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Sample records for dna extraction step

  1. Phytoplasma plasmid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mark T; Liefting, Lia W

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma plasmids have generally been detected from DNA extracted from plants and insects using methods designed for the purification of total phytoplasma DNA. Methods include extraction from tissues that are high in phytoplasma titre, such as the phloem of plants, with the use of CsCl-bisbenzimide gradients that exploit the low G+C content of phytoplasma DNA. Many of the methods employed for phytoplasma purification have been described elsewhere in this book. Here we describe in detail two methods that are specifically aimed at isolating plasmid DNA.

  2. Development of a rapid DNA extraction method and one-step nested PCR for the detection of Naegleria fowleri from the environment.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Arine Fadzlun; Lonnen, James; Andrew, Peter W; Kilvington, Simon

    2011-10-15

    Naegleria fowleri is a small free-living amoebo-flagellate found in natural and manmade thermal aquatic habitats worldwide. The organism is pathogenic to man causing fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Infection typically results from bathing in contaminated water and is usually fatal. It is, therefore, important to identify sites containing N. fowleri in the interests of preventive public health microbiology. Culture of environmental material is the conventional method for the isolation of N. fowleri but requires several days incubation and subsequent biochemical or molecular tests to confirm identification. Here, a nested one-step PCR test, in conjunction with a direct DNA extraction from water or sediment material, was developed for the rapid and reliable detection of N. fowleri from the environment. Here, the assay detected N, fowleri in 18/109 river water samples associated with a nuclear power plant in South West France and 0/10 from a similar site in the UK. Although culture of samples yielded numerous thermophilic free-living amoebae, none were N. fowleri or other thermophilic Naegleria spp. The availability of a rapid, reliable and sensitive one-step nested PCR method for the direct detection of N. fowleri from the environment may aid ecological studies and enable intervention to prevent PAM cases.

  3. Ancient DNA extraction from plants.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Logan

    2012-01-01

    A variety of protocols for DNA extraction from archaeological and paleobotanical plant specimens have been proposed. This is not surprising given the range of taxa and tissue types that may be preserved and the variety of conditions in which that preservation may take place. Commercially available DNA extraction kits can be used to recover ancient plant DNA, but modifications to standard approaches are often necessary to improve yield. In this chapter, I describe two protocols for extracting DNA from small amounts of ancient plant tissue. The CTAB protocol, which I recommend for use with single seeds, utilizes an incubation period in extraction buffer and subsequent chloroform extraction followed by DNA purification and suspension. The PTB protocol, which I recommend for use with gourd rind and similar tissues, utilizes an overnight incubation of pulverized tissue in extraction buffer, removal of the tissue by centrifugation, and DNA extraction from the buffer using commercial plant DNA extraction kits.

  4. Automated DNA extraction for large numbers of plant samples.

    PubMed

    Mehle, Nataša; Nikolić, Petra; Rupar, Matevž; Boben, Jana; Ravnikar, Maja; Dermastia, Marina

    2013-01-01

    The method described here is a rapid, total DNA extraction procedure applicable to a large number of plant samples requiring pathogen detection. The procedure combines a simple and quick homogenization step of crude extracts with DNA extraction based upon the binding of DNA to magnetic beads. DNA is purified in an automated process in which the magnetic beads are transferred through a series of washing buffers. The eluted DNA is suitable for efficient amplification in PCR reactions.

  5. Successive DNA extractions improve characterization of soil microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    de Hollander, Mattias; Smidt, Hauke; van Veen, Johannes A.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, characterization of soil microbial communities relies heavily on the use of molecular approaches. Independently of the approach used, soil DNA extraction is a crucial step, and success of downstream procedures will depend on how well DNA extraction was performed. Often, studies describing and comparing soil microbial communities are based on a single DNA extraction, which may not lead to a representative recovery of DNA from all organisms present in the soil. The use of successive DNA extractions might improve soil microbial characterization, but the benefit of this approach has only been limitedly studied. To determine whether successive DNA extractions of the same soil sample would lead to different observations in terms of microbial abundance and community composition, we performed three successive extractions, with two widely used commercial kits, on a range of clay and sandy soils. Successive extractions increased DNA yield considerably (1–374%), as well as total bacterial and fungal abundances in most of the soil samples. Analysis of the 16S and 18S ribosomal RNA genes using 454-pyrosequencing, revealed that microbial community composition (taxonomic groups) observed in the successive DNA extractions were similar. However, successive DNA extractions did reveal several additional microbial groups. For some soil samples, shifts in microbial community composition were observed, mainly due to shifts in relative abundance of a number of microbial groups. Our results highlight that performing successive DNA extractions optimize DNA yield, and can lead to a better picture of overall community composition. PMID:28168105

  6. DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Drábková, Lenka Záveská

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of molecular techniques, the historical collections have become widely used. Studying plant DNA using modern molecular techniques such as DNA sequencing plays an important role in understanding evolutionary relationships, identification through DNA barcoding, conservation status, and many other aspects of plant biology. Enormous herbarium collections are an important source of material especially for specimens from areas difficult to access or from taxa that are now extinct. The ability to utilize these specimens greatly enhances the research. However, the process of extracting DNA from herbarium specimens is often fraught with difficulty related to such variables as plant chemistry, drying method of the specimen, and chemical treatment of the specimen. Although many methods have been developed for extraction of DNA from herbarium specimens, the most frequently used are modified CTAB and DNeasy Plant Mini Kit protocols. Nine selected protocols in this chapter have been successfully used for high-quality DNA extraction from different kinds of plant herbarium tissues. These methods differ primarily with respect to their requirements for input material (from algae to vascular plants), type of the plant tissue (leaves with incrustations, sclerenchyma strands, mucilaginous tissues, needles, seeds), and further possible applications (PCR-based methods or microsatellites, AFLP).

  7. Comparison of three DNA extraction methods for recovery of soil protist DNA.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana S; Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Hansen, Lars H; Winding, Anne

    2015-08-01

    The use of molecular methods to investigate protist communities in soil is in rapid development this decade. Molecular analysis of soil protist communities is usually dependant on direct genomic DNA extraction from soil and inefficient or differential DNA extraction of protist DNA can lead to bias in downstream community analysis. Three commonly used soil DNA extraction methods have been tested on soil samples from three European Long-Term Observatories (LTOs) with different land-use and three protist cultures belonging to different phylogenetic groups in different growth stages. The methods tested were: ISOm-11063 (a version of the ISO-11063 method modified to include a FastPrep ®-24 mechanical lysis step), GnS-GII (developed by the GenoSol platform to extract soil DNA in large-scale soil surveys) and a commercial DNA extraction kit - Power Lyzer™ PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (MoBio). DNA yield and quality were evaluated along with DNA suitability for amplification of 18S rDNA fragments by PCR. On soil samples, ISOm-11063 yields significantly higher DNA for two of the three soil samples, however, MoBio extraction favors DNA quality. This method was also more effective to recover copies of 18S rDNA numbers from all soil types. In addition and despite the lower yields, higher DNA quality was observed with DNA extracted from protist cultures with the MoBio method. Likewise, a bead-beating step shows to be a good solution for DNA extraction of soil protists, since the recovery of DNA from protist cultures and from the different soil samples with the ISOm method proved to be efficient in recovering PCR-amplifiable DNA. This study showed that soil DNA extraction methods provide biased results towards the cyst stages of protist organism.

  8. Automated DNA extraction from pollen in honey.

    PubMed

    Guertler, Patrick; Eicheldinger, Adelina; Muschler, Paul; Goerlich, Ottmar; Busch, Ulrich

    2014-04-15

    In recent years, honey has become subject of DNA analysis due to potential risks evoked by microorganisms, allergens or genetically modified organisms. However, so far, only a few DNA extraction procedures are available, mostly time-consuming and laborious. Therefore, we developed an automated DNA extraction method from pollen in honey based on a CTAB buffer-based DNA extraction using the Maxwell 16 instrument and the Maxwell 16 FFS Nucleic Acid Extraction System, Custom-Kit. We altered several components and extraction parameters and compared the optimised method with a manual CTAB buffer-based DNA isolation method. The automated DNA extraction was faster and resulted in higher DNA yield and sufficient DNA purity. Real-time PCR results obtained after automated DNA extraction are comparable to results after manual DNA extraction. No PCR inhibition was observed. The applicability of this method was further successfully confirmed by analysis of different routine honey samples.

  9. DNA Extraction Techniques for Use in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearn, R. P.; Arblaster, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA extraction provides a hands-on introduction to DNA and enables students to gain real life experience and practical knowledge of DNA. Students gain a sense of ownership and are more enthusiastic when they use their own DNA. A cost effective, simple protocol for DNA extraction and visualization was devised. Buccal mucosal epithelia provide a…

  10. A two-step electrodialysis method for DNA purification from polluted metallic environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mejía, José Luis; Martínez-Anaya, Claudia; Folch-Mallol, Jorge Luis; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2008-08-01

    Extracting DNA from samples of polluted environments using standard methods often results in low yields of poor-quality material unsuited to subsequent manipulation and analysis by molecular biological techniques. Here, we report a novel two-step electrodialysis-based method for the extraction of DNA from environmental samples. This technique permits the rapid and efficient isolation of high-quality DNA based on its acidic nature, and without the requirement for phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol cleanup and ethanol precipitation steps. Subsequent PCR, endonuclease restriction, and cloning reactions were successfully performed utilizing DNA obtained by electrodialysis, whereas some or all of these techniques failed using DNA extracted with two alternative methods. We also show that his technique is applicable to purify DNA from a range of polluted and nonpolluted samples.

  11. The First Attested Extraction of Ancient DNA in Legumes (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Mikić, Aleksandar M

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analyzing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350-1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng μl(-1) of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK, and rbcL) among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighboring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide.

  12. Residual soil DNA extraction increases the discriminatory power between samples.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer M; Weyrich, Laura S; Clarke, Laurence J; Cooper, Alan

    2015-06-01

    Forensic soil analysis relies on capturing an accurate and reproducible representation of the diversity from limited quantities of soil; however, inefficient DNA extraction can markedly alter the taxonomic abundance. The performance of a standard commercial DNA extraction kit (MOBIO PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit) and three modified protocols of this kit: soil pellet re-extraction (RE); an additional 24-h lysis incubation step at room temperature (RT); and 24-h lysis incubation step at 55°C (55) were compared using high-throughput sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer I ribosomal DNA. DNA yield was not correlated with fungal diversity and the four DNA extraction methods displayed distinct fungal community profiles for individual samples, with some phyla detected exclusively using the modified methods. Application of a 24 h lysis step will provide a more complete inventory of fungal biodiversity, and re-extraction of the residual soil pellet offers a novel tool for increasing discriminatory power between forensic soil samples.

  13. Optimisation of DNA extraction from the crustacean Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Athanasio, Camila Gonçalves; Chipman, James K.; Viant, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Daphnia are key model organisms for mechanistic studies of phenotypic plasticity, adaptation and microevolution, which have led to an increasing demand for genomics resources. A key step in any genomics analysis, such as high-throughput sequencing, is the availability of sufficient and high quality DNA. Although commercial kits exist to extract genomic DNA from several species, preparation of high quality DNA from Daphnia spp. and other chitinous species can be challenging. Here, we optimise methods for tissue homogenisation, DNA extraction and quantification customised for different downstream analyses (e.g., LC-MS/MS, Hiseq, mate pair sequencing or Nanopore). We demonstrate that if Daphnia magna are homogenised as whole animals (including the carapace), absorbance-based DNA quantification methods significantly over-estimate the amount of DNA, resulting in using insufficient starting material for experiments, such as preparation of sequencing libraries. This is attributed to the high refractive index of chitin in Daphnia’s carapace at 260 nm. Therefore, unless the carapace is removed by overnight proteinase digestion, the extracted DNA should be quantified with fluorescence-based methods. However, overnight proteinase digestion will result in partial fragmentation of DNA therefore the prepared DNA is not suitable for downstream methods that require high molecular weight DNA, such as PacBio, mate pair sequencing and Nanopore. In conclusion, we found that the MasterPure DNA purification kit, coupled with grinding of frozen tissue, is the best method for extraction of high molecular weight DNA as long as the extracted DNA is quantified with fluorescence-based methods. This method generated high yield and high molecular weight DNA (3.10 ± 0.63 ng/µg dry mass, fragments >60 kb), free of organic contaminants (phenol, chloroform) and is suitable for large number of downstream analyses. PMID:27190714

  14. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment. PMID:27446026

  15. Monitoring of four DNA extraction methods upstream of high-throughput sequencing of Anisakidae nematodes.

    PubMed

    Seesao, Y; Audebert, C; Verrez-Bagnis, V; Merlin, S; Jérôme, M; Viscogliosi, E; Dei-Cas, E; Aliouat-Denis, C M; Gay, M

    2014-07-01

    Different methods were evaluated to extract DNA from pooled nematodes belonging to Anisakis, Contracaecum, Pseudoterranova and Hysterothylacium genera isolated from edible fish. Pooled DNA extraction is the first and compulsory step to allow the identification of a large number of samples through high-throughput DNA sequencing with drastic time and cost reductions.

  16. A comparison of the efficiency of five different commercial DNA extraction kits for extraction of DNA from faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Shantelle; du Toit, Elloise; Kaba, Mamadou; Moodley, Clinton; Zar, Heather J; Nicol, Mark P

    2013-08-01

    Differences in the composition of the gut microbiota have been associated with a range of diseases using culture-independent methods. Reliable extraction of nucleic acid is a key step in identifying the composition of the faecal microbiota. Five widely used commercial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extraction kits (QIAsymphony® Virus/Bacteria Midi Kit (kit QS), ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep™ (kit Z), QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit (kit QA), Ultraclean® Fecal DNA Isolation Kit (kit U) and PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (kit P)) were evaluated, using human faecal samples. Yield, purity and integrity of total genomic DNA were compared spectrophotometrically and using gel electrophoresis. Three bacteria, commonly found in human faeces were quantified using real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and total bacterial diversity was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) as well as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The measurements of DNA yield and purity exhibited variations between the five kits tested in this study. Automated kit QS exhibited the best quality and highest quantity of DNA. All kits were shown to be reproducible with CV values≤0.46 for DNA extraction. qPCR results showed that all kits were uniformly efficient for extracting DNA from the selected target bacteria. DGGE and T-RFLP produced the highest diversity scores for DNA extracted using kit Z (H'=2.30 and 1.27) and kit QS (H'=2.16 and 0.94), which also extracted the highest DNA yields compared to the other kits assessed.

  17. A simplified universal genomic DNA extraction protocol suitable for PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, T Y; Wang, L; Zhang, J H; Dong, W H

    2011-03-29

    Conventional genomic DNA extraction protocols need expensive and hazardous reagents for decontamination of phenolic compounds from the extracts and are only suited for certain types of tissue. We developed a simple, time-saving and cost-efficient method for genomic DNA extraction from various types of organisms, using relatively innocuous reagents. The protocol employs a single purification step to remove contaminating compounds, using a silica column and a non-hazardous buffer, and a chaotropic-detergent lysing solution that hydrolyzes RNA and allows the selective precipitation of DNA from cell lysates. We used this system to extract genomic DNA from different tissues of various organisms, including algae (Dunaliella salina), human peripheral blood, mouse liver, Escherichia coli, and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Mean DNA yields were 20-30 μg/cm(3) from fresh tissues (comparable to yields given by commercial extraction kits), and the 260/280 nm absorbance ratio was 1.8-2.0, demonstrating a good degree of purity. The extracted DNA was successfully used in PCR, restriction enzyme digestion and for recombinant selection studies.

  18. DNA extraction from rice endosperm (including a protocol for extraction of DNA from ancient seed samples).

    PubMed

    Mutou, Chiaki; Tanaka, Katsunori; Ishikawa, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from endosperm can be effectively used for rapid genotyping using seed tissue, to evaluate seed quality from packaged grains and to determine the purity of milled grains. Methods outlined here are optimal procedures to isolate DNA from endosperm tissue of modern rice grains and of aged rice remains preserved between 50 and 100 years. The extracted DNA can be used to amplify regions of chloroplast genomic DNA (ctDNA), mitochondrial genomic DNA (mtDNA), and nuclear genomic DNA using standard PCR protocols. In addition, we describe an optimal procedure to process archaeological grain specimens, aged for a couple of thousand years, to isolate DNA from these ancient samples, referred to here as ancient DNA (aDNA). The aDNA can be successfully amplified by PCR using appropriate primer pairs designed specifically for aDNA amplification.

  19. Extracting DNA from submerged pine wood.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, M Megan; Williams, Claire G

    2004-10-01

    A DNA extraction protocol for submerged pine logs was developed with the following properties: (i) high molecular weight DNA, (ii) PCR amplification of chloroplast and nuclear sequences, and (iii) high sequence homology to voucher pine specimens. The DNA extraction protocol was modified from a cetyltrimehtylammonium bromide (CTAB) protocol by adding stringent electrophoretic purification, proteinase K, RNAse, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), and Gene Releaser. Chloroplast rbcL (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase) could be amplified. Nuclear ribosomal sequences had >95% homology to Pinus taeda and Pinus palustris. Microsatellite polymorphism for PtTX2082 matched 2 of 14 known P. taeda alleles. Our results show DNA analysis for submerged conifer wood is feasible.

  20. Leaf tissue sampling and DNA extraction protocols.

    PubMed

    Semagn, Kassa

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomists must be familiar with a number of issues in collecting and transporting samples using freezing methods (liquid nitrogen and dry ice), desiccants (silica gel and blotter paper), and preservatives (CTAB, ethanol, and isopropanol), with each method having its own merits and limitations. For most molecular studies, a reasonably good quality and quantity of DNA is required, which can only be obtained using standard DNA extraction protocols. There are many DNA extraction protocols that vary from simple and quick ones that yield low-quality DNA but good enough for routine analyses to the laborious and time-consuming standard methods that usually produce high quality and quantities of DNA. The protocol to be chosen will depend on the quality and quantity of DNA needed, the nature of samples, and the presence of natural substances that may interfere with the extraction and subsequent analysis. The protocol described in this chapter has been tested for extracting DNA from eight species and provided very good quality and quantity of DNA for different applications, including those genotyping methods that use restriction enzymes.

  1. [Application of the QIAamp DNA Investigator Kit and Prepfiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit in genomic DNA extraction from skeletal remains].

    PubMed

    Ludwikowska-Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Jacewicz, Renata; Jedrzejczyk, Maciej; Prośniak, Adam; Berent, Jarosław

    2009-01-01

    The report presents an application of the QIAamp DNA Investigator Kit and PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit in genomic DNA extraction from post-mortem highly degraded skeletal remains. The analysis included 25 bone samples collected on autopsy. DNA extraction was performed in accordance with the QIAamp DNA Investigator Kit and PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit manufacturer's isolation protocols. Amplification was performed on a Biometra termocycler using the AmpFISTR Identifiler PCR Amplification Kit according to the manufacturer's protocol. Typing of PCR products was carried out on an ABI Prism 377 DNA sequencer. The recommended parameters for GeneScan analysis and Genotyper software were followed. The authors demonstrated that the QIAamp DNA Investigator Kit was more effective, convenient and statistically significantly better method which may be employed in DNA extraction from bone specimens.

  2. The First Attested Extraction of Ancient DNA in Legumes (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Mikić, Aleksandar M.

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analyzing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350–1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng μl-1 of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK, and rbcL) among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighboring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide. PMID:26635833

  3. Comparison of commercial DNA extraction kits for isolation and purification of bacterial and eukaryotic DNA from PAH-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Nagissa; Slater, Greg F; Fulthorpe, Roberta R

    2011-08-01

    Molecular characterization of the microbial populations of soils and sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is often a first step in assessing intrinsic biodegradation potential. However, soils are problematic for molecular analysis owing to the presence of organic matter, such as humic acids. Furthermore, the presence of contaminants, such as PAHs, can cause further challenges to DNA extraction, quantification, and amplification. The goal of our study was to compare the effectiveness of four commercial soil DNA extraction kits (UltraClean Soil DNA Isolation kit, PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit, PowerMax Soil DNA Isolation kit, and FastDNA SPIN kit) to extract pure, high-quality bacterial and eukaryotic DNA from PAH-contaminated soils. Six different contaminated soils were used to determine if there were any biases among the kits due to soil properties or level of contamination. Extracted DNA was used as a template for bacterial 16S rDNA and eukaryotic 18S rDNA amplifications, and PCR products were subsequently analyzed using denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE). We found that the FastDNA SPIN kit provided significantly higher DNA yields for all soils; however, it also resulted in the highest levels of humic acid contamination. Soil texture and organic carbon content of the soil did not affect the DNA yield of any kit. Moreover, a liquid-liquid extraction of the DNA extracts found no residual PAHs, indicating that all kits were effective at removing contaminants in the extraction process. Although the PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit gave relatively low DNA yields, it provided the highest quality DNA based on successful amplification of both bacterial and eukaryotic DNA for all six soils. DGGE fingerprints among the kits were dramatically different for both bacterial and eukaryotic DNA. The PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit revealed multiple bands for each soil and provided the most consistent DGGE profiles among replicates for both

  4. Fern spore extracts can damage DNA

    PubMed Central

    Simán, S E; Povey, A C; Ward, T H; Margison, G P; Sheffield, E

    2000-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of the vegetative tissues of bracken fern (Pteridium) has long been established. More recently, the carcinogenic effects of the spores of bracken have also been recognized. Both vegetative tissues and spores of bracken can induce adducts in DNA in animal tissues, but the possible genotoxic or carcinogenic effects of spores from fern species other than bracken are unknown. The single-cell gel electrophoresis (‘comet’) assay was used to investigate whether fern spores can cause DNA damage in vitro. Extracts of spores from six fern species were administered to cultured human premyeloid leukaemia (K562) cells. Spore extracts of five fern species: Anemia phyllitidis, Dicksonia antarctica, Pteridium aquilinum, Pteris vittata and Sadleria pallida, induced significantly more DNA strand breaks than those in the control groups. Only in one species, Osmunda regalis, was the effect no different from that in the control groups. Using extracts from A. phyllitidis and P. vittata, the extent of DNA damage was increased by increasing the original dose 10 times, whereas an experiment in which exposure times were varied suggested that the highest levels of strand breaks appear after 2 h exposure. Simultaneous incubation with human S9 liver enzyme mix ablated the damaging effect of the extracts. Our data show that fern spore extracts can cause DNA damage in human cells in vitro. Considering the strong correlation between DNA damage and carcinogenic events, the observations made in this report may well have some implications for human health. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883670

  5. Optimizing Storage and Handling of DNA Extracts.

    PubMed

    Lee, S B; Crouse, C A; Kline, M C

    2010-07-01

    Nucleic acid sample storage is of paramount importance in forensic science as well as in epidemiological, clinical, and genetic laboratories. Millions of biological samples, including cells, viruses, and DNA/RNA, are stored every year for diagnostics, research, and forensic science. PCR has permitted the analysis of minute sample quantities. Samples such as bone, teeth, touch samples, and some sexual assault evidence may yield only low-quality and low-quantity DNA/RNA. Efficient storage of the extracted DNA/RNA is needed to ensure the stability of the sample over time for retesting of the CODIS STRs, mtDNA, YSTRs, mRNA, and other future marker-typing systems. Amplification of some or all of these markers may fail because the biological material has been highly degraded, contains inhibitors, is too low in quantity, or is contaminated with contemporary DNA. Reduction in recovery has been observed with refrigerated liquid DNA extracts and also those exposed to multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Therefore, the development of optimal storage and amplification methods is critical for successful recovery of profiles from these types of samples since, in many cases, retesting is necessary. This review is divided into three sections. The Introduction and Background covers forensic DNA storage, factors that influence DNA stability, and a brief review of molecular strategies to type non-optimal DNA. Section I covers the importance of DNA extract storage in forensic and non-forensic DNA databanks and the mechanisms responsible for loss during storage. Finally, Section II covers strategies and technologies being utilized to store DNA.

  6. DNA intercalation optimized by two-step molecular lock mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Almaqwashi, Ali A.; Andersson, Johanna; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Westerlund, Fredrik; Williams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The diverse properties of DNA intercalators, varying in affinity and kinetics over several orders of magnitude, provide a wide range of applications for DNA-ligand assemblies. Unconventional intercalation mechanisms may exhibit high affinity and slow kinetics, properties desired for potential therapeutics. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to probe the free energy landscape for an unconventional intercalator that binds DNA through a novel two-step mechanism in which the intermediate and final states bind DNA through the same mono-intercalating moiety. During this process, DNA undergoes significant structural rearrangements, first lengthening before relaxing to a shorter DNA-ligand complex in the intermediate state to form a molecular lock. To reach the final bound state, the molecular length must increase again as the ligand threads between disrupted DNA base pairs. This unusual binding mechanism results in an unprecedented optimized combination of high DNA binding affinity and slow kinetics, suggesting a new paradigm for rational design of DNA intercalators. PMID:27917863

  7. Step-wise supercritical extraction of carbonaceous residua

    DOEpatents

    Warzinski, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    A method of fractionating a mixture containing high boiling carbonaceous material and normally solid mineral matter includes processing with a plurality of different supercritical solvents. The mixture is treated with a first solvent of high critical temperature and solvent capacity to extract a large fraction as solute. The solute is released as liquid from solvent and successively treated with other supercritical solvents of different critical values to extract fractions of differing properties. Fractionation can be supplemented by solute reflux over a temperature gradient, pressure let down in steps and extractions at varying temperature and pressure values.

  8. An Efficient Method for Genomic DNA Extraction from Different Molluscs Species

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jorge C.; Chaves, Raquel; Bastos, Estela; Leitão, Alexandra; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    The selection of a DNA extraction method is a critical step when subsequent analysis depends on the DNA quality and quantity. Unlike mammals, for which several capable DNA extraction methods have been developed, for molluscs the availability of optimized genomic DNA extraction protocols is clearly insufficient. Several aspects such as animal physiology, the type (e.g., adductor muscle or gills) or quantity of tissue, can explain the lack of efficiency (quality and yield) in molluscs genomic DNA extraction procedure. In an attempt to overcome these aspects, this work describes an efficient method for molluscs genomic DNA extraction that was tested in several species from different orders: Veneridae, Ostreidae, Anomiidae, Cardiidae (Bivalvia) and Muricidae (Gastropoda), with different weight sample tissues. The isolated DNA was of high molecular weight with high yield and purity, even with reduced quantities of tissue. Moreover, the genomic DNA isolated, demonstrated to be suitable for several downstream molecular techniques, such as PCR sequencing among others. PMID:22174651

  9. A Simple Method to Extract DNA from Hair Shafts Using Enzymatic Laundry Powder

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinchuan; Jiang, Xiaoling; Li, Sicong; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2013-01-01

    A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts was developed by using enzymatic laundry powder at the first step of the process. The whole extraction can be finished in less than 2 hours. The simple extraction reagent proposed here contains only two cheap components: ordinary enzymatic laundry powder and PCR buffer. After extraction, an ultra sensitive fluorescent nucleic acid stain, PicoGreen, was used for quantifying trace amount of double-stranded DNA in the solution extracted. For further validation of DNA extraction, four primers were employed to amplify DNA microsatellite loci. Both fluorescence spectroscopy and PCR results suggested that this method can extract DNA from hair shafts with good efficiency and repeatability. The study will greatly facilitate the use of hair shafts in future for DNA analyses on genome-wide scale. PMID:23922747

  10. A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts using enzymatic laundry powder.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Jinchuan; Jiang, Xiaoling; Li, Sicong; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2013-01-01

    A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts was developed by using enzymatic laundry powder at the first step of the process. The whole extraction can be finished in less than 2 hours. The simple extraction reagent proposed here contains only two cheap components: ordinary enzymatic laundry powder and PCR buffer. After extraction, an ultra sensitive fluorescent nucleic acid stain, PicoGreen, was used for quantifying trace amount of double-stranded DNA in the solution extracted. For further validation of DNA extraction, four primers were employed to amplify DNA microsatellite loci. Both fluorescence spectroscopy and PCR results suggested that this method can extract DNA from hair shafts with good efficiency and repeatability. The study will greatly facilitate the use of hair shafts in future for DNA analyses on genome-wide scale.

  11. Microscope Titration and Extraction of DNA from Liver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Lois T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive, one-period activity to extract DNA to make the study of DNA less abstract. A microscope titration is used to determine when cells are ready for DNA extraction. (PR)

  12. Single-step intercalating dye strategies for DNA damage studies.

    PubMed

    Paidipalli, Manasa; Pjescic, Ilija; Hindmarsh, Patrick L; Crews, Niel D

    2013-08-01

    Many analytical protocols exist for the quantification of varied types of DNA damage, which span a range of complexity and sensitivity. As an alternative or companion to existing procedures, this article demonstrates the application of quantitative PCR (qPCR) and high-resolution DNA melting analysis (HRMA) to the detection and quantification of intramolecular DNA damage and/or strand breaks. These proven molecular biology methods are essentially single-step processes. When implemented with a third-generation saturating DNA dye, high sensitivity can be obtained. The experiments presented here demonstrate how DNA damage can inhibit amplification of the affected molecules. This corresponding decrease in the initial concentration of amplifiable DNA can be measured with qPCR. In addition, damage in the form of intramolecular dimerization and strand breaks alters the stored energy in the hydrogen bonds between the two strands in the dsDNA molecule. This significantly affects the thermal stability, which can be measured with extreme precision using HRMA. Simplified damage models were used in these experiments: UV-C irradiation to produce photoproducts, and restriction enzyme digestion to simulate double-strand breaks. The findings of this work, however, can be intuitively applied to the broad scope of DNA damage mechanisms.

  13. Plant and metagenomic DNA extraction of mucilaginous seeds

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Simone N.M.; Salazar, Marcela M.; Pereira, Gonçalo A.G.; Efraim, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    The pulp surrounding the seeds of some fruits is rich in mucilage, carbohydrates, etc. Some seeds are rich in proteins and polyphenols. Fruit seeds, like cacao (Theobroma cacao) and cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum), are subjected to fermentation to develop flavor. During fermentation, ethanol is produced [2–6]. All of these compounds are considered as interfering substances that hinder the DNA extraction [4–8]. Protocols commonly used in the DNA extraction in samples of plant origin were used, but without success. Thus, a protocol for DNA samples under different conditions that can be used for similar samples was developed and applied with success. The protocol initially described for RNA samples by Zeng et al. [9] and with changes proposed by Provost et al. [5] was adapted for extracting DNA samples from those described. However, several modifications have been proposed:•Samples were initially washed with petroleum ether for fat phase removal.•RNAse was added to the extraction buffer, while spermidin was removed.•Additional steps of extraction with 5 M NaCl, saturated NaCl and CTAB (10%) were included and precipitation was carried out with isopropanol, followed by washing with ethanol. PMID:26150956

  14. Comparison of four commercial DNA extraction kits for the recovery of Bacillus spp. spore DNA from spiked powder samples.

    PubMed

    Mölsä, Markos; Kalin-Mänttäri, Laura; Tonteri, Elina; Hemmilä, Heidi; Nikkari, Simo

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus spp. include human pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax and a biothreat agent. Bacillus spp. form spores that are physically highly resistant and may remain active over sample handling. We tested four commercial DNA extraction kits (QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, RTP Pathogen Kit, ZR Fungal/Bacterial DNA MiniPrep, and genesig Easy DNA/RNA Extraction kit) for sample inactivation and DNA recovery from two powders (icing sugar and potato flour) spiked with Bacillus thuringiensis spores. The DNA was analysed using a B. thuringiensis-specific real-time PCR assay. The detection limit was 3×10(1)CFU of spiked B. thuringiensis spores with the QIAamp DNA Mini, RTP Pathogen, and genesig Easy DNA/RNA Extraction kits, and 3×10(3)CFU with the ZR Fungal/Bacterial DNA MiniPrep kit. The results showed that manual extraction kits are effective and safe for fast and easy DNA extraction from powder samples even in field conditions. Adding a DNA filtration step to the extraction protocol ensures the removal of Bacillus spp. spores from DNA samples without affecting sensitivity.

  15. Microbial diversity in fecal samples depends on DNA extraction method: easyMag DNA extraction compared to QIAamp DNA stool mini kit extraction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are challenges, when extracting bacterial DNA from specimens for molecular diagnostics, since fecal samples also contain DNA from human cells and many different substances derived from food, cell residues and medication that can inhibit downstream PCR. The purpose of the study was to evaluate two different DNA extraction methods in order to choose the most efficient method for studying intestinal bacterial diversity using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Findings In this study, a semi-automatic DNA extraction system (easyMag®, BioMérieux, Marcy I’Etoile, France) and a manual one (QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) were tested on stool samples collected from 3 patients with Inflammatory Bowel disease (IBD) and 5 healthy individuals. DNA extracts obtained by the QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit yield a higher amount of DNA compared to DNA extracts obtained by easyMag® from the same fecal samples. Furthermore, DNA extracts obtained using easyMag® seemed to contain inhibitory compounds, since in order to perform a successful PCR-analysis, the sample should be diluted at least 10 times. DGGE performed on PCR from DNA extracted by QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit DNA was very successful. Conclusion QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit DNA extracts are optimal for DGGE runs and this extraction method yields a higher amount of DNA compared to easyMag®. PMID:24447346

  16. Extraction of DNA from forensic-type sexual assault specimens using simple, rapid sonication procedures.

    PubMed

    Crouse, C A; Ban, J D; D'Alessio, J K

    1993-10-01

    Sonication procedures for the extraction of DNA from forensic-type semen specimens have been developed, which, when compared to currently utilized sperm DNA extraction techniques, are simple, rapid and result in comparable DNA yields. Sperm DNA extraction by sonication was performed on whole semen, seminal stains, buccal swabs and post-coital specimens. Ultrasound disruption of sperm cells and their ultimate release of cellular DNA has been conducted in the presence of sperm wash buffers followed by organic extraction or Chelex 100 with little or no compromise to DNA quality, quantity or amplifiability. Two advantages of sonication over currently used forensic techniques to extract sperm DNA include 1) sperm DNA extraction that occurs within five minutes of sonication compared with an hour or greater for water bath incubations in classic enzyme digestion DNA extractions and 2) one less preparatory step with the Chelex/sonication protocol and three less steps with the sonication/organic protocol compared with other procedures thus eliminating potential sample-to-sample cross-contamination. Sperm DNA extracted by optimum sonication procedures was used for forensic HLA DQ alpha typing and restriction fragment length polymorphisms analysis without any adverse effects on typing results.

  17. Detection of genetically modified crops and their derivatives: critical steps in sample preparation and extraction.

    PubMed

    Terry, Catherine F; Harris, Neil; Parkes, Helen C

    2002-01-01

    The detection of genetically modified crops in foodstuff relies on detection of transgenic DNA or protein material in the sample matrix. Purified DNA or proteins are used as analytical material for polymerase chain reaction technologies and immunodiagnostics. Successful sample preparation is critical to the validity of subsequent analysis. For routine analysis, a good sample preparation technique should be simple, safe, and inexpensive while reproducibly generating DNA/protein of sufficient quality and yield. The suitability of isolated DNA or protein as an analyte for a detection or characterization technique depends on amount or concentration, purity, and integrity, each of which may be influenced by sample matrix and the extraction technique, and, in turn, may impact the validity of analytical techniques. The key sample preparation steps of homogenization, pretreatment, extraction, and purification are discussed as well as typical analytical methods. Consideration is given to application of these steps for particular sample matrixes to maximize yield, reduce inhibition effects, and minimize contamination. The choice of the most appropriate and valid methods for sample preparation from particular foods is discussed with respect to DNA analysis. Attention is also given to ease of use, cost, and generic applicability of the procedures.

  18. Co-extraction of DNA and PLFA from soil samples.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Sheridan; Techtmann, Stephen M; Mahmoudi, Nagissa; Niang, Dijibril; Pfiffner, Susan; Hazen, Terry C

    2015-08-01

    Lipid/DNA co-extraction from one sample is attractive in limiting biases associated with microbial community analysis from separate extractions. We sought to enhance established co-extraction methods and use high-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing to identify preferentially extracted taxa from co-extracted DNA. Co-extraction results in low DNA yields and distinct community structure changes.

  19. Bioaerosol DNA Extraction Technique from Air Filters Collected from Marine and Freshwater Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, M.; Crandall, S. G.; Barnes, A.; Paytan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Bioaerosols are composed of microorganisms suspended in air. Among these organisms include bacteria, fungi, virus, and protists. Microbes introduced into the atmosphere can drift, primarily by wind, into natural environments different from their point of origin. Although bioaerosols can impact atmospheric dynamics as well as the ecology and biogeochemistry of terrestrial systems, very little is known about the composition of bioaerosols collected from marine and freshwater environments. The first step to determine composition of airborne microbes is to successfully extract environmental DNA from air filters. We asked 1) can DNA be extracted from quartz (SiO2) air filters? and 2) how can we optimize the DNA yield for downstream metagenomic sequencing? Aerosol filters were collected and archived on a weekly basis from aquatic sites (USA, Bermuda, Israel) over the course of 10 years. We successfully extracted DNA from a subsample of ~ 20 filters. We modified a DNA extraction protocol (Qiagen) by adding a beadbeating step to mechanically shear cell walls in order to optimize our DNA product. We quantified our DNA yield using a spectrophotometer (Nanodrop 1000). Results indicate that DNA can indeed be extracted from quartz filters. The additional beadbeating step helped increase our yield - up to twice as much DNA product was obtained compared to when this step was omitted. Moreover, bioaerosol DNA content does vary across time. For instance, the DNA extracted from filters from Lake Tahoe, USA collected near the end of June decreased from 9.9 ng/μL in 2007 to 3.8 ng/μL in 2008. Further next-generation sequencing analysis of our extracted DNA will be performed to determine the composition of these microbes. We will also model the meteorological and chemical factors that are good predictors for microbial composition for our samples over time and space.

  20. [Research advances on DNA extraction methods from peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Chen-Xi

    2014-10-01

    DNA extraction is a basic technology of molecular biology. The purity and the integrality of DNA structure are necessary for different experiments of gene engineering. As commonly used materials in the clinical detection, the fast, efficient isolation and extraction of genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is very important for the inspection and analysis of clinical blood. At present, there are many methods for extracting DNA, such as phenol-chloroform method, salting out method, centrifugal adsorption column chromatography method (artificial methods), magnetic beads (semi-automatic method) and DNA extraction kit. In this article, a brief review of the principle for existing DNA blood extraction method, the specific steps and the assessment of the specific methods briefly are summarized.

  1. [Rapid extraction of DNA from Chinese medicinal products by alkaline lysis].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Jiang, Chao; Huang, Lu-Qi; Zhang, Zhi-Jie; Li, Rao-Rao; Chen, Kang; Yuan, Yuan; Jin, Yan

    2014-10-01

    The study is aimed to explore a rapid method to extract DNA from fried Chinese medicinal products. The alkaline lysis buffer was made of sodium hydroxide, 1% PVP and 1% TritonX-100 and Tris-HCl solution was neutralized, through heat cracking and neutralization two step to extract DNA from processed and prepared products of traditional Chinese medicine. Then universal primes were used to amplify PCR products for fired Chinese medicinal materials. The results indicated the optimized alkaline lysis method for extracting DNA is quick and easy. Extracting of the different processed Sophora japonica of DNA concentration was (420.61 ± 123.91) g x L(-1). Using 5% Chelex-100 resin purification can improve the DNA concentration. Our results showed that the optimized alkaline lysis method is suitable for Chinese medicinal materials for quickly DNA extraction.

  2. Comparison of seven methods for extraction of bacterial DNA from fecal and cecal samples of mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Janina; Patron, Kevin; Legrand-Frossi, Christine; Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Merlin, Christophe; Alauzet, Corentine; Lozniewski, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of bacterial DNA from fecal samples of mice is commonly performed in experimental studies. Although DNA extraction is a critical step in various molecular approaches, the efficiency of methods that may be used for DNA extraction from mice fecal samples has never been evaluated. We compared the efficiencies of six widely used commercial kits (MasterPure™ Gram Positive DNA Purification Kit, QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit; NucliSENS® easyMAG®, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep™, FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Feces and FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil) and a non-commercial method for DNA isolation from mice feces and cecal contents. DNA quantity and quality were assessed by fluorometry, spectrophotometry, gel electrophoresis and qPCR. Cell lysis efficiencies were evaluated by qPCR targeting three relevant bacteria in spiked specimens. For both feces and intestinal contents, the most efficient extraction method was the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil.

  3. Extraction of ultrashort DNA molecules from herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Gutaker, Rafal M; Reiter, Ella; Furtwängler, Anja; Schuenemann, Verena J; Burbano, Hernán A

    2017-02-01

    DNA extracted from herbarium specimens is highly fragmented; therefore, it is crucial to use extraction protocols that retrieve short DNA molecules. Improvements in extraction and DNA library preparation protocols for animal remains have allowed efficient retrieval of molecules shorter than 50 bp. Here, we applied these improvements to DNA extraction protocols for herbarium specimens and evaluated extraction performance by shotgun sequencing, which allows an accurate estimation of the distribution of DNA fragment lengths. Extraction with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB) buffer decreased median fragment length by 35% when compared with cetyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB); modifying the binding conditions of DNA to silica allowed for an additional decrease of 10%. We did not observe a further decrease in length for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) versus double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) library preparation methods. Our protocol enables the retrieval of ultrashort molecules from herbarium specimens, which will help to unlock the genetic information stored in herbaria.

  4. An improved protocol for DNA extraction from alkaline soil and sediment samples for constructing metagenomic libraries.

    PubMed

    Verma, Digvijay; Satyanarayana, T

    2011-09-01

    An improved single-step protocol has been developed for extracting pure community humic substance-free DNA from alkaline soils and sediments. The method is based on direct cell lysis in the presence of powdered activated charcoal and polyvinylpolypyrrolidone followed by precipitation with polyethyleneglycol and isopropanol. The strategy allows simultaneous isolation and purification of DNA while minimizing the loss of DNA with respect to other available protocols for metagenomic DNA extraction. Moreover, the purity levels are significant, which are difficult to attain with any of the methods reported in the literature for DNA extraction from soils. The DNA thus extracted was free from humic substances and, therefore, could be processed for restriction digestion, PCR amplification as well as for the construction of metagenomic libraries.

  5. Forensic animal DNA analysis using economical two-step direct PCR.

    PubMed

    Kitpipit, Thitika; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Linacre, Adrian; Thanakiatkrai, Phuvadol

    2014-03-01

    Wildlife forensic DNA analysis by amplification of a mitochondrial locus followed by DNA sequencing is routine, yet suffers from being costly and time-consuming. To address these disadvantages we report on a low-cost two-step direct PCR assay to efficiently analyze 12 forensically relevant mammalian sample types without DNA extraction. A cytochrome oxidase I degenerate-universal primer pair was designed and validated for the developed assay. The 12 sample types, which included bone, horn, feces, and urine, were amplified successfully by the assay using a pre-direct PCR dilution protocol. The average amplification success rate was as high as 92.5 % (n = 350), with an average PCR product concentration of 220.71 ± 180.84 ng/μL. Differences in amplification success rate and PCR product quantity between sample types were observed; however, most samples provided high quality sequences, permitting a 100 % nucleotide similarity to their respective species via BLAST database queries. The combination of PBS and Phire(®) Hot Start II DNA polymerase gave comparable amplification success rate and amplicon quantity with the proprietary commercial kits (P > 0.05, n = 350) but at considerably lower cost. The stability of the assay was tested by successfully amplifying samples that had been stored for up to 12 months. Our data indicate that this low-cost two-step direct amplification assay has the potential to be a valuable tool for the forensic DNA community.

  6. Improving the sensitivity of negative controls in ancient DNA extractions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Bosong; Tan, Jingze; Li, Shilin; Jin, Li

    2009-04-01

    Much attention has been paid on ancient DNA (aDNA) studies, and negative control was used as one of the stringent quality assurance criteria in order to detect potential contamination. However, the results of some aDNA studies showed the evidence of contamination despite their negative controls failed to do so. Using lambda DNA to mock extraneous contaminating DNA, our study showed that aDNA had a property of improving the efficiency of extraction including contaminating DNA, while negative controls had low sensitivity to detect contamination. To circumvent this problem, carrier DNA such as poly(dA) is suggested to be introduced into aDNA extraction.

  7. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  8. A rapid and efficient assay for extracting DNA from fungi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Peak, K.K.; Shinn, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: A method for the rapid extraction of fungal DNA from small quantities of tissue in a batch-processing format was investigated. Methods and Results: Tissue (< 3.0 mg) was scraped from freshly-grown fungal isolates. The tissue was suspended in buffer AP1 and subjected to seven rounds of freeze/thaw using a crushed dry ice/ethanol bath and a boiling water bath. After a 30 min boiling step, the tissue was quickly ground against the wall of the microfuge tube using a sterile pipette tip. The Qiagen DNeasy Plant Tissue Kit protocol was then used to purify the DNA for PCR/ sequencing applications. Conclusions: The method allowed batch DNA extraction from multiple fungal isolates using a simple yet rapid and reliable assay. Significance and Impact of the Study: Use of this assay will allow researchers to obtain DNA from fungi quickly for use in molecular assays that previously required specialized instrumentation, was time-consuming or was not conducive to batch processing.

  9. Comparison of DNA extraction methods from small samples of newborn screening cards suitable for retrospective perinatal viral research.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Gai L; Highet, Amanda R; Gibson, Catherine S; Goldwater, Paul N; O'Callaghan, Michael E; Alvino, Emily R; MacLennan, Alastair H

    2011-04-01

    Reliable detection of viral DNA in stored newborn screening cards (NSC) would give important insight into possible silent infection during pregnancy and around birth. We sought a DNA extraction method with sufficient sensitivity to detect low copy numbers of viral DNA from small punch samples of NSC. Blank NSC were spotted with seronegative EDTA-blood and seropositive EBV EDTA-blood. DNA was extracted with commercial and noncommercial DNA extraction methods and quantified on a spectrofluorometer using a PicoGreen dsDNA quantification kit. Serial dilutions of purified viral DNA controls determined the sensitivity of the amplification protocol, and seropositive EBV EDTA-blood amplified by nested PCR (nPCR) validated the DNA extraction methods. There were considerable differences between the commercial and noncommercial DNA extraction methods (P=0.014; P=0.016). Commercial kits compared favorably, but the QIamp DNA micro kit with an added forensic filter step was marginally more sensitive. The mean DNA yield from this method was 3 ng/μl. The limit of detection was 10 viral genome copies in a 50-μl reaction. EBV nPCR detection in neat and 1:10 diluted DNA extracts could be replicated reliably. We conclude that the QIamp Micro DNA extraction method with the added forensic spin-filter step was suitable for retrospective DNA viral assays from NSC.

  10. Strategy for the extraction of yeast DNA from artisan agave must for quantitative PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Kirchmayr, Manuel Reinhart; Segura-Garcia, Luis Eduardo; Flores-Berrios, Ericka Patricia; Gschaedler, Anne

    2011-11-01

    An efficient method for the direct extraction of yeast genomic DNA from agave must was developed. The optimized protocol, which was based on silica-adsorption of DNA on microcolumns, included an enzymatic cell wall degradation step followed by prolonged lysis with hot detergent. The resulting extracts were suitable templates for subsequent qPCR assays that quantified mixed yeast populations in artisan Mexican mezcal fermentations.

  11. High Efficiency DNA Extraction by Graphite Oxide/Cellulose/Magnetite Composites Under Na+ Free System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-04-01

    DNA extraction is the key step at various research areas like biotechnology, diagnostic development, paternity determination, and forensic science . Solid support extraction is the most common method for DNA purification. In this method, Na+ ions have often been applied as binding buffers in order to obtain high extraction efficiency and high quality of DNA; however, the presence of Na+ ions might be interfering with the downstream DNA applications. In this study, we proposed graphite oxide (GO)/magnetite composite/cellulose as an innovative material for Na+-free DNA extraction. The total wt.% of GO was fixed at 4.15% in the GO/cellulose/magnetite composite . The concentration of magnetite within the composites were controlled at 0-3.98 wt.%. The extraction yield of DNA increased with increasing weight percentage of magnetite. The highest yield was achieved at 3.98 wt.% magnetite, where the extraction efficiency was reported to be 338.5 ng/µl. The absorbance ratios between 260 nm and 280 nm (A260/A280) of the DNA elution volume was demonstrated as 1.81, indicating the extracted DNA consisted of high purity. The mechanism of adsorption of DNA was provided by (1) π-π interaction between the aromatic ring in GO and nucleobases of DNA molecule, and (2) surface charge interaction between the positive charge magnetite and anions such as phosphates within the DNA molecules. The results proved that the GO/cellulose/magnetite composite provides a Na+-free method for selective DNA extraction with high extraction efficiency of pure DNA.

  12. Genomic DNA extraction from medicinal plants available in Malaysia using a TriOmic(TM) improved extraction kit.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Hairul, A R; Sade, A B; Yiap, B C; Raha, A R

    2011-11-08

    DNA extraction was carried out on 32 medicinal plant samples available in Malaysia using the TriOmic(TM) extraction kit. Amounts of 0.1 g flowers or young leaves were ground with liquid nitrogen, lysed at 65°C in RY1(plus) buffer and followed by RNAse treatment. Then, RY2 buffer was added to the samples and mixed completely by vortexing before removal of cell debris by centrifugation. Supernatants were transferred to fresh microcentrifuge tubes and 0.1 volume RY3 buffer was added to each of the transferred supernatant. The mixtures were applied to spin columns followed by a centrifugation step to remove buffers and other residues. Washing step was carried out twice by applying 70% ethanol to the spin columns. Genomic DNA of the samples was recovered by applying 50 μL TE buffer to the membrane of each spin column, followed by a centrifugation step at room temperature. A modification of the TriOmic(TM) extraction procedure was carried out by adding chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (24:1) steps in the extraction procedure. The genomic DNA extracted from most of the 32 samples showed an increase of total yield when chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (24:1) steps were applied in the TriOmicTM extraction procedure. This preliminary study is very important for molecular studies of medicinal plants available in Malaysia since the DNA extraction can be completed in a shorter period of time (within 1 h) compared to manual extraction, which entails applying phenol, chloroform and ethanol precipitation, and requires 1-2 days to complete.

  13. One-step extraction of polar drugs from plasma by parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction.

    PubMed

    Pilařová, Veronika; Sultani, Mumtaz; Ask, Kristine Skoglund; Nováková, Lucie; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2017-02-01

    The new microextraction technique named parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction (PALME) was introduced as an alternative approach to liquid-liquid extraction of charged analytes from aqueous samples. The concept is based on extraction of analytes across a supported liquid membrane sustained in the pores of a thin polymeric membrane, a well-known extraction principle also used in hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME). However, the new PALME technique offers a more user-friendly setup in which the supported liquid membrane is incorporated in a 96 well plate system. Thus, high-throughput is achievable, in addition to the green chemistry offered by using PALME. The consumption of organic solvent is minimized to 3-5μL per sample. With a sample volume of 250μL and acceptor solution volume of 50μL, a maximal enrichment factor of five is achievable. Based on these parameters, a new method for extraction of polar basic drugs was developed in the present work. The basic drugs hydralazine, ephedrine, metaraminol, salbutamol, and cimetidine were used as model analytes, and were extracted from alkalized human plasma into an aqueous solution via the supported liquid membrane. The extraction was promoted by a carrier dissolved in the membrane, creating a temporary ion-pair complex between the hydrophilic drug and the carrier. As the model analytes were extracted directly into an aqueous solution, there was no need for evaporation of the extract before injection into LC-MS. Hence, the sample preparation is performed in one step. With optimized conditions, the extraction recoveries were in the range 50-89% from human plasma after 45min extraction. The data from the method evaluation were satisfactory and in line with current guidelines, and revealed an extraction method with substantial potential for high throughput bioanalysis of polar basic drugs.

  14. Bacterial and fungal DNA extraction from positive blood culture bottles: a manual and an automated protocol.

    PubMed

    Mäki, Minna

    2015-01-01

    When adapting a gene amplification-based method in a routine sepsis diagnostics using a blood culture sample as a specimen type, a prerequisite for a successful and sensitive downstream analysis is the efficient DNA extraction step. In recent years, a number of in-house and commercial DNA extraction solutions have become available. Careful evaluation in respect to cell wall disruption of various microbes and subsequent recovery of microbial DNA without putative gene amplification inhibitors should be conducted prior selecting the most feasible DNA extraction solution for the downstream analysis used. Since gene amplification technologies have been developed to be highly sensitive for a broad range of microbial species, it is also important to confirm that the used sample preparation reagents and materials are bioburden-free to avoid any risks for false-positive result reporting or interference of the diagnostic process. Here, one manual and one automated DNA extraction system feasible for blood culture samples are described.

  15. Evaluation of Five Methods for Total DNA Extraction from Western Corn Rootworm Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Tan, Sek Yee; Wang, Haichuan; Siegfried, Blair D.

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA extraction is a routine step in many insect molecular studies. A variety of methods have been used to isolate DNA molecules from insects, and many commercial kits are available. Extraction methods need to be evaluated for their efficiency, cost, and side effects such as DNA degradation during extraction. Methodology/Principal Findings From individual western corn rootworm beetles, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, DNA extractions by the SDS method, CTAB method, DNAzol® reagent, Puregene® solutions and DNeasy® column were compared in terms of DNA quantity and quality, cost of materials, and time consumed. Although all five methods resulted in acceptable DNA concentrations and absorbance ratios, the SDS and CTAB methods resulted in higher DNA yield (ng DNA vs. mg tissue) at much lower cost and less degradation as revealed on agarose gels. The DNeasy® kit was most time-efficient but was the costliest among the methods tested. The effects of ethanol volume, temperature and incubation time on precipitation of DNA were also investigated. The DNA samples obtained by the five methods were tested in PCR for six microsatellites located in various positions of the beetle's genome, and all samples showed successful amplifications. Conclusion/Significance These evaluations provide a guide for choosing methods of DNA extraction from western corn rootworm beetles based on expected DNA yield and quality, extraction time, cost, and waste control. The extraction conditions for this mid-size insect were optimized. The DNA extracted by the five methods was suitable for further molecular applications such as PCR and sequencing by synthesis. PMID:20730102

  16. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  17. Evaluation of methods for the extraction of DNA from drinking water distribution system biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chiachi; Ling, Fangqiong; Andersen, Gary L; LeChevallier, Mark W; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2012-01-01

    While drinking water biofilms have been characterized in various drinking water distribution systems (DWDS), little is known about the impact of different DNA extraction methods on the subsequent analysis of microbial communities in drinking water biofilms. Since different DNA extraction methods have been shown to affect the outcome of microbial community analysis in other environments, it is necessary to select a DNA extraction method prior to the application of molecular tools to characterize the complex microbial ecology of the DWDS. This study compared the quantity and quality of DNA yields from selected DWDS bacteria with different cell wall properties using five widely used DNA extraction methods. These were further selected and evaluated for their efficiency and reproducibility of DNA extraction from DWDS samples. Terminal restriction fragment length analysis and the 454 pyrosequencing technique were used to interpret the differences in microbial community structure and composition, respectively, from extracted DNA. Such assessments serve as a concrete step towards the determination of an optimal DNA extraction method for drinking water biofilms, which can then provide a reliable comparison of the meta-analysis results obtained in different laboratories.

  18. DNA extraction from vegetative tissue for next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Agnelo

    2014-01-01

    The quality of extracted DNA is crucial for several applications in molecular biology. If the DNA is to be used for next-generation sequencing (NGS), then microgram quantities of good-quality DNA is required. In addition, the DNA must substantially be of high molecular weight so that it can be used for library preparation and NGS sequencing. Contaminating phenol or starch in the isolated DNA can be easily removed by filtration through kit-based cartridges. In this chapter we describe a simple two-reagent DNA extraction protocol which yields a high quality and quantity of DNA which can be used for different applications including NGS.

  19. Extraction of high-quality genomic DNA from latex-containing plants.

    PubMed

    Michiels, An; Van den Ende, Wim; Tucker, Mark; Van Riet, Liesbet; Van Laere, André

    2003-04-01

    The isolation of intact, high-molecular-mass genomic DNA is essential for many molecular biology applications including long PCR, endonuclease restriction digestion, Southern blot analysis, and genomic library construction. Many protocols are available for the extraction of DNA from plant material. However, for latex-containing Asteraceae (Cichorioideae) species, standard protocols and commercially available kits do not produce efficient yields of high-quality amplifiable DNA. A cetyltrimethylammonium bromide protocol has been optimized for isolation of genomic DNA from latex-containing plants. Key steps in the modified protocol are the use of etiolated leaf tissue for extraction and an overnight 25 degrees C isopropanol precipitation step. The purified DNA has excellent spectral qualities, is efficiently digested by restriction endonucleases, and is suitable for long-fragment PCR amplification.

  20. Biases during DNA extraction of activated sludge samples revealed by high throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2013-05-01

    Standardization of DNA extraction is a fundamental issue of fidelity and comparability in investigations of environmental microbial communities. Commercial kits for soil or feces are often adopted for studies of activated sludge because of a lack of specific kits, but they have never been evaluated regarding their effectiveness and potential biases based on high throughput sequencing. In this study, seven common DNA extraction kits were evaluated, based on not only yield/purity but also sequencing results, using two activated sludge samples (two sub-samples each, i.e. ethanol-fixed and fresh, as-is). The results indicate that the bead-beating step is necessary for DNA extraction from activated sludge. The two kits without the bead-beating step yielded very low amounts of DNA, and the least abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and significantly underestimated the Gram-positive Actinobacteria, Nitrospirae, Chloroflexi, and Alphaproteobacteria and overestimated Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and the rare phyla whose cell walls might have been readily broken. Among the other five kits, FastDNA(@) SPIN Kit for Soil extracted the most and the purest DNA. Although the number of total OTUs obtained using this kit was not the highest, the abundant OTUs and abundance of Actinobacteria demonstrated its efficiency. The three MoBio kits and one ZR kit produced fair results, but had a relatively low DNA yield and/or less Actinobacteria-related sequences. Moreover, the 50 % ethanol fixation increased the DNA yield, but did not change the sequenced microbial community in a significant way. Based on the present study, the FastDNA SPIN kit for Soil is recommended for DNA extraction of activated sludge samples. More importantly, the selection of the DNA extraction kit must be done carefully if the samples contain dominant lysing-resistant groups, such as Actinobacteria and Nitrospirae.

  1. Comparative analysis of protocols for DNA extraction from soybean caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Palma, J; Valmorbida, I; da Costa, I F D; Guedes, J V C

    2016-04-07

    Genomic DNA extraction is crucial for molecular research, including diagnostic and genome characterization of different organisms. The aim of this study was to comparatively analyze protocols of DNA extraction based on cell lysis by sarcosyl, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and sodium dodecyl sulfate, and to determine the most efficient method applicable to soybean caterpillars. DNA was extracted from specimens of Chrysodeixis includens and Spodoptera eridania using the aforementioned three methods. DNA quantification was performed using spectrophotometry and high molecular weight DNA ladders. The purity of the extracted DNA was determined by calculating the A260/A280 ratio. Cost and time for each DNA extraction method were estimated and analyzed statistically. The amount of DNA extracted by these three methods was sufficient for PCR amplification. The sarcosyl method yielded DNA of higher purity, because it generated a clearer pellet without viscosity, and yielded high quality amplification products of the COI gene I. The sarcosyl method showed lower cost per extraction and did not differ from the other methods with respect to preparation times. Cell lysis by sarcosyl represents the best method for DNA extraction in terms of yield, quality, and cost effectiveness.

  2. DNA extraction from bovine faeces: current status and future trends.

    PubMed

    Rapp, D

    2010-05-01

    There is an increasing interest in the detection and enumeration of micro-organisms pathogenic for human and present in bovine faeces. This interest is because pollution of the environment by animal faeces may affect the safety of food and of drinking or recreational water. Detection and quantification of microbial pathogens carried out using DNA extracted from the faecal matrix are affected by the quality and the quantity of the DNA extracts, which are critical factors that limit the accuracy and sensitivity of molecular studies. This review compares published methods on DNA extraction from bovine faeces, focusing on the extent to which the success of DNA amplification is affected by issues related to the faeces. Following a general discussion on the DNA extraction methods used for faeces, we focus particularly on issues related to the faecal environment itself. The objective is to identify information that can be used to improve the sensitivity of those PCR methods used after direct DNA extraction.

  3. Technical note: Bone DNA extraction and purification using silica-coated paramagnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Dukes, Mary J; Williams, Audra L; Massey, Corina M; Wojtkiewicz, Patrick W

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a simple method to improve DNA recovery from challenging bone samples. To this end, an optimized procedure was developed that combined the demineralization and DNA extraction into a single step, followed by DNA purification using an automated silica-coated paramagnetic bead procedure. This method replaced a previous silica-membrane-based procedure, which was able to recover sufficient DNA to obtain full autosomal and Y chromosome STR profiles from greater than 90% of the samples, including samples greater than 20 years old. The development process began with the evaluation of buffer and demineralization systems to determine the best reagent combination. During the developmental process, we observed that the addition of EDTA and DTT affected silica-based DNA purification methods by raising the pH of the digest buffer. The protocols with buffer ATL, PK, EDTA, and DTT followed by lowering the pH with sodium acetate just before purification resulted in the best yields. The method reduced the extraction volume from 10 to 1.5 ml and used commercially available reagents already being utilized in forensic DNA casework. Because of the simplicity and small volume needed for the procedure, many steps where contamination could be introduced have been eliminated or minimized. This study demonstrated a new method of recovering DNA from bone samples capable of extracting trace quantities of DNA, removing potential inhibitors, and minimizing the potential for exogenous DNA contamination.

