAN contributes to the targeting of Polη to DNA damage sites.

    PubMed

    Toth, Agnes; Hegedus, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia; Haracska, Lajos; Burkovics, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate repair of UV-induced DNA damage results in human diseases such as Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is associated with an extremely high risk of skin cancer. A variant form of XP is caused by the absence of Polη, which is normally able to bypass UV-induced DNA lesions in an error-free manner. However, Polη is highly error prone when replicating undamaged DNA and, thus, the regulation of the proper targeting of Polη is crucial for the prevention of mutagenesis and UV-induced cancer formation. Spartan is a novel regulator of the damage tolerance pathway, and its association with Ub-PCNA has a role in Polη targeting; however, our knowledge about its function is only rudimentary. Here, we describe a new biochemical property of purified human SPARTAN by showing that it is a DNA-binding protein. Using a DNA binding mutant, we provide in vivo evidence that DNA binding by SPARTAN regulates the targeting of Polη to damage sites after UV exposure, and this function contributes highly to its DNA-damage tolerance function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA-damaging agents from Crypteronia paniculata.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing-Zhen; Marshall, Rebekah; Jones, Shannon H; Johnson, Randall K; Hecht, Sidney M

    2002-12-01

    A survey of crude plant extracts using a new yeast strain designed to identify DNA-damaging agents resulted in the identification of an extract prepared from Crypteronia paniculata. Bioassay-guided fractionation resulted in the isolation of three active compounds. Two of these were ellagic acid derivatives, namely, 3,3'-di-O-methylellagic acid 4'-O-beta-d-xylopyranoside (1) and 3'-O-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyellagic acid 4'-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (2). The third was identified as kaempferol-3-O-alpha-l-rhamnoside (3). The three principles exhibited strong, selective cytotoxity toward the RAD52 repair-deficient yeast strain.

  13. The Werner's Syndrome protein collaborates with REV1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lara G.; Sale, Julian E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance pathways facilitate the bypass of DNA lesions encountered during replication. These pathways can be mechanistically divided into recombinational damage avoidance and translesion synthesis, in which the lesion is directly bypassed by specialised DNA polymerases. We have recently shown distinct genetic dependencies for lesion bypass at and behind the replication fork in the avian cell line DT40, bypass at the fork requiring REV1 and bypass at post-replicative gaps requiring PCNA ubiquitination by RAD18. The WRN helicase/exonuclease, which is mutated in the progeroid and cancer predisposition disorder Werner's Syndrome, has previously been implicated in a RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathway. However, WRN has also been shown to be required to maintain normal replication fork progression on a damaged DNA template, a defect reminiscent of REV1-deficient cells. Here we use the avian cell line DT40 to demonstrate that WRN assists REV1-dependent translesion synthesis at the replication fork and that PCNA ubiquitination-dependent post-replicative lesion bypass provides an important backup mechanism for damage tolerance in the absence of WRN protein. PMID:20691646

  14. Damage tolerance of a composite sandwich with interleaved foam core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishai, Ori; Hiel, Clement

    1992-01-01

    A composite sandwich panel consisting of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) skins and a syntactic foam core was selected as an appropriate structural concept for the design of wind tunnel compressor blades. Interleaving of the core with tough interlayers was done to prevent core cracking and to improve damage tolerance of the sandwich. Simply supported sandwich beam specimens were subjected to low-velocity drop-weight impacts as well as high velocity ballistic impacts. The performance of the interleaved core sandwich panels was characterized by localized skin damage and minor cracking of the core. Residual compressive strength (RCS) of the skin, which was derived from flexural test, shows the expected trend of decreasing with increasing size of the damage, impact energy, and velocity. In the case of skin damage, RCS values of around 50 percent of the virgin interleaved reference were obtained at the upper impact energy range. Based on the similarity between low-velocity and ballistic-impact effects, it was concluded that impact energy is the main variable controlling damage and residual strength, where as velocity plays a minor role.

  15. Damage tolerance of a composite sandwich with interleaved foam core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishai, Ori; Hiel, Clement

    1992-01-01

    A composite sandwich panel consisting of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) skins and a syntactic foam core was selected as an appropriate structural concept for the design of wind tunnel compressor blades. Interleaving of the core with tough interlayers was done to prevent core cracking and to improve damage tolerance of the sandwich. Simply supported sandwich beam specimens were subjected to low-velocity drop-weight impacts as well as high velocity ballistic impacts. The performance of the interleaved core sandwich panels was characterized by localized skin damage and minor cracking of the core. Residual compressive strength (RCS) of the skin, which was derived from flexural test, shows the expected trend of decreasing with increasing size of the damage, impact energy, and velocity. In the case of skin damage, RCS values of around 50 percent of the virgin interleaved reference were obtained at the upper impact energy range. Based on the similarity between low-velocity and ballistic-impact effects, it was concluded that impact energy is the main variable controlling damage and residual strength, where as velocity plays a minor role.

  16. DNA strand breaks: the DNA template alterations that trigger p53-dependent DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, W G; Kastan, M B

    1994-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 serves as a critical regulator of a G1 cell cycle checkpoint and of apoptosis following exposure of cells to DNA-damaging agents. The mechanism by which DNA-damaging agents elevate p53 protein levels to trigger G1/S arrest or cell death remains to be elucidated. In fact, whether damage to the DNA template itself participates in transducing the signal leading to p53 induction has not yet been demonstrated. We exposed human cell lines containing wild-type p53 alleles to several different DNA-damaging agents and found that agents which rapidly induce DNA strand breaks, such as ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and DNA topoisomerase-targeted drugs, rapidly triggered p53 protein elevations. In addition, we determined that camptothecin-stimulated trapping of topoisomerase I-DNA complexes was not sufficient to elevate p53 protein levels; rather, replication-associated DNA strand breaks were required. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the antimetabolite N(phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) did not cause rapid p53 protein increases but resulted in delayed increases in p53 protein levels temporally correlated with the appearance of DNA strand breaks. Finally, we concluded that DNA strand breaks were sufficient for initiating p53-dependent signal transduction after finding that introduction of nucleases into cells by electroporation stimulated rapid p53 protein elevations. While DNA strand breaks appeared to be capable of triggering p53 induction, DNA lesions other than strand breaks did not. Exposure of normal cells and excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells to low doses of UV light, under conditions in which thymine dimers appear but DNA replication-associated strand breaks were prevented, resulted in p53 induction attributable to DNA strand breaks associated with excision repair. Our data indicate that DNA strand breaks are sufficient and probably necessary for p53 induction in cells with wild-type p53 alleles exposed to DNA-damaging

  17. DNA damage-induced cell death: from specific DNA lesions to the DNA damage response and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Roos, Wynand P; Kaina, Bernd

    2013-05-28

    DNA damaging agents are potent inducers of cell death triggered by apoptosis. Since these agents induce a plethora of different DNA lesions, it is firstly important to identify the specific lesions responsible for initiating apoptosis before the apoptotic executing pathways can be elucidated. Here, we describe specific DNA lesions that have been identified as apoptosis triggers, their repair and the signaling provoked by them. We discuss methylating agents such as temozolomide, ionizing radiation and cisplatin, all of them are important in cancer therapy. We show that the potentially lethal events for the cell are O(6)-methylguanine adducts that are converted by mismatch repair into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), non-repaired N-methylpurines and abasic sites as well as bulky adducts that block DNA replication leading to DSBs that are also directly induced following ionizing radiation. Transcriptional inhibition may also contribute to apoptosis. Cells are equipped with sensors that detect DNA damage and relay the signal via kinases to executors, who on their turn evoke a process that inhibits cell cycle progression and provokes DNA repair or, if this fails, activate the receptor and/or mitochondrial apoptotic cascade. The main DNA damage recognition factors MRN and the PI3 kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which phosphorylate a multitude of proteins and thus induce the DNA damage response (DDR), will be discussed as well as the downstream players p53, NF-κB, Akt and survivin. We review data and models describing the signaling from DNA damage to the apoptosis executing machinery and discuss the complex interplay between cell survival and death. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA damage in normally and prematurely aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Alexander Y.; Ganapathi, Shireen; Westerhof, Maaike; Quispe, Wilber; White, Ryan R.; Van Houten, Bennett; Reiling, Erwin; Dollé, Martijn E.T.; van Steeg, Harry; Hasty, Paul; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Vijg, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Steady-state levels of spontaneous DNA damage, the by-product of normal metabolism and environmental exposure, are controlled by DNA repair pathways. Incomplete repair or an age-related increase in damage production and/or decline in repair could lead to an accumulation of DNA damage, increasing mutation rate, affecting transcription and/or activating programmed cell death or senescence. These consequences of DNA damage metabolism are highly conserved and the accumulation of lesions in the DNA of the genome could, therefore, provide a universal cause of aging. An important corollary of this hypothesis is that defects in DNA repair cause both premature aging and accelerated DNA damage accumulation. While the former has been well-documented, the reliable quantification of the various lesions thought to accumulate in DNA during aging has been a challenge. Here, we quantified inhibition of long distance PCR as a measure of DNA damage in liver and brain of both normal and prematurely aging, DNA repair defective mice. The results indicate a marginal, but statistically significant, increase of spontaneous DNA damage with age in normal mouse liver but not in brain. Increased levels of DNA damage were not observed in the DNA repair defective mice. We also show that oxidative lesions do not increase with age. These results indicate that neither normal nor premature aging is accompanied by a dramatic increase in DNA damage. This suggests that factors other than DNA damage per se, e.g., cellular responses to DNA damage, are responsible for the aging phenotype in mice. PMID:23496256

  19. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans.

  20. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  1. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.G.; Adams, D.O.

    1987-12-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is though that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. The authors and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and oxidized lipid products. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin that C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice. These data support the hypothesis that inflammation and the release of genotoxic oxidants may be one mechanism whereby initiated cells receive further genetic insults. They also further complicate risk assessment by suggesting that some environmental agents may work indirectly by subverting host systems to induce damage rather than maintaining homeostasis.

  2. A preliminary damage tolerance methodology for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The certification experience for the primary, safety-of-flight composite structure applications on the F-16 is discussed. The rationale for the selection of delamination as the major issue for damage tolerance is discussed, as well as the modeling approach selected. The development of the necessary coupon-level data base is briefly summarized. The major emphasis is on the description of a full-scale fatigue test where delamination growth was obtained to demonstrate the validity of the selected approach. A summary is used to review the generic features of the methodology.

  3. Microplasticity and fatigue in a damage tolerant niobium aluminide intermetallic

    SciTech Connect

    Soboyejo, W.O.; DiPasquale, J.; Srivatsan, T.S.; Konitzer, D.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, the micromechanisms of microplasticity and fatigue are elucidated for a damage tolerant niobium aluminide intermetallic deformed to failure under both monotonic and cyclic loading. Localized microplasticity is shown to occur by the formation of slip bands at stresses as low as 9% of the bulk yield stress. Formation and presence of slip bands is also observed upon application of the first cycle of fatigue load. The deformation and cracking phenomena are discussed in light of classical fatigue crack initiation and propagation models. The implications of microplasticity are elucidated for both fatigue crack initiation and crack growth.

  4. Replication fork dynamics and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Petermann, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Prevention and repair of DNA damage is essential for maintenance of genomic stability and cell survival. DNA replication during S-phase can be a source of DNA damage if endogenous or exogenous stresses impair the progression of replication forks. It has become increasingly clear that DNA-damage-response pathways do not only respond to the presence of damaged DNA, but also modulate DNA replication dynamics to prevent DNA damage formation during S-phase. Such observations may help explain the developmental defects or cancer predisposition caused by mutations in DNA-damage-response genes. The present review focuses on molecular mechanisms by which DNA-damage-response pathways control and promote replication dynamics in vertebrate cells. In particular, DNA damage pathways contribute to proper replication by regulating replication initiation, stabilizing transiently stalled forks, promoting replication restart and facilitating fork movement on difficult-to-replicate templates. If replication fork progression fails to be rescued, this may lead to DNA damage and genomic instability via nuclease processing of aberrant fork structures or incomplete sister chromatid separation during mitosis.

  5. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs. PMID:28239143

  6. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities.

    PubMed

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K

    2014-08-01

    Loss of Werner syndrome protein function causes Werner syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN's DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor HU. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency.

  7. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  8. Radiation damage to DNA-protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, M.; Davídková, M.

    2011-01-01

    We review here the advances in understanding the effects of ionizing radiations on DNA, proteins and their complexes, resulting from the collaboration of the authors' teams. It concerns the preponderant indirect effect of low LET ionizing radiations, thus the attack of the macromolecules in aqueous solution by the most aggressive product of water radiolysis, the hydroxyl radical. A model of simulation of the reaction of these radicals with the macromolecules (called RADACK) was developed and was used for calculating the probabilities of damage of each constituent of DNA or proteins (nucleotide or amino-acid). The calculations allowed to draw conclusions from electrophoresis, mutagenesis, spectroscopic (fluorescence, circular dichroïsm) and mass spectrometry experiments. Thus we have shown that the extent and location of the lesions are strongly dependent on the 3D structure of the macromolecules, which in turns is modulated by their sequence and by the binding of some ligands. Molecular dynamics simulation completed our studies in showing the consequences of each lesion on the stability and structure of the proteins and their complexes with DNA.

  9. Replication Fork Slowing and Reversal upon DNA Damage Require PCNA Polyubiquitination and ZRANB3 DNA Translocase Activity.

    PubMed

    Vujanovic, Marko; Krietsch, Jana; Raso, Maria Chiara; Terraneo, Nastassja; Zellweger, Ralph; Schmid, Jonas A; Taglialatela, Angelo; Huang, Jen-Wei; Holland, Cory L; Zwicky, Katharina; Herrador, Raquel; Jacobs, Heinz; Cortez, David; Ciccia, Alberto; Penengo, Lorenza; Lopes, Massimo

    2017-09-07

    DNA damage tolerance during eukaryotic replication is orchestrated by PCNA ubiquitination. While monoubiquitination activates mutagenic translesion synthesis, polyubiquitination activates an error-free pathway, elusive in mammals, enabling damage bypass by template switching. Fork reversal is driven in vitro by multiple enzymes, including the DNA translocase ZRANB3, shown to bind polyubiquitinated PCNA. However, whether this interaction promotes fork remodeling and template switching in vivo was unknown. Here we show that damage-induced fork reversal in mammalian cells requires PCNA ubiquitination, UBC13, and K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, previously involved in error-free damage tolerance. Fork reversal in vivo also requires ZRANB3 translocase activity and its interaction with polyubiquitinated PCNA, pinpointing ZRANB3 as a key effector of error-free DNA damage tolerance. Mutations affecting fork reversal also induced unrestrained fork progression and chromosomal breakage, suggesting fork remodeling as a global fork slowing and protection mechanism. Targeting these fork protection systems represents a promising strategy to potentiate cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Platinum nanoparticles induce damage to DNA and inhibit DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Nejdl, Lukas; Kudr, Jiri; Moulick, Amitava; Hegerova, Dagmar; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Gumulec, Jaromir; Cihalova, Kristyna; Smerkova, Kristyna; Dostalova, Simona; Krizkova, Sona; Novotna, Marie; Kopel, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Sparsely tested group of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) may have a comparable effect as complex platinum compounds. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of PtNPs in in vitro amplification of DNA fragment of phage λ, on the bacterial cultures (Staphylococcus aureus), human foreskin fibroblasts and erythrocytes. In vitro synthesized PtNPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (PtNPs size range 4.8–11.7 nm), zeta potential measurements (-15 mV at pH 7.4), X-ray fluorescence, UV/vis spectrophotometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. The PtNPs inhibited the DNA replication and affected the secondary structure of DNA at higher concentrations, which was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing and DNA denaturation experiments. Further, cisplatin (CisPt), as traditional chemotherapy agent, was used in all parallel experiments. Moreover, the encapsulation of PtNPs in liposomes (LipoPtNPs) caused an approximately 2.4x higher of DNA damage in comparison with CisPt, LipoCisPt and PtNPs. The encapsulation of PtNPs in liposomes also increased their antibacterial, cytostatic and cytotoxic effect, which was determined by the method of growth curves on S. aureus and HFF cells. In addition, both the bare and encapsulated PtNPs caused lower oxidative stress (determined by GSH/GSSG ratio) in the human erythrocytes compared to the bare and encapsulated CisPt. CisPt was used in all parallel experiments as traditional chemotherapy agent. PMID:28704436

  11. Mus308 Processes Oxygen and Nitrogen Ethylation DNA Damage in Germ Cells of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Comendador, Miguel A.; Sierra, L. María

    2010-01-01

    The D. melanogaster mus308 gene, highly conserved among higher eukaryotes, is implicated in the repair of cross-links and of O-ethylpyrimidine DNA damage, working in a DNA damage tolerance mechanism. However, despite its relevance, its possible role on the processing of different DNA ethylation damages is not clear. To obtain data on mutation frequency and on mutation spectra in mus308 deficient (mus308−) conditions, the ethylating agent diethyl sulfate (DES) was analysed in postmeiotic male germ cells. These data were compared with those corresponding to mus308 efficient conditions. Our results indicate that Mus308 is necessary for the processing of oxygen and N-ethylation damage, for the survival of fertilized eggs depending on the level of induced DNA damage, and for an influence of the DNA damage neighbouring sequence. These results support the role of mus308 in a tolerance mechanism linked to a translesion synthesis pathway and also to the alternative end-joinig system. PMID:20936147

  12. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of α-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels.

  13. Histone H3 Lysine 56 Acetylation and the Response to DNA Replication Fork Damage

    PubMed Central

    Wurtele, Hugo; Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Bacal, Julien; St-Hilaire, Edlie; Lee, Eun-Hye; Tsao, Sarah; Dorn, Jonas; Maddox, Paul; Lisby, Michael; Pasero, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) occurs in newly synthesized histones that are deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. Defects in H3K56ac sensitize cells to genotoxic agents, suggesting that this modification plays an important role in the DNA damage response. However, the links between histone acetylation, the nascent chromatin structure, and the DNA damage response are poorly understood. Here we report that cells devoid of H3K56ac are sensitive to DNA damage sustained during transient exposure to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or camptothecin but are only mildly affected by hydroxyurea. We demonstrate that, after exposure to MMS, H3K56ac-deficient cells cannot complete DNA replication and eventually segregate chromosomes with intranuclear foci containing the recombination protein Rad52. In addition, we provide evidence that these phenotypes are not due to defects in base excision repair, defects in DNA damage tolerance, or a lack of Rad51 loading at sites of DNA damage. Our results argue that the acute sensitivity of H3K56ac-deficient cells to MMS and camptothecin stems from a failure to complete the repair of specific types of DNA lesions by recombination and/or from defects in the completion of DNA replication. PMID:22025679

  14. Histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation and the response to DNA replication fork damage.

    PubMed

    Wurtele, Hugo; Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Bacal, Julien; St-Hilaire, Edlie; Lee, Eun-Hye; Tsao, Sarah; Dorn, Jonas; Maddox, Paul; Lisby, Michael; Pasero, Philippe; Verreault, Alain

    2012-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) occurs in newly synthesized histones that are deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. Defects in H3K56ac sensitize cells to genotoxic agents, suggesting that this modification plays an important role in the DNA damage response. However, the links between histone acetylation, the nascent chromatin structure, and the DNA damage response are poorly understood. Here we report that cells devoid of H3K56ac are sensitive to DNA damage sustained during transient exposure to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or camptothecin but are only mildly affected by hydroxyurea. We demonstrate that, after exposure to MMS, H3K56ac-deficient cells cannot complete DNA replication and eventually segregate chromosomes with intranuclear foci containing the recombination protein Rad52. In addition, we provide evidence that these phenotypes are not due to defects in base excision repair, defects in DNA damage tolerance, or a lack of Rad51 loading at sites of DNA damage. Our results argue that the acute sensitivity of H3K56ac-deficient cells to MMS and camptothecin stems from a failure to complete the repair of specific types of DNA lesions by recombination and/or from defects in the completion of DNA replication.

  15. Curcumin-Mediated HDAC Inhibition Suppresses the DNA Damage Response and Contributes to Increased DNA Damage Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-Huei; Lin, Pei-Ya; Chiu, Ya-Chen; Huang, Ju-Sui; Kuo, Yi-Tsen; Wu, Jen-Chine; Chen, Chin-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Chemo- and radiotherapy cause multiple forms of DNA damage and lead to the death of cancer cells. Inhibitors of the DNA damage response are candidate drugs for use in combination therapies to increase the efficacy of such treatments. In this study, we show that curcumin, a plant polyphenol, sensitizes budding yeast to DNA damage by counteracting the DNA damage response. Following DNA damage, the Mec1-dependent DNA damage checkpoint is inactivated and Rad52 recombinase is degraded by curcumin, which results in deficiencies in double-stand break repair. Additive effects on damage-induced apoptosis and the inhibition of damage-induced autophagy by curcumin were observed. Moreover, rpd3 mutants were found to mimic the curcumin-induced suppression of the DNA damage response. In contrast, hat1 mutants were resistant to DNA damage, and Rad52 degradation was impaired following curcumin treatment. These results indicate that the histone deacetylase inhibitor activity of curcumin is critical to DSB repair and DNA damage sensitivity. PMID:26218133

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  17. The distribution of DNA damage is defined by region-specific susceptibility to DNA damage formation rather than repair differences.

    PubMed

    Strand, Janne M; Scheffler, Katja; Bjørås, Magnar; Eide, Lars

    2014-06-01

    The cellular genomes are continuously damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS) from aerobic processes. The impact of DNA damage depends on the specific site as well as the cellular state. The steady-state level of DNA damage is the net result of continuous formation and subsequent repair, but it is unknown to what extent heterogeneous damage distribution is caused by variations in formation or repair of DNA damage. Here, we used a restriction enzyme/qPCR based method to analyze DNA damage in promoter and coding regions of four nuclear genes: the two house-keeping genes Gadph and Tbp, and the Ndufa9 and Ndufs2 genes encoding mitochondrial complex I subunits, as well as mt-Rnr1 encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The distribution of steady-state levels of damage varied in a site-specific manner. Oxidative stress induced damage in nDNA to a similar extent in promoter and coding regions, and more so in mtDNA. The subsequent removal of damage from nDNA was efficient and comparable with recovery times depending on the initial damage load, while repair of mtDNA was delayed with subsequently slower repair rate. The repair was furthermore found to be independent of transcription or the transcription-coupled repair factor CSB, but dependent on cellular ATP. Our results demonstrate that the capacity to repair DNA is sufficient to remove exogenously induced damage. Thus, we conclude that the heterogeneous steady-state level of DNA damage in promoters and coding regions is caused by site-specific DNA damage/modifications that take place under normal metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  19. Damage-Tolerant Fan Casings for Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    All turbofan engines work on the same principle. A large fan at the front of the engine draws air in. A portion of the air enters the compressor, but a greater portion passes on the outside of the engine this is called bypass air. The air that enters the compressor then passes through several stages of rotating fan blades that compress the air more, and then it passes into the combustor. In the combustor, fuel is injected into the airstream, and the fuel-air mixture is ignited. The hot gasses produced expand rapidly to the rear, and the engine reacts by moving forward. If there is a flaw in the system, such as an unexpected obstruction, the fan blade can break, spin off, and harm other engine components. Fan casings, therefore, need to be strong enough to contain errant blades and damage-tolerant to withstand the punishment of a loose blade-turned-projectile. NASA has spearheaded research into improving jet engine fan casings, ultimately discovering a cost-effective approach to manufacturing damage-tolerant fan cases that also boast significant weight reduction. In an aircraft, weight reduction translates directly into fuel burn savings, increased payload, and greater aircraft range. This technology increases safety and structural integrity; is an attractive, viable option for engine manufacturers, because of the low-cost manufacturing; and it is a practical alternative for customers, as it has the added cost saving benefits of the weight reduction.

  20. Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chalissery, Jisha; Jalal, Deena; Al-Natour, Zeina; Hassan, Ahmed H

    2017-03-01

    Malfunction of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species leads to oxidative attack on biomolecules including DNA and consequently activates various DNA repair pathways. The nature of DNA damage and the cell cycle stage at which DNA damage occurs determine the appropriate repair pathway to rectify the damage. Oxidized DNA bases are primarily repaired by base excision repair and nucleotide incision repair. Nucleotide excision repair acts on lesions that distort DNA helix, mismatch repair on mispaired bases, and homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining on double stranded breaks. Post-replication repair that overcomes replication blocks caused by DNA damage also plays a crucial role in protecting the cell from the deleterious effects of oxidative DNA damage. Mitochondrial DNA is also prone to oxidative damage and is efficiently repaired by the cellular DNA repair machinery. In this review, we discuss the DNA repair pathways in relation to the nature of oxidative DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydroxyl radical Thymine adduct induced DNA damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schyman, Patric; Eriksson, Leif A.; Zhang, Ru bo; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2008-06-01

    DNA damages caused by a 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine-6-yl radical (5-OHT-6yl) abstracting a C2‧ hydrogen from a neighboring sugar (inter-H abstraction) have been theoretically investigated using hybrid DFT in gas phase and in water solution. The inter-H abstraction was here shown to be comparable in energy (24 kcal mol-1) with the intra-H abstraction in which the 5-OHT-6yl abstracts a C2‧ hydrogen from its own sugar. The effect of a neutrally or a negatively charged phosphate group was also studied and the results show no significant impact on the activation energy of the hydrogen abstraction whereas base release and strand break reactions are affected.

  2. RNF111-dependent neddylation activates DNA damage-induced ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Chen, Yibin; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Chao-Yie; Wang, Shaomeng; Yu, Xiaochun

    2013-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin-like proteins have been shown to be covalently conjugated to targets. However, the functions of these ubiquitin-like proteins are largely unknown. Here, we have screened most known ubiquitin-like proteins after DNA damage and found that NEDD8 is involved in the DNA damage response. Following various DNA damage stimuli, NEDD8 accumulated at DNA damage sites, and this accumulation was dependent on an E2 enzyme UBE2M and an E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF111. We further found that histone H4 was polyneddylated in response to DNA damage, and NEDD8 was conjugated to the N-terminal lysine residues of H4. Interestingly, the DNA damage-induced polyneddylation chain could be recognized by the MIU (Motif Interacting with Ubiquitin) domain of RNF168. Loss of DNA damage-induced neddylation negatively regulated DNA damage-induced foci formation of RNF168 and its downstream functional partners, such as 53BP1 and BRCA1, thus affecting the normal DNA damage repair process. PMID:23394999

  3. Mitochondrial DNA damage by bleomycin induces AML cell death.

    PubMed

    Yeung, ManTek; Hurren, Rose; Nemr, Carine; Wang, Xiaoming; Hershenfeld, Samantha; Gronda, Marcela; Liyanage, Sanduni; Wu, Yan; Augustine, Jeevan; Lee, Eric A; Spagnuolo, Paul A; Southall, Noel; Chen, Catherine; Zheng, Wei; Jeyaraju, Danny V; Minden, Mark D; Laposa, Rebecca; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of their own 16.6 kb circular genome. To explore the impact of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage on mitochondrial (mt) function and viability of AML cells, we screened a panel of DNA damaging chemotherapeutic agents to identify drugs that could damage mtDNA. We identified bleomycin as an agent that damaged mtDNA in AML cells at concentrations that induced cell death. Bleomycin also induced mtDNA damage in primary AML samples. Consistent with the observed mtDNA damage, bleomycin reduced mt mass and basal oxygen consumption in AML cells. We also demonstrated that the observed mtDNA damage was functionally important for bleomycin-induced cell death. Finally, bleomycin delayed tumor growth in xenograft mouse models of AML and anti-leukemic concentrations of the drug induced mtDNA damage in AML cells preferentially over normal lung tissue. Taken together, mtDNA-targeted therapy may be an effective strategy to target AML cells and bleomycin could be useful in the treatment of this disease.

  4. Commentary: Mitochondrial DNA damage and loss in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gilkerson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This commentary discusses damage and loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in type 2 diabetes mellitus from both the clinical and experimental perspectives. Increasingly, an array of studies in experimental models and patients suggests that the cellular stresses of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes damage mtDNA, leading to loss of mitochondrial genetic content. As such, mtDNA is emerging as both a valuable monitoring tool and translational preventive target for metabolic disease. PMID:27253402

  5. Oxidative DNA damage during night shift work.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Parveen; Mirick, Dana K; Randolph, Timothy W; Gong, Jicheng; Buchanan, Diana Taibi; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Davis, Scott

    2017-09-01

    We previously reported that compared with night sleep, day sleep among shift workers was associated with reduced urinary excretion of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), potentially reflecting a reduced ability to repair 8-OH-dG lesions in DNA. We identified the absence of melatonin during day sleep as the likely causative factor. We now investigate whether night work is also associated with reduced urinary excretion of 8-OH-dG. For this cross-sectional study, 50 shift workers with the largest negative differences in night work versus night sleep circulating melatonin levels (measured as 6-sulfatoxymelatonin in urine) were selected from among the 223 shift workers included in our previous study. 8-OH-dG concentrations were measured in stored urine samples using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Mixed effects models were used to compare night work versus night sleep 8-OH-dG levels. Circulating melatonin levels during night work (mean=17.1 ng/mg creatinine/mg creatinine) were much lower than during night sleep (mean=51.7 ng/mg creatinine). In adjusted analyses, average urinary 8-OH-dG levels during the night work period were only 20% of those observed during the night sleep period (95% CI 10% to 30%; p<0.001). This study suggests that night work, relative to night sleep, is associated with reduced repair of 8-OH-dG lesions in DNA and that the effect is likely driven by melatonin suppression occurring during night work relative to night sleep. If confirmed, future studies should evaluate melatonin supplementation as a means to restore oxidative DNA damage repair capacity among shift workers. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Durability and Damage Tolerance of High Temperature Polymeric Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Scott W.; Reifsnider, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    Modern durability and damage tolerance predictions for composite material systems rely on accurate estimates of the local stress and material states for each of the constituents, as well as the manner in which the constituents interact. In this work, an number of approaches to estimating the stress states and interactions are developed. First, an elasticity solution is presented for the problem of a penny-shaped crack in an N-phase composite material system opened by a prescribed normal pressure. The stress state around such a crack is then used to estimate the stress concentrations due to adjacent fiber fractures in composite materials. The resulting stress concentrations are then used to estimate the tensile strength of the composite. The predicted results are compared with experimental values. In addition, a cumulative damage model for fatigue is presented. Modifications to the model are made to include the effects of variable amplitude loading. These modifications are based upon the use of remaining strength as a damage metric and the definition of an equivalent generalized time. The model is initially validated using results from the literature. Also, experimental data from APC-2 laminates and IM7/K3B laminates are used in the model. The use of such data for notched laminates requires the use of an effective hole size, which is calculated based upon strain distribution measurements. Measured remaining strengths after fatigue loading are compared with the predicted values for specimens fatigued at room temperature and 350 F (177 C).

