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Sample records for dna methyltransferase-3a promoter

  1. Pain vulnerability and DNA methyltransferase 3a involved in the affective dimension of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Caiyue; Cai, Youqing; Pan, Zhizhong Z

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain with comorbid emotional disorders is a prevalent neurological disease in patients under various pathological conditions, yet patients show considerable difference in their vulnerability to developing chronic pain. Understanding the neurobiological basis underlying this pain vulnerability is essential to develop targeted therapies of higher efficiency in pain treatment of precision medicine. However, this pain vulnerability has not been addressed in preclinical pain research in animals to date. In this study, we investigated individual variance in both sensory and affective/emotional dimensions of pain behaviors in response to chronic neuropathic pain condition in a mouse model of chronic pain. We found that mice displayed considerably diverse sensitivities in the chronic pain-induced anxiety- and depression-like behaviors of affective pain. Importantly, the mouse group that was more vulnerable to developing anxiety was also more vulnerable to developing depressive behavior under the chronic pain condition. In contrast, there was relatively much less variance in individual responses in the sensory dimension of pain sensitization. Molecular analysis revealed that those mice vulnerable to developing the emotional disorders showed a significant reduction in the protein level of DNA methyltransferase 3a in the emotion-processing central nucleus of the amygdala. In addition, social stress also revealed significant individual variance in anxiety behavior in mice. These findings suggest that individual pain vulnerability may be inherent mostly in the emotional/affective component of chronic pain and remain consistent in different aspects of negative emotion, in which adaptive changes in the function of DNA methyltransferase 3a for DNA methylation in central amygdala may play an important role. This may open a new avenue of basic research into the neurobiological mechanisms underlying pain vulnerability.

  2. Pain vulnerability and DNA methyltransferase 3a involved in the affective dimension of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Caiyue; Cai, Youqing

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain with comorbid emotional disorders is a prevalent neurological disease in patients under various pathological conditions, yet patients show considerable difference in their vulnerability to developing chronic pain. Understanding the neurobiological basis underlying this pain vulnerability is essential to develop targeted therapies of higher efficiency in pain treatment of precision medicine. However, this pain vulnerability has not been addressed in preclinical pain research in animals to date. In this study, we investigated individual variance in both sensory and affective/emotional dimensions of pain behaviors in response to chronic neuropathic pain condition in a mouse model of chronic pain. We found that mice displayed considerably diverse sensitivities in the chronic pain-induced anxiety- and depression-like behaviors of affective pain. Importantly, the mouse group that was more vulnerable to developing anxiety was also more vulnerable to developing depressive behavior under the chronic pain condition. In contrast, there was relatively much less variance in individual responses in the sensory dimension of pain sensitization. Molecular analysis revealed that those mice vulnerable to developing the emotional disorders showed a significant reduction in the protein level of DNA methyltransferase 3a in the emotion-processing central nucleus of the amygdala. In addition, social stress also revealed significant individual variance in anxiety behavior in mice. These findings suggest that individual pain vulnerability may be inherent mostly in the emotional/affective component of chronic pain and remain consistent in different aspects of negative emotion, in which adaptive changes in the function of DNA methyltransferase 3a for DNA methylation in central amygdala may play an important role. This may open a new avenue of basic research into the neurobiological mechanisms underlying pain vulnerability. PMID:28849714

  3. Cyclical DNA Methyltransferase 3a Expression Is a Seasonal and Estrus Timer in Reproductive Tissues.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Eloise W J; Coyle, Chris S; Lorgen, Marlene; Campbell, Ewan M; Bowman, Alan S; Stevenson, Tyler J