  4. Preliminary assessment for DNA extraction on microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Hashim, Uda; Uda, M. N. A.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this research is to extract, purify and yield DNA in mushroom from solid state mushroom sample by using fabricated continuous high-capacity sample delivery microfluidic through integrated solid state extraction based amino-coated silica bead. This device is made to specifically extract DNA in mushroom sample in continuous inflow process with energy and cost consumption. In this project, we present two methods of DNA extraction and purification which are by using centrifuge (complex and conventional method) and by using microfluidic biosensor (new and fast method). DNA extracted can be determined by using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS). The peak obtained at wavelength 260nm after measuring the absorbance of sample proves that DNA is successfully extracted from the mushroom.

  5. One-stop genomic DNA extraction by salicylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhongwu; Kadam, Ulhas S; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-11-15

    Salicylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles were prepared via a modified one-step synthesis and used for a one-stop extraction of genomic DNA from mammalian cells. The synthesized magnetic particles were used for magnetic separation of cells from the media by nonspecific binding of the particles as well as extraction of genomic DNA from the lysate. The quantity and quality were confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction. The entire process of extraction and isolation can be completed within 30 min. Compared with traditional methods based on centrifugation and filtration, the established method is fast, simple, reliable, and environmentally friendly.

  6. Comparison between modified DNA extraction protocols and commercial isolation kits in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.).

    PubMed

    Akkurt, M

    2012-08-13

    Various protocols have been developed and used for DNA extraction in grapevine. However, owing to the long duration of the isolation steps in previously developed protocols, researchers have preferred to use isolation kits for studies in recent years. In our study, the DNA yield and purity obtained using six methods--namely three DNA isolation protocols and three commercial DNA isolation kits--were compared. Modifications were made and the isolation steps were shortened in the previously developed DNA isolation protocols to achieve more rapid and practical protocols. The samples were taken from plants grown under vineyard and greenhouse conditions in two periods during spring and autumn. The best results among the six DNA isolation methods were discussed. The results were also supported with polymerase chain reaction analyses conducted with isolated DNAs.

  7. A rapid DNA extraction method suitable for human papillomavirus detection.

    PubMed

    Brestovac, Brian; Wong, Michelle E; Costantino, Paul S; Groth, David

    2014-04-01

    Infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes is necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Testing for HPV DNA from liquid based cervical samples can be used as an adjunct to traditional cytological screening. In addition there are ongoing viral load, genotyping, and prevalence studies. Therefore, a sensitive DNA extraction method is needed to maximize the efficiency of HPV DNA detection. The XytXtract Tissue kit is a DNA extraction kit that is rapid and so could be useful for HPV testing, particularly in screening protocols. This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of this method for HPV detection. DNA extraction from HeLa and Caski cell lines containing HPV 18 and 16 respectively together with DNA from five liquid based cervical samples were used in a HPV PCR assay. DNA was also extracted using the QIAamp DNA mini kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) as a comparison. DNA extracts were serially diluted and assayed. HPV DNA was successfully detected in cell lines and cervical samples using the XytXtract Tissue kit. In addition, the XytXtract method was found to be more sensitive than the QIAmp method as determined by a dilution series of the extracted DNA. While the XytXtract method is a closed, the QIAamp method uses a spin column with possible loss of DNA through DNA binding competition of the matrix, which could impact on the final extraction efficiency. The XytXtract is a cheap, rapid and efficient method for extracting HPV DNA from both cell lines and liquid based cervical samples.

  8. Microbial food safety: Potential of DNA extraction methods for use in diagnostic metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Josefsen, Mathilde H; Andersen, Sandra C; Christensen, Julia; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency of ten widely applied DNA extraction protocols was evaluated for suitability for diagnostic metagenomics. The protocols were selected based on a thorough literature study. Chicken fecal samples inoculated with about 1×10(3) and 1×10(6) CFU/g Campylobacter jejuni were used as a model. The evaluation was performed based on total DNA yield measured by fluorometry, and quality and quantity of C. jejuni DNA measured by real-time PCR. There was up to a 25-fold variance between the lowest (NucliSens miniMAG, BIOMÉRIEUX) and highest (PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, MO BIO Laboratories) yielding protocols. The PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit performed significantly better than all other protocols tested. Selected protocols were modified, i.e., extended heating and homogenization, resulting in increased yields of total DNA. For QIAamp Fast DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) a 7-fold increase in total DNA was observed following the protocol for human DNA analysis and including a 5 min heating step at 70°C. For the PowerLyzer PowerSoil and the PowerFecal DNA Isolation Kit (MO BIO Laboratories) the total DNA fold increase was 1.6 to 1.8 when including an extra 10 min of bead-vortexing. There was no correlation between the yield of total DNA and the amount of PCR-amplifiable DNA from C. jejuni. The protocols resulting in the highest yield of total DNA did not show correspondingly increased levels of C. jejuni DNA as determined by PCR. In conclusion, substantial variation in the efficiency of the protocols to extract DNA was observed. The highest DNA yield was obtained with the PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, whereas the FastDNA SPIN Kit for Feces (MP Biomedicals) resulted in the highest amount of PCR-amplifiable C. jejuni DNA.

  9. A comparison of DNA extraction methods using Petunia hybrida tissues.

    PubMed

    Tamari, Farshad; Hinkley, Craig S; Ramprashad, Naderia

    2013-09-01

    Extraction of DNA from plant tissue is often problematic, as many plants contain high levels of secondary metabolites that can interfere with downstream applications, such as the PCR. Removal of these secondary metabolites usually requires further purification of the DNA using organic solvents or other toxic substances. In this study, we have compared two methods of DNA purification: the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method that uses the ionic detergent hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide and chloroform-isoamyl alcohol and the Edwards method that uses the anionic detergent SDS and isopropyl alcohol. Our results show that the Edwards method works better than the CTAB method for extracting DNA from tissues of Petunia hybrida. For six of the eight tissues, the Edwards method yielded more DNA than the CTAB method. In four of the tissues, this difference was statistically significant, and the Edwards method yielded 27-80% more DNA than the CTAB method. Among the different tissues tested, we found that buds, 4 days before anthesis, had the highest DNA concentrations and that buds and reproductive tissue, in general, yielded higher DNA concentrations than other tissues. In addition, DNA extracted using the Edwards method was more consistently PCR-amplified than that of CTAB-extracted DNA. Based on these results, we recommend using the Edwards method to extract DNA from plant tissues and to use buds and reproductive structures for highest DNA yields.

  10. A simple Chelex protocol for DNA extraction from Anopheles spp.

    PubMed

    Musapa, Mulenga; Kumwenda, Taida; Mkulama, Mtawa; Chishimba, Sandra; Norris, Douglas E; Thuma, Philip E; Mharakurwa, Sungano

    2013-01-09

    Endemic countries are increasingly adopting molecular tools for efficient typing, identification and surveillance against malaria parasites and vector mosquitoes, as an integral part of their control programs. For sustainable establishment of these accurate approaches in operations research to strengthen malaria control and elimination efforts, simple and affordable methods, with parsimonious reagent and equipment requirements are essential. Here we present a simple Chelex-based technique for extracting malaria parasite and vector DNA from field collected mosquito specimens. We morphologically identified 72 Anopheles gambiae sl. from 156 mosquitoes captured by pyrethrum spray catches in sleeping rooms of households within a 2,000 km(2) vicinity of the Malaria Institute at Macha. After dissection to separate the head and thorax from the abdomen for all 72 Anopheles gambiae sl. mosquitoes, the two sections were individually placed in 1.5 ml microcentrifuge tubes and submerged in 20 μl of deionized water. Using a sterile pipette tip, each mosquito section was separately homogenized to a uniform suspension in the deionized water. Of the ensuing homogenate from each mosquito section, 10 μl was retained while the other 10 μl was transferred to a separate autoclaved 1.5 ml tube. The separate aliquots were subjected to DNA extraction by either the simplified Chelex or the standard salting out extraction protocol(9,10). The salting out protocol is so-called and widely used because it employs high salt concentrations in lieu of hazardous organic solvents (such as phenol and chloroform) for the protein precipitation step during DNA extraction(9). Extracts were used as templates for PCR amplification using primers targeting arthropod mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH) subunit 4 gene (ND4) to check DNA quality, a PCR for identification of Anopheles gambiae sibling species(10) and a nested PCR for typing of Plasmodium falciparum infection

  11. Qualitative and quantitative identification of adulteration of milk powder using DNA extracted with a novel method.

    PubMed

    Liao, J; Liu, Y F; Ku, T; Liu, M H; Huang, Y

    2017-03-01

    The extraction of high-quality DNA from processed dairy products is often the crucial step in an authentication process by PCR-based methods. In this study, we optimized a novel DNA extraction method for milk powder and used the extracted DNA for identification of milk powder based on PCR analysis. The DNA quality was assessed by amplifying target sequences from mitochondrial genes, as well as by monitoring the yield, purity, and integrity of the extracted DNA. In addition, a laboratory adulteration model of milk powder was detected by PCR-based methods (PCR and real-time PCR) using primers targeting the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. Results showed that a sufficient amount and quality of DNA could be isolated from milk powder with this method. Both PCR and real-time PCR detection of cow milk compositions in goat milk powder further confirmed the DNA extracted with this extraction method could be widely used in addressing milk powder adulterant by a PCR-based method.

  12. Transparent DNA/RNA Co-extraction Workflow Protocol Suitable for Inhibitor-Rich Environmental Samples That Focuses on Complete DNA Removal for Transcriptomic Analyses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Natalie Y N; Roco, Constance A; Frostegård, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Adequate comparisons of DNA and cDNA libraries from complex environments require methods for co-extraction of DNA and RNA due to the inherent heterogeneity of such samples, or risk bias caused by variations in lysis and extraction efficiencies. Still, there are few methods and kits allowing simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample, and the existing ones generally require optimization. The proprietary nature of kit components, however, makes modifications of individual steps in the manufacturer's recommended procedure difficult. Surprisingly, enzymatic treatments are often performed before purification procedures are complete, which we have identified here as a major problem when seeking efficient genomic DNA removal from RNA extracts. Here, we tested several DNA/RNA co-extraction commercial kits on inhibitor-rich soils, and compared them to a commonly used phenol-chloroform co-extraction method. Since none of the kits/methods co-extracted high-quality nucleic acid material, we optimized the extraction workflow by introducing small but important improvements. In particular, we illustrate the need for extensive purification prior to all enzymatic procedures, with special focus on the DNase digestion step in RNA extraction. These adjustments led to the removal of enzymatic inhibition in RNA extracts and made it possible to reduce genomic DNA to below detectable levels as determined by quantitative PCR. Notably, we confirmed that DNase digestion may not be uniform in replicate extraction reactions, thus the analysis of "representative samples" is insufficient. The modular nature of our workflow protocol allows optimization of individual steps. It also increases focus on additional purification procedures prior to enzymatic processes, in particular DNases, yielding genomic DNA-free RNA extracts suitable for metatranscriptomic analysis.

  13. Transparent DNA/RNA Co-extraction Workflow Protocol Suitable for Inhibitor-Rich Environmental Samples That Focuses on Complete DNA Removal for Transcriptomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Natalie Y. N.; Roco, Constance A.; Frostegård, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Adequate comparisons of DNA and cDNA libraries from complex environments require methods for co-extraction of DNA and RNA due to the inherent heterogeneity of such samples, or risk bias caused by variations in lysis and extraction efficiencies. Still, there are few methods and kits allowing simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample, and the existing ones generally require optimization. The proprietary nature of kit components, however, makes modifications of individual steps in the manufacturer’s recommended procedure difficult. Surprisingly, enzymatic treatments are often performed before purification procedures are complete, which we have identified here as a major problem when seeking efficient genomic DNA removal from RNA extracts. Here, we tested several DNA/RNA co-extraction commercial kits on inhibitor-rich soils, and compared them to a commonly used phenol-chloroform co-extraction method. Since none of the kits/methods co-extracted high-quality nucleic acid material, we optimized the extraction workflow by introducing small but important improvements. In particular, we illustrate the need for extensive purification prior to all enzymatic procedures, with special focus on the DNase digestion step in RNA extraction. These adjustments led to the removal of enzymatic inhibition in RNA extracts and made it possible to reduce genomic DNA to below detectable levels as determined by quantitative PCR. Notably, we confirmed that DNase digestion may not be uniform in replicate extraction reactions, thus the analysis of “representative samples” is insufficient. The modular nature of our workflow protocol allows optimization of individual steps. It also increases focus on additional purification procedures prior to enzymatic processes, in particular DNases, yielding genomic DNA-free RNA extracts suitable for metatranscriptomic analysis. PMID:27803690

  14. Stepped electrophoresis for movement and concentration of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy Wei-Yun; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2005-03-15

    A fluidic channel patterned with a series of thin-film electrodes makes it possible to move and concentrate DNA in a fluid passing through the fluidic channel. The DNA has an inherent negative charge and by applying a voltage between adjacent electrodes the DNA is caused to move. By using a series of electrodes, when one electrode voltage or charge is made negative with respect to adjacent electrodes, the DNA is repelled away from this electrode and attached to a positive charged electrode of the series. By sequentially making the next electrode of the series negative, the DNA can be moved to and concentrated over the remaining positive electrodes.

  15. Microwave-Accelerated Method for Ultra-Rapid Extraction of Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA for Downstream Detection

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, Johan H.; Santaus, Tonya M.; Brinsley, Gregory; Kiang, Daniel; Mali, Buddha; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based detection of gonorrhea infections typically require a two-step process involving isolation of the nucleic acid, followed by the detection of the genomic target often involving PCR-based approaches. In an effort to improve on current detection approaches, we have developed a unique two-step microwave-accelerated approach for rapid extraction and detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) DNA. Our approach is based on the use of highly-focused microwave radiation to rapidly lyse bacterial cells, release, and subsequently fragment microbial DNA. The DNA target is then detected by a process known as microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF), an ultra-sensitive direct DNA detection analytical technique. In the present study, we show that highly focused microwaves at 2.45 GHz, using 12.3 mm gold film equilateral triangles, are able to rapidly lyse both bacteria cells and fragment DNA in a time- and microwave power-dependent manner. Detection of the extracted DNA can be performed by MAMEF, without the need for DNA amplification in less than 10 minutes total time or by other PCR-based approaches. Collectively, the use of a microwave-accelerated method for the release and detection of DNA represents a significant step forward towards the development of a point-of-care (POC) platform for detection of gonorrhea infections. PMID:27325503

  16. Microwave-accelerated method for ultra-rapid extraction of Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA for downstream detection.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Johan H; Santaus, Tonya M; Brinsley, Gregory; Kiang, Daniel; Mali, Buddha; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Geddes, Chris D

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acid-based detection of gonorrhea infections typically require a two-step process involving isolation of the nucleic acid, followed by detection of the genomic target often involving polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approaches. In an effort to improve on current detection approaches, we have developed a unique two-step microwave-accelerated approach for rapid extraction and detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea, GC) DNA. Our approach is based on the use of highly focused microwave radiation to rapidly lyse bacterial cells, release, and subsequently fragment microbial DNA. The DNA target is then detected by a process known as microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF), an ultra-sensitive direct DNA detection analytical technique. In the current study, we show that highly focused microwaves at 2.45 GHz, using 12.3-mm gold film equilateral triangles, are able to rapidly lyse both bacteria cells and fragment DNA in a time- and microwave power-dependent manner. Detection of the extracted DNA can be performed by MAMEF, without the need for DNA amplification, in less than 10 min total time or by other PCR-based approaches. Collectively, the use of a microwave-accelerated method for the release and detection of DNA represents a significant step forward toward the development of a point-of-care (POC) platform for detection of gonorrhea infections.

  17. Botanical Extracts as Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    seed extract supplements and Labrador tea whole leaf extracts as potential radioprotectants. Three different commercial grape seed extracts were... supplements and Labrador tea whole leaf extracts as potential radioprotectants. A novel assay was used to compare DNA damage in cellular and...concentrations of commercial grape seed extract supplements and Labrador tea. In addition, this work has identified and validated a set of procedures to use

  18. Preparation of DNA-containing extract for PCR amplification

    DOEpatents

    Dunbar, John M.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2006-07-11

    Environmental samples typically include impurities that interfere with PCR amplification and DNA quantitation. Samples of soil, river water, and aerosol were taken from the environment and added to an aqueous buffer (with or without detergent). Cells from the sample are lysed, releasing their DNA into the buffer. After removing insoluble cell components, the remaining soluble DNA-containing extract is treated with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, which causes rapid precipitation of impurities. Centrifugation provides a supernatant that can be used or diluted for PCR amplification of DNA, or further purified. The method may provide a DNA-containing extract sufficiently pure for PCR amplification within 5–10 minutes.

  19. Safer DNA extraction from plant tissues using sucrose buffer and glass fiber filter.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Koh-Ichi; Nishio, Takayuki

    2012-11-01

    For some plant species, DNA extraction and downstream experiments are inhibited by various chemicals such as polysaccharides and polyphenols. This short communication proposed an organic-solvent free (except for ethanol) extraction method. This method consists of an initial washing step with STE buffer (0.25 M sucrose, 0.03 M Tris, 0.05 M EDTA), followed by DNA extraction using a piece of glass fiber filter. The advantages of this method are its safety and low cost. The purity of the DNA solution obtained using this method is not necessarily as high as that obtained using the STE/CTAB method, but it is sufficient for PCR experiments. These points were demonstrated empirically with two species, Japanese speedwell and common dandelion, for which DNA has proven difficult to amplify via PCR in past studies.

  20. A simple DNA extraction method for marijuana samples used in amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis.

    PubMed

    Miller Coyle, Heather; Shutler, Gary; Abrams, Sharon; Hanniman, Janet; Neylon, Suzanne; Ladd, Carll; Palmbach, Timothy; Lee, Henry C

    2003-03-01

    As a first step in developing a molecular method for the individualization of marijuana samples, we evaluated a plant DNA extraction kit. The QIAGEN plant DNeasy method uses a spin column format for recovery of DNA and is effective for obtaining high molecular weight DNA from leaf, flower (bud), and seed samples of marijuana. The average DNA yield was 125-500 ng per 100 milligrams of fresh plant tissue. The recovered DNA was of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) quality as measured by the ability to generate reproducible amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiles. AFLP is a technique used to create a DNA profile for plant varieties and is being applied to marijuana samples by the authors to link growers and distributors of clonal material. The QIAGEN plant DNeasy method was simple, efficient, and reproducible for processing small quantities of marijuana into DNA.

  1. A protocol for high-quality genomic DNA extraction from legumes.

    PubMed

    Agbagwa, I O; Datta, S; Patil, P G; Singh, P; Nadarajan, N

    2012-12-19

    Current DNA extraction protocols, which require liquid nitrogen, lyophilization and considerable infrastructure in terms of instrumentation, often impede the application of biotechnological tools in less researched crops in laboratories in developing countries. We modified and optimized the existing CTAB method for plant genomic DNA extraction by avoiding liquid nitrogen usage and lyophilization. DNA was extracted directly from freshly harvested leaves ground in pre-heated CTAB buffer. Chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (24:1) and RNase treatments followed by single-purification step decontaminated the samples thereby paving way for selective extraction of DNA. High molecular weight DNA yield in the range of 328 to 4776 ng/μL with an average of 1459 ng/μL was obtained from 45 samples of cultivated and wild Cajanus species. With an absorbance ratio at 260 to 280 nm, a range of 1.66 to 2.20, and a mean of 1.85, very low levels of protein and polysaccharide contamination were recorded. Forty samples can be extracted daily at a cost between 1.8 and US$2.0 per plant sample. This modified method is suitable for most plants especially members of the Leguminosae. Apart from Cajanus, it has been extensively applied in DNA extraction from Cicer and Vigna species.

  2. SPION-mediated soil DNA extraction and comparative analysis with conventional and commercial kit-based protocol.

    PubMed

    Paul, Tanima; Basu, Semanti; Sarkar, Keka

    2014-12-01

    Direct isolation of soil DNA comes as an emerging technology to understand the microbial diversity of a particular environment circumventing the dependency on culturable methods. Soil DNA isolation is tough due to the presence of various organic components present in soil which interfere in extraction procedure. Here, we report a novel direct soil DNA extraction protocol utilizing bare superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and its comparison with conventional and commercial kit-based soil DNA extraction methods. The quality, quantity and feasibility of the recovered DNA from all the three methods towards various molecular techniques were checked. Our magnetic nanoparticle-based soil DNA extraction successfully yields pure DNA without any RNA or protein contamination as revealed by the nanodrop spectrophotometer and agarose gel electrophoretic study. Different methods of soil DNA extraction were evaluated on the basis of PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR. Soil DNA extracted using conventional method fails to carry out critical molecular biology techniques where as magnetic nanoparticle-based soil DNA extraction gave good results which is comparable to commercial kit. This comparative study suggests that protocol described in this report is novel, less time consuming, cost effective with fewer handling steps and yields high quantity, good quality DNA from soil.

  3. The influence of substrate on DNA transfer and extraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Verdon, Timothy J; Mitchell, R John; van Oorschot, Roland A H

    2013-01-01

    The circumstances surrounding deposition of DNA profiles are increasingly becoming an issue in court proceedings, especially whether or not the deposit was made by primary transfer. In order to improve the currently problematic evaluation of transfer scenarios in court proceedings, we examined the influence a variety of nine substrate types (six varieties of fabric, plywood, tarpaulin, and plastic sheets) has on DNA transfer involving blood. DNA transfer percentages were significantly higher (p=0.03) when the primary substrate was of non-porous material (such as tarpaulin, plastic or, to a lesser degree, wood) and the secondary substrate porous (such as fabrics). These findings on transfer percentages confirm the results of previous studies. Fabric composition was also shown to have a significant (p=0.03) effect on DNA transfer; when experiments were performed with friction from a variety of fabrics to a specific weave of cotton, transfer percentages ranged from 4% (flannelette) to 94% (acetate). The propensity for the same nine substrates to impact upon the efficiency of DNA extraction procedures was also examined. Significant (p=0.03) differences were found among the extraction efficiencies from different materials. When 15μL of blood was deposited on each of the substrates, the lowest quantity of DNA was extracted from plastic (20ng) and the highest quantities extracted from calico and flannelette (650ng). Significant (p<0.05) differences also exist among the DNA extraction yield from different initial blood volumes from all substrates. Also, significantly greater (p<0.05) loss of DNA was seen during concentration of extracts with higher compared to lower initial quantities of DNA. These findings suggest that the efficiency of extraction and concentration impacts upon the final amount of DNA available for analysis and that consideration of these effects should not be ignored. The application of correction factors to adjust for any variation among extraction and

  4. Evaluating the Impact of DNA Extraction Method on the Representation of Human Oral Bacterial and Fungal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Kristi; Taylor, Michael W.; Gear, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The application of high-throughput, next-generation sequencing technologies has greatly improved our understanding of the human oral microbiome. While deciphering this diverse microbial community using such approaches is more accurate than traditional culture-based methods, experimental bias introduced during critical steps such as DNA extraction may compromise the results obtained. Here, we systematically evaluate four commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods (MoBio PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp® DNA Mini Kit, Zymo Bacterial/Fungal DNA Mini PrepTM, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) based on the following criteria: DNA quality and yield, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V3–V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 region of fungi. Our results indicate that DNA quality and yield varied significantly with DNA extraction method. Representation of bacterial genera in plaque and saliva samples did not significantly differ across DNA extraction methods and DNA extraction method showed no effect on the recovery of fungal genera from plaque. By contrast, fungal diversity from saliva was affected by DNA extraction method, suggesting that not all protocols are suitable to study the salivary mycobiome. PMID:28099455

  5. Evaluating the Impact of DNA Extraction Method on the Representation of Human Oral Bacterial and Fungal Communities.

    PubMed

    Vesty, Anna; Biswas, Kristi; Taylor, Michael W; Gear, Kim; Douglas, Richard G

    2017-01-01

    The application of high-throughput, next-generation sequencing technologies has greatly improved our understanding of the human oral microbiome. While deciphering this diverse microbial community using such approaches is more accurate than traditional culture-based methods, experimental bias introduced during critical steps such as DNA extraction may compromise the results obtained. Here, we systematically evaluate four commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods (MoBio PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp® DNA Mini Kit, Zymo Bacterial/Fungal DNA Mini PrepTM, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) based on the following criteria: DNA quality and yield, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 region of fungi. Our results indicate that DNA quality and yield varied significantly with DNA extraction method. Representation of bacterial genera in plaque and saliva samples did not significantly differ across DNA extraction methods and DNA extraction method showed no effect on the recovery of fungal genera from plaque. By contrast, fungal diversity from saliva was affected by DNA extraction method, suggesting that not all protocols are suitable to study the salivary mycobiome.

  6. Optimization of DNA extraction for RAPD and ISSR analysis of Arbutus unedo L. Leaves.

    PubMed

    Sá, Olga; Pereira, José Alberto; Baptista, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Genetic analysis of plants relies on high yields of pure DNA. For the strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) this represents a great challenge since leaves can accumulate large amounts of polysaccharides, polyphenols and secondary metabolites, which co-purify with DNA. For this specie, standard protocols do not produce efficient yields of high-quality amplifiable DNA. Here, we present for the first time an improved leaf-tissue protocol, based on the standard cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide protocol, which yields large amounts of high-quality amplifiable DNA. Key steps in the optimized protocol are the addition of antioxidant compounds-namely polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT) and 2-mercaptoethanol, in the extraction buffer; the increasing of CTAB (3%, w/v) and sodium chloride (2M) concentration; and an extraction with organic solvents (phenol and chloroform) with the incubation of samples on ice. Increasing the temperature for cell lyses to 70 °C also improved both DNA quality and yield. The yield of DNA extracted was 200.0 ± 78.0 μg/μL and the purity, evaluated by the ratio A(260)/A(280), was 1.80 ± 0.021, indicative of minimal levels of contaminating metabolites. The quality of the DNA isolated was confirmed by random amplification polymorphism DNA and by inter-simple sequence repeat amplification, proving that the DNA can be amplified via PCR.

  7. Optimization of DNA Extraction for RAPD and ISSR Analysis of Arbutus unedo L. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Olga; Pereira, José Alberto; Baptista, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Genetic analysis of plants relies on high yields of pure DNA. For the strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) this represents a great challenge since leaves can accumulate large amounts of polysaccharides, polyphenols and secondary metabolites, which co-purify with DNA. For this specie, standard protocols do not produce efficient yields of high-quality amplifiable DNA. Here, we present for the first time an improved leaf-tissue protocol, based on the standard cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide protocol, which yields large amounts of high-quality amplifiable DNA. Key steps in the optimized protocol are the addition of antioxidant compounds—namely polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT) and 2-mercaptoethanol, in the extraction buffer; the increasing of CTAB (3%, w/v) and sodium chloride (2M) concentration; and an extraction with organic solvents (phenol and chloroform) with the incubation of samples on ice. Increasing the temperature for cell lyses to 70 °C also improved both DNA quality and yield. The yield of DNA extracted was 200.0 ± 78.0 μg/μL and the purity, evaluated by the ratio A260/A280, was 1.80 ± 0.021, indicative of minimal levels of contaminating metabolites. The quality of the DNA isolated was confirmed by random amplification polymorphism DNA and by inter-simple sequence repeat amplification, proving that the DNA can be amplified via PCR. PMID:21747730

  8. A novel DNA selection and direct extraction process and its application in DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, An-Bang; Cheng, Chia-Wei; Lin, I-Chun; Lu, Fei-Yau; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Lin, Chiu-Chun; Yang, Chun-Hui; Pan, Po-Ting; Kuan, Chen-Chi; Chen, Yen-Chih; Lin, Yi-Wei; Chang, Chih-Ning; Wu, Yi-Hung; Kurniawan, Tetuko; Lin, Chii-Wann; Wo, Andrew M; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2011-02-01

    In the conventional bench-top approach, the DNA recombination process is time- and effort-consuming due to laborious procedures lasting from several hours to a day. A novel DNA selection and direct extraction process has been proposed, integrated and tested on chip. The integrative microfluidic chip can perform the whole procedure of DNA recombination, including DNA digestion, gel electrophoresis, DNA extraction and insert-vector ligation within 1 h. In this high-throughput design, the manual gel cutting was replaced by an automatic processing system that performed high-quality and high-recovery efficiency in DNA extraction process. With no need of gel-dissolving reagents and manipulation, the application of selection and direct extraction process could significantly eliminate the risks from UV and EtBr and also facilitate DNA recombination. Reliable output with high success rate of cloning has been achieved with a significant reduction in operational hazards, required materials, efforts and time.

  9. Optimization of DNA Extraction from Deep-sea Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Edwards, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    Studies on the microorganisms that inhabit deep-sea basalt can provide information on this dark ecosystem, which will contribution to our understanding of mass transformation and energy flow in the deep ocean. However, molecular methods for use with metal- and clay-rich rock materials such as basalt have not been suitably developed at present, yet are critically required in order to be able to fully evaluate the basalt biotope. For example, inefficient DNA extraction might lead to loss of information about important components of this community, and misinterpretation about the total community diversity and function. In order to investigate the effects of sample pretreated method, particle size, different DNA extraction methods and cell density on extracted DNA yields, two basalt samples were collected from the East Pacific Rise 9° N during research cruise AT11- 20 in Nov 2004. Basalt samples were crushed to different particle size, washed with ddH2O and 100% ethanol respectively, and autoclaved. Marinobacter aquaeolei cultures with different cell densities were inoculated into differently treated basalt samples. Pure culture and basalt samples without inoculation were used as positive and negative control to evaluate the extracting efficiency. FastDNA spin for soil kit, GeneClean for ancient DNA kit and UltraCleanTM soil DNA Kit are used for DNA extraction. Results showed that DNA yields increased with culture density. FastDNA spin for soil kit gave the highest DNA yields, which is almost 10 times more than that of UltraCleanTM soil DNA Kit. Ethanol washing and ddH2O washing did not make big difference to DNA yields. Mineral composition and surface areas might also affect DNA yields.

  10. One-step synthesis of silver nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanowires on the surface of DNA network.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gang; Zhou, Hualan; Liu, Zhiguo; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li; Sun, Lanlan; Li, Zhuang

    2005-05-12

    Here, we describe a one-step synthesis of silver nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanowires on DNA network surface in the absence of surfactant. Silver ions were first adsorbed onto the DNA network and then reduced in sodium borohydride solution. Silver nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanowires were formed by controlling the size of pores of the DNA network. The diameter of the silver nanoparticles and the aspect ratio of the silver nanorods and nanowires can be controlled by adjusting the DNA concentration and reduction time.

  11. A simple automated instrument for DNA extraction in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Montpetit, Shawn A; Fitch, Ian T; O'Donnell, Patrick T

    2005-05-01

    The Qiagen BioRobot EZ1 is a small, rapid, and reliable automated DNA extraction instrument capable of extracting DNA from up to six samples in as few as 20 min using magnetic bead technology. The San Diego Police Department Crime Laboratory has validated the BioRobot EZ1 for the DNA extraction of evidence and reference samples in forensic casework. The BioRobot EZ1 was evaluated for use on a variety of different evidence sample types including blood, saliva, and semen evidence. The performance of the BioRobot EZ1 with regard to DNA recovery and potential cross-contamination was also assessed. DNA yields obtained with the BioRobot EZ1 were comparable to those from organic extraction. The BioRobot EZ1 was effective at removing PCR inhibitors, which often co-purify with DNA in organic extractions. The incorporation of the BioRobot EZ1 into forensic casework has streamlined the DNA analysis process by reducing the need for labor-intensive phenol-chloroform extractions.

  12. Extraction of DNA from plant and fungus tissues in situ

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When samples are collected in the field and transported to the lab, degradation of the nucleic acids contained in the samples is frequently observed. Immediate extraction and precipitation of the nucleic acids reduces degradation to a minimum, thus preserving accurate sequence information. An extraction method to obtain high quality DNA in field studies is described. Findings DNA extracted immediately after sampling was compared to DNA extracted after allowing the sampled tissues to air dry at 21°C for 48 or 72 hours. While DNA extracted from fresh tissues exhibited little degradation, DNA extracted from all tissues exposed to 21°C air for 48 or 72 hours exhibited varying degrees of degradation. Yield was higher for extractions from fresh tissues in most cases. Four microcentrifuges were compared for DNA yield: one standard electric laboratory microcentrifuge (max rcf = 16,000×g), two battery-operated microcentrifuges (max rcf = 5,000 and 3,000 ×g), and one manually-operated microcentrifuge (max rcf = 120×g). Yields for all centrifuges were similar. DNA extracted under simulated field conditions was similar in yield and quality to DNA extracted in the laboratory using the same equipment. Conclusions This CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) DNA extraction method employs battery-operated and manually-operated equipment to isolate high quality DNA in the field. The method was tested on plant and fungus tissues, and may be adapted for other types of organisms. The method produced high quality DNA in laboratory tests and under simulated field conditions. The field extraction method should prove useful for working in remote sites, where ice, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen are unavailable; where degradation is likely to occur due to the long distances between the sample site and the laboratory; and in instances where other DNA preservation and transportation methods have been unsuccessful. It may be possible to adapt this method for genomic

  13. Extraction of DNA by magnetic ionic liquids: tunable solvents for rapid and selective DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin D; Nacham, Omprakash; Yu, Honglian; Li, Tianhao; Yamsek, Melissa M; Ronning, Donald R; Anderson, Jared L

    2015-02-03

    DNA extraction represents a significant bottleneck in nucleic acid analysis. In this study, hydrophobic magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) were synthesized and employed as solvents for the rapid and efficient extraction of DNA from aqueous solution. The DNA-enriched microdroplets were manipulated by application of a magnetic field. The three MILs examined in this study exhibited unique DNA extraction capabilities when applied toward a variety of DNA samples and matrices. High extraction efficiencies were obtained for smaller single-stranded and double-stranded DNA using the benzyltrioctylammonium bromotrichloroferrate(III) ([(C8)3BnN(+)][FeCl3Br(-)]) MIL, while the dicationic 1,12-di(3-hexadecylbenzimidazolium)dodecane bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide bromotrichloroferrate(III) ([(C16BnIM)2C12(2+)][NTf2(-), FeCl3Br(-)]) MIL produced higher extraction efficiencies for larger DNA molecules. The MIL-based method was also employed for the extraction of DNA from a complex matrix containing albumin, revealing a competitive extraction behavior for the trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium tetrachloroferrate(III) ([P6,6,6,14(+)][FeCl4(-)]) MIL in contrast to the [(C8)3BnN(+)][FeCl3Br(-)] MIL, which resulted in significantly less coextraction of albumin. The MIL-DNA method was employed for the extraction of plasmid DNA from bacterial cell lysate. DNA of sufficient quality and quantity for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was recovered from the MIL extraction phase, demonstrating the feasibility of MIL-based DNA sample preparation prior to downstream analysis.

  14. High-throughput Method of One-Step DNA Isolation for PCR Diagnostics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, D V; Prostyakova, A I; Alexeev, Ya I; Varlamov, D A; Zubov, V P; Zavriev, S K

    2014-04-01

    The efficiency of one-step and multi-step protocols of DNA isolation from lysed sputum samples containing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex has been compared. DNA was isolated using spin-cartridges containing a special silica-based sorbent modified with fluoroplast and polyaniline, or using an automated isolation system. One-step isolation using the obtained sorbent has been shown to ensure a significantly lower DNA loss and higher sensitivity in the PCR detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as compared to a system based on sorption and desorption of nucleic acids during the isolation.

  15. High-throughput Method of One-Step DNA Isolation for PCR Diagnostics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, D. V.; Prostyakova, A. I.; Alexeev, Ya. I.; Varlamov, D. A.; Zubov, V. P.; Zavriev, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of one-step and multi-step protocols of DNA isolation from lysed sputum samples containing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex has been compared. DNA was isolated using spin-cartridges containing a special silica-based sorbent modified with fluoroplast and polyaniline, or using an automated isolation system. One-step isolation using the obtained sorbent has been shown to ensure a significantly lower DNA loss and higher sensitivity in the PCR detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as compared to a system based on sorption and desorption of nucleic acids during the isolation. PMID:25093111

  16. A novel method of genomic DNA extraction for Cactaceae1

    PubMed Central

    Fehlberg, Shannon D.; Allen, Jessica M.; Church, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Genetic studies of Cactaceae can at times be impeded by difficult sampling logistics and/or high mucilage content in tissues. Simplifying sampling and DNA isolation through the use of cactus spines has not previously been investigated. • Methods and Results: Several protocols for extracting DNA from spines were tested and modified to maximize yield, amplification, and sequencing. Sampling of and extraction from spines resulted in a simplified protocol overall and complete avoidance of mucilage as compared to typical tissue extractions. Sequences from one nuclear and three plastid regions were obtained across eight genera and 20 species of cacti using DNA extracted from spines. • Conclusions: Genomic DNA useful for amplification and sequencing can be obtained from cactus spines. The protocols described here are valuable for any cactus species, but are particularly useful for investigators interested in sampling living collections, extensive field sampling, and/or conservation genetic studies. PMID:25202521

  17. Developmental validation of the PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit for extraction of genomic DNA from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Brevnov, Maxim G; Pawar, Hemant S; Mundt, Janna; Calandro, Lisa M; Furtado, Manohar R; Shewale, Jaiprakash G

    2009-05-01

    The PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit enables isolation of genomic DNA from a variety of biological samples. The kit facilitates reversible binding of DNA with magnetic particles resulting in high DNA recovery from samples with very low and high quantities of biological materials: 0.1 and 40 microL of human blood (donor 2) provided 14 and 2883 ng of DNA, respectively. Following the revised SWGDAM guidelines, performance of the developed method was investigated using different sample types including saliva on swabs, semen stains on cotton fabric, samples exposed to environment, samples with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors, blood stains (on denim, cotton cloth, and FTA paper), and touch evidence-type samples. DNA yields for all samples tested were equal or better than those obtained by both phenol-chloroform extraction and commercial kits tested. DNA obtained from these samples was free of detectable PCR inhibitors. Short tandem repeat profiles were complete, conclusive, and devoid of PCR artifacts.

  18. A comparative study of three extraction protocols of DNA from nails: Potential use in the diagnosis of onychomycoses.

    PubMed

    Kotrotsiou, T; Chatzimichaloglou, A; Nasr, A; Spandou, E; Patsatsi, A; Sotiriadis, D; Vyzantiadis, T-A

    2017-03-01

    Molecular techniques can be useful adjuncts to the diagnosis of onychomycoses. However, the nail presents difficulties in the extraction of its DNA. The comparison of three extraction protocols of DNA from nails and their ranking for possible use in the molecular diagnosis of onychomycoses are described. Extraction was performed on weighed nail clippings of equal size from positive (31) or negative (14) samples, according to the culture result. At Prot1, the extraction was performed according to Tahir and Watson, with an additional step implementing silica columns. At Prot2, the methodology proposed by the Statens Serum Institute of Copenhagen was used. At Prot3, DNA was extracted by the use of magnetic separation after homogenisation with glass beading. The evaluation parameters were DNA purity, DNA concentration, total DNA yield/g of tissue, cost and duration. The multiples of the means of medians of the first three parameters, for each protocol, were calculated. Prot3 showed the highest DNA purity. Prot2 presented the highest DNA concentration and DNA yield/g of tissue, while it was the cheapest and shortest. In total, the three protocols were graded as Prot2>Prot1>Prot3. The second method, although had a lower DNA purity, presented the higher DNA concentration and DNA yield, while its duration and cost were also favourable.

  19. Methods of sperm DNA extraction for genetic and epigenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Jeanine

    2013-01-01

    High quality DNA extractions developed for mammalian somatic cells are ineffective for sperm, due mainly to the high degree of nuclear compaction in sperm. The highly specialized nuclear proteins in sperm create a chromatin structure that is at least six times denser than histone bound DNA. Unlike somatic cells, sperm DNA is highly compacted by the replacement of histones with sperm-specific low molecular weight proteins called protamines. Both the protamines and the disulfide bridges formed within and between protamines inhibit the extraction of sperm DNA by standard techniques used for somatic cells. Here we describe the guanidine thiocyanate method reported by Hossain with additional modifications resulting in high molecular weight DNA of high quality with an A260/280 ratio ranging between 1.8 and 2.0 and an A260/230 ratio of 2.0 and greater. The DNA is efficiently digested with restriction enzymes and amplified by PCR.

  20. Cost-effective method of DNA extraction from taeniid eggs.

    PubMed

    Dyachenko, V; Beck, E; Pantchev, N; Bauer, C

    2008-03-01

    A new cost-effective method using silicon dioxide- and guanidine isothiocyanate-containing buffers, after previous alkaline lysis, was established for the DNA extraction from taeniid eggs isolated from canine faeces. The purified DNA can be used to amplify the species-specific 12S mitochondrial DNA of Echinococcus multilocularis in direct and nested polymerase chain reaction in order to differentiate between E. multilocularis and Taenia spp.

  1. Extracting biological knowledge from DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    De La Vega, F.M.; Thieffry, D. |; Collado-Vides, J.

    1996-12-31

    This session describes the elucidation of information from dna sequences and what challenges computational biologists face in their task of summarizing and deciphering the human genome. Techniques discussed include methods from statistics, information theory, artificial intelligence and linguistics. 1 ref.

  2. Extraction of high quality DNA from seized Moroccan cannabis resin (Hashish).

    PubMed

    El Alaoui, Moulay Abdelaziz; Melloul, Marouane; Alaoui Amine, Sanaâ; Stambouli, Hamid; El Bouri, Aziz; Soulaymani, Abdelmajid; El Fahime, Elmostafa

    2013-01-01

    The extraction and purification of nucleic acids is the first step in most molecular biology analysis techniques. The objective of this work is to obtain highly purified nucleic acids derived from Cannabis sativa resin seizure in order to conduct a DNA typing method for the individualization of cannabis resin samples. To obtain highly purified nucleic acids from cannabis resin (Hashish) free from contaminants that cause inhibition of PCR reaction, we have tested two protocols: the CTAB protocol of Wagner and a CTAB protocol described by Somma (2004) adapted for difficult matrix. We obtained high quality genomic DNA from 8 cannabis resin seizures using the adapted protocol. DNA extracted by the Wagner CTAB protocol failed to give polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase coding gene. However, the extracted DNA by the second protocol permits amplification of THCA synthase coding gene using different sets of primers as assessed by PCR. We describe here for the first time the possibility of DNA extraction from (Hashish) resin derived from Cannabis sativa. This allows the use of DNA molecular tests under special forensic circumstances.

  3. Extraction of High Quality DNA from Seized Moroccan Cannabis Resin (Hashish)

    PubMed Central

    El Alaoui, Moulay Abdelaziz; Melloul, Marouane; Alaoui Amine, Sanaâ; Stambouli, Hamid; El Bouri, Aziz; Soulaymani, Abdelmajid; El Fahime, Elmostafa

    2013-01-01

    The extraction and purification of nucleic acids is the first step in most molecular biology analysis techniques. The objective of this work is to obtain highly purified nucleic acids derived from Cannabis sativa resin seizure in order to conduct a DNA typing method for the individualization of cannabis resin samples. To obtain highly purified nucleic acids from cannabis resin (Hashish) free from contaminants that cause inhibition of PCR reaction, we have tested two protocols: the CTAB protocol of Wagner and a CTAB protocol described by Somma (2004) adapted for difficult matrix. We obtained high quality genomic DNA from 8 cannabis resin seizures using the adapted protocol. DNA extracted by the Wagner CTAB protocol failed to give polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase coding gene. However, the extracted DNA by the second protocol permits amplification of THCA synthase coding gene using different sets of primers as assessed by PCR. We describe here for the first time the possibility of DNA extraction from (Hashish) resin derived from Cannabis sativa. This allows the use of DNA molecular tests under special forensic circumstances. PMID:24124454

  4. Comparing the performance of three ancient DNA extraction methods for high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Cristina; Hanghøj, Kristian; Gaunitz, Charleen; Alfarhan, Ahmed H; Alquraishi, Saleh A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Bradley, Daniel G; Orlando, Ludovic

    2016-03-01

    The DNA molecules that can be extracted from archaeological and palaeontological remains are often degraded and massively contaminated with environmental microbial material. This reduces the efficacy of shotgun approaches for sequencing ancient genomes, despite the decreasing sequencing costs of high-throughput sequencing (HTS). Improving the recovery of endogenous molecules from the DNA extraction and purification steps could, thus, help advance the characterization of ancient genomes. Here, we apply the three most commonly used DNA extraction methods to five ancient bone samples spanning a ~30 thousand year temporal range and originating from a diversity of environments, from South America to Alaska. We show that methods based on the purification of DNA fragments using silica columns are more advantageous than in solution methods and increase not only the total amount of DNA molecules retrieved but also the relative importance of endogenous DNA fragments and their molecular diversity. Therefore, these methods provide a cost-effective solution for downstream applications, including DNA sequencing on HTS platforms.

  5. Nondestructive DNA extraction from blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae): retaining voucher specimens for DNA barcoding projects.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Stephanie J; Goodall, Tim I; Walsh, Kerry A; Owen, Richard; Day, John C

    2008-01-01

    A nondestructive, chemical-free method is presented for the extraction of DNA from small insects. Blackflies were submerged in sterile, distilled water and sonicated for varying lengths of time to provide DNA which was assessed in terms of quantity, purity and amplification efficiency. A verified DNA barcode was produced from DNA extracted from blackfly larvae, pupae and adult specimens. A 60-second sonication period was found to release the highest quality and quantity of DNA although the amplification efficiency was found to be similar regardless of sonication time. Overall, a 66% amplification efficiency was observed. Examination of post-sonicated material confirmed retention of morphological characters. Sonication was found to be a reliable DNA extraction approach for barcoding, providing sufficient quality template for polymerase chain reaction amplification as well as retaining the voucher specimen for post-barcoding morphological evaluation.

  6. One-step assay for the quantification of T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Franke, Steffi; Kreisig, Thomas; Buettner, Karin; Zuchner, Thole

    2015-02-01

    As one of the most commonly used enzyme in molecular biology, the T4 DNA ligase presents an important tool for the manipulation of DNA. T4 DNA ligase activity measurements are based on the use of radioactivity or rather labor-intense procedures including gel-based analysis. We therefore established a homogeneous T4 DNA ligase assay utilizing a specifically designed fluorescein- and dark quencher-labeled DNA molecule. Upon ligation of both DNA molecules, a quenching occurs and the fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing ligase concentrations. The assay allows a sensitive and precise quantification (CV, 4.6-5.5 %) of T4 DNA ligase activities and showed a high specificity when tested against other ligases of related and different species. Most importantly, this T4 DNA ligase assay requires only one working and incubation step before measurement can take place at room temperature and may therefore offer an interesting alternative to existing, more laborious ligase assays.

  7. High-throughput DNA extraction of forensic adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Christina; Jansson, Linda; Ansell, Ricky; Hedman, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Tape-lifting has since its introduction in the early 2000's become a well-established sampling method in forensic DNA analysis. Sampling is quick and straightforward while the following DNA extraction is more challenging due to the "stickiness", rigidity and size of the tape. We have developed, validated and implemented a simple and efficient direct lysis DNA extraction protocol for adhesive tapes that requires limited manual labour. The method uses Chelex beads and is applied with SceneSafe FAST tape. This direct lysis protocol provided higher mean DNA yields than PrepFiler Express BTA on Automate Express, although the differences were not significant when using clothes worn in a controlled fashion as reference material (p=0.13 and p=0.34 for T-shirts and button-down shirts, respectively). Through in-house validation we show that the method is fit-for-purpose for application in casework, as it provides high DNA yields and amplifiability, as well as good reproducibility and DNA extract stability. After implementation in casework, the proportion of extracts with DNA concentrations above 0.01ng/μL increased from 71% to 76%. Apart from providing higher DNA yields compared with the previous method, the introduction of the developed direct lysis protocol also reduced the amount of manual labour by half and doubled the potential throughput for tapes at the laboratory. Generally, simplified manual protocols can serve as a cost-effective alternative to sophisticated automation solutions when the aim is to enable high-throughput DNA extraction of complex crime scene samples.

  8. DNA extraction and quantitation of forensic samples using the phenol-chloroform method and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Köchl, Silvano; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther

    2005-01-01

    Forensic laboratories are increasingly confronted with problematic samples from the scene of crime, containing only minute amounts of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which may include polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-inhibiting substances. Efficient DNA extraction procedures, as well as accurate DNA quantification methods, are critical steps involved in the process of successful DNA analysis of such samples. The phenol-chloroform method is a sensitive method for the extraction of DNA from a wide variety of forensic samples, although it is known to be laborious compared with single-tube extraction methods. The relatively high DNA recovery and the quality of the extracted DNA speak for itself. For reliable and sensitive DNA quantitation, the application of real-time PCR is described. We modified a published real-time PCR assay, which allows for the combined analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, by introducing 1) improved hybridization probes with the use of minor groove binders; 2) an internal positive control (for both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA) for the detection of PCR inhibitors; and 3) different amplicon lengths for the determination of the degradation state of the DNA. The internal positive controls were constructed by site directed mutagenesis by overlap extension of the wild-type mitochondrial and nuclear DNA target with the advantage that no additional probes, which are cost-intensive, are required. The quantitation system is accomplished as a modular concept, which allows for the combined determination of the above-mentioned features (quantity/inhibition or quantity/degradation) depending on the situation.

  9. Toward DNA-based Security Circuitry: First Step - Random Number Generation.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Christy M; Arazi, Benjamin; Rouchka, Eric C

    2008-08-10

    DNA-based circuit design is an area of research in which traditional silicon-based technologies are replaced by naturally occurring phenomena taken from biochemistry and molecular biology. Our team investigates the implications of DNA-based circuit design in serving security applications. As an initial step we develop a random number generation circuitry. A novel prototype schema employs solid-phase synthesis of oligonucleotides for random construction of DNA sequences. Temporary storage and retrieval is achieved through plasmid vectors.

  10. Effect of DNA extraction methods and sampling techniques on the apparent structure of cow and sheep rumen microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Gemma; Cox, Faith; Kittelmann, Sandra; Miri, Vahideh Heidarian; Zethof, Michael; Noel, Samantha J; Waghorn, Garry C; Janssen, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Molecular microbial ecology techniques are widely used to study the composition of the rumen microbiota and to increase understanding of the roles they play. Therefore, sampling and DNA extraction methods that result in adequate yields of microbial DNA that also accurately represents the microbial community are crucial. Fifteen different methods were used to extract DNA from cow and sheep rumen samples. The DNA yield and quality, and its suitability for downstream PCR amplifications varied considerably, depending on the DNA extraction method used. DNA extracts from nine extraction methods that passed these first quality criteria were evaluated further by quantitative PCR enumeration of microbial marker loci. Absolute microbial numbers, determined on the same rumen samples, differed by more than 100-fold, depending on the DNA extraction method used. The apparent compositions of the archaeal, bacterial, ciliate protozoal, and fungal communities in identical rumen samples were assessed using 454 Titanium pyrosequencing. Significant differences in microbial community composition were observed between extraction methods, for example in the relative abundances of members of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Microbial communities in parallel samples collected from cows by oral stomach-tubing or through a rumen fistula, and in liquid and solid rumen digesta fractions, were compared using one of the DNA extraction methods. Community representations were generally similar, regardless of the rumen sampling technique used, but significant differences in the abundances of some microbial taxa such as the Clostridiales and the Methanobrevibacter ruminantium clade were observed. The apparent microbial community composition differed between rumen sample fractions, and Prevotellaceae were most abundant in the liquid fraction. DNA extraction methods that involved phenol-chloroform extraction and mechanical lysis steps tended to be more comparable. However, comparison of data

  11. Development of Procedures for Direct Extraction of Cryptosporidium DNA from Water Concentrates and for Relief of PCR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianlin; Alderisio, Kerri A.; Singh, Ajaib; Xiao, Lihua

    2005-01-01

    Extraction of high-quality DNA is a key step in PCR detection of Cryptosporidium and other pathogens in environmental samples. Currently, Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples have to be purified from water concentrates before DNA is extracted. This study compared the effectiveness of six DNA extraction methods (DNA extraction with the QIAamp DNA minikit after oocyst purification with immunomagnetic separation and direct DNA extraction methods using the FastDNA SPIN kit for soil, QIAamp DNA stool minikit, UltraClean soil kit, or QIAamp DNA minikit and the traditional phenol-chloroform technique) for the detection of Cryptosporidium with oocyst-seeded samples, DNA-spiked samples, and field water samples. The study also evaluated the effects of different PCR facilitators (nonacetylated bovine serum albumin, the T4 gene 32 protein, and polyvinylpyrrolidone) and treatments (the use of GeneReleaser or ultrafiltration) for the relief from or removal of inhibitors of PCR amplification. The results of seeding and spiking studies showed that PCR inhibitors were presented in all DNA solutions extracted by the six methods. However, the effect of PCR inhibitors could be relieved significantly by the addition of 400 ng of bovine serum albumin/μl or 25 ng of T4 gene 32 protein/μl to the PCR mixture. With the inclusion of bovine serum albumin in the PCR mixture, DNA extracted with the FastDNA SPIN kit for soil without oocyst isolation resulted in PCR performance similar to that produced by the QIAamp DNA minikit after oocysts were purified by immunomagnetic separation. PMID:15746310

  12. Microfluidic enzymatic DNA extraction on a hybrid polyester-toner-PMMA device.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brandon L; Birch, Christopher; Li, Jingyi; DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Le Roux, Delphine; Nelson, Daniel A; Tsuei, An-Chi; Mills, Daniel L; Krauss, Shannon T; Root, Brian E; Landers, James P

    2016-08-07

    To date, the forensic community regards solid phase extraction (SPE) as the most effective methodology for the purification of DNA for use in short tandem repeat (STR) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. While a dominant methodology, SPE protocols generally necessitate the use of PCR inhibitors (guanidine, IPA) and, in addition, can demand timescales of up to 30 min due to the necessary load, wash and elution steps. The recent discovery and characterization of the EA1 protease has allowed the user to enzymatically extract (not purify) DNA, dramatically simplifying the task of producing a PCR-ready template. Despite this, this procedure has yet to make a significant impact on microfluidic technologies. Here, we describe a microfluidic device that implements the EA1 enzyme for DNA extraction by incorporating it into a hybrid microdevice comprising laminated polyester (Pe) and PMMA layers. The PMMA layer provides a macro-to-micro interface for introducing the biological sample into the microfluidic architecture, whilst also possessing the necessary dimensions to function as the swab acceptor. Pre-loaded reagents are then introduced to the swab chamber centrifugally, initiating DNA extraction at 75 °C. The extraction of DNA occurs in timescales of less than 3 min and any external hardware associated with the transportation of reagents by pneumatic pumping is eliminated. Finally, multiplexing is demonstrated with a circular device containing eight separate chambers for the simultaneous processing of eight buccal swab samples. The studies here provide DNA concentrations up to 10 ng μL(-1) with a 100% success rate in less than 3 minutes. The STR profiles generated using these extracted samples demonstrate that the DNA is of PCR forensic-quality and adequate for human identification.

  13. Evidence on DNA slippage step-length distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borštnik, Branko; Pumpernik, Danilo

    2005-03-01

    A simple model based on a master equation is constructed in order to reveal the details of the mutational events modifying simple sequence repeats in the human genome, A database of simple repeats together with their flanking sequences comprising approximately 105 entries from all 24 human chromosomes was constructed. By aligning the pairs of fragments of sequences containing the repeat elements, the matrices that count the number of slippage events were evaluated. The counts were then used as a target to be reproduced by our theoretical model, in which the elongation and shortening of the repeats proceed through a mechanism in which the step lengths exhibit a decaying distribution in the form of an inverse power law rather than through one nucleotide extension or deletion, which was the most frequent supposition in previous studies.

  14. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods for Bacillus anthracis spores spiked to food and feed matrices at biosafety level 3 conditions.

    PubMed

    Wielinga, Peter R; de Heer, Lianne; de Groot, Astrid; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; Bruggeman, Geert; Jordan, Kieran; van Rotterdam, Bart J

    2011-11-01

    The DNA extraction efficiency from milk, whey, soy, corn gluten meal, wheat powders and heat-treated corn grain that were spiked with Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis spores was determined. Two steps were critical: lysis of the spores and binding of the free DNA to the DNA binding magnetic beads in the presence of the interfering powders. For the guanidine-thiocyanate based Nuclisens lysis buffer from Biomerieux we found that between 15 and 30% of the spores survived the lysis step. As most lysis buffers in DNA/RNA extraction kits are guanidine based it is likely that other lysis buffers will show a similar partial lysis of the Bacillus spores. Our results show that soybean flour and wheat flour inhibited the DNA extraction process strongest, leading to unreliable DNA extractions when using too much of the matrix. For corn gluten meal, heat-treated corn grain and milk powders, DNA extraction efficiencies in the presence of 100mg and 10mg of powder resulted in 70%-95% reduced DNA recoveries. The inhibition was, however, reliable and intermediate compared to the inhibition by soy and wheat. Whey powder had the lowest inhibitory effect on DNA-extraction efficiency and recoveries of 70-100% could be reached when using 10mg of powder. The results show that reducing the amount of matrix leads to better DNA-extraction efficiencies, particularly for strongly inhibiting powders such as soy and wheat. Based on these results, a standard protocol to directly isolate DNA from micro-organisms present in complex matrixes such as food and feed powders was designed.

  15. Protocol: A high-throughput DNA extraction system suitable for conifers

    PubMed Central

    Bashalkhanov, Stanislav; Rajora, Om P

    2008-01-01

    Background High throughput DNA isolation from plants is a major bottleneck for most studies requiring large sample sizes. A variety of protocols have been developed for DNA isolation from plants. However, many species, including conifers, have high contents of secondary metabolites that interfere with the extraction process or the subsequent analysis steps. Here, we describe a procedure for high-throughput DNA isolation from conifers. Results We have developed a high-throughput DNA extraction protocol for conifers using an automated liquid handler and modifying the Qiagen MagAttract Plant Kit protocol. The modifications involve change to the buffer system and improving the protocol so that it almost doubles the number of samples processed per kit, which significantly reduces the overall costs. We describe two versions of the protocol: one for medium-throughput (MTP) and another for high-throughput (HTP) DNA isolation. The HTP version works from start to end in the industry-standard 96-well format, while the MTP version provides higher DNA yields per sample processed. We have successfully used the protocol for DNA extraction and genotyping of thousands of individuals of several spruce and a pine species. Conclusion A high-throughput system for DNA extraction from conifer needles and seeds has been developed and validated. The quality of the isolated DNA was comparable with that obtained from two commonly used methods: the silica-spin column and the classic CTAB protocol. Our protocol provides a fully automatable and cost effective solution for processing large numbers of conifer samples. PMID:18673554

  16. A DNA extraction protocol for improved DNA yield from individual mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Catelyn C.; Yamasaki, Youki; Collier, Travis C.; Lee, Yoosook

    2015-01-01

    Typical DNA extraction protocols from commercially available kits provide an adequate amount of DNA from a single individual mosquito sufficient for PCR-based assays. However, next-generation sequencing applications and high-throughput SNP genotyping assays exposed the limitation of DNA quantity one usually gets from a single individual mosquito. Whole genome amplification could alleviate the issue but it also creates bias in genome representation. While trying to find alternative DNA extraction protocols for improved DNA yield, we found that a combination of the tissue lysis protocol from Life Technologies and the DNA extraction protocol from Qiagen yielded a higher DNA amount than the protocol using the Qiagen or Life Technologies kit only. We have not rigorously tested all the possible combinations of extraction protocols; we also only tested this on mosquito samples. Therefore, our finding should be noted as a suggestion for improving people’s own DNA extraction protocols and not as an advertisement of a commercially available product. PMID:26937269

  17. Establishing a novel automated magnetic bead-based method for the extraction of DNA from a variety of forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Witt, Sebastian; Neumann, Jan; Zierdt, Holger; Gébel, Gabriella; Röscheisen, Christiane

    2012-09-01

    Automated systems have been increasingly utilized for DNA extraction by many forensic laboratories to handle growing numbers of forensic casework samples while minimizing the risk of human errors and assuring high reproducibility. The step towards automation however is not easy: The automated extraction method has to be very versatile to reliably prepare high yields of pure genomic DNA from a broad variety of sample types on different carrier materials. To prevent possible cross-contamination of samples or the loss of DNA, the components of the kit have to be designed in a way that allows for the automated handling of the samples with no manual intervention necessary. DNA extraction using paramagnetic particles coated with a DNA-binding surface is predestined for an automated approach. For this study, we tested different DNA extraction kits using DNA-binding paramagnetic particles with regard to DNA yield and handling by a Freedom EVO(®)150 extraction robot (Tecan) equipped with a Te-MagS magnetic separator. Among others, the extraction kits tested were the ChargeSwitch(®)Forensic DNA Purification Kit (Invitrogen), the PrepFiler™Automated Forensic DNA Extraction Kit (Applied Biosystems) and NucleoMag™96 Trace (Macherey-Nagel). After an extensive test phase, we established a novel magnetic bead extraction method based upon the NucleoMag™ extraction kit (Macherey-Nagel). The new method is readily automatable and produces high yields of DNA from different sample types (blood, saliva, sperm, contact stains) on various substrates (filter paper, swabs, cigarette butts) with no evidence of a loss of magnetic beads or sample cross-contamination.