  7. Towards a damage tolerance philosophy for composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin

    1990-01-01

    A damage-threshold/fail-safe approach is proposed to ensure that composite structures are both sufficiently durable for economy of operation, as well as adequately fail-safe or damage tolerant for flight safety. Matrix cracks are assumed to exist throughout the off-axis plies. Delamination onset is predicted using a strain energy release rate characterization. Delamination growth is accounted for in one of three ways: either analytically, using delamination growth laws in conjunction with strain energy release rate analyses incorporating delamination resistance curves; experimentally, using measured stiffness loss; or conservatively, assuming delamination onset corresponds to catastrophic delamination growth. Fail-safety is assessed by accounting for the accumulation of delaminations through the thickness. A tension fatigue life prediction for composite laminates is presented as a case study to illustrate how this approach may be implemented. Suggestions are made for applying the damage-threshold/fail-safe approach to compression fatigue, tension/compression fatigue, and compression strength following low velocity impact.

  8. Towards a damage tolerance philosophy for composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1988-01-01

    A damage-threshold/fail-safe approach is proposed to ensure that composite structures are both sufficiently durable for economy of operation, as well as adequately fail-safe or damage tolerant for flight safety. Matrix cracks are assumed to exist throughout the off-axis plies. Delamination onset is predicted using a strain energy release rate characterization. Delamination growth is accounted for in one of three ways: either analytically, using delamination growth laws in conjunction with strain energy release rate analyses incorporating delamination resistance curves; experimentally, using measured stiffness loss; or conservatively, assuming delamination onset corresponds to catastrophic delamination growth. Fail-safety is assessed by accounting for the accumulation of delaminations through the thickness. A tension fatigue life prediction for composite laminates is presented as a case study to illustrate how this approach may be implemented. Suggestions are made for applying the damage-threshold/fail-safe approach to compression fatigue, tension/compression fatigue, and compression strength following low velocity impact.

  9. Towards a damage tolerance philosophy for composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin

    1990-01-01

    A damage-threshold/fail-safe approach is proposed to ensure that composite structures are both sufficiently durable for economy of operation, as well as adequately fail-safe or damage tolerant for flight safety. Matrix cracks are assumed to exist throughout the off-axis plies. Delamination onset is predicted using a strain energy release rate characterization. Delamination growth is accounted for in one of three ways: either analytically, using delamination growth laws in conjunction with strain energy release rate analyses incorporating delamination resistance curves; experimentally, using measured stiffness loss; or conservatively, assuming delamination onset corresponds to catastrophic delamination growth. Fail-safety is assessed by accounting for the accumulation of delaminations through the thickness. A tension fatigue life prediction for composite laminates is presented as a case study to illustrate how this approach may be implemented. Suggestions are made for applying the damage-threshold/fail-safe approach to compression fatigue, tension/compression fatigue, and compression strength following low velocity impact.

  10. Impact of Alternative DNA Structures on DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Genetic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive genomic sequences can adopt a number of alternative DNA structures that differ from the canonical B-form duplex (i.e. non-B DNA). These non-B DNA-forming sequences have been shown to have many important biological functions related to DNA metabolic processes; for example, they may have regulatory roles in DNA transcription and replication. In addition to these regulatory functions, non-B DNA can stimulate genetic instability in the presence or absence of DNA damage, via replication-dependent and/or replication-independent pathways. This review focuses on the interactions of non-B DNA conformations with DNA repair proteins and how these interactions impact genetic instability. PMID:24767258

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system for studying clustered DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Moscariello, M.M.; Sutherland, B.

    2010-08-01

    DNA-damaging agents can induce clustered lesions or multiply damaged sites (MDSs) on the same or opposing DNA strands. In the latter, attempts to repair MDS can generate closely opposed single-strand break intermediates that may convert non-lethal or mutagenic base damage into double-strand breaks (DSBs). We constructed a diploid S. cerevisiae yeast strain with a chromosomal context targeted by integrative DNA fragments carrying different damages to determine whether closely opposed base damages are converted to DSBs following the outcomes of the homologous recombination repair pathway. As a model of MDS, we studied clustered uracil DNA damages with a known location and a defined distance separating the lesions. The system we describe might well be extended to assessing the repair of MDSs with different compositions, and to most of the complex DNA lesions induced by physical and chemical agents.

  12. Monoubiquitylation of histone H2B contributes to the bypass of DNA damage during and after DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Shih-Hsun; Wong, Ronald P.; Ulrich, Helle D.; Kao, Cheng-Fu

    2017-01-01

    DNA lesion bypass is mediated by DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways and homologous recombination (HR). The DDT pathways, which involve translesion synthesis and template switching (TS), are activated by the ubiquitylation (ub) of PCNA through components of the RAD6-RAD18 pathway, whereas the HR pathway is independent of RAD18. However, it is unclear how these processes are coordinated within the context of chromatin. Here we show that Bre1, an ubiquitin ligase specific for histone H2B, is recruited to chromatin in a manner coupled to replication of damaged DNA. In the absence of Bre1 or H2Bub, cells exhibit accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions. Consequently, the damaged forks become unstable and resistant to repair. We provide physical, genetic, and cytological evidence that H2Bub contributes toward both Rad18-dependent TS and replication fork repair by HR. Using an inducible system of DNA damage bypass, we further show that H2Bub is required for the regulation of DDT after genome duplication. We propose that Bre1-H2Bub facilitates fork recovery and gap-filling repair by controlling chromatin dynamics in response to replicative DNA damage. PMID:28246327

  13. Damage tolerance of bonded composite aircraft repairs for metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Randal John

    This thesis describes the development and validation of methods for damage tolerance substantiation of bonded composite repairs applied to cracked plates. This technology is used to repair metal aircraft structures, offering improvements in fatigue life, cost, manufacturability, and inspectability when compared to riveted repairs. The work focuses on the effects of plate thickness and bending on repair life, and covers fundamental aspects of fracture and fatigue of cracked plates and bonded joints. This project falls under the UBC Bonded Composite Repair Program, which has the goal of certification and widespread use of bonded repairs in civilian air transportation. This thesis analyses the plate thickness and transverse stress effects on fracture of repaired plates and the related problem of induced geometrically nonlinear bending in unbalanced (single-sided) repairs. The author begins by developing a classification scheme for assigning repair damage tolerance substantiation requirements based upon stress-based adhesive fracture/fatigue criteria and the residual strength of the original structure. The governing equations for bending of cracked plates are then reformulated and line-spring models are developed for linear and nonlinear coupled bending and extension of reinforced cracks. The line-spring models were used to correct the Wang and Rose energy method for the determination of the long-crack limit stress intensity, and to develop a new interpolation model for repaired cracks of arbitrary length. The analysis was validated using finite element models and data from mechanical tests performed on hybrid bonded joints and repair specimens that are representative of an in-service repair. This work will allow designers to evaluate the damage tolerance of the repaired plate, the adhesive, and the composite patch, which is an airworthiness requirement under FAR (Federal Aviation Regulations) 25.571. The thesis concludes by assessing the remaining barriers to

  14. Systemic DNA damage responses in aging and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ribezzo, Flavia; Shiloh, Yosef; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The genome is constantly attacked by a variety of genotoxic insults. The causal role for DNA damage in aging and cancer is exemplified by genetic defects in DNA repair that underlie a broad spectrum of acute and chronic human disorders that are characterized by developmental abnormalities, premature aging, and cancer predisposition. The disease symptoms are typically tissue-specific with uncertain genotype-phenotype correlation. The cellular DNA damage response (DDR) has been extensively investigated ever since yeast geneticists discovered DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms, several decades ago. In recent years, it has become apparent that not only cell-autonomous but also systemic DNA damage responses determine the outcome of genome instability in organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of non-cell-autonomous DNA damage responses will provide important new insights into the role of genome instability in human aging and a host of diseases including cancer and might better explain the complex phenotypes caused by genome instability. PMID:26773346

  15. Advanced information processing system - Status report. [for fault tolerant and damage tolerant data processing for aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, L. D.; Lala, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is designed to provide a fault tolerant and damage tolerant data processing architecture for a broad range of aerospace vehicles. The AIPS architecture also has attributes to enhance system effectiveness such as graceful degradation, growth and change tolerance, integrability, etc. Two key building blocks being developed by the AIPS program are a fault and damage tolerant processor and communication network. A proof-of-concept system is now being built and will be tested to demonstrate the validity and performance of the AIPS concepts.

  16. Advanced information processing system - Status report. [for fault tolerant and damage tolerant data processing for aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, L. D.; Lala, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is designed to provide a fault tolerant and damage tolerant data processing architecture for a broad range of aerospace vehicles. The AIPS architecture also has attributes to enhance system effectiveness such as graceful degradation, growth and change tolerance, integrability, etc. Two key building blocks being developed by the AIPS program are a fault and damage tolerant processor and communication network. A proof-of-concept system is now being built and will be tested to demonstrate the validity and performance of the AIPS concepts.

  17. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  18. Hertzian contact response and damage tolerance of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Coldea, Andrea; Swain, Michael V; Thiel, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    To determine the contact response and damage tolerance or strength degradation of a range of dental CAD/CAM ceramic materials including novel polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network (PICN) materials by means of spherical indentations at various loads and indenter radii. The seven tested materials included Mark II, PICN test materials 1 and 2, In-Ceram Alumina, VM 9, In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Saeckingen, Germany) and IPS e.max CAD, (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein). To evaluate the damage tolerance and role of indenter size, indentations with tungsten carbide spheres (0.5mm and 1.25mm radius) were placed on bending bars with varying loads (1.96-1000N). The indented bending bars were subsequently loaded to fracture in three-point bending. The contact induced damage was analyzed by light microscopy (LM) and SEM. The spherical contact response was measured on polished surfaces. The initial strengths for the individual materials were found to reduce above specific indentation loads, which were a function of the indenter radius. Employing a 0.5mm radius sphere resulted in the following strength degrading loads and ordering of materials: VM9 (98N)damage modes were observed by SEM and LM - brittle cone cracking and plastic deformation. The PICN materials exhibited elastic-plastic behavior with creep. In contrast YTZP showed entirely elastic behavior upon loading with both spheres. This study aims to emulate the likely clinical behavior of contact loading by opposing cusps to dental restorative ceramic materials by utilizing spherical indentations at various loads and sphere diameters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  20. Fuel containment and damage tolerance for large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 1: Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandifer, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Technical problems associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite material wings for transport aircraft were identified. The major tasks are the following: (1) the preliminary design of damage tolerant wing surface using composite materials; (2) the evaluation of fuel sealing and lightning protection methods for a composite material wing; and (3) an experimental investigation of the damage tolerant characteristics of toughened resin graphite/epoxy materials. The test results, the test techniques, and the test data are presented.

  1. A DNA element in the slo gene modulates ethanol tolerance.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Harish R; Li, Xiaolei; Ghezzi, Alfredo; Atkinson, Nigel S

    2016-03-01

    In Drosophila, the slo gene encodes BK-type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels and is involved in producing rapid functional tolerance to sedation with ethanol. Drosophila are ideal for the study of functional ethanol tolerance because the adult does not acquire metabolic ethanol tolerance (Scholz, Ramond, Singh, & Heberlein, 2000). It has been shown that mutations in slo block the capacity to acquire tolerance, that sedation with ethanol vapor induces slo gene expression in the nervous system, and that transgenic induction of slo can phenocopy tolerance (Cowmeadow, Krishnan, & Atkinson, 2005; Cowmeadow et al., 2006). Here we use ethanol-induced histone acetylation to map a DNA regulatory element in the slo transcriptional control region and functionally test the element for a role in producing ethanol tolerance. Histone acetylation is commonly associated with activating transcription factors. We used the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to map histone acetylation changes following ethanol sedation to identify an ethanol-responsive DNA element. Ethanol sedation induced an increase in histone acetylation over a 60 n DNA element called 6b, which is situated between the two ethanol-responsive neural promoters of the slo gene. Removal of the 6b element from the endogenous slo gene affected the production of functional ethanol tolerance as assayed in an ethanol-vapor recovery from sedation assay. Removal of element 6b extended the period of functional ethanol tolerance from ∼10 days to more than 21 days after a single ethanol-vapor sedation. This study demonstrates that mapping the position of ethanol-induced histone acetylation is an effective way to identify DNA regulatory elements that help to mediate the response of a gene to ethanol. Using this approach, we identified a DNA element, which is conserved among Drosophila species, and which is important for producing a behaviorally relevant ethanol response.

  2. Independent mechanisms recruit the cohesin loader protein NIPBL to sites of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Annika; Giordano, Fosco; Dantuma, Nico P.; Ström, Lena

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT NIPBL is required to load the cohesin complex on to DNA. While the canonical role of cohesin is to couple replicated sister chromatids together until the onset of mitosis, it also promotes tolerance to DNA damage. Here, we show that NIPBL is recruited to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle via independent mechanisms, influenced by type of damage. First, the heterochromatin protein HP1γ (also known as CBX3) recruits NIPBL to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through the corresponding HP1-binding motif within the N-terminus. By contrast, the C-terminal HEAT repeat domain is unable to recruit NIPBL to DSBs but independently targets NIPBL to laser microirradiation-induced DNA damage. Each mechanism is dependent on the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitylation pathway, while the recruitment of the HEAT repeat domain requires further ATM or ATR activity. Thus, NIPBL has evolved a sophisticated response to damaged DNA that is influenced by the form of damage, suggesting a highly dynamic role for NIPBL in maintaining genomic stability. PMID:28167679

  3. Independent mechanisms recruit the cohesin loader protein NIPBL to sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bot, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Annika; Giordano, Fosco; Manjeera, Dharani E; Dantuma, Nico P; Ström, Lena

    2017-03-15

    NIPBL is required to load the cohesin complex on to DNA. While the canonical role of cohesin is to couple replicated sister chromatids together until the onset of mitosis, it also promotes tolerance to DNA damage. Here, we show that NIPBL is recruited to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle via independent mechanisms, influenced by type of damage. First, the heterochromatin protein HP1γ (also known as CBX3) recruits NIPBL to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through the corresponding HP1-binding motif within the N-terminus. By contrast, the C-terminal HEAT repeat domain is unable to recruit NIPBL to DSBs but independently targets NIPBL to laser microirradiation-induced DNA damage. Each mechanism is dependent on the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitylation pathway, while the recruitment of the HEAT repeat domain requires further ATM or ATR activity. Thus, NIPBL has evolved a sophisticated response to damaged DNA that is influenced by the form of damage, suggesting a highly dynamic role for NIPBL in maintaining genomic stability.

  4. Novel DNA damage checkpoint in mitosis: Mitotic DNA damage induces re-replication without cell division in various cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sun-Yi; Rosen, Eliot M; Jang, Young-Joo

    2012-07-06

    DNA damage induces multiple checkpoint pathways to arrest cell cycle progression until damage is repaired. In our previous reports, when DNA damage occurred in prometaphase, cells were accumulated in 4 N-DNA G1 phase, and mitosis-specific kinases were inactivated in dependent on ATM/Chk1 after a short incubation for repair. We investigated whether or not mitotic DNA damage causes cells to skip-over late mitotic periods under prolonged incubation in a time-lapse study. 4 N-DNA-damaged cells re-replicated without cell division and accumulated in 8 N-DNA content, and the activities of apoptotic factors were increased. The inhibition of DNA replication reduced the 8 N-DNA cell population dramatically. Induction of replication without cell division was not observed upon depletion of Chk1 or ATM. Finally, mitotic DNA damage induces mitotic slippage and that cells enter G1 phase with 4 N-DNA content and then DNA replication is occurred to 8 N-DNA content before completion of mitosis in the ATM/Chk1-dependent manner, followed by caspase-dependent apoptosis during long-term repair.

  5. DNA damage induced by low energy electron collision and new experimental setup for further studying DNA damage by plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeunsoo; Sanche, Leon; Wagner, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Low energy electrons (LEEs; below 10 eV) are the most abundant among the radiolytic species generated along the high energy radiation track in living cell. And these electrons are also one of major components with ions and photon in plasma. Interestingly, it has turned out that LEEs can create DNA damages such as base release, single- and double- strand breaks (SSB and DSB) via indirect action named dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The purposes of this study are to further find out exact mechanisms of DNA damage by LEEs at the molecular level and to verify new DNA damage like structural alteration on DNA subunits. And we will expand our study to DNA damage by plasma source to develop plasma-based new medical and biological applications. We are currently setting new experimental system for reaching our goals. We will show some recent results about new finding DNA modification damage and some experimental designs and working principles.

  6. Oxidative DNA damage in osteoarthritic porcine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antonia F.; Davies, Catrin M.; De Lin, Ming; Fermor, Beverley

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species. This study investigated if increased oxidative DNA damage accumulates in OA articular cartilage compared with non-OA articular cartilage from pigs with spontaneous OA. Additionally, the ability of nitric oxide (NO) or peroxynitrite (ONOO-) induced DNA damage in non-OA chondrocytes to undergo endogenous repair was investigated. Methods Porcine femoral condyles were graded for the stage of OA, macroscopically by the Collins Scale, and histologically by the modified Mankin Grade. Levels of DNA damage were determined in non-OA and OA cartilage, using the comet assay. For calibration, DNA damage was measured by exposing non-OA chondrocytes to 0-12 Gray of x-ray irradiation. Non-OA articular chondrocytes were treated with 0-500 μM of NO donors (NOC-18 or SIN-1), and DNA damage assessed after treatment and 5 days recovery. Results A significant increase (p<0.01) in oxidative DNA damage occurred in OA chondrocytes in joints with Mankin Grades 3 or greater, compared to non-OA chondrocytes. The percentage of nuclei containing DNA damage increased significantly (p<0.001) from early to late grades of OA. An increase of approximately 0.65-1.7 breaks/1000kB of DNA occurred in OA, compared to non-OA nuclei. NOC-18 or SIN-1 caused significant DNA damage (p<0.001) in non-OA chondrocytes that did not undergo full endogenous repair after 5 days (p<0.05). Conclusion Our data suggest significant levels of oxidative DNA damage occur in OA chondrocytes that accumulates with OA progression. Additionally, DNA damage induced by NO and ONOO- in non-OA chondrocytes does not undergo full endogenous repair. PMID:18720406

  7. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  8. Amphetamines promote mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-I; Cao, Aiqin; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tojais, Nancy F.; Hennigs, Jan K.; Li, Caiyun G.; Sweeney, Nathaly M.; Inglis, Audrey S.; Wang, Lingli; Li, Dan; Ye, Matthew; Feldman, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) or methamphetamine (METH) abuse can cause oxidative damage and is a risk factor for diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from AMPH-associated-PAH patients show DNA damage as judged by γH2AX foci and DNA comet tails. We therefore hypothesized that AMPH induces DNA damage and vascular pathology by interfering with normal adaptation to an environmental perturbation causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this, we found that AMPH alone does not cause DNA damage in normoxic PAECs, but greatly amplifies DNA damage in hypoxic PAECs. The mechanism involves AMPH activation of protein phosphatase 2A, which potentiates inhibition of Akt. This increases sirtuin 1, causing deacetylation and degradation of HIF1α, thereby impairing its transcriptional activity, resulting in a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and impaired cytochrome c oxidase 4 isoform switch. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is inappropriately enhanced and, as a result of impaired electron transport and mitochondrial ROS increase, caspase-3 is activated and DNA damage is induced. In mice given binge doses of METH followed by hypoxia, HIF1α is suppressed and pulmonary artery DNA damage foci are associated with worse pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, chronic AMPH/METH can induce DNA damage associated with vascular disease by subverting the adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:28138562

  9. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  10. Guarding chromosomes from oxidative DNA damage to the very end.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rong; Lan, Li

    2016-07-01

    The ends of each chromosome are capped by the telomere assembly to protect chromosomal integrity from telomere attrition and DNA damage. In response to DNA damage, DNA repair factors are enriched at damage sites by a sophisticated signaling and recruitment cascade. However, DNA damage response at telomeres is different from non-telomeric region of genomic DNA due to specialized sequences and structures of the telomeres. In the course of normal DNA replication or DNA damage repair, both the telomere shelterin protein complex and the condensed telomeric chromatin structure in mammalian cells are modified to protect telomeres from exposing free DNA ends which are subject to both telemere shortening and chromosome end fusion. Initiation of either homologous recombination or non-homologous end joint repair at telomeres requires disassembling and/or post-translational modifications of the shelterin complex and telomeric chromatin. In addition, cancer cells utilize distinct mechanisms to maintain telomere length and cell survival upon damage. In this review, we summarize current studies that focus on telomere end protection and telomere DNA repair using different methodologies to model telomere DNA damage and disruption. These include genetic ablation of sheltering proteins, targeting endonuclease to telomeres, and delivering oxidative damage directly. These different approaches, when combined, offer better understanding of the mechanistic differences in DNA damage response between telomeric and genomic DNA, which will provide new hope to identify potential cancer therapeutic targets to curtail cancer cell proliferation via induction of telomere dysfunctions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Inflammation, DNA Damage, Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kalisperati, Polyxeni; Spanou, Evangelia; Pateras, Ioannis S.; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Varvarigou, Anastasia; Karavokyros, Ioannis; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Vlachoyiannopoulos, Panayiotis G.; Sougioultzis, Stavros

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of almost half human population. It has evolved to escape immune surveillance, establishes lifelong inflammation, predisposing to genomic instability and DNA damage, notably double strand breaks. The epithelial host cell responds by activation of DNA damage repair (DDR) machinery that seems to be compromised by the infection. It is therefore now accepted that genetic damage is a major mechanism operating in cases of H. pylori induced carcinogenesis. Here, we review the data on the molecular pathways involved in DNA damage and DDR activation during H. pylori infection. PMID:28289428

  12. Biological consequences of formation and repair of complex DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Magnander, Karin; Elmroth, Kecke

    2012-12-31

    Endogenous processes or genotoxic agents can induce many types of single DNA damage (single-strand breaks, oxidized bases and abasic sites). In addition, ionizing radiation induces complex lesions such as double-strand breaks and clustered damage. To preserve the genomic stability and prevent carcinogenesis, distinct repair pathways have evolved. Despite this, complex DNA damage can cause severe problems and is believed to contribute to the biological consequences observed in cells exposed to genotoxic stress. In this review, the current knowledge of formation and repair of complex DNA damage is summarized and the risks and biological consequences associated with their repair are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ischemic Tolerance Protects the Rat Retina from Glaucomatous Damage

    PubMed Central

    Belforte, Nicolás; Sande, Pablo H.; de Zavalía, Nuria; Fernandez, Diego C.; Silberman, Dafne M.; Chianelli, Mónica S.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of acquired blindness which may involve an ischemic-like insult to retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve head. We investigated the effect of a weekly application of brief ischemia pulses (ischemic conditioning) on the rat retinal damage induced by experimental glaucoma. Glaucoma was induced by weekly injections of chondroitin sulfate (CS) in the rat eye anterior chamber. Retinal ischemia was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 120 mmHg for 5 min; this maneuver started after 6 weekly injections of vehicle or CS and was weekly repeated in one eye, while the contralateral eye was submitted to a sham procedure. Glaucoma was evaluated in terms of: i) intraocular pressure (IOP), ii) retinal function (electroretinogram (ERG)), iii) visual pathway function (visual evoked potentials, (VEPs)) iv) histology of the retina and optic nerve head. Retinal thiobarbituric acid substances levels were assessed as an index of lipid peroxidation. Ischemic conditioning significantly preserved ERG, VEPs, as well as retinal and optic nerve head structure from glaucomatous damage, without changes in IOP. Moreover, ischemia pulses abrogated the increase in lipid peroxidation induced by experimental glaucoma. These results indicate that induction of ischemic tolerance could constitute a fertile avenue for the development of new therapeutic strategies in glaucoma treatment. PMID:21887313

  14. Damage tolerance of nuclear graphite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Gludovatz, Bernd; Barnard, Harold S.; Kuball, Martin; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear-grade graphite is a critically important high-temperature structural material for current and potentially next generation of fission reactors worldwide. It is imperative to understand its damage-tolerant behaviour and to discern the mechanisms of damage evolution under in-service conditions. Here we perform in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography at temperatures between ambient and 1,000 °C on a nuclear-grade Gilsocarbon graphite. We find that both the strength and fracture toughness of this graphite are improved at elevated temperature. Whereas this behaviour is consistent with observations of the closure of microcracks formed parallel to the covalent-sp2-bonded graphene layers at higher temperatures, which accommodate the more than tenfold larger thermal expansion perpendicular to these layers, we attribute the elevation in strength and toughness primarily to changes in the residual stress state at 800-1,000 °C, specifically to the reduction in significant levels of residual tensile stresses in the graphite that are `frozen-in' following processing.

  15. Damage tolerance of nuclear graphite at elevated temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Gludovatz, Bernd; Barnard, Harold S.; Kuball, Martin; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear-grade graphite is a critically important high-temperature structural material for current and potentially next generation of fission reactors worldwide. It is imperative to understand its damage-tolerant behaviour and to discern the mechanisms of damage evolution under in-service conditions. Here we perform in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography at temperatures between ambient and 1,000 °C on a nuclear-grade Gilsocarbon graphite. We find that both the strength and fracture toughness of this graphite are improved at elevated temperature. Whereas this behaviour is consistent with observations of the closure of microcracks formed parallel to the covalent-sp2-bonded graphene layers at higher temperatures, which accommodate the more than tenfold larger thermal expansion perpendicular to these layers, we attribute the elevation in strength and toughness primarily to changes in the residual stress state at 800–1,000 °C, specifically to the reduction in significant levels of residual tensile stresses in the graphite that are ‘frozen-in’ following processing. PMID:28665405

  16. Pseudo-DNA damage response in senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Pospelova, Tatyana V; Demidenko, Zoya N; Bukreeva, Elena I; Pospelov, Valery A; Gudkov, Andrei V; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2009-12-15

    Cellular senescence is currently viewed as a response to DNA damage. In this report, we showed that non-damaging agents such as sodium butyrate-induced p21 and ectopic expression of either p21 or p16 cause cellular senescence without detectable DNA breaks. Nevertheless, senescent cells displayed components of DNA damage response (DDR) such as gammaH2AX foci and uniform nuclear staining for p-ATM. Importantly, there was no accumulation of 53BP1 in gammaH2AX foci of senescent cells. Consistently, comet assay failed to detect DNA damage. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTO R, which was shown to suppress cellular senescence, decreased gammaH2AX foci formation. Thus, cellular senescence leads to activation of atypical DDR without detectable DNA damage. Pseudo-DDR may be a marker of general over-activation of senescent cells.

  17. DNA Damage among Wood Workers Assessed with the Comet Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bruschweiler, Evin Danisman; Wild, Pascal; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Danuser, Brigitta; Hopf, Nancy B.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to wood dust, a human carcinogen, is common in wood-related industries, and millions of workers are occupationally exposed to wood dust worldwide. The comet assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for determining DNA damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the DNA damage associated with occupational exposure to wood dust using the comet assay (peripheral blood samples) among nonsmoking wood workers (n = 31, furniture and construction workers) and controls (n = 19). DNA damage was greater in the group exposed to composite wood products compared to the group exposed to natural woods and controls (P < 0.001). No difference in DNA damage was observed between workers exposed to natural woods and controls (P = 0.13). Duration of exposure and current dust concentrations had no effect on DNA damage. In future studies, workers’ exposures should include cumulative dust concentrations and exposures originating from the binders used in composite wood products. PMID:27398027

  18. An inducible long noncoding RNA amplifies DNA damage signaling.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Adam M; Garcia, Julia T; Hung, Tiffany; Flynn, Ryan A; Shen, Ying; Qu, Kun; Payumo, Alexander Y; Peres-da-Silva, Ashwin; Broz, Daniela Kenzelmann; Baum, Rachel; Guo, Shuling; Chen, James K; Attardi, Laura D; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-11-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalent genes with frequently precise regulation but mostly unknown functions. Here we demonstrate that lncRNAs guide the organismal DNA damage response. DNA damage activated transcription of the DINO (Damage Induced Noncoding) lncRNA via p53. DINO was required for p53-dependent gene expression, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage, and DINO expression was sufficient to activate damage signaling and cell cycle arrest in the absence of DNA damage. DINO bound to p53 protein and promoted its stabilization, mediating a p53 auto-amplification loop. Dino knockout or promoter inactivation in mice dampened p53 signaling and ameliorated acute radiation syndrome in vivo. Thus, inducible lncRNA can create a feedback loop with its cognate transcription factor to amplify cellular signaling networks.