    2016-06-01

    It is becoming clear that epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation can be dynamic and, in many cases, reversible. Here we investigated the photoperiod and hormone regulation of DNA methylation in testes, ovaries, and uterine tissue across multiple time scales. We hypothesized that DNA methyltransferase 3a (dnmt3a) is driven by photoperiodic treatment and exhibits natural variation across the female reproductive cycle and that melatonin increases whereas estrogen reduces DNA methylation. We used Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) due to their robust changes in reproductive physiology across seasonal and estrus time scales. Our findings indicate that short-day (SD) winter-like conditions significantly increased global DNA methylation and dnmt3a expression in the testes. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirm that increased dnmt3a expression was primarily localized to spermatogonium. Conversely, the ovaries did not exhibit variation in DNA methylation or dnmt3a/3b expression. However, exposure to SD significantly increased uterine dnmt3a expression. We then determined that dnmt3a was significantly decreased during the estrus stage. Next, we ovariectomized females and subsequently identified that a single estrogen+progesterone injection was sufficient to rapidly inhibit dnmt3a and dnmt3b expression. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment of human embryonic kidney-293 cells with melatonin significantly increased both dnmt3a and dnmt3b expression, suggesting that long-duration nocturnal signaling in SD may be involved in the regulation of DNA methylation in both sexes. Overall, our data indicate that dnmt3a shows marked photoperiod and estrus plasticity that likely has broad downstream effects on the timing of the genomic control of reproductive function.

  4. Haploinsufficiency for DNA methyltransferase 3A predisposes hematopoietic cells to myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christopher B; Russler-Germain, David A; Ketkar, Shamika; Verdoni, Angela M; Smith, Amanda M; Bangert, Celia V; Helton, Nichole M; Guo, Mindy; Klco, Jeffery M; O'Laughlin, Shelly; Fronick, Catrina; Fulton, Robert; Chang, Gue Su; Petti, Allegra A; Miller, Christopher A; Ley, Timothy J

    2017-09-05

    The gene that encodes de novo DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) is frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukemia genomes. Point mutations at position R882 have been shown to cause a dominant negative loss of DNMT3A methylation activity, but 15% of DNMT3A mutations are predicted to produce truncated proteins that could either have dominant negative activities or cause loss of function and haploinsufficiency. Here, we demonstrate that 3 of these mutants produce truncated, inactive proteins that do not dimerize with WT DNMT3A, strongly supporting the haploinsufficiency hypothesis. We therefore evaluated hematopoiesis in mice heterozygous for a constitutive null Dnmt3a mutation. With no other manipulations, Dnmt3a+/- mice developed myeloid skewing over time, and their hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells exhibited a long-term competitive transplantation advantage. Dnmt3a+/- mice also spontaneously developed transplantable myeloid malignancies after a long latent period, and 3 of 12 tumors tested had cooperating mutations in the Ras/MAPK pathway. The residual Dnmt3a allele was neither mutated nor downregulated in these tumors. The bone marrow cells of Dnmt3a+/- mice had a subtle but statistically significant DNA hypomethylation phenotype that was not associated with gene dysregulation. These data demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for Dnmt3a alters hematopoiesis and predisposes mice (and probably humans) to myeloid malignancies by a mechanism that is not yet clear.

  5. Dysregulated DNA Methyltransferase 3A Upregulates IGFBP5 to Suppress Trophoblast Cell Migration and Invasion in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuanhui; Li, Ting; Huang, Xiaojie; Xu, Xianghong; Zhou, Xinyao; Jia, Linyan; Zhu, Jingping; Xie, Dandan; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Qian; Jin, Liping; Zhang, Jiqin; Duan, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Preeclampsia is a unique multiple system disorder during human pregnancy, which affects ≈5% to 8% of pregnancies. Its risks and complications have become the major causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Although abnormal placentation to which DNA methylation dysregulation is always linked is speculated to be one of the reasons causing preeclampsia, the underlying mechanisms still remain elusive to date. Here we revealed that aberrant DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) plays a critical role in preeclampsia. Our results show that the expression and localization of DNMT3A are dysregulated in preeclamptic placenta. Moreover, knockdown of DNMT3A obviously inhibits trophoblast cell migration and invasion. Mechanistically, IGFBP5 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5), known as a suppressor, is upregulated by decreased DNMT3A because of promoter hypomethylation. Importantly, IGFBP5 downregulation can rescue the defects caused by DNMT3A knockdown, thereby, consolidating the significance of IGFBP5 in the downstream of DNMT3A in trophoblast. Furthermore, we detected low promoter methylation and high protein expression of IGFBP5 in the clinical samples of preeclamptic placenta. Collectively, our study suggests that dysregulation of DNMT3A and IGFBP5 is relevant to preeclampsia. Thus, we propose that DNMT3A and IGFBP5 can serve as potential markers and targets for the clinical diagnosis and therapy of preeclampsia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. The inhibition of the mammalian DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) by dietary black tea and coffee polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Black tea is, second only to water, the most consumed beverage globally. Previously, the inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 1 was shown by dietary polyphenols and epi-gallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the main polyphenolic constituent of green tea, and 5-caffeoyl quinic acid, the main phenolic constituent of the green coffee bean. Results We studied the inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 3a by a series of dietary polyphenols from black tea such as theaflavins and thearubigins and chlorogenic acid derivatives from coffee. For theaflavin 3,3 digallate and thearubigins IC50 values in the lower micro molar range were observed, which when compared to pharmacokinetic data available, suggest an effect of physiological relevance. Conclusions Since Dnnmt3a has been associated with development, cancer and brain function, these data suggest a biochemical mechanism for the beneficial health effect of black tea and coffee and a possible molecular mechanism for the improvement of brain performance and mental health by dietary polyphenols. PMID:21510884