  18. Yeast Pif1 helicase exhibits a one-base-pair stepping mechanism for unwinding duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Ramanagoudr-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Chib, Shubeena; Byrd, Alicia K; Aarattuthodiyil, Suja; Pandey, Manjula; Patel, Smita S; Raney, Kevin D

    2013-05-31

    Kinetic analysis of the DNA unwinding and translocation activities of helicases is necessary for characterization of the biochemical mechanism(s) for this class of enzymes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pif1 helicase was characterized using presteady state kinetics to determine rates of DNA unwinding, displacement of streptavidin from biotinylated DNA, translocation on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and ATP hydrolysis activities. Unwinding of substrates containing varying duplex lengths was fit globally to a model for stepwise unwinding and resulted in an unwinding rate of ∼75 bp/s and a kinetic step size of 1 base pair. Pif1 is capable of displacing streptavidin from biotinylated oligonucleotides with a linear increase in the rates as the length of the oligonucleotides increased. The rate of translocation on ssDNA was determined by measuring dissociation from varying lengths of ssDNA and is essentially the same as the rate of unwinding of dsDNA, making Pif1 an active helicase. The ATPase activity of Pif1 on ssDNA was determined using fluorescently labeled phosphate-binding protein to measure the rate of phosphate release. The quantity of phosphate released corresponds to a chemical efficiency of 0.84 ATP/nucleotides translocated. Hence, when all of the kinetic data are considered, Pif1 appears to move along DNA in single nucleotide or base pair steps, powered by hydrolysis of 1 molecule of ATP.

  19. Comparison of five DNA extraction methods for molecular analysis of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus).

    PubMed

    Mornkham, T; Wangsomnuk, P P; Wangsomnuk, P; Jogloy, S; Pattanothai, A; Fu, Y B

    2012-03-08

    DNA extraction is an essential step for molecular analysis of an organism, but it is difficult to acquire a sufficient amount of pure DNA from plant tissue with high levels of phenolic compounds, carbohydrates, proteins, and secondary metabolites. Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) has high levels of such substances. We compared five commonly used methods of extracting genomic DNA in tests made with leaves and seed of four Jerusalem artichoke genotypes: 1) modified method of Tai and Tanksley, 2) method of Doyle and Doyle, 3) method of Porebski, 4) modified method of Štorchová, and 5) Plant DNA Kit of Omega Bio-tek. The quality and quantity of extracted DNAs were assessed by photometric assay, electrophoresis on 1% agarose gel and a PCR-based technique. The modified method of Tai and Tanksley was found to be superior for both young leaves and seed. The quality of the extracted DNA was confirmed by sequence-related amplified polymorphism. This information will be useful for molecular analyses of Jerusalem artichoke and other related Helianthus species.

  20. Statistical assessment of DNA extraction reagent lot variability in real-time quantitative PCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, R.N.; Kephart, C.M.; Koltun, G.F.; Francy, D.S.; Schaefer, F. W.; Lindquist, H.D. Alan

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability in lots of a DNA extraction kit using real-time PCR assays for Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Vibrio cholerae. Methods and Results: Replicate aliquots of three bacteria were processed in duplicate with three different lots of a commercial DNA extraction kit. This experiment was repeated in triplicate. Results showed that cycle threshold values were statistically different among the different lots. Conclusions: Differences in DNA extraction reagent lots were found to be a significant source of variability for qPCR results. Steps should be taken to ensure the quality and consistency of reagents. Minimally, we propose that standard curves should be constructed for each new lot of extraction reagents, so that lot-to-lot variation is accounted for in data interpretation. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study highlights the importance of evaluating variability in DNA extraction procedures, especially when different reagent lots are used. Consideration of this variability in data interpretation should be an integral part of studies investigating environmental samples with unknown concentrations of organisms. ?? 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Proboscidean DNA from museum and fossil specimens: an assessment of ancient DNA extraction and amplification techniques.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Golenberg, E M; Shoshani, J

    1997-06-01

    Applications of reliable DNA extraction and amplification techniques to postmortem samples are critical to ancient DNA research. Commonly used methods for isolating DNA from ancient material were tested and compared using both soft tissue and bones from fossil and contemporary museum proboscideans. DNAs isolated using three principal methods served as templates in subsequent PCR amplifications, and the PCR products were directly sequenced. Authentication of the ancient origin of obtained nucleotide sequences was established by demonstrating reproducibility under a blind testing system and by phylogenetic analysis. Our results indicate that ancient samples may respond differently to extraction buffers or purification procedures, and no single method was universally successful. A CTAB buffer method, modified from plant DNA extraction protocols, was found to have the highest success rate. Nested PCR was shown to be a reliable approach to amplify ancient DNA templates that failed in primary amplification.

  2. A DNA extraction method of small quantities of bone for high-quality genotyping.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Mariela; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Alechine, Evguenia; Corach, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    DNA genotyping techniques have been used successfully in forensic science for almost three decades and represent the gold standard for individual identification. However, efficient protocols for obtaining DNA from exhumed bones suitable for genotyping are still scarce and most of them require a considerable amount of starting material, are time consuming and are inefficient for reducing inhibitor's effects. We sought to develop an optimised protocol for extracting DNA from bone samples obtained from exhumations. We tested two approaches for preparing bone samples: (a) fine powder and (b) thin slices of bone. The best ratio of bone amount to DNA yields was assessed by a titration experiment using bone powder ranging from 50 to 1000mg. We obtained optimal DNA yields (27pg mg(-1) on average) when 150-200mg of starting material were processed using a one-step demineralisation method. Better-quality profiles (determined by the number of genotyped loci) were obtained when DNA was extracted from bone slices compared to extraction from bone powder. From bone slices 83.9% and from bone powder 46.7% of the samples provided genotypes for 11 or more loci. Since bone preparation procedures were carried out at room temperature, the method developed in the present study might be an attractive alternative to the standard freeze-mill approach, being faster and more cost-efficient.

  3. Recognizing a Single Base in an Individual DNA Strand: A Step Toward Nanopore DNA Sequencing**

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenasy, N.; Sánchez-Quesada, J.; Ghadiri, M. R.; Bayley, H.

    2007-01-01

    Functional supramolecular chemistry at the single-molecule level. Single strands of DNA can be captured inside α-hemolysin transmembrane pore protein to form single-species α-HL·DNA pseudorotaxanes. This process can be used to identify a single adenine nucleotide at a specific location on a strand of DNA by the characteristic reductions in the α-HL ion conductance. This study suggests that α-HL-mediated single-molecule DNA sequencing might be fundamentally feasible. PMID:15666419

  4. DNA Extraction from Museum Specimens of Parasitic Hymenoptera

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jeremy C.; Mills, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    At the same time that molecular researchers are improving techniques to extract DNA from museum specimens, this increased demand for access to museum specimens has created tension between the need to preserve specimens for maintaining collections and morphological research and the desire to conduct molecular analyses. To address these concerns, we examined the suitability of non-invasive DNA extraction techniques on three species of parasitic Hymenoptera (Braconidae), and test the effects of body size (parasitoid species), age (time since collection), and DNA concentration from each extract on the probability of amplifying meaningful fragments of two commonly used genetic loci. We found that age was a significant factor for determining the probability of success for sequencing both 28S and COI fragments. While the size of the braconid parasitoids significantly affected the total amount of extracted DNA, neither size nor DNA concentration were significant factors for the amplification of either gene region. We also tested several primer combinations of various lengths, but were unable to amplify fragments longer than ∼150 base pairs. These short fragments of 28S and COI were however sufficient for species identification, and for the discovery of within species genetic variation. PMID:23077493

  5. Microfluidic DNA extraction using a patterned aluminum oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Gale, Bruce K.

    2006-01-01

    A DNA extraction system was designed and fabricated using an AOM (aluminum oxide membrane) with 200 nm pores and PDMS microfluidic channels. The membrane was patterned using soft lithography techniques and SU-8 photolithography on the membrane. After making the pattern with SU-8, the AOM was observed using an SEM (scanning electro microscope) to verify the AOM structure was not damaged. From the SEM images, the AOM structure was not different after modification with SU-8. To complete the system, a PDMS mold for the microfluidic channels was made by soft lithography. Using the SU-8 mold, PDMS microchannels were cast using PDMS with a low polymer to curing agent ratio to provide adhesion between the patterned membrane and microfluidic channel. Then, the patterned membrane was sandwiched between PDMS microfluidic channels in a parallel format. The completed system was tested with 10ug of Lambda DNA mixed with the fluorescent dye SYBR Green I. Following DNA extraction, the surface of each well was examined with fluorescence microscopy while embedded in the microfluidic system. Extracted and immobilized DNA on the AOM was observed in almost every separation well. This microsystem, referred to as a membrane-on-a-chip, has potential applications in high-throughput DNA extraction and analysis, with the possibility of being integrated into polymer-based microfluidic systems.

  6. DNA purification using dynamic solid-phase extraction on a rotationally-driven polyethylene-terephthalate microdevice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K R; Borba, J C; Meija, M; Mills, D L; Haverstick, D M; Olson, K E; Aranda, R; Garner, G T; Carrilho, E; Landers, J P

    2016-09-21

    We report the development of a disposable polyester toner centrifugal device for semi-automated, dynamic solid phase DNA extraction (dSPE) from whole blood samples. The integration of a novel adhesive and hydrophobic valving with a simple and low cost microfabrication method allowed for sequential addition of reagents without the need for external equipment for fluid flow control. The spin-dSPE method yielded an average extraction efficiency of ∼45% from 0.6 μL of whole blood. The device performed single sample extractions or accommodate up to four samples for simultaneous DNA extraction, with PCR-readiness DNA confirmed by effective amplification of a β-globin gene. The purity of the DNA was challenged by a multiplex amplification with 16 targeted amplification sites. Successful multiplexed amplification could routinely be obtained using the purified DNA collected post an on-chip extraction, with the results comparable to those obtained with commercial DNA extraction methods. This proof-of-principle work represents a significant step towards a fully-automated low cost DNA extraction device.

  7. Toenails as an alternative source material for the extraction of DNA from decomposed human remains.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Andrew; Grimble, Katelyn; Azim, Arani; Owen, Rebecca; Hartman, Dadna

    2016-01-01

    The DNA identification of decomposed human remains for coronial investigations at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine routinely requires the retrieval and processing of a bone sample obtained from the deceased. Bone is a difficult sample type to work with as it requires surgical removal from the deceased, refrigerated storage, and additional processing steps prior to DNA analysis in comparison to other samples types such as buccal swabs or blood stains. In an attempt to overcome the issues posed by bone, a DNA extraction method utilising toenails as an alternate source material was optimised and trialled. Two DNA extraction methods were optimised for digestion of toenail material, with the method utilising the QIAGEN DNA Investigator Kit selected for a casework trial. Single source DNA profiles, matching those of the conventional samples taken, were obtained for toenail samples collected from 28 of 30 coronial cases available for this study. Of these, 26 toenail samples produced full profiles. Although the overall DNA profile quality from the toenails was less than that of the conventional sample, the profiles from toenails met the reporting requirements for identification. Based on the results obtained, the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine will be implementing toenails as the primary sample type for collection from decomposed remains when blood is not a suitable sample type.

  8. An optimized high quality male DNA extraction from spermatophores in open thelycum shrimp species.

    PubMed

    Planella, Laia; Heras, Sandra; Vera, Manuel; García-Marín, José Luís; Roldán, María Inés

    2016-12-19

    The crucial step of most of the current genetic studies is the extraction of DNA with sufficient quantity and quality. Several genomic DNA isolation methods have been described to successfully obtain male DNA from shrimp species. However, all current protocols require invasive handling methods on males for DNA isolation. Using Aristeus antennatus as a model we tested a reliable non-invasive differential DNA extraction method to male DNA isolation from spermatophores attached to female thelycum. The present protocol provides high quality and quantity DNA for PCR amplification and male genotyping. This new approach could be useful to experimental shrimp culture to select sires with relevant genetic patterns for selective breeding programs. More important, it can be applied to identify the mating pairs and male structure in wild populations of species as A. antennatus where males are often difficult to capture. Our method could be also valuable to biological studies on other spermatophore-using species, such as myriapods, arachnids and insects. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial and fungal DNA extraction from blood samples: manual protocols.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Michael G; Mühl, Helge; Disqué, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    A critical point of molecular diagnosis of systemic infections is the method employed for the extraction of microbial DNA from blood. A DNA isolation method has to be able to fulfill several fundamental requirements for optimal performance of diagnostic assays. First of all, low- and high-molecular-weight substances of the blood inhibitory to downstream analytical reactions like PCR amplification have to be removed. This includes human DNA which is a known source of false-positive results and factor decreasing the analytical sensitivity of PCR assays by unspecific primer binding. At the same time, even extremely low amounts of microbial DNA need to be supplied to molecular diagnostic assays in order to detect low pathogen loads in the blood. Further, considering the variety of microbial etiologies of sepsis, a method should be capable of lysing Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal organisms. Last, extraction buffers, reagents, and consumables have to be free of microbial DNA which leads to false-positive results. Here, we describe manual methods which allow the extraction of microbial DNA from small- and large-volume blood samples for the direct molecular analysis of pathogen.

  10. [Adaptation of a sensitive DNA extraction method for detection of Entamoeba histolytica by real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Pınar, Ahmet; Akyön, Yakut; Alp, Alpaslan; Ergüven, Sibel

    2010-07-01

    This study was aimed to adapt a sensitive DNA extraction protocol in stool samples for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of Entamoeba histolytica which causes important morbidity and mortality worldwide. Stool extraction is a problematic step and has direct effects on PCR sensitivity. In order to improve the sensitivity of E.histolytica detection by real-time PCR, "QIAamp DNA stool minikit (Qiagen, Germany)" was modified by adding an overnight incubation step with proteinase K and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in this study. Three different extraction methods [(1) original method, (2) cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) method, (3) modified method] were evaluated for effects on sensitivity in real-time quantitative PCR (Artus RealArt TM E.histolytica RG PCR Kit, Qiagen Diagnostics, Germany). For this purpose, several concentrations of standard E.histolytica DNA were spiked in parasite-free stool samples and three different extraction protocols were performed. Detection sensitivities of "QIAamp DNA stool minikit" was found 5000 copies/ml and of CTAB method was found 500 copies/ml. Detection sensitivity of the extraction was improved to 5 copies/mL by modified "QIAamp DNA stool minikit" protocol. Since detection sensitivities of nucleic acid extraction protocols from stool samples directly affect the sensitivity of PCR amplification, different extraction protocols for different microorganisms should be evaluated.

  11. Development of a fast DNA extraction method for sea food and marine species identification.

    PubMed

    Tagliavia, Marcello; Nicosia, Aldo; Salamone, Monica; Biondo, Girolama; Bennici, Carmelo Daniele; Mazzola, Salvatore; Cuttitta, Angela

    2016-07-15

    The authentication of food components is one of the key issues in food safety. Similarly taxonomy, population and conservation genetics as well as food web structure analysis, also rely on genetic analyses including the DNA barcoding technology. In this scenario we developed a fast DNA extraction method without any purification step from fresh and processed seafood, suitable for any PCR analysis. The protocol allows the fast DNA amplification from any sample, including fresh, stored and processed seafood and from any waste of industrial fish processing, independently of the sample storage method. Therefore, this procedure is particularly suitable for the fast processing of samples and to carry out investigations for the authentication of seafood by means of DNA analysis.

  12. Stacking interactions in RNA and DNA: Roll-slide energy hyperspace for ten unique dinucleotide steps.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2015-03-01

    Understanding dinucleotide sequence directed structures of nuleic acids and their variability from experimental observation remained ineffective due to unavailability of statistically meaningful data. We have attempted to understand this from energy scan along twist, roll, and slide degrees of freedom which are mostly dependent on dinucleotide sequence using ab initio density functional theory. We have carried out stacking energy analysis in these dinucleotide parameter phase space for all ten unique dinucleotide steps in DNA and RNA using DFT-D by ωB97X-D/6-31G(2d,2p), which appears to satisfactorily explain conformational preferences for AU/AU step in our recent study. We show that values of roll, slide, and twist of most of the dinucleotide sequences in crystal structures fall in the low energy region. The minimum energy regions with large twist values are associated with the roll and slide values of B-DNA, whereas, smaller twist values correspond to higher stability to RNA and A-DNA like conformations. Incorporation of solvent effect by CPCM method could explain the preference shown by some sequences to occur in B-DNA or A-DNA conformations. Conformational preference of BII sub-state in B-DNA is preferentially displayed mainly by pyrimidine-purine steps and partly by purine-purine steps. The purine-pyrimidine steps show largest effect of 5-methyl group of thymine in stacking energy and the introduction of solvent reduces this effect significantly. These predicted structures and variabilities can explain the effect of sequence on DNA and RNA functionality.

  13. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-01

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10-18 mol l-1 for t-DNA has been achieved.

  14. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals.

  15. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark A.; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  16. DNA extraction from aged skeletal samples for STR typing by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Huel, René; Amory, Sylvain; Bilić, Ana; Vidović, Stojko; Jasaragić, Edin; Parsons, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    STR analysis of DNA extracted from skeletal samples can play an important role in the identification of missing persons. Here we present a method for the extraction of DNA from skeletal samples involving complete demineralization and digestion of the sample, followed by purification by silica binding. This method, together with the multiplex STR typing approach also presented, has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA profiles from degraded, aged skeletal remains from a wide range of environmental contexts. The methodological steps presented include bone decontamination and grinding, DNA extraction, repurification in the case of highly inhibited samples, quantification, STR multiplex amplification, and profile reporting guidelines. However, the conditions applied for amplification and the criteria for allele calling and profile submission must be based on the results of each laboratory's internal validation experiments involving the type of samples relevant to the project at hand. The methods presented here have permitted large-scale DNA-based identification of persons missing from mass disasters and armed conflict.

  17. Back to basics: an evaluation of NaOH and alternative rapid DNA extraction protocols for DNA barcoding, genotyping, and disease diagnostics from fungal and oomycete samples.

    PubMed

    Osmundson, Todd W; Eyre, Catherine A; Hayden, Katherine M; Dhillon, Jaskirn; Garbelotto, Matteo M

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquity, high diversity and often-cryptic manifestations of fungi and oomycetes frequently necessitate molecular tools for detecting and identifying them in the environment. In applications including DNA barcoding, pathogen detection from plant samples, and genotyping for population genetics and epidemiology, rapid and dependable DNA extraction methods scalable from one to hundreds of samples are desirable. We evaluated several rapid extraction methods (NaOH, Rapid one-step extraction (ROSE), Chelex 100, proteinase K) for their ability to obtain DNA of quantity and quality suitable for the following applications: PCR amplification of the multicopy barcoding locus ITS1/5.8S/ITS2 from various fungal cultures and sporocarps; single-copy microsatellite amplification from cultures of the phytopathogenic oomycete Phytophthora ramorum; probe-based P. ramorum detection from leaves. Several methods were effective for most of the applications, with NaOH extraction favored in terms of success rate, cost, speed and simplicity. Frozen dilutions of ROSE and NaOH extracts maintained PCR viability for over 32 months. DNA from rapid extractions performed poorly compared to CTAB/phenol-chloroform extracts for TaqMan diagnostics from tanoak leaves, suggesting that incomplete removal of PCR inhibitors is an issue for sensitive diagnostic procedures, especially from plants with recalcitrant leaf chemistry. NaOH extracts exhibited lower yield and size than CTAB/phenol-chloroform extracts; however, NaOH extraction facilitated obtaining clean sequence data from sporocarps contaminated by other fungi, perhaps due to dilution resulting from low DNA yield. We conclude that conventional extractions are often unnecessary for routine DNA sequencing or genotyping of fungi and oomycetes, and recommend simpler strategies where source materials and intended applications warrant such use.

  18. Optimization and validation of DNA extraction and real-time PCR assay for the quantitative measurement of residual host cell DNA in biopharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Sellers, J; Kupec, J; Ngo, W; Fenton, S; Yang, T-Y; Grebanier, A

    2014-01-01

    Host cell DNA contamination occurs during the production of biopharmaceuticals and must be controlled and monitored for the purity and safety of the drug products. A sodium iodide-based DNA extraction and a subsequent real time PCR assay were developed and validated for the quantitative measurement of residual host cell DNA impurity in monoclonal antibody therapeutic products. A sodium iodide-based commercial kit was optimized for the removal of interfering matrices. Several incubation steps from the kit protocol were combined and a neutralization buffer was introduced to protein digestion step to eliminate any precipitation from the detergent. The elimination of the two washing steps significantly reduced assay variability from loss of DNA pellets. The optimized DNA extraction procedure can recover DNA close to 100% for DNA concentrations from 10 to 100,000pg/mL. Of the published sequences of repetitive interspersed nuclear elements, we identified a nucleotide mismatch from the published CHO probe. Correction of this nucleotide increased DNA amplification by a thousand fold. The optimized assay was further validated for the quantitation of residual CHO DNA according to ICH guidelines with preset assay acceptance criteria. The method met all assay acceptance criteria and was found linear, accurate and precise for the quantitation of residual CHO in the linear range of 10-100,000pg DNA/mL. LOQ was measured at 10pg DNA/mL and LOD at 1pg DNA/mL. No matrix interference to our validated assay was detected from bioreactor harvest, Protein A eluate or eluate from ion exchange columns.

  19. One-step large-scale deposition of salt-free DNA origami nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2015-10-23

    DNA origami nanostructures have tremendous potential to serve as versatile platforms in self-assembly -based nanofabrication and in highly parallel nanoscale patterning. However, uniform deposition and reliable anchoring of DNA nanostructures often requires specific conditions, such as pre-treatment of the chosen substrate or a fine-tuned salt concentration for the deposition buffer. In addition, currently available deposition techniques are suitable merely for small scales. In this article, we exploit a spray-coating technique in order to resolve the aforementioned issues in the deposition of different 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures. We show that purified DNA origamis can be controllably deposited on silicon and glass substrates by the proposed method. The results are verified using either atomic force microscopy or fluorescence microscopy depending on the shape of the DNA origami. DNA origamis are successfully deposited onto untreated substrates with surface coverage of about 4 objects/mm(2). Further, the DNA nanostructures maintain their shape even if the salt residues are removed from the DNA origami fabrication buffer after the folding procedure. We believe that the presented one-step spray-coating method will find use in various fields of material sciences, especially in the development of DNA biochips and in the fabrication of metamaterials and plasmonic devices through DNA metallisation.

  20. One-step large-scale deposition of salt-free DNA origami nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J. Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2015-10-01

    DNA origami nanostructures have tremendous potential to serve as versatile platforms in self-assembly -based nanofabrication and in highly parallel nanoscale patterning. However, uniform deposition and reliable anchoring of DNA nanostructures often requires specific conditions, such as pre-treatment of the chosen substrate or a fine-tuned salt concentration for the deposition buffer. In addition, currently available deposition techniques are suitable merely for small scales. In this article, we exploit a spray-coating technique in order to resolve the aforementioned issues in the deposition of different 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures. We show that purified DNA origamis can be controllably deposited on silicon and glass substrates by the proposed method. The results are verified using either atomic force microscopy or fluorescence microscopy depending on the shape of the DNA origami. DNA origamis are successfully deposited onto untreated substrates with surface coverage of about 4 objects/mm2. Further, the DNA nanostructures maintain their shape even if the salt residues are removed from the DNA origami fabrication buffer after the folding procedure. We believe that the presented one-step spray-coating method will find use in various fields of material sciences, especially in the development of DNA biochips and in the fabrication of metamaterials and plasmonic devices through DNA metallisation.

  1. One-step large-scale deposition of salt-free DNA origami nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J. Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami nanostructures have tremendous potential to serve as versatile platforms in self-assembly -based nanofabrication and in highly parallel nanoscale patterning. However, uniform deposition and reliable anchoring of DNA nanostructures often requires specific conditions, such as pre-treatment of the chosen substrate or a fine-tuned salt concentration for the deposition buffer. In addition, currently available deposition techniques are suitable merely for small scales. In this article, we exploit a spray-coating technique in order to resolve the aforementioned issues in the deposition of different 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures. We show that purified DNA origamis can be controllably deposited on silicon and glass substrates by the proposed method. The results are verified using either atomic force microscopy or fluorescence microscopy depending on the shape of the DNA origami. DNA origamis are successfully deposited onto untreated substrates with surface coverage of about 4 objects/mm2. Further, the DNA nanostructures maintain their shape even if the salt residues are removed from the DNA origami fabrication buffer after the folding procedure. We believe that the presented one-step spray-coating method will find use in various fields of material sciences, especially in the development of DNA biochips and in the fabrication of metamaterials and plasmonic devices through DNA metallisation. PMID:26492833

  2. Direct Extraction and Amplification of DNA from Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevors, Jack T.; Leung, K.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise that describes the direct extraction and purification of DNA from a small soil sample. Also discusses the subsequent amplification of a 343-bp Tn7 transposate A gene fragment (tnsA) from a strain of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 3732RNL11. Contains 21 references. (DDR)

  3. DNA extraction and barcode identification of development stages of forensically important flies in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Olekšáková, Tereza; Žurovcová, Martina; Klimešová, Vanda; Barták, Miroslav; Šuláková, Hana

    2017-03-21

    Several methods of DNA extraction, coupled with 'DNA barcoding' species identification, were compared using specimens from early developmental stages of forensically important flies from the Calliphoridae and Sarcophagidae families. DNA was extracted at three immature stages - eggs, the first instar larvae, and empty pupal cases (puparia) - using four different extraction methods, namely, one simple 'homemade' extraction buffer protocol and three commercial kits. The extraction conditions, including the amount of proteinase K and incubation times, were optimized. The simple extraction buffer method was successful for half of the eggs and for the first instar larval samples. The DNA Lego Kit and DEP-25 DNA Extraction Kit were useful for DNA extractions from the first instar larvae samples, and the DNA Lego Kit was also successful regarding the extraction from eggs. The QIAamp DNA mini kit was the most effective; the extraction was successful with regard to all sample types - eggs, larvae, and pupari.

  4. Homologous recombination intermediates between two duplex DNA catalysed by human cell extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, B; Rousset, S; Coppey, J

    1987-01-01

    Using as substrates, 1: the replicative form (RF) of phage M13 mp8 in which the reading frame of the lac Z' gene was disrupted by insertion of an octonucleotide, and 2: a restriction fragment one kb long, containing the functional lac Z' gene (isolated from wild type M13 mp8), we show that nuclear extracts from human cells (3 lines tested) promote the targeted replacement of the altered sequence by the functional one. Following incubation with the extracts, the DNA's were introduced in JM 109 bacteria (rec A- and lac Z'-) which were grown in presence of a colorimetric indicator of beta-galactosidase activity. Homologous recombination gives rise to the genotypical modification: lac Z'+ instead of lac Z'- in the bacteriophage DNA. This is revealed by phenotypical expression of the lac Z' gene product in replicating bacteriophage, i.e. the formation of blue instead of white plaques. The frequency of recombination (blue/total plaques) is increased by a factor of 50-80 as a function of protein concentration and of incubation time. The maximal frequency observed is 5 X 10(-5). There is no increase over the background when extracts are boiled. Electrophoresis and electron microscopy of DNA's incubated with the extracts show the formation of recombination intermediates with single strand exchange. Restriction analysis of recombined DNA confirms that the process corresponds to targeted sequence exchange. These data allow to propose three steps for homologous recombination between two duplex DNA's: i) unpairing of the two duplexes; ii) single-strand exchange and synaptic pairing; iii) resolution of the cross-junctions. The three steps correspond to those predicted by the gene conversion model of Holliday. Images PMID:3302944

  5. Forensic DNA-typing of dog hair: DNA-extraction and PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, I; Völkel, I; Täubert, H; Brenig, B

    2004-05-10

    The forensic application of DNA-typing for the identification of dog hair provides objective evidence in the characterisation of traces found at crime scenes. During the past few years forensic dog identity testing has been improved considerably using multiplex PCR systems. However, DNA-typing from samples of one up to 10 dog hairs is often problematic in forensic science. A single dog hair contains very small quantities of DNA or the hair sample consists of hairs with roots of bad quality or even of broken hairshafts without roots. Here we describe an experimental study about dog hairs by means of a Ca(2+) improved DNA-extraction method, quantification and amplification.

  6. Comparison of DNA extraction methods for meat analysis.

    PubMed

    Yalçınkaya, Burhanettin; Yumbul, Eylem; Mozioğlu, Erkan; Akgoz, Muslum

    2017-04-15

    Preventing adulteration of meat and meat products with less desirable or objectionable meat species is important not only for economical, religious and health reasons, but also, it is important for fair trade practices, therefore, several methods for identification of meat and meat products have been developed. In the present study, ten different DNA extraction methods, including Tris-EDTA Method, a modified Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide (CTAB) Method, Alkaline Method, Urea Method, Salt Method, Guanidinium Isothiocyanate (GuSCN) Method, Wizard Method, Qiagen Method, Zymogen Method and Genespin Method were examined to determine their relative effectiveness for extracting DNA from meat samples. The results show that the salt method is easy to perform, inexpensive and environmentally friendly. Additionally, it has the highest yield among all the isolation methods tested. We suggest this method as an alternative method for DNA isolation from meat and meat products.

  7. Comparisons of Three Automated Systems for Genomic DNA Extraction in a Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Han; Park, Yongjung; Choi, Jong Rak; Lee, Eun Kyung

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The extraction of nucleic acid is initially a limiting step for successful molecular-based diagnostic workup. This study aims to compare the effectiveness of three automated DNA extraction systems for clinical laboratory use. Materials and Methods Venous blood samples from 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed using QIAamp® Blood Mini Kit (Qiagen), MagNA Pure LC Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit I (Roche), and Magtration-Magnazorb DNA common kit-200N (PSS). The concentration of extracted DNAs was measured by NanoDrop ND-1000 (PeqLab). Also, extracted DNAs were confirmed by applying in direct agarose gel electrophoresis and were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for human beta-globin gene. Results The corrected concentrations of extracted DNAs were 25.42 ± 8.82 ng/µL (13.49-52.85 ng/µL) by QIAamp® Blood Mini Kit (Qiagen), and 22.65 ± 14.49 ng/µL (19.18-93.39 ng/µL) by MagNA Pure LC Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit I, and 22.35 ± 6.47 ng/µL (12.57-35.08 ng/µL) by Magtration-Magnazorb DNA common kit-200N (PSS). No statistically significant difference was noticed among the three commercial kits (p > 0.05). Only the mean value of DNA purity through PSS was slightly lower than others. All the extracted DNAs were successfully identified in direct agarose gel electrophoresis. And all the product of beta-globin gene PCR showed a reproducible pattern of bands. Conclusion The effectiveness of the three automated extraction systems is of an equivalent level and good enough to produce reasonable results. Each laboratory could select the automated system according to its clinical and laboratory conditions. PMID:20046522

  8. Development of microfluidic modules for DNA purification via phenol extraction and analyte concentration using transverse electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Mercedes C.

    bounding walls. The miniaturization of DNA phenol extraction and the novel electrokinetic trapping techniques presented in this research are the initial steps towards an efficient DNA sample preparation chip which could be integrated with post-extraction DNA manipulations for genomic analysis modules such as capillary electrophoretic separations.

  9. A single-step method for rapid extraction of total lipids from green microalgae.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Martin; Gentili, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae produce a wide range of lipid compounds of potential commercial interest. Total lipid extraction performed by conventional extraction methods, relying on the chloroform-methanol solvent system are too laborious and time consuming for screening large numbers of samples. In this study, three previous extraction methods devised by Folch et al. (1957), Bligh and Dyer (1959) and Selstam and Öquist (1985) were compared and a faster single-step procedure was developed for extraction of total lipids from green microalgae. In the single-step procedure, 8 ml of a 2∶1 chloroform-methanol (v/v) mixture was added to fresh or frozen microalgal paste or pulverized dry algal biomass contained in a glass centrifuge tube. The biomass was manually suspended by vigorously shaking the tube for a few seconds and 2 ml of a 0.73% NaCl water solution was added. Phase separation was facilitated by 2 min of centrifugation at 350 g and the lower phase was recovered for analysis. An uncharacterized microalgal polyculture and the green microalgae Scenedesmus dimorphus, Selenastrum minutum, and Chlorella protothecoides were subjected to the different extraction methods and various techniques of biomass homogenization. The less labour intensive single-step procedure presented here allowed simultaneous recovery of total lipid extracts from multiple samples of green microalgae with quantitative yields and fatty acid profiles comparable to those of the previous methods. While the single-step procedure is highly correlated in lipid extractability (r² = 0.985) to the previous method of Folch et al. (1957), it allowed at least five times higher sample throughput.

  10. The fate of the chemical warfare agent during DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Della A; Hulst, Albert G; de Reuver, Leo P J; van Krimpen, Simon H; van Baar, Ben M L

    2007-11-01

    Forensic laboratories do not have the infrastructure to process or store contaminated DNA samples that have been recovered from a crime scene contaminated with chemical or biological warfare agents. Previous research has shown that DNA profiles can be recovered from blood exposed to several chemical warfare agents after the agent has been removed. The fate of four toxic agents, sulfur mustard, sodium 2-fluoroacetate, sarin, and diazinon, in a lysis buffer used in Promega DNA IQ extraction protocol was studied to determine if extraction would render the samples safe. Two independent analytical methods were used per agent, selected from GC-MS, 1H NMR, 19F NMR, (31)P NMR, or LC-ES MS. The methods were validated before use. Determinations were carried out in a semi-quantitative way, by direct comparison to standards. Agent levels in the elution buffer were found to be below the detectable limits for mustard, sarin, sodium 2-fluoroacetate or low (<0.02 mg/mL) for diazinon. Therefore, once extracted these DNA samples could be safely processed in a forensic laboratory.

  11. DNA micropatterning on polycrystalline diamond via one-step direct amination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Jun; Song, Kwang-Soup; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ueno, Taro; Funatsu, Takashi; Ohdomari, Iwao; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2006-04-11

    We report a novel method of one-step direct amination on polycrystalline diamond to produce functionalized surfaces for DNA micropatterning by photolithography. Polycrystalline diamond was exposed to UV irradiation in ammonia gas to generate amine groups directly. After patterning, optical microscopy confirmed that micropatterns covered with an Au mask were regular in size and shape. The regions outside the micropatterns were passivated with fluorine termination by C3F8 plasma, and the chemical changes on the two different surfaces--the amine groups inside the patterned regions by one-step direct amination and fluorine termination outside the patterned regions--were characterized by spatially resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The patterned areas terminated with active amine groups were then immobilized with probe DNA via a bifunctional molecule. The sequence specificity was conducted by hybridizing fluorescently labeled target DNA to both complementary and noncomplementary probe DNA attached inside the micropatterns. The fluorescence micropatterns observed by epifluorescence microscopy corresponded to those imaged by optical microscopy. DNA hybridization and denaturation experiments on a DNA-modified diamond show that the diamond surfaces reveal superior stability. The influence of a different amination time on fluorescence intensity was compared. Different terminations as passivated layers were investigated, and as a result, fluorine termination points to the greatest signal-to-noise ratio.

  12. DNA extraction from protozoan oocysts/cysts in feces for diagnostic PCR.

    PubMed

    Hawash, Yousry

    2014-06-01

    PCR detection of intestinal protozoa is often restrained by a poor DNA recovery or by inhibitors present in feces. The need for an extraction protocol that can overcome these obstacles is therefore clear. QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) was evaluated for its ability to recover DNA from oocysts/cysts directly from feces. Twenty-five Giardia-positive, 15 Cryptosporidium-positive, 15 Entamoeba histolytica-positive, and 45 protozoa-free samples were processed as control by microscopy and immunoassay tests. DNA extracts were amplified using 3 sets of published primers. Following the manufacturer's protocol, the kit showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% towards Giardia and Entamoeba. However, for Cryptosporidium, the sensitivity and specificity were 60% (9/15) and 100%, respectively. A series of optimization experiments involving various steps of the kit's protocol were conducted using Cryptosporidium-positive samples. The best DNA recoveries were gained by raising the lysis temperature to the boiling point for 10 min and the incubation time of the InhibitEX tablet to 5 min. Also, using a pre-cooled ethanol for nucleic acid precipitation and small elution volume (50-100 µl) were valuable. The sensitivity of the amended protocol to Cryptosporidium was raised to 100%. Cryptosporidium DNA was successfully amplified by either the first or the second primer set. When applied on parasite-free feces spiked with variable oocysts/cysts counts, ≈ 2 oocysts/cysts were theoretically enough for detection by PCR. To conclude, the Qiagen kit with the amended protocol was proved to be suitable for protozoan DNA extraction directly from feces and support PCR diagnosis.

  13. Study of microtip-based extraction and purification of DNA from human samples for portable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotouhi, Gareth

    recovery of DNA to 45% efficiency. Furthermore, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips recover more DNA than gold-coated microtips when the surface is washed. Heat-cured (225°C) PEI-coated microtips are used for the recovery of human genomic DNA from whole blood. A washing protocol is developed to remove inhibiting particles bound to the PEI-coated microtip surface after DNA extraction. From 1.25 muL of whole blood, an average of 1.83 ng of human genomic DNA is captured, purified, and released using a 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtip in less than 30 minutes. The extracted DNA is profiled by short tandem repeat analysis (STR). For forensic and medical applications, genomic DNA is extracted from dried samples using heat-cured PEI-coated microtips that are integrated into an automated device. DNA extraction from dried samples is critical for forensics. The use of dried samples in the medical field is increasing because dried samples are convenient for storage, biosafety, and contamination. The main challenge is the time required to properly extract DNA in a purified form. Typically, a 1 hour incubation period is required to complete this process. Overnight incubation is sometimes necessary. To address this challenge, a pre-extraction washing step is investigated to remove inhibiting particles from dried blood spots (DBS) before DNA is released from dried form into solution for microtip extraction. The developed protocol is expanded to extract DNA from a variety of dried samples including nasal swabs, buccal swabs, and other forensic samples. In comparison to a commercial kit, the microtip-based extraction reduced the processing time from 1.5 hours to 30 minutes or less with an equivalent concentration of extracted DNA from dried blood spots. The developed assay will benefit genetic studies on newborn screening, forensic investigation, and POC diagnostics.

  14. Mechano-chemical kinetics of DNA replication: identification of the translocation step of a replicative DNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Morin, José A.; Cao, Francisco J.; Lázaro, José M.; Arias-Gonzalez, J. Ricardo; Valpuesta, José M.; Carrascosa, José L.; Salas, Margarita; Ibarra, Borja

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication replicative polymerases move in discrete mechanical steps along the DNA template. To address how the chemical cycle is coupled to mechanical motion of the enzyme, here we use optical tweezers to study the translocation mechanism of individual bacteriophage Phi29 DNA polymerases during processive DNA replication. We determine the main kinetic parameters of the nucleotide incorporation cycle and their dependence on external load and nucleotide (dNTP) concentration. The data is inconsistent with power stroke models for translocation, instead supports a loose-coupling mechanism between chemical catalysis and mechanical translocation during DNA replication. According to this mechanism the DNA polymerase works by alternating between a dNTP/PPi-free state, which diffuses thermally between pre- and post-translocated states, and a dNTP/PPi-bound state where dNTP binding stabilizes the post-translocated state. We show how this thermal ratchet mechanism is used by the polymerase to generate work against large opposing loads (∼50 pN). PMID:25800740

  15. The Mechanism of the Translocation Step in DNA Replication by DNA Polymerase I: A Computer Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Golosov, Andrei A.; Warren, Joshua J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Karplus, Martin

    2010-11-03

    High-fidelity DNA polymerases copy DNA rapidly and accurately by adding correct deoxynucleotide triphosphates to a growing primer strand of DNA. Following nucleotide incorporation, a series of conformational changes translocate the DNA substrate by one base pair step, readying the polymerase for the next round of incorporation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the translocation consists globally of a polymerase fingers-opening transition, followed by the DNA displacement and the insertion of the template base into the preinsertion site. They also show that the pyrophosphate release facilitates the opening transition and that the universally conserved Y714 plays a key role in coupling polymerase opening to DNA translocation. The transition involves several metastable intermediates in one of which the O helix is bent in the vicinity of G711. Completion of the translocation appears to require a gating motion of the O1 helix, perhaps facilitated by the presence of G715. These roles are consistent with the high level of conservation of Y714 and the two glycine residues at these positions. It is likely that a corresponding mechanism is applicable to other polymerases.

  16. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, Michael J; Hiett, Kelli L; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M; Caporaso, J Gregory

    2014-12-10

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the "gold standard" enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples.

  17. A Hybrid DNA Extraction Method for the Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Bacterial Communities from Poultry Production Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rothrock, Michael J.; Hiett, Kelli L.; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C.; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M.; Caporaso, J. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the “gold standard” enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples. PMID:25548939

  18. A rapid and hazardous reagent free protocol for genomic DNA extraction suitable for genetic studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Kotchoni, Simeon O; Gachomo, Emma W

    2009-07-01

    Protocols for genomic DNA extraction from plants are generally lengthy, since they require that tissues be ground in liquid nitrogen, followed by a precipitation step, washing and drying of the DNA pellet, etc. This represents a major challenge especially when several hundred samples must be screened/analyzed within a working day. There is therefore a need for a rapid and simple procedure, which will produce DNA quality suitable for various analyses. Here, we describe a time and cost efficient protocol for genomic DNA isolation from plants suitable for all routine genetic screening/analyses. The protocol is free from hazardous reagents and therefore safe to be executed by non-specialists. With this protocol more than 100 genomic DNA samples could manually be extracted within a working day, making it a promising alternative in genetic studies of large-scale genomic screening projects.

  19. DNA Everywhere. A Guide for Simplified Environmental Genomic DNA Extraction Suitable for Use in Remote Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielle N. Pecora; Francine C. Reid; Lauren M. Tom; Yvette M. Piceno; Gary L. Andersen

    2016-05-01

    Collecting field samples from remote or geographically distant areas can be a financially and logistically challenging. With participation of a local organization where the samples are originated from, gDNA samples can be extracted from the field and shipped to a research institution for further processing and analysis. The ability to set up gDNA extraction capabilities in the field can drastically reduce cost and time when running long-term microbial studies with a large sample set. The method outlined here has developed a compact and affordable method for setting up a “laboratory” and extracting and shipping gDNA samples from anywhere in the world. This white paper explains the process of setting up the “laboratory”, choosing and training individuals with no prior scientific experience how to perform gDNA extractions and safe methods for shipping extracts to any research institution. All methods have been validated by the Andersen group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using the Berkeley Lab PhyloChip.

  20. Nondestructive DNA extraction method for mitochondrial DNA analyses of museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Rohland, Nadin; Siedel, Heike; Hofreiter, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Museum specimens have provided the material for a large proportion of ancient DNA studies conducted during the last 20 years. However, a major drawback of the genetic analyses is that the specimens investigated are usually damaged, as parts of skin, bone, or a tooth have to be removed for DNA extraction. To get around these limitations, we have developed a nondestructive extraction method for bone, tooth, and skin samples. We found that it is possible to amplify mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences up to at least 414 bp long from samples up to 164 years old. Using this method, almost 90% (35 of 40) of the investigated samples yielded amplifiable mtDNA. Moreover, we found that repeated extractions of the same samples allowed amplifications of the expected length for all samples at least three times and for some samples up to at least five times. Thus this method opens up the possibility to repeatedly use museum collections for mtDNA analyses without damaging the specimens and thus without reducing the value of irreplaceable collections for morphological analyses.

  1. Modification of extraction method for community DNA isolation from salt affected compact wasteland soil samples.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Purvi; Patel, Rushika; Patel, Meghavi; Sarodia, Devki; Munshi, Nasreen S

    2017-01-01

    To overcome the issue of interferences by salt and compactness in release of bacterial cell required for lysis, method described by Yeates et al. (1998), was optimized for isolation of genomic material (Deoxyribo Nucleic Acid, DNA) from soil microbial community by addition of Al(NH4)SO4. Very low total viable count was observed in the samples tested and hence use of higher amount of soil is required primarily for DNA isolation from wasteland soils. The method proves itself efficient where commercially available bead beating and enzymatic lysis methods could not give isolation of any amount of community genomic DNA due to compact nature and salt concentrations present in soil. •The protocol was found efficient for soil samples with high clay content for microbial community DNA extraction.•Variation in lysis incubation and amount of soil may help with soil samples containing low microbial population.•Addition of Al(NH4)SO4 is crucial step in humic acid removal from extracted DNA samples for soil samples containing high salinity and clay particles.

  2. A simplified genomic DNA extraction protocol for pre-germination genotyping in rice.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y B; Zhao, F L; Chen, H D; Li, H; Ni, D H; Wei, P C; Sheng, W; Teng, J T; Zhang, A M; Xue, J P

    2015-06-11

    Genotyping is a critical step for molecular marker-assisted selection in rice. Rice genomic DNA samples for genotyping are typically isolated from living tissues such as seedlings. This requires the germination of all candidate seeds and extraction of DNA from the seedlings. Currently, an ideal individual is selected from a very large number of plants, which is time- and labor-consuming, requiring several transplantations of materials and sampling processes. In this study, we developed a simplified genomic DNA extraction protocol in rice by using amylase to treat half-seeds. The yields of genomic DNA from a half-seed of Indica and Japonica rice were greater than 203.8 ± 32.5 and 143.2 ± 25.5 ng, respectively, and the 260/280 nm absorbance ratio was 1.75-2.10. The DNA was confirmed to be sufficient for polymerase chain reaction amplification and can be used in a marker-assisted selection program.

  3. Isolation of plant DNA for PCR and genotyping using organic extraction and CTAB.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nathan M

    2010-11-01

    A general difficulty in isolation of DNA from plant cells is the presence of a cell wall. It is necessary to degrade plant cell walls, either physically or enzymatically, in order to effectively isolate plant DNA. Additionally, some tissues (such as endosperm) or some species contain high levels of starches or phenolic compounds that can complicate DNA isolation. A number of plant DNA isolation protocols are designed to overcome species-specific difficulties. This is a relatively simple protocol that uses an extraction buffer containing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB); it can be used for many plant species. It provides a substantial amount of high-quality DNA that is suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures and is stable for long periods of time. The cost per sample is very low. In addition, this protocol is relatively robust and can be performed by individuals who have had relatively little training. A typical undergraduate student can perform ~200-300 isolations in a day using this protocol. The disadvantages are that it requires a freeze-dryer and a mill or paint-shaker-like device and that it utilizes an organic extraction step, requiring the use of a fume hood.

  4. Direct extraction of genomic DNA from maize with aqueous ionic liquid buffer systems for applications in genetically modified organisms analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez García, Eric; Ressmann, Anna K; Gaertner, Peter; Zirbs, Ronald; Mach, Robert L; Krska, Rudolf; Bica, Katharina; Brunner, Kurt

    2014-12-01

    To date, the extraction of genomic DNA is considered a bottleneck in the process of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. Conventional DNA isolation methods are associated with long extraction times and multiple pipetting and centrifugation steps, which makes the entire procedure not only tedious and complicated but also prone to sample cross-contamination. In recent times, ionic liquids have emerged as innovative solvents for biomass processing, due to their outstanding properties for dissolution of biomass and biopolymers. In this study, a novel, easily applicable, and time-efficient method for the direct extraction of genomic DNA from biomass based on aqueous-ionic liquid solutions was developed. The straightforward protocol relies on extraction of maize in a 10 % solution of ionic liquids in aqueous phosphate buffer for 5 min at room temperature, followed by a denaturation step at 95 °C for 10 min and a simple filtration to remove residual biopolymers. A set of 22 ionic liquids was tested in a buffer system and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate, as well as the environmentally benign choline formate, were identified as ideal candidates. With this strategy, the quality of the genomic DNA extracted was significantly improved and the extraction protocol was notably simplified compared with a well-established method.

  5. Comparison of eight methods of genomic DNA extraction from babassu.

    PubMed

    Viana, J P G; Borges, A N C; Lopes, A C A; Gomes, R L F; Britto, F B; Lima, P S C; Valente, S E S

    2015-12-22

    Babassu (Orbignya phalerata Martius) is one of the most important palms in Brazil because of the largest morphological variation, wide geographic distribution, and high socio-economic importance. The diversity present in babassu germplasm should be protected against loss to ensure their use with high productivity. Study of the available variability in populations of babassu is necessary to develop conservation strategies. The study of genetic variability can be conducted using molecular markers and many of these studies require significant quantity of high-quality DNA. The present study aimed to effect comparison among eight DNA extraction methods in case of O. phalerata. The quality and concentration of nucleic acids were analyzed by spectrophotometry and integrity of DNA was ascertained by agarose gel electrophoresis. The spectrophotometry revealed that some methods resulted in high levels of concentration of nucleic acids, in which values of the ratio A260/280 and A260/230 were outside the range of purity. The agarose gel electrophoresis established the concentration and integrity of DNA. The methods of Murray and Thompson (1980) and Ferreira and Grattapaglia (1998) did not result in satisfactory quantities of DNA. Conversely, the method proposed by Khanuja et al. (1999) resulted in DNA of adequate quality and quantity that could be satisfactorily used for amplification reactions performed with two ISSR primers.

  6. Using a commercial DNA extraction kit to obtain RNA for RT-PCR from starchy rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Belefant-Miller, Helen; Ledbetter, Cindy; Bennett, Selester

    2008-03-01

    The extraction of RNA from a starchy plant material, such as many common food grains, is difficult, and especially so from the mature endosperm of rice. Most commercial RNA kits are not suitable for starchy materials. Traditional RNA extraction procedures, in addition to being laborious and time consuming, leave hazardous organic wastes that result in expensive disposal costs. Interestingly, the numerous commercial DNA isolation kits now available often include directions for eliminating co-isolated RNA. This indicated an approach to obtain the generally unwanted RNA by-product by treating the total extraction product to intentionally retain RNA. A method was developed by which a two-step DNase procedure was applied to the product of the Cartagen Food DNA extraction kit that eliminated the DNA but left the co-extracted RNA. This modified procedure was compared with several other commercial and standard methods that are promoted as being able to work under high polysaccharide conditions. Successful extraction was determined by the production and amplification of cDNA by RT-PCR of actin. Extraction was successful from milled rice, as well as from cornmeal and wheat flour. The modification provides an RNA extraction method that is quick, easy, and inexpensive, and also eliminates the production of hazardous wastes.

  7. Evaluating genomic DNA extraction methods from human whole blood using endpoint and real-time PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Linda; Anju, A L; Harikrishnan, S; Kutty, V R; Jissa, V T; Kurikesu, Irin; Jayachandran, Parvathy; Jayakumaran Nair, A; Gangaprasad, A; Nair, G M; Sudhakaran, P R

    2017-02-01

    The extraction of genomic DNA is the crucial first step in large-scale epidemiological studies. Though there are many popular DNA isolation methods from human whole blood, only a few reports have compared their efficiencies using both end-point and real-time PCR assays. Genomic DNA was extracted from coronary artery disease patients using solution-based conventional protocols such as the phenol-chloroform/proteinase-K method and a non-phenolic non-enzymatic Rapid-Method, which were evaluated and compared vis-a-vis a commercially available silica column-based Blood DNA isolation kit. The appropriate method for efficiently extracting relatively pure DNA was assessed based on the total DNA yield, concentration, purity ratios (A260/A280 and A260/A230), spectral profile and agarose gel electrophoresis analysis. The quality of the isolated DNA was further analysed for PCR inhibition using a murine specific ATP1A3 qPCR assay and mtDNA/Y-chromosome ratio determination assay. The suitability of the extracted DNA for downstream applications such as end-point SNP genotyping, was tested using PCR-RFLP analysis of the AGTR1-1166A>C variant, a mirSNP having pharmacogenetic relevance in cardiovascular diseases. Compared to the traditional phenol-chloroform/proteinase-K method, our results indicated the Rapid-Method to be a more suitable protocol for genomic DNA extraction from human whole blood in terms of DNA quantity, quality, safety, processing time and cost. The Rapid-Method, which is based on a simple salting-out procedure, is not only safe and cost-effective, but also has the added advantage of being scaled up to process variable sample volumes, thus enabling it to be applied in large-scale epidemiological studies.

  8. Ancient DNA: extraction, characterization, molecular cloning, and enzymatic amplification.

    PubMed

    Pääbo, S

    1989-03-01

    Several chemical and enzymatic properties were examined in the DNA extracted from dry remains of soft tissues that vary in age from 4 to 13,000 years and represent four species, including two extinct animals (the marsupial wolf and giant ground sloth). The DNA obtained was invariably of a low average molecular size and damaged by oxidative processes, which primarily manifest themselves as modifications of pyrimidines and sugar residues as well as baseless sites and intermolecular cross-links. This renders molecular cloning difficult. However, the polymerase chain reaction can be used to amplify and study short mitochondrial DNA sequences that are of anthropological and evolutionary significance. This opens up the prospect of performing diachronical studies of molecular evolutionary genetics.

  9. Evaluation of automated and manual commercial DNA extraction methods for recovery of Brucella DNA from suspensions and spiked swabs.

    PubMed

    Dauphin, Leslie A; Hutchins, Rebecca J; Bost, Liberty A; Bowen, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    This study evaluated automated and manual commercial DNA extraction methods for their ability to recover DNA from Brucella species in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) suspension and from spiked swab specimens. Six extraction methods, representing several of the methodologies which are commercially available for DNA extraction, as well as representing various throughput capacities, were evaluated: the MagNA Pure Compact and the MagNA Pure LC instruments, the IT 1-2-3 DNA sample purification kit, the MasterPure Complete DNA and RNA purification kit, the QIAamp DNA blood mini kit, and the UltraClean microbial DNA isolation kit. These six extraction methods were performed upon three pathogenic Brucella species: B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. Viability testing of the DNA extracts indicated that all six extraction methods were efficient at inactivating virulent Brucella spp. Real-time PCR analysis using Brucella genus- and species-specific TaqMan assays revealed that use of the MasterPure kit resulted in superior levels of detection from bacterial suspensions, while the MasterPure kit and MagNA Pure Compact performed equally well for extraction of spiked swab samples. This study demonstrated that DNA extraction methodologies differ in their ability to recover Brucella DNA from PBS bacterial suspensions and from swab specimens and, thus, that the extraction method used for a given type of sample matrix can influence the sensitivity of real-time PCR assays for Brucella.

  10. A knowledge-based, two-step procedure for extracting channel networks from noisy dem data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Terence R.; Zhan, Cixiang; Gao, Peng

    We present a new procedure for extracting channel networks from noisy DEM data. The procedure is a knowledge-based, two-step procedure employing both local and nonlocal information. In particular, we employ a model of an ideal drainage network as a source of constraints that must be satisfied by the output of the procedure. We embed these constraints as part of the network extraction procedure. In a first step, the procedure employs the facet model of Haralick to extract valley information from digital images. The constraints employed at this stage relate to conditions indicating reliable valley pixels. In a second step, the procedure applies knowledge of drainage networks to integrate reliable valley points discovered into a network of single-pixel width lines. This network satisfies the constraints imposed by viewing a drainage network as a binary tree in which the channel segments have a one-pixel width. The procedure performs well on DEM data in the example investigated. The overall worst-case performance of the procedure is O( N) log N), but the most computationally intensive step in the procedure is parallelized easily. Hence the procedure is a good candidate for automation.

  11. Optimization of DNA Extractions from Iron-rich Microbial Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, H.; Hilton, T. S.; Moyer, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is potentially one of the most abundant energy sources on the earth as an electron donor for chemolithoautotrophicgrowth coupled to Fe(II) oxidation. Many microbes have adapted to this energy source. One such bacterial class are the Zetaproteobacteria, which dominate Iron-rich microbial mats at Loihi seamount. Although cell counts are very high (up to 5.3x108 cells/ml), efficient DNA yields are low in comparison. In this study we compared extraction efficiency across different methods and with the addition of various buffers. Regardless of protocol (i.e., kit), the addition of sodium citrate drastically increased the DNA yield. The addition of sodium citrate did not alter community structure as determined by T-RFLP and qPCR. Citrate is a well-known ferric iron chelator and will bind ferrous as well. The chelated iron is then unable to participate in the Fenton reaction and this stops the generation of hydroxyl radicals which in turn can react and degrade the extracted DNA. We have utilized this relationship to allow us to obtain nearly an order of magnitude more microbial community DNA per sample, which should also have implications when processing low biomass samples, e.g., from the deep subsurface.

  12. Assessing the Utility of Soil DNA Extraction Kits for Increasing DNA Yields and Eliminating PCR Inhibitors from Buried Skeletal Remains.

    PubMed

    Hebda, Lisa M; Foran, David R

    2015-09-01

    DNA identification of human remains is often necessary when decedents are skeletonized; however, poor DNA recovery and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibition are frequently encountered, a situation exacerbated by burial. In this research, the utility of integrating soil DNA isolation kits into buried skeletal DNA analysis was evaluated and compared to a standard human DNA extraction kit and organic extraction. The soil kits successfully extracted skeletal DNA at quantities similar to standard methods, although the two kits tested, which differ mechanistically, were not equivalent. Further, the PCR inhibitors calcium and humic acid were effectively removed using the soil kits, whereas collagen was less so. Finally, concordant control region sequences were obtained from human skeletal remains using all four methods. Based on these comparisons, soil DNA isolation kits, which quickened the extraction process, proved to be a viable extraction technique for skeletal remains that resulted in positive identification of a decedent.

  13. Validation of a PicoGreen-based DNA quantification integrated in an RNA extraction method for two-dimensional and three-dimensional cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yantian; Sonnaert, Maarten; Roberts, Scott J; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan

    2012-06-01

    DNA measurement and RNA extraction are two frequently used methods for cell characterization. In the conventional protocols, they require similar, but separate samples and in most cases, different pretreatments. The few combined protocols that exist still include time-consuming steps. Hence, to establish an efficient combined RNA extraction and DNA measurement protocol for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures, a PicoGreen-based DNA measurement was integrated in an existing RNA extraction protocol. It was validated by analysis of the influence of different lysis buffers, RLT, RA1, or Trizol, used for RNA extraction on the measured DNA concentration. The DNA cell yield was evaluated both in cell suspensions (2D) and on 3D cell-seeded scaffolds. Results showed that the different RNA lysis buffers caused a concentration-dependent perturbation of the PicoGreen signal. The measured DNA concentrations in 2D and 3D using RLT and RA1 buffer were comparable, also to the positive control. We, therefore, concluded that RNA extraction protocols using RA1 or RLT buffer allow the integration of a DNA quantification step without the buffer influencing the results. Hence, the combined DNA measurement and RNA extraction offer an alternative for DNA measurement techniques that is time and sample saving, for both 2D cell cultures and specific 3D constructs.

  14. Evaluation of Methods to Improve the Extraction and Recovery of DNA from Cotton Swabs for Forensic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adamowicz, Michael S.; Stasulli, Dominique M.; Sobestanovich, Emily M.; Bille, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Samples for forensic DNA analysis are often collected from a wide variety of objects using cotton or nylon tipped swabs. Testing has shown that significant quantities of DNA are retained on the swab, however, and subsequently lost. When processing evidentiary samples, the recovery of the maximum amount of available DNA is critical, potentially dictating whether a usable profile can be derived from a piece of evidence or not. The QIAamp DNA Investigator extraction kit was used with its recommended protocol for swabs (one hour incubation at 56°C) as a baseline. Results indicate that over 50% of the recoverable DNA may be retained on the cotton swab tip, or otherwise lost, for both blood and buccal cell samples when using this protocol. The protocol’s incubation time and temperature were altered, as was incubating while shaking or stationary to test for increases in recovery efficiency. An additional step was then tested that included periodic re-suspension of the swab tip in the extraction buffer during incubation. Aliquots of liquid blood or a buccal cell suspension were deposited and dried on cotton swabs and compared with swab-less controls. The concentration of DNA in each extract was quantified and STR analysis was performed to assess the quality of the extracted DNA. Stationary incubations and those performed at 65°C did not result in significant gains in DNA yield. Samples incubated for 24 hours yielded less DNA. Increased yields were observed with three and 18 hour incubation periods. Increases in DNA yields were also observed using a swab re-suspension method for both cell types. The swab re-suspension method yielded an average two-fold increase in recovered DNA yield with buccal cells and an average three-fold increase with blood cells. These findings demonstrate that more of the DNA collected on swabs can be recovered with specific protocol alterations. PMID:25549111

  15. Evaluation of methods to improve the extraction and recovery of DNA from cotton swabs for forensic analysis.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Michael S; Stasulli, Dominique M; Sobestanovich, Emily M; Bille, Todd W

    2014-01-01

    Samples for forensic DNA analysis are often collected from a wide variety of objects using cotton or nylon tipped swabs. Testing has shown that significant quantities of DNA are retained on the swab, however, and subsequently lost. When processing evidentiary samples, the recovery of the maximum amount of available DNA is critical, potentially dictating whether a usable profile can be derived from a piece of evidence or not. The QIAamp DNA Investigator extraction kit was used with its recommended protocol for swabs (one hour incubation at 56°C) as a baseline. Results indicate that over 50% of the recoverable DNA may be retained on the cotton swab tip, or otherwise lost, for both blood and buccal cell samples when using this protocol. The protocol's incubation time and temperature were altered, as was incubating while shaking or stationary to test for increases in recovery efficiency. An additional step was then tested that included periodic re-suspension of the swab tip in the extraction buffer during incubation. Aliquots of liquid blood or a buccal cell suspension were deposited and dried on cotton swabs and compared with swab-less controls. The concentration of DNA in each extract was quantified and STR analysis was performed to assess the quality of the extracted DNA. Stationary incubations and those performed at 65°C did not result in significant gains in DNA yield. Samples incubated for 24 hours yielded less DNA. Increased yields were observed with three and 18 hour incubation periods. Increases in DNA yields were also observed using a swab re-suspension method for both cell types. The swab re-suspension method yielded an average two-fold increase in recovered DNA yield with buccal cells and an average three-fold increase with blood cells. These findings demonstrate that more of the DNA collected on swabs can be recovered with specific protocol alterations.