  19. An inducible long noncoding RNA amplifies DNA damage signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Adam M.; Garcia, Julia T.; Hung, Tiffany; Flynn, Ryan A.; Shen, Ying; Qu, Kun; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Peres-da-Silva, Ashwin; Broz, Daniela Kenzelmann; Baum, Rachel; Guo, Shuling; Chen, James K.; Attardi, Laura D.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalent genes with frequently exquisite regulation but mostly unknown functions. Here we demonstrate a role of lncRNAs in guiding organismal DNA damage response. DNA damage activates transcription of DINO (Damage Induced NOncoding) via p53. DINO is required for p53-dependent gene expression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in response to DNA damage, and DINO expression suffice to activate damage signaling and cell cycle arrest in the absence of DNA damage. DINO binds to and promotes p53 protein stabilization, mediating a p53 auto-amplification loop. Dino knockout or promoter inactivation in mice dampens p53 signaling and ameliorates acute radiation syndrome in vivo. Thus, inducible lncRNA can create a feedback loop with its cognate transcription factor to amplify cellular signaling networks. PMID:27668660

  20. Intraspecific competition facilitates the evolution of tolerance to insect damage in the perennial plant Solanum carolinense.

    PubMed

    McNutt, David W; Halpern, Stacey L; Barrows, Kahaili; Underwood, Nora

    2012-12-01

    Tolerance to herbivory (the degree to which plants maintain fitness after damage) is a key component of plant defense, so understanding how natural selection and evolutionary constraints act on tolerance traits is important to general theories of plant-herbivore interactions. These factors may be affected by plant competition, which often interacts with damage to influence trait expression and fitness. However, few studies have manipulated competitor density to examine the evolutionary effects of competition on tolerance. In this study, we tested whether intraspecific competition affects four aspects of the evolution of tolerance to herbivory in the perennial plant Solanum carolinense: phenotypic expression, expression of genetic variation, the adaptive value of tolerance, and costs of tolerance. We manipulated insect damage and intraspecific competition for clonal lines of S. carolinense in a greenhouse experiment, and measured tolerance in terms of sexual and asexual fitness components. Compared to plants growing at low density, plants growing at high density had greater expression of and genetic variation in tolerance, and experienced greater fitness benefits from tolerance when damaged. Tolerance was not costly for plants growing at either density, and only plants growing at low density benefited from tolerance when undamaged, perhaps due to greater intrinsic growth rates of more tolerant genotypes. These results suggest that competition is likely to facilitate the evolution of tolerance in S. carolinense, and perhaps in other plants that regularly experience competition, while spatio-temporal variation in density may maintain genetic variation in tolerance.

  1. Transcription and DNA Damage: Holding Hands or Crossing Swords?

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-11-05

    Transcription has classically been considered a potential threat to genome integrity. Collision between transcription and DNA replication machinery, and retention of DNA:RNA hybrids, may result in genome instability. On the other hand, it has been proposed that active genes repair faster and preferentially via homologous recombination. Moreover, while canonical transcription is inhibited in the proximity of DNA double-strand breaks, a growing body of evidence supports active non-canonical transcription at DNA damage sites. Small non-coding RNAs accumulate at DNA double-strand break sites in mammals and other organisms, and are involved in DNA damage signaling and repair. Furthermore, RNA binding proteins are recruited to DNA damage sites and participate in the DNA damage response. Here, we discuss the impact of transcription on genome stability, the role of RNA binding proteins at DNA damage sites, and the function of small non-coding RNAs generated upon damage in the signaling and repair of DNA lesions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Sodium tungstate modulates ATM function upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Hernandez, C J; Llorens-Agost, M; Calbó, J; Murguia, J R; Guinovart, J J

    2013-05-21

    Both radiotherapy and most effective chemotherapeutic agents induce different types of DNA damage. Here we show that tungstate modulates cell response to DNA damaging agents. Cells treated with tungstate were more sensitive to etoposide, phleomycin and ionizing radiation (IR), all of which induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Tungstate also modulated the activation of the central DSB signalling kinase, ATM, in response to these agents. These effects required the functionality of the Mre11-Nbs1-Rad50 (MRN) complex and were mimicked by the inhibition of PP2A phosphatase. Therefore, tungstate may have adjuvant activity when combined with DNA-damaging agents in the treatment of several malignancies.

  3. DNA Damage Response and Autophagy: A Meaningful Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Eliopoulos, Aristides G.; Havaki, Sophia; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and the DNA damage response (DDR) are biological processes essential for cellular and organismal homeostasis. Herein, we summarize and discuss emerging evidence linking DDR to autophagy. We highlight published data suggesting that autophagy is activated by DNA damage and is required for several functional outcomes of DDR signaling, including repair of DNA lesions, senescence, cell death, and cytokine secretion. Uncovering the mechanisms by which autophagy and DDR are intertwined provides novel insight into the pathobiology of conditions associated with accumulation of DNA damage, including cancer and aging, and novel concepts for the development of improved therapeutic strategies against these pathologies. PMID:27917193

  4. Ultraviolet induced DNA damage and hereditary skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Francis, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Clearly, cells from normal individuals possess the ability to repair a variety of damage to DNA. Numerous studies indicate that defects in DNA repair may increase an individual's susceptibility to cancer. It is hoped that continued studies of the exact structural changes produced in the DNA by environmental insults, and the correlation of specific DNA changes with particulr cellular events, such as DNA repair, will lead to a better understanding of cell-killing, mutagenesis and carbinogenesis. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Interaction of Human and Yeast DNA Damage Recognition Complexes with Damaged DNA in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Pestryakov, Pavel E.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2013-01-01

    The human XPC-RAD23B complex and its yeast ortholog, Rad4-Rad23, are the primary initiators of global genome nucleotide excision repair. The interaction of these proteins with damaged DNA was analyzed using model DNA duplexes containing a single fluorescein-substituted dUMP analog as a lesion. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed similarity between human and yeast proteins in DNA binding. Quantitative analyses of XPC/Rad4 binding to the model DNA structures were performed by fluorescent depolarization measurements. XPC-RAD23B and Rad4-Rad23 proteins demonstrate approximately equal binding affinity to the damaged DNA duplex (KD ∼ (0.5 ± 0.1) and (0.6 ± 0.3) nm, respectively). Using photoreactive DNA containing 5-iodo-dUMP in defined positions, XPC/Rad4 location on damaged DNA was shown. Under conditions of equimolar binding to DNA both proteins exhibited the highest level of cross-links to 5I-dUMP located exactly opposite the damaged nucleotide. The positioning of the XPC and Rad4 proteins on damaged DNA by photocross-linking footprinting is consistent with x-ray analysis of the Rad4-DNA crystal complex. The identity of the XPC and Rad4 location illustrates the common principles of structure organization of DNA damage-scanning proteins from different Eukarya organisms. PMID:23443653

  6. Reshaping chromatin after DNA damage: the choreography of histone proteins.

    PubMed

    Polo, Sophie E

    2015-02-13

    DNA damage signaling and repair machineries operate in a nuclear environment where DNA is wrapped around histone proteins and packaged into chromatin. Understanding how chromatin structure is restored together with the DNA sequence during DNA damage repair has been a topic of intense research. Indeed, chromatin integrity is central to cell functions and identity. However, chromatin shows remarkable plasticity in response to DNA damage. This review presents our current knowledge of chromatin dynamics in the mammalian cell nucleus in response to DNA double strand breaks and UV lesions. I provide an overview of the key players involved in regulating histone dynamics in damaged chromatin regions, focusing on histone chaperones and their concerted action with histone modifiers, chromatin remodelers and repair factors. I also discuss how these dynamics contribute to reshaping chromatin and, by altering the chromatin landscape, may affect the maintenance of epigenetic information.

  7. The combined effect of glass buffer strips and stitching on the damage tolerance of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kullerd, Susan M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that through-the-thickness stitching provides major improvements in the damage tolerance of composite laminates loaded in compression. However, the brittle nature of polymer matrix composites makes them susceptible to damage propagation, requiring special material applications and designs to limit damage growth. Glass buffer strips, embedded within laminates, have shown the potential for improving the damage tolerance of unstitched composite laminates loaded in tension. The glass buffer strips, less stiff than the surrounding carbon fibers, arrest crack growth in composites under tensile loads. The present study investigates the damage tolerance characteristics of laminates that contain both stitching and glass buffer strips.

  8. Design, testing, and damage tolerance study of bonded stiffened composite wing cover panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madan, Ram C.; Sutton, Jason O.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from the application of damage tolerance criteria for composite panels to multistringer composite wing cover panels developed under NASA's Composite Transport Wing Technology Development contract. This conceptual wing design integrated aeroelastic stiffness constraints with an enhanced damage tolerance material system, in order to yield optimized producibility and structural performance. Damage tolerance was demonstrated in a test program using full-sized cover panel subcomponents; panel skins were impacted at midbay between stiffeners, directly over a stiffener, and over the stiffener flange edge. None of the impacts produced visible damage. NASTRAN analyses were performed to simulate NDI-detected invisible damage.

  9. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  10. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data.

  11. DNA damage in kidney transplant patients. Role of organ origin.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Zuray; Rodríguez-Ribera, Lara; Coll, Elisabet; Silva, Irene; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Ballarín, José; Marcos, Ricard; Pastor, Susana

    2017-08-19

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are characterized by elevated levels of genomic damage. This damage increases when kidney function decreases being maximum in hemodialysis patients. As kidney transplantation improves renal function, and it is related with better survival, the aim of our study was to evaluate potential changes in DNA damage levels after kidney transplantation, and comparing living donor recipients with cadaveric donor recipients. The alkaline comet assay was used to determine DNA breaks and oxidative damaged DNA; and the micronucleus assay was used to determine chromosomal breakage and/or aneuploidy. Fifty CKD patients were followed up after 6 and 12 months of their kidney transplantation. All patients increased their genomic damage levels after 6 and 12 months of renal transplantation, compared with those observed before transplantation, despite of the improvement of their metabolic functions. Donor advanced age correlated positively with higher DNA damage. Genomic damage was lower in living donor transplants with respect to cadaveric donor transplants. Our conclusion is that DNA damage increased in kidney transplantation patients, whereas their renal function improved. Higher levels of DNA damage were found in cadaveric donor transplants when compared to living donor transplants. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. HDAC inhibitors: roles of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Robert, Carine; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) increase gene expression through induction of histone acetylation. However, it remains unclear whether specific gene expression changes determine the apoptotic response following HDACis administration. Herein, we discuss evidence that HDACis trigger in cancer and leukemia cells not only widespread histone acetylation but also actual increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage that are further increased following treatment with DNA-damaging chemotherapies. While the origins of ROS production are not completely understood, mechanisms, including inflammation and altered antioxidant signaling, have been reported. While the generation of ROS is an explanation, at least in part, for the source of DNA damage observed with HDACi treatment, DNA damage can also be independently induced by changes in the DNA repair activity and chromatin remodeling factors. Recent development of sirtuin inhibitors (SIRTis) has shown that, similar to HDACis, these drugs induce increases in ROS and DNA damage used singly, or in combination with HDACis and other drugs. Thus, induction of apoptosis by HDACis/SIRTis may result through oxidative stress and DNA damage mechanisms in addition to direct activation of apoptosis-inducing genes. Nevertheless, while DNA damage and stress responses could be of interest as markers for clinical responses, they have yet to be validated as markers for responses to HDACi treatment in clinical trials, alone, and in combination.

  13. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  14. Regulation of DNA Repair Mechanisms: How the Chromatin Environment Regulates the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Jens; Richly, Holger

    2017-08-05

    Cellular DNA is constantly challenged by damage-inducing factors derived from exogenous or endogenous sources. In order to maintain genome stability and integrity, cells have evolved a wide variety of DNA repair pathways which counteract different types of DNA lesions, also referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR). However, DNA in eukaryotes is highly organized and compacted into chromatin representing major constraints for all cellular pathways, including DNA repair pathways, which require DNA as their substrate. Therefore, the chromatin configuration surrounding the lesion site undergoes dramatic remodeling to facilitate access of DNA repair factors and subsequent removal of the DNA lesion. In this review, we focus on the question of how the cellular DNA repair pathways overcome the chromatin barrier, how the chromatin environment is rearranged to facilitate efficient DNA repair, which proteins mediate this re-organization process and, consequently, how the altered chromatin landscape is involved in the regulation of DNA damage responses.

  15. Primary DNA Damage in Dry Cleaners with Perchlorethylene Exposure.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei Hachesu, Vida; Zavar Reza, Javad; Mihanpour, Hamideh; Zare Sakhvidi, Mohammad Javad; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad

    2017-10-01

    Perchloroethylene is a halogenated solvent widely used in dry cleaning. International agency of research on cancer classified this chemical as a probable human carcinogen. To evaluate the extent of primary DNA damage in dry cleaner workers who were exposed to perchloroethylene as compared to non-exposed subjects. The effect of exposure modifying factors such as use of personal protective equipment, perceived risk, and reported safe behaviors on observed DNA damage were also studied. 59 exposed and non-exposed workers were selected from Yazd, Iran. All the 33 exposed workers had work history at least 3 months in the dry cleaning shops. Peripheral blood sampling was performed. Microscope examination was performed under fluorescent microscope (400×). Open comet software was used for image analysis. All biological analysis was performed in one laboratory. Primary DNA damage to leukocytes in dry cleaners was relatively high. The median tail length, %DNA in tail, and tail moment in exposed group were significantly higher than those in non-exposed group. There was no significant difference between smokers and nonsmokers in terms of tail length, tail moment, and %DNA in tail. There was no significant correlation between duration of employment in dry cleaning and observed DNA damage in terms of tail length, tail moment and %DNA in tail. Stratified analysis based on exposed and nonexposed category showed no significant relationship between age and observed DNA damage. Occupationally exposure to perchloroethylene can cause early DNA damage in dry cleaners.

  16. Single cell trapping and DNA damage analysis using microwell arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wood, David K.; Weingeist, David M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2010-01-01

    With a direct link to cancer, aging, and heritable diseases as well as a critical role in cancer treatment, the importance of DNA damage is well-established. The intense interest in DNA damage in applications ranging from epidemiology to drug development drives an urgent need for robust, high throughput, and inexpensive tools for objective, quantitative DNA damage analysis. We have developed a simple method for high throughput DNA damage measurements that provides information on multiple lesions and pathways. Our method utilizes single cells captured by gravity into a microwell array with DNA damage revealed morphologically by gel electrophoresis. Spatial encoding enables simultaneous assays of multiple experimental conditions performed in parallel with fully automated analysis. This method also enables novel functionalities, including multiplexed labeling for parallel single cell assays, as well as DNA damage measurement in cell aggregates. We have also developed 24- and 96-well versions, which are applicable to high throughput screening. Using this platform, we have quantified DNA repair capacities of individuals with different genetic backgrounds, and compared the efficacy of potential cancer chemotherapeutics as inhibitors of a critical DNA repair enzyme, human AP endonuclease. This platform enables high throughput assessment of multiple DNA repair pathways and subpathways in parallel, thus enabling new strategies for drug discovery, genotoxicity testing, and environmental health. PMID:20534572

  17. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  18. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  19. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  20. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response.

  1. DNA damage as a biological sensor for environmental sunlight.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Garcia, Camila Carrião Machado; Makita, Kazuo; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2013-08-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is widely known as an environmental genotoxic agent that affects ecosystems and the human population, generating concerns and motivating worldwide scientific efforts to better understand the role of sunlight in the induction of DNA damage, cell death, mutagenesis, and ultimately, carcinogenesis. In this review, general aspects of UV radiation at the Earth's surface are reported, considering measurements by physical and biological sensors that monitor solar UV radiation under different environmental conditions. The formation of DNA photoproducts and other types of DNA damage by different UV wavelengths are compared with the present information on their roles in inducing biological effects. Moreover, the use of DNA-based biological dosimeters is presented as a feasible molecular and cellular tool that is focused on the evaluation of DNA lesions induced by natural sunlight. Clearly, direct environmental measurements demonstrate the biological impact of sunlight in different locations worldwide and reveal how this affects the DNA damage profile at different latitudes. These tools are also valuable for the quantification of photoprotection provided by commercial sunscreens against the induction of DNA damage and cell death, employing DNA repair-deficient cells that are hypersensitive to sunlight. Collectively, the data demonstrate the applicability of DNA-based biosensors as alternative, complementary, and reliable methods for registering variations in the genotoxic impact of solar UV radiation and for determining the level of photoprotection sunscreens provided at the level of DNA damage and cell death.

  2. Stress-induced DNA Damage biomarkers: Applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism’s endogenous processes like replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damages play a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g. X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e. single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition to such DNA damage products, we suggest possible gene inductions that can be used to characterize responses to different types of stresses i.e. radiation, oxidative and replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and stringent meta-analysis of literature data.

  3. The effect of resin on the impact damage tolerance of graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the matrix resin on the impact damage tolerance of graphite-epoxy composite laminates was investigated. The materials were evaluated on the basis of the damage incurred due to local impact and on their ability to retain compression strength in the presence of impact damage. Twenty-four different resin systems were evaluated. Five of the systems demonstrated substantial improvements compared to the baseline system including retention of compression strength in the presence of impact damage. Examination of the neat resin mechanical properties indicates the resin tensile properties influence significantly the laminate damage tolerance and that improvements in laminate damage tolerance are not necessarily made at the expense of room temperature mechanical properties. Preliminary results indicate a resin volume fraction on the order of 40 percent or greater may be required to permit the plastic flow between fibers necessary for improved damage tolerance.

  4. Acid stress damage of DNA is prevented by Dps binding in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kwang Cheol; Hung, Kai Foong; Baumler, David J; Byrd, Jeffrey J; Kaspar, Charles W

    2008-10-15

    Acid tolerance in Escherichia coli O157:H7 contributes to persistence in its bovine host and is thought to promote passage through the gastric barrier of humans. Dps (DNA-binding protein in starved cells) mutants of E. coli have reduced acid tolerance when compared to the parent strain although the role of Dps in acid tolerance is unclear. This study investigated the mechanism by which Dps contributes to acid tolerance in E. coli O157:H7. The results from this study showed that acid stress lead to damage of chromosomal DNA, which was accentuated in dps and recA mutants. The use of Bal31, which cleaves DNA at nicks and single-stranded regions, to analyze chromosomal DNA extracted from cells challenged at pH 2.0 provided in vivo evidence of acid damage to DNA. The DNA damage in a recA mutant further corroborated the hypothesis that acid stress leads to DNA strand breaks. Under in vitro assay conditions, Dps was shown to bind plasmid DNA directly and protect it from acid-induced strand breaks. Furthermore, the extraction of DNA from Dps-DNA complexes required a denaturing agent at low pH (2.2 and 3.6) but not at higher pH (>pH4.6). Low pH also restored the DNA-binding activity of heat-denatured Dps. Circular dichroism spectra revealed that at pH 3.6 and pH 2.2 Dps maintains or forms alpha-helices that are important for Dps-DNA complex formation. Results from the present work showed that acid stress results in DNA damage that is more pronounced in dps and recA mutants. The contribution of RecA to acid tolerance indicated that DNA repair was important even when Dps was present. Dps protected DNA from acid damage by binding to DNA. Low pH appeared to strengthen the Dps-DNA association and the secondary structure of Dps retained or formed alpha-helices at low pH. Further investigation into the precise interplay between DNA protection and damage repair pathways during acid stress are underway to gain additional insight.

  5. Recent Advancements in DNA Damage-Transcription Crosstalk and High-Resolution Mapping of DNA Breaks.

    PubMed

    Vitelli, Valerio; Galbiati, Alessandro; Iannelli, Fabio; Pessina, Fabio; Sharma, Sheetal; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-08-31

    Until recently, DNA damage arising from physiological DNA metabolism was considered a detrimental by-product for cells. However, an increasing amount of evidence has shown that DNA damage could have a positive role in transcription activation. In particular, DNA damage has been detected in transcriptional elements following different stimuli. These physiological DNA breaks are thought to be instrumental for the correct expression of genomic loci through different mechanisms. In this regard, although a plethora of methods are available to precisely map transcribed regions and transcription start sites, commonly used techniques for mapping DNA breaks lack sufficient resolution and sensitivity to draw a robust correlation between DNA damage generation and transcription. Recently, however, several methods have been developed to map DNA damage at single-nucleotide resolution, thus providing a new set of tools to correlate DNA damage and transcription. Here, we review how DNA damage can positively regulate transcription initiation, the current techniques for mapping DNA breaks at high resolution, and how these techniques can benefit future studies of DNA damage and transcription.

  6. Loss of Urokinase Receptor Sensitizes Cells to DNA Damage and Delays DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Pavan B.; Hodjat, Mahshid; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna; Kiyan, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage induced by numerous exogenous or endogenous factors may have irreversible consequences on the cell leading to cell cycle arrest, senescence and cell death. The DNA damage response (DDR) is powerful signaling machinery triggered in response to DNA damage, to provide DNA damage recognition, signaling and repair. Most anticancer drugs induce DNA damage, and DNA repair in turn attenuates therapeutic efficiency of those drugs. Approaches delaying DNA repair are often used to increase efficiency of treatment. Recent data show that ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for signaling and repair of DNA damage. However, mechanisms providing regulation of proteasome intracellular localization, activity, and recruitment to DNA damage sites are elusive. Even less investigated are the roles of extranuclear signaling proteins in these processes. In this study, we report the involvement of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in DDR-associated regulation of proteasome. We show that in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) uPAR activates DNA single strand break repair signaling pathway. We provide evidence that uPAR is essential for functional assembly of the 26S proteasome. We further demonstrate that uPAR mediates DNA damage-induced phosphorylation, nuclear import, and recruitment of the regulatory subunit PSMD6 to proteasome. We found that deficiency of uPAR and PSMD6 delays DNA repair and leads to decreased cell survival. These data may offer new therapeutic approaches for diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24987841

  7. Sperm DNA damage and its role in IVF and ICSI.

    PubMed

    Bach, Phil Vu; Schlegel, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    While the semen analysis has traditionally been relied upon to differentiate fertile and infertile men, its utility has been questioned in the current era of assisted reproductive technologies. The desire for more sophisticated diagnostic and predictive tools has led to increased use of sperm DNA damage in the management of male infertility. Despite the availability of numerous assays to measure sperm DNA damage, our understanding of the etiology, measurement, and clinical implications of sperm DNA damage remains incomplete. While the current evidence is fraught with heterogeneity that complicates attempts at comparison and meta-analysis, there does appear to be a role for sperm DNA damage in the development and maintenance of pregnancy in the era of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). However, as noted by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, the routine and widespread use of sperm DNA damage testing is not yet supported. Further studies are needed to standardize the measurement of sperm DNA damage and to clarify the exact role of sperm DNA damage within the myriad of other male and female factors contributing to reproductive outcomes in IVF and ICSI.

  8. Oxidative and non-oxidative DNA damage and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Malik, Qudsia; Herbert, Karl E

    2012-04-01

    Evidence for the association of DNA damage with cardiovascular disease has been obtained from in vitro cell culture models, experimental cardiovascular disease and analysis of samples obtained from humans with disease. There is general acceptance that several factors associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular disease cause oxidative damage to DNA in cell culture models with both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA as targets. Moreover, evidence obtained over the past 10 years points to a possible mechanistic role for DNA damage in experimental atherosclerosis culminating in recent studies challenging the assumption that DNA damage is merely a biomarker of the disease process. This kind of mechanistic insight provides a renewed impetus for further studies in this area.

  9. 75 FR 24502 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures; Reopening of Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 27 and 29 RIN 2120-AJ52 Damage Tolerance and Fatigue... 793) Notice No. 09-12, entitled ``Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite...

  10. 77 FR 50576 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures; OMB Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 27 and 29 RIN 2120-AJ52 Damage Tolerance and Fatigue... collection requirement contained in the FAA's final rule, ``Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of... and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures,'' published in the Federal Register (76...

  11. Imaging the DNA damage response with PET and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Knight, James C; Koustoulidou, Sofia; Cornelissen, Bart

    2017-06-01

    DNA integrity is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous factors that can alter the DNA sequence, leading to mutagenesis, aberrant transcriptional activity, and cytotoxicity. Left unrepaired, damaged DNA can ultimately lead to the development of cancer. To overcome this threat, a series of complex mechanisms collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) are able to detect the various types of DNA damage that can occur and stimulate the appropriate repair process. Each DNA damage repair pathway leads to the recruitment, upregulation, or activation of specific proteins within the nucleus, which, in some cases, can represent attractive targets for molecular imaging. Given the well-established involvement of DDR during tumorigenesis and cancer therapy, the ability to monitor these repair processes non-invasively using nuclear imaging techniques may facilitate the earlier detection of cancer and may also assist in monitoring response to DNA damaging treatment. This review article aims to provide an overview of recent efforts to develop PET and SPECT radiotracers for imaging of DNA damage repair proteins.

  12. Aging of hematopoietic stem cells: DNA damage and mutations?

    PubMed

    Moehrle, Bettina M; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Aging in the hematopoietic system and the stem cell niche contributes to aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including leukemia and aging-associated immune remodeling. Among others, the DNA damage theory of aging of HSCs is well established, based on the detection of a significantly larger amount of γH2AX foci and a higher tail moment in the comet assay, both initially thought to be associated with DNA damage in aged HSCs compared with young cells, and bone marrow failure in animals devoid of DNA repair factors. Novel data on the increase in and nature of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system with age, the quality of the DNA damage response in aged HSCs, and the nature of γH2AX foci question a direct link between DNA damage and the DNA damage response and aging of HSCs, and rather favor changes in epigenetics, splicing-factors or three-dimensional architecture of the cell as major cell intrinsic factors of HSCs aging. Aging of HSCs is also driven by a strong contribution of aging of the niche. This review discusses the DNA damage theory of HSC aging in the light of these novel mechanisms of aging of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Single-step intercalating dye strategies for DNA damage studies.

    PubMed

    Paidipalli, Manasa; Pjescic, Ilija; Hindmarsh, Patrick L; Crews, Niel D

    2013-08-01

    Many analytical protocols exist for the quantification of varied types of DNA damage, which span a range of complexity and sensitivity. As an alternative or companion to existing procedures, this article demonstrates the application of quantitative PCR (qPCR) and high-resolution DNA melting analysis (HRMA) to the detection and quantification of intramolecular DNA damage and/or strand breaks. These proven molecular biology methods are essentially single-step processes. When implemented with a third-generation saturating DNA dye, high sensitivity can be obtained. The experiments presented here demonstrate how DNA damage can inhibit amplification of the affected molecules. This corresponding decrease in the initial concentration of amplifiable DNA can be measured with qPCR. In addition, damage in the form of intramolecular dimerization and strand breaks alters the stored energy in the hydrogen bonds between the two strands in the dsDNA molecule. This significantly affects the thermal stability, which can be measured with extreme precision using HRMA. Simplified damage models were used in these experiments: UV-C irradiation to produce photoproducts, and restriction enzyme digestion to simulate double-strand breaks. The findings of this work, however, can be intuitively applied to the broad scope of DNA damage mechanisms.

  14. DNA damage and repair after high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis; Anderson, Jennifer

    Predictions from biophysical models of interactions of radiation tracks with cellular DNA indicate that clustered DNA damage sites, defined as two or more lesions formed within one or two helical turns of the DNA by passage of a single radiation track, are formed in mammalian cells. These complex DNA damage sites are regarded as a signature of ionizing radiation exposure particularly as the likelihood of clustered damage sites arising endogenously is low. For instance, it was predicted from biophysical modelling that 30-40% of low LET-induced double strand breaks (DSB), a form of clustered damage, are complex with the yield increasing to >90% for high LET radiation, consistent with the reduced reparability of DSB with increasing ionization density of the radiation. The question arises whether the increased biological effects such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and lethality is in part related to DNA damage complexity and/or spatial distribution of the damage sites, which may lead to small DNA fragments. With particle radiation it is also important to consider not only delta-rays which may cause clustered damaged sites and may be highly mutagenic but the non-random spatial distribution of DSB which may lead to deletions. In this overview I will concentrate on the molecular aspects of the variation of the complexity of DNA damage on radiation quality and the challenges this complexity presents the DNA damage repair pathways. I will draw on data from micro-irradiations which indicate that the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining is highly regulated with pathway choice and kinetics of repair dependent on the chemical complexity of the DSB. In summary the aim is to emphasis the link between the spatial distribution of energy deposition events related to the track, the molecular products formed and the consequence of damage complexity contributing to biological effects and to present some of the outstanding molecular challenges with particle radiation.

  15. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies.

  16. Analysis of chromatin integrity and DNA damage of buffalo spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, K. Gh. M.; El-Sokary, A. A. E.; Abdel-Ghaffar, A. E.; Abou El-Roos, M. E. A.; Ahmed, Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine chromatin integrity and DNA damage by DNA electrophoresis and comet assays of buffalo fresh and frozen semen. Semen samples were collected from four buffalo bulls and evaluated after freezing for semen motility, viability, sperm abnormalities, chromatin integrity and DNA damage. A significant variation was found in semen parameters after thawing. Highly significant differences (P<0.001) in chromatin integrity were observed between fresh and frozen semen. For the fresh semen, there was no significant difference between the bulls for chromatin integrity; however, a significant variation (P<0.05) was detected in their frozen semen. No DNA fragmentation was observed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The percentage of sperm with damaged DNA detected by comet assay differed significantly between fresh and frozen semen. A significant negative correlation was recorded between motility and DNA damage (r=-0.68, P<0.05). Sperm abnormalities and DNA fragmentation were significantly positively correlated (r=0.59, P<0.05). In conclusion, DNA damage evaluation can provide reassurance about genomic normalcy and guide the development of improved methods of selecting spermatozoa with intact DNA to be used in artificial insemination. PMID:27175169

  17. Reactive Scattering Damage to DNA Components by Hyperthermal Secondary Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Zongwu; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen; Huels, Michael A.