  7. Function of DNA methyltransferase 3a in lead (Pb(2+) )-Induced Cyclooxygenase-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yao-Ting; Chang, Che-Mai; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Hou, Ming-Feng; Wang, Ju-Ming; Shiurba, Robert; Chang, Wen-Chang; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2015-09-01

    Lead ions (Pb(2+) ) are toxic industrial pollutants associated with chronic inflammatory diseases in humans and animals. Previously, we found that Pb(2+) ions induce COX-2 gene expression via the EGF receptor/nuclear factor-κB signal transduction pathway in epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. In this study, to see whether Pb(2+) ions affect COX-2 expression by epigenetic mechanisms, we looked at the mRNAs of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) using real-time PCR of total RNA from these cells. Cells exposed to Pb(2+) had low levels of DNMT3a mRNA, whereas the levels of DNMT1 and DNMT3b mRNAs remained unchanged. Pretreatment of cells with DNMT inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5 μM) followed by Pb(2+) (1 μM) significantly increased levels of COX-2 mRNA compared with cells treated with Pb(2+) alone. Overexpression of tumor suppressor gene Rb correlated with an increase in COX-2 mRNA and a decrease in DNMT3a mRNA. Conversely, overexpression of transcription factor E2F1 correlated with a decrease in COX-2 mRNA and an increase in DMNT3a mRNA. Pretreatment with EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and PD153035 significantly limited Pb(2+) -induced reduction in DNMT3a mRNA. In addition, gene knockdown of DNMT3a with short hairpin RNA correlated with increased COX-2 mRNA induced by Pb(2+) . Our findings suggest Pb(2+) ions induce COX-2 expression indirectly by reducing DNMT3a methylation of the COX-2 promoter via transcription factors Rb and E2F1.

  8. Discovery of novel DNA methyltransferase 3A inhibitors via structure-based virtual screening and biological assays.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhiyuan; Xu, Pan; Xu, Wen; Li, Linjuan; Liu, Shien; Zhang, Rukang; Liu, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Chenhua; Chen, Shijie; Luo, Cheng

    2017-01-15

    DNA methyltransferases are involved in diverse biological processes and abnormal methylation patterns play essential roles in cancer initiation and progression. DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) acting as a de novo DNA methyltransferase, has gained widespread attention especially in haematological diseases. To date, large numbers of DNMTs inhibitors have been discovered, however, the small molecular inhibitors targeting DNMT3A are still in its infancy. In this study, structure-based virtual screening in combination with biological assays was performed to discovery potent novel DNMT3A inhibitors. Compound 40 and 40_3 displayed comparable in vitro inhibitory activity against DNMT3A with IC50 values of 46.5μM and 41μM, respectively. Further binding mode analysis suggested these molecules inhibit DNMT3A activity through binding the S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) pocket. Overall, 40 and 40_3 may serve as novel scaffolds for further optimization and small molecular probes for investigating DNMT3A function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Liganded Thyroid Hormone Receptors Transactivate the DNA Methyltransferase 3a Gene in Mouse Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kyono, Yasuhiro; Subramani, Arasakumar; Ramadoss, Preeti; Hollenberg, Anthony N.; Bonett, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) is essential for proper neurological development. The hormone, bound to its receptors, regulates gene transcription in part by modulating posttranslational modifications of histones. Methylation of DNA, which is established by the de novo DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)3a and DNMT3b, and maintained by DNMT1 is another epigenetic modification influencing gene transcription. The expression of Dnmt3a, but not other Dnmt genes, increases in mouse brain in parallel with the postnatal rise in plasma [T3]. We found that treatment of the mouse neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a[TRβ1] with T3 caused rapid induction of Dnmt3a mRNA, which was resistant to protein synthesis inhibition, supporting that it is a direct T3-response gene. Injection of T3 into postnatal day 6 mice increased Dnmt3a mRNA in the brain by 1 hour. Analysis of two chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing datasets, and targeted analyses using chromatin immunoprecipitation, transfection-reporter assays, and in vitro DNA binding identified 2 functional T3-response elements (TREs) at the mouse Dnmt3a locus located +30.3 and +49.3 kb from the transcription start site. Thyroid hormone receptors associated with both of these regions in mouse brain chromatin, but with only 1 (+30.3 kb) in Neuro2a[TRβ1] cells. Deletion of the +30.3-kb TRE using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing eliminated or strongly reduced the Dnmt3a mRNA response to T3. Bioinformatics analysis showed that both TREs are highly conserved among eutherian mammals. Thyroid regulation of Dnmt3a may be an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for modulating global changes in DNA methylation during postnatal neurological development. PMID:27387481