  16. DNA extraction techniques for DNA barcoding of minute gall-inhabiting wasps.

    PubMed

    Dittrich-Schröder, Gudrun; Wingfield, Michael J; Klein, Hildegard; Slippers, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    DNA extraction from minute hymenopterans and their larvae is difficult and challenging because of their small size indicating a low amount of starting material. Hence, 11 DNA extraction methods were compared to determine their efficacy in isolating DNA. Success of each method was scored on a 2% agarose gel after PCR of the cox 1 mitochondrial locus. A silica-membrane-based approach was the most successful, followed by a method using a combination of incubation buffers and a method using magnetic beads. The method using buffers was the most cost- and time effective. Using this method, larvae from Eucalyptus seed capsule galls could be assigned a role (parasitoid, gall former or inquiline) in the gall-inhabiting complex.

  17. A comparison of DNA extraction protocols from blood spotted on FTA cards for the detection of tick-borne pathogens by Reverse Line Blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hailemariam, Zerihun; Ahmed, Jabbar Sabir; Clausen, Peter-Henning; Nijhof, Ard Menzo

    2017-01-01

    An essential step in the molecular detection of tick-borne pathogens (TBPs) in blood is the extraction of DNA. When cooled storage of blood under field conditions prior to DNA extraction in a dedicated laboratory is not possible, the storage of blood on filter paper forms a promising alternative. We evaluated six DNA extraction methods from blood spotted on FTA Classic(®) cards (FTA cards), to determine the optimal protocol for the subsequent molecular detection of TBPs by PCR and the Reverse Line Blot hybridization assay (RLB). Ten-fold serial dilutions of bovine blood infected with Babesia bovis, Theileria mutans, Anaplasma marginale or Ehrlichia ruminantium were made by dilution with uninfected blood and spotted on FTA cards. Subsequently, DNA was extracted from FTA cards using six different DNA extraction protocols. DNA was also isolated from whole blood dilutions using a commercial kit. PCR/RLB results showed that washing of 3mm discs punched from FTA cards with FTA purification reagent followed by DNA extraction using Chelex(®) resin was the most sensitive procedure. The detection limit could be improved when more discs were used as starting material for the DNA extraction, whereby the use of sixteen 3mm discs proved to be most practical. The presented best practice method for the extraction of DNA from blood spotted on FTA cards will facilitate epidemiological studies on TBPs. It may be particularly useful for field studies where a cold chain is absent.

  18. Evaluation of a new experimental kit for the extraction of DNA from bones and teeth using a non-powder method.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Tetsushi; Ogawa, Yoshinori; Fujii, Koji; Nakahara, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Natsuko; Sekiguchi, Kazumasa; Kasai, Kentaro; Yurino, Noriko; Yokoi, Takahide; Fukuma, Yoshiya; Yamamoto, Kenji; Oki, Takahito; Asamura, Hideki; Fukushima, Hirofumi

    2010-03-01

    An experimental DNA extraction kit (new kit) was recently developed to extract DNA from degraded skeletal remains without the need for powdering the samples. We compared the utility of the new kit with the conventional phenol/chloroform method using real-time quantitative PCR and multiplex STR analysis. The new kit yielded large amounts of DNA from a compact bone fragment compared with the conventional phenol/chloroform method. We were able to extract sufficient DNA for STR analysis from 75% (3 of 4) and 60% (3 of 5) of the un-powdered tooth and bone samples, respectively, using the new kit. We were able to perform mini-STR analysis of the remaining samples using DNA extracted with the new kit. Furthermore, we successfully performed mitochondrial DNA sequencing of every sample. The new kit simplifies the DNA extraction procedure as it does not require powdering samples. Decreasing the number of procedural steps in DNA extraction will be beneficial in controlling DNA contamination in laboratories. Our results suggest that the new kit may be used for the simple, simultaneous extraction of DNA from multiple samples.

  19. Evaluation of four automated protocols for extraction of DNA from FTA cards.

    PubMed

    Stangegaard, Michael; Børsting, Claus; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Poulsen, Lena; Hansen, Anders J; Morling, Niels

    2013-10-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead-based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable, and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. Here, we have compared the yield and quality of DNA extracted from FTA cards using four automated extraction protocols on three different instruments. The extraction processes were repeated up to six times with the same pieces of FTA cards. The sample material on the FTA cards was either blood or buccal cells. With the QIAamp DNA Investigator and QIAsymphony DNA Investigator kits, it was possible to extract DNA from the FTA cards in all six rounds of extractions in sufficient amount and quality to obtain complete short tandem repeat (STR) profiles on a QIAcube and a QIAsymphony SP. With the PrepFiler Express kit, almost all the extractable DNA was extracted in the first two rounds of extractions. Furthermore, we demonstrated that it was possible to successfully extract sufficient DNA for STR profiling from previously processed FTA card pieces that had been stored at 4 °C for up to 1 year. This showed that rare or precious FTA card samples may be saved for future analyses even though some DNA was already extracted from the FTA cards.

  20. An efficient and cost-effective method for DNA extraction from athalassohaline soil using a newly formulated cell extraction buffer.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Avinash; Jain, Kunal; Shah, Amita R; Madamwar, Datta

    2016-06-01

    The present study describes the rapid and efficient indirect lysis method for environmental DNA extraction from athalassohaline soil by newly formulated cell extraction buffer. The available methods are mostly based on direct lysis which leads to DNA shearing and co-extraction of extra cellular DNA that influences the community and functional analysis. Moreover, during extraction of DNA by direct lysis from athalassohaline soil, it was observed that, upon addition of poly ethylene glycol (PEG), isopropanol or absolute ethanol for precipitation of DNA, salt precipitates out and affecting DNA yield significantly. Therefore, indirect lysis method was optimized for extraction of environmental DNA from such soil containing high salts and low microbial biomass (CFU 4.3 × 10(4) per gram soil) using newly formulated cell extraction buffer in combination with low and high speed centrifugation. The cell extraction buffer composition and its concentration were optimized and PEG 8000 (1 %; w/v) and 1 M NaCl gave maximum cell mass for DNA extraction. The cell extraction efficiency was assessed with acridine orange staining of soil samples before and after cell extraction. The efficiency, reproducibility and purity of extracted DNA by newly developed procedure were compared with previously recognized methods and kits having different protocols including indirect lysis. The extracted environmental DNA showed better yield (5.6 ± 0.7 μg g(-1)) along with high purity ratios. The purity of DNA was validated by assessing its usability in various molecular techniques like restriction enzyme digestion, amplification of 16S rRNA gene using PCR and UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis.

  1. One-step purification of metallothionein extracted from two different sources.

    PubMed

    Honda, Rubens T; Araújo, Roziete Mendes; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Val, Adalberto L; Demasi, Marilene

    2005-06-25

    We describe a one-step purification of hepatic metallothionein from the Amazon fish Colossoma macropomum injected with cadmium and from the copper-loaded metallothionein from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, performed by affinity chromatography through metal-chelating columns. Yeast metallothionein was purified from Cu2+-loaded resin and eluted by a continuous EDTA gradient whereas hepatic metallothionein extracted from fishes was purified by Ni2+-loaded resin and eluted by a continuous imidazol gradient. Purified metallothioneins were evaluated by SDS-PAGE and characterized by UV spectra of the apo- and Cd2+-loaded protein. This method allowed high purity and yield as well as rapid one-step extraction of both metal-loaded and apoprotein.

  2. Extracting the stepping dynamics of molecular motors in living cells from trajectories of single particles.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Augusto; Bruno, Luciana; Levi, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motors are responsible of transporting a wide variety of cargos in the cytoplasm. Current efforts are oriented to characterize the biophysical properties of motors in cells with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of these nanomachines in the complex cellular environment. In this study, we present an algorithm designed to extract motor step sizes and dwell times between steps from trajectories of motors or cargoes driven by motors in cells. The algorithm is based on finding patterns in the trajectory compatible with the behavior expected for a motor step, i.e., a region of confined motion followed by a jump in the position to another region of confined motion with similar characteristics to the previous one. We show that this algorithm allows the analysis of 2D trajectories even if they present complex motion patterns such as active transport interspersed with diffusion and does not require the assumption of a given step size or dwell period. The confidence on the step detection can be easily obtained and allows the evaluation of the confidence of the dwell and step size distributions. To illustrate the possible applications of this algorithm, we analyzed trajectories of myosin-V driven organelles in living cells.

  3. Microfluidic chip for stacking, separation and extraction of multiple DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruige; Seah, Y P; Wang, Zhiping

    2016-03-11

    A disposable integrated microfluidic device was developed for rapid sample stacking, separation and extraction of multiple DNA fragments from a relatively large amount of sample. Isotachophoresis hyphenated gel electrophoresis (ITP-GE) was used to pre-concentrate and separate DNA fragments, followed by extraction of pure DNA fragments with electroelution on-chip. DNA fragments of 200bp, 500bp and 1kbp were successfully separated and collected in the extraction chamber within 25min. The extraction efficiency obtained from the chip was 49.9%, 52.1% and 53.7% for 200bp, 500bp and 1kbp DNA fragments, respectively. The extracted DNA fragments exhibited compatibility with downstream enzymatic reactions, for example PCR. The chip was also used to extract DNA fragments with specific size range from sheared genomic DNA and demonstrated similar performance to that using traditional gel cutting method. The whole assay can finish in 32min, 6 times faster than traditional method.

  4. An alternate method for DNA and RNA extraction from clotted blood.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Z; Umi, S H; Mokhtar, S S; Mokhtar, U; Zaiharina, M Z; Aziz, A T A; Hoh, B P

    2013-02-04

    We developed an alternative method to extract DNA and RNA from clotted blood for genomic and molecular investigations. A combination of the TRIzol method and the QIAamp spin column were used to extract RNA from frozen clotted blood. Clotted blood was sonicated and then the QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit was used for DNA extraction. Extracted DNA and RNA were adequate for gene expression analysis and copy number variation (CNV) genotyping, respectively. The purity of the extracted RNA and DNA was in the range of 1.8-2.0, determined by absorbance ratios of A(260):A(280). Good DNA and RNA integrity were confirmed using gel electrophoresis and automated electrophoresis. The extracted DNA was suitable for qPCR and microarrays for CNV genotyping, while the extracted RNA was adequate for gene analysis using RT-qPCR.

  5. Development of a rapid, 96-well alkaline based differential DNA extraction method for sexual assault evidence.

    PubMed

    Hudlow, William R; Buoncristiani, Martin R

    2012-01-01

    We present a rapid alkaline lysis procedure for the extraction of DNA from sexual assault evidence that generates purified sperm fraction extracts that yield STR typing results similar to those obtained from the traditional organic/dithiothreitol differential extraction. Specifically, a sodium hydroxide based differential extraction method has been developed in a single-tube format and further optimized in a 96-well format. The method yields purified extracts from a small sample set (≈ 2-6 swabs) in approximately 2h and from a larger sample set (up to 96 swabs) in approximately 4h. While conventional differential extraction methods require vigorous sample manipulation to remove the spermatozoa from the substrate, the method described here exploits the propensity of sperm to adhere to a substrate and does not require any manipulation of the substrate after it is sampled. For swabs, sample handling is minimized by employing a process where the tip of the swab, including the shaft, is transferred to the appropriate vessel eliminating the need for potentially hazardous scalpels to separate the swab material from the shaft. The absence of multiple handling steps allows the process to be semi-automated, however the procedure as described here does not require use of a robotic system. This method may provide forensic laboratories a cost-effective tool for the eradication of backlogs of sexual assault evidence, and more timely service to their client agencies. In addition, we have demonstrated that a modification of the procedure can be used to retrieve residual sperm-cell DNA from previously extracted swabs.

  6. DNA pairing is an important step in the process of targeted nucleotide exchange.

    PubMed

    Drury, Miya D; Kmiec, Eric B

    2003-02-01

    Modified single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides can direct the repair of genetic mutations in yeast, plant and mammalian cells. The mechanism by which these molecules exert their effect is being elucidated, but the first phase is likely to involve the homologous alignment of the single strand with its complementary sequence in the target gene. In this study, we establish the importance of such DNA pairing in facilitating the gene repair event. Oligonucleotide-directed repair occurs at a low frequency in an Escherichia coli strain (DH10B) lacking the RECA DNA pairing function. Repair activity can be rescued by using purified RecA protein to catalyze the assimilation of oligonucleotide vectors into a plasmid containing a mutant kanamycin resistance gene in vitro. Electroporation of the preformed complex into DH10B cells results in high levels of gene repair activity, evidenced by the appearance of kanamycin-resistant colonies. Gene repair is dependent on the formation of a double-displacement loop (double-D-loop), a recombination intermediate containing two single-stranded oligonucleotides hybridized to opposite strands of the plasmid at the site of the point mutation. The heightened level of stability of the double-D-loop enables it to serve as an active template for the DNA repair events. The data establish DNA pairing and the formation of the double-D-loop as important first steps in the process of gene repair.

  7. Development of a real-world direct interface for integrated DNA extraction and amplification in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Joyce, Domino A; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenway, Gillian M; Greenman, John; Haswell, Stephen J

    2011-02-07

    Integrated DNA extraction and amplification have been carried out in a microfluidic device using electro-osmotic pumping (EOP) for fluidic control. All the necessary reagents for performing both DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification were pre-loaded into the microfluidic device following encapsulation in agarose gel. Buccal cells were collected using OmniSwabs [Whatman™, UK] and manually added to a chaotropic binding/lysis solution pre-loaded into the microfluidic device. The released DNA was then adsorbed onto a silica monolith contained within the DNA extraction chamber and the microfluidic device sealed using polymer electrodes. The washing and elution steps for DNA extraction were carried out using EOP, resulting in transfer of the eluted DNA into the PCR chamber. Thermal cycling, achieved using a Peltier element, resulted in amplification of the Amelogenin locus as confirmed using conventional capillary gel electrophoresis. It was demonstrated that the PCR reagents could be stored in the microfluidic device for at least 8 weeks at 4 °C with no significant loss of activity. Such methodology lends itself to the production of 'ready-to-use' microfluidic devices containing all the necessary reagents for sample processing, with many obvious applications in forensics and clinical medicine.

  8. Comparison of Boiling and Robotics Automation Method in DNA Extraction for Metagenomic Sequencing of Human Oral Microbes.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Junya; Sato, Yukuto; Shinozaki, Natsuko; Ye, Bin; Tsuboi, Akito; Nagasaki, Masao; Yamashita, Riu

    2016-01-01

    The rapid improvement of next-generation sequencing performance now enables us to analyze huge sample sets with more than ten thousand specimens. However, DNA extraction can still be a limiting step in such metagenomic approaches. In this study, we analyzed human oral microbes to compare the performance of three DNA extraction methods: PowerSoil (a method widely used in this field), QIAsymphony (a robotics method), and a simple boiling method. Dental plaque was initially collected from three volunteers in the pilot study and then expanded to 12 volunteers in the follow-up study. Bacterial flora was estimated by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rRNA following species-level profiling. Our results indicate that the efficiency of PowerSoil and QIAsymphony was comparable to the boiling method. Therefore, the boiling method may be a promising alternative because of its simplicity, cost effectiveness, and short handling time. Moreover, this method was reliable for estimating bacterial species and could be used in the future to examine the correlation between oral flora and health status. Despite this, differences in the efficiency of DNA extraction for various bacterial species were observed among the three methods. Based on these findings, there is no "gold standard" for DNA extraction. In future, we suggest that the DNA extraction method should be selected on a case-by-case basis considering the aims and specimens of the study.

  9. Comparison of Boiling and Robotics Automation Method in DNA Extraction for Metagenomic Sequencing of Human Oral Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Natsuko; Ye, Bin; Tsuboi, Akito; Nagasaki, Masao; Yamashita, Riu

    2016-01-01

    The rapid improvement of next-generation sequencing performance now enables us to analyze huge sample sets with more than ten thousand specimens. However, DNA extraction can still be a limiting step in such metagenomic approaches. In this study, we analyzed human oral microbes to compare the performance of three DNA extraction methods: PowerSoil (a method widely used in this field), QIAsymphony (a robotics method), and a simple boiling method. Dental plaque was initially collected from three volunteers in the pilot study and then expanded to 12 volunteers in the follow-up study. Bacterial flora was estimated by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rRNA following species-level profiling. Our results indicate that the efficiency of PowerSoil and QIAsymphony was comparable to the boiling method. Therefore, the boiling method may be a promising alternative because of its simplicity, cost effectiveness, and short handling time. Moreover, this method was reliable for estimating bacterial species and could be used in the future to examine the correlation between oral flora and health status. Despite this, differences in the efficiency of DNA extraction for various bacterial species were observed among the three methods. Based on these findings, there is no “gold standard” for DNA extraction. In future, we suggest that the DNA extraction method should be selected on a case-by-case basis considering the aims and specimens of the study. PMID:27104353

  10. Downstream processing of human antibodies integrating an extraction capture step and cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana M; Rosa, Paula A J; Ferreira, I Filipa; de Vries, J; Visser, T J; Aires-Barros, M Raquel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we explore an alternative process for the purification of human antibodies from a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell supernatant comprising a ligand-enhanced extraction capture step and cation exchange chromatography (CEX). The extraction of human antibodies was performed in an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) composed of dextran and polyethylene glycol (PEG), in which the terminal hydroxyl groups of the PEG molecule were modified with an amino acid mimetic ligand in order to enhance the partition of the antibodies to the PEG-rich phase. This capture step was optimized using a design of experiments and a central composite design allowed the determination of the conditions that favor the partition of the antibodies to the phase containing the PEG diglutaric acid (PEG-GA) polymer, in terms of system composition. Accordingly, higher recovery yields were obtained for higher concentrations of PEG-GA and lower concentrations of dextran. The highest yield experimentally obtained was observed for an ATPS composed of 5.17% (w/w) dextran and 8% (w/w) PEG-GA. Higher purities were however predicted for higher concentrations of both polymers. A compromise between yield and purity was achieved using 5% dextran and 10% PEG-GA, which allowed the recovery of 82% of the antibodies with a protein purity of 96% and a total purity of 63%, determined by size-exclusion chromatography. ATPS top phases were further purified by cation exchange chromatography and it was observed that the most adequate cation exchange ligand was carboxymethyl, as the sulfopropyl ligand induced the formation of multi-aggregates or denatured forms. This column allowed the elution of 89% of the antibodies present in the top phase, with a protein purity of 100% and a total purity of 91%. The overall process containing a ligand-enhanced extraction step and a cation exchange chromatography step had an overall yield of 73%.

  11. 'Direct PCR' optimization yields a rapid, cost-effective, nondestructive and efficient method for obtaining DNA barcodes without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing Hing; Tay, Ywee Chieh; Puniamoorthy, Jayanthi; Balke, Michael; Cranston, Peter S; Meier, Rudolf

    2014-11-01

    Macroinvertebrates that are collected in large numbers pose major problems in basic and applied biodiversity research: identification to species via morphology is often difficult, slow and/or expensive. DNA barcodes are an attractive alternative or complementary source of information. Unfortunately, obtaining DNA barcodes from specimens requires many steps and thus time and money. Here, we promote a short cut to DNA barcoding, that is, a nondestructive PCR method that skips DNA extraction ('direct PCR') and that can be used for a broad range of invertebrate taxa. We demonstrate how direct PCR can be optimized for the larvae and adults of nonbiting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae), a typical invertebrate group that is abundant, contains important bioindicator species, but is difficult to identify based on morphological features. After optimization, direct PCR yields high PCR success rates (>90%), preserves delicate morphological features (e.g. details of genitalia, and larval head capsules) while allowing for the recovery of genomic DNA. We also document that direct PCR can be successfully optimized for a wide range of other invertebrate taxa that need routine barcoding (flies: Culicidae, Drosophilidae, Dolichopodidae, Sepsidae; sea stars: Oreasteridae). Key for obtaining high PCR success rates is optimizing (i) tissue quantity, (ii) body part, (iii) primer pair and (iv) type of Taq polymerase. Unfortunately, not all invertebrates appear suitable because direct PCR has low success rates for other taxa that were tested (e.g. Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Copepoda, Hymenoptera: Formicidae and Odonata). It appears that the technique is less successful for heavily sclerotized insects and/or those with many exocrine glands.

  12. Akonni TruTip(®) and Qiagen(®) methods for extraction of fetal circulating DNA--evaluation by real-time and digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Rebecca C; Gindlesperger, Alissa; Stokes, Tinsley; Lopez, David; Hyman, Lynn; Freed, Michelle; Belgrader, Phil; Harvey, Jeanne; Li, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Due to the low percentage of fetal DNA present in maternal plasma (< 10%) during early gestation, efficient extraction processes are required for successful downstream detection applications in non-invasive prenatal diagnostic testing. In this study, two extraction methods using similar chemistries but different workflows were compared for isolation efficiency and percent fetal DNA recovery. The Akonni Biosystems TruTip technology uses a binding matrix embedded in a pipette tip; the Circulating Nucleic Acids Kit from Qiagen employs a spin column approach. The TruTip method adds an extra step to decrease the recovery of DNA fragments larger than 600 bp from the sample to yield an overall higher percentage of smaller molecular weight DNA, effectively enriching for fetal DNA. In this evaluation, three separate extraction comparison studies were performed--a dilution series of fragmented DNA in plasma, a set of clinical maternal samples, and a blood collection tube time point study of maternal samples. Both extraction methods were found to efficiently extract small fragment DNA from large volumes of plasma. In the amended samples, the TruTip extraction method was ~15% less efficient with overall DNA recovery, but yielded an 87% increase in % fetal DNA relative to the Qiagen method. The average percent increase of fetal DNA of TruTip extracted samples compared to the Qiagen method was 55% for all sets of blinded clinical samples. A study comparing extraction efficiencies from whole blood samples incubated up to 48 hours prior to processing into plasma resulted in more consistent % fetal DNA recoveries using TruTip. The extracted products were tested on two detection platforms, quantitative real-time PCR and droplet digital PCR, and yielded similar results for both extraction methods.

  13. Towards a rapid molecular diagnostic for melioidosis: comparison of DNA extraction methods from clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Leisha J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Bowers, Jolene R; Tuanyok, Apichai; Schupp, Jim; Engelthaler, David; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul S; Currie, Bart J

    2011-01-01

    Optimising DNA extraction from clinical samples for Burkholderia pseudomallei Type III secretion system real-time PCR in suspected melioidosis patients confirmed that urine and sputum are useful diagnostic samples. Direct testing on blood remains problematic; testing DNA extracted from plasma was superior to DNA from whole blood or buffy coat. PMID:22108495

  14. Microbial DNA extraction from intestinal biopsies is improved by avoiding mechanical cell disruption

    PubMed Central

    Carbonero, Franck; Nava, Gerardo M.; Benefiel, Ann C.; Greenberg, Eugene; Gaskins, H. Rex

    2011-01-01

    Currently, standard protocols for microbial DNA extraction from intestinal tissues do not exist. We assessed the efficiency of a commercial kit with and without mechanical disruption. Better quality DNA was obtained without mechanical disruption. Thus, it appears that bead-beating is not required for efficient microbial DNA extraction from intestinal biopsies. PMID:21820015

  15. Establishment and application of an efficient, economic, and rapid rice DNA extraction method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid, economic, and efficient method for DNA extraction from rice leaf, root and seed was developed, and the extracted DNA was used as a template to successfully amplify the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta. Profiles of Pi-ta in 165 breeding lines detected by DNA markers were verified using diff...

  16. Comparison of three methods of DNA extraction from human bones with different degrees of degradation.

    PubMed

    Jakubowska, Joanna; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pawłowski, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    There is a necessity for deceased identification as a result of many accidents and sometimes bones are the only accessible source of DNA. So far, a universal method that allows for extraction of DNA from materials at different stages of degradation does not exist. The aims of this study were: the comparison of three methods of DNA extraction from bones with different degree of degradation and an evaluation of the usefulness of these methods in forensic genetics. The efficiency of DNA extraction, the degree of extract contamination by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors and the possibility of determining the STR loci profile were especially being compared. Nuclear DNA from bones at different states of degradation was isolated using three methods: classical, organic phenol-chloroform extraction, DNA extraction from crystal aggregates and extraction by total demineralisation. Total demineralisation is the best method for most cases of DNA extraction from bones, although it does not provide pure DNA. DNA extraction from aggregates removes inhibitors much better and is also a good method of choice when identity determination of exhumed remains is necessary. In the case of not buried bones (remains found outside) total demineralisation or phenol-chloroform protocols are more efficient for successful DNA extraction.

  17. Deparaffinization with mineral oil: a simple procedure for extraction of high-quality DNA from archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples.

    PubMed

    Heikal, Nahla; Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Agarwal, Archana M

    2014-09-01

    Extracting DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival samples remains difficult. Successful polymerase chain reactions (PCR) with DNA extracted from FFPE samples is still very low. We extracted DNA from 12 recent and old archival FFPE bone marrow trephine biopsies by use of a simple protocol on the basis of deparaffinization with molecular biology-grade mineral oil followed by DNA extraction with the Qiagen FFPE kit. Comparison of this deparaffinization method with standard protocols, for example, xylene or Hemo-D with subsequent rehydration using graded ethanols, was investigated. The quality and quantity of extracted DNA were tested by a combination of ultraviolet spectroscopy, analysis on a Caliper LabChip GX, and real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melt analysis. Highest quality PCR-amplifiable DNA was obtained by deparaffinization with mineral oil, whereas more variable results were obtained for the other 2 deparaffinization procedures. This result was confirmed by real-time PCR and high-resolution melt analysis. Besides improvements in the quality of extracted DNA, use of mineral oil for deparaffinization has the added benefit of decreased time (20 vs. 75 min) and a significant reduction of hands-on labor (1 step vs. multiple hands-on centrifugation and decanting steps).

  18. A method for DNA and RNA co-extraction for use on forensic samples using the Promega DNA IQ™ system.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Anna; Fleming, Rachel; Harbison, SallyAnn

    2011-01-01

    The use of messenger RNA profiling to identify the origin of biological samples (e.g. blood, semen and saliva) from crime scenes is now at the stage of being implemented into routine forensic casework. We report on the successful modification of the Promega DNA IQ™ system to enable co-extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample without compromising the potential DNA profile. Using the protocol in our laboratory for extracting DNA using the DNA IQ™ system combined with the Zymo Research Mini RNA Isolation Kit™ II we demonstrate the simultaneous co-extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample for routine DNA and mRNA profiling for the identification of both the individual and the biological stain.

  19. Sequential steps in DNA replication are inhibited to ensure reduction of ploidy in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hua, Hui; Namdar, Mandana; Ganier, Olivier; Gregan, Juraj; Méchali, Marcel; Kearsey, Stephen E

    2013-03-01

    Meiosis involves two successive rounds of chromosome segregation without an intervening S phase. Exit from meiosis I is distinct from mitotic exit, in that replication origins are not licensed by Mcm2-7 chromatin binding, but spindle disassembly occurs during a transient interphase-like state before meiosis II. The absence of licensing is assumed to explain the block to DNA replication, but this has not been formally tested. Here we attempt to subvert this block by expressing the licensing control factors Cdc18 and Cdt1 during the interval between meiotic nuclear divisions. Surprisingly, this leads only to a partial round of DNA replication, even when these factors are overexpressed and effect clear Mcm2-7 chromatin binding. Combining Cdc18 and Cdt1 expression with modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase activity, activation of Dbf4-dependent kinase, or deletion of the Spd1 inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase has little additional effect on the extent of DNA replication. Single-molecule analysis indicates this partial round of replication results from inefficient progression of replication forks, and thus both initiation and elongation replication steps may be inhibited in late meiosis. In addition, DNA replication or damage during the meiosis I-II interval fails to arrest meiotic progress, suggesting absence of checkpoint regulation of meiosis II entry.

  20. Automated one-step DNA sequencing based on nanoliter reaction volumes and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pang, H M; Yeung, E S

    2000-08-01

    An integrated system with a nano-reactor for cycle-sequencing reaction coupled to on-line purification and capillary gel electrophoresis has been demonstrated. Fifty nanoliters of reagent solution, which includes dye-labeled terminators, polymerase, BSA and template, was aspirated and mixed with the template inside the nano-reactor followed by cycle-sequencing reaction. The reaction products were then purified by a size-exclusion chromatographic column operated at 50 degrees C followed by room temperature on-line injection of the DNA fragments into a capillary for gel electrophoresis. Over 450 bases of DNA can be separated and identified. As little as 25 nl reagent solution can be used for the cycle-sequencing reaction with a slightly shorter read length. Significant savings on reagent cost is achieved because the remaining stock solution can be reused without contamination. The steps of cycle sequencing, on-line purification, injection, DNA separation, capillary regeneration, gel-filling and fluidic manipulation were performed with complete automation. This system can be readily multiplexed for high-throughput DNA sequencing or PCR analysis directly from templates or even biological materials.

  1. DNA Extraction by Isotachophoresis in a Microfluidic Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, S J

    2011-08-10

    Biological assays have many applications. For example, forensics personnel and medical professionals use these tests to diagnose diseases and track their progression or identify pathogens and the host response to them. One limitation of these tests, however, is that most of them target only one piece of the sample - such as bacterial DNA - and other components (e.g. host genomic DNA) get in the way, even though they may be useful for different tests. To address this problem, it would be useful to extract several different substances from a complex biological sample - such as blood - in an inexpensive and efficient manner. This summer, I worked with Maxim Shusteff at Lawrence Livermore National Lab on the Rapid Automated Sample Prep project. The goal of the project is to solve the aforementioned problem by creating a system that uses a series of different extraction methods to extract cells, bacteria, and DNA from a complex biological sample. Biological assays can then be run on purified output samples. In this device, an operator could input a complex sample such as blood or saliva, and would receive separate outputs of cells, bacteria, viruses, and DNA. I had the opportunity to work this summer with isotachophoresis (ITP), a technique that can be used to extract nucleic acids from a sample. This technique is intended to be the last stage of the purification device. Isotachophoresis separates particles based on different electrophoretic mobilities. This technique is convenient for out application because free solution DNA mobility is approximately equal for DNA longer than 300 base pairs in length. The sample of interest - in our case DNA - is fed into the chip with streams of leading electrolyte (LE) and trailing electrolyte (TE). When an electric field is applied, the species migrate based on their electrophoretic mobilities. Because the ions in the leading electrolyte have a high electrophoretic mobility, they race ahead of the slower sample and trailing

  2. Simple salting-out method for DNA extraction from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Elena R C; Neves, Adriana C; Silva-Valenzuela, Maria G; Sousa, Suzana O M; Nunes, Fabio D

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to standardize a method of DNA extraction from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues (PETs) using a salt solution to precipitate protein and isopropanol to precipitate DNA. The samples were submitted to a DNA extraction method in which two different concentrations of ammonium acetate (2 and 4M) were compared with a phenol-chloroform extraction method and with a commercial DNA isolation kit. DNA was qualified and quantified by spectrophotometer analysis, electrophoresis, and amplification by PCR. The 167 and 268bp fragments of APC and beta-globin genes, respectively, were amplified equally from DNA extracted by all tested methods and in all cases. However, the 536bp fragment of beta-globin gene was not amplified in all cases. According to our results, the extraction method using ammonium acetate proved to be simple and suitable for obtaining DNA of good quality, which can be easily amplified by PCR.

  3. Comparison of different protocols for the extraction of microbial DNA from reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Santos, H.F.; Carmo, F.L.; Leite, D.C.A.; Jesus, H.E.; Maalouf, P. De Carvalho; Almeida, C.; Soriano, A.U.; Altomari, D.; Suhett, L.; Vólaro, V.; Valoni, E.; Francisco, M.; Vieira, J.; Rocha, R.; Sardinha, B.L.; Mendes, L.B.; João, R.R.; Lacava, B.; Jesus, R.F.; Sebastian, G.V.; Pessoa, A.; van Elsas, J.D.; Rezende, R.P.; Pires, D.O.; Duarte, G.; Castro, C.B.; Rosado, A.S.; Peixoto, R.S.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to test different protocols for the extraction of microbial DNA from the coral Mussismilia harttii. Four different commercial kits were tested, three of them based on methods for DNA extraction from soil (FastDNA SPIN Kit for soil, MP Bio, PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, MoBio, and ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit, Zymo Research) and one kit for DNA extraction from plants (UltraClean Plant DNA Isolation Kit, MoBio). Five polyps of the same colony of M. harttii were macerated and aliquots were submitted to DNA extraction by the different kits. After extraction, the DNA was quantified and PCR-DGGE was used to study the molecular fingerprint of Bacteria and Eukarya. Among the four kits tested, the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount of DNA extracted, yielding about three times more DNA than the other kits. Also, we observed a higher number and intensities of DGGE bands for both Bacteria and Eukarya with the same kit. Considering these results, we suggested that the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit is the best adapted for the study of the microbial communities of corals. PMID:24031859

  4. Comparison of different protocols for the extraction of microbial DNA from reef corals.

    PubMed

    Santos, H F; Carmo, F L; Leite, D C A; Jesus, H E; Maalouf, P De Carvalho; Almeida, C; Soriano, A U; Altomari, D; Suhett, L; Vólaro, V; Valoni, E; Francisco, M; Vieira, J; Rocha, R; Sardinha, B L; Mendes, L B; João, R R; Lacava, B; Jesus, R F; Sebastian, G V; Pessoa, A; van Elsas, J D; Rezende, R P; Pires, D O; Duarte, G; Castro, C B; Rosado, A S; Peixoto, R S

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to test different protocols for the extraction of microbial DNA from the coral Mussismilia harttii. Four different commercial kits were tested, three of them based on methods for DNA extraction from soil (FastDNA SPIN Kit for soil, MP Bio, PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, MoBio, and ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit, Zymo Research) and one kit for DNA extraction from plants (UltraClean Plant DNA Isolation Kit, MoBio). Five polyps of the same colony of M. harttii were macerated and aliquots were submitted to DNA extraction by the different kits. After extraction, the DNA was quantified and PCR-DGGE was used to study the molecular fingerprint of Bacteria and Eukarya. Among the four kits tested, the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount of DNA extracted, yielding about three times more DNA than the other kits. Also, we observed a higher number and intensities of DGGE bands for both Bacteria and Eukarya with the same kit. Considering these results, we suggested that the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit is the best adapted for the study of the microbial communities of corals.

  5. Improved extraction of saturated fatty acids but not omega-3 fatty acids from sheep red blood cells using a one-step extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Edward H; Gulliver, Catherine E; Piltz, John W; Taylor, Robert D; Blake, Robert J; Meyer, Richard G

    2012-07-01

    Several methods are available to extract total lipid and methylate fatty acids from a range of samples including red blood cells (RBC). Fatty acid analysis of human RBC can be undertaken using a two-step extraction and methylation or a combined one-step extraction and methylation procedure. The lipid composition of sheep RBC differs significantly from that of humans and may affect their extraction. The purpose of the current study was to examine the efficiency of extraction of lipid and detection of fatty acids from sheep RBC using a one-step procedure. Fatty acids were analysed using a one-step extraction and methylation procedure using methanol:toluene and acetyl chloride in comparison with a two-step procedure involving extraction of lipid using chloroform:methanol and separate methylation. Concentrations of saturated fatty acids including C16:0 and C18:0 were significantly higher (42.6 and 33.9 % respectively) following extraction using the one-step procedure compared with the two-step procedure. However, concentrations of some polyunsaturated fatty acids, including C20:5n-3 and C22:6n-3 were not significantly different between either procedure. The improved detection of fatty acids may be related to the ability of different solvents to extract different lipid fractions. The differential extraction of lipids and detection of fatty acids from sheep RBC may have important implications in studies examining the effect of dietary treatment on the possible health benefits of fatty acids.

  6. Fast protocol for extraction of DNA from Prosopis spp leaves (plant adapted to arid environment) without liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Michel-López, C Y; González-Mendoza, D; Grimaldo-Juarez, O

    2013-09-27

    The extraction of high-quality genomic DNA from Prosopis spp for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification is complicated, owing to the presence of a high percentage of secondary metabolites that bind to or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. In the present study, we report a modified sodium dodecyl sulfate/phenol protocol that eliminates the use of liquid nitrogen in the maceration process, β-mercaptoethanol in the buffer extraction, and the ethanol precipitation step. The A₂₆₀/A₂₈₀ absorbance ratios of the isolated DNA were approximately 2.0 to 1.9, suggesting that the DNA fraction was pure and can be used for further PCR analysis. The DNA isolated by this protocol is of sufficient quality for molecular applications; this technique could be applied to other organisms that have similar substances that hinder DNA extraction. Finally, this proposal represents an alternative fast, cheap, and effective method for the isolation of genomic DNA from fresh leaves of Prosopis spp, even in low-technology laboratories.

  7. Estimation of the uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps in pesticide residue analysis of plant commodities.

    PubMed

    Omeroglu, P Yolci; Ambrus, A; Boyacioglu, D

    2013-01-01

    Extraction and clean-up constitute important steps in pesticide residue analysis. For the correct interpretation of analytical results, uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps should be taken into account when the combined uncertainty of the analytical result is estimated. In the scope of this study, uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps were investigated by spiking (14)C-labelled chlorpyrifos to analytical portions of tomato, orange, apple, green bean, cucumber, jackfruit, papaya and starfruit. After each step, replicate measurements were carried out with a liquid scintillation counter. Uncertainties in extraction and clean-up steps were estimated separately for every matrix and method combination by using within-laboratory reproducibility standard deviation and were characterised with the CV of recoveries. It was observed that the uncertainty of the ethyl acetate extraction step varied between 0.8% and 5.9%. The relative standard uncertainty of the clean-up step with dispersive SPE used in the method known as QuEChERS was estimated to be around 1.5% for tomato, apple and green beans. The highest variation of 4.8% was observed in cucumber. The uncertainty of the clean-up step with gel permeation chromatography ranged between 5.3% and 13.1%, and it was relatively higher than that obtained with the dispersive SPE method.

  8. One step behind to step ahead - femoral approach to stabilize and to extract functional pacing lead to regain venous access.

    PubMed

    Maciąg, Aleksander; Syska, Paweł; Kuśmierski, Krzysztof; Broy, Beata; Sterliński, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Transvenous lead extraction can be a method to regain venous access. We present the case of a man, aged 67, with indications to upgrade an ICD to a resynchronization therapy device. Since innominate vein occlusion was diagnosed and extraction of an abandoned ventricular pacing lead did not provide lumen regain, a functional atrial lead was extracted with the femoral approach to stabilization and venous access was regained. Asymptomatic vein wall damage but no other complications were recorded. The simultaneous application of different techniques to regain venous access may allow success of the final procedure in system upgrading.

  9. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods for the analysis of microbial community in biological activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lu; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang

    2012-01-01

    It is difficult to isolate DNA from biological activated carbon (BAC) samples used in water treatment plants, owing to the scarcity of microorganisms in BAC samples. The aim of this study was to identify DNA extraction methods suitable for a long-term, comprehensive ecological analysis of BAC microbial communities. To identify a procedure that can produce high molecular weight DNA, maximizes detectable diversity and is relatively free from contaminants, the microwave extraction method, the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) extraction method, a commercial DNA extraction kit, and the ultrasonic extraction method were used for the extraction of DNA from BAC samples. Spectrophotometry, agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) analysis were conducted to compare the yield and quality of DNA obtained using these methods. The results showed that the CTAB method produce the highest yield and genetic diversity of DNA from BAC samples, but DNA purity was slightly less than that obtained with the DNA extraction-kit method. This study provides a theoretical basis for establishing and selecting DNA extraction methods for BAC samples.

  10. A comparison of methods for forensic DNA extraction: Chelex-100® and the QIAGEN DNA Investigator Kit (manual and automated).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kirsty; McCallum, Nicola; Welch, Lindsey

    2012-03-01

    Efficient isolation of DNA from a sample is the basis for successful forensic DNA profiling. There are many DNA extraction methods available and they vary in their ability to efficiently extract the DNA; as well as in processing time, operator intervention, contamination risk and ease of use. In recent years, automated robots have been made available which speed up processing time and decrease the amount of operator input. This project was set up to investigate the efficiency of three DNA extraction methods, two manual (Chelex(®)-100 and the QIAGEN DNA Investigator Kit) and one automated (QIAcube), using both buccal cells and blood stains as the DNA source. Extracted DNA was quantified using real-time PCR in order to assess the amount of DNA present in each sample. Selected samples were then amplified using AmpFlSTR SGM Plus amplification kit. The results suggested that there was no statistical difference between results gained for the different methods investigated, but the automated QIAcube robot made sample processing much simpler and quicker without introducing DNA contamination.

  11. Effective removal of co-purified inhibitors from extracted DNA samples using synchronous coefficient of drag alteration (SCODA) technology.

    PubMed

    Schmedes, Sarah; Marshall, Pamela; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2013-07-01

    Various types of biological samples present challenges for extraction of DNA suitable for subsequent molecular analyses. Commonly used extraction methods, such as silica membrane columns and phenol-chloroform, while highly successful may still fail to provide a sufficiently pure DNA extract with some samples. Synchronous coefficient of drag alteration (SCODA), implemented in Boreal Genomics' Aurora Nucleic Acid Extraction System (Boreal Genomics, Vancouver, BC), is a new technology that offers the potential to remove inhibitors effectively while simultaneously concentrating DNA. In this initial study, SCODA was tested for its ability to remove various concentrations of forensically and medically relevant polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors naturally found in tissue, hair, blood, plant, and soil samples. SCODA was used to purify and concentrate DNA from intentionally contaminated DNA samples containing known concentrations of hematin, humic acid, melanin, and tannic acid. The internal positive control (IPC) provided in the Quantifiler™ Human DNA Quantification Kit (Life Technologies, Foster City, CA) and short tandem repeat (STR) profiling (AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR Amplification Kit; Life Technologies, Foster City, CA) were used to measure inhibition effects and hence purification. SCODA methodology yielded overall higher efficiency of purification of highly contaminated samples compared with the QIAquick® PCR Purification Kit (Qiagen, Valencia, CA). SCODA-purified DNA yielded no cycle shift of the IPC for each sample and yielded greater allele percentage recovery and relative fluorescence unit values compared with the QIAquick® purification method. The Aurora provided an automated, minimal-step approach to successfully remove inhibitors and concentrate DNA from challenged samples.

  12. Tenrec phylogeny and the noninvasive extraction of nuclear DNA.

    PubMed

    Asher, Robert J; Hofreiter, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Due in part to scarcity of material, no published study has yet cladistically addressed the systematics of living and fossil Tenrecidae (Mammalia, Afrotheria). Using a noninvasive technique for sampling nuclear DNA from museum specimens, we investigate the evolution of the Tenrecidae and assess the extent to which tenrecids fit patterns of relationships proposed for other terrestrial mammals on Madagascar. Application of several tree-reconstruction techniques on sequences of the nuclear growth hormone receptor gene and morphological data for all recognized tenrecid genera supports monophyly of Malagasy tenrecids to the exclusion of the two living African genera. However, both parsimony and Bayesian methods favor a close relationship between fossil African tenrecs and the Malagasy Geogale, supporting the hypothesis of island paraphyly, but not polyphyly. More generally, the noninvasive extraction technique can be applied with minimal risk to rare/unique specimens and, by better utilizing museum collections for genetic work, can greatly mitigate field expenses and disturbance of natural populations.

  13. How to Show the Real Microbial Biodiversity? A Comparison of Seven DNA Extraction Methods for Bacterial Population Analyses in Matrices Containing Highly Charged Natural Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kaden, Rene; Krolla-Sidenstein, Peter

    2015-10-20

    A DNA extraction that comprises the DNA of all available taxa in an ecosystem is an essential step in population analysis, especially for next generation sequencing applications. Many nanoparticles as well as naturally occurring clay minerals contain charged surfaces or edges that capture negatively charged DNA molecules after cell lysis within DNA extraction. Depending on the methodology of DNA extraction, this phenomenon causes a shift in detection of microbial taxa in ecosystems and a possible misinterpretation of microbial interactions. With the aim to describe microbial interactions and the bio-geo-chemical reactions during a clay alteration experiment, several methods for the detection of a high number of microbial taxa were examined in this study. Altogether, 13 different methods of commercially available DNA extraction kits provided by seven companies as well as the classical phenol-chloroform DNA extraction were compared. The amount and the quality of nucleic acid extracts were determined and compared to the amplifiable amount of DNA. The 16S rRNA gene fragments of several taxa were separated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to determine the number of different species and sequenced to get the information about what kind of species the microbial population consists of. A total number of 13 species was detected in the system. Up to nine taxa could be detected with commercially available DNA extraction kits while phenol-chloroform extraction lead to three detected species. In this paper, we describe how to combine several DNA extraction methods for the investigation of microbial community structures in clay.

  14. DNA Extraction and Amplification from Contemporary Polynesian Bark-Cloth

    PubMed Central

    Moncada, Ximena; Payacán, Claudia; Arriaza, Francisco; Lobos, Sergio; Seelenfreund, Daniela; Seelenfreund, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background Paper mulberry has been used for thousands of years in Asia and Oceania for making paper and bark-cloth, respectively. Museums around the world hold valuable collections of Polynesian bark-cloth. Genetic analysis of the plant fibers from which the textiles were made may answer a number of questions of interest related to provenance, authenticity or species used in the manufacture of these textiles. Recovery of nucleic acids from paper mulberry bark-cloth has not been reported before. Methodology We describe a simple method for the extraction of PCR-amplifiable DNA from small samples of contemporary Polynesian bark-cloth (tapa) using two types of nuclear markers. We report the amplification of about 300 bp sequences of the ITS1 region and of a microsatellite marker. Conclusions Sufficient DNA was retrieved from all bark-cloth samples to permit successful PCR amplification. This method shows a means of obtaining useful genetic information from modern bark-cloth samples and opens perspectives for the analyses of small fragments derived from ethnographic materials. PMID:23437166

  15. A kinetic analysis of strand breaks on large DNA induced by cigarette smoke extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Takata, Tatsuya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We report a kinetic analysis of strand breakages on large DNA molecules induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE), an extract of soluble cigarette smoke components. Previously, this DNA damage was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, whereas we used fluorescence to kinetically analyze damage to individual DNA molecules. CSE caused a marked change in length of DNA molecules. The rate of CSE-induced double-strand breakage on large random-coiled DNA molecules was determined using a simple theoretical model, allowing the facile estimation of the rate of double-strand breaks on large DNA molecules.

  16. Comparison of different methods for extraction and purification of human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from serum samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizah, N.; Hashim, U.; Nadzirah, Sh.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.

    2017-03-01

    The affectability and unwavering quality of PCR for indicative and research purposes require effective fair systems of extraction and sanitization of nucleic acids. One of the real impediments of PCR-based tests is the hindrance of the enhancement procedure by substances exhibit in clinical examples. This examination considers distinctive techniques for extraction and cleaning of viral DNA from serum tests in view of recuperation productivity as far as yield of DNA and rate recouped immaculateness of removed DNA, and rate of restraint. The best extraction strategies were the phenol/chloroform strategy and the silica gel extraction methodology for serum tests, individually. Considering DNA immaculateness, extraction technique by utilizing the phenol/chloroform strategy delivered the most tasteful results in serum tests contrasted with the silica gel, separately. The nearness of inhibitors was overcome by all DNA extraction strategies in serum tests, as confirm by semiquantitative PCR enhancement.

  17. Innovative Graphite Oxide-Cellulose Based Material Specific for Genomic DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-11-01

    Extraction of genomic DNA from various types of samples is often challenging for commercial silica spin column. In this study, we proposed graphite oxide (GO)/cellulose composite as an alternative material for genomic DNA extraction. The purity of DNA and extraction efficiency were compared to that of commercial silica product. In this study, the total weight % of GO was fixed at 4.15% in GO/Cellulose composite. Chewed gum, nail clip, cigarette bud paper, animal tissue and hair sample were used as various genomic DNA sources for extraction experiments. Among all types of samples, the extraction efficiencies were 4 to 12 times higher than that of commercial silica spin column. The absorbance ratio of 260 nm to 280 nm (A260/A280) of all samples ranged between 1.6 and 2.0. The results demonstrated that GO/Cellulose composites might serve as an innovative solid support material for genomic DNA extraction.

  18. Streamlining DNA Barcoding Protocols: Automated DNA Extraction and a New cox1 Primer in Arachnid Systematics

    PubMed Central

    Vidergar, Nina; Toplak, Nataša; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding is a popular tool in taxonomic and phylogenetic studies, but for most animal lineages protocols for obtaining the barcoding sequences—mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (cox1 AKA CO1)—are not standardized. Our aim was to explore an optimal strategy for arachnids, focusing on the species-richest lineage, spiders by (1) improving an automated DNA extraction protocol, (2) testing the performance of commonly used primer combinations, and (3) developing a new cox1 primer suitable for more efficient alignment and phylogenetic analyses. Methodology We used exemplars of 15 species from all major spider clades, processed a range of spider tissues of varying size and quality, optimized genomic DNA extraction using the MagMAX Express magnetic particle processor—an automated high throughput DNA extraction system—and tested cox1 amplification protocols emphasizing the standard barcoding region using ten routinely employed primer pairs. Results The best results were obtained with the commonly used Folmer primers (LCO1490/HCO2198) that capture the standard barcode region, and with the C1-J-2183/C1-N-2776 primer pair that amplifies its extension. However, C1-J-2183 is designed too close to HCO2198 for well-interpreted, continuous sequence data, and in practice the resulting sequences from the two primer pairs rarely overlap. We therefore designed a new forward primer C1-J-2123 60 base pairs upstream of the C1-J-2183 binding site. The success rate of this new primer (93%) matched that of C1-J-2183. Conclusions The use of C1-J-2123 allows full, indel-free overlap of sequences obtained with the standard Folmer primers and with C1-J-2123 primer pair. Our preliminary tests suggest that in addition to spiders, C1-J-2123 will also perform in other arachnids and several other invertebrates. We provide optimal PCR protocols for these primer sets, and recommend using them for systematic efforts beyond DNA barcoding. PMID:25415202

  19. DNA extraction from fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Hua; Gouda-Vossos, Amany; Dzamko, Nicolas; Halliday, Glenda; Huang, Yue

    2013-10-01

    Both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human brain tissues are invaluable resources for molecular genetic studies of central nervous system diseases, especially neurodegenerative disorders. To identify the optimal method for DNA extraction from human brain tissue, we compared methods on differently-processed tissues. Fragments of LRRK2 and MAPT (257 bp and 483 bp/245 bp) were amplified for evaluation. We found that for FFPE samples, the success rate of DNA extraction was greater when using a commercial kit than a laboratory-based method (successful DNA extraction from 76% versus 33% of samples). PCR amplicon size and storage period were key factors influencing the success rate of DNA extraction from FFPE samples. In the fresh-frozen samples, the DNA extraction success rate was 100% using either a commercial kit (QIAamp DNA Micro) or a laboratory-based method (sample boiling in 0.1 mol/L NaOH, followed by proteinase K digestion, and then DNA extraction using Chelex-100) regardless of PCR amplicon length or tissue storage time. Although the present results demonstrate that PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA can be extracted from both fresh-frozen and FFPE samples, fresh brain tissue is recommended for DNA extraction in future neuropathological studies.

  20. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for microbial communities from soil treated with biochar

    PubMed Central

    Leite, D.C.A.; Balieiro, F.C.; Pires, C.A.; Madari, B.E.; Rosado, A.S.; Coutinho, H.L.C.; Peixoto, R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of biochar application on soil structure and plant growth. However, there are very few studies describing the effect of biochar on native soil microbial communities. Microbial analysis of environmental samples requires accurate and reproducible methods for the extraction of DNA from samples. Because of the variety among microbial species and the strong adsorption of the phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule to biochar, extracting and purifying high quality microbial DNA from biochar-amended soil is not a trivial process and can be considerably more difficult than the extraction of DNA from other environmental samples. The aim of this study was to compare the relative efficacies of three commercial DNA extraction kits, the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FD kit), the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (PS kit) and the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit Miniprep™ (ZR kit), for extracting microbial genomic DNA from sand treated with different types of biochar. The methods were evaluated by comparing the DNA yields and purity and by analysing the bacterial and fungal community profiles generated by PCR-DGGE. Our results showed that the PCR-DGGE profiles for bacterial and fungal communities were highly affected by the purity and yield of the different DNA extracts. Among the tested kits, the PS kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount and purity of recovered DNA and considering the complexity of the generated DGGE microbial fingerprint from the sand-biochar samples. PMID:24948928

  1. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for microbial communities from soil treated with biochar.

    PubMed

    Leite, D C A; Balieiro, F C; Pires, C A; Madari, B E; Rosado, A S; Coutinho, H L C; Peixoto, R S

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of biochar application on soil structure and plant growth. However, there are very few studies describing the effect of biochar on native soil microbial communities. Microbial analysis of environmental samples requires accurate and reproducible methods for the extraction of DNA from samples. Because of the variety among microbial species and the strong adsorption of the phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule to biochar, extracting and purifying high quality microbial DNA from biochar-amended soil is not a trivial process and can be considerably more difficult than the extraction of DNA from other environmental samples. The aim of this study was to compare the relative efficacies of three commercial DNA extraction kits, the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FD kit), the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (PS kit) and the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit Miniprep™ (ZR kit), for extracting microbial genomic DNA from sand treated with different types of biochar. The methods were evaluated by comparing the DNA yields and purity and by analysing the bacterial and fungal community profiles generated by PCR-DGGE. Our results showed that the PCR-DGGE profiles for bacterial and fungal communities were highly affected by the purity and yield of the different DNA extracts. Among the tested kits, the PS kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount and purity of recovered DNA and considering the complexity of the generated DGGE microbial fingerprint from the sand-biochar samples.

  2. Carrier molecules and extraction of circulating tumor DNA for next generation sequencing in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Beránek, Martin; Sirák, Igor; Vošmik, Milan; Petera, Jiří; Drastíková, Monika; Palička, Vladimír

    The aims of the study were: i) to compare circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) yields obtained by different manual extraction procedures, ii) to evaluate the addition of various carrier molecules into the plasma to improve ctDNA extraction recovery, and iii) to use next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to analyze KRAS, BRAF, and NRAS somatic mutations in ctDNA from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Venous blood was obtained from patients who suffered from metastatic colorectal carcinoma. For plasma ctDNA extraction, the following carriers were tested: carrier RNA, polyadenylic acid, glycogen, linear acrylamide, yeast tRNA, salmon sperm DNA, and herring sperm DNA. Each extract was characterized by quantitative real-time PCR and next generation sequencing. The addition of polyadenylic acid had a significant positive effect on the amount of ctDNA eluted. The sequencing data revealed five cases of ctDNA mutated in KRAS and one patient with a BRAF mutation. An agreement of 86% was found between tumor tissues and ctDNA. Testing somatic mutations in ctDNA seems to be a promising tool to monitor dynamically changing genotypes of tumor cells circulating in the body. The optimized process of ctDNA extraction should help to obtain more reliable sequencing data in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  3. High-resolution melt analysis without DNA extraction affords rapid genotype resolution and species identification.

    PubMed

    Rugman-Jones, Paul F; Stouthamer, Richard

    2016-09-22

    Extracting and sequencing DNA from specimens can impose major time and monetary costs to studies requiring genotyping, or identification to species, of large numbers of individuals. As such, so-called direct PCR methods have been developed enabling significant savings at the DNA extraction step. Similarly, real-time quantitative PCR techniques (qPCR) offer very cost-effective alternatives to sequencing. High-resolution melt analysis (HRM) is a qPCR method that incorporates an intercalating dye into a double-stranded PCR amplicon. The dye fluoresces brightly, but only when it is bound. Thus, after PCR, raising the temperature of the amplicon while measuring the fluorescence of the reaction results in the generation of a sequence-specific melt curve, allowing discrimination of genotypes. Methods combining HRM (or other qPCR methods) and direct PCR have not previously been reported, most likely due to concerns that any tissue in the reaction tube would interfere with detection of the fluorescent signal. Here, we couple direct PCR with HRM and, by way of three examples, demonstrate a very quick and cost-effective method for genotyping large numbers of specimens, using Rotor-Gene HRM instruments (QIAGEN). In contrast to the heated-block design of most qPCR/HRM instruments, the Rotor-Gene's centrifugal rotor and air-based temperature-regulation system facilitate our method by depositing tissues away from the pathway of the machine's fluorescence detection optics.

  4. Elementary steps for charge transport in DNA: thermal activation vs. tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Yuri A.; Burin, Alexander L.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    Using stacks of Watson-Crick base pairs as an important example of multichromophoric molecular assemblies, we studied charge migration in DNA with special emphasis on the mechanism of hole hopping between neighboring guanines (G) connected by the adenine-thymine (AT) bridge. The tight-binding model proposed for this elementary step shows that for short AT bridges, hole transfer between two G bases proceeds via quantum mechanical tunneling. By contrast, hopping over long bridges requires thermal activation. The condition for crossover between tunneling and thermal activation near room temperature is specified and applies to the analysis of experimental data. We show that thermal activation dominates, if the bridge between two G bases contains more than three AT pairs. Our theoretical findings predict that the replacement of AT base pairs by GC pairs increases the efficiency of hole transport only in the case of short base pair sequences. For long sequences, however, the opposite effect is expected.

  5. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  6. A high-throughput, high-quality plant genomic DNA extraction protocol.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J; Cong, X H; Duan, Y B; Li, L; Wei, P C; Lu, X Z; Yang, J B

    2013-10-15

    The isolation of high-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) is a crucial technique in plant molecular biology. The quality of gDNA determines the reliability of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In this paper, we reported a high-quality gDNA extraction protocol optimized for real-time PCR in a variety of plant species. Performed in a 96-well block, our protocol provides high throughput. Without the need for phenol-chloroform and liquid nitrogen or dry ice, our protocol is safer and more cost-efficient than traditional DNA extraction methods. The method takes 10 mg leaf tissue to yield 5-10 µg high-quality gDNA. Spectral measurement and electrophoresis were used to demonstrate gDNA purity. The extracted DNA was qualified in a restriction enzyme digestion assay and conventional PCR. The real-time PCR amplification was sufficiently sensitive to detect gDNA at very low concentrations (3 pg/µL). The standard curve of gDNA dilutions from our phenol-chloroform-free protocol showed better linearity (R(2) = 0.9967) than the phenol-chloroform protocol (R(2) = 0.9876). The results indicate that the gDNA was of high quality and fit for real-time PCR. This safe, high-throughput plant gDNA extraction protocol could be used to isolate high-quality gDNA for real-time PCR and other downstream molecular applications.

  7. Limitations and recommendations for successful DNA extraction from forensic soil samples: a review.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer M; Rawlence, Nicolas J; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Soil is commonly used in forensic casework to provide discriminatory power to link a suspect to a crime scene. Standard analyses examine the intrinsic properties of soils, including mineralogy, geophysics, texture and colour; however, soils can also support a vast amount of organisms, which can be examined using DNA fingerprinting techniques. Many previous genetic analyses have relied on patterns of fragment length variation produced by amplification of unidentified taxa in the soil extract. In contrast, the development of advanced DNA sequencing technologies now provides the ability to generate a detailed picture of soil microbial communities and the taxa present, allowing for improved discrimination between samples. However, DNA must be efficiently extracted from the complex soil matrix to achieve accurate and reproducible DNA sequencing results, and extraction efficacy is highly dependent on the soil type and method used. As a result, a consideration of soil properties is important when estimating the likelihood of successful DNA extraction. This would include a basic understanding of soil components, their interactions with DNA molecules and the factors that affect such interactions. This review highlights some important considerations required prior to DNA extraction and discusses the use of common chemical reagents in soil DNA extraction protocols to achieve maximum efficacy. Together, the information presented here is designed to facilitate informed decisions about the most appropriate sampling and extraction methodology, relevant both to the soil type and the details of a specific forensic case, to ensure sufficient DNA yield and enable successful analysis.

  8. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD FOR PCR IDENTIFICATION OF FUNGAL INDOOR AIR CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following air sampling, fungal DNA needs to be extracted and purified to a state suitable for laboratory use. Our laboratory has developed a simple method of extraction and purification of fungal DNA appropriate for enzymatic manipulation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) appli...

  9. Comparison of DNA extraction methods for sweet corn and processed sweet corns.

    PubMed

    Takabatake, Reona; Noritake, Hiromichi; Noguchi, Akio; Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2013-01-01

    DNA was extracted from sweet corn and its processed products using four DNA extraction methods: the CTAB method, the DNeasy Plant Maxi kit, GM Quicker 3, and Genomic-tip 20/G. DNA was successfully extracted from raw sweet corn and baby corn samples using all four methods. Meanwhile, from frozen, canned, and dry pack products, DNA was well extracted using the DNeasy Plant Maxi kit, GM Quicker 3, and Genomic-tip 20/G, but not enough with the CTAB method. The highest yield of DNA was obtained with Genomic-tip 20/G. The degree of degradation of extracted DNA was observed to increase in the order of raw, frozen, canned, dry pack, and baby corn samples. To evaluate the quality of extracted DNA, real-time PCR analyses were conducted using three maize endogenous genes. The DNAs extracted using GM Quicker 3 had high purity, suggesting that GM Quicker 3 would be the most suitable method for DNA extraction from processed sweet corn products.