    2006-06-23

    We have observed reactive scattering damage to fundamental DNA building blocks by the type of hyperthermal secondary ions that are produced along heavy ion tracks in biological media. Reactions include carbon abstraction by N{sup +}, and hydrogen abstraction by O{sup -} and N{sup +}, at collision energies down to 1 eV. Our results show that localized reactive scattering by hyperthermal secondary fragments can lead to important physicochemical damage to DNA in cells irradiated by heavy ions. This suggests a fundamentally different picture of nascent DNA damage induced by heavy ion tracks, compared to conventional (x or {gamma}) radiation tracks.

  18. Reactive Scattering Damage to DNA Components by Hyperthermal Secondary Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zongwu; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen; Huels, Michael A.

    2006-06-01

    We have observed reactive scattering damage to fundamental DNA building blocks by the type of hyperthermal secondary ions that are produced along heavy ion tracks in biological media. Reactions include carbon abstraction by N+, and hydrogen abstraction by O- and N+, at collision energies down to 1 eV. Our results show that localized reactive scattering by hyperthermal secondary fragments can lead to important physicochemical damage to DNA in cells irradiated by heavy ions. This suggests a fundamentally different picture of nascent DNA damage induced by heavy ion tracks, compared to conventional (x or γ) radiation tracks.

  19. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  20. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  1. DNA damage processing at telomeres: The ends justify the means.

    PubMed

    Fouquerel, Elise; Parikh, Dhvani; Opresko, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Telomeres at chromosome ends are nucleoprotein structures consisting of tandem TTAGGG repeats and a complex of proteins termed shelterin. DNA damage and repair at telomeres is uniquely influenced by the ability of telomeric DNA to form alternate structures including loops and G-quadruplexes, coupled with the ability of shelterin proteins to interact with and regulate enzymes in every known DNA repair pathway. The role of shelterin proteins in preventing telomeric ends from being falsely recognized and processed as DNA double strand breaks is well established. Here we focus instead on recent developments in understanding the roles of shelterin proteins and telomeric DNA sequence and structure in processing genuine damage at telomeres induced by endogenous and exogenous DNA damage agents. We will highlight advances in double strand break repair, base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair at telomeres, and will discuss important questions remaining in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  3. A fluorescence enhancement assay for cellular DNA damage. [X Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, P.M.; Schwartz, H.S.

    1982-07-01

    A fluorescence procedure is described for quantitative measurement of DNA damage in mammalian cells. The technique is based upon the time-dependent partial alkaline unwinding of cellular DNA followed by determination of duplex:total DNA ratios with bisbenzamide, which has a differential molar fluorescence with single-stranded and duplex DNA. The method is rapid, does not require radioactive labeling of DNA, and is sufficiently sensitive to detect damage induced with 100 rads of X-irradiation. This method is standardized with respect to the alkaline unwinding unit, Mn0, and the unwinding constant, beta. Results obtained with this new technique and with hydroxylapatite chromatography for physical separation of single- and double-stranded DNA were confirmatory. The utility of the technique was demonstrated by detection of dose-related damage with X-irradiation and a variety of antineoplastic agents in unlabeled murine leukemia cells.

  4. Oxidatively induced DNA damage and its repair in cancer.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2015-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by endogenous and exogenous reactive species. DNA lesions resulting from this type of damage are mutagenic and cytotoxic and, if not repaired, can cause genetic instability that may lead to disease processes including carcinogenesis. Living organisms possess DNA repair mechanisms that include a variety of pathways to repair multiple DNA lesions. Mutations and polymorphisms also occur in DNA repair genes adversely affecting DNA repair systems. Cancer tissues overexpress DNA repair proteins and thus develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions before they become toxic is a major mechanism for development of resistance to therapy, affecting patient survival. Accumulated evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker for patient response to therapy. Thus, knowledge of DNA protein expressions in normal and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. DNA repair proteins constitute targets for inhibitors to overcome the resistance of tumors to therapy. Inhibitors of DNA repair for combination therapy or as single agents for monotherapy may help selectively kill tumors, potentially leading to personalized therapy. Numerous inhibitors have been developed and are being tested in clinical trials. The efficacy of some inhibitors in therapy has been demonstrated in patients. Further development of inhibitors of DNA repair proteins is globally underway to help eradicate cancer.

  5. DNA intercalator BMH-21 inhibits RNA polymerase I independent of DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Colis, Laureen; Peltonen, Karita; Sirajuddin, Paul; Liu, Hester; Sanders, Sara; Ernst, Glen; Barrow, James C; Laiho, Marikki

    2014-06-30

    DNA intercalation is a major therapeutic modality for cancer therapeutic drugs. The therapeutic activity comes at a cost of normal tissue toxicity and genotoxicity. We have recently described a planar heterocyclic small molecule DNA intercalator, BMH-21, that binds ribosomal DNA and inhibits RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription. Despite DNA intercalation, BMH-21 does not cause phosphorylation of H2AX, a key biomarker activated in DNA damage stress. Here we assessed whether BMH-21 activity towards expression and localization of Pol I marker proteins depends on DNA damage signaling and repair pathways. We show that BMH-21 effects on the nucleolar stress response were independent of major DNA damage associated PI3-kinase pathways, ATM, ATR and DNA-PKcs. However, testing a series of BMH-21 derivatives with alterations in its N,N-dimethylaminocarboxamide arm showed that several derivatives had acquired the property to activate ATM- and DNA-PKcs -dependent damage sensing and repair pathways while their ability to cause nucleolar stress and affect cell viability was greatly reduced. The data show that BMH-21 is a chemically unique DNA intercalator that has high bioactivity towards Pol I inhibition without activation or dependence of DNA damage stress. The findings also show that interference with DNA and DNA metabolic processes can be exploited therapeutically without causing DNA damage.

  6. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process developed and patented by The Welding Institute in Cambridge, England. Friction stir welding has been implemented in the aerospace industry in the fabrication of longitudinal welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks. As the industry looks to implement friction stir welding in circumferential welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks, techniques to close out the termination hole associated with retracting the pin tool are being evaluated. Friction pull plug welding is under development as a one means of closing out the termination hole. A friction pull plug weld placed in a friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite, plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size in the test or service environments. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in two aluminum alloy friction plug weld configurations is presented.

  7. Structurally Integrated, Damage-Tolerant, Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackel, Andrew; Dwivedi, Gopal; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Thermal spray coatings are used extensively for the protection and life extension of engineering components exposed to harsh wear and/or corrosion during service in aerospace, energy, and heavy machinery sectors. Cermet coatings applied via high-velocity thermal spray are used in aggressive wear situations almost always coupled with corrosive environments. In several instances (e.g., landing gear), coatings are considered as part of the structure requiring system-level considerations. Despite their widespread use, the technology has lacked generalized scientific principles for robust coating design, manufacturing, and performance analysis. Advances in process and in situ diagnostics have provided significant insights into the process-structure-property-performance correlations providing a framework-enhanced design. In this overview, critical aspects of materials, process, parametrics, and performance are discussed through exemplary studies on relevant compositions. The underlying connective theme is understanding and controlling residual stresses generation, which not only addresses process dynamics but also provides linkage for process-property relationship for both the system (e.g., fatigue) and the surface (wear and corrosion). The anisotropic microstructure also invokes the need for damage-tolerant material design to meet future goals.

  8. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  9. Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Gallagher, David C.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2011-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

  10. Proteins in the Nutrient-Sensing and DNA Damage Checkpoint Pathways Cooperate to Restrain Mitotic Progression following DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Searle, Jennifer S.; Wood, Matthew D.; Kaur, Mandeep; Tobin, David V.; Sanchez, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    Checkpoint pathways regulate genomic integrity in part by blocking anaphase until all chromosomes have been completely replicated, repaired, and correctly aligned on the spindle. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA damage and mono-oriented or unattached kinetochores trigger checkpoint pathways that bifurcate to regulate both the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The sensor-associated kinase, Mec1, phosphorylates two downstream kinases, Chk1 and Rad53. Activation of Chk1 and Rad53 prevents anaphase and causes inhibition of the mitotic exit network. We have previously shown that the PKA pathway plays a role in blocking securin and Clb2 destruction following DNA damage. Here we show that the Mec1 DNA damage checkpoint regulates phosphorylation of the regulatory (R) subunit of PKA following DNA damage and that the phosphorylated R subunit has a role in restraining mitosis following DNA damage. In addition we found that proteins known to regulate PKA in response to nutrients and stress either by phosphorylation of the R subunit or regulating levels of cAMP are required for the role of PKA in the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data indicate that there is cross-talk between the DNA damage checkpoint and the proteins that integrate nutrient and stress signals to regulate PKA. PMID:21779180

  11. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and {gamma}H2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by

  12. Bayesian estimation of sequence damage in ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simon Y W; Heupink, Tim H; Rambaut, Andrew; Shapiro, Beth

    2007-06-01

    DNA extracted from archaeological and paleontological remains is usually damaged by biochemical processes postmortem. Some of these processes lead to changes in the structure of the DNA molecule, which can result in the incorporation of incorrect nucleotides during polymerase chain reaction. These base misincorporations, or miscoding lesions, can lead to the inclusion of spurious additional mutations in ancient DNA (aDNA) data sets. This has the potential to affect the outcome of phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, including estimates of mutation rates and genetic diversity. We present a novel model, termed the delta model, which estimates the amount of damage in DNA data and accounts for its effects in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. The ability of the delta model to estimate damage is first investigated using a simulation study. The model is then applied to 13 aDNA data sets. The amount of damage in these data sets is shown to be significant but low (about 1 damaged base per 750 nt), suggesting that precautions for limiting the influence of damaged sites, such as cloning and enzymatic treatment, are worthwhile. The results also suggest that relatively high rates of mutation previously estimated from aDNA data are not entirely an artifact of sequence damage and are likely to be due to other factors such as the persistence of transient polymorphisms. The delta model appears to be particularly useful for placing upper credibility limits on the amount of sequence damage in an alignment, and this capacity might be beneficial for future aDNA studies or for the estimation of sequencing errors in modern DNA.

  13. A model of the cell nucleus for DNA damage calculations.

    PubMed

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Girard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Development of a computer model of genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the human cell nucleus for DNA damage and repair calculations. The model comprises the human genomic DNA, chromosomal domains, and loops attached to factories. A model of canonical B-DNA was used to build the nucleosomes and the 30-nanometer solenoidal chromatin. In turn the chromatin was used to form the loops of factories in chromosome domains. The entire human genome was placed in a spherical nucleus of 10 micrometers diameter. To test the new target model, tracks of protons and alpha-particles were generated using Monte Carlo track structure codes PITS99 (Positive Ion Track Structure) and KURBUC. Damage sites induced in the genome were located and classified according to type and complexity. The three-dimensional structure of the genome starting with a canonical B-DNA model, nucleosomes, and chromatin loops in chromosomal domains are presented. The model was used to obtain frequencies of DNA damage induced by protons and alpha-particles by direct energy deposition, including single- and double-strand breaks, base damage, and clustered lesions. This three-dimensional model of the genome is the first such model using the full human genome for the next generation of more comprehensive modelling of DNA damage and repair. The model combines simple geometrical structures at the level of domains and factories with potentially full detail at the level of atoms in particular genes, allowing damage patterns in the latter to be simulated.

  14. DNA damage in cancer therapeutics: a boon or a curse?

    PubMed

    Khanna, Anchit

    2015-06-01

    Millions of DNA-damaging lesions occur every day in each cell of our bodies due to various stresses. The failure to detect and accurately repair these lesions can give rise to cells with high levels of endogenous DNA damage, deleterious mutations, or genomic aberrations. Such genomic instability can lead to the activation of specific signaling pathways, including the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Constitutive activation of DDR proteins has been observed in human tumor specimens from different cancer stages, including precancerous and metastatic cancers, although not in normal tissues. The tumor-suppressive role of DDR activity during the premalignant stage has been studied, and strong evidence is emerging for an oncogenic role for DDR proteins such as DNA-PK and CHK1 during the later stages of tumor development. However, the majority of current cancer therapies induce DNA damage, potentially exacerbating protumorigenic genomic instability and enabling the development of resistance. Therefore, elucidating the molecular basis of DNA damage-mediated genomic instability and its role in tumorigenesis is critical. Finally, I discuss the potential existence of distinct DNA damage thresholds at various stages of tumorigenesis and what the ramifications of such thresholds would be, including the ambiguous role of the DDR pathway in human cancers, therapy-induced malignancies, and enhanced therapies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Commentary: Mitochondrial DNA damage and loss in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, Robert

    2016-10-01

    This commentary discusses damage and loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in type 2 diabetes mellitus from both the clinical and experimental perspectives. Increasingly, an array of studies in experimental models and patients suggests that the cellular stresses of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes damage mtDNA, leading to loss of mitochondrial genetic content. As such, mtDNA is emerging as both a valuable monitoring tool and translational preventive target for metabolic disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1% NP-40.

  17. Electrochemical study of DNA damaged by oxidation stress.

    PubMed

    Zitka, Ondrej; Krizkova, Sona; Skalickova, Sylvie; Kopel, Pavel; Babula, Petr; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2013-02-01

    Many compounds can interact with DNA leading to changes of DNA structure as point mutation and bases excision, which could trigger some metabolic failures, which leads to the changes in DNA structure resulting in cancer. Oxidation of nucleic acid bases belongs to the one of the mostly occurred type of DNA damaging leading to the above mentioned phenomena. The investigation of processes of DNA oxidation damage is topical and electrochemical methods include a versatile and sensitive tool for these purposes. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is the most widely accepted marker of DNA damage. Oxidative damage to DNA by free radicals and exposure to ionizing radiation generate several other products within the double helix besides mentioned oxidation products of nucleic acid bases. The basic electrochemical behaviour of nucleic acids bases on various types of carbon electrodes is reviewed. Further, we address our attention on description of oxidation mechanisms and on detection of the most important products of nucleic bases oxidation. The miniaturization of detector coupled with some microfluidic devices is suggested and discussed. The main aim of this review is to report the advantages and features of the electrochemical detection of guanine oxidation product as 8-OHdG and other similarly produced molecules as markers for DNA damage.

  18. Water availability limits tolerance of apical damage in the Chilean tarweed Madia sativa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzáles, Wilfredo L.; Suárez, Lorena H.; Molina-Montenegro, Marco A.; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2008-07-01

    Plant tolerance is the ability to reduce the negative impact of herbivory on plant fitness. Numerous studies have shown that plant tolerance is affected by nutrient availability, but the effect of soil moisture has received less attention. We evaluated tolerance of apical damage (clipping that mimicked insect damage) under two watering regimes (control watering and drought) in the tarweed Madia sativa (Asteraceae). We recorded number of heads with seeds and total number of heads as traits related to fitness. Net photosynthetic rate, water use efficiency, number of branches, shoot biomass, and the root:shoot biomass ratio were measured as traits potentially related to tolerance via compensatory responses to damage. In the drought treatment, damaged plants showed ≈43% reduction in reproductive fitness components in comparison with undamaged plants. In contrast, there was no significant difference in reproductive fitness between undamaged and damaged plants in the control watering treatment. Shoot biomass was not affected by apical damage. The number of branches increased after damage in both water treatments but this increase was limited by drought stress. Net photosynthetic rate increased in damaged plants only in the control watering treatment. Water use efficiency increased with drought stress and, in plants regularly watered, also increased after damage. Root:shoot ratio was higher in the low water treatment and damaged plants tended to reduce root:shoot ratio only in this water treatment. It is concluded that water availability limits tolerance to apical damage in M. sativa, and that putative compensatory mechanisms are differentially affected by water availability.

  19. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA.

  20. DNA damage in Wistar Kyoto rats exercised during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Mikaela da Silva; Gelaleti, Rafael Bottaro; Bento, Giovana Fernanda; Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Peraçoli, José Carlos

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate DNA damage levels in pregnant rats undergoing a treadmill exercise program. Wistar Kyoto rats were allocated into two groups (n= 5 animals/group): non-exercise and exercise. The pregnant rats were underwent an exercise protocol on a treadmill throughout pregnancy. Exercise intensity was set at 50% of maximal capacity during maximal exercise testing performed before mating. Body weight, blood pressure and glucose levels, and triglyceride concentration were measured during pregnancy. At day 10 post-natal, the animals were euthanized and maternal blood samples were collected for DNA damage. Blood pressure and glucose levels and biochemical measurements showed no significant differences. Increased DNA damage levels were found in exercise group compared to those of non-exercise group (p<0.05). The exercise intensity protocol used in the study might have been exhaustive leading to maternal increased DNA damage levels, demonstrating the relevance of an adequate protocol of physical exercise.

  1. Carbamate insecticide methomyl confers cytotoxicity through DNA damage induction.

    PubMed

    Guanggang, Xiang; Diqiu, Li; Jianzhong, Yuan; Jingmin, Guan; Huifeng, Zhai; Mingan, Shi; Liming, Tao

    2013-03-01

    Carbamate insecticide methomyl could induce genotoxic effects, including micronuclei, chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchanges. However, methomyl induction of cytotoxicity through DNA damage is largely unknown. Here we identify cytotoxicity and potential genotoxicity of methomyl in vitro. We have employed alkaline comet assay, γH2AX foci formation and DNA ladder assay to detected DNA damage and apoptosis of Drosophila S2, HeLa and HEK293 cells. The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate total DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in the target cells exposed in vitro to sublethal concentrations of methomyl. As expected, methomyl induced significant concentration-dependent increases in DNA damage of target cells compared with the negative control, as measured by increases in tail length (μm), tail DNA (percentage of the comet tail) and tail moment (arbitrary units). In agreement with the comet assay data, the percentage of γH2AX positive reaction in HeLa cells also revealed methomyl caused DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, methomyl induced a significant increase of apoptosis in Drosophila S2, HeLa and HEK293 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, as determined by Urea PAGE DNA fragmentation analysis. In conclusion, methomyl is a strongly genotoxic agent that induces cell DNA damage and apoptosis in vitro at these sublethal concentrations.

  2. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: DNA replication in the presence of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Tang, Yong; Cao, Jia; Guengerich, F. Peter; Zhang, Huidong

    2017-01-01

    Environmental mutagens cause DNA damage that disturbs replication and produces mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. We discuss mechanisms of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage, from the level of DNA replication by a single polymerase to the complex DNA replisome of some typical model organisms (including bacteriophage T7, T4, Sulfolobus solfataricus, E. coli, yeast and human). For a single DNA polymerase, DNA damage can affect replication in three major ways: reducing replication fidelity, causing frameshift mutations, and blocking replication. For the DNA replisome, protein interactions and the functions of accessory proteins can yield rather different results even with a single DNA polymerase. The mechanism of mutation during replication performed by the DNA replisome is a long-standing question. Using new methods and techniques, the replisomes of certain organisms and human cell extracts can now be investigated with regard to the bypass of DNA damage. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage in replication at the levels of single DNA polymerases and complex DNA replisomes, including translesion DNA synthesis. PMID:27234563

  3. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: DNA replication in the presence of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Tang, Yong; Cao, Jia; Guengerich, F Peter; Zhang, Huidong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental mutagens cause DNA damage that disturbs replication and produces mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. We discuss mechanisms of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage, from the level of DNA replication by a single polymerase to the complex DNA replisome of some typical model organisms (including bacteriophage T7, T4, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Escherichia coli, yeast and human). For a single DNA polymerase, DNA damage can affect replication in three major ways: reducing replication fidelity, causing frameshift mutations, and blocking replication. For the DNA replisome, protein interactions and the functions of accessory proteins can yield rather different results even with a single DNA polymerase. The mechanism of mutation during replication performed by the DNA replisome is a long-standing question. Using new methods and techniques, the replisomes of certain organisms and human cell extracts can now be investigated with regard to the bypass of DNA damage. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage in replication at the levels of single DNA polymerases and complex DNA replisomes, including translesion DNA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins in DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Kai, Mihoko

    2016-02-27

    Living cells experience DNA damage as a result of replication errors and oxidative metabolism, exposure to environmental agents (e.g., ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation (IR)), and radiation therapies and chemotherapies for cancer treatments. Accumulation of DNA damage can lead to multiple diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancers, immune deficiencies, infertility, and also aging. Cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms to deal with DNA damage. Networks of DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are coordinated to detect and repair DNA damage, regulate cell cycle and transcription, and determine the cell fate. Upstream factors of DNA damage checkpoints and repair, "sensor" proteins, detect DNA damage and send the signals to downstream factors in order to maintain genomic integrity. Unexpectedly, we have discovered that an RNA-processing factor is involved in DNA repair processes. We have identified a gene that contributes to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)'s treatment resistance and recurrence. This gene, RBM14, is known to function in transcription and RNA splicing. RBM14 is also required for maintaining the stem-like state of GBM spheres, and it controls the DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway by interacting with KU80. RBM14 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP) with low complexity domains, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), and it also physically interacts with PARP1. Furthermore, RBM14 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent manner (unpublished data). DNA-dependent PARP1 (poly-(ADP) ribose polymerase 1) makes key contributions in the DNA damage response (DDR) network. RBM14 therefore plays an important role in a PARP-dependent DSB repair process. Most recently, it was shown that the other RBPs with intrinsically disordered domains are recruited to DNA damage sites in a PAR-dependent manner, and that these RBPs form liquid compartments (also known as "liquid-demixing"). Among the

  5. Chemical studies on DNA damage by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagiya, V. Tsutomu; Sakano, Koichi; Nishimoto, Sei-Ici

    The radiation chemical characteristics of DNA-related compounds, especially thymine, as the most radiosensitivity DNA base in aqueous solution, are shown to obtain correlations with the radiation inactivations of bacterial and mammalian cultured cells. Recent development of chemical sensitizers for modification of the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells, which is closely associated with the radiation therapy of cancer, is also reviewed.

  6. Shuttle/Centaur G-prime composite adapters damage tolerance/repair test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollars, Teresa A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle/Centaur Composite Adapters Damage Tolerance/Repair Test program had as its goals the determination of probable and potentially critical defects or damages on the adapters' strength and stability, as well as the adequacy of repairs on significantly damaged areas and the generation of NDT data for the upgrading of acceptance criteria. Such rational accept/reject criteria and repair methods reduce both engineering liason costs and any unnecessary parts-scrapping. Successful 'damage tolerant' design ensures that degradations of strength and stability due to undetected defects or damage will not be catastrophic.

  7. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in teratogenesis and neurodevelopmental deficits.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; McCallum, Gordon P; Lam, Kyla C H; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Ondovcik, Stephanie L

    2010-06-01

    Several teratogenic agents, including ionizing radiation and xenobiotics such as phenytoin, benzo[a]pyrene, thalidomide, and methamphetamine, can initiate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules including DNA. Oxidative DNA damage, and particularly the most prevalent 8-oxoguanine lesion, may adversely affect development, likely via alterations in gene transcription rather than via a mutational mechanism. Contributions from oxidative DNA damage do not exclude roles for alternative mechanisms of initiation like receptor-mediated processes or the formation of covalent xenobiotic-macromolecular adducts, damage to other macromolecular targets like proteins and lipids, and other effects of ROS like altered signal transduction. Even in the absence of teratogen exposure, endogenous developmental oxidative stress can have embryopathic consequences in the absence of key pathways for detoxifying ROS or repairing DNA damage. Critical proteins in pathways for DNA damage detection/repair signaling, like p53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and DNA repair itself, like oxoguanine glycosylase 1 and Cockayne syndrome B, can often, but not always, protect the embryo from ROS-initiating teratogens. Protection may be variably dependent upon such factors as the nature of the teratogen and its concentration within the embryo, the stage of development, the species, strain, gender, target tissue and cell type, among other factors.

  8. Prevention of DNA damage in human skin by topical sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catherine M; Wilson, Louise F; Green, Adèle C; Biswas, Neela; Loyalka, Juhi; Whiteman, David C

    2017-05-01

    There is strong evidence that topical sunscreens, designed to protect against ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced erythema, decrease the amount of UVR to which the skin is exposed, but their effectiveness in reducing UVR-induced DNA damage in vivo has not been well quantified. We systematically reviewed the published literature (1990-2015) to determine whether sunscreens prevent DNA damage in human skin when applied prior to UVR exposure. We included experimental studies measuring UVR-induced DNA damage in human skin in vivo with and without sunscreens and excluded studies conducted in animal models and cell lines. Eligible studies were identified by computerized search of bibliographic databases, supplemented by hand-searching the reference lists of retrieved articles. We identified ten eligible studies. Despite heterogeneity in methodological approaches, including the sun protection factors of the sunscreens assessed, range of skin types examined, the UVR exposure time and dose, the timing of post-irradiation biopsies and in the markers of DNA damage examined, all studies reported markedly reduced (or nil) UVR-induced DNA damage on sunscreen-protected skin. Our review of the experimental evidence supports a protective effect of topical sunscreens in preventing UVR-induced DNA damage in human skin cells in vivo. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  10. Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dennis H.; King, Brett A.; Boxer, Steven G.; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Psoralens linked to triplex-forming oligonucleotides (psoTFOs) have been used in conjunction with laser-induced two-photon excitation (TPE) to damage a specific DNA target sequence. To demonstrate that TPE can initiate photochemistry resulting in psoralen–DNA photoadducts, target DNA sequences were incubated with psoTFOs to form triple-helical complexes and then irradiated in liquid solution with pulsed 765-nm laser light, which is half the quantum energy required for conventional one-photon excitation, as used in psoralen + UV A radiation (320–400 nm) therapy. Target DNA acquired strand-specific psoralen monoadducts in a light dose-dependent fashion. To localize DNA damage in a model tissue-like medium, a DNA–psoTFO mixture was prepared in a polyacrylamide gel and then irradiated with a converging laser beam targeting the rear of the gel. The highest number of photoadducts formed at the rear while relatively sparing DNA at the front of the gel, demonstrating spatial localization of sequence-specific DNA damage by TPE. To assess whether TPE treatment could be extended to cells without significant toxicity, cultured monolayers of normal human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with tritium-labeled psoralen without TFO to maximize detectable damage and irradiated by TPE. DNA from irradiated cells treated with psoralen exhibited a 4- to 7-fold increase in tritium activity relative to untreated controls. Functional survival assays indicated that the psoralen–TPE treatment was not toxic to cells. These results demonstrate that DNA damage can be simultaneously manipulated at the nucleotide level and in three dimensions. This approach for targeting photochemical DNA damage may have photochemotherapeutic applications in skin and other optically accessible tissues. PMID:11572980

  11. Aberrant BLM cytoplasmic expression associates with DNA damage stress and hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Votino, Carolina; Laudanna, Carmelo; Parcesepe, Pietro; Giordano, Guido; Remo, Andrea; Manfrin, Erminia; Pancione, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Bloom syndrome is a rare and recessive disorder characterized by loss-of-function mutations of the BLM gene, which encodes a RecQ 3'-5' DNA helicase. Despite its putative tumor suppressor function, the contribution of BLM to human sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) remains poorly understood. The transcriptional regulation mechanism underlying BLM and related DNA damage response regulation in independent CRC subsets and a panel of derived cell lines was investigated by bioinformatics analysis, the transcriptomic profile, a CpG island promoter methylation assay, Western blot, and an immunolocalization assay. In silico analysis of gene expression data sets revealed that BLM is overexpressed in poorly differentiated CRC and exhibits a close connection with shorter relapse-free survival even after adjustment for prognostic factors and pathways that respond to DNA damage response through ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling. Functional characterization demonstrated that CpG island promoter hypomethylation increases BLM expression and associates with cytoplasmic BLM mislocalization and increased DNA damage response both in clinical CRC samples and in derived cancer cell lines. The DNA-damaging agent S-adenosylmethionine suppresses BLM expression, leading to the inhibition of cell growth following accumulation of DNA damage. In tumor specimens, cytoplasmic accumulation of BLM correlates with DNA damage and γH2AX and phosphorylated ATM foci and predicts long-term progression-free survival in metastatic patients treated with irinotecan. Taken together, the findings of this study provide the first evidence that cancer-linked DNA hypomethylation and cytosolic BLM mislocalization might reflect compromised levels of DNA-repair activity and enhanced hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in CRC patients.

  12. Nonhomologous end-joining promotes resistance to DNA damage in the absence of an ADP-ribosyltransferase that signals DNA single strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Couto, C Anne-Marie; Hsu, Duen-Wei; Teo, Regina; Rakhimova, Alina; Lempidaki, Styliana; Pears, Catherine J; Lakin, Nicholas D

    2013-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation of proteins at DNA lesions by ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) is an early response to DNA damage. The best defined role of ADP-ribosylation in the DNA damage response is in repair of single strand breaks (SSBs). Recently, we initiated a study of how ADP-ribosylation regulates DNA repair in Dictyostelium and found that two ARTs (Adprt1b and Adprt2) are required for tolerance of cells to SSBs, and a third ART (Adprt1a) promotes nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Here we report that disruption of adprt2 results in accumulation of DNA damage throughout the cell cycle following exposure to agents that induce base damage and DNA SSBs. Although ADP-ribosylation is evident in adprt2(-) cells exposed to methylmethanesulfonate (MMS), disruption of adprt1a and adprt2 in combination abolishes this response and further sensitises cells to this agent, indicating that in the absence of Adprt2, Adprt1a signals MMS-induced DNA lesions to promote resistance of cells to DNA damage. As a consequence of defective signalling of SSBs by Adprt2, Adprt1a is required to assemble NHEJ factors in chromatin, and disruption of the NHEJ pathway in combination with adprt2 increases sensitivity of cells to MMS. Taken together, these data indicate overlapping functions of different ARTs in signalling DNA damage, and illustrate a critical requirement for NHEJ in maintaining cell viability in the absence of an effective SSB response.