  10. PML-RARA requires DNA methyltransferase 3A to initiate acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Christopher B.; Verdoni, Angela M.; Ketkar, Shamika; Leight, Elizabeth R.; Russler-Germain, David A.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Magrini, Vincent; Ley, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferases DNMT3A and DNMT3B are primarily responsible for de novo methylation of specific cytosine residues in CpG dinucleotides during mammalian development. While loss-of-function mutations in DNMT3A are highly recurrent in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), DNMT3A mutations are almost never found in AML patients with translocations that create oncogenic fusion genes such as PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1, and MLL-AF9. Here, we explored how DNMT3A is involved in the function of these fusion genes. We used retroviral vectors to express PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1, or MLL-AF9 in bone marrow cells derived from WT or DNMT3A-deficient mice. Additionally, we examined the phenotypes of hematopoietic cells from Ctsg-PML-RARA mice, which express PML-RARA in early hematopoietic progenitors and myeloid precursors, with or without DNMT3A. We determined that the methyltransferase activity of DNMT3A, but not DNMT3B, is required for aberrant PML-RARA–driven self-renewal ex vivo and that DNMT3A is dispensable for RUNX1-RUNX1T1– and MLL-AF9–driven self-renewal. Furthermore, both the PML-RARA–driven competitive transplantation advantage and development of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) required DNMT3A. Together, these findings suggest that PML-RARA requires DNMT3A to initiate APL in mice. PMID:26595813

  11. Identification and characterization of alternatively spliced variants of DNA methyltransferase 3a in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Weisenberger, Daniel J; Velicescu, Mihaela; Preciado-Lopez, Miguel A; Gonzales, Felicidad A; Tsai, Yvonne C; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A

    2002-09-18

    CpG methylation is mediated by the functions of at least three active DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). While DNMT1 is thought to perform maintenance methylation, the more recently discovered DNMT3a and DNMT3b enzymes are thought to facilitate de novo methylation. Murine Dnmt3a and 3b are developmentally regulated and a new Dnmt3a isoform, Dnmt3a2, has been recently shown to be expressed preferentially in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we have characterized four alternatively spliced variants of human and mouse DNMT3a. These transcripts included a novel exon 1 (1beta) that was spliced into the same exon 2 acceptor splice site used by the original exon 1 (1alpha). Cloning and sequencing of the 5' region of the human DNMT3a gene revealed that exon 1beta was situated upstream of exon 1alpha and that the entire region was contained within a CpG island. We also identified other alternatively spliced species containing intron 4 inclusions that were associated with either exon 1alpha or 1beta. These were expressed at low levels in mouse and human cells. All transcripts were highly conserved between human and mouse. The levels of Dnmt3a mRNA containing exon 1beta were 3-25-fold greater in mouse ES cells than in various somatic cells as determined by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis, while the levels of exon 1alpha-containing transcripts were slightly higher in human and mouse somatic cells. The preferential expression of the beta transcript in ES cells suggests that this transcript, in addition to Dnmt3a2, may also be important for de novo methylation during development.