  10. DNA extraction protocols from dormant buds of twelve woody plant genera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standard plant DNA extraction protocols call for samples of newly expanding leaves and shoots yet analysis is sometimes needed when plants are dormant. We evaluated three DNA extraction protocols using dormant buds from 40 species and four hybrids of 12 genera. Two protocols were from ready-to-use ...

  11. Tailing DNA aptamers with a functional protein by two-step enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Mari; Hayashi, Kounosuke; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2013-12-01

    An efficient, quantitative synthetic strategy for aptamer-enzyme conjugates was developed by using a two-step enzymatic reaction. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) was used to first incorporate a Z-Gln-Gly (QG) modified nucleotide which can act as a glutamine donor for a subsequent enzymatic reaction, to the 3'-OH of a DNA aptamer. Microbial transglutaminase (MTG) then catalyzed the cross-linking between the Z-QG modified aptamers and an enzyme tagged with an MTG-reactive lysine containing peptide. The use of a Z-QG modified dideoxynucleotide (Z-QG-ddUTP) or a deoxyuridine triphosphate (Z-QG-dUTP) in the TdT reaction enables the controlled introduction of a single or multiple MTG reactive residues. This leads to the preparation of enzyme-aptamer and (enzyme)n-aptamer conjugates with different detection limits of thrombin, a model analyte, in a sandwich enzyme-linked aptamer assay (ELAA). Since the combination of two enzymatic reactions yields high site-specificity and requires only short peptide substrates, the methodology should be useful for the labeling of DNA/RNA aptamers with proteins.

  12. A modified acidic approach for DNA extraction from plant species containing high levels of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, M M; Siqueira, M V B M; Val, T M; Pavanelli, J C; Monteiro, M; Grando, C; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Gimenes, M A

    2014-08-25

    Purified genomic DNA can be difficult to obtain from some plant species because of the presence of impurities such as polysaccharides, which are often co-extracted with DNA. In this study, we developed a fast, simple, and low-cost protocol for extracting DNA from plants containing high levels of secondary metabolites. This protocol does not require the use of volatile toxic reagents such as mercaptoethanol, chloroform, or phenol and allows the extraction of high-quality DNA from wild and cultivated tropical species.

  13. Fast-Track, One-Step E. coli Detection: A Miniaturized Hydrogel Array Permits Specific Direct PCR and DNA Hybridization while Amplification.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Antje; Pollok, Sibyll; Rudloff, Anne; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    A timesaving and convenient method for bacterial detection based on one-step, one-tube deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization on hydrogel array while target gene amplification is described. The hydrogel array is generated by a fast one-pot synthesis, where N,N'-dimethylacrylamide/polyethyleneglycol(PEG1900 )-bisacrylamide mixture polymerizes via radical photoinitiation by visible light within 20 min concomitant with in situ capture probe immobilization. These DNA-functionalized hydrogel droplets arrayed on a planar glass surface are placed in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mixture during the thermal amplification cycles. The bacterial cells can be implemented in a direct PCR reaction, omitting the need for prior template DNA extraction. The resulting fluorescence signal is immediately detectable after the end of the PCR (1 h) following one short washing step by microscopy. Therefore a valid signal can be reached within 1.5 h including 10 min for pipetting and placement of the tubes and chips. The performance of this novel hydrogel DNA array was successfully proven with varying cell numbers down to a limit of 10(1) Escherichia coli cells.

  14. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction.

  15. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol–chloroform–isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol–chloroform–isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction. PMID:24834966

  16. Enhanced method for microbial community DNA extraction and purification from agricultural yellow loess soil.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Mathur Nadarajan; Gim, Geun Ho; Ryu, Jaewon; Kim, Pyung Il; Lee, Chul Won; Kim, Si Wouk

    2015-11-01

    In this study, novel DNA extraction and purification methods were developed to obtain high-quantity and reliable quality DNA from the microbial community of agricultural yellow loess soil samples. The efficiencies of five different soil DNAextraction protocols were evaluated on the basis of DNA yield, quality and DNA shearing. Our suggested extraction method, which used CTAB, EDTA and cell membrane lytic enzymes in the extraction followed by DNA precipitation using isopropanol, yielded a maximum DNA content of 42.28 ± 5.59 µg/g soil. In addition, among the five different purification protocols, the acid-treated polyvinyl polypyrrolidone (PVPP) spin column purification method yielded high-quality DNA and recovered 91% of DNA from the crude DNA. Spectrophotometry revealed that the ultraviolet A 260/A 230 and A 260/A 280 absorbance ratios of the purified DNA were 1.82 ± 0.03 and 1.94 ± 0.05, respectively. PCR-based 16S rRNA amplification showed clear bands at ~1.5 kb with acid-treated PVPP-purified DNA templates. In conclusion, our suggested extraction and purification protocols can be used to recover high concentration, high purity, and high-molecular-weight DNA from clay and silica-rich agricultural soil samples.

  17. Simple and highly effective DNA extraction methods from old skeletal remains using silica columns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Na Young; Sim, Jeong Eun; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2010-10-01

    The recovery of DNA data from old skeletal remains is often difficult due to degraded and very low yield of extracted DNA and the presence of PCR inhibitors. Herein, we compared several silica-based DNA extraction methods from artificially degraded DNA, DNA with PCR inhibitors and DNA from old skeletal remains using quantitative real-time PCR. We present a modified large-scale silica-based extraction combined with complete demineralization, that enables maximum DNA recovery and efficient elimination of PCR inhibitors. This is performed with high concentration of EDTA solution for demineralization of bone powder followed by QIAamp spin columns and buffers from the QIAquick PCR purification kit. We have successfully used this modified technique to perform STR analysis for 55-year-old skeletal remains. The results of this study will contribute to solve the forensic cases dealing with skeletal remains.

  18. Physical Pre-Treatment Improves Efficient DNA Extraction and qPCR Sensitivity from Clostridium Difficile Spores in Faecal Swine Specimens.

    PubMed

    Grześkowiak, Łukasz; Zentek, Jürgen; Vahjen, Wilfried

    2016-11-01

    A considerable fraction of the faecal microbiota is spore-forming. Molecular quantification of bacteria may be underestimated if preceded with nucleic acid extraction without special treatment to extract recalcitrant bacterial spores. The objective of this study was to improve the DNA extraction regarding the presence of Clostridium difficile spores in faecal swine specimens. Sow faeces were inoculated with spores of C. difficile (10(6) CFU), frozen at - 30 °C overnight and subjected to DNA extraction. As a preceding step to a standard DNA extraction method (QIAamp DNA stool Mini kit), different physical treatments such as microwave oven heating and repeated bead-beating techniques and a combination of both were applied and compared with each other by means of qPCR. Using a standard DNA extraction method only, C. difficile spores were quantified at 4.96 log copy number/200 mg of faeces. A repeated bead-beating at 6 m/s for 10 min followed by a standard DNA extraction resulted in 5.77 log copy number of spores in inoculated faeces. Heating in a microwave oven at 800 W for 1, 3, 5 and 10 min followed by a standard DNA extraction resulted in a gene quantification of up to 4.89 log copy number. A combination of both methods resulted in the bacterial gene quantity of 5.37 log copy number. Pre-treatment with repeated bead-beating led to the highest quantification of bacteria, and therefore it can be applied for more efficient DNA extraction from spores of C. difficile in faecal specimens.

  19. Extraction of human genomic DNA from whole blood using a magnetic microsphere method.

    PubMed

    Gong, Rui; Li, Shengying

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of molecular biology and the life sciences, magnetic extraction is a simple, automatic, and highly efficient method for separating biological molecules, performing immunoassays, and other applications. Human blood is an ideal source of human genomic DNA. Extracting genomic DNA by traditional methods is time-consuming, and phenol and chloroform are toxic reagents that endanger health. Therefore, it is necessary to find a more convenient and efficient method for obtaining human genomic DNA. In this study, we developed urea-formaldehyde resin magnetic microspheres and magnetic silica microspheres for extraction of human genomic DNA. First, a magnetic microsphere suspension was prepared and used to extract genomic DNA from fresh whole blood, frozen blood, dried blood, and trace blood. Second, DNA content and purity were measured by agarose electrophoresis and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The human genomic DNA extracted from whole blood was then subjected to polymerase chain reaction analysis to further confirm its quality. The results of this study lay a good foundation for future research and development of a high-throughput and rapid extraction method for extracting genomic DNA from various types of blood samples.

  20. A comparative evaluation of four DNA extraction protocols from whole blood sample.

    PubMed

    Ghaheri, M; Kahrizi, D; Yari, K; Babaie, A; Suthar, R S; Kazemi, E

    2016-03-31

    All organisms have Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) within their cells. DNA is a complex molecule that contains all of the information necessary to build and maintain an organism. DNA extraction is one of the most basic and essential techniques in the study of DNA that allow huge advances in molecular biology, biotechnology and bioinformatics laboratories. Whole blood samples are one of the main sources used to obtain DNA and there are many different protocols available in this issue. In current research, compared four DNA extraction protocols from blood samples; include modified phenol-chloroform protocol, two salting-out and enzyme free method and from commercial kit. The extracted DNAs by these protocols were analyzed according to their time demands, quality and quantity, toxicity and functionality in PCR method. Also the quality and quantity of the extracted DNA were surveyed by gel electrophoresis and Nanodrop spectrophotometry methods. It was observed that there are not significantly differences between these methods about DNA Purity (A260/A280), but the DNA yield (ng DNA/μl) of phenol/chloroform method was higher than other methods. In addition, phenol/chloroform was the most toxic method and it takes more time than other methods. Roche diagnostics GmbH kit was the most expensive among the four methods but the least extraction time was required and it was the safest method.

  1. A high volume extraction and purification method for recovering DNA from human bone.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Pamela L; Stoljarova, Monika; Schmedes, Sarah E; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    DNA recovery, purity and overall extraction efficiency of a protocol employing a novel silica-based column, Hi-Flow(®) (Generon Ltd., Maidenhead, UK), were compared with that of a standard organic DNA extraction methodology. The quantities of DNA recovered by each method were compared by real-time PCR and quality of DNA by STR typing using the PowerPlex(®) ESI 17 Pro System (Promega Corporation, Madison, WI) on DNA from 10 human bone samples. Overall, the Hi-Flow method recovered comparable quantities of DNA ranging from 0.8ng±1 to 900ng±159 of DNA compared with the organic method ranging from 0.5ng±0.9 to 855ng±156 of DNA. Complete profiles (17/17 loci tested) were obtained for at least one of three replicates for 3/10 samples using the Hi-Flow method and from 2/10 samples with the organic method. All remaining bone samples yielded partial profiles for all replicates with both methods. Compared with a standard organic DNA isolation method, the results indicated that the Hi-Flow method provided equal or improved recovery and quality of DNA without the harmful effects of organic extraction. Moreover, larger extraction volumes (up to 20mL) can be employed with the Hi-Flow method which enabled more bone sample to be extracted at one time.

  2. Relaxase DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing that involve different sequence elements of the nic site.

    PubMed

    Lucas, María; González-Pérez, Blanca; Cabezas, Matilde; Moncalian, Gabriel; Rivas, Germán; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-03-19

    TrwC, the relaxase of plasmid R388, catalyzes a series of concerted DNA cleavage and strand transfer reactions on a specific site (nic) of its origin of transfer (oriT). nic contains the cleavage site and an adjacent inverted repeat (IR(2)). Mutation analysis in the nic region indicated that recognition of the IR(2) proximal arm and the nucleotides located between IR(2) and the cleavage site were essential for supercoiled DNA processing, as judged either by in vitro nic cleavage or by mobilization of a plasmid containing oriT. Formation of the IR(2) cruciform and recognition of the distal IR(2) arm and loop were not necessary for these reactions to take place. On the other hand, IR(2) was not involved in TrwC single-stranded DNA processing in vitro. For single-stranded DNA nic cleavage, TrwC recognized a sequence embracing six nucleotides upstream of the cleavage site and two nucleotides downstream. This suggests that TrwC DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing and that different sequence elements are recognized by TrwC in each step. IR(2)-proximal arm recognition was crucial for the initial supercoiled DNA binding. Subsequent recognition of the adjacent single-stranded DNA binding site was required to position the cleavage site in the active center of the protein so that the nic cleavage reaction could take place.

  3. Single-Step DNA Detection Assay Monitoring Dual-Color Light Scattering from Individual Metal Nanoparticle Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Efficiently detecting DNA sequences within a limited time is vital for disease screening and public health monitoring. This calls for a new method that combines high sensitivity, fast read-out time, and easy manipulation of the sample, avoiding the extensive steps of DNA amplification, purification, or grafting to a surface. Here, we introduce photon cross-correlation spectroscopy as a new method for specific DNA sensing with high sensitivity in a single-step homogeneous solution phase. Our approach is based on confocal dual-color illumination and detection of the scattering intensities from individual silver nanoparticles and gold nanorods. In the absence of the target DNA, the nanoparticles move independently and their respective scattering signals are uncorrelated. In the presence of the target DNA, the probe-functionalized gold and silver nanoparticles assemble via DNA hybridization with the target, giving rise to temporal coincidence between the signals scattered by each nanoparticle. The degree of coincidence accurately quantifies the amount of target DNA. To demonstrate the efficiency of our technique, we detect a specific DNA sequence of sesame, an allergenic food ingredient, for a range of concentration from 5 pM to 1.5 nM with a limit of detection of 1 pM. Our method is sensitive and specific enough to detect single nucleotide deletion and mismatch. With the dual-color scattering signals being much brighter than fluorescence-based analogs, the analysis is fast, quantitative, and simple to operate, making it valuable for biosensing applications. PMID:28261666

  4. Using a commercial DNA extraction kit to obtain RNA from mature rice kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few RNA extraction protocols or commercial kits work well with the starchy endosperm of cereal grains. Standard RNA extraction protocols are time consuming, use large amounts of expensive chemicals, and leave behind hazardous wastes. However, there are numerous commercial DNA extraction kits that ...

  5. [Method validation according to ISO 15189 and SH GTA 04: application for the extraction of DNA and its quantitative evaluation by a spectrophotometric assay].

    PubMed

    Harlé, Alexandre; Lion, Maëva; Husson, Marie; Dubois, Cindy; Merlin, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    According to the French legislation on medical biology (January 16th, 2010), all biological laboratories must be accredited according to ISO 15189 for at least 50% of their activities before the end of 2016. The extraction of DNA from a sample of interest, whether solid or liquid is one of the critical steps in molecular biology and specifically in somatic or constitutional genetic. The extracted DNA must meet a number of criteria such quality and also be in sufficient concentration to allow molecular biology assays such as the detection of somatic mutations. This paper describes the validation of the extraction and purification of DNA using chromatographic column extraction and quantitative determination by spectrophotometric assay, according to ISO 15189 and the accreditation technical guide in Human Health SH-GTA-04.

  6. Study of the cell cycle-dependent assembly of the DNA pre-replication centres in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Y; Laemmli, U K

    1994-01-01

    RPA is a cellular, three-subunit, single-stranded (ss) DNA binding protein, which assists T-antigen in the assembly of the pre-priming complex in the SV40 replication system. By immunodepletion and complementation, we have identified RPA as an essential factor for cellular DNA replication in Xenopus extracts. RPA assembles post-mitotically on the decondensing chromosomes into numerous subnuclear pre-replication centres (preRCs) which serve, upon formation of the nuclear membrane, as RCs for the initiation of DNA synthesis. By a variety of experiments including the use of isolated components, we demonstrate that an inactive cdc2-cyclin B kinase complex is essential to allow post-mitotic assembly of the preRCs. In contrast, the active cdk2-cyclin A kinase does not impede or facilitate the assembly of preRCs. Digestion analysis using the single-strand-specific P1 nuclease as well as competition experiments with ssDNA, reveal that replication-associated unwinding of the DNA, assisted by RPA, requires the formation of the nuclear membrane. The p21 cdk-interacting protein Cip1 appears to inhibit DNA replication prior to the unwinding DNA step, but after assembly of preRC and nuclear reconstruction. Images PMID:8076611

  7. Modification of a commercial DNA extraction kit for safe and rapid recovery of DNA and RNA simultaneously from soil, without the use of harmful solvents

    PubMed Central

    Tournier, E.; Amenc, L.; Pablo, A.L.; Legname, E.; Blanchart, E.; Plassard, C.; Robin, A.; Bernard, L.

    2015-01-01

    An optimized method, based on the coupling of two commercial kits, is described for the extraction of soil nucleic acids, with simultaneous extraction and purification of DNA and RNA following a cascade scheme and avoiding the use of harmful solvents. The protocol canmonitor the variations in the recovery yield of DNA and RNA from soils of various types.The quantitative version of the protocol was obtained by testing the starting soil quantity, the grinding parameters and the final elution volumes, in order to avoid saturation of both kits. • A first soil-crushing step in liquid nitrogen could be added for the assessment of fungal parameters. • The protocol was efficienton different tropical soils, including Andosol, while their high contents of clays, including poorly crystalline clays, and Fe and Al oxides usually make the nucleic acid extraction more difficult. • The RNA recovery yield from the previous tropical soils appeared to correlate better to soil respiration than DNA, which is positively influenced by soil clay content. PMID:26150987

  8. Modification of a commercial DNA extraction kit for safe and rapid recovery of DNA and RNA simultaneously from soil, without the use of harmful solvents.

    PubMed

    Tournier, E; Amenc, L; Pablo, A L; Legname, E; Blanchart, E; Plassard, C; Robin, A; Bernard, L

    2015-01-01

    An optimized method, based on the coupling of two commercial kits, is described for the extraction of soil nucleic acids, with simultaneous extraction and purification of DNA and RNA following a cascade scheme and avoiding the use of harmful solvents. The protocol canmonitor the variations in the recovery yield of DNA and RNA from soils of various types.The quantitative version of the protocol was obtained by testing the starting soil quantity, the grinding parameters and the final elution volumes, in order to avoid saturation of both kits. •A first soil-crushing step in liquid nitrogen could be added for the assessment of fungal parameters.•The protocol was efficienton different tropical soils, including Andosol, while their high contents of clays, including poorly crystalline clays, and Fe and Al oxides usually make the nucleic acid extraction more difficult.•The RNA recovery yield from the previous tropical soils appeared to correlate better to soil respiration than DNA, which is positively influenced by soil clay content.

  9. Less is More--Optimization of DNA Extraction from Canine Feces.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Christina D; Wictum, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Although most DNA crime laboratories may not encounter fecal samples often, they are a familiar sample type in non-human forensic laboratories due to their prevalence in the environment. Fecal matter can be challenging due to low numbers of nucleated cells and the presence of inhibitors that impede amplification success. Sampling location (internal vs. external), sampling quantity (10-200 mg), and various extraction protocols (silica matrix, bead beating, and clean-up column) were evaluated to maximize DNA yield. The greatest yield of intact DNA was obtained using a modified silica matrix extraction protocol (VGL-Fecal) on 30-50 mg of fecal matter collected from the external surface of a stool that had been dried for 24 h. This optimized sampling and extraction protocol was applied to a pilot study where DNA yield and genotyping success were evaluated. By optimizing our collection, sampling, and extraction procedures, a reliable method for maximizing the yield of canine fecal DNA was developed.

  10. Effect of DNA extraction procedure, repeated extraction and ethidium monoazide (EMA)/propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment on overall DNA yield and impact on microbial fingerprints for bacteria, fungi and archaea in a reference soil.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andreas O; Praeg, Nadine; Reitschuler, Christoph; Illmer, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Different DNA extraction protocols were evaluated on a reference soil. A wide difference was found in the total extractable DNA as derived from different extraction protocols. Concerning the DNA yield phenol-chloroform-isomyl alcohol extraction resulted in high DNA yield but also in a remarkable co-extraction of contaminants making PCR from undiluted DNA extracts impossible. By comparison of two different extraction kits, the Macherey&Nagel SoilExtract II kit resulted in the highest DNA yields when buffer SL1 and the enhancer solution were applied. The enhancer solution not only significantly increased the DNA yield but also the amount of co-extracted contaminates, whereas additional disintegration strategies did not. Although a three times repeated DNA extraction increased the total amount of extracted DNA, microbial fingerprints were merely affected. However, with the 5th extraction this changed. A reduction of total DGGE band numbers was observed for archaea and fungi, whereas for bacteria the diversity increased. The application of ethidium monoazide (EMA) or propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment aiming on the selective removal of soil DNA derived from cells lacking cell wall integrity resulted in a significant reduction of total extracted DNA, however, the hypothesized effect on microbial fingerprints failed to appear indicating the need for further investigations.

  11. Effect of DNA extraction procedure, repeated extraction and ethidium monoazide (EMA)/propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment on overall DNA yield and impact on microbial fingerprints for bacteria, fungi and archaea in a reference soil

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas O.; Praeg, Nadine; Reitschuler, Christoph; Illmer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Different DNA extraction protocols were evaluated on a reference soil. A wide difference was found in the total extractable DNA as derived from different extraction protocols. Concerning the DNA yield phenol–chloroform–isomyl alcohol extraction resulted in high DNA yield but also in a remarkable co-extraction of contaminants making PCR from undiluted DNA extracts impossible. By comparison of two different extraction kits, the Macherey&Nagel SoilExtract II kit resulted in the highest DNA yields when buffer SL1 and the enhancer solution were applied. The enhancer solution not only significantly increased the DNA yield but also the amount of co-extracted contaminates, whereas additional disintegration strategies did not. Although a three times repeated DNA extraction increased the total amount of extracted DNA, microbial fingerprints were merely affected. However, with the 5th extraction this changed. A reduction of total DGGE band numbers was observed for archaea and fungi, whereas for bacteria the diversity increased. The application of ethidium monoazide (EMA) or propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment aiming on the selective removal of soil DNA derived from cells lacking cell wall integrity resulted in a significant reduction of total extracted DNA, however, the hypothesized effect on microbial fingerprints failed to appear indicating the need for further investigations. PMID:26339125

  12. Evaluation of commercial kits for extraction of DNA and RNA from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Devon; Weese, J Scott

    2012-12-01

    Commercial nucleic acid extraction kits are a cost effective, efficient and convenient way to isolate DNA and RNA from bacteria. Despite the increasing importance of the gastrointestinal pathogen, Clostridium difficile, and the increased use of nucleic acids in its identification, characterization, and investigation of virulence factors, no standardized or recommended methods for nucleic acid isolation exist. Here, we sought to evaluate 4 commercial DNA extraction kits and 3 commercial RNA extraction kits assessing cost, labor intensity, purity, quantity and quality of nucleic acid preparations. The DNA extraction kits produced a range of concentrations (20.9-546 ng/ml) and A(260/280) ratios (1.92-2.11). All kits were suitable for DNA extraction with the exception of the Roche MagNA pure LC DNA isolation kit III which produced DNA of high yield but with substantial shearing, but that did not affect downstream PCR amplifications. For RNA extraction, the Qiagen RNeasy mini kit stood out producing preparations of consistently higher concentrations and higher RNA integrity numbers (RIN). The Roche MagNA pure LC RNA isolation kit produced preparations that could not be properly assigned RINs due to a failure to remove small RNAs which were interpreted as degradation. Good DNA and RNA yield are critical but methods are often overlooked. This study highlights the potential for critical variation between established commercial systems and the need for assessment of any extraction methods that are used.

  13. A filter paper-based microdevice for low-cost, rapid, and automated DNA extraction and amplification from diverse sample types.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wupeng; Zhuang, Bin; Zhang, Pengfei; Han, Junping; Li, Cai-Xia; Liu, Peng

    2014-10-07

    A plastic microfluidic device that integrates a filter disc as a DNA capture phase was successfully developed for low-cost, rapid and automated DNA extraction and PCR amplification from various raw samples. The microdevice was constructed by sandwiching a piece of Fusion 5 filter, as well as a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) membrane, between two PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) layers. An automated DNA extraction from 1 μL of human whole blood can be finished on the chip in 7 minutes by sequentially aspirating NaOH, HCl, and water through the filter. The filter disc containing extracted DNA was then taken out directly for PCR. On-chip DNA purification from 0.25-1 μL of human whole blood yielded 8.1-21.8 ng of DNA, higher than those obtained using QIAamp® DNA Micro kits. To realize DNA extraction from raw samples, an additional sample loading chamber containing a filter net with an 80 μm mesh size was designed in front of the extraction chamber to accommodate sample materials. Real-world samples, including whole blood, dried blood stains on Whatman® 903 paper, dried blood stains on FTA™ cards, buccal swabs, saliva, and cigarette butts, can all be processed in the system in 8 minutes. In addition, multiplex amplification of 15 STR (short tandem repeat) loci and Sanger-based DNA sequencing of the 520 bp GJB2 gene were accomplished from the filters that contained extracted DNA from blood. To further prove the feasibility of integrating this extraction method with downstream analyses, "in situ" PCR amplifications were successfully performed in the DNA extraction chamber following DNA purification from blood and blood stains without DNA elution. Using a modified protocol to bond the PDMS and PMMA, our plastic PDMS devices withstood the PCR process without any leakage. This study represents a significant step towards the practical application of on-chip DNA extraction methods, as well as the development of fully integrated genetic analytical systems.

  14. Evaluation of four different DNA extraction methods in coagulase-negative staphylococci clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Caio Fernando de; Paim, Thiago Galvão da Silva; Reiter, Keli Cristine; Rieger, Alexandre; D'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2014-01-01

    Currently there are several methods to extract bacterial DNA based on different principles. However, the amount and the quality of the DNA obtained by each one of those methods is highly variable and microorganism dependent, as illustrated by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) which have a thick cell wall that is difficult to lyse. This study was designed to compare the quality and the amount of CoNS DNA, extracted by four different techniques: two in-house protocols and two commercial kits. DNA amount and quality determination was performed through spectrophotometry. The extracted DNA was also analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis and by PCR. 267 isolates of CoNS were used in this study. The column method and thermal lyses showed better results with regard to DNA quality (mean ratio of A260/280 = 1.95) and average concentration of DNA (), respectively. All four methods tested provided appropriate DNA for PCR amplification, but with different yields. DNA quality is important since it allows the application of a large number of molecular biology techniques, and also it's storage for a longer period of time. In this sense the extraction method based on an extraction column presented the best results for CoNS.

  15. How Severely Is DNA Quantification Hampered by RNA Co-extraction?

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ignacio; Remm, Matthieu; Frasquilho, Sonia; Betsou, Fay; Mathieson, William

    2015-10-01

    The optional RNase digest that is part of many DNA extraction protocols is often omitted, either because RNase is not provided in the kit or because users do not want to risk contaminating their laboratory. Consequently, co-eluting RNA can become a "contaminant" of unknown magnitude in a DNA extraction. We extracted DNA from liver, lung, kidney, and heart tissues and established that 28-52% of the "DNA" as assessed by spectrophotometry is actually RNA (depending on tissue type). Including an RNase digest in the extraction protocol reduced 260:280 purity ratios. Co-eluting RNA drives an overestimation of DNA yield when quantification is carried out using OD 260 nm spectrophotometry, or becomes an unquantified contaminant when spectrofluorometry is used for DNA quantification. This situation is potentially incompatible with the best practice guidelines for biobanks issued by organizations such as the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories, which state that biospecimens should be accurately characterized in terms of their identity, purity, concentration, and integrity. Consequently, we conclude that an RNase digest must be included in DNA extractions if pure DNA is required. We also discuss the implications of unquantified RNA contamination in DNA samples in the context of laboratory accreditation schemes.

  16. A Rapid and Cost-Effective Method for DNA Extraction from Archival Herbarium Specimens.

    PubMed

    Krinitsina, A A; Sizova, T V; Zaika, M A; Speranskaya, A S; Sukhorukov, A P

    2015-11-01

    Here we report a rapid and cost-effective method for the extraction of total DNA from herbarium specimens up to 50-90-year-old. The method takes about 2 h, uses AMPure XP magnetic beads diluted by PEG-8000- containing buffer, and does not require use of traditional volatile components like chloroform, phenol, and liquid nitrogen. It yields up to 4 µg of total nucleic acid with high purity from about 30 mg of dry material. The quality of the extracted DNA was tested by PCR amplification of 5S rRNA and rbcL genes (nuclear and chloroplast DNA markers) and compared against the traditional chloroform/isoamyl alcohol method. Our results demonstrate that the use of the magnetic beads is crucial for extraction of DNA suitable for subsequent PCR from herbarium samples due to the decreasing inhibitor concentrations, reducing short fragments of degraded DNA, and increasing median DNA fragment sizes.

  17. Simple practical approach for sample loading prior to DNA extraction using a silica monolith in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Joyce, Domino A; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-12-07

    A novel DNA loading methodology is presented for performing DNA extraction on a microfluidic system. DNA in a chaotropic salt solution was manually loaded onto a silica monolith orthogonal to the subsequent flow of wash and elution solutions. DNA was successfully extracted from buccal swabs using electro-osmotic pumping (EOP) coupled with in situ reagents contained within a 1.5% agarose gel matrix. The extracted DNA was of sufficient quantity and purity for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification.

  18. Complete sequence analysis of 18S rDNA based on genomic DNA extraction from individual Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Xu, Ji-Ru; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Hang

    2012-05-01

    The study for the first time attempted to accomplish 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) complete sequence amplification and analysis for three Demodex species (Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis and Demodex canis) based on gDNA extraction from individual mites. The mites were treated by DNA Release Additive and Hot Start II DNA Polymerase so as to promote mite disruption and increase PCR specificity. Determination of D. folliculorum gDNA showed that the gDNA yield reached the highest at 1 mite, tending to descend with the increase of mite number. The individual mite gDNA was successfully used for 18S rDNA fragment (about 900 bp) amplification examination. The alignments of 18S rDNA complete sequences of individual mite samples and those of pooled mite samples ( ≥ 1000mites/sample) showed over 97% identities for each species, indicating that the gDNA extracted from a single individual mite was as satisfactory as that from pooled mites for PCR amplification. Further pairwise sequence analyses showed that average divergence, genetic distance, transition/transversion or phylogenetic tree could not effectively identify the three Demodex species, largely due to the differentiation in the D. canis isolates. It can be concluded that the individual Demodex mite gDNA can satisfy the molecular study of Demodex. 18S rDNA complete sequence is suitable for interfamily identification in Cheyletoidea, but whether it is suitable for intrafamily identification cannot be confirmed until the ascertainment of the types of Demodex mites parasitizing in dogs.

  19. Evaluating DNA Extraction Methods for Community Profiling of Pig Hindgut Microbial Community.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Hugenholtz, Philip; Batstone, Damien John

    2015-01-01

    Recovery of high quality PCR-amplifiable DNA has been the general minimal requirement for DNA extraction methods for bulk molecular analysis. However, modern high through-put community profiling technologies are more sensitive to representativeness and reproducibility of DNA extraction method. Here, we assess the impact of three DNA extraction methods (with different levels of extraction harshness) for assessing hindgut microbiomes from pigs fed with different diets (with different physical properties). DNA extraction from each sample was performed in three technical replicates for each extraction method and sequenced by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Host was the primary driver of molecular sequencing outcomes, particularly on samples analysed by wheat based diets, but higher variability, with one failed extraction occurred on samples from a barley fed pig. Based on these results, an effective method will enable reproducible and quality outcomes on a range of samples, whereas an ineffective method will fail to generate extract, but host (rather than extraction method) remains the primary factor.

  20. An evaluation of the performance of five extraction methods: Chelex® 100, QIAamp® DNA Blood Mini Kit, QIAamp® DNA Investigator Kit, QIAsymphony® DNA Investigator® Kit and DNA IQ™.

    PubMed

    Ip, Stephen C Y; Lin, Sze-Wah; Lai, Kam-Ming

    2015-05-01

    DNA left at a crime scene was often limited in amount and far from pristine. To maximize the chance of recovering as much information as possible from such compromised samples, an appropriate extraction method using the available technologies needs to be devised. In this study, we used human blood, buffy coat and a total of 76 simulated touch DNA samples to test the effectiveness of the following five common DNA extraction methods, namely, Chelex® 100, QIAamp® DNA Blood Mini Kit, QIAamp® DNA Investigator Kit, QIAsymphony® DNA Investigator® Kit and DNA IQ™ system, in the recovery of such DNA. We demonstrated that the QIAamp® and QIAsymphony® DNA Investigator® Kits, and the DNA IQ™ system, exhibited a better effectiveness in DNA recovery amongst these methods and yielded extracts with higher success rate in subsequent DNA profiling. These extracts also generated profiles with better intra-colour signal balance. The findings in this work allowed us to propose an extraction approach as follows: 1) casework samples shall be extracted with the QIAamp®/QIAsymphony® DNA Investigator® Kits or the DNA IQ™ system, viz., QIAsymphony® DNA Investigator® Kit and DNA IQ™, due to their higher throughput, are for the touched DNA evidence from the volume crime, while QIAamp® DNA Investigator Kit is preferable for challenging bloodstain samples; and 2) control samples, such as buccal swab, with known identity can be extracted with the Chelex, due to their cheaper cost per sample.

  1. Characterization of the initial steps in the T7 DNA ejection process

    PubMed Central

    González-García, Verónica A; Bocanegra, Rebeca; Pulido-Cid, Mar; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Cuervo, Ana; Carrascosa, José L

    2015-01-01

    A specialized complex, the tail, is the most common strategy employed by bacterial viruses to deliver their genome without disrupting cell integrity. T7 has a short, non-contractile tail formed by a tubular structure surrounded by fibers. Recent studies showed that incubation of the virus with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides (LPS) resulted in complete delivery of the viral genome, demonstrating for the first time that LPS are the T7 receptor. Further screening of the bacterial envelope for proteinaceous compounds that affect T7 ejection showed that porins OmpA and OmpF affect viral particle adsorption and infection kinetics, suggesting that these proteins play a role in the first steps of virus-host interaction. Comparison of the structures before and after ejection showed the conformational changes needed in the tail for genome delivery. Structural similarities between T7 and other viruses belonging to the Podoviridae family suggests that they could also follow a similar DNA ejection mechanism. PMID:26458390

  2. Assessment of five soil DNA extraction methods and a rapid laboratory-developed method for quality soil DNA extraction for 16S rDNA-based amplification and library construction.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Kalpana; Singh, Salam Pradeep; Goutam, Kapil Kumar; Konwar, Bolin Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Extraction of DNA from soil samples using standard methods often results in low yield and poor quality making them unsuitable for community analysis through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) due to the formation of chimeric products with smaller template DNAs and the presence of humic substances. The present study focused on the assessment of five different methods for metagenomic DNA isolation from soil samples on the basis of processing time, purity, DNA yield, suitability for PCR, restriction digestion and mDNA library construction. A simple and rapid alkali lysis based on indirect DNA extraction from soil was developed which could remove 90% of humic substances without shearing the DNA and permits the rapid and efficient isolation of high quality DNA without the requirement of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide and phenol cleanup. The size of DNA fragment in the crude extracts was >23 kb and yield 0.5-5 μg/g of soil. mDNA purification using Sephadex G-50 resin yielded high concentration of DNA from soil samples, which has been successfully used for 16S rDNA based amplification of a 1500 bp DNA fragment with 27F and 1492R universal primers followed by restriction digestion and mDNA library construction.

  3. Methodology: a modified method for high-quality DNA extraction for molecular analysis in cereal plants.

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Z H; Turi, N A; Khaliq, I; Rabbani, M A; Malik, S A

    2011-01-01

    Cereal crops that have rigid non-cellulose components in the cell wall tissues of leaves and high starch and protein content in grains face limitations in DNA extraction. Advanced molecular genetic techniques such as mapping and marker-assisted selection programs require pure and quick DNA extraction. In this study, we developed methods for isolating high-quality genomic DNA from leaves and seeds of major cereal crops with minor modifications. DNA yields ranged from 300 to 1800 ng for 0.01 g seed or leaf tissue.

  4. Single step plasmid DNA purification using methacrylate monolith bearing combination of ion-exchange and hydrophobic groups.

    PubMed

    Smrekar, Vida; Smrekar, Franc; Strancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2013-02-08

    Purification of high quantities of human grade plasmid DNA is one of the most intensive production steps. Because of that several methods have been proposed, among them also chromatographic purification using methacrylate monoliths. Recently, a process comprising the combination of hydrophobic interaction (HIC) monolith and ion-exchange monolith was developed. In this work both chemistries were tried to be introduced on a single monolith. Methacrylate monoliths bearing octylamine groups, combination of butyl (C4) grafted methacrylate groups and diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) groups as well as grafted chains bearing both C4 and DEAE groups were prepared. All monoliths were investigated for their ionic and protein capacity and compared to conventional epoxy, C4, and DEAE methacrylate monoliths. Octylamine monolith and monolith bearing combination of C4 grafted methacrylate groups and DEAE groups were found to be the most promising candidates and were further tested for plasmid DNA (pDNA) dynamic binding capacity under ion-exchange (IEX) and HIC binding conditions and ability to separate open circular (OC) from supercoiled (SC) pDNA forms and RNA from pDNA. Since monolith bearing combination of grafted C4 methacrylate groups and DEAE groups was superior in all three tested features, exhibiting pDNA dynamic binding capacity of 4.7 mg/ml under IEX conditions and 2.1mg/ml under HIC conditions, it was used for the development of a single step purification method and tested with pure pDNA as well as with cell lysate. Developed method removed over 99% of RNA, host cell proteins (HCP) and genomic DNA (gDNA) demonstrating capacity to purify around 1.5mg of pDNA/ml of monolith from cell lysate.

  5. The effect of different solvents and number of extraction steps on the polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity of basil leaves (Ocimum basilicum L.) extracts.

    PubMed

    Złotek, Urszula; Mikulska, Sylwia; Nagajek, Małgorzata; Świeca, Michał

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine best conditions for the extraction of phenolic compounds from fresh, frozen and lyophilized basil leaves. The acetone mixtures with the highest addition of acetic acid extracted most of the phenolic compounds when fresh and freeze-dried material have been used. The three times procedure was more effective than once shaking procedure in most of the extracts obtained from fresh basil leaves - unlike the extracts derived from frozen material. Surprisingly, there were not any significant differences in the content of phenolics between the two used procedures in the case of lyophilized basil leaves used for extraction. Additionally, the positive correlation between the phenolic compounds content and antioxidant activity of the studied extracts has been noted. It is concluded that the acetone mixtures were more effective than the methanol ones for polyphenol extraction. The number of extraction steps in most of the cases was also a statistically significant factor affecting the yield of phenolic extraction as well as antioxidant potential of basil leaf extracts.

  6. Elimination of bioweapons agents from forensic samples during extraction of human DNA.

    PubMed

    Timbers, Jason; Wilkinson, Della; Hause, Christine C; Smith, Myron L; Zaidi, Mohsin A; Laframboise, Denis; Wright, Kathryn E

    2014-11-01

    Collection of DNA for genetic profiling is a powerful means for the identification of individuals responsible for crimes and terrorist acts. Biologic hazards, such as bacteria, endospores, toxins, and viruses, could contaminate sites of terrorist activities and thus could be present in samples collected for profiling. The fate of these hazards during DNA isolation has not been thoroughly examined. Our goals were to determine whether the DNA extraction process used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police eliminates or neutralizes these agents and if not, to establish methods that render samples safe without compromising the human DNA. Our results show that bacteria, viruses, and toxins were reduced to undetectable levels during DNA extraction, but endospores remained viable. Filtration of samples after DNA isolation eliminated viable spores from the samples but left DNA intact. We also demonstrated that contamination of samples with some bacteria, endospores, and toxins for longer than 1 h compromised the ability to complete genetic profiling.

  7. Optimization of HPV DNA detection in urine by improving collection, storage, and extraction.

    PubMed

    Vorsters, A; Van den Bergh, J; Micalessi, I; Biesmans, S; Bogers, J; Hens, A; De Coster, I; Ieven, M; Van Damme, P

    2014-11-01

    The benefits of using urine for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA have been evaluated in disease surveillance, epidemiological studies, and screening for cervical cancers in specific subgroups. HPV DNA testing in urine is being considered for important purposes, notably the monitoring of HPV vaccination in adolescent girls and young women who do not wish to have a vaginal examination. The need to optimize and standardize sampling, storage, and processing has been reported.In this paper, we examined the impact of a DNA-conservation buffer, the extraction method, and urine sampling on the detection of HPV DNA and human DNA in urine provided by 44 women with a cytologically normal but HPV DNA-positive cervical sample. Ten women provided first-void and midstream urine samples. DNA analysis was performed using real-time PCR to allow quantification of HPV and human DNA.The results showed that an optimized method for HPV DNA detection in urine should (a) prevent DNA degradation during extraction and storage, (b) recover cell-free HPV DNA in addition to cell-associated DNA, (c) process a sufficient volume of urine, and (d) use a first-void sample.In addition, we found that detectable human DNA in urine may not be a good internal control for sample validity. HPV prevalence data that are based on urine samples collected, stored, and/or processed under suboptimal conditions may underestimate infection rates.

  8. Two-steps extraction of essential oil, polysaccharides and biphenyl cyclooctene lignans from Schisandra chinensis Baill fruits.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Yang, Yingjie; Liu, Yan; Liu, Zhigang; Zhou, Hongli; Hu, Haobin

    2014-08-05

    A method for two-steps extraction of essential oil, polysaccharides and lignans from Schisandra chinensis Baill had been established. Firstly, S. chinensis was extracted by hydro-distillation, the extracted solution was separated from the water-insoluble residue and precipitated by adding dehydrated alcohol after the essential oil was collected, and then the precipitate as polysaccharide was collected. Finally, second extraction was performed to obtained lignans from the water-insoluble residue with ultrasonic-microwave assisted extraction (UMAE) method. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the UMAE parameters, the optimal conditions were as follows: microwave power 430W, ethanol concentration 84%, particle size of sample 120-mesh sieves, ratio of water to raw material 15 and extraction time 2.1min. Under these optimized conditions, the total extraction yields of five lignans (Schisandrol A, Schisantherin A, Deoxyschisandrin, Schisandrin B and Schisandrin C) had reached 14.22±0.135mg/g. Compared with the traditional method of direct extraction of different bioactive components in respective procedure, the extraction yields of polysaccharides and the five lignans had reached 99% and 95%, respectively. The mean recoveries of the 5 lignan compounds and polysaccharides were 97.75-101.08% and their RSD value was less than 3.88%.The approach proposed in this study not only improved the extraction yield of lignans, but also elevated the utilization of Schisandra resources.

  9. Comparison of DNA extraction kits and modification of DNA elution procedure for the quantitation of subdominant bacteria from piggery effluents with real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Desneux, Jérémy; Pourcher, Anne-Marie

    2014-08-01

    Four commercial DNA extraction kits and a minor modification in the DNA elution procedure were evaluated for the quantitation of bacteria in pig manure samples. The PowerSoil(®), PowerFecal(®), NucleoSpin(®) Soil kits and QIAamp(®) DNA Stool Mini kit were tested on raw manure samples and on lagoon effluents for their ability to quantify total bacteria and a subdominant bacteria specific of pig manure contamination: Lactobacillus amylovorus. The NucleoSpin(®) Soil kit (NS kit), and to a lesser extent the PowerFecal(®) kit were the most efficient methods. Regardless of the kit utilized, the modified elution procedure increased DNA yield in the lagoon effluent by a factor of 1.4 to 1.8. When tested on 10 piggery effluent samples, compared to the QIAamp kit, the NS kit combined with the modified elution step, increased by a factor up to 1.7 log10 the values of the concentration of L. amylovorus. Regardless of the type of manure, the best DNA quality and the highest concentrations of bacteria were obtained using the NS kit combined with the modification of the elution procedure. The method recommended here significantly improved quantitation of subdominant bacteria in manure.

  10. DNA extraction methods for detecting genetically modified foods: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Elsanhoty, Rafaat M; Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy; Jany, Klaus Dieter

    2011-06-15

    The work presented in this manuscript was achieved to compare six different methods for extracting DNA from raw maize and its derived products. The methods that gave higher yield and quality of DNA were chosen to detect the genetic modification in the samples collected from the Egyptian market. The different methods used were evaluated for extracting DNA from maize kernels (without treatment), maize flour (mechanical treatment), canned maize (sweet corn), frozen maize (sweet corn), maize starch, extruded maize, popcorn, corn flacks, maize snacks, and bread made from corn flour (mechanical and thermal treatments). The quality and quantity of the DNA extracted from the standards, containing known percentages of GMO material and from the different food products were evaluated. For qualitative detection of the GMO varieties in foods, the GMOScreen 35S/NOS test kit was used, to screen the genetic modification in the samples. The positive samples for the 35S promoter and/or the NOS terminator were identified by the standard methods adopted by EU. All of the used methods extracted yielded good DNA quality. However, we noted that the purest DNA extract were obtained using the DNA extraction kit (Roche) and this generally was the best method for extracting DNA from most of the maize-derived foods. We have noted that the yield of DNA extracted from maize-derived foods was generally lower in the processed products. The results indicated that 17 samples were positive for the presence of 35S promoter, while 34% from the samples were positive for the genetically modified maize line Bt-176.

  11. DNA extraction protocol for biological ingredient analysis of Liuwei Dihuang Wan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinwei; Chen, Xiaohua; Su, Xiaoquan; Zhao, Huanxin; Han, Maozhen; Bo, Cunpei; Xu, Jian; Bai, Hong; Ning, Kang

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparations are widely used for healthcare and clinical practice. So far, the methods commonly used for quality evaluation of TCM preparations mainly focused on chemical ingredients. The biological ingredient analysis of TCM preparations is also important because TCM preparations usually contain both plant and animal ingredients, which often include some mis-identified herbal materials, adulterants or even some biological contaminants. For biological ingredient analysis, the efficiency of DNA extraction is an important factor which might affect the accuracy and reliability of identification. The component complexity in TCM preparations is high, and DNA might be destroyed or degraded in different degrees after a series of processing procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an effective protocol for DNA extraction from TCM preparations. In this study, we chose a classical TCM preparation, Liuwei Dihuang Wan (LDW), as an example to develop a TCM-specific DNA extraction method. An optimized cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method (TCM-CTAB) and three commonly-used extraction kits were tested for extraction of DNA from LDW samples. Experimental results indicated that DNA with the highest purity and concentration was obtained by using TCM-CTAB. To further evaluate the different extraction methods, amplification of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and the chloroplast genome trnL intron was carried out. The results have shown that PCR amplification was successful only with template of DNA extracted by using TCM-CTAB. Moreover, we performed high-throughput 454 sequencing using DNA extracted by TCM-CTAB. Data analysis showed that 3-4 out of 6 prescribed species were detected from LDW samples, while up to 5 contaminating species were detected, suggesting TCM-CTAB method could facilitate follow-up DNA-based examination of TCM preparations.

  12. Comparing DNA extraction methods for analysis of botanical materials found in anti-diabetic supplements.

    PubMed

    Llongueras, Jose P; Nair, Saraswathy; Salas-Leiva, Dayana; Schwarzbach, Andrea E

    2013-03-01

    A comparative performance evaluation of DNA extraction methods from anti-diabetic botanical supplements using various commercial kits was conducted, to determine which produces the best quality DNA suitable for PCR amplification, sequencing and species identification. All plant materials involved were of suboptimal quality showing various levels of degradation and therefore representing real conditions for testing herbal supplements. Eight different DNA extraction methods were used to isolate genomic DNA from 13 medicinal plant products. Two methods for evaluation, DNA concentration measurements that included absorbance ratios as well as PCR amplifiability, were used to determine quantity and quality of extracted DNA. We found that neither DNA concentrations nor commonly used UV absorbance ratio measurements at A(260)/A(280) between 1.7 and 1.9 are suitable for globally predicting PCR success in these plant samples, and that PCR amplifiablity itself was the best indicator of extracted product quality. However, our results suggest that A(260)/A(280) ratios below about 1.3 and above 2.3 indicated a DNA quality too poor to amplify. Therefore, A(260)/A(280) measurements are not useful to identify samples that likely will amplify but can be used to exclude samples that likely will not amplify reducing the cost for unnecessarily subjecting samples to PCR. The two Nucleospin(®) plant II kit extraction methods produced the most pure and amplifiable genomic DNA extracts. Our results suggest that there are clear, discernable differences between extraction methods for low quality plant samples in terms of producing contamination-free, high-quality genomic DNA to be used for further analysis.

  13. Extraction of DNA from human embryos after long-term preservation in formalin and Bouin's solutions.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Momoko; Minegishi, Katsura; Komada, Munekazu; Tsuchiya, Maiko; Kameda, Tomomi; Yamada, Shigehito

    2016-05-01

    The "Kyoto Collection of Human Embryos" at Kyoto University was begun in 1961. Although morphological analyses of samples in the Kyoto Collection have been performed, these embryos have been considered difficult to genetically analyze because they have been preserved in formalin or Bouin's solution for 20-50 years. Owing to the recent advances in molecular biology, it has become possible to extract DNA from long-term fixed tissues. The purpose of this study was to extract DNA from wet preparations of human embryo samples after long-term preservation in fixing solution. We optimized the DNA extraction protocol to be suitable for tissues that have been damaged by long-term fixation, including DNA-protein crosslinking damage. Diluting Li2 CO3 with 70% ethanol effectively removed picric acid from samples fixed in Bouin's solution. Additionally, 20.0 mg/mL proteinase was valuable to lyse the long-term fixed samples. The extracted DNA was checked with PCR amplification using several sets of primers and sequence analysis. The PCR products included at least 295- and 838-bp amplicons. These results show that the extracted DNA is applicable for genetic analyses, and indicate that old embryos in the Kyoto Collection should be made available for future studies. The protocol described in this study can successfully extract DNA from old specimens and, with improvements, should be applicable in research aiming to understand the molecular mechanisms of human congenital anomalies.

  14. DNA extraction methods and multiple sampling to improve molecular diagnosis of Sarcocystis spp. in cattle hearts.

    PubMed

    Bräunig, Patrícia; Portella, Luiza Pires; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Libardoni, Felipe; Sangioni, Luis Antonio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias

    2016-10-01

    Molecular detection of Sarcocystis spp. in tissue samples can be useful for experimental and diagnostic purposes. However, the parasite spreads unevenly through tissues, forming tissue cysts, and the cystic wall is an obstacle in DNA extraction protocols. Therefore, adequate sampling and effective disruption of the cysts are essential to improve the accuracy of DNA detection by PCR. The aims of this study were to evaluate the suitability of four protocols for DNA extraction from cysts of Sarcocystis spp. present in bovine myocardium samples or after their harvest in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution as well as determine the effects of single or multiple sampling on the accuracy of molecular diagnosis of sarcocystosis in cattle hearts. Cysts and myocardium samples from nine bovine hearts were randomly distributed to four DNA extraction protocols: kit, kit with modification, DNAzol, and cetyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). Samples were submitted to DNA extraction and PCR as replicates of each heart (simplicate, duplicate, and triplicate), and the probability of a true positive diagnostic was calculated. Among the protocols tested, the kit with modification was determined to be the most suitable for DNA extraction from cysts in PBS solution (92.6 % of DNA detection by PCR); DNAzol resulted in higher DNA detection frequency from bovine myocardium samples (48.1 %). Multiple sampling improved the molecular diagnosis of Sarcocystis spp. infection in cattle hearts, increasing at 22.2 % the rate of true positive diagnostic.

  15. Evaluation of extraction methodologies for corn kernel (Zea mays) DNA for detection of trace amounts of biotechnology-derived DNA.

    PubMed

    Holden, Marcia J; Blasic, Joseph R; Bussjaeger, Louis; Kao, Chuan; Shokere, Luke A; Kendall, Donald C; Freese, Larry; Jenkins, G Ronald

    2003-04-23

    Sensitive and accurate testing for trace amounts of biotechnology-derived DNA from plant material requires pure, high-quality genomic DNA as template for subsequent amplification using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Six methodologies were evaluated for extracting DNA from ground corn kernels spiked with 0.1% (m/m) CBH351 (StarLink) corn. DNA preparations were evaluated for purity and fragment size. Extraction efficiency was determined. The alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adh1) and the CBH351 (cry9C, 35S promoter) genes in the genomic DNA were detected using PCR. DNA isolated by two of the methods proved unsuitable for performing PCR amplification. All other methods produced some DNA preparations that gave false negative PCR results. We observed that cornstarch, a primary component of corn kernels, was not an inhibitor of PCR, while acidic polysaccharides were. Our data suggest that amplification of an endogenous positive control gene, as an indicator for the absence of PCR inhibitors, is not always valid. This study points out aspects of DNA isolation that need to be considered when choosing a method for a particular plant/tissue type.

  16. [Evaluation of 3 methods of DNA extraction from paraffin-embedded material for the amplification of genomic DNA using PCR].

    PubMed

    Mesquita, R A; Anzai, E K; Oliveira, R N; Nunes, F D

    2001-01-01

    There are several protocols reported in the literature for the extraction of genomic DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Genomic DNA is utilized in molecular analyses, including PCR. This study compares three different methods for the extraction of genomic DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia) and non-formalin-fixed (normal oral mucosa) samples: phenol with enzymatic digestion, and silica with and without enzymatic digestion. The amplification of DNA by means of the PCR technique was carried out with primers for the exon 7 of human keratin type 14. Amplicons were analyzed by means of electrophoresis in an 8% polyacrylamide gel with 5% glycerol, followed by silver-staining visualization. The phenol/enzymatic digestion and the silica/enzymatic digestion methods provided amplicons from both tissue samples. The method described is a potential aid in the establishment of the histopathologic diagnosis and in retrospective studies with archival paraffin-embedded samples.

  17. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction using magnetic beads from viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Li, Rongqun; Chen, Yi; Pan, Ping; Tong, Wenjuan; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Yu, Daojun

    2017-03-23

    Current extraction methods often extract DNA and RNA separately, and few methods are capable of co-extracting DNA and RNA from sputum. We established a nucleic acid co-extraction method from sputum based on magnetic beads and optimized the method by evaluating influencing factors, such as the guanidinium thiocyanate (GTC) and dithiothreitol (DTT) concentrations, magnetic bead amount, incubation temperature, lysis buffer pH and RNA carrier type. The feasibility of the simultaneous nucleic acid co-extraction method was evaluated by amplifying DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen with a multiplex RT-qPCR method. Both DNA and RNA were most efficiently extracted when the GTC and DTT concentrations were 2.0 M and 80 mM, respectively, 20 μl magnetic beads were added, the incubation temperature was 80 °C, the pH was 8 or 9, and RNA carrier A was used. Therefore, we established a simple method to extract nucleic acids from two important respiratory viruses compared with other commercial kits. This magnetic beads-based co-extraction method for sputum followed by a multiplex RT-qPCR can rapidly and precisely detect DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen and has many advantages, such as decreased time, low cost, and a lack of harmful chemicals.

  18. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction using magnetic beads from viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui; Li, Rongqun; Chen, Yi; Pan, Ping; Tong, Wenjuan; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Yu, Daojun

    2017-01-01

    Current extraction methods often extract DNA and RNA separately, and few methods are capable of co-extracting DNA and RNA from sputum. We established a nucleic acid co-extraction method from sputum based on magnetic beads and optimized the method by evaluating influencing factors, such as the guanidinium thiocyanate (GTC) and dithiothreitol (DTT) concentrations, magnetic bead amount, incubation temperature, lysis buffer pH and RNA carrier type. The feasibility of the simultaneous nucleic acid co-extraction method was evaluated by amplifying DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen with a multiplex RT-qPCR method. Both DNA and RNA were most efficiently extracted when the GTC and DTT concentrations were 2.0 M and 80 mM, respectively, 20 μl magnetic beads were added, the incubation temperature was 80 °C, the pH was 8 or 9, and RNA carrier A was used. Therefore, we established a simple method to extract nucleic acids from two important respiratory viruses compared with other commercial kits. This magnetic beads-based co-extraction method for sputum followed by a multiplex RT-qPCR can rapidly and precisely detect DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen and has many advantages, such as decreased time, low cost, and a lack of harmful chemicals. PMID:28332631

  19. Comparison of three sequential extraction procedures (original and modified 3 steps BCR procedure) applied to sediments of different origin.

    PubMed

    Craba, Laura; Brunori, Claudia; Galletti, Mara; Cremisini, Carlo; Morabito, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    The 3 steps sequential extraction procedure proposed by the Standards Measurements and Testing program (SM&T--formerly BCR) of the European Union has been applied for the speciation of metals in sediments. Results obtained by the application of the BCR standardized procedure were compared to those of two four step sequential extraction procedures, which are different from the BCR procedure only for the introduction of an additional step with NaOCl, as 2nd and 3rd step respectively. Five different metals have been taken into consideration: Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The analytical performances of the laboratory have been evaluated using three certified reference materials: the BCR 601 lake sediment for the BCR sequential extraction procedure, PACS-1 and MESS-1 for total metal concentration. Results showed that the efficiency of NaOCl treatment is higher or at least equal to that of H2O2 treatment and that its selectivity is quite satisfying. Moreover the NaOCl treatment doesn't significantly influence the extraction of the easily reducible fraction.

  20. The use of carrier RNA to enhance DNA extraction from microfluidic-based silica monoliths.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Thain, Lauren; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-10-12

    DNA extraction was carried out on silica-based monoliths within a microfluidic device. Solid-phase DNA extraction methodology was applied in which the DNA binds to silica in the presence of a chaotropic salt, such as guanidine hydrochloride, and is eluted in a low ionic strength solution, such as water. The addition of poly-A carrier RNA to the chaotropic salt solution resulted in a marked increase in the effective amount of DNA that could be recovered (25ng) compared to the absence of RNA (5ng) using the silica-based monolith. These findings confirm that techniques utilising nucleic acid carrier molecules can enhance DNA extraction methodologies in microfluidic applications.

  1. Global analysis of ion dependence unveils hidden steps in DNA binding and bending by integration host factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivas, Paula; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Ansari, Anjum

    2013-09-01

    Proteins that recognize and bind to specific sites on DNA often distort the DNA at these sites. The rates at which these DNA distortions occur are considered to be important in the ability of these proteins to discriminate between specific and nonspecific sites. These rates have proven difficult to measure for most protein-DNA complexes in part because of the difficulty in separating the kinetics of unimolecular conformational rearrangements (DNA bending and kinking) from the kinetics of bimolecular complex association and dissociation. A notable exception is the Integration Host Factor (IHF), a eubacterial architectural protein involved in chromosomal compaction and DNA recombination, which binds with subnanomolar affinity to specific DNA sites and bends them into sharp U-turns. The unimolecular DNA bending kinetics has been resolved using both stopped-flow and laser temperature-jump perturbation. Here we expand our investigation by presenting a global analysis of the ionic strength dependence of specific binding affinity and relaxation kinetics of an IHF-DNA complex. This analysis enables us to obtain each of the underlying elementary rates (DNA bending/unbending and protein-DNA association/dissociation), and their ionic strength dependence, even under conditions where the two processes are coupled. Our analysis indicates interesting differences in the ionic strength dependence of the bi- versus unimolecular steps. At moderate [KCl] (100-500 mM), nearly all the ionic strength dependence to the overall equilibrium binding affinity appears in the bimolecular association/dissociation of an initial, presumably weakly bent, encounter complex, with a slope SKbi ≈ 8 describing the loglog-dependence of the equilibrium constant to form this complex on [KCl]. In contrast, the unimolecular equilibrium constant to form the fully wrapped specific complex from the initial complex is nearly independent of [KCl], with SKuni < 0.5. This result is counterintuitive because there

  2. DNA extraction from plant food supplements: Influence of different pharmaceutical excipients.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Amaral, Joana S; Fernandes, Telmo J R; Batista, Andreia; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    The consumption of plant food supplements (PFS) has been growing globally, with an increase of misleading labeling and fraudulent practices also being reported. Recently, the use of molecular biology techniques has been proposed to detect botanical adulterations, one of the possible frauds in PFS. However, difficulties in recovering DNA from some PFS samples have been described. Aiming at using DNA-based methods for the unequivocal identification of plant species in PFS, adequate DNA isolation is required. However, PFS often contain pharmaceutical excipients known to have adsorbent properties that might interfere with DNA extraction. Thus, the aim of this work was to assess the effect of different excipients (talc, silica, iron oxide and titanium dioxide) on the recovery/amplification of DNA. For that purpose, known amounts of template maize DNA were spiked either to PFS or to model mixtures of excipients and quantified by real-time PCR. The tested excipients evidenced clear adsorption phenomena that justify the hampering effect on DNA extraction from PFS. The use of either 10% talc or 0.5% dyes completely adsorbed DNA, resulting in negative PCR amplifications. For the first time, pharmaceutical excipients were shown to affect DNA extraction explaining the inability of recovering DNA from some PFS samples in previous studies.

  3. Comparison of proteases in DNA extraction via quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Eychner, Alison M; Lebo, Roberta J; Elkins, Kelly M

    2015-06-01

    We compared four proteases in the QIAamp DNA Investigator Kit (Qiagen) to extract DNA for use in multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The aim was to evaluate alternate proteases for improved DNA recovery as compared with proteinase K for forensic, biochemical research, genetic paternity and immigration, and molecular diagnostic purposes. The Quantifiler Kit TaqMan quantitative PCR assay was used to measure the recovery of DNA from human blood, semen, buccal cells, breastmilk, and earwax in addition to low-template samples, including diluted samples, computer keyboard swabs, chewing gum, and cigarette butts. All methods yielded amplifiable DNA from all samples.