  13. The Cartography of UV-induced DNA Damage Formation and DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage presents a barrier to DNA-templated biochemical processes, including gene expression and faithful DNA replication. Compromised DNA repair leads to mutations, enhancing the risk for genetic diseases and cancer development. Conventional experimental approaches to study DNA damage required a researcher to choose between measuring bulk damage over the entire genome, with little or no resolution regarding a specific location, and obtaining data specific to a locus of interest, without a global perspective. Recent advances in high-throughput genomic tools overcame these limitations and provide high-resolution measurements simultaneously across the genome. In this review, we discuss the available methods for measuring DNA damage and their repair, focusing on genomewide assays for pyrimidine photodimers, the major types of damage induced by ultraviolet irradiation. These new genomic assays will be a powerful tool in identifying key components of genome stability and carcinogenesis. © 2016 The American Society of Photobiology.

  14. Chironomus ramosus larvae exhibit DNA damage control in response to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Datkhile, Kailas D; Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2015-01-01

    Chironomus ramosus is one of the recently reported radiotolerant insects. Salivary gland cells of fourth instar larvae respond to ionizing radiations with increases in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and chaperone proteins. Here we made an attempt to study the state of nuclear DNA after exposure of larvae to a lethal dose for 20% of the population (LD(20)) of gamma radiation (2200 Gy, at a dose rate 5.5 Gy/min). Genomic DNA preparations were subjected to competitive ELISA (Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) for detection of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) to monitor any radiation-induced damage. Single salivary gland cells were subjected to alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (ASCGE), comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to check for DNA double-strand breaks. Results from all four experimental procedures confirmed damage of nucleobases and fragmentation of nuclear DNA immediately after radiation. Some 48 h after radiation exposure, modified 8-oxodG residues returned to basal level, homodispersity of genomic DNA reappeared, the length of comet tail regressed significantly (ASCGE) and PFGE pattern matched with that of high molecular weight unirradiated DNA. Chironomus ramosus larvae showed control of DNA damage as observed over 48 h in post irradiation recovery which could be attributed to their ability to tolerate gamma radiation stress.

  15. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity.

  16. DNA damage in mouse lymphocytes exposed to curcumin and copper.

    PubMed

    Urbina-Cano, Patricia; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Ramírez-Herrera, Mario A; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Mendoza-Magaña, Maria L; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    Dietary polyphenolics, such as curcumin, have shown antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Some antioxidants cause DNA strand breaks in excess of transition metal ions, such as copper. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of curcumin in the presence of increasing concentrations of copper to induce DNA damage in murine leukocytes by the comet assay. Balb-C mouse lymphocytes were exposed to 50 microM curcumin and various concentrations of copper (10 microM, 100 microM and 200 microM). Cellular DNA damage was detected by means of the alkaline comet assay. Our results show that 50 microM curcumin in the presence of 100-200 microM copper induced DNA damage in murine lymphocytes. Curcumin did not inhibit the oxidative DNA damage caused by 50 microM H2O2 in mouse lymphocytes. Moreover, 50 microM curcumin alone was capable of inducing DNA strand breaks under the tested conditions. The increased DNA damage by 50 mM curcumin was observed in the presence of various concentrations of copper, as detected by the alkaline comet assay.

  17. Single-molecule visualization of ROS-induced DNA damage in large DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Yongkyun; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-02-07

    We present a single molecule visualization approach for the quantitative analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced DNA damage, such as base oxidation and single stranded breaks in large DNA molecules. We utilized the Fenton reaction to generate DNA damage with subsequent enzymatic treatment using a mixture of three types of glycosylases to remove oxidized bases, and then fluorescent labeling on damaged lesions via nick translation. This single molecule analytical platform provided the capability to count one or two damaged sites per λ DNA molecule (48.5 kb), which were reliably dependent on the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous ion at the micromolar level. More importantly, the labeled damaged sites that were visualized under a microscope provided positional information, which offered the capability of comparing DNA damaged sites with the in silico genomic map to reveal sequence specificity that GTGR is more sensitive to oxidative damage. Consequently, single DNA molecule analysis provides a sensitive analytical platform for ROS-induced DNA damage and suggests an interesting biochemical insight that the genome primarily active during the lysogenic cycle may have less probability for oxidative DNA damage.

  18. MECHANISTIC AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HELICASE ACTION ON DAMAGED DNA

    PubMed Central

    Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Brosh, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicases catalytically unwind structured nucleic acids in a nucleoside-triphosphate-dependent and directionally specific manner, and are essential for virtually all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism. ATPase-driven helicases which translocate along nucleic acids play a role in damage recognition or unwinding of a DNA tract containing the lesion. Although classical biochemical experiments provided evidence that bulky covalent adducts inhibit DNA unwinding catalyzed by certain DNA helicases in a strand-specific manner (i.e. , block to DNA unwinding restricted to adduct residence in the strand the helicase translocates), recent studies suggest more complex arrangements that may depend on the helicase under study, its assembly in a protein complex, and the type of structural DNA perturbation. Moreover, base and sugar phosphate backbone modifications exert effects on DNA helicases that suggest specialized tracking mechanisms. As a component of the replication stress response, the single-stranded DNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA) may serve to enable eukaryotic DNA helicases to overcome certain base lesions. Helicases play important roles in DNA damage signaling which also involve their partnership with RPA. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of mechanistic and biological aspects of helicase action on damaged DNA. PMID:20574162

  19. Anhydrobiosis-Associated Nuclear DNA Damage and Repair in the Sleeping Chironomid: Linkage with Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions (4He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3–4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  20. Anhydrobiosis-associated nuclear DNA damage and repair in the sleeping chironomid: linkage with radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Oleg; Nakahara, Yuichi; Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-11-16

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3-4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  1. Recent Advances in Durability and Damage Tolerance Methodology at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. B.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, I. S.; Harris, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) issues are critical to the development of lighter, safer and more efficient aerospace vehicles. Durability is largely an economic life-cycle design consideration whereas damage tolerance directly addresses the structural airworthiness (safety) of the vehicle. Both D&DT methodologies must address the deleterious effects of changes in material properties and the initiation and growth of damage that may occur during the vehicle s service lifetime. The result of unanticipated D&DT response is often manifested in the form of catastrophic and potentially fatal accidents. As such, durability and damage tolerance requirements must be rigorously addressed for commercial transport aircraft and NASA spacecraft systems. This paper presents an overview of the recent and planned future research in durability and damage tolerance analytical and experimental methods for both metallic and composite aerospace structures at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC).

  2. Replication fork slowing and stalling are distinct, checkpoint-independent consequences of replicating damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In response to DNA damage during S phase, cells slow DNA replication. This slowing is orchestrated by the intra-S checkpoint and involves inhibition of origin firing and reduction of replication fork speed. Slowing of replication allows for tolerance of DNA damage and suppresses genomic instability. Although the mechanisms of origin inhibition by the intra-S checkpoint are understood, major questions remain about how the checkpoint regulates replication forks: Does the checkpoint regulate the rate of fork progression? Does the checkpoint affect all forks, or only those encountering damage? Does the checkpoint facilitate the replication of polymerase-blocking lesions? To address these questions, we have analyzed the checkpoint in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe using a single-molecule DNA combing assay, which allows us to unambiguously separate the contribution of origin and fork regulation towards replication slowing, and allows us to investigate the behavior of individual forks. Moreover, we have interrogated the role of forks interacting with individual sites of damage by using three damaging agents—MMS, 4NQO and bleomycin—that cause similar levels of replication slowing with very different frequency of DNA lesions. We find that the checkpoint slows replication by inhibiting origin firing, but not by decreasing fork rates. However, the checkpoint appears to facilitate replication of damaged templates, allowing forks to more quickly pass lesions. Finally, using a novel analytic approach, we rigorously identify fork stalling events in our combing data and show that they play a previously unappreciated role in shaping replication kinetics in response to DNA damage. PMID:28806726

  3. Dynamic Changes in DNA Methylation in Ischemic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Meller, Robert; Pearson, Andrea; Simon, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mediators of gene expression are hypothesized to regulate transcriptomic responses to preconditioning ischemia and ischemic tolerance. Here, we utilized a methyl-DNA enrichment protocol and sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify patterns of DNA methylation in an established model of ischemic tolerance in neuronal cultures (oxygen and glucose deprivation: OGD). We observed an overall decrease in global DNA methylation at 4 h following preconditioning ischemia (30 min OGD), harmful ischemia (120 min OGD), and in ischemic tolerant neuronal cultures (30 min OGD, 24 h recovery, 120 min OGD). We detected a smaller cohort of hypermethylated regions following ischemic conditions, which were further analyzed revealing differential chromosomal localization of methylation, and a differential concentration of methylation on genomic regions. Together, these data show that the temporal profiles of DNA methylation with respect to chromatin hyper- and hypo-methylation following various ischemic conditions are highly dynamic, and may reveal novel targets for neuroprotection. PMID:26029158

  4. Insight into the ERVK Integrase – Propensity for DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Samantha; Turnbull, Matthew; Hebert, Sherry; Douville, Renée N.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses create permanently integrated proviruses that exist in the host genome. Retroviral genomes encode for functionally conserved gag, pro, pol, and env regions, as well as integrase (IN), which is required for retroviral integration. IN mediates viral genome insertion through 3′ end processing of the viral DNA and the strand transfer reaction. This process requires the formation of a pre-integration complex, comprised of IN, viral DNA, and cellular proteins. Viral insertion causes DNA damage, leading to the requirement of host DNA repair mechanisms. Therefore, a failure of DNA repair pathways may result in genomic instability and potentially cause host cell death. Considering the numerous human diseases associated with genomic instability, the endogenous retrovirus-K (ERVK) IN should be considered as a putative contributor to DNA damage in human cells. Future research and drug discovery should focus on ERVK IN activity and its role in human conditions, such as neurological disease and cancers. PMID:27990140

  5. p53 and RAD9, the DNA Damage Response, and Regulation of Transcription Networks.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Howard B; Panigrahi, Sunil K; Hopkins, Kevin M; Wang, Li; Broustas, Constantinos G

    2017-04-01

    The way cells respond to DNA damage is important since inefficient repair or misrepair of lesions can have deleterious consequences, including mutation, genomic instability, neurodegenerative disorders, premature aging, cancer or death. Whether damage occurs spontaneously as a byproduct of normal metabolic processes, or after exposure to exogenous agents, cells muster a coordinated, complex DNA damage response (DDR) to mitigate potential harmful effects. A variety of activities are involved to promote cell survival, and include DNA repair, DNA damage tolerance, as well as transient cell cycle arrest to provide time for repair before entry into critical cell cycle phases, an event that could be lethal if traversal occurs while damage is present. When such damage is prolonged or not repairable, senescence, apoptosis or autophagy is induced. One major level of DDR regulation occurs via the orchestrated transcriptional control of select sets of genes encoding proteins that mediate the response. p53 is a transcription factor that transactivates specific DDR downstream genes through binding DNA consensus sequences usually in or near target gene promoter regions. The profile of p53-regulated genes activated at any given time varies, and is dependent upon type of DNA damage or stress experienced, exact composition of the consensus DNA binding sequence, presence of other DNA binding proteins, as well as cell context. RAD9 is another protein critical for the response of cells to DNA damage, and can also selectively regulate gene transcription. The limited studies addressing the role of RAD9 in transcription regulation indicate that the protein transactivates at least one of its target genes, p21/waf1/cip1, by binding to DNA sequences demonstrated to be a p53 response element. NEIL1 is also regulated by RAD9 through a similar DNA sequence, though not yet directly verified as a bonafide p53 response element. These findings suggest a novel pathway whereby p53 and RAD9 control

  6. T7 replisome directly overcomes DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Pandey, Manjula; Inman, James T.; Yang, Yi; Kashlev, Mikhail; Patel, Smita S.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2015-12-01

    Cells and viruses possess several known `restart' pathways to overcome lesions during DNA replication. However, these `bypass' pathways leave a gap in replicated DNA or require recruitment of accessory proteins, resulting in significant delays to fork movement or even cell division arrest. Using single-molecule and ensemble methods, we demonstrate that the bacteriophage T7 replisome is able to directly replicate through a leading-strand cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. We show that when a replisome encounters the lesion, a substantial fraction of DNA polymerase (DNAP) and helicase stay together at the lesion, the replisome does not dissociate and the helicase does not move forward on its own. The DNAP is able to directly replicate through the lesion by working in conjunction with helicase through specific helicase-DNAP interactions. These observations suggest that the T7 replisome is fundamentally permissive of DNA lesions via pathways that do not require fork adjustment or replisome reassembly.

  7. Curcumin Triggers DNA Damage and Inhibits Expression of DNA Repair Proteins in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Liu, Yu-Chang; Chiang, I-Tsang

    2015-07-01

    The study goal was to evaluate the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and expression of DNA-repair proteins in human lung cancer. Thus, NCI-H460 cells were used to study the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and repair in vitro. We investigated curcumin induces DNA damage by comet the assay and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. The DNA damage/repair-related protein levels were examined and monitored by western blotting and confocal microscopy. Curcumin significantly increased the length of comet tails and DNA condensation in NCI-H460 cells. Curcumin reduced expression of DNA-repair proteins such as 14-3-3 protein sigma (14-3-3σ), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1). Curcumin also increased phosphorylation of p53 and Histone H2A.X (S140) in the nuclei of NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our findings indicated that curcumin triggered DNA damage and inhibited expression of DNA-repair-associated proteins in NCI-H460 cells. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. DNA damage response to the Mdm2 inhibitor Nutlin-3

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajeev; Rigatti, Marc J.; Belinsky, Glenn S.; Godman, Cassandra A.; Giardina, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Mdm2 inhibitors represent a promising class of p53 activating compounds that may be useful in cancer treatment and prevention. However, the consequences of pharmacological p53 activation are not entirely clear. We observed that Nutlin-3 triggered a DNA damage response in azoxymethane-induced mouse AJ02-NM0 colon cancer cells, characterized by the phosphorylation of H2AX (at Ser-139) and p53 (at Ser-15). The DNA damage response was highest in cells showing robust p53 stabilization, it could be triggered by the active but not the inactive Nutlin-3 enantiomer, and it was also activated by another pharmacological Mdm2 inhibitor (Caylin). Quantification of γH2AX-positive cells following Nutlin-3 exposure showed that approximately 17% of cells in late S and G2/M were mounting a DNA damage response (compared to a ~50% response to 5-fluorouracil). Nutlin-3 treatment caused the formation of double strand DNA strand breaks, promoted the formation of micronuclei, accentuated strand breakage induced by doxorubicin and sensitized the mouse colon cancer cells to DNA break-inducing topoisomerase II inhibitors. Although the HCT116 colon cancer cells did not mount a significant DNA damage response following Nutlin-3 treatment, Nutlin-3 enhanced the DNA damage response to the nucleotide synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea in a p53-dependent manner. Finally, p21 deletion also sensitized HCT116 cells to the Nutlin-3-induced DNA damage response, suggesting that cell cycle checkpoint abnormalities may promote this response. We propose that p53 activation by Mdm2 inhibitors can result in the slowing of double stranded DNA repair. Although this effect may suppress illegitimate homologous recombination repair, it may also increase the risk of clastogenic events. PMID:19788889

  9. Electronic hybridisation implications for the damage-tolerance of thin film metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Volker; Jaya, B. Nagamani; Köhler, Mathias; Music, Denis; Kirchlechner, Christoph; Dehm, Gerhard; Raabe, Dierk; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2016-11-01

    A paramount challenge in materials science is to design damage-tolerant glasses. Poisson’s ratio is commonly used as a criterion to gauge the brittle-ductile transition in glasses. However, our data, as well as results in the literature, are in conflict with the concept of Poisson’s ratio serving as a universal parameter for fracture energy. Here, we identify the electronic structure fingerprint associated with damage tolerance in thin film metallic glasses. Our correlative theoretical and experimental data reveal that the fraction of bonds stemming from hybridised states compared to the overall bonding can be associated with damage tolerance in thin film metallic glasses.

  10. Electronic hybridisation implications for the damage-tolerance of thin film metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Volker; Jaya, B. Nagamani; Köhler, Mathias; Music, Denis; Kirchlechner, Christoph; Dehm, Gerhard; Raabe, Dierk; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2016-01-01

    A paramount challenge in materials science is to design damage-tolerant glasses. Poisson’s ratio is commonly used as a criterion to gauge the brittle-ductile transition in glasses. However, our data, as well as results in the literature, are in conflict with the concept of Poisson’s ratio serving as a universal parameter for fracture energy. Here, we identify the electronic structure fingerprint associated with damage tolerance in thin film metallic glasses. Our correlative theoretical and experimental data reveal that the fraction of bonds stemming from hybridised states compared to the overall bonding can be associated with damage tolerance in thin film metallic glasses. PMID:27819318

  11. Electronic hybridisation implications for the damage-tolerance of thin film metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Volker; Jaya, B Nagamani; Köhler, Mathias; Music, Denis; Kirchlechner, Christoph; Dehm, Gerhard; Raabe, Dierk; Schneider, Jochen M

    2016-11-07

    A paramount challenge in materials science is to design damage-tolerant glasses. Poisson's ratio is commonly used as a criterion to gauge the brittle-ductile transition in glasses. However, our data, as well as results in the literature, are in conflict with the concept of Poisson's ratio serving as a universal parameter for fracture energy. Here, we identify the electronic structure fingerprint associated with damage tolerance in thin film metallic glasses. Our correlative theoretical and experimental data reveal that the fraction of bonds stemming from hybridised states compared to the overall bonding can be associated with damage tolerance in thin film metallic glasses.

  12. A modal H∞-norm-based performance requirement for damage-tolerant active controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genari, Helói F. G.; Mechbal, Nazih; Coffignal, Gérard; Nóbrega, Eurípedes G. O.

    2017-04-01

    Damage-tolerant active control (DTAC) is a recent research area that encompasses control design methodologies resulting from the application of fault-tolerant control methods to vibration control of structures subject to damage. The possibility of damage occurrence is not usually considered in the active vibration control design requirements. Damage changes the structure dynamics, which may produce unexpected modal behavior of the closed-loop system, usually not anticipated by the controller design approaches. A modal H∞ norm and a respective robust controller design framework were recently introduced, and this method is here extended to face a new DTAC strategy implementation. Considering that damage affects each vibration mode differently, this paper adopts the modal H∞ norm to include damage as a design requirement. The basic idea is to create an appropriate energy distribution over the frequency range of interest and respective vibration modes, guaranteeing robustness, damage tolerance, and adequate overall performance, taking into account that it is common to have previous knowledge of the structure regions where damage may occur during its operational life. For this purpose, a structural health monitoring technique is applied to evaluate modal modifications caused by damage. This information is used to create modal weighing matrices, conducting to the modal H∞ controller design. Finite element models are adopted for a case study structure, including different damage severities, in order to validate the proposed control strategy. Results show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology with respect to damage tolerance.

  13. The intersection between DNA damage response and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Nowsheen, S; Yang, E S

    2012-10-01

    Apoptosis is a finely regulated process that serves to determine the fate of cells in response to various stresses. One such stress is DNA damage, which not only can signal repair processes but is also intimately involved in regulating cell fate. In this review we examine the relationship between the DNA damage/repair response in cell survival and apoptosis following insults to the DNA. Elucidating these pathways and the crosstalk between them is of great importance, as they eventually contribute to the etiology of human disease such as cancer and may play key roles in determining therapeutic response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Apoptosis: Four Decades Later".

  14. Chromosome territories reposition during DNA damage-repair response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Local higher-order chromatin structure, dynamics and composition of the DNA are known to determine double-strand break frequencies and the efficiency of repair. However, how DNA damage response affects the spatial organization of chromosome territories is still unexplored. Results Our report investigates the effect of DNA damage on the spatial organization of chromosome territories within interphase nuclei of human cells. We show that DNA damage induces a large-scale spatial repositioning of chromosome territories that are relatively gene dense. This response is dose dependent, and involves territories moving from the nuclear interior to the periphery and vice versa. Furthermore, we have found that chromosome territory repositioning is contingent upon double-strand break recognition and damage sensing. Importantly, our results suggest that this is a reversible process where, following repair, chromosome territories re-occupy positions similar to those in undamaged control cells. Conclusions Thus, our report for the first time highlights DNA damage-dependent spatial reorganization of whole chromosomes, which might be an integral aspect of cellular damage response. PMID:24330859

  15. DNA damage in dihydroartemisinin-resistant Molt-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsoo; Lai, Henry C; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Singh, Narendra P

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin generates carbon-based free radicals when it reacts with iron, and induces molecular damage and apoptosis. Its toxicity is more selective toward cancer cells because cancer cells contain a higher level of intracellular free iron. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an analog of artemisinin, has selective cytotoxicity toward Molt-4 human lymphoblastoid cells. A major concern is whether cancer cells could develop resistance to DHA, thus limiting its therapeutic efficacy. We have developed a DHA-resistant Molt-4 cell line (RTN) and found out that these cells exhibited resistance to DHA but no significant cross- resistance to artemisinin-tagged holotransferrin (ART-TF), a synthetic artemisinin compound. In the present study, we investigated DNA damage induced by DHA and ART-TF in both Molt-4 and RTN cells using the comet assay. RTN cells exhibited a significantly lower level of basal and X-ray-induced DNA damage compared to Molt-4 cells. Both DHA and ART-TF induced DNA damage in Molt-4 cells, whereas DNA damage was induced in RTN cells by ART-TF, and not DHA. The result of this study shows that by the cell selection method, it is possible to generate a Molt-4 cell line which is not sensitive to DHA, but sensitive to ART-TF, as measured by DNA damage.

  16. DICER, DROSHA and DNA damage response RNAs are necessary for the secondary recruitment of DNA damage response factors.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Cabrini, Matteo; Matti, Valentina; Oldani, Amanda; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) plays a central role in preserving genome integrity. Recently, we reported that the endoribonucleases DICER and DROSHA contribute to DDR activation by generating small non-coding RNAs, termed DNA damage response RNA (DDRNA), carrying the sequence of the damaged locus. It is presently unclear whether DDRNAs act by promoting the primary recognition of DNA lesions or the secondary recruitment of DDR factors into cytologically detectable foci and consequent signal amplification. Here, we demonstrate that DICER and DROSHA are dispensable for primary recruitment of the DDR sensor NBS1 to DNA damage sites. Instead, the accumulation of the DDR mediators MDC1 and 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1), markers of secondary recruitment, is reduced in DICER- or DROSHA-inactivated cells. In addition, NBS1 (also known as NBN) primary recruitment is resistant to RNA degradation, consistent with the notion that RNA is dispensable for primary recognition of DNA lesions. We propose that DICER, DROSHA and DDRNAs act in the response to DNA damage after primary recognition of DNA lesions and, together with γH2AX, are essential for enabling the secondary recruitment of DDR factors and fuel the amplification of DDR signaling.

  17. Synthesis of damaged DNA containing the oxidative lesion 3'-oxothymidine.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Mel F; Li, Weiye; Gutwald, Taylor; Bryant-Friedrich, Amanda C

    2017-09-01

    Oxidative events that take place during regular oxygen metabolism can lead to the formation of organic or inorganic radicals. The interaction of these radicals with macromolecules in the organism and with DNA in particular is suspected to lead to apoptosis, DNA lesions and cell damage. Independent generation of DNA lesions resulting from oxidative damage is used to promote the study of their effects on biological systems. An efficient synthesis of oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing the oxidative damage lesion 3'-oxothymidine has been accomplished via incorporation of C3'-hydroxymethyl thymidine as its corresponding 5'-phosphoramidite. Through oxidative cleavage using sodium periodate in aqueous solution, the lesion of interest is easily generated. Due to its inherent instability it cannot be directly isolated, but must be generated in situ. 3'-Oxothymidine is a demonstrated damage product formed upon generation of the C3'-thymidinyl radical in ODN. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Activation of DNA damage response signaling by condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Burman, Bharat; Kruhlak, Michael J; Misteli, Tom

    2014-12-11

    The DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in the context of chromatin, and architectural features of chromatin have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and repair. Whereas a role of chromatin decondensation in the DDR is well established, we show here that chromatin condensation is integral to DDR signaling. We find that, in response to DNA damage chromatin regions transiently expand before undergoing extensive compaction. Using a protein-chromatin-tethering system to create defined chromatin domains, we show that interference with chromatin condensation results in failure to fully activate DDR. Conversely, forced induction of local chromatin condensation promotes ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ATR-dependent activation of upstream DDR signaling in a break-independent manner. Whereas persistent chromatin compaction enhanced upstream DDR signaling from irradiation-induced breaks, it reduced recovery and survival after damage. Our results demonstrate that chromatin condensation is sufficient for activation of DDR signaling and is an integral part of physiological DDR signaling.

  19. DNA photo-oxidative damage hazard in transfection complexes.

    PubMed

    Rudiuk, Sergii; Franceschi-Messant, Sophie; Chouini-Lalanne, Nadia; Perez, Emile; Rico-Lattes, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Complexes of DNA with various cationic vectors have been largely used for nonviral transfection, and yet the photochemical stability of DNA in such complexes has never been considered. We studied, for the first time, the influence of DNA complexation by a cationic lipid and polymers on the amount of damage induced by benzophenone photosensitization. The localization of benzophenone inside the hydrophobic domains formed by a cationic lipid, DOTAP (N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride), and close to DNA, locally increases the photoinduced cleavage by the reactive oxygen species generated. The same effect was found in the case of DNA complexation with an amphiphilic polymer (polynorbornenemethyleneammonium chloride). However, a decrease in DNA damage was observed in the case of complexation with a hydrophilic polymer (polyethylenimine). The DNA protection in this case was because of the absence of benzophenone hydrophobic incorporation into the complex, and to DNA compaction which decreased the probability of radical attack. These results underline the importance of the chemical structure of the nonviral transfection vector in limiting the risks of photo-oxidative damage of the complexed DNA. © 2010 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2010 The American Society of Photobiology.

  20. Systemic DNA damage responses in aging and diseases.

    PubMed

    Ribezzo, Flavia; Shiloh, Yosef; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-06-01

    The genome is constantly attacked by a variety of genotoxic insults. The causal role for DNA damage in aging and cancer is exemplified by genetic defects in DNA repair that underlie a broad spectrum of acute and chronic human disorders that are characterized by developmental abnormalities, premature aging, and cancer predisposition. The disease symptoms are typically tissue-specific with uncertain genotype-phenotype correlation. The cellular DNA damage response (DDR) has been extensively investigated ever since yeast geneticists discovered DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms, several decades ago. In recent years, it has become apparent that not only cell-autonomous but also systemic DNA damage responses determine the outcome of genome instability in organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of non-cell-autonomous DNA damage responses will provide important new insights into the role of genome instability in human aging and a host of diseases including cancer and might better explain the complex phenotypes caused by genome instability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Specialists Meeting on Impact Damage Tolerance of Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    damage in metal and fiber- composite structure. III 1 1 IMPACT DAMAGE IN ETIJALS SrlThe impact-darmdge response of metals depends upon many interrelated...established. Il1. 1.2 IMPACT DAMAGE IN FIBER COMPOSITES There has been very little parametric impact-damage testing of fiber composites . Figure 15 shows...type of structural material, and Includes: I. Bullets Impacting metal 2. Bullets or fragments Impacting fiber composites 3. Fragments impacting metal

  2. DNA damage caused by pesticide-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthi, K; Saravana Devi, S; Chakrabarti, T

    2006-12-01

    To determine the DNA damaging potential and the genotoxicity of individual compounds in pesticide contaminated soil. In the present study, DNA damaging potential of pesticide-contaminated soil and the genotoxicity of individual compounds present in the soil were assessed using fluorimetric analysis of DNA unwinding assay. The contaminated soil sample showed 79% (P < 0.001) of DNA strand break, whereas technical grade of major carbaryl and alpha-naphthol constituents of the contaminated soil showed 64% (P < 0.01) and 60% (P < 0.02) damage respectively. Our results indicate that the toxicity caused by contaminated soil is mainly due to carbaryl and alpha-napthol, which are the major constituents of the soil sample analyzed by GC-MS.

  3. Investigating DNA Radiation Damage Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Czapla-Masztafiak, Joanna; Szlachetko, Jakub; Milne, Christopher J.; Lipiec, Ewelina; Sá, Jacinto; Penfold, Thomas J.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Borca, Camelia; Abela, Rafael; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.

    2016-01-01

    The biological influence of radiation on living matter has been studied for years; however, several questions about the detailed mechanism of radiation damage formation remain largely unanswered. Among all biomolecules exposed to radiation, DNA plays an important role because any damage to its molecular structure can affect the whole cell and may lead to chromosomal rearrangements resulting in genomic instability or cell death. To identify and characterize damage induced in the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, in this work we performed x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the P K-edge on DNA irradiated with either UVA light or protons. By combining the experimental results with theoretical calculations, we were able to establish the types and relative ratio of lesions produced by both UVA and protons around the phosphorus atoms in DNA. PMID:27028640

  4. Bacterial natural transformation by highly fragmented and damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Harms, Klaus; Orlando, Ludovic A A; Mayar, J Victor Moreno; Rasmussen, Simon; Dahl, Tais W; Rosing, Minik T; Poole, Anthony M; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Inselmann, Sabrina; de Vries, Johann; Wackernagel, Wilfried; Pybus, Oliver G; Nielsen, Rasmus; Johnsen, Pål Jarle; Nielsen, Kaare Magne; Willerslev, Eske

    2013-12-03

    DNA molecules are continuously released through decomposition of organic matter and are ubiquitous in most environments. Such DNA becomes fragmented and damaged (often <100 bp) and may persist in the environment for more than half a million years. Fragmented DNA is recognized as nutrient source for microbes, but not as potential substrate for bacterial evolution. Here, we show that fragmented DNA molecules (≥ 20 bp) that additionally may contain abasic sites, cross-links, or miscoding lesions are acquired by the environmental bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi through natural transformation. With uptake of DNA from a 43,000-y-old woolly mammoth bone, we further demonstrate that such natural transformation events include ancient DNA molecules. We find that the DNA recombination is RecA recombinase independent and is directly linked to DNA replication. We show that the adjacent nucleotide variations generated by uptake of short DNA fragments escape mismatch repair. Moreover, double-nucleotide polymorphisms appear more common among genomes of transformable than nontransformable bacteria. Our findings reveal that short and damaged, including truly ancient, DNA molecules, which are present in large quantities in the environment, can be acquired by bacteria through natural transformation. Our findings open for the possibility that natural genetic exchange can occur with DNA up to several hundreds of thousands years old.