  4. Detection of rendered meat and bone meals by PCR is dependent on animal species of origin and DNA extraction method.

    PubMed

    Myers, Michael J; Farrell, Dorothy E; Deaver, Christine M; Mason, Jacquline; Swaim, Heidi L; Yancy, Haile F

    2010-06-01

    The capability of eight commercially available DNA extraction kits to extract bovine DNA originating in meat and bone meal from fortified feed was evaluated. Four different batches of bovine meat and bone meal (BMBM) were used for DNA extraction with the eight commercial DNA extraction kits. Within each kit, there were minimal differences in the batch-to-batch amounts of extracted DNA. There were differences between the kits in the amounts of DNA that could be extracted from the same amount of starting BMBM. These differences did not translate into differences in the amount of amplifiable DNA from BMBM-fortified dairy feed. Using a validated real-time PCR method, the kit yielding the highest amount extractable DNA was completely unable to yield a positive PCR result; one other kit was also unable to produce a positive PCR result from DNA extracted from BMBM-fortified feed. There was a complete lack of a correlation between the amount of bovine DNA isolated from BMBM by a given extraction kit compared with the relative amounts of DNA isolated from fortified animal feed as evidenced by the cycle threshold values generated using the real-time PCR method. These results demonstrate that extraction of DNA from processed animal protein is different for pure ingredients and fortified animal feeds. These results indicate that a method specifically developed using just animal-derived meat and bone meal may not yield a functional assay when used to detect animal tissues in complete animal feed.

  5. Influence of DNA extraction methods on relative telomere length measurements and its impact on epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Raschenberger, Julia; Lamina, Claudia; Haun, Margot; Kollerits, Barbara; Coassin, Stefan; Boes, Eva; Kedenko, Ludmilla; Köttgen, Anna; Kronenberg, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of telomere length is widely used in epidemiologic studies. Insufficient standardization of the measurements processes has, however, complicated the comparison of results between studies. We aimed to investigate whether DNA extraction methods have an influence on measured values of relative telomere length (RTL) and whether this has consequences for epidemiological studies. We performed four experiments with RTL measurement in quadruplicate by qPCR using DNA extracted with different methods: 1) a standardized validation experiment including three extraction methods (magnetic-particle-method EZ1, salting-out-method INV, phenol-chloroform-isoamyl-alcohol PCI) each in the same 20 samples demonstrated pronounced differences in RTL with lowest values with EZ1 followed by INV and PCI-isolated DNA; 2) a comparison of 307 samples from an epidemiological study showing EZ1-measurements 40% lower than INV-measurements; 3) a matching-approach of two similar non-diseased control groups including 143 pairs of subjects revealed significantly shorter RTL in EZ1 than INV-extracted DNA (0.844 ± 0.157 vs. 1.357 ± 0.242); 4) an association analysis of RTL with prevalent cardiovascular disease detected a stronger association with INV than with EZ1-extracted DNA. In summary, DNA extraction methods have a pronounced influence on the measured RTL-values. This might result in spurious or lost associations in epidemiological studies under certain circumstances. PMID:27138987

  6. Influence of DNA extraction methods on relative telomere length measurements and its impact on epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Raschenberger, Julia; Lamina, Claudia; Haun, Margot; Kollerits, Barbara; Coassin, Stefan; Boes, Eva; Kedenko, Ludmilla; Köttgen, Anna; Kronenberg, Florian

    2016-05-03

    Measurement of telomere length is widely used in epidemiologic studies. Insufficient standardization of the measurements processes has, however, complicated the comparison of results between studies. We aimed to investigate whether DNA extraction methods have an influence on measured values of relative telomere length (RTL) and whether this has consequences for epidemiological studies. We performed four experiments with RTL measurement in quadruplicate by qPCR using DNA extracted with different methods: 1) a standardized validation experiment including three extraction methods (magnetic-particle-method EZ1, salting-out-method INV, phenol-chloroform-isoamyl-alcohol PCI) each in the same 20 samples demonstrated pronounced differences in RTL with lowest values with EZ1 followed by INV and PCI-isolated DNA; 2) a comparison of 307 samples from an epidemiological study showing EZ1-measurements 40% lower than INV-measurements; 3) a matching-approach of two similar non-diseased control groups including 143 pairs of subjects revealed significantly shorter RTL in EZ1 than INV-extracted DNA (0.844 ± 0.157 vs. 1.357 ± 0.242); 4) an association analysis of RTL with prevalent cardiovascular disease detected a stronger association with INV than with EZ1-extracted DNA. In summary, DNA extraction methods have a pronounced influence on the measured RTL-values. This might result in spurious or lost associations in epidemiological studies under certain circumstances.

  7. Comparison of protocols for DNA extraction from long-term preserved formalin fixed tissues.

    PubMed

    Paireder, Stefan; Werner, Bettina; Bailer, Josef; Werther, Wolfgang; Schmid, Erich; Patzak, Beatrix; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2013-08-15

    The current study compared the applicability of protocols to extract DNA from formalin fixed heart tissues that have been preserved for more than 50 years. Ten methods were tested: a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) standard protocol, seven variants of this standard protocol, and two commercial kits. In the case of younger specimens (fixed in 1951, 1934, or 1914), extracts with DNA concentrations ≥ 10.0 ng/μl were obtained with the standard CTAB protocol, two variants of the standard protocol including prolonged tissue digestion (72 h instead of 1-2h), and a commercial kit particularly recommended for DNA extraction from formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues (FFPE Kit). With the FFPE Kit, DNA could also be extracted from older tissues (fixed in 1893, 1850/1851, or before 1820). In general, the purity of the DNA extracts, assessed from the ratio of the absorbance at 260 and 280 nm, was not very high. In spite of their rather low purity, the DNA extracts could, however, be used to amplify a 122-bp sequence and, in most cases, also a 171-bp sequence of the gene coding for human albumin by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

  8. Comparative assessment of genomic DNA extraction processes for Plasmodium: Identifying the appropriate method.

    PubMed

    Mann, Riti; Sharma, Supriya; Mishra, Neelima; Valecha, Neena; Anvikar, Anupkumar R

    2015-12-01

    Plasmodium DNA, in addition to being used for molecular diagnosis of malaria, find utility in monitoring patient responses to antimalarial drugs, drug resistance studies, genotyping and sequencing purposes. Over the years, numerous protocols have been proposed for extracting Plasmodium DNA from a variety of sources. Given that DNA isolation is fundamental to successful molecular studies, here we review the most commonly used methods for Plasmodium genomic DNA isolation, emphasizing their pros and cons. A comparison of these existing methods has been made, to evaluate their appropriateness for use in different applications and identify the method suitable for a particular laboratory based study. Selection of a suitable and accessible DNA extraction method for Plasmodium requires consideration of many factors, the most important being sensitivity, cost-effectiveness and, purity and stability of isolated DNA. Need of the hour is to accentuate on the development of a method that upholds well on all these parameters.

  9. Water extracts of tree Hypericum sps. protect DNA from oxidative and alkylating damage and enhance DNA repair in colon cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alice A; Marques, Filipe; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Diet may induce colon carcinogenesis through oxidative or alkylating DNA damage. However, diet may also contain anticarcinogenic compounds that contribute to cancer prevention. DNA damage prevention and/or induction of repair are two important mechanisms involved in cancer chemoprevention by dietary compounds. Hypericum sps. are widely used in traditional medicine to prepare infusions due to their beneficial digestive and neurologic effects. In this study, we investigated the potential of water extracts from three Hypericum sps. and some of their main phenolic compounds to prevent and repair oxidative and alkylating DNA damage in colon cells. The results showed that water extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum androsaemum, Hypericum undulatum, quercetin and rutin have protective effect against oxidative DNA damage in HT29 cells. Protective effect was also observed against alkylating DNA damage induced by methyl-methanesulfonate, except for H. androsaemum. With regard to alkylating damage repair H. perforatum, H. androsaemum and chlorogenic acid increased repair of alkylating DNA damage by base excision repair pathway. No effect was observed on nucleotide excision repair pathway. Antigenotoxic effects of Hypericum sps. may contribute to colon cancer prevention and the high amount of phenolic compounds present in Hypericum sps. play an important role in DNA protective effects.

  10. Extraction of DNA from bones in cases where expectations for success are low.

    PubMed

    Piglionica, Marilidia; De Donno, Antonio; Baldassarra, Stefania Lonero; Santoro, Valeria; Scorca, Antonella; Introna, Francesco; Dell'Erba, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    To resolve cases involving unidentified cadavers, the study of polymorphic DNA markers of old bones is an invaluable but often challenging tool used in forensic genetics. Some of the difficulties encountered involve the limited quantity of endogenous DNA, its subsequent degradation (a result of elapsed time, environmental conditions, and the microorganisms that develop during the postmortem phase), and the coextraction of substances that inhibit amplification reactions. For these reasons, it is necessary to direct research toward the development of new extraction techniques with the goal of obtaining adequate quantities of high-quality DNA.The aim of this study was to improve the collection of extracted DNA compared with the amount of DNA obtained with the NucleoSpin DNA Trace Kit (Macherey Nagel) protocol for the extraction of genomic DNA from human bones. A modified version of the standard protocol is presented.The modified method for the extraction of genomic DNA, followed by amplification reaction, allowed for identification of 4 cadavers and typification of 1 cadaver. The study carried out involved unidentified cadavers, or their remains, discovered after a long period from time of death.

  11. [Application of DNA extraction kit, 'GM quicker' for detection of genetically modified soybeans].

    PubMed

    Sato, Noriko; Sugiura, Yoshitsugu; Tanaka, Toshitsugu

    2012-01-01

    Several DNA extraction methods have been officially introduced to detect genetically modified soybeans, but the choice of DNA extraction kits depend on the nature of the samples, such as grains or processed foods. To overcome this disadvantage, we examined whether the GM quicker kit is available for both grains and processed foods. We compared GM quicker with four approved DNA extraction kits in respect of DNA purity, copy numbers of lectin gene, and working time. We found that the DNA quality of GM quicker was superior to that of the other kits for grains, and the procedure was faster. However, in the case of processed foods, GM quicker was not superior to the other kits. We therefore investigated an unapproved GM quicker 3 kit, which is available for DNA extraction from processed foods, such as tofu and boiled soybeans. The GM quicker 3 kit provided good DNA quality from both grains and processed foods, so we made a minor modification of the GM quicker-based protocol that was suitable for processed foods, using GM quicker and its reagents. The modified method enhanced the performance of GM quicker with processed foods. We believe that GM quicker with the modified protocol is an excellent tool to obtain high-quality DNA from grains and processed foods for detection of genetically modified soybeans.

  12. Organic extraction of bone lysates improves DNA purification with silica beads.

    PubMed

    Desmyter, Stijn; De Cock, Greet; Moulin, Sabine; Noël, Fabrice

    2017-04-01

    In our standard protocol for DNA extraction from skeletal remains of unidentified bodies, bone lysates resulting from decalcification and Proteinase K treatment were purified with the DNA IQ™ Casework Pro Kit for Maxwell(®)16 automate (Promega, WI). Despite its success in the majority of cases, the DNA purification with paramagnetic silica beads failed in some challenging samples. This failure in DNA recovery was often associated with filter clogging during the required volume reduction of the lysate to enable loading on the automate. Two modifications to the standard method were tested for a more efficient filtering and purification. Adding collagenase to the lysate reduced the filter lead time but did not enhance DNA yield, while organic extraction of the crude lysate solved the filter clogging and resulted in successful DNA purification. The modified method in which a phenol treated lysate was loaded on the automate resulted in successful STR-profiling of the skeletal remains of all 13 unidentified bodies tested, which showed a wide variety in post mortem interval and preservation conditions. The variation in DNA yield between the 28 samples tested showed the importance of bone type selection and multiple sampling in successful STR-profiling of skeletal remains. Despite the disadvantages inherent to phenol, the organic extraction of crude bone lysates enhanced the efficiency of DNA purification with paramagnetic silica beads. The combined method of organic extraction and purification with silica beads resulted in STR-profiling of challenging bone samples.

  13. Comparison of six extraction techniques for isolation of DNA from filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    van Burik, J A; Schreckhise, R W; White, T C; Bowden, R A; Myerson, D

    1998-10-01

    Filamentous fungi have a sturdy cell wall which is resistant to the usual DNA extraction procedures. We determined the DNA extraction procedure with the greatest yield of high quality fungal DNA and the least predilection for cross-contamination of equipment between specimens. Each of six extraction methods was performed using Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae. The six methods were: (1) glass bead pulverization with vortexing; (2) grinding with mortar and pestle followed by glass bead pulverization; (3) glass bead pulverization using 1% hydroxyacetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) buffer in a water bath sonicator; (4) water bath sonication in CTAB buffer; (5) grinding followed by incubation with CTAB; and (6) lyticase enzymatic cell lysis. Genomic DNA yields were measured by spectrophotometry and by visual reading of 2% agarose gels, with shearing assessed by the migration of the DNA on the gel. Genomic fungal DNA yields were highest for Method 1, followed by Methods 5 approximately = to 2 >3 approximately = to 4 approximately = to 6. Methods 2 and 5, both of which involved grinding with mortar and pestle, led to shearing of the genomic DNA in one of two trials each. We conclude that the use of glass beads with extended vortexing is optimal for extraction of microgramme amounts of DNA from filamentous fungal cultures.

  14. Experimental investigations in hamsters and rabbits with DNA extracted from human uterine tumors.

    PubMed

    Nastac, E; Athanasiu, P; Predescu, E; Stoian, M; Hozoc, M; Perju, A

    1980-01-01

    Experimental inoculation of a DNA preparation extracted from a fragment of non-irradiated human uterine cervix carcinoma was followed by the appearance of neoplasia in four hamsters and of lymphosarcoma in one rabbit. Similar DNA preparations obtained from three cases of irradiated human uterine cervix carcinoma and from a human uterine fibroma proved to have no biological activity.

  15. Practical method for extraction of PCR-quality DNA from environmental soil samples.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Kelly A; Kersh, Gilbert J; Massung, Robert F

    2010-07-01

    Methods for the extraction of PCR-quality DNA from environmental soil samples by using pairs of commercially available kits were evaluated. Coxiella burnetii DNA was detected in spiked soil samples at <1,000 genome equivalents per gram of soil and in 12 (16.4%) of 73 environmental soil samples.

  16. Extraction of electron energy distribution functions from Langmuir probes using integrated step function response and regularized least squares solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaghir, Ahmed; Shannon, Steve

    2008-10-01

    Electron energy distribution function (EEDF) extraction from Langmuir probe data is an ill-posed problem due to the integral relationship between electron current and EEDF with respect to probe voltage. Curve fitting solutions to extract this EEDF assume a specific type of distribution. Point by point extraction of the second derivative relationship uses a small fraction of the integrated data to extract the EEDF. Recently EEDF extraction techniques have been evaluated using regularized solutions to the integral problem.ootnotetextGuti'errez-Tapia and Flores-Llamas, Phys. Plasmas 11 5102 (2004) These techniques do not assume any mathematical representation of the EEDF and solve the integral problem for any function that best represents the EEDF. In this paper the electron current for arbitrary functions is derived assuming that the electron density is a sum of step functions representing such a function. This technique for EEDF extraction is validated by adding noise to numerically generated data and using a regularized least squares method to calculate the original function by solving for the individual step function contribution to the total electron current. The methodology, reconstruction, and comparison to current best-known methods will be presented.

  17. Single molecule FRET analysis of the 11 discrete steps of a DNA actuator.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Lasse L; Preus, Søren; Zhang, Zhao; Voigt, Niels V; Gothelf, Kurt V; Birkedal, Victoria

    2014-06-25

    DNA hybridization allows the design and assembly of dynamic DNA-based molecular devices. Such structures usually accomplish their function by the addition of fuel strands that drive the structure from one conformation to a new one or by internal changes in DNA hybridization. We report here on the performance and robustness of one of these devices by the detailed study of a dynamic DNA actuator. The DNA actuator was chosen as a model system, as it is the device with most discrete states to date. It is able to reversibly slide between 11 different states and can in principle function both autonomously and nonautonomously. The 11 states of the actuator were investigated by single molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) microscopy to obtain information on the static and dynamic heterogeneities of the device. Our results show that the DNA actuator can be effectively locked in several conformations with the help of well-designed DNA lock strands. However, the device also shows pronounced static and dynamic heterogeneities both in the unlocked and locked modes, and we suggest possible structural models. Our study allows for the direct visualization of the conformational diversity and movement of the dynamic DNA-based device and shows that complex DNA-based devices are inherently heterogeneous. Our results also demonstrate that single molecule techniques are a powerful tool for structural dynamics studies and provide a stringent test for the performance of molecular devices made out of DNA.

  18. Extraction of DNA suitable for PCR applications from mature leaves of Mangifera indica L.

    PubMed

    Azmat, Muhammad Abubakkar; Khan, Iqrar Ahmad; Cheema, Hafiza Masooma Naseer; Rajwana, Ishtiaq Ahmad; Khan, Ahmad Sattar; Khan, Asif Ali

    2012-04-01

    Good quality deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the pre-requisite for its downstream applications. The presence of high concentrations of polysaccharides, polyphenols, proteins, and other secondary metabolites in mango leaves poses problem in getting good quality DNA fit for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) applications. The problem is exacerbated when DNA is extracted from mature mango leaves. A reliable and modified protocol based on the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method for DNA extraction from mature mango leaves is described here. High concentrations of inert salt were used to remove polysaccharides; Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and β-mercaptoethanol were employed to manage phenolic compounds. Extended chloroform-isoamyl alcohol treatment followed by RNase treatment yielded 950-1050 µg of good quality DNA, free of protein and RNA. The problems of DNA degradation, contamination, and low yield due to irreversible binding of phenolic compounds and coprecipitation of polysaccharides with DNA were avoided by this method. The DNA isolated by the modified method showed good PCR amplification using simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers. This modified protocol can also be used to extract DNA from other woody plants having similar problems.

  19. The validation of forensic DNA extraction systems to utilize soil contaminated biological evidence.

    PubMed

    Kasu, Mohaimin; Shires, Karen

    2015-07-01

    The production of full DNA profiles from biological evidence found in soil has a high failure rate due largely to the inhibitory substance humic acid (HA). Abundant in various natural soils, HA co-extracts with DNA during extraction and inhibits DNA profiling by binding to the molecular components of the genotyping assay. To successfully utilize traces of soil contaminated evidence, such as that found at many murder and rape crime scenes in South Africa, a reliable HA removal extraction system would often be selected based on previous validation studies. However, for many standard forensic DNA extraction systems, peer-reviewed publications detailing the efficacy on soil evidence is either lacking or is incomplete. Consequently, these sample types are often not collected or fail to yield suitable DNA material due to the use of unsuitable methodology. The aim of this study was to validate the common forensic DNA collection and extraction systems used in South Africa, namely DNA IQ, FTA elute and Nucleosave for processing blood and saliva contaminated with HA. A forensic appropriate volume of biological evidence was spiked with HA (0, 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 mg/ml) and processed through each extraction protocol for the evaluation of HA removal using QPCR and STR-genotyping. The DNA IQ magnetic bead system effectively removed HA from highly contaminated blood and saliva, and generated consistently acceptable STR profiles from both artificially spiked samples and crude soil samples. This system is highly recommended for use on soil-contaminated evidence over the cellulose card-based systems currently being preferentially used for DNA sample collection.

  20. Highly efficient automated extraction of DNA from old and contemporary skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Zupanič Pajnič, Irena; Debska, Magdalena; Gornjak Pogorelc, Barbara; Vodopivec Mohorčič, Katja; Balažic, Jože; Zupanc, Tomaž; Štefanič, Borut; Geršak, Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    We optimised the automated extraction of DNA from old and contemporary skeletal remains using the AutoMate Express system and the PrepFiler BTA kit. 24 Contemporary and 25 old skeletal remains from WWII were analysed. For each skeleton, extraction using only 0.05 g of powder was performed according to the manufacturer's recommendations (no demineralisation - ND method). Since only 32% of full profiles were obtained from aged and 58% from contemporary casework skeletons, the extraction protocol was modified to acquire higher quality DNA and genomic DNA was obtained after full demineralisation (FD method). The nuclear DNA of the samples was quantified using the Investigator Quantiplex kit and STR typing was performed using the NGM kit to evaluate the performance of tested extraction methods. In the aged DNA samples, 64% of full profiles were obtained using the FD method. For the contemporary skeletal remains the performance of the ND method was closer to the FD method compared to the old skeletons, giving 58% of full profiles with the ND method and 71% of full profiles using the FD method. The extraction of DNA from only 0.05 g of bone or tooth powder using the AutoMate Express has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA from old and contemporary skeletons, especially with the modified FD method. We believe that the results obtained will contribute to the possibilities of using automated devices for extracting DNA from skeletal remains, which would shorten the procedures for obtaining high-quality DNA from skeletons in forensic laboratories.

  1. An efficient DNA extraction method for desert Calligonum species.

    PubMed

    Abdellaoui, Raoudha; Gouja, Hassen; Sayah, Amel; Neffati, Mohamed

    2011-12-01

    Genetic conservation programs in arid environments rely on molecular methods for diversity assessments. DNA-based molecular profiling will aid in conservation and protection of species from genetic erosion. Obtaining intact genomic DNA from Calligonum species, of sufficiently high-quality that is readily amplifiable using PCR, is challenging because of the presence of the exceptionally large amount of oxidized polyphenolic compounds, polysaccharides, and other secondary metabolites. The present method involves a modification of the available CTAB method employing higher concentrations of NaCl and CTAB, and incorporating PEG 6000 (1%) and glucose. The yield of DNA was 60-670 μg g(-1) of fresh tissue. The protocol has been tested with two species from the arid region. The DNA isolated was successfully amplified by two ITS primer pairs. PCR-RFLP analysis of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region among and within Calligonum species followed by sequencing is under way.

  2. A Fast One Step Extraction and UPLC-MS/MS Analysis for E2/D2 Series Prostaglandins and Isoprostanes

    PubMed Central

    Brose, Stephen A.; Baker, Andrew G.; Golovko, Mikhail Y.

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) and isoprostanes (iso-PG) may be derived through cyclooxygenase or free radical pathways and are important signaling molecules that are also robust biomarkers of oxidative stress. Their quantification is important for understanding many biological processes where PG, iso-PG, or oxidative stress are involved. One of the common methods for PG and iso-PG quantifications is LC-MS/MS that allows a highly selective, sensitive, simultaneous analysis for prostanoids without derivatization. However, the currently used LC-MS/MS methods require a multi-step extraction and a long (within an hour) LC separation to achieve simultaneous separation and analysis of the major iso-PG. The developed and validated for brain tissue analysis one-step extraction protocol and UPLC-MS/MS method significantly increases the recovery of the PG extraction up to 95%, and allows for a much faster (within 4 min) major iso-PGE2 and -PGD2 separation with 5 times narrower chromatographic peaks as compared to previously used methods. In addition, it decreases the time and cost of analysis due to one-step extraction approach performed in disposable centrifuge tubes. All together, this significantly increases the sensitivity, and the time and cost efficiency of the PG and iso-PG analysis. PMID:23400687

  3. Comparison of three DNA extraction kits to establish maximum yield and quality of coral-associated microbial DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Erin J.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    Coral microbiology is an expanding field, yet there is no standard DNA extraction protocol. Although many researchers depend on commercial extraction kits, no specific kit has been optimized for use with coral samples. Both soil and plant DNA extraction kits from MO BIO Laboratories, Inc., have been used by many research groups for this purpose. MO BIO recently replaced their PowerPlant® kit with an improved PowerPlantPro kit, but it was unclear how these changes would affect the kit’s use with coral samples. In order to determine which kit produced the best results, we conducted a comparison between the original PowerPlant kit, the new PowerPlantPro kit, and an alternative kit, PowerSoil, using samples from several different coral genera. The PowerPlantPro kit had the highest DNA yields, but the lack of 16S rRNA gene amplification in many samples suggests that much of the yield may be coral DNA rather than microbial DNA. The most consistent positive amplifications came from the PowerSoil kit.

  4. One-Step Formation of "Chain-Armor"-Stabilized DNA Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Cassinelli, Valentina; Oberleitner, Birgit; Sobotta, Jessica; Nickels, Philipp; Grossi, Guido; Kempter, Susanne; Frischmuth, Thomas; Liedl, Tim; Manetto, Antonio

    2015-06-26

    DNA-based self-assembled nanostructures are widely used to position organic and inorganic objects with nanoscale precision. A particular promising application of DNA structures is their usage as programmable carrier systems for targeted drug delivery. To provide DNA-based templates that are robust against degradation at elevated temperatures, low ion concentrations, adverse pH conditions, and DNases, we built 6-helix DNA tile tubes consisting of 24 oligonucleotides carrying alkyne groups on their 3'-ends and azides on their 5'-ends. By a mild click reaction, the two ends of selected oligonucleotides were covalently connected to form rings and interlocked DNA single strands, so-called DNA catenanes. Strikingly, the structures stayed topologically intact in pure water and even after precipitation from EtOH. The structures even withstood a temperature of 95 °C when all of the 24 strands were chemically interlocked.

  5. Effects of DNA extraction and purification methods on real-time quantitative PCR analysis of Roundup Ready soybean.

    PubMed

    Demeke, Tigst; Ratnayaka, Indira; Phan, Anh

    2009-01-01

    The quality of DNA affects the accuracy and repeatability of quantitative PCR results. Different DNA extraction and purification methods were compared for quantification of Roundup Ready (RR) soybean (event 40-3-2) by real-time PCR. DNA was extracted using cetylmethylammonium bromide (CTAB), DNeasy Plant Mini Kit, and Wizard Magnetic DNA purification system for food. CTAB-extracted DNA was also purified using the Zymo (DNA Clean & Concentrator 25 kit), Qtip 100 (Qiagen Genomic-Tip 100/G), and QIAEX II Gel Extraction Kit. The CTAB extraction method provided the largest amount of DNA, and the Zymo purification kit resulted in the highest percentage of DNA recovery. The Abs260/280 and Abs260/230 ratios were less than the expected values for some of the DNA extraction and purification methods used, indicating the presence of substances that could inhibit PCR reactions. Real-time quantitative PCR results were affected by the DNA extraction and purification methods used. Further purification or dilution of the CTAB DNA was required for successful quantification of RR soybean. Less variability of quantitative PCR results was observed among experiments and replications for DNA extracted and/or purified by CTAB, CTAB+Zymo, CTAB+Qtip 100, and DNeasy methods. Correct and repeatable results for real-time PCR quantification of RR soybean were achieved using CTAB DNA purified with Zymo and Qtip 100 methods.

  6. High-quality plant DNA extraction for PCR: an easy approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, I; Islam, M; Arshad, W; Mannan, A; Ahmad, W; Mirza, B

    2009-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction has found wide applications in modern research involving transformations and other genomic studies. For reproducible PCR results, however, the quantity and quality of template DNA is of considerable importance. A simple and efficient plant DNA extraction procedure for isolation of high-quality DNA from plant tissues is presented here. It requires maceration of plant tissue of about 1.0 cm(2) (e.g. of a leaf blade) in DNA extraction buffer (100 mM Tris-HCl, 100 mM EDTA, 250 mM NaCl) using 1.5-mL microfuge tubes, followed by cell lysis with 20% SDS, and DNA extraction with phenol: chloroform: iso-amyl alcohol (25:24:1). Hydrated ether is then used to remove polysaccharides and other contaminants from the DNA preparation. Average DNA yield is 20-30 microg cm(-2) for fresh tissues, and ratio of absorbance at 260 nm to absorbance at 280 nm is 1.5-1.8. The DNA is quite suitable for PCR using microsatellites, RAPD and specific markers for recombinant selection. Amplifications have been obtained for these markers by using template DNA extracted from fresh as well as frozen leaf tissues of various plants, including barley, oat, potato and tomato. DNA stored for more than 2 years has been successfully amplified with microsatellite markers, which shows suitability of this method after long-term storage of DNA. Besides, the ease of use and cost-effectiveness make the procedure attractive.

  7. Cell-free Xenopus egg extracts for studying DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed

    Cupello, Steven; Richardson, Christine; Yan, Shan

    2016-01-01

    In response to a variety of DNA replication stress or DNA damaging agents, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are triggered for cells to coordinate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis, and senescence. Cell-free Xenopus egg extracts, derived from the eggs of African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), have been widely used for studies concerning DDR pathways. In this review, we focus on how different experimental systems have been established using Xenopus egg extracts to investigate the DDR pathways that are activated in response to DNA replication stress, double-strand breaks (DSBs), inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs), and oxidative stress. We summarize how molecular details of DDR pathways are dissected by the mechanistic studies with Xenopus egg extracts. We also provide an update on the regulation of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) polymerases (Pol ĸ and REV1) in the DDR pathways. A better understanding of DDR pathways using Xenopus egg extracts has opened new avenues for future cancer therapeutics. Finally, we offer our perspectives of future directions for studies of DDR pathways with Xenopus egg extracts.

  8. Non-destructive high-throughput DNA extraction and genotyping methods for cotton seeds and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuting; Hoegenauer, Kevin A; Maeda, Andrea B V; Wang, Fei; Stelly, David M; Nichols, Robert L; Jones, Don C

    2015-05-01

    Extensive use of targeted PCR-based genotyping is precluded for many plant research laboratories by the cost and time required for DNA extraction. Using cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) as a model for plants with medium-sized seeds, we report here manual procedures for inexpensive non-destructive high-throughput extraction of DNA suitable for PCR-based genotyping of large numbers of individual seeds and seedlings. By sampling only small amounts of cotyledon tissue of ungerminated seed or young seedlings, damage is minimized, and viability is not discernibly affected. The yield of DNA from each seed or seedling is typically sufficient for 1000 or 500 PCR reactions, respectively. For seeds, the tissue sampling procedure relies on a modified 96-well plate that is used subsequently for seed storage. For seeds and seedlings, the DNA is extracted in a strongly basic DNA buffer that is later neutralized and diluted. Extracts can be used directly for high-throughput PCR-based genotyping. Any laboratory can thus extract DNA from thousands of individual seeds/seedlings per person-day at a very modest cost for consumables (~$0.05 per sample). Being non-destructive, our approach enables a wide variety of time- and resource-saving applications, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS), before planting, transplanting, and flowering.

  9. New efficient DNA extraction method to access the microbiome of Ricinus communis seeds.

    PubMed

    Santos, C D; Dias, A C C; Amaral, I M R; Bonetti, A M; Campos, T A

    2013-02-28

    Ricinus communis (castor bean) seeds are used to produce an alcohol-soluble oil that is used in more than 400 industrial processes. Despite its economic importance, there has been little research on the endophytic microbiota of castor bean seeds. This microbiota is important for plant metabolic processes and may have considerable biotechnological potential, such as production of lipases and plant growth promoter agents. We evaluated several DNA extraction methodologies in order to access the microbial diversity of castor bean through a metagenomic approach. Based on our observations, we developed a new methodology that takes advantage of the low solubility of calcium phosphates and the high affinity of these phosphates for proteins and polysaccharides. The extracted DNA quality was evaluated by PCR, using a selective primer pair for bacterial and mitochondrial 16S rDNA genes (799F and 1492R). We found this methodology quantitatively and qualitatively more efficient than the other approaches. In evaluating this new extraction methodology, we found that the difficulties of DNA extraction from castor bean seeds, such as abundant oil, polysaccharides, phenolic compounds, and plant enzymes, could be overcome. The resulting extracts had high concentration and purity, and they were obtained faster than with previous methods. The samples contained virtually all of the DNA, including the microbial DNA; this was validated by PCR analysis.

  10. Extraction of DNA-cellulose-bound glucocorticoid-receptor complexes with sodium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Murakami, N; Moudgil, V K

    1981-09-04

    Glucocorticoid-receptor complex from rat liver cytosol, activated by warming at 23 degrees C or fractionation with (NH4)2SO4, was adsorbed over DNA-cellulose. This DNA-cellulose-bound [3H]triamcinolone acetonide-receptor complex was extracted in a dose-dependent manner by incubation with different concentrations of sodium tungstate. A 50% recovery of receptor was achieved with 5 mM sodium tungstate. Almost the entire glucocorticoid-receptor complex bound to DNA-cellulose could be extracted with 20 mM sodium tungstate. The [3H]triamcinolone acetonide released from DNA-cellulose following tungstate and molybdate treatment was found to be associated with a macromolecule, as seen by analysis on a Sephadex G-75 column. The glucocorticoid-receptor complex extracted by both the compounds sedimented as a 4 S entity of 5-20% sucrose gradients under low- and high-salt conditions. Addition of tungstate or molybdate to the preparations containing activated receptor had no effect on the sedimentation rate of receptor. However, addition of tungstate to non-activated receptor preparation caused aggregates of larger size. The tungstate-extracted glucocorticoid-receptor complex failed to rebind to DNA-cellulose even after extensive dialysis, whereas receptor in molybdate-extract retained its DNA-cellulose binding capacity.

  11. Universal and rapid salt-extraction of high quality genomic DNA for PCR-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Aljanabi, S M; Martinez, I

    1997-11-15

    A very simple, fast, universally applicable and reproducible method to extract high quality megabase genomic DNA from different organisms is described. We applied the same method to extract high quality complex genomic DNA from different tissues (wheat, barley, potato, beans, pear and almond leaves as well as fungi, insects and shrimps' fresh tissue) without any modification. The method does not require expensive and environmentally hazardous reagents and equipment. It can be performed even in low technology laboratories. The amount of tissue required by this method is approximately 50-100 mg. The quantity and the quality of the DNA extracted by this method is high enough to perform hundreds of PCR-based reactions and also to be used in other DNA manipulation techniques such as restriction digestion, Southern blot and cloning.

  12. A Rapid and Economical Method for Efficient DNA Extraction from Diverse Soils Suitable for Metagenomic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Selvaraju Gayathri; Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Radha, Sudhakar; Arunraj, Rex; Curtis, Wayne R.; Ramya, Mohandass

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost effective method of metagenomic DNA extraction from soil is a useful tool for environmental microbiology. The present work describes an improved method of DNA extraction namely “powdered glass method” from diverse soils. The method involves the use of sterile glass powder for cell lysis followed by addition of 1% powdered activated charcoal (PAC) as purifying agent to remove humic substances. The method yielded substantial DNA (5.87 ± 0.04 μg/g of soil) with high purity (A260/280: 1.76 ± 0.05) and reduced humic substances (A340: 0.047 ± 0.03). The quality of the extracted DNA was compared against five different methods based on 16S rDNA PCR amplification, BamHI digestion and validated using quantitative PCR. The digested DNA was used for a metagenomic library construction with the transformation efficiency of 4 X 106 CFU mL-1. Besides providing rapid, efficient and economical extraction of metgenomic DNA from diverse soils, this method’s applicability is also demonstrated for cultivated organisms (Gram positive B. subtilis NRRL-B-201, Gram negative E. coli MTCC40, and a microalgae C. sorokiniana UTEX#1666). PMID:26167854

  13. Automated Device for Asynchronous Extraction of RNA, DNA, or Protein Biomarkers from Surrogate Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Bitting, Anna L; Bordelon, Hali; Baglia, Mark L; Davis, Keersten M; Creecy, Amy E; Short, Philip A; Albert, Laura E; Karhade, Aditya V; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R; Adams, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Many biomarker-based diagnostic methods are inhibited by nontarget molecules in patient samples, necessitating biomarker extraction before detection. We have developed a simple device that purifies RNA, DNA, or protein biomarkers from complex biological samples without robotics or fluid pumping. The device design is based on functionalized magnetic beads, which capture biomarkers and remove background biomolecules by magnetically transferring the beads through processing solutions arrayed within small-diameter tubing. The process was automated by wrapping the tubing around a disc-like cassette and rotating it past a magnet using a programmable motor. This device recovered biomarkers at ~80% of the operator-dependent extraction method published previously. The device was validated by extracting biomarkers from a panel of surrogate patient samples containing clinically relevant concentrations of (1) influenza A RNA in nasal swabs, (2) Escherichia coli DNA in urine, (3) Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in sputum, and (4) Plasmodium falciparum protein and DNA in blood. The device successfully extracted each biomarker type from samples representing low levels of clinically relevant infectivity (i.e., 7.3 copies/µL of influenza A RNA, 405 copies/µL of E. coli DNA, 0.22 copies/µL of TB DNA, 167 copies/µL of malaria parasite DNA, and 2.7 pM of malaria parasite protein).

  14. Extraction of DNA from soil for analysis of bacterial diversity in transgenic and nontransgenic papaya sites.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ceshing; Wu, Chung-Yi; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Lo, Chi-Chu

    2008-12-24

    The influence of transgenic crops on the soil diversity of microorganisms is one of the major risk assessments being conducted in Taiwan since 2007, and a reliable soil DNA extraction method for denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) is required. Six soils of different type, organic matter content, cation exchange capacity, and pH were tested, and four previously reported soil DNA extraction methods were applied to these soils. Soil DNA extracts by Zhou's CS method plus QIAquick gel was recommended in our laboratory for DGGE to monitor the microbial diversity in soil. There were some differences on the bacterial diversity based on DGGE patterns at the beginning of planting, and the difference decreased after six months. The results also indicated that clay content (10.8-25.0%) and pH (4.4-6.9) of different soil samples we tested did not affect the DNA extraction efficiencies, but positive correlations were found between the organic matter content (1.2-3.9%) of soils and the DNA yields in Widmer's GS method (r = 0.93, p = 0.005) and the MoBio UC method (r = 0.92, p = 0.007). Coefficient of determinations between organic matter content and DNA yield were higher than those between clay content, CEC, and pH, indicating that organic matter content was more correlated with DNA yield than that clay content, CEC, and pH in our soil samples tested.

  15. An optimized DNA extraction and purification method from dairy manure compost for genetic diversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Zhang, Zhenhua; Liu, Dongyang; Zhou, Tiantian; Shen, Qirong; Shen, Biao

    2013-05-01

    An unbiased DNA extraction protocol is necessary for analysis of genetic diversity, particularly, of genes in complex environmental samples by nucleic acid techniques. In the present study, three manual extraction methods and two commonly used commercial kits, which were accompanied by two DNA purification strategies, were compared based on cell lysis efficiency, DNA and humic acid yields, PCR amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The results show that in spite of higher cell lysis efficiencies of the two commercial kits, the purified DNA yields were only one-third of that obtained by the two manual methods of FTSP (Freeze-thaw-SDS-Protein K) and FTSPP (Freeze-thaw-SDS-Protein K-Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone). The purified DNA from all five methods was pure enough for successful PCR and real-time PCR amplifications in the presence of 1 μg μL(-1) BSA. However, the FTSPP extraction method with DNA purification by a Wizard(®) kit yielded the largest number of 16S rRNA gene copies and ribotypes or bands in DGGE profiles, which indicated a superiority over the other four methods. The development of this optimized DNA extraction and purification method may provide a valuable tool for further molecular analysis of compost.

  16. Attempted DNA extraction from a Rancho La Brea Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi): prospects for ancient DNA from asphalt deposits.

    PubMed

    Gold, David A; Robinson, Jacqueline; Farrell, Aisling B; Harris, John M; Thalmann, Olaf; Jacobs, David K

    2014-02-01

    Fossil-bearing asphalt deposits are an understudied and potentially significant source of ancient DNA. Previous attempts to extract DNA from skeletons preserved at the Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, have proven unsuccessful, but it is unclear whether this is due to a lack of endogenous DNA, or if the problem is caused by asphalt-mediated inhibition. In an attempt to test these hypotheses, a recently recovered Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) skeleton with an unusual pattern of asphalt impregnation was studied. Ultimately, none of the bone samples tested successfully amplified M. columbi DNA. Our work suggests that reagents typically used to remove asphalt from ancient samples also inhibit DNA extraction. Ultimately, we conclude that the probability of recovering ancient DNA from fossils in asphalt deposits is strongly (perhaps fatally) hindered by the organic compounds that permeate the bones and that at the Rancho La Brea tar pits, environmental conditions might not have been ideal for the general preservation of genetic material.

  17. Attempted DNA extraction from a Rancho La Brea Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi): prospects for ancient DNA from asphalt deposits

    PubMed Central

    Gold, David A; Robinson, Jacqueline; Farrell, Aisling B; Harris, John M; Thalmann, Olaf; Jacobs, David K

    2014-01-01

    Fossil-bearing asphalt deposits are an understudied and potentially significant source of ancient DNA. Previous attempts to extract DNA from skeletons preserved at the Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, have proven unsuccessful, but it is unclear whether this is due to a lack of endogenous DNA, or if the problem is caused by asphalt-mediated inhibition. In an attempt to test these hypotheses, a recently recovered Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) skeleton with an unusual pattern of asphalt impregnation was studied. Ultimately, none of the bone samples tested successfully amplified M. columbi DNA. Our work suggests that reagents typically used to remove asphalt from ancient samples also inhibit DNA extraction. Ultimately, we conclude that the probability of recovering ancient DNA from fossils in asphalt deposits is strongly (perhaps fatally) hindered by the organic compounds that permeate the bones and that at the Rancho La Brea tar pits, environmental conditions might not have been ideal for the general preservation of genetic material. PMID:24634719

  18. Antigenotoxic Effect of Trametes spp. Extracts against DNA Damage on Human Peripheral White Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knežević, Aleksandar; Živković, Lada; Stajić, Mirjana; Vukojević, Jelena; Milovanović, Ivan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Trametes species have been used for thousands of years in traditional and conventional medicine for the treatment of various types of diseases. The goal was to evaluate possible antigenotoxic effects of mycelium and basidiocarp extracts of selected Trametes species and to assess dependence on their antioxidant potential. Trametes versicolor, T. hirsuta, and T. gibbosa were the species studied. Antigenotoxic potentials of extracts were assessed on human peripheral white blood cells with basidiocarp and mycelium extracts of the species. The alkaline comet test was used for detection of DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, as well as the extent of DNA migration. DPPH assay was used to estimate antioxidative properties of extracts. Fruiting body extracts of T. versicolor and T. gibbosa as well as T. hirsuta extracts, except that at 20.0 mg/mL, were not genotoxic agents. T. versicolor extract had at 5.0 mg/mL the greatest antigenotoxic effect in both pre- and posttreatment of leukocytes. The mycelium extracts of the three species had no genotoxic activity and significant antigenotoxic effect against H2O2-induced DNA damage, both in pre- and posttreatment. The results suggest that extracts of these three species could be considered as strong antigenotoxic agents able to stimulate genoprotective response of cells. PMID:26258163

  19. Two-step polymerase chain reactions and restriction endonuclease analyses detect and differentiate ompA DNA of Chlamydia spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenboeck, B; Kousoulas, K G; Storz, J

    1992-01-01

    Specific and sensitive amplification of major outer membrane protein (MOMP) gene (ompA) DNA sequences of Chlamydia species with various MOMP genotypes was achieved by a two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Degenerate, inosine-containing oligonucleotide primers homologous to the 5' and 3' ends of the translated regions of all chlamydial MOMP genes were used in a PCR to amplify a DNA fragment of approximately 1,120 bp. A portion of this DNA fragment was amplified in a second genus-specific reaction that yielded a DNA fragment of approximately 930 bp. A pair of degenerate oligonucleotide primers homologous to internal sequences of the primary DNA fragment was used in this PCR. This method detected three cognate chlamydial genomes in a background of 1 microgram of unrelated DNA. MOMP genes of 13 representative chlamydial MOMP genotypes of the species C. trachomatis, C. pneumoniae, and C. psittaci were amplified. In a secondary PCR, group-specific detection was achieved by the simultaneous use of one genus-specific primer and three primers derived from different fingerprint regions of three major groups of chlamydiae. This multiplex PCR differentiated the groups by the length of the amplified DNA fragments and detected the simultaneous presence of DNA sequences of the Chlamydia spp. with different MOMP genotypes. Further differentiation as ompA restriction fragment length polymorphism types among all chlamydial strains with the various MOMP genotypes analyzed here was achieved by restriction endonuclease analysis of the secondary PCR products. DNA sequences corresponding to the ompA restriction fragment length polymorphism type B577 of C. psittaci were detected in two of seven milk samples from cases of bovine mastitis. Images PMID:1349899

  20. Tracing tree nut allergens in chocolate: A comparison of DNA extraction protocols.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Melo, Vítor S; Santos, Cristina G; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2015-11-15

    The present work aimed at comparing different DNA extraction methods, from chocolate matrices, for the effective application in molecular techniques to detect tree nut allergens. For this study, DNA from almond or hazelnut model chocolates was extracted using seven selected protocols: the in-house methods of CTAB-PVP (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-polyvinylpyrrolidone), Wizard with and without RNase, Wizard-PVP with and without RNase, and the Wizard Magnetic and Nucleospin kits. The extracts were assessed for their suitability for amplification by qualitative PCR and real-time PCR. From the evaluated protocols, Nucleospin presented the best results for almond and hazelnut amplification, achieving a limit of detection of 0.005% (w/w) with high PCR efficiency, linearity and range of amplification. These results highlight the importance of the DNA extraction protocol in the case of food allergens from complex matrices, such as chocolate, in which sensitivity is a key parameter.

  1. Comparison and optimization of methods for the simultaneous extraction of DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Vorreiter, Fränze; Richter, Silke; Peter, Michel; Baumann, Sven; von Bergen, Martin; Tomm, Janina M

    2016-09-01

    The challenge of performing a time-resolved comprehensive analysis of molecular systems has led to the quest to optimize extraction methods. When the size of a biological sample is limited, there is demand for the simultaneous extraction of molecules representing the four areas of "omics": genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Here we optimized a protocol for the simultaneous extraction of DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites and compared it with two existing protocols. Our optimization comprised the addition of a methanol/chloroform metabolite purification before the separation of DNA/RNA and proteins. Extracted DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites were quantitatively and/or qualitatively analyzed. Of the three methods, only the newly developed protocol yielded all biomolecule classes of adequate quantity and quality.

  2. High-quality genomic DNA extraction from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples deparaffinized using mineral oil

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianghai; Kennedy, Stephen H.; Svarovsky, Therese; Rogers, Jeffrey; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Xu, Anlong; Zondervan, Krina T.

    2009-01-01

    Extracting DNA from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue remains a challenge, despite numerous attempts to develop a more effective method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) success rates with DNA extracted using current methods remain low. We extracted DNA from 140 long-term archived FFPE samples using a simple but effective deparaffinization method, removing the wax with mineral oil, and a commercially available DNA extraction kit. DNA quality was subsequently tested in a genotyping experiment with 14 microsatellite markers. High-quality DNA was obtained with a mean PCR success rate of 97% (range: 88–100%) across markers. The results suggested that DNA extracted using this novel method is likely to be suitable for genetic studies involving DNA fragments <200 bp. PMID:19698695

  3. Extraction of high-molecular-weight genomic DNA for long-read sequencing of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Mayjonade, Baptiste; Gouzy, Jérôme; Donnadieu, Cécile; Pouilly, Nicolas; Marande, William; Callot, Caroline; Langlade, Nicolas; Muños, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    De novo sequencing of complex genomes is one of the main challenges for researchers seeking high-quality reference sequences. Many de novo assemblies are based on short reads, producing fragmented genome sequences. Third-generation sequencing, with read lengths >10 kb, will improve the assembly of complex genomes, but these techniques require high-molecular-weight genomic DNA (gDNA), and gDNA extraction protocols used for obtaining smaller fragments for short-read sequencing are not suitable for this purpose. Methods of preparing gDNA for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries could be adapted, but these approaches are time-consuming, and commercial kits for these methods are expensive. Here, we present a protocol for rapid, inexpensive extraction of high-molecular-weight gDNA from bacteria, plants, and animals. Our technique was validated using sunflower leaf samples, producing a mean read length of 12.6 kb and a maximum read length of 80 kb.

  4. Rapid and economic DNA extraction from a single salmon egg for real-time PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Iong; Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Chou, Yii-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Lee, Guo-Chi; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Salmon eggs are common in Japanese sushi and other seafood products; however, certain fish eggs are used as counterfeit salmon eggs which are found in foods and processed products. This study develops a simple, rapid, and cost-effective method for DNA extraction, filtration (FT) and dilution (DL) protocols from a single salmon egg with good DNA quality for real-time PCR amplification. The DNA amount, DNA quality, and real-time PCR performance for different dilutions and different lengths of PCR amplicons were evaluated and compared with the common Qiagen tissue kit (QTK) and Chelex-100-based (CX) protocols. The extracted DNA from a single salmon egg using the FT or DL protocol can be applied in phylogenic research, food authentication and post-marketing monitoring of genetically modified (GM) food products.

  5. Simultaneous Extraction from Bacterioplankton of Total RNA and DNA Suitable for Quantitative Structure and Function Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Weinbauer, Markus G.; Fritz, Ingo; Wenderoth, Dirk F.; Höfle, Manfred G.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for the simultaneous extraction from bacterioplankton of RNA and DNA suitable for quantitative molecular analysis. By using a combined mechanical and chemical extraction method, the highest RNA and DNA yield was obtained with sodium lauryl sarcosinate-phenol or DivoLab-phenol as the extraction mix. The efficiency of extraction of nucleic acids was comparatively high and varied only moderately in gram-negative bacterial isolates and bacterioplankton (RNA, 52 to 66%; DNA, 43 to 61%); significant amounts of nucleic acids were also obtained for a gram-positive bacterial isolate (RNA, 20 to 30%; DNA, 20 to 25%). Reverse transcription-PCR and PCR amplification products of fragments of 16S rRNA and its genes were obtained from all isolates and communities, indicating that the extracted nucleic acids were intact and pure enough for community structure analyses. By using single-strand conformation polymorphism of fragments of 16S rRNA and its gene, community fingerprints were obtained from pond bacterioplankton. mRNA transcripts encoding fragments of the enzyme nitrite reductase gene (nir gene) could be detected in a pond water sample, indicating that the extraction method is also suitable for studying gene expression. The extraction method presented yields nucleic acids that can be used to perform structural and functional studies of bacterioplankton communities from a single sample. PMID:11872453

  6. DNA extraction for short tandem repeat typing from mixed samples using anti-human leukocyte CD45 and ABO blood group antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shizue; Honda, Katsuya; Kaminiwa, Junko; Nishi, Takeki; Iwabuchi, Yayoi; Sugano, Yukiko; Kurosu, Akira; Suzuki, Yasuhito

    2014-05-01

    DNA testing from mixed cell samples can be difficult to use successfully in criminal investigations. Here, we present a method for the extraction of DNA from mixed bloodstains involving plural contributors, after antibody-microbead captured cell separation. This method, together with the multiplex short tandem repeat typing presented, has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA profiles corresponding to the ABO blood type. Methodological steps include magnetic separation using leukocyte specific CD45 antibody-coated microbeads and centrifugal separation of leukocyte agglutination by ABO antibody. The detection results of variable mixed ratio showed that the target DNA was detected accurately as low as 1:512 mixed ratio, regardless of the large amount of the background DNA present. The method presented here is applicable to PCR-based identification for various kinds of mixed samples.

  7. Design and use of mouse control DNA for DNA biomarker extraction and PCR detection from urine: Application for transrenal Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Bordelon, Hali; Ricks, Keersten M; Pask, Megan E; Russ, Patricia K; Solinas, Francesca; Baglia, Mark L; Short, Philip A; Nel, Andrew; Blackburn, Jonathan; Dheda, Keertan; Zamudio, Carlos; Cáceres, Tatiana; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R; Pettit, April C

    2017-05-01

    Urine samples are increasingly used for diagnosing infections including Escherichia coli, Ebola virus, and Zika virus. However, extraction and concentration of nucleic acid biomarkers from urine is necessary for many molecular detection strategies such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Since urine samples typically have large volumes with dilute biomarker concentrations making them prone to false negatives, another impediment for urine-based diagnostics is the establishment of appropriate controls particularly to rule out false negatives. In this study, a mouse glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) DNA target was added to retrospectively collected urine samples from tuberculosis (TB)-infected and TB-uninfected patients to indicate extraction of intact DNA and removal of PCR inhibitors from urine samples. We tested this design on surrogate urine samples, retrospective 1milliliter (mL) urine samples from patients in Lima, Peru and retrospective 5mL urine samples from patients in Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction/PCR control DNA was detectable in 97% of clinical samples with no statistically significant differences among groups. Despite the inclusion of this control, there was no difference in the amount of TB IS6110 Tr-DNA detected between TB-infected and TB-uninfected groups except for samples from known HIV-infected patients. We found an increase in TB IS6110 Tr-DNA between TB/HIV co-infected patients compared to TB-uninfected/HIV-infected patients (N=18, p=0.037). The inclusion of an extraction/PCR control DNA to indicate successful DNA extraction and removal of PCR inhibitors should be easily adaptable as a sample preparation control for other acellular sample types.

  8. Universal Dynamic DNA Assembly-Programmed Surface Hybridization Effect for Single-Step, Reusable, and Amplified Electrochemical Nucleic Acid Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Fang, Li; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2017-03-07

    The traditional sensitive electrochemical biosensors are commonly confronted with the cumbersome interface operation and washing procedures and the inclusion of extra exogenous reagents, which impose the challenge on the detection simplicity, reliability, and reusability. Herein, we present the proof-of-principle of a unique biosensor architecture based on dynamic DNA assembly programmed surface hybridization, which confers the single-step, reusable, and enzyme-free amplified electrochemical nucleic acid analysis. To demonstrate the fabrication universality three dynamic DNA assembly strategies including DNA-fueled target recycling, catalytic hairpin DNA assembly, and hybridization chain reaction were flexibly harnessed to convey the homogeneous target recognition and amplification events into various DNA scaffolds for the autonomous proximity-based surface hybridization. The current biosensor architecture features generalizability, simplicity, low cost, high sensitivity, and specificity over the traditional nucleic acid-related amplified biosensors. The lowest detection limit of 50 aM toward target DNA could be achieved by hybridization chain reaction-programmed surface hybridization. The reliable working ability for both homogeneous solution and heterogeneous inteface facilitates the target analysis with a robust reliability and reproducibility, also making it to be readily extended for the integration with the kinds of detecting platforms. Thus, it may hold great potential for the biosensor fabrication served for the point-of-care applications in resource constrained regions.

  9. Microbes on building materials--evaluation of DNA extraction protocols as common basis for molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Ettenauer, Jörg D; Piñar, Guadalupe; Lopandic, Ksenija; Spangl, Bernhard; Ellersdorfer, Günther; Voitl, Christian; Sterflinger, Katja

    2012-11-15

    The study of microbial life in building materials is an emerging topic concerning biodeterioration of materials as well as health risks in houses and at working places. Biodegradation and potential health implications associated with microbial growth in our residues claim for more precise methods for quantification and identification. To date, cultivation experiments are commonly used to gain insight into the microbial diversity. Nowadays, molecular techniques for the identification of microorganisms provide efficient methods that can be applied in this field. The efficiency of DNA extraction is decisive in order to perform a reliable and reproducible quantification of the microorganisms by qPCR or to characterize the structure of the microbial community. In this study we tested thirteen DNA extraction methods and evaluated their efficiency for identifying (1) the quantity of DNA, (2) the quality and purity of DNA and (3) the ability of the DNA to be amplified in a PCR reaction using three universal primer sets for the ITS region of fungi as well as one primer pair targeting the 16S rRNA of bacteria with three typical building materials - common plaster, red brick and gypsum cardboard. DNA concentration measurements showed strong variations among the tested methods and materials. Measurement of the DNA yield showed up to three orders of magnitude variation from the same samples, whereas A260/A280 ratios often prognosticated biases in the PCR amplifications. Visualization of the crude DNA extracts and the comparison of DGGE fingerprints showed additional drawbacks of some methods. The FastDNA Spin kit for soil showed to be the best DNA extraction method and could provide positive results for all tests with the three building materials. Therefore, we suggest this method as a gold standard for quantification of indoor fungi and bacteria in building materials.

  10. A viral packaging motor varies its DNA rotation and step size to preserve subunit coordination as the capsid fills.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shixin; Chistol, Gheorghe; Hetherington, Craig L; Tafoya, Sara; Aathavan, K; Schnitzbauer, Joerg; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-04-24

    Multimeric, ring-shaped molecular motors rely on the coordinated action of their subunits to perform crucial biological functions. During these tasks, motors often change their operation in response to regulatory signals. Here, we investigate a viral packaging machine as it fills the capsid with DNA and encounters increasing internal pressure. We find that the motor rotates the DNA during packaging and that the rotation per base pair increases with filling. This change accompanies a reduction in the motor's step size. We propose that these adjustments preserve motor coordination by allowing one subunit to make periodic, specific, and regulatory contacts with the DNA. At high filling, we also observe the downregulation of the ATP-binding rate and the emergence of long-lived pauses, suggesting a throttling-down mechanism employed by the motor near the completion of packaging. This study illustrates how a biological motor adjusts its operation in response to changing conditions, while remaining highly coordinated.

  11. Step-gate polysilicon nanowires field effect transistor compatible with CMOS technology for label-free DNA biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wenga, G; Jacques, E; Salaün, A-C; Rogel, R; Pichon, L; Geneste, F

    2013-02-15

    Currently, detection of DNA hybridization using fluorescence-based detection technique requires expensive optical systems and complex bioinformatics tools. Hence, the development of new low cost devices that enable direct and highly sensitive detection stimulates a lot of research efforts. Particularly, devices based on silicon nanowires are emerging as ultrasensitive electrical sensors for the direct detection of biological species thanks to their high surface to volume ratio. In this study, we propose innovative devices using step-gate polycrystalline silicon nanowire FET (poly-Si NW FETs), achieved with simple and low cost fabrication process, and used as ultrasensitive electronic sensor for DNA hybridization. The poly-SiNWs are synthesized using the sidewall spacer formation technique. The detailed fabrication procedure for a step-gate NWFET sensor is described in this paper. No-complementary and complementary DNA sequences were clearly discriminated and detection limit to 1 fM range is observed. This first result using this nano-device is promising for the development of low cost and ultrasensitive polysilicon nanowires based DNA sensors compatible with the CMOS technology.

  12. Second-step transfer of bacteriophage T5 DNA: purification and characterization of the T5 gene A2 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, C E; Benzinger, R H

    1981-01-01

    Second-step transfer of bacteriophage T5 DNA requires the function of the T5 pre-early proteins A1 and A2. We have isolated and characterized the gene A2 protein as part of an effort to determine the mechanism of second-step transfer. The A2 protein was purified by DNA-cellulose column chromatography followed by gel filtration and ion-exchange column chromatography. The A2 protein's identity was confirmed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and thin-layer gel filtration in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride demonstrated a molecular weight of 15,000 for the A2 polypeptide. Migration of the A2 protein through gel filtration columns under nondenaturing conditions, in combination with sedimentation behavior, indicated dimerization of the A2 polypeptide. The existence of the A2 dimer was confirmed by protein cross-linking with dimethyl suberimidate and analysis of the cross-linked proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The amino acid composition, degree of polymerization, DNA-binding ability, and physical characteristics of the T5 gene A2 protein are consistent with a function of the A2 protein in DNA transfer. Images PMID:7288924

  13. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD IS SUCCESSFULLY APPLIED TO ITS-RFLP ANALYSIS OF MYCORRHIZAL ROOT TIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid method for extracting DNA from intact, single root tips using a Xanthine solution was developed to handle very large numbers of analyses of ectomycorrhizas. By using an extraction without grinding we have attempted to bias the extraction towards the fungal DNA in the man...

  14. Protective effect of enzymatic extracts from microalgae against DNA damage induced by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Karawita, Rohan; Senevirathne, Mahinda; Athukorala, Yasantha; Affan, Abu; Lee, Young-Jae; Kim, Se-Kwon; Lee, Joon-Baek; Jeon, You-Jin

    2007-01-01

    The enzymatic extracts from seven species of microalgae (Pediastrum duplex, Dactylococcopsis fascicularis, Halochlorococcum porphyrae, Oltmannsiellopsis unicellularis, Achnanthes longipes, Navicula sp. and Amphora coffeaeformis) collected from three habitats (freshwater, tidal pool, and coastal benthic) at Jeju Island in Korea were investigated for their antioxidant activity. Of the extracts tested, the AMG 300 L (an exo 1, 4-alpha-D-glucosidase) extract of P. duplex, the Viscozyme extract of Navicula sp., and the Celluclast extract of A. longipes provided the most potential as antioxidants. Meanwhile, the Termamyl extract of P. duplex in an H(2)O(2) scavenging assay exhibited an approximate 60% scavenging effect. In this study, we report that the DNA damage inhibitory effects of P. duplex (Termamyl extract) and D. fascicularis (Kojizyme extract) were nearly 80% and 69% respectively at a concentration of 100 microg/ml. Thus, it is suggested that the microalgae tested in this study yield promising DNA damage inhibitory properties on mouse lymphoma L 5178 cells that are treated with H(2)O(2). Therefore, microalgae such as P. duplex may be an excellent source of naturally occurring antioxidant compounds with potent DNA damage inhibition potential.

  15. Pulsatile culture of a poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) sandwiched cell/hydrogel construct fabricated using a step-by-step mold/extraction method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Sui, Shaochun

    2011-06-01

    To overcome the weak mechanical properties of cell/hydrogel composites, a poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) sandwiched adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)/fibrin construct was fabricated using a step-by-step mold/extraction method to generate the middle smooth muscle layer of natural blood vessels. A pulse bioreactor with an adjustable 0-0.2 MPa pressure, 0-7% pulse amplitude, and 0-80 times/min pulse frequency was developed to mimic the liquid movement in the natural blood vessels. This new type of pulse bioreactor is sterilizable and dismantles easily. A comparative study was conducted with static and dynamic in vitro cultures. Exogenous growth factors, such as hepatocyte growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor BB, transforming growth factor β1, and basic fibroblast growth factor were used as additives in the culture medium for inducing the ADSCs into smooth muscle cells. The dynamic training, integrated with the growth factor, induced the transformation of ADSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with regular arrangement. This strategy shows promise of being widely used in tissue engineering and complex organ manufacturing.

  16. Xenopus egg extract to study regulation of genome-wide and locus-specific DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Raspelli, Erica; Falbo, Lucia; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication, coupled with accurate repair of DNA damage, is essential to maintain genome stability and relies on different DNA metabolism genes. Many of these genes are involved in the assembly of replication origins, in the coordination of DNA repair to protect replication forks progression in the presence of DNA damage and in the replication of repetitive chromatin regions. Some DNA metabolism genes are essential in higher eukaryotes, suggesting the existence of specialized mechanisms of repair and replication in organisms with complex genomes. The impact on cell survival of many of these genes has so far precluded in depth molecular analysis of their function. The cell-free Xenopus laevis egg extract represents an ideal system to overcome survival issues and to facilitate the biochemical study of replication-associated functions of essential proteins in vertebrate organisms. Here, we will discuss how Xenopus egg extracts have been used to study cellular and molecular processes, such as DNA replication and DNA repair. In particular, we will focus on innovative imaging and proteomic-based experimental approaches to characterize the molecular function of a number of essential DNA metabolism factors involved in the duplication of complex vertebrate genomes.

  17. Early steps of active DNA demethylation initiated by ROS1 glycosylase require three putative helix-invading residues.

    PubMed

    Parrilla-Doblas, Jara Teresa; Ponferrada-Marín, María Isabel; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R

    2013-10-01

    Active DNA demethylation is crucial for epigenetic control, but the underlying enzymatic mechanisms are incompletely understood. REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1) is a 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) DNA glycosylase/lyase that initiates DNA demethylation in plants through a base excision repair process. The enzyme binds DNA nonspecifically and slides along the substrate in search of 5-meC. In this work, we have used homology modelling and biochemical analysis to gain insight into the mechanism of target location and recognition by ROS1. We have found that three putative helix-intercalating residues (Q607, R903 and M905) are required for processing of 5-meC:G pairs, but dispensable for excision of mismatched 5-meC. Mutant proteins Q607A, R903A and M905G retain the capacity to process an abasic site opposite G, thus suggesting that all three residues play a critical role in early steps of the base extrusion process and likely contribute to destabilization of 5-meC:G pairs. While R903 and M905 are not essential for DNA binding, mutation of Q607 abrogates stable binding to both methylated and nonmethylated DNA. However, the mutant protein Q607A can form stable complexes with DNA substrates containing blocked ends, which suggests that Q607 intercalates into the helix and inhibits sliding. Altogether, our results suggest that ROS1 uses three predicted helix-invading residues to actively interrogate DNA in search for 5-meC.

  18. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-09-30

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition.

  19. DNA extraction from hair shafts of wild Brazilian felids and canids.

    PubMed

    Alberts, C C; Ribeiro-Paes, J T; Aranda-Selverio, G; Cursino-Santos, J R; Moreno-Cotulio, V R; Oliveira, A L D; Porchia, B F M M; Santos, W F; Souza, E B

    2010-12-21

    Wild felids and canids are usually the main predators in the food chains where they dwell and are almost invisible to behavior and ecology researchers. Due to their grooming behavior, they tend to swallow shed hair, which shows up in the feces. DNA found in hair shafts can be used in molecular studies that can unravel, for instance, genetic variability, reproductive mode and family structure, and in some species, it is even possible to estimate migration and dispersion rates in given populations. First, however, DNA must be extracted from hair. We extracted successfully and dependably hair shaft DNA from eight wild Brazilian felids, ocelot, margay, oncilla, Geoffroy's cat, pampas cat, jaguarundi, puma, and jaguar, as well as the domestic cat and from three wild Brazilian canids, maned wolf, crab-eating fox, and hoary fox, as well as the domestic dog. Hair samples came mostly from feces collected at the São Paulo Zoo and were also gathered from non-sedated pet or from recently dead wild animals and were also collected from museum specimens. Fractions of hair samples were stained before DNA extraction, while most samples were not. Our extraction protocol is based on a feather DNA extraction technique, based in the phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol general method, with proteinase K as digestive enzyme.

  20. Efficient DNA extraction from nail clippings using the protease solution from Cucumis melo.

    PubMed

    Yoshida-Yamamoto, Shumi; Nishimura, Sayaka; Okuno, Teruko; Rakuman, Miki; Takii, Yukio

    2010-09-01

    Owing to the increasing importance of genomic information, obtaining genomic DNA easily from biological specimens has become more and more important. This article proposes an efficient method for obtaining genomic DNA from nail clippings. Nail clippings can be easily obtained, are thermostable and easy to transport, and have low infectivity. The drawback of their use, however, has been the difficulty of extracting genomic material from them. We have overcome this obstacle using the protease solution obtained from Cucumis melo. The keratinolytic activity of the protease solution was 1.78-fold higher than that of proteinase K, which is commonly used to degrade keratin. With the protease solution, three times more DNA was extracted than when proteinase K was used. In order to verify the integrity of the extracted DNA, genotype analysis on 170 subjects was performed by both PCR-RFLP and Real Time PCR. The results of the genotyping showed that the extracted DNA was suitable for genotyping analysis. In conclusion, we have developed an efficient extraction method for using nail clippings as a genome source and a research tool in molecular epidemiology, medical diagnostics, and forensic science.

  1. Imported malaria in United Arab Emirates: evaluation of a new DNA extraction technique using nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Doaa M; Khalil, Marwa M; Abdouh, Ahmed S; Doleh, Wafaa F; Al Muthanna, Abdul Aziz M

    2009-09-01

    Local malaria transmission in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) came to an end in 1997. Nevertheless, UAE has been subjected to substantial importation of malaria cases from abroad, concerning both UAE nationals and immigrants from malarious countries with a total number of 2,119 cases in 2007. To evaluate a new DNA extraction technique using nested PCR, blood samples were collected from 132 individuals who presented to Infectious Diseases Department in Rashid Hospital, Dubai, and Central Department of Malaria Control with fever and persistent headache. Giemsa-stained blood films and ELISA test for malaria antibodies were carried out for detection of Plasmodium infection. Plasmodium infections were identified with the genus-specific primer set and species differentiation using nested PCR. A rapid procedure for diagnosis of malaria infections directly from dried blood spots using for the first time DNA extract from FTA Elute cards was evaluated in contrast to extraction techniques using FTA classic cards and rapid boiling technique. Our new simple technique for DNA extraction using FTA Elute cards was very sensitive giving a sensitivity of 100% compared to 94% using FTA classic cards and 62% in the rapid boiling technique. No complex preparation of blood samples was required prior to the amplification. The production cost of DNA isolation in our PCR assay was much less in comparable to that of other DNA extraction protocols. The nested PCR detected plasmodial infection and could differentiate P. falciparum from P. vivax, and also detected the mixed infection.

  2. Exploring microbial diversity in volcanic environments: a review of methods in DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Aude; Cockell, Charles S

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has been marked by a large number of studies focused on understanding the distribution of microorganisms in volcanic environments. These studies are motivated by the desire to elucidate how the geochemically extreme conditions of such environments can influence microbial diversity both on the surface and in the subsurface of the Earth. The exploration of microbial community diversity has generally not relied on culture-dependent methods, but has been carried out using environmental DNA extraction. Because of the large diversity of chemically and physically complex samples, extracting DNA from volcanic environments is technically challenging. In view of the emerging literature, and our own experience in the optimisation of methods for DNA extraction from volcanic materials, it is timely to provide a methodological comparison. This review highlights and discusses new insights and methods published on DNA extraction methods from volcanic samples, considering the different volcanic environments. A description of a recent method for DNA extraction from basalt and obsidian glass rock samples from Iceland is included. Finally, we discuss these approaches in the wider context of modern work to understand the microbial diversity of volcanic environments.

  3. Comparison of DNA extraction methods for polymerase chain reaction amplification of guanaco (Lama guanicoe) fecal DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, M I; Bertin, A; Squeo, F A; Cortés, A; Gouin, N

    2015-01-23

    Feces-based population genetic studies have become increasingly popular. However, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification rates from fecal material vary depending on the species, populations, loci, and extraction protocols. Here, we assessed the PCR amplification success of three microsatellite markers and a segment of the mitochondrial control region of DNA extracted from field-collected feces of guanaco (Lama guanicoe) using two protocols - Qiagen DNA Stool Kit and 2 cetyltrimethylammonium bromide/phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (2CTAB/PCI) method. Chelex resin treatment to remove inhibitors was also tested. Our results show that the mitochondrial locus was the most difficult to amplify. PCR success rates improved for all markers after Chelex treatment of extracted DNA, and 2CTAB/PCI method (95.83%) appeared to perform slightly better than stool kit (91.67%) for the nuclear markers. Amplification success was significantly influenced by the extraction method, Chelex treatment, and locus (P < 0.001) but not by the freshness of the feces (fresh vs old, P = 0.17). The repeatability levels were high without Chelex treatment (> 0.89), but they decreased slightly after treatment for amplification of nuclear markers and markedly after treatment for amplification of the mitochondrial control region. Thus, we showed that Chelex treatment gives high PCR success, especially for nuclear markers, and adequate DNA extraction rates can be achieved from L. guanicoe feces even from non-fresh fecal material. Although not significant, 2CTAB/PCI method tended to provide higher successful amplification rates on a whole set of samples, suggesting that the method could be particularly useful when using small sample sizes.

  4. Optimisation of DNA extraction and validation of PCR assays to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Timms, Verlaine J; Mitchell, Hazel M; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate DNA extraction methods and PCR assays suitable for the detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in bovine tissue. The majority of methods currently used to detect M. paratuberculosis have been developed using bovine samples, such as faeces, blood or tissue and, in many cases, have been based on detection from pooled samples from a herd. However most studies have not compared PCR results to culture results. In order to address this problem, four DNA extraction protocols and three PCR assays were employed to detect M. paratuberculosis in bovine tissue. Given that culture is reliable from cows, the results were then compared with the known M. paratuberculosis culture status. The following DNA extractions were included, two commercial kits, a boiling method, an in house extraction based on a published method and enrichment by sonication. The three PCR assays used included single round IS900 and f57 assays and a nested IS900 assay. In addition, another PCR assay was validated for the detection of any Mycobacterial species and a universal bacterial 16S rRNA gene assay was used to detect sample inhibition. The in-house DNA extraction was the most consistent in extracting good quality DNA compared to all other methods. The use of two PCR markers, IS900 and f57, and a universal PCR enabled the correct samples to be identified as M. paratuberculosis positive. In addition, when compared to the culture result, false-positives did not occur and PCR inhibition was readily identified. Using an in house DNA extraction coupled with the IS900 and f57 PCR markers, this study provides a reliable and simple method to detect M. paratuberculosis in both veterinary and spill over infections.

  5. Ancient DNA in historical parchments - identifying a procedure for extraction and amplification of genetic material.

    PubMed

    Lech, T

    2016-05-06

    Historical parchments in the form of documents, manuscripts, books, or letters, make up a large portion of cultural heritage collections. Their priceless historical value is associated with not only their content, but also the information hidden in the DNA deposited on them. Analyses of ancient DNA (aDNA) retrieved from parchments can be used in various investigations, including, but not limited to, studying their authentication, tracing the development of the culture, diplomacy, and technology, as well as obtaining information on the usage and domestication of animals. This article proposes and verifies a procedure for aDNA recovery from historical parchments and its appropriate preparation for further analyses. This study involved experimental selection of an aDNA extraction method with the highest efficiency and quality of extracted genetic material, from among the multi-stage phenol-chloroform extraction methods, and the modern, column-based techniques that use selective DNA-binding membranes. Moreover, current techniques to amplify entire genetic material were questioned, and the possibility of using mitochondrial DNA for species identification was analyzed. The usefulness of the proposed procedure was successfully confirmed in identification tests of historical parchments dating back to the 13-16th century AD.

  6. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  7. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.

  8. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    DOE PAGES

    None

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illuminamore » 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.« less

  9. Using Arabidopsis cell extracts to monitor repair of DNA base damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R

    2012-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway for the removal of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. This repair mechanism is initiated by DNA glycosylases that excise the altered base, and continues through alternative routes that culminate in DNA resynthesis and ligation. In contrast to the information available for microbes and animals, our knowledge about this important DNA repair pathway in plants is very limited, partially due to a lack of biochemical approaches. Here we describe an in vitro assay to monitor BER in cell-free extracts from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The assay uses labeled DNA substrates containing a single damaged base within a restriction site, and allows detection of fully repaired molecules as well as DNA repair intermediates. The method is easily applied to measure the repair activity of purified proteins and can be successfully used in combination with the extensive array of biological resources available for Arabidopsis.

  10. Extraction of PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA from Bacillus anthracisspores

    SciTech Connect

    Torok, Tamas

    2003-05-19

    Bacterial endospore disruption and nucleic acid extractionresulting in DNA of PCR-amplifiable quality and quantity are not trivial.Responding to the needs of the Hazardous Materials Response Unit (HMRU),Laboratory Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation, protocols weredeveloped to close these gaps. Effectiveness and reproducibility of thetechniques were validated with laboratory grown pure spores of Bacillusanthracis and its close phylogenetic neighbors, and with spiked soils anddamaged samples.

  11. Feature Extraction From DNA Sequences by Multifractal Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    genome may lead to an under- standing of the genome and to the understanding of life. Recently a draft sequence of the human genome ...which covers 96% of the entire human genome containing base pairs, has been published by the Human Genome Project (HGP) and Celera Genomics . However...time series model based on the global structure of the complete genome , and showed long-range correlations in the bacteria DNA sequences . Although

  12. VCP/p97 Extracts Sterically Trapped Ku70/80 Rings from DNA in Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    van den Boom, Johannes; Wolf, Markus; Weimann, Lena; Schulze, Nina; Li, Fanghua; Kaschani, Farnusch; Riemer, Anne; Zierhut, Christian; Kaiser, Markus; Iliakis, George; Funabiki, Hironori; Meyer, Hemmo

    2016-10-06

    During DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, the ring-shaped Ku70/80 complex becomes trapped on DNA and needs to be actively extracted, but it has remained unclear what provides the required energy. By means of reconstitution of DSB repair on beads, we demonstrate here that DNA-locked Ku rings are released by the AAA-ATPase p97. To achieve this, p97 requires ATP hydrolysis, cooperates with the Ufd1-Npl4 ubiquitin-adaptor complex, and specifically targets Ku80 that is modified by K48-linked ubiquitin chains. In U2OS cells, chemical inhibition of p97 or siRNA-mediated depletion of p97 or its adapters impairs Ku80 removal after non-homologous end joining of DSBs. Moreover, this inhibition attenuates early steps in homologous recombination, consistent with p97-driven Ku release also affecting repair pathway choice. Thus, our data answer a central question regarding regulation of Ku in DSB repair and illustrate the ability of p97 to segregate even tightly bound protein complexes for release from DNA.

  13. Extracting DNA from 'jaws': high yield and quality from archived tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) skeletal material.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, E E; Morgan, J A T; Maher, S L; Edson, J; Gauthier, M; Pepperell, J; Holmes, B J; Bennett, M B; Ovenden, J R

    2016-08-10

    Archived specimens are highly valuable sources of DNA for retrospective genetic/genomic analysis. However, often limited effort has been made to evaluate and optimize extraction methods, which may be crucial for downstream applications. Here, we assessed and optimized the usefulness of abundant archived skeletal material from sharks as a source of DNA for temporal genomic studies. Six different methods for DNA extraction, encompassing two different commercial kits and three different protocols, were applied to material, so-called bio-swarf, from contemporary and archived jaws and vertebrae of tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier). Protocols were compared for DNA yield and quality using a qPCR approach. For jaw swarf, all methods provided relatively high DNA yield and quality, while large differences in yield between protocols were observed for vertebrae. Similar results were obtained from samples of white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). Application of the optimized methods to 38 museum and private angler trophy specimens dating back to 1912 yielded sufficient DNA for downstream genomic analysis for 68% of the samples. No clear relationships between age of samples, DNA quality and quantity were observed, likely reflecting different preparation and storage methods for the trophies. Trial sequencing of DNA capture genomic libraries using 20 000 baits revealed that a significant proportion of captured sequences were derived from tiger sharks. This study demonstrates that archived shark jaws and vertebrae are potential high-yield sources of DNA for genomic-scale analysis. It also highlights that even for similar tissue types, a careful evaluation of extraction protocols can vastly improve DNA yield.

  14. Method Specific Calibration Corrects for DNA Extraction Method Effects on Relative Telomere Length Measurements by Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Seeker, Luise A; Holland, Rebecca; Underwood, Sarah; Fairlie, Jennifer; Psifidi, Androniki; Ilska, Joanna J; Bagnall, Ainsley; Whitelaw, Bruce; Coffey, Mike; Banos, Georgios; Nussey, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is increasingly being used as a biomarker in epidemiological, biomedical and ecological studies. A wide range of DNA extraction techniques have been used in telomere experiments and recent quantitative PCR (qPCR) based studies suggest that the choice of DNA extraction method may influence average relative TL (RTL) measurements. Such extraction method effects may limit the use of historically collected DNA samples extracted with different methods. However, if extraction method effects are systematic an extraction method specific (MS) calibrator might be able to correct for them, because systematic effects would influence the calibrator sample in the same way as all other samples. In the present study we tested whether leukocyte RTL in blood samples from Holstein Friesian cattle and Soay sheep measured by qPCR was influenced by DNA extraction method and whether MS calibration could account for any observed differences. We compared two silica membrane-based DNA extraction kits and a salting out method. All extraction methods were optimized to yield enough high quality DNA for TL measurement. In both species we found that silica membrane-based DNA extraction methods produced shorter RTL measurements than the non-membrane-based method when calibrated against an identical calibrator. However, these differences were not statistically detectable when a MS calibrator was used to calculate RTL. This approach produced RTL measurements that were highly correlated across extraction methods (r > 0.76) and had coefficients of variation lower than 10% across plates of identical samples extracted by different methods. Our results are consistent with previous findings that popular membrane-based DNA extraction methods may lead to shorter RTL measurements than non-membrane-based methods. However, we also demonstrate that these differences can be accounted for by using an extraction method-specific calibrator, offering researchers a simple means of accounting for

  15. Method Specific Calibration Corrects for DNA Extraction Method Effects on Relative Telomere Length Measurements by Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Rebecca; Underwood, Sarah; Fairlie, Jennifer; Psifidi, Androniki; Ilska, Joanna J.; Bagnall, Ainsley; Whitelaw, Bruce; Coffey, Mike; Banos, Georgios; Nussey, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is increasingly being used as a biomarker in epidemiological, biomedical and ecological studies. A wide range of DNA extraction techniques have been used in telomere experiments and recent quantitative PCR (qPCR) based studies suggest that the choice of DNA extraction method may influence average relative TL (RTL) measurements. Such extraction method effects may limit the use of historically collected DNA samples extracted with different methods. However, if extraction method effects are systematic an extraction method specific (MS) calibrator might be able to correct for them, because systematic effects would influence the calibrator sample in the same way as all other samples. In the present study we tested whether leukocyte RTL in blood samples from Holstein Friesian cattle and Soay sheep measured by qPCR was influenced by DNA extraction method and whether MS calibration could account for any observed differences. We compared two silica membrane-based DNA extraction kits and a salting out method. All extraction methods were optimized to yield enough high quality DNA for TL measurement. In both species we found that silica membrane-based DNA extraction methods produced shorter RTL measurements than the non-membrane-based method when calibrated against an identical calibrator. However, these differences were not statistically detectable when a MS calibrator was used to calculate RTL. This approach produced RTL measurements that were highly correlated across extraction methods (r > 0.76) and had coefficients of variation lower than 10% across plates of identical samples extracted by different methods. Our results are consistent with previous findings that popular membrane-based DNA extraction methods may lead to shorter RTL measurements than non-membrane-based methods. However, we also demonstrate that these differences can be accounted for by using an extraction method-specific calibrator, offering researchers a simple means of accounting for

  16. Novel extraction method of genomic DNA suitable for long-fragment amplification from small amounts of milk.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y F; Gao, J L; Yang, Y F; Ku, T; Zan, L S

    2014-11-01

    Isolation of genomic DNA is a prerequisite for assessment of milk quality. As a source of genomic DNA, milk somatic cells from milking ruminants are practical, animal friendly, and cost-effective sources. Extracting DNA from milk can avoid the stress response caused by blood and tissue sampling of cows. In this study, we optimized a novel DNA extraction method for amplifying long (>1,000 bp) DNA fragments and used it to evaluate the isolation of DNA from small amounts of milk. The techniques used for the separation of milk somatic cell were explored and combined with a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-phenol method for optimizing DNA extraction from milk. Spectrophotometry was used to determine the concentration and purity of the extracted DNA. Gel electrophoresis and DNA amplification technologies were used for to determine DNA size and quality. The DNA of 112 cows was obtained from milk (samples of 13 ± 1 mL) and the corresponding optical density ratios at 260:280 nm were between 1.65 and 1.75. Concentrations were between 12 and 45 μg/μL and DNA size and quality were acceptable. The specific PCR amplification of 1,019- and 729-bp bovine DNA fragments was successfully carried out. This novel method can be used as a practical, fast, and economical mean for long genomic DNA extraction from a small amount of milk.

  17. Comparative analysis of different DNA extraction protocols in fresh and herbarium specimens of the genus Dalbergia.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, R A; Lovato, M B

    2007-03-29

    Five published DNA extraction protocols were compared for their ability to produce good quality DNA from fresh and herbarium leaves of several species of the genus Dalbergia. The leaves of these species contain high amounts of secondary metabolites, which make it difficult to perform a clean DNA extraction and thereby interfering with subsequent PCR amplification. The protocol that produced the best DNA quality in most of the Dalbergia species analyzed, utilizes polyvinylpyrrolidone to bind the phenolic compounds, a high molar concentration of NaCl to inhibit co-precipitation of polysaccharides and DNA, and LiCl for removing RNA by selective precipitation. The DNA quality of herbarium specimens was worse than that for fresh leaves, due to collecting conditions and preservation of samples. We analyzed 54 herbarium specimens, but the recovered DNA allowed successful PCR amplification in only eight. For the genus Dalbergia, the herbarium is an important source of material for phylogenetic and evolutionary studies; due to the occurrence of the different species in various geographical regions in Brazil, it is difficult to obtain fresh material in nature. Our results demonstrated that for Dalbergia species the methods used for the collection and preservation of herbarium specimens have a mayor influence on DNA quality and in the success of phylogenetic studies of the species.

  18. Optimization of DNA extraction from fresh leaf tissues of Melanoxylon brauna (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Borges, D B; Amorim, M B; Waldschmidt, A M; Mariano-Neto, E; Vivas, C V; Pereira, D G

    2012-05-22

    Melanoxylon brauna (Fabaceae - Caesalpinioideae) is an endemic and valuable hardwood tree species in the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest; it is comparable to African ebony wood. We tested three protocols of DNA extraction based on the citrimonium bromide (CTAB) method and evaluated the quantity, purity and integrity of the DNA. We also determined whether these procedures interfere with PCR amplification in order to develop a protocol for M. brauna. We found that the quality and integrity of DNA were improved with the use of proteinase K in the extraction buffer and by modifications in the centrifugation speed. The lowest concentration of DNA was obtained with Doyle and Doyle's protocol (5.42 ng/μL). Ferreira and Grattapaglia's protocol modified for M. brauna provided the most DNA (36.89 ng/μL) and the highest quality DNA (purity ratio of 1.80 nm). The original Ferreira and Grattapaglia protocol provided 13.42 ng/μL DNA; however, the purity ratio (1.44 nm) indicates protein contamination. PCR results showed that Ferreira and Grattapaglia's protocol modified for M. brauna gave satisfactory quantity and purity of DNA for molecular studies.

  19. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies support a late step in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Percy Luk; Denissova, Natalia G; Nasello, Cara; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Chen, J Don; Brenneman, Mark A

    2012-05-01

    The PML protein and PML nuclear bodies (PML-NB) are implicated in multiple cellular functions relevant to tumor suppression, including DNA damage response. In most cases of acute promyelocytic leukemia, the PML and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) genes are translocated, resulting in expression of oncogenic PML-RARα fusion proteins. PML-NB fail to form normally, and promyelocytes remain in an undifferentiated, abnormally proliferative state. We examined the involvement of PML protein and PML-NB in homologous recombinational repair (HRR) of chromosomal DNA double-strand breaks. Transient overexpression of wild-type PML protein isoforms produced hugely enlarged or aggregated PML-NB and reduced HRR by ~2-fold, suggesting that HRR depends to some extent upon normal PML-NB structure. Knockdown of PML by RNA interference sharply attenuated formation of PML-NB and reduced HRR by up to 20-fold. However, PML-knockdown cells showed apparently normal induction of H2AX phosphorylation and RAD51 foci after DNA damage by ionizing radiation. These findings indicate that early steps in HRR, including recognition of DNA double-strand breaks, initial processing of ends, and assembly of single-stranded DNA/RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, do not depend upon PML-NB. The HRR deficit in PML-depleted cells thus reflects inhibition of later steps in the repair pathway. Expression of PML-RARα fusion proteins disrupted PML-NB structure and reduced HRR by up to 10-fold, raising the possibility that defective HRR and resulting genomic instability may figure in the pathogenesis, progression and relapse of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  20. An evaluation of the effect of microwave irradiation on bone decalcification aimed to DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Kei; Ogawa, Yoshinori

    2013-09-01

    An effect of intermittent microwave irradiation on decalcification of compact bone followed by DNA extraction was verified. In order to perform quantitative analysis regarding the degree of decalcification, Cubic bone specimens were prepared from bovine metacarpal bone and micro-focus X-ray CT imaging was applied to measure precise volume of decalcified area in the cubes. Microwave irradiation was performed under strict control of temperature using commercially available experimental device which is designed for advancing tissue fixation, decalcification, and antigen-antibody reaction by intermittent microwave. The integrity of the DNA obtained from irradiated specimen was also examined by PCR analysis. The results of morphological analysis with CT imaging showed that microwave irradiation has a positive effect on decalcification though that effect is not so drastic. The results obtained from PCR analysis showed that microwave irradiation decrease amplifiable DNA, suggesting that we should be careful to use microwave for the purpose of bone DNA extraction.

  1. Comparison of five protocols to extract DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues for the detection of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Aldana, Adalucy; Martínez, José William; Sepúlveda-Arias, Juan C

    2015-02-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are a valuable source of DNA with which to perform large retrospective studies on the epidemiology of HPV infection. Five different DNA extraction protocols were carried out to evaluate the DNA obtained from FFPE samples with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two primer sets to amplify a constitutive human gene, β-globin, and two primer sets to detect the L1 and E6 HPV genes. From the five DNA extraction protocols evaluated, the best results were obtained with protocol A, corresponding to a crude extract from the sample. With the procedures described herein, we were able to amplify DNA extracted from archival paraffin blocks stored for six years. However, the amplification products were more efficiently obtained with primers that amplified shorter fragments. This result indicates that a major factor limiting the extraction process in these samples is DNA fragmentation, a factor that will naturally vary between the different specimens evaluated. Also, depending upon the extraction method, PCR amplification of a human gene does not necessarily guarantee the successful extraction of viral DNA. In conclusion, different DNA and HPV detection methods can significantly influence the results. Therefore, the DNA extraction methods and primers used for DNA amplification in fixed tissues need to be chosen carefully, depending on the specific requirements of the study being carried out.

  2. Effect of nucleic acid binding dyes on DNA extraction, amplification, and STR typing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Kobus, Hilton J; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    We report on the effects of six dyes used in the detection of DNA on the process of DNA extraction, amplification, and detection of STR loci. While dyes can be used to detect the presence of DNA, their use is restricted if they adversely affect subsequent DNA typing processes. Diamond™ Nucleic Acid Dye, GelGreen™, GelRed™, RedSafe™, SYBR(®) Green I, and EvaGreen™ were evaluated in this study. The percentage of dye removed during the extraction process was determined to be: 70.3% for SYBR(®) Green I; 99.6% for RedSafe™; 99.4% for EvaGreen™; 52.7% for Diamond™ Dye; 50.6% for GelRed™, and; could not be determined for GelGreen™. It was then assumed that the amount of dye in the fluorescent quantification assay had no effect on the DNA signal. The presence of all six dyes was then reviewed for their effect on DNA extraction. The t-test showed no significant difference between the dyes and the control. These extracts were then STR profiled and all dyes and control produced full DNA profiles. STR loci in the presence of GelGreen(TM) at 1X concentration showed increased amplification products in comparison to the control samples. Full STR profiles were detected in the presence of EvaGreen™ (1X), although with reduced amplification products. RedSafe™ (1X), Diamond™ Dye (1X), and SYBR(®) Green I (1X) all exhibited varying degrees of locus drop-out with GelRed™ generating no loci at all. We provide recommendations for the best dye to visualize the presence of DNA profile as a biological stain and its subsequent amplification and detection.

  3. A versatile bacterial expression vector designed for single-step cloning of multiple DNA fragments using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Mats A; Gowda, Naveen Kumar Chandappa; Andréasson, Claes

    2014-06-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is the starting point for biochemical and biophysical analyses and requires methodology to efficiently proceed from gene sequence to purified protein. While optimized strategies for the efficient cloning of single-gene fragments for bacterial expression is available, efficient multiple DNA fragment cloning still presents a challenge. To facilitate this step, we have developed an efficient cloning strategy based on yeast homologous recombination cloning (YHRC) into the new pET-based bacterial expression vector pSUMO-YHRC. The vector supports cloning for untagged expression as well as fusions to His6-SUMO or His6 tags. We demonstrate that YHRC from single PCR products of 6 independent genes into the vector results in virtually no background. Importantly, in a quantitative assay for functional expression we find that single-step YHRC of 7 DNA fragments can be performed with very high cloning efficiencies. The method and reagents described in this paper significantly simplifies the construction of expression plasmids from multiple DNA fragments, including complex gene fusions, chimeric genes and polycistronic constructs.

  4. Comparison of six simple methods for extracting ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA from Toxocara and Toxascaris nematodes.

    PubMed

    Mikaeili, F; Kia, E B; Sharbatkhori, M; Sharifdini, M; Jalalizand, N; Heidari, Z; Zarei, Z; Stensvold, C R; Mirhendi, H

    2013-06-01

    Six simple methods for extraction of ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA from Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxascaris leonina were compared by evaluating the presence, appearance and intensity of PCR products visualized on agarose gels and amplified from DNA extracted by each of the methods. For each species, two isolates were obtained from the intestines of their respective hosts: T. canis and T. leonina from dogs, and T. cati from cats. For all isolates, total DNA was extracted using six different methods, including grinding, boiling, crushing, beating, freeze-thawing and the use of a commercial kit. To evaluate the efficacy of each method, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene were chosen as representative markers for ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA, respectively. Among the six DNA extraction methods, the beating method was the most cost effective for all three species, followed by the commercial kit. Both methods produced high intensity bands on agarose gels and were characterized by no or minimal smear formation, depending on gene target; however, beating was less expensive. We therefore recommend the beating method for studies where costs need to be kept at low levels.

  5. [Comparative assessment of DNA extraction methods for identification of glanders and melioidosis etiological agents by PCR].

    PubMed

    Zinchenko, O V; Antonov, V A; Tkachenko, G A; Altukhova, V V; Zamaraev, V S; Piven', N N; Goloseev, Iu A; Vasil'ev, V P; Lomova, L V; Alekseev, V V

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Burkholderia are considered as a cause of dangerous infections and potential agents of bioterrorism. Comparative assessment of different methods of extraction and purification of DNA for PCR analysis of pure cultures and samples contaminated by etiological agents of glanders and melioidosis was performed. Samples of soil and food artificially contaminated by pathogenic Burkholderia as well as organs of infected animals were tested. DNA was extracted by methods of boiling, nucleosorption with presence of guanidine thiocyanate, guanidine thiocyanatephenol extraction, guanidine thiocyanate-phenol extraction with additional purification of DNA by nucleosorption. Amplification was performed by "Flash" technique and detector of fluorescence was used for analysis of PCR products. Utilization of the recommended methods of preparation depending on the nature of sample let to detect by the "Flash" technique the etiological agents of glanders and melioidosis in concentration =10(3) microbial cells per ml. Choice of DNA extraction and purification methods is determined by type of a sample and presence in it of admixtures inhibiting PCR.

  6. An alternative for the extraction and storage of DNA from insects in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Michelle L

    2005-05-01

    An important area of recent research in forensic entomology has been the use of insect DNA to provide identification of insects for fast and accurate estimation of time since death. This requires DNA to be extracted efficiently and in a state suitable for use in molecular procedures, and then stored on a long-term basis. In this study, Whatman FTA cards were tested for use with the Calliphoridae (Diptera). In particular, testing examined their ability to effectively extract DNA from specimens, and store and provide DNA template in a suitable condition for amplification using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cards provided DNA that was able to be amplified from a variety of life stages, and thus appears to be of sufficient quality and quantity for use in subsequent procedures. FTA cards therefore appear suitable for use with calliphorids, and provide a new method of extraction that is simple and efficient and allows for storage and transportation without refrigeration, consequently simplifying the handling of DNA in forensic entomological cases.

  7. Method for RNA extraction and cDNA library construction from microbes in crop rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Fang, Changxun; Xu, Tiecheng; Ye, Changliang; Huang, Likun; Wang, Qingshui; Lin, Wenxiong

    2014-02-01

    Techniques to analyze the transcriptome of the soil rhizosphere are essential to reveal the interactions and communications between plants and microorganisms in the soil ecosystem. In this study, different volumes of Al₂(SO₄)₃ were added to rhizosphere soil samples to precipitate humic substances, which interfere with most procedures of RNA and DNA analyses. After humic substances were precipitated, cells of soil microorganisms were broken by vortexing with glass beads, and then DNA and RNA were recovered using Tris-HCl buffer with LiCl, SDS, and EDTA. The crude extract was precipitated and dissolved in RNAse-free water, and then separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. We determined the optimum volume of Al₂(SO₄)₃ for treating rhizosphere soil of rice, tobacco, sugarcane, Rehmannia glutinosa, and Pseudostellaria heterophylla. The crude nucleic acids extract from rice soil was treated with DNase I and then RNA was purified using a gel filtration column. The purified RNA was reverse-transcribed into single-strand cDNA and then ligated with an adaptor at each end before amplifying ds cDNA. The ds cDNA was sub-cloned for subsequent gene sequence analysis. We conducted qPCR to amplify 16S ribosomal DNA and observed highly efficient amplification. These results show that the extraction method can be optimized to isolate and obtain high-quality nucleic acids from microbes in different rhizosphere soils, suitable for genomic and post-genomic analyses.

  8. DNA extraction from bristles and quills of Chaetomys subspinosus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) using a novel protocol.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C G; Martinez, R A; Gaiotto, F A

    2007-09-30

    DNA extraction protocols are as varied as DNA sources. When it comes to endangered species, it is especially important to pay attention to all details that ensure the completion of the study goals and effectiveness in attaining useful data for conservation. Chaetomys subspinosus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) is a secretive arboreal porcupine endemic to certain ecosystems of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. A multidisciplinary study (including genetic data) was performed to create a management plan for the conservation of this species. Individuals from natural populations of the states of Bahia, Espírito Santo and Sergipe were sampled. To obtain a reliable and abundant amount of starting material, non-destructive methods were tested, extracting DNA from the bristles and quills that comprise most of this animal's hide. This method has also been innovative in adapting a DNA extraction protocol traditionally used for plants. Digestion using proteinase K was followed by protein precipitation with CTAB, a chloroform-isoamyl alcohol cleaning and DNA precipitation with isopropyl alcohol. This protocol supplies good-quality DNA for genetic analysis with molecular markers based on PCR.

  9. Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes as assessed by comet assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Hyang Burm; Jeon, Eun-Jae; Jung, Hack Sung; Kang, Myung-Hee

    2004-01-01

    The Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) is claimed to have beneficial properties for human health, such as anti-bacterial, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The antioxidant effects of the mushroom may be partly explained by protection of cell components against free radicals. We evaluated the effect of aqueous Chaga mushroom extracts for their potential for protecting against oxidative damage to DNA in human lymphocytes. Cells were pretreated with various concentrations (10, 50, 100 and 500 microg/mL) of the extract for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Cells were then treated with 100 microM of H2O2 for 5 min as an oxidative stress. Evaluation of oxidative damage was performed using single-cell gel electrophoresis for DNA fragmentation (Comet assay). Using image analysis, the degree of DNA damage was evaluated as the DNA tail moment. Cells pretreated with Chaga extract showed over 40% reduction in DNA fragmentation compared with the positive control (100 micromol H2O2 treatment). Thus, Chaga mushroom treatment affords cellular protection against endogenous DNA damage produced by H2O2.

  10. Comparison of methods for high quantity and quality genomic DNA extraction from raw cow milk.

    PubMed

    Usman, T; Yu, Y; Liu, C; Fan, Z; Wang, Y

    2014-04-29

    Isolation of sufficient quantities of high quality DNA is a prerequisite for molecular studies. Milk somatic cells can be used; however, inhibitors such as fats and proteins make milk a difficult medium for extracting large amounts of quality DNA. We optimized, evaluated and compared three methods, Modified Nucleospin Blood Kit method, Modified TianGen Kit method and Phenol-Chloroform method for genomic DNA extraction from bovine milk. Individual cows' milk and bulk milk samples were collected from a China agricultural university dairy farm. Genomic DNA extracted from each milk sample by the three methods was evaluated for quantity and purity by spectrophotometry and gel electrophoresis, as well as PCR and sequencing. All the three methods were found suitable for genomic DNA isolation from bovine milk, PCR applications, and sequencing. Comparing the three methods, we found that the Modified Nucleospin Blood Kit method was significantly better than the Phenol-Chloroform method in terms of quantity as well as quality (amount, concentration, 260/280 nm and 260/230 nm absorbance ratio), whereas, the Modified TianGen Kit method was more efficient than the Phenol-Chloroform method and cheaper than the Modified Nucleospine Blood Kit method; it yielded reasonably good quantities of good quality DNA and would be suitable for large-scale genotyping of lactating cows.

  11. Multiple DNA extractions coupled with stable-isotope probing of anthracene-degrading bacteria in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Jones, Maiysha D; Singleton, David R; Sun, Wei; Aitken, Michael D

    2011-05-01

    In many of the DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) studies published to date in which soil communities were investigated, a single DNA extraction was performed on the soil sample, usually using a commercial DNA extraction kit, prior to recovering the (13)C-labeled (heavy) DNA by density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Recent evidence suggests, however, that a single extraction of a soil sample may not lead to representative recovery of DNA from all of the organisms in the sample. To determine whether multiple DNA extractions would affect the DNA yield, the eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number, or the identification of anthracene-degrading bacteria, we performed seven successive DNA extractions on the same aliquot of contaminated soil either untreated or enriched with [U-(13)C]anthracene. Multiple extractions were necessary to maximize the DNA yield and 16S rRNA gene copy number from both untreated and anthracene-enriched soil samples. Sequences within the order Sphingomonadales, but unrelated to any previously described genus, dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from (13)C-enriched DNA and were designated "anthracene group 1." Sequences clustering with Variovorax spp., which were also highly represented, and sequences related to the genus Pigmentiphaga were newly associated with anthracene degradation. The bacterial groups collectively identified across all seven extracts were all recovered in the first extract, although quantitative PCR analysis of SIP-identified groups revealed quantitative differences in extraction patterns. These results suggest that performing multiple DNA extractions on soil samples improves the extractable DNA yield and the number of quantifiable eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copies but have little qualitative effect on the identification of the bacterial groups associated with the degradation of a given carbon source by SIP.

  12. Multiple DNA Extractions Coupled with Stable-Isotope Probing of Anthracene-Degrading Bacteria in Contaminated Soil▿†

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Maiysha D.; Singleton, David R.; Sun, Wei; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In many of the DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) studies published to date in which soil communities were investigated, a single DNA extraction was performed on the soil sample, usually using a commercial DNA extraction kit, prior to recovering the 13C-labeled (heavy) DNA by density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Recent evidence suggests, however, that a single extraction of a soil sample may not lead to representative recovery of DNA from all of the organisms in the sample. To determine whether multiple DNA extractions would affect the DNA yield, the eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number, or the identification of anthracene-degrading bacteria, we performed seven successive DNA extractions on the same aliquot of contaminated soil either untreated or enriched with [U-13C]anthracene. Multiple extractions were necessary to maximize the DNA yield and 16S rRNA gene copy number from both untreated and anthracene-enriched soil samples. Sequences within the order Sphingomonadales, but unrelated to any previously described genus, dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from 13C-enriched DNA and were designated “anthracene group 1.” Sequences clustering with Variovorax spp., which were also highly represented, and sequences related to the genus Pigmentiphaga were newly associated with anthracene degradation. The bacterial groups collectively identified across all seven extracts were all recovered in the first extract, although quantitative PCR analysis of SIP-identified groups revealed quantitative differences in extraction patterns. These results suggest that performing multiple DNA extractions on soil samples improves the extractable DNA yield and the number of quantifiable eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copies but have little qualitative effect on the identification of the bacterial groups associated with the degradation of a given carbon source by SIP. PMID:21398486

  13. Evaluation of MolYsis™ Complete5 DNA extraction method for detecting Staphylococcus aureus DNA from whole blood in a sepsis model using PCR/pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    McCann, Chase D; Jordan, Jeanne A

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) and ensuing sepsis are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and rapid treatment with appropriate antibiotics are vital for improving outcome. Nucleic acid amplification of bacteria directly from whole blood has the potential of providing a faster means of diagnosing BSI than automated blood culture. However, effective DNA extraction of commonly low levels of bacterial target from whole blood is critical for this approach to be successful. This study compared the Molzyme MolYsis™ Complete5 DNA extraction method to a previously described organic bead-based method for use with whole blood. A well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus-induced pneumonia model of sepsis in canines was used to provide clinically relevant whole blood samples. DNA extracts were assessed for purity and concentration and analyzed for bacterial rRNA gene targets using PCR and sequence-based identification. Both extraction methods yielded relatively pure DNA with median A260/280 absorbance ratios of 1.71 (MolYsis™) and 1.97 (bead-based). The organic bead-based extraction method yielded significantly higher average DNA concentrations (P<0.05) at each time point throughout the experiment, closely correlating with changes observed in white blood cell (WBC) concentrations during this same time period, while DNA concentrations of the MolYsis™ extracts closely mirrored quantitative blood culture results. Overall, S. aureus DNA was detected from whole blood samples in 70.7% (58/82) of MolYsis™ DNA extracts, and in 59.8% (49/82) of organic bead-based extracts, with peak detection rates seen at 48h for both MolYsis™ (87.0%) and organic bead-based (82.6%) methods. In summary, the MolYsis™ Complete5 DNA extraction kit proved to be the more effective method for isolating bacterial DNA directly from extracts made from whole blood.

  14. Evaluation of MolYsis™ Complete5 DNA Extraction Method for Detecting Staphylococcus aureus DNA from Whole Blood in a Sepsis Model Using PCR/Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Chase D.; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) and ensuing sepsis are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and rapid treatment with appropriate antibiotics are vital for improving outcome. Nucleic acid amplification of bacteria directly from whole blood has the potential of providing a faster means of diagnosing BSI than automated blood culture. However, effective DNA extraction of commonly low levels of bacterial target from whole blood is critical for this approach to be successful. This study compared the Molzyme MolYsis™ Complete5 DNA extraction method to a previously described organic bead-based method for use with whole blood. A well-characterized S. aureus-induced pneumonia model of sepsis in canines was used to provide clinically relevant whole blood samples. DNA extracts were assessed for purity and concentration and analyzed for bacterial rRNA gene targets using PCR and sequence-based identification. Both extraction methods yielded relatively pure DNA with median A260/280 absorbance ratios of 1.71 (MolYsis™) and 1.97 (bead-based). The organic bead-based extraction method yielded significantly higher average DNA concentrations (P <0.05) at each time point throughout the experiment, closely correlating with changes observed in white blood cell (WBC) concentrations during this same time period, while DNA concentrations of the MolYsis™ extracts closely mirrored quantitative blood culture results. Overall, S. aureus DNA was detected from whole blood samples in 70.7% (58/82) of MolYsis™ DNA extracts, and in 59.8% (49/82) of organic bead-based extracts, with peak detection rates seen at 48 h for both MolYsis™ (87.0%) and organic bead-based (82.6%) methods. In summary, the MolYsis™ Complete5 DNA extraction kit proved to be the more effective method for isolating bacterial DNA directly from extracts made from whole blood. PMID:24503182

  15. How to open the treasure chest? Optimising DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Särkinen, Tiina; Staats, Martijn; Richardson, James E; Cowan, Robyn S; Bakker, Freek T

    2012-01-01

    Herbarium collections are potentially an enormous resource for DNA studies, but the use of herbarium specimens in molecular studies has thus far been slowed down by difficulty in obtaining amplifiable DNA. Here we compare a set of commercially available DNA extraction protocols and their performance in terms of DNA purity and yield, and PCR amplification success as measured by using three differentially sized markers, the rbcL barcoding marker (cpDNA), the LEAFY exon 3 (nrDNA), and the trnL((UAA)) P6 loop (cpDNA). Results reveal large differences between extraction methods, where DNA purity rather than yield is shown to be strongly correlated with PCR success. Amplicon size shows similarly strong correlation with PCR success, with the shortest fragment showing the highest success rate (78%, P6 loop, 10-143 base pairs (bp)) and the largest fragment the lowest success (10%, rbcL, 670 bp). The effect of specimen preparation method on PCR success was also tested. Results show that drying method strongly affects PCR success, especially the availability of fragments longer than 250 bp, where longer fragments are more available for PCR amplification in air dried material compared to alcohol dried specimens. Results from our study indicate that projects relying on poor-quality starting material such as herbarium or scat samples should focus on extracting pure DNA and aim to amplify short target regions (<200-300 bp) in order to maximise outcomes. Development of shorter barcoding regions, or mini-barcodes within existing ones should be of high importance as only a few options are currently available; this is particularly important if we hope to incorporate the millions of herbarium samples available into barcoding initiatives and other molecular studies.

  16. Pentaprobe: a comprehensive sequence for the one-step detection of DNA-binding activities.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Ann H Y; Czolij, Robert; Mackay, Joel P; Crossley, Merlin

    2003-10-15

    The rapid increase in the number of novel proteins identified in genome projects necessitates simple and rapid methods for assigning function. We describe a strategy for determining whether novel proteins possess typical sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Many proteins bind recognition sequences of 5 bp or less. Given that there are 4(5) possible 5 bp sites, one might expect the length of sequence required to cover all possibilities would be 4(5) x 5 or 5120 nt. But by allowing overlaps, utilising both strands and using a computer algorithm to generate the minimum sequence, we find the length required is only 516 base pairs. We generated this sequence as six overlapping double-stranded oligonucleotides, termed pentaprobe, and used it in gel retardation experiments to assess DNA binding by both known and putative DNA-binding proteins from several protein families. We have confirmed binding by the zinc finger proteins BKLF, Eos and Pegasus, the Ets domain protein PU.1 and the treble clef N- and C-terminal fingers of GATA-1. We also showed that the N-terminal zinc finger domain of FOG-1 does not behave as a typical DNA-binding domain. Our results suggest that pentaprobe, and related sequences such as hexaprobe, represent useful tools for probing protein function.

  17. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Foriş, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as μEq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co γ-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 μEq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with γ-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 μEq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 μEq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  18. One-step extraction for gas chromatography with flame photometric detection of 18 organophosphorus pesticides in Chinese medicine health wines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianzhen; Kong, Weijun; Qiu, Feng; Wei, Jianhe; Yang, Shihai; Zheng, Yuguo; Yang, Meihua

    2012-02-15

    An easy, rapid and selective gas chromatography with flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) method was established for simultaneously determining 18 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in 80 Chinese medicine (CM) health wines. This method was based on a simple one-step extraction procedure using a little solvent without any further cleanup steps. The optimized extraction solvent for the pesticides is acetone:dichloromethane (1:1, V/V) with extraction recovery of 79.0-109.1% and relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.36-12.68%, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) of the established GC-FPD method for all investigated pesticides ranged from 1 to 15ngmL(-1) and limits of quantification (LOQs) from 4 to 50ngmL(-1). Out of all 80 CM health wines, 18 OPPs were found in 8 samples at low concentrations of 8.2-37.9ngmL(-1). These pesticides were successfully confirmed by GC-MS. This is the first report of determining OPPs in CM health wines, providing references for monitoring the quality of CM health wine in routine analysis.

  19. Identification of the traditional Tibetan medicine "Shaji" and their different extracts through tri-step infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yue; Li, Jingyi; Fan, Gang; Sun, Suqin; Zhang, Yuxin; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Ya

    2016-11-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides subsp. sinensis Rousi, Hippophae gyantsensis (Rousi) Y. S. Lian, Hippophae neurocarpa S. W. Liu & T. N. He and Hippophae tibetana Schlechtendal are typically used under one name "Shaji", to treat cardiovascular diseases and lung disorders in Tibetan medicine (TM). A complete set of infrared (IR) macro-fingerprints of these four Hippophae species should be characterized and compared simply, accurately, and in detail for identification. In the present study, tri-step IR spectroscopy, which included Fourier transform IR (FT-IR) spectroscopy, second derivative IR (SD-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation IR (2D-IR) spectroscopy, was employed to discriminate the four Hippophae species and their corresponding extracts using different solvents. The relevant spectra exhibited the holistic chemical compositions and variations. Flavonoids, fatty acids and sugars were found to be the main chemical components. Characteristic peak positions, intensities and shapes derived from FT-IR, SD-IR and 2D-IR spectra provided valuable information for sample discrimination. Principal component analysis (PCA) of spectral differences was performed to illustrate the objective identification. Results showed that the species and their extracts can be clearly distinguished. Thus, a quick, precise and effective tri-step IR spectroscopy combined with PCA can be applied to identify and discriminate medicinal materials and their extracts in TM research.

  20. Separation of Y-chromosomal haplotypes from male DNA mixtures via multiplex haplotype-specific extraction.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Jessica; Nagy, Marion

    2015-11-01

    In forensic analysis, the interpretation of DNA mixtures is the subject of ongoing debate and requires expertise knowledge. Haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) is an alternative method that enables the separation of large chromosome fragments or haplotypes by using magnetic beads in conjunction with allele-specific probes. HSE thus allows physical separation of the components of a DNA mixture. Here, we present the first multiplex HSE separation of a Y-chromosomal haplotype consisting of six Yfiler short tandem repeat markers from a mixture of male DNA.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods from Feces of Multiple Host Species for Downstream Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hart, Marcia L; Meyer, Alexandra; Johnson, Philip J; Ericsson, Aaron C

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract contains a vast community of microbes that to this day remain largely unculturable, making studies in this area challenging. With the newly affordable advanced sequencing technology, important breakthroughs in this exciting field are now possible. However, standardized methods of sample collection, handling, and DNA extraction have yet to be determined. To help address this, we investigated the use of 5 common DNA extraction methods on fecal samples from 5 different species. Our data show that the method of DNA extraction impacts DNA concentration and purity, successful NGS amplification, and influences microbial communities seen in NGS output dependent on the species of fecal sample and the DNA extraction method used. These data highlight the importance of careful consideration of DNA extraction method used when designing and interpreting data from cross species studies.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods from Feces of Multiple Host Species for Downstream Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Marcia L.; Meyer, Alexandra; Johnson, Philip J.; Ericsson, Aaron C.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract contains a vast community of microbes that to this day remain largely unculturable, making studies in this area challenging. With the newly affordable advanced sequencing technology, important breakthroughs in this exciting field are now possible. However, standardized methods of sample collection, handling, and DNA extraction have yet to be determined. To help address this, we investigated the use of 5 common DNA extraction methods on fecal samples from 5 different species. Our data show that the method of DNA extraction impacts DNA concentration and purity, successful NGS amplification, and influences microbial communities seen in NGS output dependent on the species of fecal sample and the DNA extraction method used. These data highlight the importance of careful consideration of DNA extraction method used when designing and interpreting data from cross species studies. PMID:26599606

  3. Probabilistically determining the cellular source of DNA derived from differential extractions in sexual assault scenarios.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Duncan

    2016-09-01

    Sexual assault cases are the type of case that often produces questions about the cellular source of DNA. In these cases multiple findings of microscopy, DNA profiling and presumptive testing need to be considered when addressing source level propositions. In this work, I consider a line of questioning that has been raised a number of times in the recent past, where in court it was disputed that low levels of sperm seen on a microscope slide were the cellular source of the male DNA profile component generated from the sperm fraction of a differential DNA extraction. I demonstrate how the cell scoring results and DNA profiling results can be considered together, in helping address this source level question through the use of Bayesian Networks.

  4. Genomic DNA extraction and barcoding of endophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Patricia L; Hennell, James R; Sucher, Nikolaus J

    2012-01-01

    Endophytes live inter- and/or intracellularly inside healthy aboveground tissues of plants without causing disease. Endophytic fungi are found in virtually every vascular plant species examined. The origins of this symbiotic relationship between endophytes go back to the emergence of vascular plants. Endophytic fungi receive nutrition and protection from their hosts while the plants benefit from the production of fungal secondary metabolites, which enhance the host plants' resistance to herbivores, pathogens, and various abiotic stresses. Endophytic fungi have attracted increased interest as potential sources of secondary metabolites with agricultural, industrial, and medicinal use. This chapter provides detailed protocols for isolation of genomic DNA from fungal endophytes and its use in polymerase chain reaction-based amplification of the internal transcribed spacer region between the conserved flanking regions of the small and large subunit of ribosomal RNA for barcoding purposes.

  5. Low cost extraction and isothermal amplification of DNA for infectious diarrhea diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shichu; Do, Jaephil; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Fan, Andy; Zhao, Lei; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K; Klapperich, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    In order to counter the common perception that molecular diagnostics are too complicated to work in low resource settings, we have performed a difficult sample preparation and DNA amplification protocol using instrumentation designed to be operated without wall or battery power. In this work we have combined a nearly electricity-free nucleic acid extraction process with an electricity-free isothermal amplification assay to detect the presence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) DNA in the stool of infected patients. We used helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (HDA) to amplify the DNA in a low-cost, thermoplastic reaction chip heated with a pair of commercially available toe warmers, while using a simple Styrofoam insulator. DNA was extracted from known positive and negative stool samples. The DNA extraction protocol utilized an air pressure driven solid phase extraction device run using a standard bicycle pump. The simple heater setup required no electricity or battery and was capable of maintaining the temperature at 65°C±2°C for 55 min, suitable for repeatable HDA amplification. Experiments were performed to explore the adaptability of the system for use in a range of ambient conditions. When compared to a traditional centrifuge extraction protocol and a laboratory thermocycler, this disposable, no power platform achieved approximately the same lower limit of detection (1.25×10(-2) pg of C. difficile DNA) while requiring much less raw material and a fraction of the lab infrastructure and cost. This proof of concept study could greatly impact the accessibility of molecular assays for applications in global health.

  6. A Two-Step Double Filter Method to Extract Open Water Surfaces from Landsat ETM+ Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijing; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, lakes and temporal ponds play a significant role in agriculture and livelihood of local communities as well as in ecology. Monitoring the changes of these open water bodies allows to draw conclusions on water use as well as climatic impacts and can assist in the formulation of a sustainable resource management strategy. The simultaneous monitoring of larger numbers of water bodies with respect to their stage and area is feasible with the aid of remote sensing. Here the monitoring of lake surface areas is discussed. Landsat TM and ETM+ images provide a medium resolution of 30m, and offer an easily available data source to monitor the long term changes of water surfaces in arid and semi-arid regions. In the past great effort was put into developing simple indices to extract water surfaces from satellite images. However, there is a common problem in achieving accurate results with these indices: How to select a threshold value for water pixels without introducing excessive subjective judgment. The threshold value would also have to vary with location, land features and seasons, allowing for inherent uncertainty. A new method was developed using Landsat ETM+ imaginary (30 meter resolution) to extract open water surfaces. This method uses the Normalized Difference of Vegetation Index (NDVI) as the basis for an objective way of selecting threshold values of Modified Normalized Difference of Water Index (MNDWI) and Stress Degree Days (SDD), which were used as a combined filter to extract open water surfaces. We choose two study areas to verify the method. One study area is in Northeast China, where bigger lakes, smaller muddy ponds and wetlands are interspersed with agricultural land and salt crusts. The other one is Kafue Flats in Zambia, where seasonal floods of the Zambezi River create seasonal wetlands in addition to the more permanent water ponds and river channels. For both sites digital globe images of 0.5 meter resolution are available

  7. Dynamic solid phase DNA extraction and PCR amplification in polyester-toner based microchip.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Gabriela R M; Price, Carol W; Augustine, Brian H; Carrilho, Emanuel; Landers, James P

    2011-07-01

    A variety of substrates have been used for fabrication of microchips for DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and DNA fragment separation, including the more conventional glass and silicon as well as alternative polymer-based materials. Polyester represents one such polymer, and the laser-printing of toner onto polyester films has been shown to be effective for generating polyester-toner (PeT) microfluidic devices with channel depths on the order of tens of micrometers. Here, we describe a novel and simple process that allows for the production of multilayer, high aspect-ratio PeT microdevices with substantially larger channel depths. This innovative process utilizes a CO(2) laser to create the microchannel in polyester sheets containing a uniform layer of printed toner, and multilayer devices can easily be constructed by sandwiching the channel layer between uncoated cover sheets of polyester containing precut access holes. The process allows the fabrication of deep channels, with ~270 μm, and we demonstrate the effectiveness of multilayer PeT microchips for dynamic solid phase extraction (dSPE) and PCR amplification. With the former, we found that (i) more than 65% of DNA from 0.6 μL of blood was recovered, (ii) the resultant DNA was concentrated to greater than 3 ng/μL (which was better than other chip-based extraction methods), and (iii) the DNA recovered was compatible with downstream microchip-based PCR amplification. Illustrative of the compatibility of PeT microchips with the PCR process, the successful amplification of a 520 bp fragment of λ-phage DNA in a conventional thermocycler is shown. The ability to handle the diverse chemistries associated with DNA purification and extraction is a testimony to the potential utility of PeT microchips beyond separations and presents a promising new disposable platform for genetic analysis that is low cost and easy to fabricate.

  8. Two-Step Extraction of the Lower First Molar for Class III Treatment in Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Ricardo Fabris; Raveli, Taísa Barnabé; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabé

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a case report of Class III malocclusion treatment with lower first molar extraction. The 27-year-old Caucasian male patient presented a symmetric face with a straight profile, hyperdivergent growth pattern, molar and cuspid Class III relation, and an anterior crossbite as well as a mild crowding on cuspids area, in both upper and lower arches and a tendency to posterior crossbite. The treatment was performed by the use of Haas expansion appliance followed by an initial alignment and leveling of the upper and lower arches with a fixed edgewise appliance, extraction of lower teeth aiming the correction of the incisors proclination and end the treatment with a Class I molar relationship. It resulted in a significant change in the patient's profile, dentoalveolar Class III correction, upper arch expansion, leveling and alignment of the upper and lower arches, and improvement of tipping of the upper and lowers incisors. In cases of a dentoalveolar compensation in well positioned bone bases the treatment with fixed appliances is an alternative and extraction of lower teeth is considered. PMID:27699072

  9. New sorbent in the dispersive solid phase extraction step of quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe for the extraction of organic contaminants in drinking water treatment sludge.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Maristela B R; Caldas, Sergiane S; Primel, Ednei G

    2014-04-04

    Recent studies have shown a decrease in the concentration of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PCPs) in water after treatment. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that these compounds may adhere to the sludge; however, investigation of these compounds in drinking water treatment sludge has been scarce. The sludge generated by drinking water treatment plants during flocculation and decantation steps should get some special attention not only because it has been classified as non-inert waste but also because it is a very complex matrix, consisting essentially of inorganic (sand, argil and silt) and organic (humic substances) compounds. In the first step of this study, three QuEChERS methods were used, and then compared, for the extraction of pesticides (atrazine, simazine, clomazone and tebuconazole), pharmaceuticals (amitriptyline, caffeine, diclofenac and ibuprofen) and PCPs (methylparaben, propylparaben, triclocarban and bisphenol A) from drinking water treatment sludge. Afterwards, the study of different sorbents in the dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) step was evaluated. Finally, a new QuEChERS method employing chitin, obtained from shrimp shell waste, was performed in the d-SPE step. After having been optimized, the method showed limits of quantification (LOQ) between 1 and 50 μg kg(-1) and the analytical curves showed r values higher than 0.98, when liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was employed. Recoveries ranged between 50 and 120% with RSD≤15%. The matrix effect was evaluated and compensated with matrix-matched calibration. The method was applied to drinking water treatment sludge samples and methylparaben and tebuconazole were found in concentration

  10. Single step aqueous two-phase extraction for downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Chethana, S; Nayak, Chetan A; Madhusudhan, M C; Raghavarao, K S M S

    2015-04-01

    C-phycocyanin, a natural food colorant, is gaining importance worldwide due to its several medical and pharmaceutical applications. In the present study, aqueous two-phase extraction was shown to be an attractive alternative for the downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis. By employing differential partitioning, C-phycocyanin selectively partitioned to the polymer rich (top) phase in concentrated form and contaminant proteins to the salt rich (bottom) phase. This resulted in an increase in the product purity (without losing much of the yield) in a single step without the need of multiple processing steps. Effect of process parameters such as molecular weight, tie line length, phase volume ratio, concentration of phase components on the partitioning behavior of C-phycocyanin was studied. The results were explained based on relative free volume of the phase systems. C-phycocyanin with a purity of 4.32 and yield of about 79 % was obtained at the standardized conditions.