  5. A DNA Element Regulates Drug Tolerance and Withdrawal in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolei; Ghezzi, Alfredo; Pohl, Jascha B.; Bohm, Arun Y.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2013-01-01

    Drug tolerance and withdrawal are insidious responses to drugs of abuse; the first increases drug consumption while the second punishes abstention. Drosophila generate functional tolerance to benzyl alcohol sedation by increasing neural expression of the slo BK-type Ca2+ activated K+ channel gene. After drug clearance this change produces a withdrawal phenotype—increased seizure susceptibility. The drug-induced histone modification profile identified the 6b element (60 nt) as a drug responsive element. Genomic deletion of 6b produces the allele, sloΔ6b, that reacts more strongly to the drug with increased induction, a massive increase in the duration of tolerance, and an increase in the withdrawal phenotype yet does not alter other slo-dependent behaviors. The 6b element is a homeostatic regulator of BK channel gene expression and is the first cis-acting DNA element shown to specifically affect the duration of a drug action. PMID:24086565

  6. Oxidative DNA Damage in Blood of CVD Patients Taking Detralex

    PubMed Central

    Krzyściak, Wirginia; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Kózka, Mariusz; Kozieł, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of the work reported here was to determine the degree of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in peripheral blood as well as in the blood stasis from varicose vein of (chronic venous disorder) CVD patients. Moreover, determination of the impact of Detralex usage on the level of (oxidative) DNA damages in CVD patients was evaluated as well. The degree of oxidative DNA damages was studied in a group consisted of thirty patients with diagnosed chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) in the 2nd and 3rd degree, according to clinical state, etiology, anatomy and pathophysiology (CEAP), and qualified to surgical procedure. The control group consisted of normal volunteers (blood donors) qualified during standard examinations at Regional Centers of Blood Donation and Blood Therapy. The comet assay was used for determination of DNA damages. Analyses of the obtained results showed increase in the level of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in lymphocytes originating from antebrachial blood of CVD patients as compared to the control group (Control) (p < 0.002; ANOVA). In addition, it was demonstrated that the usage of Detralex® resulted in decrease of the level of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in CVD patients as compared to patients without Detralex® treatment (p < 0.001; ANOVA). Based on findings from the study, it may be hypothesized about occurrence of significant oxidative DNA damages as the consequence of strong oxidative stress in CVD. In addition, antioxidative effectiveness of Detralexu® was observed at the recommended dose, one tablet twice daily. PMID:21912579

  7. Tyrosine-dependent oxidative DNA damage induced by carcinogenic tetranitromethane.

    PubMed

    Murata, Mariko; Kurimoto, Saori; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2006-10-01

    Tetranitromethane (TNM) is used as an oxidizer in rocket propellants and explosives and as an additive to increase the cetane number of diesel fuel. TNM was reported to induce pulmonary adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in mice and rats. However, the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis induced by TNM has not yet been clarified. We previously revealed that nitroTyr and nitroTyr-containing peptides caused Cu(II)-dependent DNA damage in the presence of P450 reductase, which is considered to yield nitroreduction. Since TNM is a reagent for nitration of Tyr in proteins and peptides, we have hypothesized that TNM-treated Tyr and Tyr-containing peptides induce DNA damage by the modification of Tyr. We examined DNA damage induced by TNM-treated amino acids or peptides using (32)P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the human p53 tumor suppressor gene and the c-Ha-ras-1 protooncogene. TNM-treated Tyr and Lys-Tyr-Lys induced DNA damage including the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in the presence of Cu(II) and NADH. DNA damage was inhibited by catalase and bathocuproine, indicating the involvement of H(2)O(2) and Cu(I). The cytosine residue of the ACG sequence complementary to codon 273, well-known hotspots of the p53 gene, was cleaved with piperidine and Fpg treatments. On the other hand, nitroTyr and Lys-nitroTyr-Lys did not induce DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II) and NADH. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry confirmed that reactions between Lys-Tyr-Lys and TNM yielded not only Lys-nitroTyr-Lys but also Lys-nitrosoTyr-Lys. Therefore, it is speculated that the nitrosotyrosine residue can induce oxidative DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II) and NADH. It is concluded that Tyr-dependent DNA damage may play an important role in the carcinogenicity of TNM. TNM is a new type of carcinogen that induces DNA damage not by itself but via Tyr modification.

  8. Oxidative DNA damage during sleep periods among nightshift workers.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Parveen; Mirick, Dana K; Randolph, Timothy W; Gong, Jicheng; Buchanan, Diana Taibi; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Davis, Scott

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage may be increased among nightshift workers because of suppression of melatonin, a cellular antioxidant, and/or inflammation related to sleep disruption. However, oxidative DNA damage has received limited attention in previous studies of nightshift work. From two previous cross-sectional studies, urine samples collected during a night sleep period for 217 dayshift workers and during day and night sleep (on their first day off) periods for 223 nightshift workers were assayed for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage, using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Urinary measures of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), a marker of circulating melatonin levels, and actigraphy-based sleep quality data were also available. Nightshift workers during their day sleep periods excreted 83% (p=0.2) and 77% (p=0.03) of the 8-OH-dG that dayshift workers and they themselves, respectively, excreted during their night sleep periods. Among nightshift workers, higher aMT6s levels were associated with higher urinary 8-OH-dG levels, and an inverse U-shaped trend was observed between 8-OH-dG levels and sleep efficiency and sleep duration. Reduced excretion of 8-OH-dG among nightshift workers during day sleep may reflect reduced functioning of DNA repair machinery, which could potentially lead to increased cellular levels of oxidative DNA damage. Melatonin disruption among nightshift workers may be responsible for the observed effect, as melatonin is known to enhance repair of oxidative DNA damage. Quality of sleep may similarly impact DNA repair. Cellular levels of DNA damage will need to be evaluated in future studies to help interpret these findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Aven-dependent activation of ATM following DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jessie Yanxiang; Yamada, Ayumi; Kajino, Taisuke; Wu, Judy Qiju; Tang, Wanli; Freel, Christopher D.; Feng, Junjie; Chau, B. Nelson; Wang, Michael Zhuo; Margolis, Seth; Yoo, Hae Yong; Wang, Xiao-Fan; Dunphy, William G.; Irusta, Pablo M.; Hardwick, J. Marie; Kornbluth, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background In response to DNA damage, cells either undergo cell cycle arrest or apoptosis, depending on the extent of damage and the cell’s capacity for DNA repair. Cell cycle arrest induced by double-stranded DNA breaks depends on activation of the ataxia-telangiectasia (ATM) protein kinase, which phosphorylates cell cycle effectors such as Chk2 and p53 to inhibit cell cycle progression. ATM is recruited to double stranded DNA breaks by a complex of sensor proteins including Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1, resulting in autophosphorylation, monomerization, and activation of ATM kinase. Results In characterizing Aven protein, a previously reported apoptotic inhibitor, we have found that Aven can function as an ATM activator to inhibit G2/M progression. Aven bound to ATM and Aven overexpression in cycling Xenopus egg extracts prevented mitotic entry and induced phosphorylation of ATM and its substrates. Immunodepletion of endogenous Aven allowed mitotic entry even in the presence of damaged DNA, and RNAi-mediated knock-down of Aven in human cells prevented autophosphorylation of ATM at an activating site (S1981) in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, Aven is also a substrate of the ATM kinase. Mutation of ATM-mediated phosphorylation sites on Aven reduced its ability to activate ATM, suggesting that Aven activation of ATM following DNA damage is enhanced by ATM-mediated Aven phosphorylation. Conclusions These results identify Aven as a new ATM activator and describe a positive feedback loop operating between Aven and ATM. In aggregate, these findings place Aven, a known apoptotic inhibitor, as a critical transducer of the DNA damage signal. PMID:18571408

  10. Fluorescent reports for detection and measurement of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.; Houck, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of real populations are complicated by the inevitable coexistence of exposure to multiple agents within the target population. An alternative method for characterizing these types of exposures is to use the reactive chemical functional group as the toxic agent identify the corresponding classes (families) of damage as markers of effects. We have begun studies to develop spectrometric reporters of DNA damage that can be measured on intact DNA. The direct measurement of adducts on microgram levels of DNA from tissue biopsy may succeed because of the high sensitivity and selectivity of different reporter compounds. While one cannot readily distinguish between recent or persistent exposures, baseline values for individuals may be constructed. For example, normal oxidative metabolism and environmental radiation create oxidation processes that continually damage DNA. These reactions create lesions that can be measured with the reporter compound FABA [N- (5- fluoresceinyl), N[prime]-(3-boronatophenyl)thioureal]. We report preliminary observations with binding FABA (selective for cis, vicdiol structures) to damage sites present on intact nonirradiated and irradiated DNA from C3H10T[sub 1/2] cells. We have observed binding of 42,000 FABA per mouse tetraploid genome (9 billion base pairs) to the putative thymidylic glycol resulting from normal oxidative processes in nonirradiated DNA. Additional binding of FABA to DNA from cells exposed to 100, 300, and 500 rad shows an exponential increase in binding sites of up to 140,000 with 500 rad exposure. This damage reporter may prove useful in characterizing levels of nonovert and overt oxidative damage to DNA.

  11. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Green, Abby M; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors.

  12. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Green, Abby M.; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C.; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S.; Weitzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors. PMID:26918916

  13. Chemical-induced DNA damage and human cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Miriam C

    2012-10-01

    For more than 200 years human cancer induction has been known to be associated with a large variety of chemical exposures. Most exposures to chemical carcinogens occur as a result of occupation, pollution in the ambient environment, lifestyle choices, or pharmaceutical use. Scientific investigations have revealed that the majority of cancer causing chemicals, or chemical carcinogens, act through "genotoxic" or DNA damaging mechanisms, which involve covalent binding of the chemical to DNA (DNA adduct formation). Cancer-inducing exposures are typically frequent and/or chronic over years, and the accumulation of DNA damage or DNA adduct formation is considered to be a necessary requirement for tumor induction. Studies in animal models have indicated that the ability to reduce DNA damage will also result in reduction of tumor risk, leading to the hypothesis that individuals having the highest levels of DNA adducts may have an increased cancer risk, compared to individuals with the lowest levels of DNA adducts. Here we have reviewed twelve investigations showing 2- to 9-fold increased Relative Risks (RR) or Odds Ratios (OR) for cancer in (the 25% of) individuals having the highest DNA adduct levels, compared to (the 25% of) matched individuals with the lowest DNA adducts. These studies also provided preliminary evidence that multiple types of DNA adducts combined, or DNA adducts combined with other risk factors (such as infection or inflammation), may be associated with more than 10-fold higher cancer risks (RR = 34-60), compared to those found with a single carcinogen. Taken together the data suggest that a reduction in human DNA adduct level is likely to produce a reduction in human cancer risk.

  14. Spermatogenesis, DNA damage and DNA repair mechanisms in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Sezgin; Al-Sadaan, Maha; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-09-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process of proliferation and differentiation during male germ cell development involving mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. Endogenous and exogenous physical, chemical and biological sources modify the genome of spermatozoa. The genomic integrity and stability of the sperm is protected by DNA repair mechanisms. In the male germline cells, DNA repair mechanisms include nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, DNA mismatch repair, double strand break repair and post-replication repair. Defects in repair mechanisms cause arrest of spermatogenesis and abnormal recombination, ultimately resulting in male infertility. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways, DNA repair defects and male infertility. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mouse Zygotes Respond to Severe Sperm DNA Damage by Delaying Paternal DNA Replication and Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Gawecka, Joanna E.; Marh, Joel; Ortega, Michael; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Ward, Monika A.; Ward, W. Steven

    2013-01-01

    Mouse zygotes do not activate apoptosis in response to DNA damage. We previously reported a unique form of inducible sperm DNA damage termed sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF mirrors some aspects of somatic cell apoptosis in that the DNA degradation is mediated by reversible double strand breaks caused by topoisomerase 2B (TOP2B) followed by irreversible DNA degradation by a nuclease(s). Here, we created zygotes using spermatozoa induced to undergo SCF (SCF zygotes) and tested how they responded to moderate and severe paternal DNA damage during the first cell cycle. We found that the TUNEL assay was not sensitive enough to identify the breaks caused by SCF in zygotes in either case. However, paternal pronuclei in both groups stained positively for γH2AX, a marker for DNA damage, at 5 hrs after fertilization, just before DNA synthesis, while the maternal pronuclei were negative. We also found that both pronuclei in SCF zygotes with moderate DNA damage replicated normally, but paternal pronuclei in the SCF zygotes with severe DNA damage delayed the initiation of DNA replication by up to 12 hrs even though the maternal pronuclei had no discernable delay. Chromosomal analysis of both groups confirmed that the paternal DNA was degraded after S-phase while the maternal pronuclei formed normal chromosomes. The DNA replication delay caused a marked retardation in progression to the 2-cell stage, and a large portion of the embryos arrested at the G2/M border, suggesting that this is an important checkpoint in zygotic development. Those embryos that progressed through the G2/M border died at later stages and none developed to the blastocyst stage. Our data demonstrate that the zygote responds to sperm DNA damage through a non-apoptotic mechanism that acts by slowing paternal DNA replication and ultimately leads to arrest in embryonic development. PMID:23431372

  16. A computational atomistic model of radiation damage to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Bulent

    A review of past and current biophysical models of DNA damage reveals that current DNA damage models have become increasingly complex in their attempts to model the full 3D structure of the nucleosome and chromatin fiber. As such, many of the finer details of direct, quasi-direct, and indirect action on DNA become difficult to study in isolation. Also, experimental comparisons that seek to validate these models become increasingly difficult to make. A better approach may be to perform the atomistic modeling of direct, indirect, and quasi-direct effects in total isolation from considerations of the macroscopic conformation of the DNA target. This would permit the highly detailed atomistic modeling to be performed only once in order to produce a database of outcome probabilities that can then be used in radiation chemistry modeling of different and more complex conformations of double-stranded DNA. This work is performed to establish the groundwork to accomplish this goal. A system of Monte Carlo computer codes that model radiation damage to DNA at the atomistic level is developed and used to predict the radiation damage to a 167-bp DNA molecule. A database of the OOH attack outcomes is generated for a 167-bp DNA molecule and used in the prediction of radiation-induced damage to DNA. Do (the dose required to create, on average, one single strand break per 167-bp DNA molecule) is calculated to be 69.9 Gy. There are no experimental study found in the literature that studied small DNA molecules like the one used in this study. Nevertheless, the results from this computational study can be compared to experimental studies preformed with larger DNA molecules such as plasmids when DNA concentrations are scaled. The `concentration scaled D0 (ssb)' values from Klimczak et al. [1993] and Tomita et al. [1998] were approximately 65 and 80 Gy, respectively. These experimental results compare favorably with the computational value of 69.9 Gy calculated in this study. With the

  17. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Heidland, August

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients' burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker's potential to predict clinical outcomes. PMID:27313827

  18. Connecting the Dots: From DNA Damage and Repair to Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Li, Kaiyi; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells evolve a delicate system, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, to monitor genomic integrity and to prevent the damage from both endogenous end exogenous insults. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant DDR and deficient DNA repair are strongly associated with cancer and aging. Our understanding of the core program of DDR has made tremendous progress in the past two decades. However, the long list of the molecules involved in the DDR and DNA repair continues to grow and the roles of the new “dots” are under intensive investigation. Here, we review the connection between DDR and DNA repair and aging and discuss the potential mechanisms by which deficient DNA repair triggers systemic effects to promote physiological or pathological aging. PMID:27164092

  19. Functions of PARylation in DNA Damage Repair Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huiting; Yu, Xiaochun

    2016-06-01

    Protein poly ADP-ribosylation (PARylation) is a widespread post-translational modification at DNA lesions, which is catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). This modification regulates a number of biological processes including chromatin reorganization, DNA damage response (DDR), transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, and mitosis. PARP1, functioning as a DNA damage sensor, can be activated by DNA lesions, forming PAR chains that serve as a docking platform for DNA repair factors with high biochemical complexity. Here, we highlight molecular insights into PARylation recognition, the expanding role of PARylation in DDR pathways, and the functional interaction between PARylation and ubiquitination, which will offer us a better understanding of the biological roles of this unique post-translational modification. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. NBS1 and multiple regulations of DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage response is finely tuned, with several pathways including those for DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and cell cycle checkpoint, although most studies to date have focused on single pathways. Genetic diseases characterized by genome instability have provided novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of DNA damage response. NBS1, a protein responsible for the radiation-sensitive autosomal recessive disorder Nijmegen breakage syndrome, is one of the first factors to accumulate at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NBS1 binds to at least five key proteins, including ATM, RPA, MRE11, RAD18 and RNF20, in the conserved regions within a limited span of the C terminus, functioning in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair in response to DSBs. In this article, we reviewed the functions of these binding proteins and their comprehensive association with NBS1. PMID:27068998

  1. An Evaluation of the Applicability of Damage Tolerance to Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Le, Dy; Turnberg, Jay

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the aircraft industry have teamed together to develop methods and guidance for the safe life-cycle management of dynamic systems. Based on the success of the United States Air Force damage tolerance initiative for airframe structure, a crack growth based damage tolerance approach is being examined for implementation into the design and management of dynamic systems. However, dynamic systems accumulate millions of vibratory cycles per flight hour, more than 12,000 times faster than an airframe system. If a detectable crack develops in a dynamic system, the time to failure is extremely short, less than 100 flight hours in most cases, leaving little room for error in the material characterization, life cycle analysis, nondestructive inspection and maintenance processes. In this paper, the authors review the damage tolerant design process focusing on uncertainties that affect dynamic systems and evaluate the applicability of damage tolerance on dynamic systems.

  2. 76 FR 74655 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... static strength of composite rotorcraft structures using a damage tolerance evaluation, or a fatigue... addresses advances in composite structures technology and provides internationally harmonized standards...

  3. Damage-tolerant metallic composites via melt infiltration of additively manufactured preforms

    DOE PAGES

    Pawlowski, Alexander E.; Cordero, Zachary C.; French, Matthew R.; ...

    2017-04-22

    A facile two-step approach for 3D printing metal-metal composites with precisely controlled microstructures is described. Composites made with this approach exhibit tailorable thermal and mechanical properties as well as exceptional damage tolerance.

  4. Damaging the Integrated HIV Proviral DNA with TALENs

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Christy L.; Guerra, Horacio P.; Mathew, Kiran R.; Roy, Nervik; Simpson, Lacy R.; Schiller, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 integrates its proviral DNA genome into the host genome, presenting barriers for virus eradication. Several new gene-editing technologies have emerged that could potentially be used to damage integrated proviral DNA. In this study, we use transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to target a highly conserved sequence in the transactivation response element (TAR) of the HIV-1 proviral DNA. We demonstrated that TALENs cleave a DNA template with the HIV-1 proviral target site in vitro. A GFP reporter, under control of HIV-1 TAR, was efficiently inactivated by mutations introduced by transfection of TALEN plasmids. When infected cells containing the full-length integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA were transfected with TALENs, the TAR region accumulated indels. When one of these mutants was tested, the mutated HIV-1 proviral DNA was incapable of producing detectable Gag expression. TALEN variants engineered for degenerate recognition of select nucleotide positions also cleaved proviral DNA in vitro and the full-length integrated proviral DNA genome in living cells. These results suggest a possible design strategy for the therapeutic considerations of incomplete target sequence conservation and acquired resistance mutations. We have established a new strategy for damaging integrated HIV proviral DNA that may have future potential for HIV-1 proviral DNA eradication. PMID:25946221

  5. Multidisciplinary Optimization and Damage Tolerance of Stiffened Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jrad, Mohamed

    interest. Buckling analysis of a composite panel with attached longitudinal stiffeners under compressive loads is performed using Ritz method with trigonometric functions. Results are then compared to those from Abaqus FEA for different shell elements. The case of composite panel with one, two, and three stiffeners is investigated. The effect of the distance between the stiffeners on the buckling load is also studied. The variation of the buckling load and buckling modes with the stiffeners' height is investigated. It is shown that there is an optimum value of stiffeners' height beyond which the structural response of the stiffened panel is not improved and the buckling load does not increase. Furthermore, there exist different critical values of stiffener's height at which the buckling mode of the structure changes. Next, buckling analysis of a composite panel with two straight stiffeners and a crack at the center is performed. Finally, buckling analysis of a composite panel with curvilinear stiffeners and a crack at the center is also conducted. Results show that panels with a larger crack have a reduced buckling load and that the buckling load decreases slightly when using higher order 2D shell FEM elements. A damage tolerance framework, EBF3PanelOpt, has been developed to design and analyze curvilinearly stiffened panels. The framework is written with the scripting language Python and it interacts with the commercial software MSC. Patran (for geometry and mesh creation), MSC. Nastran (for finite element analysis), and MSC. Marc (for damage tolerance analysis). The crack location is set to the location of the maximum value of the major principal stress while its orientation is set normal to the major principal axis direction. The effective stress intensity factor is calculated using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique and compared to the fracture toughness of the material in order to decide whether the crack will expand or not. The ratio of these two quantities is used

  6. Modulation of irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage by theanine.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry

    2012-05-01

    The possible chemoprotective activity of theanine against irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage towards mouse bone marrow cells was investigated. Chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, micronuclei formation and mitotic activity were studied in the current study as markers of genomic damage. Oxidative DNA stress markers such as 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione levels were assessed as a possible mechanism underlying this amelioration. Theanine was neither genotoxic nor cytotoxic in mice at doses equivalent to 30 or 60 mg/kg for 12 days. Pretreatment of mice with theanine significantly reduced irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells and these effects were dose dependent. Irinotecan induced marked biochemical alterations characteristic of oxidative DNA stress, including increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, enhanced lipid peroxidation and reduction in the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. Prior administration of theanine ahead of irinotecan challenge ameliorated these oxidative DNA stress markers. Overall, this study provides for the first time that theanine has a protective role in the abatement of irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells of mice that resides, at least in part, on its ability to modulate the cellular antioxidant levels and consequently protect bone marrow from irinotecan genotoxicity.

  7. PARP-2 domain requirements for DNA damage-dependent activation and localization to sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Amanda A; Cingolani, Gino; Pascal, John M

    2016-02-29

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) is one of three human PARP enzymes that are potently activated during the cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DDR-PARPs detect DNA strand breaks, leading to a dramatic increase in their catalytic production of the posttranslational modification poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to facilitate repair. There are limited biochemical and structural insights into the functional domains of PARP-2, which has restricted our understanding of how PARP-2 is specialized toward specific repair pathways. PARP-2 has a modular architecture composed of a C-terminal catalytic domain (CAT), a central Trp-Gly-Arg (WGR) domain and an N-terminal region (NTR). Although the NTR is generally considered the key DNA-binding domain of PARP-2, we report here that all three domains of PARP-2 collectively contribute to interaction with DNA damage. Biophysical, structural and biochemical analyses indicate that the NTR is natively disordered, and is only required for activation on specific types of DNA damage. Interestingly, the NTR is not essential for PARP-2 localization to sites of DNA damage. Rather, the WGR and CAT domains function together to recruit PARP-2 to sites of DNA breaks. Our study differentiates the functions of PARP-2 domains from those of PARP-1, the other major DDR-PARP, and highlights the specialization of the multi-domain architectures of DDR-PARPs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. PARP-2 domain requirements for DNA damage-dependent activation and localization to sites of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Amanda A.; Cingolani, Gino; Pascal, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) is one of three human PARP enzymes that are potently activated during the cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DDR-PARPs detect DNA strand breaks, leading to a dramatic increase in their catalytic production of the posttranslational modification poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to facilitate repair. There are limited biochemical and structural insights into the functional domains of PARP-2, which has restricted our understanding of how PARP-2 is specialized toward specific repair pathways. PARP-2 has a modular architecture composed of a C-terminal catalytic domain (CAT), a central Trp-Gly-Arg (WGR) domain and an N-terminal region (NTR). Although the NTR is generally considered the key DNA-binding domain of PARP-2, we report here that all three domains of PARP-2 collectively contribute to interaction with DNA damage. Biophysical, structural and biochemical analyses indicate that the NTR is natively disordered, and is only required for activation on specific types of DNA damage. Interestingly, the NTR is not essential for PARP-2 localization to sites of DNA damage. Rather, the WGR and CAT domains function together to recruit PARP-2 to sites of DNA breaks. Our study differentiates the functions of PARP-2 domains from those of PARP-1, the other major DDR-PARP, and highlights the specialization of the multi-domain architectures of DDR-PARPs. PMID:26704974

  9. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Ellis L; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J

    2016-01-06

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses.

  10. Involvement of DNA Damage Response Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wei, Ren-Jie; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Wang, Shen-Nien

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been known as one of the most lethal human malignancies, due to the difficulty of early detection, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, and is characterized by active angiogenesis and metastasis, which account for rapid recurrence and poor survival. Its development has been closely associated with multiple risk factors, including hepatitis B and C virus infection, alcohol consumption, obesity, and diet contamination. Genetic alterations and genomic instability, probably resulted from unrepaired DNA lesions, are increasingly recognized as a common feature of human HCC. Dysregulation of DNA damage repair and signaling to cell cycle checkpoints, known as the DNA damage response (DDR), is associated with a predisposition to cancer and affects responses to DNA-damaging anticancer therapy. It has been demonstrated that various HCC-associated risk factors are able to promote DNA damages, formation of DNA adducts, and chromosomal aberrations. Hence, alterations in the DDR pathways may accumulate these lesions to trigger hepatocarcinogenesis and also to facilitate advanced HCC progression. This review collects some of the most known information about the link between HCC-associated risk factors and DDR pathways in HCC. Hopefully, the review will remind the researchers and clinicians of further characterizing and validating the roles of these DDR pathways in HCC. PMID:24877058

  11. Repair of damaged DNA in vivo: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1987-09-01

    This contract was initiated in 1962 with the US Atomic Energy Commission to carry out basic research on the effects of radiation on the process of DNA replication in bacteria. Within the first contract year we discovered repair replication at the same time that Setlow and Carrier discovered pyrimidine dimer excision. These discoveries led to the elucidation of the process of excision-repair, one of the most important mechanisms by which living systems, including humans, respond to structural damage in their genetic material. We improved methodology for distinguishing repair replication from semiconservative replication and instructed others in these techniques. Painter then was the first to demonstrate repair replication in ultraviolet irradiated human cells. He, in turn, instructed James Cleaver who discovered that skin fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were defective in excision-repair. People with this genetic defect are extremely sensitive to sunlight and they develop carcinomas and melanomas of the skin with high frequency. The existence of this hereditary disease attests to the importance of DNA repair in man. We certainly could not survive in the normal ultraviolet flux from the sun if our DNA were not continuously monitored for damage and repaired. Other hereditary diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia, Cockayne's syndrome, Blooms syndrome and Fanconi's anemia also involve deficiencies in DNA damage processing. The field of DNA repair has developed rapidly as we have learned that most environmental chemical carcinogens as well as radiation produce repairable damage in DNA. 251 refs.

  12. DNA damage repair in breast cancer and its therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Ali, Reem; Rakha, Emad A; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Bryant, Helen E

    2017-02-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) involves the activation of numerous cellular activities that repair DNA lesions and maintain genomic integrity, and is critical in preventing tumorigenesis. Inherited or acquired mutations in specific genes involved in the DNA damage response, for example the breast cancer susceptibility genes 1/2 (BRCA1/2), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and P53 are associated with various subtypes of breast cancer. Such changes can render breast cancer cells particularly sensitive to specific DNA damage response inhibitors, for example BRCA1/2 germline mutated cells are sensitive to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. The aims of this review are to discuss specific DNA damage response defects in breast cancer and to present the current stage of development of various DDR inhibitors (namely PARP, ATM/ATR, DNA-PK, PARG, RECQL5, FEN1 and APE1) for breast cancer mono- and combination therapy. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA Damage: From Chronic Inflammation to Age-Related Deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Anna; Goulielmaki, Evi; Garinis, George A.

    2016-01-01

    To lessen the “wear and tear” of existence, cells have evolved mechanisms that continuously sense DNA lesions, repair DNA damage and restore the compromised genome back to its native form. Besides genome maintenance pathways, multicellular organisms may also employ adaptive and innate immune mechanisms to guard themselves against bacteria or viruses. Recent evidence points to reciprocal interactions between DNA repair, DNA damage responses and aspects of immunity; both self-maintenance and defense responses share a battery of common players and signaling pathways aimed at safeguarding our bodily functions over time. In the short-term, this functional interplay would allow injured cells to restore damaged DNA templates or communicate their compromised state to the microenvironment. In the long-term, however, it may result in the (premature) onset of age-related degeneration, including cancer. Here, we discuss the beneficial and unrewarding outcomes of DNA damage-driven inflammation in the context of tissue-specific pathology and disease progression. PMID:27826317

  14. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Ellis L.; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  15. SOS processing of unique oxidative DNA damages in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Laspia, M F; Wallace, S S

    1989-05-05

    phi X174 replicative form (RF) I transfecting DNA containing thymine glycols (5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine), urea glycosides or apurinic (AP) sites was used to study SOS processing of unique DNA damages in Escherichia coli. All three lesions can be found in DNA damaged by chemical oxidants or radiation and are representative of several common structural modifications of DNA bases. When phi X DNA containing thymine glycols was transfected into host cells that were ultraviolet-irradiated to induce the SOS response, a substantial increase in survival was observed compared to transfection into uninduced hosts. Studies with mutants demonstrated that both the activated form of RecA and UmuDC proteins were required for this reactivation. In contrast, no increase in survival was observed when DNA containing urea glycosides or AP sites was transfected into ultraviolet-induced hosts. These data suggest that SOS-induced reactivation does not reflect a generalized repair system for all replication-blocking, lethal lesions but rather that the efficiency of reactivation is damage dependent. Further, we found that a significant fraction of potentially lethal thymine glycols could be ultraviolet-reactivated in an umuC lexA recA-independent manner, suggesting the existence of an as yet uncharacterized damage-inducible SOS-independent mode of thymine glycol repair.

  16. Damage to rat spermatozoal DNA after chronic cyclophosphamide exposure.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J; Hales, B F; Robaire, B

    1995-12-01

    Treatment of male rats with low dosages of cyclophosphamide causes a dramatic increase in early embryo death among their progeny without significantly affecting the general health of the male. It is hypothesized that cyclophosphamide exerts its effects by targeting specific components of spermatozoal nuclei. The purpose of the present studies was to investigate the effects of chronic cyclophosphamide treatment on spermatozoal DNA. Two approaches were pursued. The first was to determine total DNA damage by using the alkaline elution method. The second was to study spermatozoal DNA template function by using an in vitro DNA synthesis system. Adult male rats were treated with saline or cyclophosphamide (6.1 mg/kg/day) daily for 1 or 6 wk. Cauda epididymal spermatozoa were collected and subjected to alkaline elution using DNA-DNA dot hybridization to quantify the fractionated DNA. One week of treatment with cyclophosphamide caused DNA single strand breaks that could be detected only in the presence of proteinase K in the lysis solution; no DNA cross-links were observed in the animals that received 1-wk drug treatment. In contrast, 6 wk of treatment with cyclophosphamide induced a significant increase in both DNA single strand breaks and cross-links in spermatozoal nuclei; the cross-links were attributable primarily to DNA-DNA linkages. The availability of spermatozoal DNA for template function was not affected by 1 wk of treatment with cyclophosphamide but was markedly affected after 6 wk of treatment with this drug. It is proposed that during chromatin transition processes the male genome may be in an open dynamic state with many exposed sites that are vulnerable to alkylating agents. Since there is no DNA repair during spermiogenesis, damage to the genome by alkylation at this stage may be cumulative, resulting in the production of dysfunctional germ cells.

  17. AGUSTA Experience on Damage Tolerance Evaluation of Helicopter Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    CVID ) with a sharp tool made by a 90’ pyramid, figure 3. Elastomeric Centering Bearing, which allows the pitch In addition, scratches and...bolts, figure 7. ageing. After having initiated a crack in the safe life test at amplified Tolerance to CVID by sharp impact at 50 J was additionally...on the blade skin. ageing and proving ultimate load static strength after fatigue in hot-wet ageing. Rear Fuselage Tolerance to CVID by sharp impact

  18. Parvovirus diversity and DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Parvoviruses have a linear single-stranded DNA genome, around 5 kb in length, with short imperfect terminal palindromes that fold back on themselves to form duplex hairpin telomeres. These contain most of the cis-acting information required for viral "rolling hairpin" DNA replication, an evolutionary adaptation of rolling-circle synthesis in which the hairpins create duplex replication origins, prime complementary strand synthesis, and act as hinges to reverse the direction of the unidirectional cellular fork. Genomes are packaged vectorially into small, rugged protein capsids ~260 Å in diameter, which mediate their delivery directly into the cell nucleus, where they await their host cell's entry into S phase under its own cell cycle control. Here we focus on genus-specific variations in genome structure and replication, and review host cell responses that modulate the nuclear environment.

  19. DNA Damage and L1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Farkash, Evan A.; Prak, Eline T. Luning

    2006-01-01

    Barbara McClintock was the first to suggest that transposons are a source of genome instability and that genotoxic stress assisted in their mobilization. The generation of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) is a severe form of genotoxic stress that threatens the integrity of the genome, activates cell cycle checkpoints, and, in some cases, causes cell death. Applying McClintock's stress hypothesis to humans, are L1 retrotransposons, the most active autonomous mobile elements in the modern day human genome, mobilized by DSBs? Here, evidence that transposable elements, particularly retrotransposons, are mobilized by genotoxic stress is reviewed. In the setting of DSB formation, L1 mobility may be affected by changes in the substrate for L1 integration, the DNA repair machinery, or the L1 element itself. The review concludes with a discussion of the potential consequences of L1 mobilization in the setting of genotoxic stress. PMID:16877815

  20. Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    whereas the related bioflavonoid quercetin induced phosphoryl- for a further 60 or 120 min, and extracts were then prepared ation at these sites in a...cell cycle in response to ionizing radiation- induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Carriers ofA TM mutations are at increased risk for breast...cancer. Since many anti-tumor chemotherapeutics used in breast cancer treatment have the capacity to induce DSBs, I have investigated the requirement for

  1. Looking for Waldo: A Potential Thermodynamic Signature to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus DNA in its simplest form is an ensemble of nucleic acids, water, and ions, and the conformation of DNA is dependent on the relative proportions of all three components. When DNA is covalently damaged by endogenous or exogenous reactive species, including those produced by some anticancer drugs, the ensemble undergoes localized changes that affect nucleic acid structure, thermodynamic stability, and the qualitative and quantative arrangement of associated cations and water molecules. Fortunately, the biological effects of low levels of DNA damage are successfully mitigated by a large number of proteins that efficiently recognize and repair DNA damage in the midst of a vast excess of canonical DNA. In this Account, we explore the impact of DNA modifications on the high resolution and dynamic structure of DNA, DNA stability, and the uptake of ions and water and explore how these changes may be sensed by proteins whose function is to initially locate DNA lesions. We discuss modifications on the nucleobases that are located in the major and minor grooves of DNA and include lesions that are observed in vivo, including oxidized bases, as well as some synthetic nucleobases that allow us to probe how the location and nature of different substituents affect the thermodynamics and structure of the DNA ensemble. It is demonstrated that disruption of a cation binding site in the major groove by modification of the N7-position on the purines, which is the major site for DNA alkylation, is enthalpically destabilizing. Accordingly, tethering a cationic charge in the major groove is enthalpically stabilizing. The combined structural and thermodynamic studies provide a detailed picture of how different DNA lesions affect the dynamics of DNA and how modified bases interact with their environment. Our work supports the hypothesis that there is a “thermodynamic signature” to DNA lesions that can be exploited in the initial search that requires differentiation between

  2. Looking for Waldo: a potential thermodynamic signature to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gold, Barry; Stone, Michael P; Marky, Luis A

    2014-04-15

    DNA in its simplest form is an ensemble of nucleic acids, water, and ions, and the conformation of DNA is dependent on the relative proportions of all three components. When DNA is covalently damaged by endogenous or exogenous reactive species, including those produced by some anticancer drugs, the ensemble undergoes localized changes that affect nucleic acid structure, thermodynamic stability, and the qualitative and quantative arrangement of associated cations and water molecules. Fortunately, the biological effects of low levels of DNA damage are successfully mitigated by a large number of proteins that efficiently recognize and repair DNA damage in the midst of a vast excess of canonical DNA. In this Account, we explore the impact of DNA modifications on the high resolution and dynamic structure of DNA, DNA stability, and the uptake of ions and water and explore how these changes may be sensed by proteins whose function is to initially locate DNA lesions. We discuss modifications on the nucleobases that are located in the major and minor grooves of DNA and include lesions that are observed in vivo, including oxidized bases, as well as some synthetic nucleobases that allow us to probe how the location and nature of different substituents affect the thermodynamics and structure of the DNA ensemble. It is demonstrated that disruption of a cation binding site in the major groove by modification of the N7-position on the purines, which is the major site for DNA alkylation, is enthalpically destabilizing. Accordingly, tethering a cationic charge in the major groove is enthalpically stabilizing. The combined structural and thermodynamic studies provide a detailed picture of how different DNA lesions affect the dynamics of DNA and how modified bases interact with their environment. Our work supports the hypothesis that there is a "thermodynamic signature" to DNA lesions that can be exploited in the initial search that requires differentiation between canonical DNA and

  3. Cellular effects of UVA: DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation between 320 nm and visible light (UVA) is a major component of both solar radiation and suntan lamps, which are being increasingly used in tanning booths. UVA has generally been considered innocuous, partially because DNA does not absorb appreciably in this region, but UVB radiation (290-320 nm) has widely been considered to be the major etiological factor in human skin carcinogenesis caused by solar uv radiation, largely because DNA absorbs photons of UVB, which is known to produce thymine photoproducts (cyclobutane dimers and adducts). It is true that patients with xeroderma pigmentosum are particularly prone to solar-uv-induced skin cancer, and cells derived from these people have been shown to lack ability to repair pyrimidine photoproducts by excision, evidence that pyrimidine photoproducts might play a role in carcinogenesis in certain specialized situations. Normal cells have the ability to repair these UVB-induced lesions. However, UVA is considerably more penetrating and more abundant than UVB, and others have performed a spectral analysis that claimed that 20-60% (depending upon the solar zenith angle) of the toxic biological effects of solar radiation can be attributed to UVA. The fact that UVA radiations are mutagenic provides motivation for studying DNA changes that might be effected by this region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  4. Lipid peroxidation-DNA damage by malondialdehyde.

    PubMed

    Marnett, L J

    1999-03-08

    Malondialdehyde is a naturally occurring product of lipid peroxidation and prostaglandin biosynthesis that is mutagenic and carcinogenic. It reacts with DNA to form adducts to deoxyguanosine and deoxyadenosine. The major adduct to DNA is a pyrimidopurinone called M1G. Site-specific mutagenesis experiments indicate that M1G is mutagenic in bacteria and is repaired by the nucleotide excision repair pathway. M1G has been detected in liver, white blood cells, pancreas, and breast from healthy human beings at levels ranging from 1-120 per 108 nucleotides. Several different assays for M1G have been described that are based on mass spectrometry, 32P-postlabeling, or immunochemical techniques. Each technique offers advantages and disadvantages based on a combination of sensitivity and specificity. Application of each of these techniques to the analysis of M1G is reviewed and future needs for improvements are identified. M1G appears to be a major endogenous DNA adduct in human beings that may contribute significantly to cancer linked to lifestyle and dietary factors. High throughput methods for its detection and quantitation will be extremely useful for screening large populations. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  5. Concepts for improving the damage tolerance of composite compression panels. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The residual strength of specimens with damage and the sensitivity to damage while subjected to an applied inplane compression load were determined for flatplate specimens and blade-stiffened panels. The results suggest that matrix materials that fail by delamination have the lowest damage tolerance capability. Alternate matrix materials or laminates which are transversely reinforced suppress the delamination mode of failure and change the failure mode to transverse shear crippling which occurs at a higher strain value. Several damage-tolerant blade-stiffened panel design concepts are evaluated. Structural efficiency studies conducted show only small mass penalties may result from incorporating these damage-tolerant features in panel design. The implication of test results on the design of aircraft structures was examined with respect to FAR requirements.

  6. E2F-7 couples DNA damage-dependent transcription with the DNA repair process.

    PubMed

    Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Coutts, Amanda S; Helleday, Thomas; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2013-09-15

    The cellular response to DNA damage, mediated by the DNA repair process, is essential in maintaining the integrity and stability of the genome. E2F-7 is an atypical member of the E2F family with a role in negatively regulating transcription and cell cycle progression under DNA damage. Surprisingly, we found that E2F-7 makes a transcription-independent contribution to the DNA repair process, which involves E2F-7 locating to and binding damaged DNA. Further, E2F-7 recruits CtBP and HDAC to the damaged DNA, altering the local chromatin environment of the DNA lesion. Importantly, the E2F-7 gene is a target for somatic mutation in human cancer and tumor-derived mutant alleles encode proteins with compromised transcription and DNA repair properties. Our results establish that E2F-7 participates in 2 closely linked processes, allowing it to directly couple the expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response with the DNA repair machinery, which has relevance in human malignancy.

  7. Influence of Fibre Architecture on Impact Damage Tolerance in 3D Woven Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potluri, P.; Hogg, P.; Arshad, M.; Jetavat, D.; Jamshidi, P.

    2012-10-01

    3D woven composites, due to the presence of through-thickness fibre-bridging, have the potential to improve damage tolerance and at the same time to reduce the manufacturing costs. However, ability to withstand damage depends on weave topology as well as geometry of individual tows. There is an extensive literature on damage tolerance of 2D prepreg laminates but limited work is reported on the damage tolerance of 3D weaves. In view of the recent interest in 3D woven composites from aerospace as well as non-aerospace sectors, this paper aims to provide an understanding of the impact damage resistance as well as damage tolerance of 3D woven composites. Four different 3D woven architectures, orthogonal, angle interlocked, layer-to-layer and modified layer-to-layer structures, have been produced under identical weaving conditions. Two additional structures, Unidirectional (UD) cross-ply and 2D plain weave, have been developed for comparison with 3D weaves. All the four 3D woven laminates have similar order of magnitude of damage area and damage width, but significantly lower than UD and 2D woven laminates. Damage Resistance, calculated as impact energy per unit damage area, has been shown to be significantly higher for 3D woven laminates. Rate of change of CAI strength with impact energy appears to be similar for all four 3D woven laminates as well as UD laminate; 2D woven laminate has higher rate of degradation with respect to impact energy. Undamaged compression strength has been shown to be a function of average tow waviness angle. Additionally, 3D weaves exhibit a critical damage size; below this size there is no appreciable reduction in compression strength. 3D woven laminates have also exhibited a degree of plasticity during compression whereas UD laminates fail instantly. The experimental work reported in this paper forms a foundation for systematic development of computational models for 3D woven architectures for damage tolerance.

  8. Human Telomeres Are Hypersensitive to UV-Induced DNA Damage and Refractory to Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rochette, Patrick J.; Brash, Douglas E.

    2010-01-01

    Telomeric repeats preserve genome integrity by stabilizing chromosomes, a function that appears to be important for both cancer and aging. In view of this critical role in genomic integrity, the telomere's own integrity should be of paramount importance to the cell. Ultraviolet light (UV), the preeminent risk factor in skin cancer development, induces mainly cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) which are both mutagenic and lethal. The human telomeric repeat unit (5′TTAGGG/CCCTAA3′) is nearly optimal for acquiring UV-induced CPD, which form at dipyrimidine sites. We developed a ChIP–based technique, immunoprecipitation of DNA damage (IPoD), to simultaneously study DNA damage and repair in the telomere and in the coding regions of p53, 28S rDNA, and mitochondrial DNA. We find that human telomeres in vivo are 7-fold hypersensitive to UV-induced DNA damage. In double-stranded oligonucleotides, this hypersensitivity is a property of both telomeric and non-telomeric repeats; in a series of telomeric repeat oligonucleotides, a phase change conferring UV-sensitivity occurs above 4 repeats. Furthermore, CPD removal in the telomere is almost absent, matching the rate in mitochondria known to lack nucleotide excision repair. Cells containing persistent high levels of telomeric CPDs nevertheless proliferate, and chronic UV irradiation of cells does not accelerate telomere shortening. Telomeres are therefore unique in at least three respects: their biophysical UV sensitivity, their prevention of excision repair, and their tolerance of unrepaired lesions. Utilizing a lesion-tolerance strategy rather than repair would prevent double-strand breaks at closely-opposed excision repair sites on opposite strands of a damage-hypersensitive repeat. PMID:20442874

  9. Utilization of salmon milt DNA against UV damage.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yoshiharu; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2010-04-01

    We examined the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the UV spectra and radical scavenging activity of DNA strands and found that the absorption spectra of salmon milt DNA was extended up to about 350 nm after ultraviolet C (UVC, 100-280 nm) irradiation with 300 kJ/m(2). The UV B (UVB, 280-315 nm) protection ability of UVC-irradiated salmon milt DNA for a single-stranded target DNA (19-mer) was further studied. The percentage of damaged target DNA after 50 kJ/m(2) of UVB irradiation in the presence of UVC-irradiated salmon milt DNA, UVC-unirradiated salmon milt DNA, and 2-phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid was estimated to be 24.6%, 27.0%, and 18.9%, respectively. Moreover, the ultraviolet A (UVA, 315-400 nm)/UVB ratio and critical wavelength of natural (UVC-unirradiated) salmon milt DNA were estimated to be 0.13 and 313 nm, respectively, whereas those of the UVC-irradiated salmon milt DNA were 0.34 and 375 nm, respectively. Interestingly, the value of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity in UVC-irradiated salmon milt DNA was about five times higher than that of UVC-unirradiated salmon milt DNA. These results indicate that the UVC-irradiated salmon milt DNA could be useful as a protector against a wide range of UV light from UVC approximately UVA.

  10. Oxidant-induced DNA damage of target cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstätter, I; Hyslop, P A; Jackson, J H; Cochrane, C G

    1988-01-01

    In this study we examined the leukocytic oxidant species that induce oxidant damage of DNA in whole cells. H2O2 added extracellularly in micromolar concentrations (10-100 microM) induced DNA strand breaks in various target cells. The sensitivity of a specific target cell was inversely correlated to its catalase content and the rate of removal of H2O2 by the target cell. Oxidant species produced by xanthine oxidase/purine or phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated monocytes induced DNA breakage of target cells in proportion to the amount of H2O2 generated. These DNA strand breaks were prevented by extracellular catalase, but not by superoxide dismutase. Cytotoxic doses of HOCl, added to target cells, did not induce DNA strand breakage, and myeloperoxidase added extracellularly in the presence of an H2O2-generating system, prevented the formation of DNA strand breaks in proportion to its H2O2 degrading capacity. The studies also indicated that H2O2 formed hydroxyl radical (.OH) intracellularly, which appeared to be the most likely free radical responsible for DNA damage: .OH was detected in cells exposed to H2O2; the DNA base, deoxyguanosine, was hydroxylated in cells exposed to H2O2; and intracellular iron was essential for induction of DNA strand breaks. PMID:2843565

  11. DNA damage in storage cells of anhydrobiotic tardigrades.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Simon; Reuner, Andy; Brümmer, Franz; Schill, Ralph O

    2009-08-01

    In order to recover without any apparent damage, tardigrades have evolved effective adaptations to preserve the integrity of cells and tissues in the anhydrobiotic state. Despite those adaptations and the fact that the process of biological ageing comes to a stop during anhydrobiosis, the time animals can persist in this state is limited; after exceedingly long anhydrobiotic periods tardigrades fail to recover. Using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) technique to study the effect of anhydrobiosis on the integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid, we showed that the DNA in storage cells of the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum was well protected during transition from the active into the anhydrobiotic state. Specimens of M. tardigradum that had been desiccated for two days had only accumulated minor DNA damage (2.09 +/- 1.98% DNA in tail, compared to 0.44 +/- 0.74% DNA in tail for the negative control with active, hydrated animals). Yet the longer the anhydrobiotic phase lasted, the more damage was inflicted on the DNA. After six weeks in anhydrobiosis, 13.63 +/- 6.41% of DNA was found in the comet tail. After ten months, 23.66 +/- 7.56% of DNA was detected in the comet tail. The cause for this deterioration is unknown, but oxidative processes mediated by reactive oxygen species are a possible explanation.

  12. Detecting ATM-dependent chromatin modification in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mishra, Lopa; Hunt, Clayton; Pandita, Tej K

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function or mutation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene product (ATM) results in inherited genetic disorders characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, and cancer. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product belongs to the PI3K-like protein kinase (PIKKs) family and is functionally implicated in mitogenic signal transduction, chromosome condensation, meiotic recombination, cell-cycle control, and telomere maintenance. The ATM protein kinase is primarily activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious form of DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic drugs. It is detected at DNA damage sites, where ATM autophosphorylation causes dissociation of the inactive homodimeric form to the activated monomeric form. Interestingly, heat shock can activate ATM independent of the presence of DNA strand breaks. ATM is an integral part of the sensory machinery that detects DSBs during meiosis, mitosis, or DNA breaks mediated by free radicals. These DNA lesions can trigger higher order chromatin reorganization fuelled by posttranslational modifications of histones and histone binding proteins. Our group, and others, have shown that ATM activation is tightly regulated by chromatin modifications. This review summarizes the multiple approaches used to discern the role of ATM and other associated proteins in chromatin modification in response to DNA damage.

  13. Detecting ATM-Dependent Chromatin Modification in DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mishra, Lope; Hunt, Clayton; Pandita, Tej K.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function or mutation of the ataxia–telangiectasia mutated gene product (ATM) results in inherited genetic disorders characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, and cancer. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product belongs to the PI3K-like protein kinase (PIKKs) family and is functionally implicated in mitogenic signal transduction, chromosome condensation, meiotic recombination, cell-cycle control, and telomere maintenance. The ATM protein kinase is primarily activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious form of DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic drugs. It is detected at DNA damage sites, where ATM autophosphorylation causes dissociation of the inactive homodimeric form to the activated monomeric form. Interestingly, heat shock can activate ATM independent of the presence of DNA strand breaks. ATM is an integral part of the sensory machinery that detects DSBs during meiosis, mitosis, or DNA breaks mediated by free radicals. These DNA lesions can trigger higher order chromatin reorganization fuelled by posttranslational modifications of histones and histone binding proteins. Our group, and others, have shown that ATM activation is tightly regulated by chromatin modifications. This review summarizes the multiple approaches used to discern the role of ATM and other associated proteins in chromatin modification in response to DNA damage. PMID:25827888

  14. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors induce DNA damage through nucleoside depletion

    PubMed Central

    Juvekar, Ashish; Hu, Hai; Yadegarynia, Sina; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Ullas, Soumya; Lien, Evan C.; Bellinger, Gary; Son, Jaekyoung; Hok, Rosanna C.; Seth, Pankaj; Daly, Michele B.; Kim, Baek; Scully, Ralph; Asara, John M.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wulf, Gerburg M.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that combining a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor with a poly-ADP Rib polymerase (PARP)-inhibitor enhanced DNA damage and cell death in breast cancers that have genetic aberrations in BRCA1 and TP53. Here, we show that enhanced DNA damage induced by PI3K inhibitors in this mutational background is a consequence of impaired production of nucleotides needed for DNA synthesis and DNA repair. Inhibition of PI3K causes a reduction in all four nucleotide triphosphates, whereas inhibition of the protein kinase AKT is less effective than inhibition of PI3K in suppressing nucleotide synthesis and inducing DNA damage. Carbon flux studies reveal that PI3K inhibition disproportionately affects the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway that delivers Rib-5-phosphate required for base ribosylation. In vivo in a mouse model of BRCA1-linked triple-negative breast cancer (K14-Cre BRCA1f/fp53f/f), the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 led to a precipitous drop in DNA synthesis within 8 h of drug treatment, whereas DNA synthesis in normal tissues was less affected. In this mouse model, combined PI3K and PARP inhibition was superior to either agent alone to induce durable remissions of established tumors. PMID:27402769

  15. Multiomic Analysis of the UV-Induced DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Boeing, Stefan; Williamson, Laura; Encheva, Vesela; Gori, Ilaria; Saunders, Rebecca E; Instrell, Rachael; Aygün, Ozan; Rodriguez-Martinez, Marta; Weems, Juston C; Kelly, Gavin P; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Stewart, Aengus; Howell, Michael; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2016-05-11

    In order to facilitate the identification of factors and pathways in the cellular response to UV-induced DNA damage, several descriptive proteomic screens and a functional genomics screen were performed in parallel. Numerous factors could be identified with high confidence when the screen results were superimposed and interpreted together, incorporating biological knowledge. A searchable database, bioLOGIC, which provides access to relevant information about a protein or process of interest, was established to host the results and facilitate data mining. Besides uncovering roles in the DNA damage response for numerous proteins and complexes, including Integrator, Cohesin, PHF3, ASC-1, SCAF4, SCAF8, and SCAF11, we uncovered a role for the poorly studied, melanoma-associated serine/threonine kinase 19 (STK19). Besides effectively uncovering relevant factors, the multiomic approach also provides a systems-wide overview of the diverse cellular processes connected to the transcription-related DNA damage response.

  16. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Onuki, Janice; Chen, Yiming; Teixeira, Priscila C; Schumacher, Robert I; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Van Houten, Bennett; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2004-12-15

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a heme precursor accumulated in plasma and in organs in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), a disease associated with neuromuscular dysfunction and increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Liver biopsies of AIP patients showed odd-shaped mitochondria and autophagic vacuoles containing well-preserved mitochondria. ALA yields reactive oxygen species upon metal-catalyzed oxidation and causes in vivo and in vitro impairment of rat liver mitochondria and DNA damage. Using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that ALA induces a dose-dependent damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in human SVNF fibroblasts and rat PC12 cells. CHO cells treated with ALA also show nuclear DNA damage and human HepG2 cells entered in apoptosis and necrosis induced by ALA and its dimerization product, DHPY. The present data provide additional information on the genotoxicity of ALA, reinforcing the hypothesis that it may be involved in the development of HCC in AIP patients.

  17. The interplay between inflammation, oxidative stress, DNA damage, DNA repair and mitochondrial dysfunction in depression.

    PubMed

    Czarny, Piotr; Wigner, Paulina; Galecki, Piotr; Sliwinski, Tomasz

    2017-06-29

    A growing body of evidence suggests that inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant-antioxidant imbalance may play a significant role in the development and progression of depression. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species - a result of oxidant-antioxidant imbalance - may lead to increased damage of biomolecules, including DNA. This was confirmed in depressed patients in a research study conducted by our team and other scientists. 8-oxoguanine - a marker of oxidative DNA damage - was found in the patients' lymphocytes, urine and serum. These results were confirmed using a comet assay on lymphocytes. Furthermore, it was shown that the patients' cells repaired peroxide-induced DNA damage less efficiently than controls' cells and that some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of the genes involved in oxidative DNA damage repair may modulate the risk of depression. Lastly, less efficient DNA damage repair observed in the patients can be, at least partly, attributed to the presence of specific SNP variants, as it was revealed through a genotype-phenotype analysis. In conclusion, the available literature shows that both oxidative stress and less efficient DNA damage repair may lead to increased DNA damage in depressed patients. A similar mechanism may result in mitochondrial dysfunction, which is observed in depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Distribution Patterns of Postmortem Damage in Human Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders J.; Barnes, Ian; Rudbeck, Lars; Lynnerup, Niels; Cooper, Alan

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of postmortem damage in mitochondrial DNA retrieved from 37 ancient human DNA samples was analyzed by cloning and was compared with a selection of published animal data. A relative rate of damage (ρv) was calculated for nucleotide positions within the human hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) and cytochrome oxidase subunit III genes. A comparison of damaged sites within and between the regions reveals that damage hotspots exist and that, in the HVR1, these correlate with sites known to have high in vivo mutation rates. Conversely, HVR1 subregions with known structural function, such as MT5, have lower in vivo mutation rates and lower postmortem-damage rates. The postmortem data also identify a possible functional subregion of the HVR1, termed “low-diversity 1,” through the lack of sequence damage. The amount of postmortem damage observed in mitochondrial coding regions was significantly lower than in the HVR1, and, although hotspots were noted, these did not correlate with codon position. Finally, a simple method for the identification of incorrect archaeological haplogroup designations is introduced, on the basis of the observed spectrum of postmortem damage. PMID:12489041

  19. Strong, damage tolerant oxide-fiber/oxide matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yahua

    cationic polyelectrolytes to have a positive surface charge and then dipped into diluted, negatively-charged AlPO4 colloidal suspension (0.05M) at pH 7.5. Amorphous AlPO4 (crystallizes to tridymite- and cristobalite-forms at 1080°C) nano particles were coated on fibers layer-by-layer using an electrostatic attraction protocol. A uniform and smooth coating was formed which allowed fiber pullout from the matrix of a Nextel 720/alumina mini-composite hot-pressed at 1250°C/20MPa. Reaction-bonded mullite (RBM), with low formation temperature and sintering shrinkage was synthesized by incorporation of mixed-rare-earth-oxide (MREO) and mullite seeds. Pure mullite formed with 7.5wt% MREO at 1300°C. Introduction of 5wt% mullite seeds gave RBM with less than 3% shrinkage and 20% porosity. AlPO4-coated Nextel 720/RBM composites were successful fabricated by EPID and pressureless sintering at 1300°C. Significant fiber pullout occurred and the 4-point bend strength was around 170MPa (with 25-30vol% fibers) at room temperature and 1100°C and a Work-of-Fracture 7KJ/m2. At 1200°C, the composite failed in shear due to the MREO-based glassy phase in the matrix. AlPO4-coated Nextel 720 fiber/aluminosilicate (no MREO) showed damage tolerance at 1200°C with a bend strength 170MPa.

  20. Some Observations on Damage Tolerance Analyses in Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Dawicke, David S.; Hampton, Roy W.