  11. Adsorption and desorption of DNA tuned by hydroxyl groups in graphite oxides-based solid extraction material.

    PubMed

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-12-01

    The extraction of DNA is the most crucial method used in molecular biology. Up to date silica matrices has been widely applied as solid support for selective DNA adsorption and extraction. However, since adsorption force of SiOH functional groups is much greater than that of desorption force, the DNA extraction efficiency of silica surfaces is limited. In order to increase the DNA extraction yield, a new surface with different functional groups which possess of greater desorption property is required. In this study, we proposed cellulose/graphite oxide (GO) composite as an alternative material for DNA adsorption and extraction. GO/Cellulose composite provides the major adsorption and desorption of DNA by COH, which belongs to alkyl or phenol type of OH functional group. Compared to SiOH, COH is less polarized and reactive, therefore the composite might provide a higher desorption of DNA during the elution process. The GO/cellulose composite were prepared in spherical structure by mixing urea, cellulose, NaOH, Graphite oxide and water. The concentration of GO within the composites were controlled to be 0-4.15 wt.%. The extraction yield of DNA increased with increasing weight percentage of GO. The highest yield was achieved at 4.15 wt.% GO, where the extraction efficiency was reported as 660.4 ng/μl when applying 2M GuHCl as the binding buffer. The absorbance ratios between 260 nm and 280 nm (A260/A280) of the DNA elution was demonstrated as 1.86, indicating the extracted DNA consisted of high purity. The results proved that GO/cellulose composite provides a simple method for selective DNA extraction with high extraction efficiency of pure DNA.

  12. Comparative study of DNA extraction methodologies from goat sperm and its effects on polymerase chain reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, E C B; Pelinca, M A; Acosta, A C; Silva, D M F; Gomes Filho, M A; Guerra, M M P

    2014-08-07

    Successful DNA extraction is indispensable for molecular methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR); however, goat sperm DNA extraction is limited. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate three methods to extract DNA from goat sperm for use in PCR. Eight goat semen pools were used for DNA extraction by using the DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit, phenol-chloroform, and Chelex-100 methods. DNA samples were analyzed spectrophotometrically to determine the DNA concentration and purity, visualized on 0.8% agarose gel, and used at different amounts (150, 100, 50, 10, and 1 ng) for PCR with electrophoresis, followed by 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis. The quantity of DNA extracted with Chelex-100 was higher (P < 0.05) than that obtained with either the DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit or the phenol-chloroform method, with the phenol-chloroform method yielding a greater quantity (P < 0.05) than the kit. The DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit produced a higher (P < 0.05) purity product than the Chelex-100 method, and all samples obtained by the three protocols were positive for DNA, as assessed by electrophoresis. All of the different concentrations of DNA produced by these methods were amplified by PCR, although for DNA produced by the phenol-chloroform method, PCR was only possible after complementary purification. In conclusion, the Chelex-100 method is cheap, secure, simple, fast, and effective, and is a potential tool for extracting goat sperm DNA without limitations in PCR.

  13. A simple method to determine bioethanol content in gasoline using two-step extraction and liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Shunji; Saito, Masaaki

    2009-12-01

    A simple method for determining bioethanol content in gasoline containing bioethanol (denoted as E-gasoline in this study) is urgently required. Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was employed based on the principle that (14)C exists in bioethanol but not in synthetic ethanol. Bioethanol was extracted in two steps by water from E-gasoline containing 3% (E3) or 10% (E10) bioethanol. The (14)C radioactivity was measured by LSC and converted to the amount of bioethanol. The bioethanol content in E-gasoline was determined precisely from the partition coefficient in the extraction and the amount of bioethanol in the water phases: 2.98+/-0.10% for E3 and 10.0+/-0.1% for E10 (means+/-SD; n=3). It appears that this method can be used to determine bioethanol content in E-gasoline quickly and easily.

  14. Automated DNA extraction platforms offer solutions to challenges of assessing microbial biofouling in oil production facilities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of microbial assemblages in industrial, marine, and medical systems can inform decisions regarding quality control or mitigation. Modern molecular approaches to detect, characterize, and quantify microorganisms provide rapid and thorough measures unbiased by the need for cultivation. The requirement of timely extraction of high quality nucleic acids for molecular analysis is faced with specific challenges when used to study the influence of microorganisms on oil production. Production facilities are often ill equipped for nucleic acid extraction techniques, making the preservation and transportation of samples off-site a priority. As a potential solution, the possibility of extracting nucleic acids on-site using automated platforms was tested. The performance of two such platforms, the Fujifilm QuickGene-Mini80™ and Promega Maxwell®16 was compared to a widely used manual extraction kit, MOBIO PowerBiofilm™ DNA Isolation Kit, in terms of ease of operation, DNA quality, and microbial community composition. Three pipeline biofilm samples were chosen for these comparisons; two contained crude oil and corrosion products and the third transported seawater. Overall, the two more automated extraction platforms produced higher DNA yields than the manual approach. DNA quality was evaluated for amplification by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and end-point PCR to generate 454 pyrosequencing libraries for 16S rRNA microbial community analysis. Microbial community structure, as assessed by DGGE analysis and pyrosequencing, was comparable among the three extraction methods. Therefore, the use of automated extraction platforms should enhance the feasibility of rapidly evaluating microbial biofouling at remote locations or those with limited resources. PMID:23168231

  15. A comparison of different pre-lysis methods and extraction kits for recovery of Streptococcus agalacticae (Lancefield group B Streptococcus) DNA from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Burke, Rachael M; McKenna, James P; Cox, Ciara; Coyle, Peter V; Shields, Michael D; Fairley, Derek J

    2016-10-01

    Sub-optimal recovery of bacterial DNA from whole blood samples can limit the sensitivity of molecular assays to detect pathogenic bacteria. We compared 3 different pre-lysis protocols (none, mechanical pre-lysis and achromopeptidase pre-lysis) and 5 commercially available DNA extraction platforms for direct detection of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in spiked whole blood samples, without enrichment culture. DNA was extracted using the QIAamp Blood Mini kit (Qiagen), UCP Pathogen Mini kit (Qiagen), QuickGene DNA Whole Blood kit S (Fuji), Speed Xtract Nucleic Acid Kit 200 (Qiagen) and MagNA Pure Compact Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit I (Roche Diagnostics Corp). Mechanical pre-lysis increased yields of bacterial genomic DNA by 51.3 fold (95% confidence interval; 31.6-85.1, p<0.001) and pre-lysis with achromopeptidase by 6.1 fold (95% CI; 4.2-8.9, p<0.001), compared with no pre-lysis. Differences in yield due to pre-lysis were 2-3 fold larger than differences in yield between extraction methods. Including a pre-lysis step can improve the limits of detection of GBS using PCR or other molecular methods without need for culture.

  16. Nucleic Acids Research Group (NRG): The Importance of DNA Extraction in Metagenomics: The Gatekeeper to Accurate Results!

    PubMed Central

    Carmical, R.; Nadella, V.; Herbert, Z.; Beckloff, N.; Chittur, S.; Rosato, C.; Perera, A.; Auer, H.; Robinson, M.; Tighe, S.; Holbrook, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that the field of metagenomics is becoming a critical tool for studying previously unobtainable population dynamics at both an identification of species level and a functional or transcriptional level. Because the power to resolve microbial information is so important for identifying the components in an mixed sample, metagenomics can be used to study nearly any possible environment or system including clinical, environmental, and industrial, to name a few. Clinically, it may be used to determine sub-populations colonizing regions of the body or determining a rare infection to assist in treatment strategies. Environmentally it may be used to identify microbial populations within a soil, water or air sample, or within a bioreactor to characterize a population- based functional process. The possibilities are endless. However, the accuracy of a metagenomics dataset relies on three important “gatekeepers” including 1) The ability to effectively extract all DNA or RNA from every cell within a sample, 2) The reliability of the methods used for deep or high-throughput sequencing, and 3) The software used to analyze the data. Since DNA extraction is the first step in the technical process of metagenomics, the Nucleic Acid Research Group (NARG) conducted a study to evaluate extraction methods using a synthetic microbial sample. The synthetic microbial sample was prepared from 10 known bacteria at specific concentrations and ranging in diversity. Samples were extracted in duplicate using various popular kit based methods as well as several homebrew protocols then analyzed by NextGen sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq. Results of the study include determining the percent recovery of those organisms by comparing to the known quantity in the original synthetic mix.

  17. DNA adducts induced by in vitro activation of diesel and biodiesel exhaust extracts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract reports the results of studies assessing the relative DNA damage potential of extracts of exhaust particles resulting from the combustion of petroleum diesel, biodiesel, and petroleum diesel-biodiesel blends. Results indicate that the commercially available B20 petr...

  18. Comparison of commercial systems for extraction of nucleic acids from DNA/RNA respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Genyan; Erdman, Dean E; Kodani, Maja; Kools, John; Bowen, Michael D; Fields, Barry S

    2011-01-01

    This study compared six automated nucleic acid extraction systems and one manual kit for their ability to recover nucleic acids from human nasal wash specimens spiked with five respiratory pathogens, representing Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pyogenes), Gram-negative bacteria (Legionella pneumophila), DNA viruses (adenovirus), segmented RNA viruses (human influenza virus A), and non-segmented RNA viruses (respiratory syncytial virus). The robots and kit evaluated represent major commercially available methods that are capable of simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from respiratory specimens, and included platforms based on magnetic-bead technology (KingFisher mL, Biorobot EZ1, easyMAG, KingFisher Flex, and MagNA Pure Compact) or glass fiber filter technology (Biorobot MDX and the manual kit Allprep). All methods yielded extracts free of cross-contamination and RT-PCR inhibition. All automated systems recovered L. pneumophila and adenovirus DNA equivalently. However, the MagNA Pure protocol demonstrated more than 4-fold higher DNA recovery from the S. pyogenes than other methods. The KingFisher mL and easyMAG protocols provided 1- to 3-log wider linearity and extracted 3- to 4-fold more RNA from the human influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus. These findings suggest that systems differed in nucleic acid recovery, reproducibility, and linearity in a pathogen specific manner.

  19. Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Reynolds, P Dominic; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jerwood, David; Anderson, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is partly caused by oxidative stress from free radicals and reduced antioxidant levels. Using hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress in vitro in peripheral lymphocytes we investigated the induction of DNA damage supplemented with ethanolic extract of Chaga mushroom as a protective antioxidant. Lymphocytes were obtained from 20 IBD patients and 20 healthy volunteers. For treatment, a constant H_{2}O_{2 } dose (50 microg/ml) was used with variable doses of Chaga extract (10-500 microg/ml). DNA damage was evaluated in 50 cells per individual and dose using the Comet assay (making 1000 observations per experimental point ensuring appropriate statistical power). Chaga supplementation resulted in a 54.9% (p < 0.001) reduction of H_{2}O_{2 } induced DNA damage within the patient group and 34.9% (p < 0.001) within the control group. Lymphocytes from Crohn's disease (CD) patients had a greater basic DNA damage than Ulcerative Colitis (UC) patients (p < 0.001). Conclusively, Chaga extract reduces oxidative stress in lymphocytes from IBD patients and also healthy individuals when challenged in vitro. Thus, Chaga extract could be a possible and valuable supplement to inhibit oxidative stress in general.

  20. Nucleosome assembly in mammalian cell extracts before and after DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Gruss, C; Gutierrez, C; Burhans, W C; DePamphilis, M L; Koller, T; Sogo, J M

    1990-01-01

    Protein-free DNA in a cytosolic extract supplemented with SV40 large T-antigen (T-Ag), is assembled into chromatin structure when nuclear extract is added. This assembly was monitored by topoisomer formation, micrococcal nuclease digestion and psoralen crosslinking of the DNA. Plasmids containing SV40 sequences (ori- and ori+) were assembled into chromatin with similar efficiencies whether T-Ag was present or not. Approximately 50-80% of the number of nucleosomes in vivo could be assembled in vitro; however, the kinetics of assembly differed on replicated and unreplicated molecules. In replicative intermediates, nucleosomes were observed on both the pre-replicated and post-replicated portions. We conclude that the extent of nucleosome assembly in mammalian cell extracts is not dependent upon DNA replication, in contrast to previous suggestions. However, the highly sensitive psoralen assay revealed that DNA replication appears to facilitate precise folding of DNA in the nucleosome. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:2167837

  1. Coordination of Steps in Single-nucleotide Base Excision Repair Mediated by Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1 and DNA Polymerase β*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Prasad, Rajendra; Beard, William A.; Kedar, Padmini S.; Hou, Esther W.; Shock, David D.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2008-01-01

    The individual steps in single-nucleotide base excision repair (SN-BER) are coordinated to enable efficient repair without accumulation of cytotoxic DNA intermediates. The DNA transactions and various proteins involved in SN-BER of abasic sites are well known in mammalian systems. Yet, despite a wealth of information on SN-BER, the mechanism of step-by-step coordination is poorly understood. In this study we conducted experiments toward understanding step-by-step coordination during BER by comparing DNA binding specificities of two major human SN-BER enzymes, apurinic/aprymidinic endonuclease 1 (APE) and DNA polymerase β (Pol β). It is known that these enzymes do not form a stable complex in solution. For each enzyme, we found that DNA binding specificity appeared sufficient to explain the sequential processing of BER intermediates. In addition, however, we identified at higher enzyme concentrations a ternary complex of APE·Pol β·DNA that formed specifically at BER intermediates containing a 5′-deoxyribose phosphate group. Formation of this ternary complex was associated with slightly stronger Pol β gap-filling and much stronger 5′-deoxyribose phosphate lyase activities than was observed with the Pol β·DNA binary complex. These results indicate that step-by-step coordination in SN-BER can rely on DNA binding specificity inherent in APE and Pol β, although coordination also may be facilitated by APE·Pol β·DNA ternary complex formation with appropriate enzyme expression levels or enzyme recruitment to sites of repair. PMID:17355977

  2. Optimized DNA extraction methods for encysted embryos of the endangered fairy shrimp, Branchinecta sandiegonensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, A.N.; Simovich, M.A.; Pepino, D.; Schroeder, K.M.; Vandergast, A.G.; Bohonak, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The San Diego fairy shrimp Branchinecta sandiegonensis is a federally endangered species endemic to vernal pools in southern California, USA. Filling events in these habitats are highly variable, with some pools failing to hold water long enough for reproduction over many successive years. Studies of this species are thus hindered by the relatively rare appearance of aquatically active life history phases. Because diapausing cysts are abundant and present at all times, they provide an underutilized opportunity for both species identification and genetic studies. However, methods for extracting DNA from cysts are technically challenging because of their structure and size. Here we present a protocol for extracting DNA from B. sandiegonensis cysts in sufficient quantities for "DNA Barcoding", microsatellite analysis and other genotyping and sequencing applications. The technique will aid in population genetic studies and species identification (since taxonomic keys only distinguish among adults), and will be applicable to other crustaceans with similar diapausing cysts. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  3. Fractionation study in bioleached metallurgy wastes using six-step sequential extraction.

    PubMed

    Krasnodebska-Ostrega, Beata; Pałdyna, Joanna; Kowalska, Joanna; Jedynak, Łukasz; Golimowski, Jerzy

    2009-08-15

    The stored metallurgy wastes contain residues from ore processing operations that are characterized by relatively high concentrations of heavy metals. The bioleaching process makes use of bacteria to recover elements from industrial wastes and to decrease potential risk of environmental contamination. Wastes were treated by solutions containing bacteria. In this work, the optimized six-stage sequential extraction procedure was applied for the fractionation of Ni, Cr, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn in iron-nickel metallurgy wastes deposited in Southern Poland (Szklary). Fractionation and total concentrations of elements in wastes before and after various bioleaching treatments were studied. Analyses of the extracts were performed by ICP-MS and FAAS. To achieve the most effective bioleaching of Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu, Mn, Fe the usage of both autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria in sequence, combined with flushing of the residue after bioleaching is required. 80-100% of total metal concentrations were mobilized after the proposed treatment. Wastes treated according to this procedure could be deposited without any risk of environmental contamination and additionally the metals could be recovered for industrial purposes.

  4. Comparison of Eight Methods for the Extraction of Bacillus atrophaeus Spore DNA from Eleven Common Interferents and a Common Swab

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Helen L.; Dewey, Caroline A.; Ely, Morgan S.; Willoughby, Sarah L.; Parsons, Tanya M.; Cox, Victoria; Spencer, Phillippa M.; Weller, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Eight DNA extraction products or methods (Applied Biosystems PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit; Bio-Rad Instagene Only, Bio-Rad Instagene & Spin Column Purification; EpiCentre MasterPure DNA & RNA Kit; FujiFilm QuickGene Mini80; Idaho Technologies 1-2-3 Q-Flow Kit; MoBio UltraClean Microbial DNA Isolation Kit; Sigma Extract-N-Amp Plant and Seed Kit) were adapted to facilitate extraction of DNA under BSL3 containment conditions. DNA was extracted from 12 common interferents or sample types, spiked with spores of Bacillus atropheaus. Resulting extracts were tested by real-time PCR. No one method was the best, in terms of DNA extraction, across all sample types. Statistical analysis indicated that the PrepFiler method was the best method from six dry powders (baking, biological washing, milk, plain flour, filler and talcum) and one solid (Underarm deodorant), the UltraClean method was the best from four liquids (aftershave, cola, nutrient broth, vinegar), and the MasterPure method was the best from the swab sample type. The best overall method, in terms of DNA extraction, across all sample types evaluated was the UltraClean method. PMID:21818364

  5. Comparison of eight methods for the extraction of Bacillus atrophaeus spore DNA from eleven common interferents and a common swab.

    PubMed

    Rose, Helen L; Dewey, Caroline A; Ely, Morgan S; Willoughby, Sarah L; Parsons, Tanya M; Cox, Victoria; Spencer, Phillippa M; Weller, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Eight DNA extraction products or methods (Applied Biosystems PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit; Bio-Rad Instagene Only, Bio-Rad Instagene & Spin Column Purification; EpiCentre MasterPure DNA & RNA Kit; FujiFilm QuickGene Mini80; Idaho Technologies 1-2-3 Q-Flow Kit; MoBio UltraClean Microbial DNA Isolation Kit; Sigma Extract-N-Amp Plant and Seed Kit) were adapted to facilitate extraction of DNA under BSL3 containment conditions. DNA was extracted from 12 common interferents or sample types, spiked with spores of Bacillus atropheaus. Resulting extracts were tested by real-time PCR. No one method was the best, in terms of DNA extraction, across all sample types. Statistical analysis indicated that the PrepFiler method was the best method from six dry powders (baking, biological washing, milk, plain flour, filler and talcum) and one solid (Underarm deodorant), the UltraClean method was the best from four liquids (aftershave, cola, nutrient broth, vinegar), and the MasterPure method was the best from the swab sample type. The best overall method, in terms of DNA extraction, across all sample types evaluated was the UltraClean method.

  6. An economical and effective high-throughput DNA extraction protocol for molecular marker analysis in honey bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraction of DNA from tissue samples can be expensive both in time and monetary resources and can often require handling and disposal of hazardous chemicals. We have developed a high throughput protocol for extracting DNA from honey bees that is of a high enough quality and quantity to enable hundr...

  7. An Improved DNA Extraction Method for Efficient and Quantitative Recovery of Phytoplankton Diversity in Natural Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jian; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are highly diverse with different species possessing different cell coverings, posing challenges for thoroughly breaking the cells in DNA extraction yet preserving DNA integrity. While quantitative molecular techniques have been increasingly used in phytoplankton research, an effective and simple method broadly applicable to different lineages and natural assemblages is still lacking. In this study, we developed a bead-beating protocol based on our previous experience and tested it against 9 species of phytoplankton representing different lineages and different cell covering rigidities. We found the bead-beating method enhanced the final yield of DNA (highest as 2 folds) in comparison with the non-bead-beating method, while also preserving the DNA integrity. When our method was applied to a field sample collected at a subtropical bay located in Xiamen, China, the resultant ITS clone library revealed a highly diverse assemblage of phytoplankton and other micro-eukaryotes, including Archaea, Amoebozoa, Chlorophyta, Ciliphora, Bacillariophyta, Dinophyta, Fungi, Metazoa, etc. The appearance of thecate dinoflagellates, thin-walled phytoplankton and “naked” unicellular organisms indicates that our method could obtain the intact DNA of organisms with different cell coverings. All the results demonstrate that our method is useful for DNA extraction of phytoplankton and environmental surveys of their diversity and abundance. PMID:26218575

  8. An Improved DNA Extraction Method for Efficient and Quantitative Recovery of Phytoplankton Diversity in Natural Assemblages.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jian; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are highly diverse with different species possessing different cell coverings, posing challenges for thoroughly breaking the cells in DNA extraction yet preserving DNA integrity. While quantitative molecular techniques have been increasingly used in phytoplankton research, an effective and simple method broadly applicable to different lineages and natural assemblages is still lacking. In this study, we developed a bead-beating protocol based on our previous experience and tested it against 9 species of phytoplankton representing different lineages and different cell covering rigidities. We found the bead-beating method enhanced the final yield of DNA (highest as 2 folds) in comparison with the non-bead-beating method, while also preserving the DNA integrity. When our method was applied to a field sample collected at a subtropical bay located in Xiamen, China, the resultant ITS clone library revealed a highly diverse assemblage of phytoplankton and other micro-eukaryotes, including Archaea, Amoebozoa, Chlorophyta, Ciliphora, Bacillariophyta, Dinophyta, Fungi, Metazoa, etc. The appearance of thecate dinoflagellates, thin-walled phytoplankton and "naked" unicellular organisms indicates that our method could obtain the intact DNA of organisms with different cell coverings. All the results demonstrate that our method is useful for DNA extraction of phytoplankton and environmental surveys of their diversity and abundance.

  9. The nuclear membrane determines the timing of DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have exploited a property of chicken erythrocyte nuclei to analyze the regulation of DNA replication in a cell-free system from Xenopus eggs. Many individual demembranated nuclei added to the extract often became enclosed within a common nuclear membrane. Nuclei within such a "multinuclear aggregate" lacked individual membranes but shared the perimeter membrane of the aggregate. Individual nuclei that were excluded from the aggregates initiated DNA synthesis at different times over a 10-12-h period, as judged by incorporation of biotinylated dUTP into discrete replication foci at early times, followed by uniformly intense incorporation at later times. Replication forks were clustered in spots, rings, and horseshoe-shaped structures similar to those described in cultured cells. In contrast to the asynchronous replication seen between individual nuclei, replication within multinuclear aggregates was synchronous. There was a uniform distribution and similar fluorescent intensity of the replication foci throughout all the nuclei enclosed within the same membrane. However, different multinuclear aggregates replicated out of synchrony with each other indicating that each membrane-bound aggregate acts as an individual unit of replication. These data indicate that the nuclear membrane defines the unit of DNA replication and determines the timing of DNA synthesis in egg extract resulting in highly coordinated triggering of DNA replication on the DNA it encloses. PMID:1993731

  10. Comparative evaluation of automated and manual commercial DNA extraction methods for detection of Francisella tularensis DNA from suspensions and spiked swabs by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dauphin, Leslie A; Walker, Roblena E; Petersen, Jeannine M; Bowen, Michael D

    2011-07-01

    This study evaluated commercial automated and manual DNA extraction methods for the isolation of Francisella tularensis DNA suitable for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis from cell suspensions and spiked cotton, foam, and polyester swabs. Two automated methods, the MagNA Pure Compact and the QIAcube, were compared to 4 manual methods, the IT 1-2-3 DNA sample purification kit, the MasterPure Complete DNA and RNA purification kit, the QIAamp DNA blood mini kit, and the UltraClean Microbial DNA isolation kit. The methods were compared using 6 F. tularensis strains representing the 2 subspecies which cause the majority of reported cases of tularemia in humans. Cell viability testing of the DNA extracts showed that all 6 extraction methods efficiently inactivated F. tularensis at concentrations of ≤10⁶ CFU/mL. Real-time PCR analysis using a multitarget 5' nuclease assay for F. tularensis revealed that the PCR sensitivity was equivalent using DNA extracted by the 2 automated methods and the manual MasterPure and QIAamp methods. These 4 methods resulted in significantly better levels of detection from bacterial suspensions and performed equivalently for spiked swab samples than the remaining 2. This study identifies optimal DNA extraction methods for processing swab specimens for the subsequent detection of F. tularensis DNA using real-time PCR assays. Furthermore, the results provide diagnostic laboratories with the option to select from 2 automated DNA extraction methods as suitable alternatives to manual methods for the isolation of DNA from F. tularensis.

  11. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A.; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J.

    2016-01-01

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included. PMID:27341629

  12. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J

    2016-06-11

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included.

  13. Initial steps towards a production platform for DNA sequence analysis on the grid

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bioinformatics is confronted with a new data explosion due to the availability of high throughput DNA sequencers. Data storage and analysis becomes a problem on local servers, and therefore it is needed to switch to other IT infrastructures. Grid and workflow technology can help to handle the data more efficiently, as well as facilitate collaborations. However, interfaces to grids are often unfriendly to novice users. Results In this study we reused a platform that was developed in the VL-e project for the analysis of medical images. Data transfer, workflow execution and job monitoring are operated from one graphical interface. We developed workflows for two sequence alignment tools (BLAST and BLAT) as a proof of concept. The analysis time was significantly reduced. All workflows and executables are available for the members of the Dutch Life Science Grid and the VL-e Medical virtual organizations All components are open source and can be transported to other grid infrastructures. Conclusions The availability of in-house expertise and tools facilitates the usage of grid resources by new users. Our first results indicate that this is a practical, powerful and scalable solution to address the capacity and collaboration issues raised by the deployment of next generation sequencers. We currently adopt this methodology on a daily basis for DNA sequencing and other applications. More information and source code is available via http://www.bioinformaticslaboratory.nl/ PMID:21156038

  14. Next-generation DNA sequencing of HEXA: a step in the right direction for carrier screening.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jodi D; Greger, Valerie; Strovel, Erin T; Blitzer, Miriam G; Umbarger, Mark A; Kennedy, Caleb; Bishop, Brian; Saunders, Patrick; Porreca, Gregory J; Schienda, Jaclyn; Davie, Jocelyn; Hallam, Stephanie; Towne, Charles

    2013-11-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is the prototype for ethnic-based carrier screening, with a carrier rate of ∼1/27 in Ashkenazi Jews and French Canadians. HexA enzyme analysis is the current gold standard for TSD carrier screening (detection rate ∼98%), but has technical limitations. We compared DNA analysis by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) plus an assay for the 7.6 kb deletion to enzyme analysis for TSD carrier screening using 74 samples collected from participants at a TSD family conference. Fifty-one of 74 participants had positive enzyme results (46 carriers, five late-onset Tay-Sachs [LOTS]), 16 had negative, and seven had inconclusive results. NGS + 7.6 kb del screening of HEXA found a pathogenic mutation, pseudoallele, or variant of unknown significance (VUS) in 100% of the enzyme-positive or obligate carrier/enzyme-inconclusive samples. NGS detected the B1 allele in two enzyme-negative obligate carriers. Our data indicate that NGS can be used as a TSD clinical carrier screening tool. We demonstrate that NGS can be superior in detecting TSD carriers compared to traditional enzyme and genotyping methodologies, which are limited by false-positive and false-negative results and ethnically focused, limited mutation panels, respectively, but is not ready for sole use due to lack of information regarding some VUS.

  15. Improved DNA extraction efficiency from low level cell numbers using a silica monolith based micro fluidic device.

    PubMed

    Kashkary, Loay; Kemp, Cordula; Shaw, Kirsty J; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2012-10-31

    The evaluation of a micro fluidic system with an integrated silica monolith for performing DNA extraction from limited biological samples has been carried out. Low DNA target concentrations usually require the addition of carrier RNA to ensure desired extraction efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate a micro fluidic extraction system with increasingly efficient extraction performances for biological samples containing <15 ng of total DNA without the need of adding carrier nucleic acids. All extracted DNA showed successful amplification via the polymerase chain reaction demonstrating both the effectiveness of the proposed system at removing potential inhibitors and yielding good quality DNA. The work presented here beneficially identifies reduced sample volumes/concentrations as suitable for processing with respect to downstream analysis by enabling pre-concentration of the biological sample, particularly important when dealing with clinical or forensic specimens.

  16. Ancient microbes from halite fluid inclusions: optimized surface sterilization and DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Timofeeff, Michael N; Spathis, Rita; Lowenstein, Tim K; Lum, J Koji

    2011-01-01

    Fluid inclusions in evaporite minerals (halite, gypsum, etc.) potentially preserve genetic records of microbial diversity and changing environmental conditions of Earth's hydrosphere for nearly one billion years. Here we describe a robust protocol for surface sterilization and retrieval of DNA from fluid inclusions in halite that, unlike previously published methods, guarantees removal of potentially contaminating surface-bound DNA. The protocol involves microscopic visualization of cell structures, deliberate surface contamination followed by surface sterilization with acid and bleach washes, and DNA extraction using Amicon centrifugal filters. Methods were verified on halite crystals of four different ages from Saline Valley, California (modern, 36 ka, 64 ka, and 150 ka), with retrieval of algal and archaeal DNA, and characterization of the algal community using ITS1 sequences. The protocol we developed opens up new avenues for study of ancient microbial ecosystems in fluid inclusions, understanding microbial evolution across geological time, and investigating the antiquity of life on earth and other parts of the solar system.

  17. High-Capacity Conductive Nanocellulose Paper Sheets for Electrochemically Controlled Extraction of DNA Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Razaq, Aamir; Nyström, Gustav; Strømme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert; Nyholm, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Highly porous polypyrrole (PPy)-nanocellulose paper sheets have been evaluated as inexpensive and disposable electrochemically controlled three-dimensional solid phase extraction materials. The composites, which had a total anion exchange capacity of about 1.1 mol kg−1, were used for extraction and subsequent release of negatively charged fluorophore tagged DNA oligomers via galvanostatic oxidation and reduction of a 30–50 nm conformal PPy layer on the cellulose substrate. The ion exchange capacity, which was, at least, two orders of magnitude higher than those previously reached in electrochemically controlled extraction, originated from the high surface area (i.e. 80 m2 g−1) of the porous composites and the thin PPy layer which ensured excellent access to the ion exchange material. This enabled the extractions to be carried out faster and with better control of the PPy charge than with previously employed approaches. Experiments in equimolar mixtures of (dT)6, (dT)20, and (dT)40 DNA oligomers showed that all oligomers could be extracted, and that the smallest oligomer was preferentially released with an efficiency of up to 40% during the reduction of the PPy layer. These results indicate that the present material is very promising for the development of inexpensive and efficient electrochemically controlled ion-exchange membranes for batch-wise extraction of biomolecules. PMID:22195031

  18. The application of alkaline lysis and pressure cycling technology in the differential extraction of DNA from sperm and epithelial cells recovered from cotton swabs.

    PubMed

    Nori, Deepthi V; McCord, Bruce R

    2015-09-01

    This study reports the development of a two-step protocol using pressure cycling technology (PCT) and alkaline lysis for differential extraction of DNA from mixtures of sperm and vaginal epithelial cells recovered from cotton swabs. In controlled experiments, in which equal quantities of sperm and female epithelial cells were added to cotton swabs, 5 min of pressure pulsing in the presence of 0.4 M NaOH resulted in 104 ± 6% recovery of female epithelial DNA present on the swab. Following the pressure treatment, exposing the swabs to a second 5-min alkaline treatment at 95 °C without pressure resulted in the selective recovery of 69 ± 6% of the sperm DNA. The recovery of the vaginal epithelia and sperm DNA was optimized by examining the effect of sodium hydroxide concentration, incubation temperature, and time. Following the alkaline lysis steps, the samples were neutralized with 2 M Tris (pH 7.5) and purified with phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol to permit downstream analysis. The total processing time to remove both fractions from the swab was less than 20 min. Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of these fractions obtained from PCT treatment and alkaline lysis generated clean profiles of female epithelial DNA and male sperm DNA for 1:1 mixtures of female and male cells and predominant male profiles for mixtures up to 5:1 female to male cells. By reducing the time and increasing the recovery of DNA from cotton swabs, this new method presents a novel and potentially useful procedure for forensic differential extractions.

  19. Impact of metagenomic DNA extraction procedures on the identifiable endophytic bacterial diversity in Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench).

    PubMed

    Maropola, Mapula Kgomotso Annah; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Trindade, Marla

    2015-05-01

    Culture-independent studies rely on the quantity and quality of the extracted environmental metagenomic DNA (mDNA). To fully access the plant tissue microbiome, the extracted plant mDNA should allow optimal PCR applications and the genetic content must be representative of the total microbial diversity. In this study, we evaluated the endophytic bacterial diversity retrieved using different mDNA extraction procedures. Metagenomic DNA from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) stem and root tissues were extracted using two classical DNA extraction protocols (CTAB- and SDS-based) and five commercial kits. The mDNA yields and quality as well as the reproducibility were compared. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP) was used to assess the impact on endophytic bacterial community structures observed. Generally, the classical protocols obtained high mDNA yields from sorghum tissues; however, they were less reproducible than the commercial kits. Commercial kits retrieved higher quality mDNA, but with lower endophytic bacterial diversities compared to classical protocols. The SDS-based protocol enabled access to the highest sorghum endophytic diversities. Therefore, "SDS-extracted" sorghum root and stem microbiome diversities were analysed via 454 pyrosequencing, and this revealed that the two tissues harbour significantly different endophytic communities. Nevertheless, both communities are dominated by agriculturally important genera such as Microbacterium, Agrobacterium, Sphingobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Erwinia, Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas; which have previously been shown to play a role in plant growth promotion. This study shows that DNA extraction protocols introduce biases in culture-independent studies of environmental microbial communities by influencing the mDNA quality, which impacts the microbial diversity analyses and evaluation. Using the broad-spectrum SDS-based DNA extraction protocol allows the recovery of the most

  20. Differential efficiency among DNA extraction methods influences detection of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Bletz, M C; Rebollar, E A; Harris, R N

    2015-02-10

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is responsible for massive declines and extinctions of amphibians worldwide. The most common method for detecting Bd is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). qPCR is a highly sensitive detection technique, but its ability to determine the presence and accurately quantify the amount of Bd is also contingent on the efficiency of the DNA extraction method used prior to PCR. Using qPCR, we compared the extraction efficiency of 3 different extraction methods commonly used for Bd detection across a range of zoospore quantities: PrepMan Ultra Reagent, Qiagen DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit, and Mobio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit. We show that not all extraction methods led to successful detection of Bd for the low zoospore quantities and that there was variation in the estimated zoospore equivalents among the methods, which demonstrates that these methods have different extraction efficiencies. These results highlight the importance of considering the extraction method when comparing across studies. The Qiagen DNeasy kit had the highest efficiency. We also show that replicated estimates of less than 1 zoospore can result from known zoospore concentrations; therefore, such results should be considered when obtained from field data. Additionally, we discuss the implications of our findings for interpreting previous studies and for conducting future Bd surveys. It is imperative to use the most efficient DNA extraction method in tandem with the highly sensitive qPCR technique in order to accurately diagnose the presence of Bd as well as other pathogens.

  1. Comparison of Eleven Methods for Genomic DNA Extraction Suitable for Large-Scale Whole-Genome Genotyping and Long-Term DNA Banking Using Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos I.; Bramis, Georgios; Lazou, Thomai; Russel, Claire L.; Arsenos, Georgios; Banos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, next generation sequencing and microarray technologies have revolutionized scientific research with their applications to high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Isolation of high quantities of pure, intact, double stranded, highly concentrated, not contaminated genomic DNA is prerequisite for successful and reliable large scale genotyping analysis. High quantities of pure DNA are also required for the creation of DNA-banks. In the present study, eleven different DNA extraction procedures, including phenol-chloroform, silica and magnetic beads based extractions, were examined to ascertain their relative effectiveness for extracting DNA from ovine blood samples. The quality and quantity of the differentially extracted DNA was subsequently assessed by spectrophotometric measurements, Qubit measurements, real-time PCR amplifications and gel electrophoresis. Processing time, intensity of labor and cost for each method were also evaluated. Results revealed significant differences among the eleven procedures and only four of the methods yielded satisfactory outputs. These four methods, comprising three modified silica based commercial kits (Modified Blood, Modified Tissue, Modified Dx kits) and an in-house developed magnetic beads based protocol, were most appropriate for extracting high quality and quantity DNA suitable for large-scale microarray genotyping and also for long-term DNA storage as demonstrated by their successful application to 600 individuals. PMID:25635817

  2. Single-step procedure for labeling DNA strand breaks with fluorescein- or BODIPY-conjugated deoxynucleotides: Detection of apoptosis and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Xun Li; Traganos, F.; Melamed, M.R.; Darzynkiewicz, Z.

    1995-06-01

    The methods of in situ labeling of DNA strand breaks have been used to identify apoptotic cells and/or DNA replicating cells. While discrimination of apoptotic cells is based on the inherent presence of numerous DNA strand breaks in their chromatin, DNA proliferating cells can be discriminated by the selective DNA strand break induction by photolysis (SBIP) methodology at the sites that contain incorporated bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) or iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd). In both instances, DNA strand breaks are labeled with biotin- or digoxygenin-conjugated deoxynucleotides, preferably in the reaction catalyzed by exogenous terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase; fluorescein tagged avidin (streptavidin) or digoxygenin antibody is used in the second step of the reaction. In the present study, DNA strand break labeling was simplified by using directly labeled deoxynucleotides, in a single-step reaction. Apoptotic cells in HL-60 cultures treated with camptothecin or in primary cultures of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma cells treated with prednisolone were easily identified utilizing BODIPY-conjugated dUTP (B-dUTP). The single-step procedure, requiring fewer centrifugation steps, resulted in less cell loss compared to the two-step cell labeling technique. The morphology of cells subjected to SBIP was excellent, allowing visualization of distinct DNA replication points. Because, unlike the immunocytochemical methods used to detect BrdUrd incorporation, the SBIP methodology does not require DNA denaturation by heat or acid, nuclear proteins are expected to remain undenatured in situ, allowing one to study colocalization of various constituents, detected immunocytochemically, at the DNA replication points. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Validation of a DNA IQ-based extraction method for TECAN robotic liquid handling workstations for processing casework.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Lett, C Marc; Fourney, Ron M

    2010-10-01

    A semi-automated DNA extraction process for casework samples based on the Promega DNA IQ™ system was optimized and validated on TECAN Genesis 150/8 and Freedom EVO robotic liquid handling stations configured with fixed tips and a TECAN TE-Shake™ unit. The use of an orbital shaker during the extraction process promoted efficiency with respect to DNA capture, magnetic bead/DNA complex washes and DNA elution. Validation studies determined the reliability and limitations of this shaker-based process. Reproducibility with regards to DNA yields for the tested robotic workstations proved to be excellent and not significantly different than that offered by the manual phenol/chloroform extraction. DNA extraction of animal:human blood mixtures contaminated with soil demonstrated that a human profile was detectable even in the presence of abundant animal blood. For exhibits containing small amounts of biological material, concordance studies confirmed that DNA yields for this shaker-based extraction process are equivalent or greater to those observed with phenol/chloroform extraction as well as our original validated automated magnetic bead percolation-based extraction process. Our data further supports the increasing use of robotics for the processing of casework samples.

  4. DNA extractions from deep subseafloor sediments: novel cryogenic-mill-based procedure and comparison to existing protocols.

    PubMed

    Alain, Karine; Callac, Nolwenn; Ciobanu, Maria-Cristina; Reynaud, Yann; Duthoit, Frédérique; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2011-12-01

    Extracting DNA from deep subsurface sediments is challenging given the complexity of sediments types, low biomasses, resting structures (spores, cysts) frequently encountered in deep sediments, and the potential presence of enzymatic inhibitors. Promising results for cell lysis efficiency were recently obtained by use of a cryogenic mill (Lipp et al., 2008). These findings encouraged us to devise a DNA extraction protocol using this tool. Thirteen procedures involving a combination of grinding in liquid nitrogen (for various durations and beating rates) with different chemical solutions (phenol, chloroform, SDS, sarkosyl, proteinase, GTC), or with use of DNA recovery kits (MagExtractor®) were compared. Effective DNA extraction was evaluated in terms of cell lysis efficiency, DNA extraction efficiency, DNA yield and determination of prokaryotic diversity. Results were compared to those obtained by standard protocols: the FastDNA®SPIN kit for soil and the Zhou protocol. For most sediment types grinding in a cryogenic mill at a low beating rate in combination with direct phenol-chloroform extraction resulted in much higher DNA yields than those obtained using classical procedures. In general (except for clay-rich sediments), this procedure provided high-quality crude extracts for direct downstream nested-PCR, from cell numbers as low as 1.1×10(6) cells/cm(3). This procedure is simple, rapid, low-cost, and could be used with minor modifications for large-scale DNA extractions for a variety of experimental goals.

  5. DNA extraction method using a silica-base resin type kit for the detection of genetically modified papaya.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Kiyomi; Tsuchiya, Hisayo; Watanabe, Takahiro; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Maitani, Tamio; Yamada, Toshiharu; Hirayama, Kuni; Satoh, Shuji

    2008-04-01

    Genetically modified (GM) papaya has not yet been approved for importation into, or cultivation in the European Union (EU) and Japan. A DNA extraction method using the Qiagen DNeasy Plant Mini Kit (PM method) and a method using a buffer containing cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB method) have been adopted as the official Japanese methods for detecting GM foods. However, the amounts of DNA extracted from papaya by these methods are very low. Therefore, we investigated an extraction method to obtain a high yield of DNA from raw or freeze-dried fresh papaya using the Promega Wizard DNA Clean-Up Resin System (WCR). The incubation for the extraction was carried out at 58 degrees C without proteinase K for 15 min. The extract was applied to a mini-column, then the column was washed with 80% isopropyl alcohol, and genomic DNA adsorbed on the column was eluted with TE buffer. The WCR method gave a higher yield of genomic DNA, and was simpler and faster than the PM method or CTAB method. In addition, it could be used to extract genomic DNA from fresh papaya at various stages of ripeness. Based on these results, we propose that the present method using WCR is the most practical and useful way to extract genomic DNA for the purpose of detecting GM papaya.

  6. Genomic DNA extraction methods using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Keerti; Mahas, Ahmed; Kent, Michael N; Naik, Sameep; Markey, Michael

    2015-10-01

    As new technologies come within reach for the average cytogenetic laboratory, the study of chromosome structure has become increasingly more sophisticated. Resolution has improved from karyotyping (in which whole chromosomes are discernible) to fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, with which specific megabase regions are visualized), array-based CGH (aCGH, examining hundreds of base pairs), and next-generation sequencing (providing single base pair resolution). Whole genome next-generation sequencing remains a cost-prohibitive method for many investigators. Meanwhile, the cost of aCGH has been reduced during recent years, even as resolution has increased and protocols have simplified. However, aCGH presents its own set of unique challenges. DNA of sufficient quantity and quality to hybridize to arrays and provide meaningful results is required. This is especially difficult for DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Here, we compare three different methods for acquiring DNA of sufficient length, purity, and "amplifiability" for aCGH and other downstream applications. Phenol-chloroform extraction and column-based commercial kits were compared with adaptive focused acoustics (AFA). Of the three extraction methods, AFA samples showed increased amplicon length and decreased polymerase chain reaction (PCR) failure rate. These findings support AFA as an improvement over previous DNA extraction methods for FFPE tissues.

  7. To beat or not to beat a tick: comparison of DNA extraction methods for ticks (Ixodes scapularis)

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are important disease vectors in the United States, known to transmit a variety of pathogens to humans, including bacteria, protozoa, and viruses. Their importance as a disease vector necessitates reliable and comparable methods for extracting microbial DNA from ticks. Furthermore, to explore the population genetics or genomics of this tick, appropriate DNA extraction techniques are needed for both the vector and its microbes. Although a few studies have investigated different methods of DNA isolation from ticks, they are limited in the number and types of DNA extraction and lack species-specific quantification of DNA yield. Methods. Here we determined the most efficient and consistent method of DNA extraction from two different developmental stages of I. scapularis—nymph and adult—that are the most important for disease transmission. We used various methods of physical disruption of the hard, chitinous exoskeleton, as well as commercial and non-commercial DNA isolation kits. To gauge the effectiveness of these methods, we quantified the DNA yield and confirmed the DNA quality via PCR of both tick and microbial genetic material. Results. DNA extraction using the Thermo GeneJET Genomic DNA Purification Kit resulted in the highest DNA yields and the most consistent PCR amplification when combined with either cutting or bead beating with select matrices across life stages. DNA isolation methods using ammonium hydroxide as well as the MoBio PowerSoil kit also produced strong and successful PCR amplification, but only for females. Discussion. We contrasted a variety of readily available methods of DNA extraction from single individual blacklegged ticks and presented the results through a quantitative and qualitative assessment. PMID:26290800

  8. Evaluation of methods of DNA extraction from Staphylococcus aureus in milk for use in real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Dibbern, A G; Botaro, B G; Viziack, M P; Silva, L F P; Santos, M V

    2015-01-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the repeatability and performance of 4 methods of extracting DNA from Staphylococcus aureus (SAU) and the gene encoding bovine mitochondrial cytochrome B (BMCB) in milk samples from cows with subclinical mastitis for use in amplification by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Two milk samples were obtained from cows naturally infected with S. aureus and subjected to the following extraction methods: Qiagen DNA extraction kit; Axyprep DNA extraction kit; in silica column boil and in silica column method. After extraction in duplicate, eluates were subjected to purification and precipitation to determine purity (A₂₆₀/A₂₈₀ ratio) and concentration (μg/μL) by spectrophotometry and amplification by real-time polymerase chain reaction of target genes (SAU and BMCB). There was no effect of the DNA extraction method on DNA concentration and threshold cycle for BMCB and SAU. The purity ratio (A₂₆₀/A₂₈₀ ) was higher when using Qiagen DNA extraction (1.76 ± 0.136) compared to the other methods tested. Our results indicate that the DNA extraction kit from Qiagen produces samples of the highest purity ratio compared to other methods.

  9. Antioxidant Activity and Protection from DNA Damage by Water Extract from Pine (Pinus densiflora) Bark.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yunyao; Han, Woong; Shen, Ting; Wang, Myeong-Hyeon

    2012-06-01

    Water extract from Pinus densiflora (WPD) was investigated for its antioxidant activity and its ability to provide protection from DNA damage. A series of antioxidant assays, including a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging assay, a reducing power assay, a metal-chelating assay, a superoxide radical scavenging assay, and a nitrite scavenging ability, as well as a DNA damage protection assay were performed. Total phenolic content was found to be 211.32 mg Tan/g WPD. The extract scavenged 50% DPPH free radical at a concentration of 21.35 μg/mL. At that same concentration, the reducing power ability of WPD was higher than that of α-tocopherol. The extract chelated 68.9% ferrous ion at the concentration of 4 mg/mL. WPD showed better nitrite scavenging effect at the lower pH. Meanwhile, WPD exhibited a strong capability for DNA damage protection at 1 mg/mL concentration. Taken together, these data suggest water extract from Pinus densiflora could be used as a suitable natural antioxidant.

  10. Repair synthesis by human cell extracts in DNA damaged by cis- and trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II).

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, J; Wood, R D

    1989-01-01

    DNA damage was induced in closed circular plasmid DNA by treatment with cis- or trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II). These plasmids were used as substrates in reactions to give quantitative measurements of DNA repair synthesis mediated by cell free extracts from human lymphoid cell lines. Adducts induced by both drugs stimulated repair synthesis in a dose dependent manner by an ATP-requiring process. Measurements by an isopycnic gradient sedimentation method gave an upper limit for the average patch sizes in this in vitro system of around 140 nucleotides. It was estimated that up to 3% of the drug adducts induce the synthesis of a repair patch. The repair synthesis is due to repair of a small fraction of frequent drug adducts, rather than extensive repair of a rare subclass of lesions. Nonspecific DNA synthesis in undamaged plasmids, caused by exonucleolytic degradation and resynthesis, was reduced by repeated purification of intact circular forms. An extract made from cells belonging to xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A was deficient in repair synthesis in response to the presence of cis- or trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) adducts in DNA. Images PMID:2554251

  11. Robust and effective methodologies for cryopreservation and DNA extraction from anaerobic gut fungi.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Kevin V; Henske, John K; Theodorou, Michael K; O'Malley, Michelle A

    2016-04-01

    Cell storage and DNA isolation are essential to developing an expanded suite of microorganisms for biotechnology. However, many features of non-model microbes, such as an anaerobic lifestyle and rigid cell wall, present formidable challenges to creating strain repositories and extracting high quality genomic DNA. Here, we establish accessible, high efficiency, and robust techniques to store lignocellulolytic anaerobic gut fungi long term without specialized equipment. Using glycerol as a cryoprotectant, gut fungal isolates were preserved for a minimum of 23 months at -80 °C. Unlike previously reported approaches, this improved protocol is non-toxic and rapid, with samples surviving twice as long with negligible growth impact. Genomic DNA extraction for these isolates was optimized to yield samples compatible with next generation sequencing platforms (e.g. Illumina, PacBio). Popular DNA isolation kits and precipitation protocols yielded preps that were unsuitable for sequencing due to carbohydrate contaminants from the chitin-rich cell wall and extensive energy reserves of gut fungi. To address this, we identified a proprietary method optimized for hardy plant samples that rapidly yielded DNA fragments in excess of 10 kb with minimal RNA, protein or carbohydrate contamination. Collectively, these techniques serve as fundamental tools to manipulate powerful biomass-degrading gut fungi and improve their accessibility among researchers.

  12. DNA Extraction Protocols for Whole-Genome Sequencing in Marine Organisms.

    PubMed

    Panova, Marina; Aronsson, Henrik; Cameron, R Andrew; Dahl, Peter; Godhe, Anna; Lind, Ulrika; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Pereyra, Ricardo; Tesson, Sylvie V M; Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Blomberg, Anders; Johannesson, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment harbors a large proportion of the total biodiversity on this planet, including the majority of the earths' different phyla and classes. Studying the genomes of marine organisms can bring interesting insights into genome evolution. Today, almost all marine organismal groups are understudied with respect to their genomes. One potential reason is that extraction of high-quality DNA in sufficient amounts is challenging for many marine species. This is due to high polysaccharide content, polyphenols and other secondary metabolites that will inhibit downstream DNA library preparations. Consequently, protocols developed for vertebrates and plants do not always perform well for invertebrates and algae. In addition, many marine species have large population sizes and, as a consequence, highly variable genomes. Thus, to facilitate the sequence read assembly process during genome sequencing, it is desirable to obtain enough DNA from a single individual, which is a challenge in many species of invertebrates and algae. Here, we present DNA extraction protocols for seven marine species (four invertebrates, two algae, and a marine yeast), optimized to provide sufficient DNA quality and yield for de novo genome sequencing projects.

  13. Comparison of STR profiling from low template DNA extracts with and without the consensus profiling method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The consensus profiling method was introduced to overcome the exaggerated stochastic effects associated with low copy number DNA typing. However, little empirical evidence has been provided which shows that a consensus profile, derived from dividing a sample into separate aliquots and including only alleles seen at least twice, gives the most informative profile, compared to a profile obtained by amplifying the entire low template DNA extract in one reaction. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the quality of consensus profiles compared to profiles obtained using the whole low template extract for amplification. Methods A total of 100 pg and 25 pg DNA samples were amplified with the PowerPlex® ESI 16 Kits using 30 or 34 PCR cycles. A total of 100 pg and 25 pg DNA samples were then divided into three aliquots for a 34-cycle PCR and a consensus profile derived that included alleles that appeared in at least two of the replicates. Profiles from the non-split samples were compared to the consensus profiles focusing on peak heights, allele drop out, locus drop out and allele drop in. Results Performing DNA profiling on non-split extracts produced profiles with a higher percentage of correct loci compared to the consensus profiling technique. Consensus profiling did eliminate any spurious alleles from the final profile. However, there was a notable increase in allele and locus drop out when a LTDNA sample was divided prior to amplification. Conclusions The loss of information that occurs when a sample is split for amplification indicates that consensus profiling may not be producing the most informative DNA profile for samples where the template amount is limited. PMID:22748106

  14. Comparison of eight commercially available kits for DNA extraction from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Janecka, Anna; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Gasińska, Anna

    2015-05-01

    A proper extraction method from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks is essential to obtain DNA of satisfactory quality/quantity. We compared the effectiveness of eight commercially available kits for DNA extraction based on 10 FFPE tissues. Kits differed significantly in terms of DNA yield, purity, and quality. Using the QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue Kit (Qiagen) and the ReliaPrep FFPE gDNA Miniprep System (Promega), we obtained DNA of the highest quality and acceptable quantity. We also demonstrated that overnight digestion of samples usually improved DNA yield and/or purity. For precious or limited material, double elution is recommended for obtaining up to 42% higher amount of DNA.

  15. Performance verification of the Maxwell 16 Instrument and DNA IQ Reference Sample Kit for automated DNA extraction of known reference samples.

    PubMed

    Krnajski, Z; Geering, S; Steadman, S

    2007-12-01

    Advances in automation have been made for a number of processes conducted in the forensic DNA laboratory. However, because most robotic systems are designed for high-throughput laboratories batching large numbers of samples, smaller laboratories are left with a limited number of cost-effective options for employing automation. The Maxwell 16 Instrument and DNA IQ Reference Sample Kit marketed by Promega are designed for rapid, automated purification of DNA extracts from sample sets consisting of sixteen or fewer samples. Because the system is based on DNA capture by paramagnetic particles with maximum binding capacity, it is designed to generate extracts with yield consistency. The studies herein enabled evaluation of STR profile concordance, consistency of yield, and cross-contamination performance for the Maxwell 16 Instrument. Results indicate that the system performs suitably for streamlining the process of extracting known reference samples generally used for forensic DNA analysis and has many advantages in a small or moderate-sized laboratory environment.

  16. Influence of DNA extraction methods, PCR inhibitors and quantification methods on real-time PCR assay of biotechnology-derived traits.

    PubMed

    Demeke, Tigst; Jenkins, G Ronald

    2010-03-01

    Biotechnology-derived varieties of canola, cotton, corn and soybean are being grown in the USA, Canada and other predominantly grain exporting countries. Although the amount of farmland devoted to production of biotechnology-derived crops continues to increase, lingering concerns that unintended consequences may occur provide the EU and most grain-importing countries with justification to regulate these crops. Legislation in the EU requires traceability of grains/oilseeds, food and feed products, and labelling, when a threshold level of 0.9% w/w of genetically engineered trait is demonstrated to be present in an analytical sample. The GE content is routinely determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and plant genomic DNA provides the template for the initial steps in this process. A plethora of DNA extraction methods exist for qPCR applications. Implementing standardized methods for detection of genetically engineered traits is necessary to facilitate grain marketing. The International Organization for Standardization draft standard 21571 identifies detergent-based methods and commercially available kits that are widely used for DNA extraction, but also indicates that adaptations may be necessary depending upon the sample matrix. This review assesses advantages and disadvantages of various commercially available DNA extraction kits, as well as modifications to published cetyltrimethylammonium bromide methods. Inhibitors are a major obstacle for efficient amplification in qPCR. The types of PCR inhibitors and techniques to minimize inhibition are discussed. Finally, accurate quantification of DNA for applications in qPCR is not trivial. Many confounders contribute to differences in analytical measurements when a particular DNA quantification method is applied and different methods do not always provide concordant results on the same DNA sample. How these differences impact measurement uncertainty in qPCR is considered.

  17. Echinococcus granulosus: DNA extraction from germinal layers allows strain determination in fertile and nonfertile hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Kamenetzky, L; Canova, S G; Guarnera, E A; Rosenzvit, M C

    2000-06-01

    A method for the isolation of Echinococcus granulosus DNA from germinal layers of hydatid cysts is described. The method includes a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide/chloroform extraction and an adsorption to diatomaceous earth suspension. DNA suitable for polymerase chain reaction was obtained and used for parasite strain determination by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene sequencing. Fertile and nonfertile cyst isolates from sheep, cattle, pigs, and humans were characterized. Hitherto, no direct parasite strain characterization has been made on nonfertile hydatid cysts, whereas here we report that nonfertile hydatid cysts were produced by sheep strain (G1 genotype) in sheep, cattle, and humans and by pig strain (G7 genotype) in pigs.

  18. DNA analysis of soil extracts can be used to investigate fine root depth distribution of trees

    PubMed Central

    Bithell, Sean L.; Tran-Nguyen, Lucy T. T.; Hearnden, Mark N.; Hartley, Diana M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the root distribution of trees by soil coring is time-consuming as it requires the separation of roots from soil and classification of roots into particular size classes. This labour-intensive process can limit sample throughput and therefore sampling intensity. We investigated the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on soil DNA extractions to determine live fine root DNA density (RDD, mg DNA m−2) for mango (Mangifera indica) trees. The specificity of the qPCR was tested against DNA extracted from 10 mango cultivars and 14 weed species. All mango cultivars and no weeds were detected. Mango DNA was successfully quantified from control soil spiked with mango roots and weed species. The DNA yield of mango root sections stored in moist soil at 23–28 °C declined after 15 days to low concentrations as roots decayed, indicating that dead root materials in moist soil would not cause false-positive results. To separate large roots from samples, a root separation method for field samples was used to target the root fragments remaining in sieved (minimum 2 mm aperture) soil for RDD comparisons. Using this method we compared the seasonal RDD values of fine roots for five mango rootstock cultivars in a field trial. The mean cultivar DNA yields by depth from root fragments in the sieved soil samples had the strongest relationship (adjusted multiple R2 = 0.9307, P < 0.001) with the dry matter (g m−2) of fine (diameter <0.64 mm) roots removed from the soil by sieving. This method provides a species-specific and rapid means of comparing the distribution and concentration of live fine roots of trees in orchards using soil samples up to 500 g. PMID:25552675

  19. Automated microfluidic DNA/RNA extraction with both disposable and reusable components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Johnson, Michael; Hill, Parker; Sonkul, Rahul S.; Kim, Jongwon; Gale, Bruce K.

    2012-01-01

    An automated microfluidic nucleic extraction system was fabricated with a multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) structure that consists of sample wells, microvalves, a micropump and a disposable microfluidic silica cartridge. Both the microvalves and micropump structures were fabricated in a single layer and are operated pneumatically using a 100 µm PDMS membrane. To fabricate the disposable microfluidic silica cartridge, two-cavity structures were made in a PDMS replica to fit the stacked silica membranes. A handheld controller for the microvalves and pumps was developed to enable system automation. With purified ribonucleic acid (RNA), whole blood and E. coli samples, the automated microfluidic nucleic acid extraction system was validated with a guanidine-based solid phase extraction procedure. An extraction efficiency of ~90% for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ~54% for RNA was obtained in 12 min from whole blood and E. coli samples, respectively. In addition, the same quantity and quality of extracted DNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR also presented the appropriate amplification and melting profiles. Automated, programmable fluid control and physical separation of the reusable components and the disposable components significantly decrease the assay time and manufacturing cost and increase the flexibility and compatibility of the system with downstream components.

  20. Development of an efficient fungal DNA extraction method to be used in random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR analysis to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid mold producers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Mar; Casado, Eva M; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2008-12-01

    A variety of previously established mechanical and chemical treatments to achieve fungal cell lysis combined with a semiautomatic system operated by a vacuum pump were tested to obtain DNA extract to be directly used in randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid-producing and -nonproducing mold strains. A DNA extraction method that includes digestion with proteinase K and lyticase prior to using a mortar and pestle grinding and a semiautomatic vacuum system yielded DNA of high quality in all the fungal strains and species tested, at concentrations ranging from 17 to 89 ng/microl in 150 microl of the final DNA extract. Two microliters of DNA extracted with this method was directly used for RAPD-PCR using primer (GACA)4. Reproducible RAPD fingerprints showing high differences between producer and nonproducer strains were observed. These differences in the RAPD patterns did not differentiate all the strains tested in clusters by cyclopiazonic acid production but may be very useful to distinguish cyclopiazonic acid producer strains from nonproducer strains by a simple RAPD analysis. Thus, the DNA extracts obtained could be used directly without previous purification and quantification for RAPD analysis to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid producer from nonproducer mold strains. This combined analysis could be adaptable to other toxigenic fungal species to enable differentiation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic molds, a procedure of great interest in food safety.

  1. Development of an Ammonium Sulfate DNA Extraction Method for Obtaining Amplifiable DNA in a Small Number of Cells and Its Application to Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seo Young; Kim, Wook Youn; Hwang, Tae Sook; Han, Hye Seung; Lim, So Dug; Kim, Wan Seop

    2013-01-01

    DNA extraction from microdissected cells has become essential for handling clinical specimens with advances in molecular pathology. Conventional methods have limitations for extracting amplifiable DNA from specimens containing a small number of cells. We developed an ammonium sulfate DNA extraction method (A) and compared it with two other methods (B and C). DNA quality and quantity, β-globin amplification, and detectability of