    2017-01-01

    AIAA standards S080 and S081 are applicable for certification of metallic pressure vessels (PV) and composite overwrap pressure vessels (COPV), respectively. These standards require damage tolerance analyses with a minimum reliable detectible flaw/crack and demonstration of safe life four times the service life with these cracks at the worst-case location in the PVs and oriented perpendicular to the maximum principal tensile stress. The standards require consideration of semi-elliptical surface cracks in the range of aspect ratios (crack depth a to half of the surface length c, i.e., (a/c) of 0.2 to 1). NASA-STD-5009 provides the minimum reliably detectible standard crack sizes (90/95 probability of detection (POD) for several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods (eddy current (ET), penetrant (PT), radiography (RT) and ultrasonic (UT)) for the two limits of the aspect ratio range required by the AIAA standards. This paper tries to answer the questions: can the safe life analysis consider only the life for the crack sizes at the two required limits, or endpoints, of the (a/c) range for the NDE method used or does the analysis need to consider values within that range? What would be an appropriate method to interpolate 90/95 POD crack sizes at intermediate (a/c) values? Several procedures to develop combinations of a and c within the specified range are explored. A simple linear relationship between a and c is chosen to compare the effects of seven different approaches to determine combinations of aj and cj that are between the (a/c) endpoints. Two of the seven are selected for evaluation: Approach I, the simple linear relationship, and a more conservative option, Approach III. For each of these two Approaches, the lives are computed for initial semi-elliptic crack configurations in a plate subjected to remote tensile fatigue loading with an R-ratio of 0.1, for an assumed material evaluated using NASGRO (registered 4) version 8.1. These calculations demonstrate

  1. Analysis of pesticide exposure and DNA damage in immigrant farmworkers.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Linda A; Lasarev, Michael; Muniz, Juan; Nazar Stewart, Valle; Kisby, Glen

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, the Comet assay has been used increasingly in studies of workers potentially exposed to genotoxic substances in the workplace or environment. Significant increases in DNA damage measured with the Comet assay has been reported in lymphocytes of agricultural workers; however, less intrusive means of biomonitoring are needed in epidemiological investigations. This study was designed to use the Comet assay to describe the association of markers of DNA damage in oral leukocytes with biomarkers of pesticide exposure in 134 farmworkers working in berry crops in Oregon compared to control populations. The authors also examined the extent of DNA damage in young workers compared to adults and the effect of work histories, lifestyle factors, and diet on markers of DNA damage. Urinary levels of organophosphate pesticides were low at the time of sampling; however, mean levels of the Captan metabolite tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI) were found to be shifted significantly higher in the farmworkers (0.14 microg/ml) compared to controls (0.078 microg/ml) (one-sided p value=.01). Likewise, the combined molar equivalent of all dialkylphosphate metabolites was marginally higher in farmworkers (p value=.05). The mean tail intensity was significantly greater for agricultural workers compared to controls (one-sided p value<.001), indicating more DNA damage in the oral leukocytes. On average, the mean tail intensity was 10.9 units greater for agricultural workers (95% CI: 6-16 units greater). Tail moment was also significantly greater for agricultural workers compared to nonagricultural workers (one-sided p value<.001). No Comet parameter was significantly associated with years spent working in agriculture, age, sex, body mass index, diet, and alcohol or tobacco use. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility for using the Comet assay in biomonitoring studies of farmworkers. Additional studies are needed to examine the effects of different pesticide types on

  2. Can graphene quantum dots cause DNA damage in cells?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Zhu, Lin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Dai, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted tremendous attention for biological applications. We report the first study on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of GQDs to fibroblast cell lines (NIH-3T3 cells). The NIH-3T3 cells treated with GQDs at dosages over 50 μg mL-1 showed no significant cytotoxicity. However, the GQD-treated NIH-3T3 cells exhibited an increased expression of proteins (p53, Rad 51, and OGG1) related to DNA damage compared with untreated cells, indicating the DNA damage caused by GQDs. The GQD-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated to be responsible for the observed DNA damage. These findings should have important implications for future applications of GQDs in biological systems.Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted tremendous attention for biological applications. We report the first study on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of GQDs to fibroblast cell lines (NIH-3T3 cells). The NIH-3T3 cells treated with GQDs at dosages over 50 μg mL-1 showed no significant cytotoxicity. However, the GQD-treated NIH-3T3 cells exhibited an increased expression of proteins (p53, Rad 51, and OGG1) related to DNA damage compared with untreated cells, indicating the DNA damage caused by GQDs. The GQD-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated to be responsible for the observed DNA damage. These findings should have important implications for future applications of GQDs in biological systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01734c

  3. DNA damage and oxidative status in PFAPA syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tuğrul, Selahattin; Doğan, Remzi; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim; Torun, Emel; Senturk, Erol; Ozturan, Orhan

    2015-10-01

    PFAPA syndrome is a clinical entity of unknown etiology which presents with periodic episodes of fever, aphthous stomatitis, tonsillitis or pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis. In this study we investigated DNA damage and the oxidative stress parameters in patients diagnosed with PFAPA, to elucidate the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of this syndrome. Thirty-one patients diagnosed with PFAPA (Group 1), 22 patients diagnosed with normal tonsillitis or pharyngitis (Group 2), and 20 healthy volunteers (Group 3) were included in our study. Heparinized peripheral blood samples were drawn from all patients and volunteers. DNA damage was assessed by single cell alkaline electrophoresis assay in peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. Plasma levels of total antioxidant status (TAS) and total oxidative status (TOS) were determined by using a novel automated measurement method, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. DNA damage in the mononuclear leukocytes of Group 1 was significantly higher than that of Group 2 and Group 3. The oxidative stress parameters revealed that the TOS and OSI values of Group 1 were significantly higher than those of Group 2 and Group 3. TAS values of Group 1 were significantly lower than those of Group 2 and Group 3. Correlation analysis of Group 1 demonstrated a significant correlation between TOS, one of the oxidative stress parameters, and DNA damage. Correlations between DNA damage and C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) values were also significant. Our study indicated that both the inflammatory and the oxidative stress parameters were significantly increased in patients with PFAPA syndrome, accompanied by a significant positive correlation between DNA damage and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. BACH2: a marker of DNA damage and ageing.

    PubMed

    Uittenboogaard, L M; Payan-Gomez, C; Pothof, J; van Ijcken, W; Mastroberardino, P G; van der Pluijm, I; Hoeijmakers, J H J; Tresini, M

    2013-11-01

    DNA damage and ageing share expression changes involving alterations in many aspects of metabolism, suppression of growth and upregulation of defence and genome maintenance systems. "Omics" technologies have permitted large-scale parallel measurements covering global cellular constituents and aided the identification of specific response pathways that change during ageing and after DNA damage. We have set out to identify genes with highly conserved response patterns through meta-analysis of mRNA expression datasets collected during natural ageing and accelerated ageing caused by a Transcription-Coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair (TC-NER) defect in a diverse set of organs and tissues in mice, and from in vitro UV-induced DNA damage in a variety of murine cells. The identified set of genes that show similar expression patterns in response to organ ageing (accelerated and normal), and endogenously and exogenously induced DNA damage, consists of genes involved in anti-oxidant systems and includes the transcription factor Bach2 as one of the most consistent markers. BACH2 was originally identified as a partner of the small Maf proteins and antagonist of the NRF2 anti-oxidant defence pathway and has been implicated in B-cell differentiation and immune system homeostasis. Although BACH2 has never before been associated with UV-induced damage or ageing, it shows a strong downregulation in both conditions. We have characterized the dynamics of Bach2 expression in response to DNA damage and show that it is a highly sensitive responder to transcription-blocking DNA lesions. Gene expression profiling using Affymetrix microarray analysis after siRNA-mediated silencing of Bach2 identified cell cycle and transcription regulation as the most significantly altered processes consistent with a function as transcription factor affecting proliferation.

  5. BACH2: a Marker of DNA Damage and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Uittenboogaard, L.M.; Payan-Gomez, C.; Pothof, J.; van IJcken, W.; Mastroberardino, PG; van der Pluijm; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Tresini, M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage and aging share expression changes involving alterations in many aspects of metabolism, suppression of growth and upregulation of defence and genome maintenance systems. “Omics” technologies have permitted large-scale parallel measurements covering global cellular constituents and aided the identification of specific response pathways that change during aging and after DNA damage. We have set out to identify genes with highly conserved response patterns through meta-analysis of mRNA expression datasets collected during natural aging and accelerated aging caused by a Transcription-Coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair (TC-NER) defect in a diverse set of organs and tissues in mice, and from in-vitro UV-induced DNA damage in a variety of murine cells. The identified set of genes that show similar expression patterns in response to organ aging (accelerated and normal), and endogenously and exogenously induced DNA damage, consists of genes involved in anti-oxidant systems and includes the transcription factor Bach2 as one of the most consistent markers. BACH2 was originally identified as a partner of the small Maf proteins and antagonist of the NRF2 anti-oxidant defence pathway and has been implicated in B-cell differentiation and immune system homeostasis. Although BACH2 has never before been associated with UV-induced damage or aging, it shows a strong downregulation in both conditions. We have characterized the dynamics of Bach2 expression in response to DNA damage and show that it is a highly sensitive responder to transcription-blocking DNA lesions. Gene expression profiling using Affymetrix microarray analysis after siRNA-mediated silencing of Bach2 identified cell cycle and transcription regulation as the most significantly altered processes consistent with a function as transcription factor affecting proliferation. PMID:24075570

  6. 5-Lipoxygenase-mediated endogenous DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Jian, Wenying; Lee, Seon Hwa; Williams, Michelle V; Blair, Ian A

    2009-06-19

    Lipoxygenases (LOs) convert polyunsaturated fatty acids into lipid hydroperoxides. Homolytic decomposition of lipid hydroperoxides gives rise to endogenous genotoxins such as 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal, which cause the formation of mutagenic DNA adducts. Chiral lipidomics analysis was employed to show that a 5-LO-derived lipid hydroperoxide was responsible for endogenous DNA-adduct formation. The study employed human lymphoblastoid CESS cells, which expressed both 5-LO and the required 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP). The major lipid peroxidation product was 5(S)-hydroperoxy-6,8,11,14-(E,Z,Z,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid, which was analyzed as its reduction product, 5(S)-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-(E,Z,Z,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid (5(S)-HETE)). Concentrations of 5(S)-HETE increased from 0.07 +/- 0.01 to 45.50 +/- 4.05 pmol/10(7) cells upon stimulation of the CESS cells with calcium ionophore A23187. There was a concomitant increase in the 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal-derived DNA-adduct, heptanone-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (HepsilondGuo) from 2.41 +/- 0.35 to 6.31 +/- 0.73 adducts/10(7) normal bases. Biosynthesis of prostaglandins, 11(R)-hydroxy-5,8,12,14-(Z,Z,E,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid, and 15(R,S)-hydroxy-5,8,11,13-(Z,Z,Z,E)-eicosatetraenoic acid revealed that there was cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in the CESS cells. Western blot analysis revealed that COX-1 was expressed by the cells, but there was no COX-2 or 15-LO-1. FLAP inhibitor reduced HepsilondGuo-adducts and 5(S)-HETE to basal levels. In contrast, aspirin, which had no effect on 5(S)-HETE, blocked the formation of prostaglandins, 15-HETE, and 11-HETE but did not inhibit HepsilondGuo-adduct formation. These data showed that 5-LO was the enzyme responsible for the generation of the HepsilondGuo DNA-adduct in CESS cells.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Damage in Iron Overload*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xueshan; Campian, Jian Li; Qian, Mingwei; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Eaton, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic iron overload has slow and insidious effects on heart, liver, and other organs. Because iron-driven oxidation of most biologic materials (such as lipids and proteins) is readily repaired, this slow progression of organ damage implies some kind of biological “memory.” We hypothesized that cumulative iron-catalyzed oxidant damage to mtDNA might occur in iron overload, perhaps explaining the often lethal cardiac dysfunction. Real time PCR was used to examine the “intactness” of mttDNA in cultured H9c2 rat cardiac myocytes. After 3–5 days exposure to high iron, these cells exhibited damage to mtDNA reflected by diminished amounts of near full-length 15.9-kb PCR product with no change in the amounts of a 16.1-kb product from a nuclear gene. With the loss of intact mtDNA, cellular respiration declined and mRNAs for three electron transport chain subunits and 16 S rRNA encoded by mtDNA decreased, whereas no decrements were found in four subunits encoded by nuclear DNA. To examine the importance of the interactions of iron with metabolically generated reactive oxygen species, we compared the toxic effects of iron in wild-type and rhoo cells. In wild-type cells, elevated iron caused increased production of reactive oxygen species, cytostasis, and cell death, whereas the rhoo cells were unaffected. We conclude that long-term damage to cells and organs in iron-overload disorders involves interactions between iron and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species resulting in cumulative damage to mtDNA, impaired synthesis of respiratory chain subunits, and respiratory dysfunction. PMID:19095657

  8. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  9. Repair Machinery for Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    significant defect in the repair of certain DNA damages, but of which damages needs to be determined. We have selected Chinese Hamster Ovary ( CHO ) as...chromosome (BAC) genomic fragment, which we isolated from a CHO BAC library, revealed that APE1 exists as a single copy gene in AA8 (see Appendix, Figure... cells , we first determined the APE1 gene copy number in the CHO AA8 cell line. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with an APE1 bacterial artificial

  10. Phase resetting of the mammalian circadian clock by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Oklejewicz, Małgorzata; Destici, Eugin; Tamanini, Filippo; Hut, Roelof A; Janssens, Roel; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J

    2008-02-26

    To anticipate the momentum of the day, most organisms have developed an internal clock that drives circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior [1]. Recent studies indicate that cell-cycle progression and DNA-damage-response pathways are under circadian control [2-4]. Because circadian output processes can feed back into the clock, we investigated whether DNA damage affects the mammalian circadian clock. By using Rat-1 fibroblasts expressing an mPer2 promoter-driven luciferase reporter, we show that ionizing radiation exclusively phase advances circadian rhythms in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Notably, this in vitro finding translates to the living animal, because ionizing radiation also phase advanced behavioral rhythms in mice. The underlying mechanism involves ATM-mediated damage signaling as radiation-induced phase shifting was suppressed in fibroblasts from cancer-predisposed ataxia telangiectasia and Nijmegen breakage syndrome patients. Ionizing radiation-induced phase shifting depends on neither upregulation or downregulation of clock gene expression nor on de novo protein synthesis and, thus, differs mechanistically from dexamethasone- and forskolin-provoked clock resetting [5]. Interestingly, ultraviolet light and tert-butyl hydroperoxide also elicited a phase-advancing effect. Taken together, our data provide evidence that the mammalian circadian clock, like that of the lower eukaryote Neurospora[6], responds to DNA damage and suggest that clock resetting is a universal property of DNA damage.

  11. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  12. DNA damage response during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alexandra; Baran, Vladimir; Sakakibara, Yogo; Brzakova, Adela; Ferencova, Ivana; Motlik, Jan; Kitajima, Tomoya S.; Schultz, Richard M.; Solc, Petr

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because low levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) appear not to activate the ATM-mediated prophase I checkpoint in full-grown oocytes, there may exist mechanisms to protect chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. Using live imaging we demonstrate that low levels of DSBs induced by the radiomimetic drug Neocarzinostatin (NCS) increase the incidence of chromosome fragments and lagging chromosomes but do not lead to APC/C activation and anaphase onset delay. The number of DSBs, represented by γH2AX foci, significantly decreases between prophase I and metaphase II in both control and NCS-treated oocytes. Transient treatment with NCS increases >2-fold the number of DSBs in prophase I oocytes, but less than 30% of these oocytes enter anaphase with segregation errors. MRE11, but not ATM, is essential to detect DSBs in prophase I and is involved in H2AX phosphorylation during metaphase I. Inhibiting MRE11 by mirin during meiotic maturation results in anaphase bridges and also increases the number of γH2AX foci in metaphase II.  Compromised DNA integrity in mirin-treated oocytes indicates a role for MRE11 in chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. PMID:26745237

  13. Nuclear DNA damage signalling to mitochondria in ageing

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Chua, Katrin F.; Mattson, Mark P.; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of ageing, and mitochondrial maintenance may lead to increased healthspan. Emerging evidence suggests a crucial role for signalling from the nucleus to mitochondria (NM signalling) in regulating mitochondrial function and ageing. An important initiator of NM signalling is nuclear DNA damage, which accumulates with age and may contribute to the development of age-associated diseases. DNA damage-dependent NM signalling constitutes a network that includes nuclear sirtuins and controls genomic stability and mitochondrial integrity. Pharmacological modulation of NM signalling is a promising novel approach for the prevention and treatment of age-associated diseases. PMID:26956196

  14. Linking abnormal mitosis to the acquisition of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Pellman, David

    2012-01-01

    Cellular defects that impair the fidelity of mitosis promote chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy. Increasing evidence reveals that errors in mitosis can also promote the direct and indirect acquisition of DNA damage and chromosome breaks. Consequently, deregulated cell division can devastate the integrity of the normal genome and unleash a variety of oncogenic stimuli that may promote transformation. Recent work has shed light on the mechanisms that link abnormal mitosis with the development of DNA damage, how cells respond to such affronts, and the potential impact on tumorigenesis. PMID:23229895

  15. Mechanisms Used by Plants to Cope with DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhubing; Cools, Toon; De Veylder, Lieven

    2016-04-29

    Because the genome stores all genetic information required for growth and development, it is of pivotal importance to maintain DNA integrity, especially during cell division, when the genome is prone to replication errors and damage. Although over the last two decades it has become evident that the basic cell cycle toolbox of plants shares several similarities with those of fungi and mammals, plants appear to have evolved a set of distinct checkpoint regulators in response to different types of DNA stress. This might be a consequence of plants' sessile lifestyle, which exposes them to a set of unique DNA damage-inducing conditions. In this review, we highlight the types of DNA stress that plants typically experience and describe the plant-specific molecular mechanisms that control cell division in response to these stresses.

  16. Voltammetric Behavior of o-Nitrophenol and Damage to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da-Peng; Wu, Wei-Li; Long, Hai-Yan; Liu, Yun-Chun; Yang, Zhou-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of o-nitrophenol was studied in detail with a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The dependence of peak potential on pH indicated that equivalent electrons and protons were involved in the process of o-nitrophenol reduction. The interaction of o-nitrophenol with calf thymus DNA was investigated by adding DNA to the o-nitrophenol solution and by immobilizing DNA on GCE, respectively. The peak current decrement and peak potential shift in presence of DNA indicated that o-nitrophenol could interact with DNA. The result was demonstrated that the in situ DNA damage was detected by differential pulse voltammetry after the o-nitrophenol was electrochemically reduced. PMID:19325751

  17. Glycosylases utilize ``stop and go'' motion to locate DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Shane

    2015-03-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA results in alterations that are mutagenic or even cytotoxic. Base excision repair is a mechanism that functions to identify and correct these lesions, and is present in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. DNA glycosylases are the first enzymes in this pathway and function to locate and remove oxidatively damaged bases, and do so utilizing only thermal energy. However, the question remains of how these enzymes locate and recognize a damaged base among millions of undamaged bases. Utilizing fluorescence video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution, we have observed a number of different fluorescently labeled glycosylases (including bacterial FPG, NEI, and NTH as well as mammalian MutyH and OGG). These enzymes diffuse along DNA tightropes at approximately 0.01 +/- 0.005 μm2/s with binding lifetimes ranging from one second to several minutes. Chemically induced damage to the DNA substrate causes a ~ 50% reduction in diffusion coefficients and a ~ 400% increase in binding lifetimes, while mutation of the key ``wedge residue'' - which has been shown to be responsible for damage detection - results in a 200% increase in the diffusion coefficient. Utilizing a sliding window approach to measure diffusion coefficients within individual trajectories, we observe that distributions of diffusion coefficients are bimodal, consistent with periods of diffusive motion interspersed with immobile periods. Utilizing a unique chemo-mechanical simulation approach, we demonstrate that the motion of these glycosylases can be explained as free diffusion along the helical pitch of the DNA, punctuated with two different types of pauses: 1) rapid, short-lived pauses as the enzyme rapidly probes DNA bases to interrogate for damage and, 2) less frequent, longer lived pauses that reflect the enzyme bound to and catalytically removing a damaged base. These simulations also indicate that the wedge residue is critical for interrogation and recognition of

  18. Use of a New Portable Instrumented Impactor on the NASA Composite Crew Module Damage Tolerance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Polis, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Damage tolerance performance is critical to composite structures because surface impacts at relatively low energies may result in a significant strength loss. For certification, damage tolerance criteria require aerospace vehicles to meet design loads while containing damage at critical locations. Data from standard small coupon testing are difficult to apply to larger more complex structures. Due to the complexity of predicting both the impact damage and the residual properties, damage tolerance is demonstrated primarily by testing. A portable, spring-propelled, impact device was developed which allows the impact damage response to be investigated on large specimens, full-scale components, or entire vehicles. During impact, both the force history and projectile velocity are captured. The device was successfully used to demonstrate the damage tolerance performance of the NASA Composite Crew Module. The impactor was used to impact 18 different design features at impact energies up to 35 J. Detailed examples of these results are presented, showing impact force histories, damage inspection results, and response to loading.

  19. DNA damage mediated transcription arrest: Step back to go forward.

    PubMed

    Mullenders, Leon

    2015-12-01

    The disturbance of DNA helix conformation by bulky DNA damage poses hindrance to transcription elongating due to stalling of RNA polymerase at transcription blocking lesions. Stalling of RNA polymerase provokes the formation of R-loops, i.e. the formation of a DNA-RNA hybrid and a displaced single stranded DNA strand as well as displacement of spliceosomes. R-loops are processed into DNA single and double strand breaks by NER factors depending on TC-NER factors leading to genome instability. Moreover, stalling of RNA polymerase induces a strong signal for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These toxic and mutagenic effects are counteracted by a rapid recruitment of DNA repair proteins to perform transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) to remove the blocking DNA lesions and to restore transcription. Recent studies have highlighted the role of backtracking of RNA polymerase to facilitate TC-NER and identified novel factors that play key roles in TC-NER and in restoration of transcription. On the molecular level these factors facilitate stability of the repair complex by promotion and regulation of various post-translational modifications of NER factors and chromatin substrate. In addition, the continuous flow of new factors that emerge from screening assays hints to several regulatory levels to safeguard the integrity of transcription elongation after disturbance by DNA damage that have yet to be explored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Photo-induced DNA damage, DNA repair and cell lethality

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    DNA lesion induction and repair was measured in DNA repair proficient and deficient cells after exposures to far-UV, mid-UV, near-UV and visible light and an attempt was made to relate these molecular phenomena to the biological endpoint of cell lethality. Pyrimidine dimer and strand break induction, DNA repair and cell killing were measured after cell exposure to polychromatic but narrow bandwidth light sources with peak emissions at 254, 305, 353, 369, and 445 nm. Pyrimidine dimers were detected using specific endonuclease that nicks DNA adjacent to dimers, while strand breaks were measured using an alkaline unwinding assay. The induction efficiencies of both lesions declined with increasing wavelength; however, the decrease in strand break induction was not as rapid as that of dimer induction. The ratio of strand breaks to dimers following cell exposure to 254 or 369 nm radiation was, respectively, 1.8 x 10/sup -4/ or 0.19. The kinetics of dimer repair as well as the size of repair synthesized patches remained constant with increasing wavelength, indicating a similar repair mechanism for dimers induced by all wavelengths tested. However, consistent with the detected decline in dimer induction with increasing wavelength the proportion of dimer repair to total DNA repair decreased with increasing wavelength. The efficiency of cell killing, determined using chlonagenic survival assays, dropped rapidly, but not as rapidly as that of dimer induction, with increasing wavelength. In addition, dimer repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells became less lethally hypersensitive with increasing wavelength. These data suggest a decline in dimer induced cell lethality and the existence of non-dimer lethal lesions at longer wavelengths.

  1. Diagnosis of Lung Cancer by Fractal Analysis of Damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kiminezhadmalaie, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Cancer starts when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. In fact cells become cancer cells because of DNA damage. A DNA walk of a genome represents how the frequency of each nucleotide of a pairing nucleotide couple changes locally. In this research in order to study the cancer genes, DNA walk plots of genomes of patients with lung cancer were generated using a program written in MATLAB language. The data so obtained was checked for fractal property by computing the fractal dimension using a program written in MATLAB. Also, the correlation of damaged DNA was studied using the Hurst exponent measure. We have found that the damaged DNA sequences are exhibiting higher degree of fractality and less correlation compared with normal DNA sequences. So we confirmed this method can be used for early detection of lung cancer. The method introduced in this research not only is useful for diagnosis of lung cancer but also can be applied for detection and growth analysis of different types of cancers. PMID:26539245

  2. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Williams, Vonetta; Filippova, Maria; Filippov, Valery; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer. PMID:25340830

  3. High glucose induces DNA damage in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, M; Montisano, D F; Toledo, S; Barrieux, A

    1986-01-01

    Morphologic and functional abnormalities of vascular endothelium are well recognized in diabetes. In view of our previous finding that high glucose concentrations accelerate death and hamper replication of cultured human endothelial cells, we have investigated in the same model the possibility that exposure to high glucose may result in DNA damage. DNA from human endothelial cells--but not from fibroblasts--exposed to 30 mM glucose for 9-14 d manifested an accelerated rate of unwinding in alkali indicative of an increased number of single strand breaks (P less than 0.001 vs. control). Endothelial cells exposed to high glucose also manifested an increased amount of hydroxy-urea-resistant thymidine incorporation (333 +/- 153 cpm/10(5) cells vs. 88 +/- 42 in control cells, mean +/- SD, P = 0.04), which is indicative of increased DNA repair synthesis. Neither DNA damage nor repair synthesis were increased by medium hypertonicity achieved with 30 mM mannitol. These findings suggest the possibility that, under conditions of high ambient glucose, excess glucose entry in cells that are insulin independent for glucose transport may, directly or indirectly, perturb DNA function. Further, they suggest the possibility that different individual capabilities to repair DNA damage--a process that is under genetic control--may represent a mechanism for different individual susceptibilities to development of diabetic vascular complication. PMID:3944257

  4. DNA damage after chronic oxytocin administration in rats: a safety yellow light?

    PubMed

    Leffa, Daniela D; Daumann, Francine; Damiani, Adriani P; Afonso, Arlindo C; Santos, Maria A; Pedro, Thayara H; Souza, Renan P; Andrade, Vanessa M

    2017-02-01

    Adjuvant therapy is a common therapeutic strategy used for schizophrenia management. Oxytocin has shown promising results as antipsychotic adjuvant in patients with schizophrenia. Although short-term clinical studies have indicated tolerability and no major side-effect manifestation, long-term studies remain needed. In this study, we investigated whether oxytocin chronic administration in rats may lead to brain DNA damage by comet assay. Our results suggest that 21 and 56-day treatment with once daily intraperitoneal oxytocin (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg) may cause substantial DNA damage in hippocampus. We have not found differences on body weight gain. Our findings also point that further clinical and preclinical studies evaluating oxytocin safety after chronic exposure are necessary.

  5. No ancient DNA damage in Actinobacteria from the Neanderthal bone.

    PubMed

    Zaremba-Niedźwiedzka, Katarzyna; Andersson, Siv G E

    2013-01-01

    The Neanderthal genome was recently sequenced using DNA extracted from a 38,000-year-old fossil. At the start of the project, the fraction of mammalian and bacterial DNA in the sample was estimated to be <6% and 9%, respectively. Treatment with restriction enzymes prior to sequencing increased the relative proportion of mammalian DNA to 15%, but the large majority of sequences remain uncharacterized. Our taxonomic profiling of 3.95 Gb of Neanderthal DNA isolated from the Vindija Neanderthal Vi33.16 fossil showed that 90% of about 50,000 rRNA gene sequence reads were of bacterial origin, of which Actinobacteria accounted for more than 75%. Actinobacteria also represented more than 80% of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences from a cave sediment sample taken from the same G layer as the Neanderthal bone. However, phylogenetic analyses did not identify any sediment clones that were closely related to the bone-derived sequences. We analysed the patterns of nucleotide differences in the individual sequence reads compared to the assembled consensus sequences of the rRNA gene sequences. The typical ancient nucleotide substitution pattern with a majority of C to T changes indicative of DNA damage was observed for the Neanderthal rRNA gene sequences, but not for the Streptomyces-like rRNA gene sequences. Our analyses suggest that the Actinobacteria, and especially members of the Streptomycetales, contribute the majority of sequences in the DNA extracted from the Neanderthal fossil Vi33.16. The bacterial DNA showed no signs of damage, and we hypothesize that it was derived from bacteria that have been enriched inside the bone. The bioinformatic approach used here paves the way for future studies of microbial compositions and patterns of DNA damage in bacteria from archaeological bones. Such studies can help identify targeted measures to increase the relative amount of endogenous DNA in the sample.

  6. No Ancient DNA Damage in Actinobacteria from the Neanderthal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Zaremba-Niedźwiedzka, Katarzyna; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Neanderthal genome was recently sequenced using DNA extracted from a 38,000-year-old fossil. At the start of the project, the fraction of mammalian and bacterial DNA in the sample was estimated to be <6% and 9%, respectively. Treatment with restriction enzymes prior to sequencing increased the relative proportion of mammalian DNA to 15%, but the large majority of sequences remain uncharacterized. Principal Findings Our taxonomic profiling of 3.95 Gb of Neanderthal DNA isolated from the Vindija Neanderthal Vi33.16 fossil showed that 90% of about 50,000 rRNA gene sequence reads were of bacterial origin, of which Actinobacteria accounted for more than 75%. Actinobacteria also represented more than 80% of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences from a cave sediment sample taken from the same G layer as the Neanderthal bone. However, phylogenetic analyses did not identify any sediment clones that were closely related to the bone-derived sequences. We analysed the patterns of nucleotide differences in the individual sequen