  12. MicroRNA-101 suppresses progression of lung cancer through the PTEN/AKT signaling pathway by targeting DNA methyltransferase 3A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lumin; Yao, Jiayi; Sun, Hongfei; He, Kang; Tong, Dongdong; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that transcriptional silencing of critical tumor suppressor genes by DNA methylation is a fundamental process in the initiation of lung cancer. However, the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in restoring abnormal DNA methylation patterns in lung cancer is not well understood. Therefore, and since miRNA-101 is complementary to the 3′-untranslated region of DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), we investigated whether miRNA-101 could restore normal DNA methylation patterns in lung cancer cell lines. Bioinformatics has indicated that DNMT3A is a major target of miR-101. In addition, the overexpression of miR-101 downregulates DNMT3A. Using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that methylation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) promoter was reduced in A549 cells transfected with miR-101, but not in the transfected control. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-101 and silencing of DNMT3A suppressed lung cell proliferation and S/G2 transition, and increased apoptosis through the PTEN/AKT pathway in vitro. Furthermore, we observed the opposite phenomenon in A549 cells transfected with a miR-101 inhibitor. Subsequent investigation revealed that overexpression of miR-101 significantly inhibited the tumorigenicity of A549 cells in a nude mouse xenograft model. These results demonstrate that miR-101 affects lung cancer progression through the PTEN/AKT signaling pathway by targeting DNMT3A in lung cells, suggesting that miR-101 may be a novel potential therapeutic strategy in lung cancer treatment. PMID:28123563

  13. DNA methyltransferase 3a and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling regulate the expression of fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) during denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tajrishi, Marjan M; Shin, Jonghyun; Hetman, Michal; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-07-18

    The TWEAK-fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) system is a critical regulator of denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. Although the expression of Fn14 is a rate-limiting step in muscle atrophy on denervation, mechanisms regulating gene expression of Fn14 remain unknown. Methylation of CpG sites within promoter region is an important epigenetic mechanism for gene silencing. Our study demonstrates that Fn14 promoter contains a CpG island close to transcription start site. Fn14 promoter also contains multiple consensus DNA sequence for transcription factors activator protein 1 (AP1) and specificity protein 1 (SP1). Denervation diminishes overall genomic DNA methylation and causes hypomethylation at specific CpG sites in Fn14 promoter leading to the increased gene expression of Fn14 in skeletal muscle. Abundance of DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) and its interaction with Fn14 promoter are repressed in denervated skeletal muscle of mice. Overexpression of Dnmt3a inhibits the gene expression of Fn14 and attenuates skeletal muscle atrophy upon denervation. Denervation also causes the activation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and ERK5 MAPKs and AP1 and SP1, which stimulate the expression of Fn14 in skeletal muscle. Collectively, our study provides novel evidence that Dnmt3a and MAPK signaling regulate the levels of Fn14 in skeletal muscle on denervation. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Properly Substituted Analogues of BIX-01294 Lose Inhibition of G9a Histone Methyltransferase and Gain Selective Anti-DNA Methyltransferase 3A Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rotili, Dante; Tarantino, Domenico; Marrocco, Biagina; Gros, Christina; Masson, Véronique; Poughon, Valérie; Ausseil, Fréderic; Chang, Yanqi; Labella, Donatella; Cosconati, Sandro; Di Maro, Salvatore; Novellino, Ettore; Schnekenburger, Michael; Grandjenette, Cindy; Bouvy, Celine; Diederich, Marc; Cheng, Xiaodong; Arimondo, Paola B.; Mai, Antonello

    2014-01-01

    Chemical manipulations performed on the histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferases (G9a/GLP) inhibitor BIX-01294 afforded novel desmethoxyquinazolines able to inhibit the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A at low micromolar levels without any significant inhibition of DNMT1 and G9a. In KG-1 cells such compounds, when tested at sub-toxic doses, induced the luciferase re-expression in a stable construct controlled by a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter silenced by methylation (CMV-luc assay). Finally, in human lymphoma U-937 and RAJI cells, the N-(1-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)-2-(4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)quinazolin-4-amine induced the highest proliferation arrest and cell death induction starting from 10 µM, in agreement with its DNMT3A inhibitory potency. PMID:24810902

  15. Comparison of high-resolution melting analysis with direct sequencing for the detection of recurrent mutations in DNA methyltransferase 3A and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes in acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Gorniak, Patryk; Ejduk, Anna; Borg, Katarzyna; Makuch-Lasica, Hanna; Nowak, Grazyna; Lech-Maranda, Ewa; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw

    2016-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells harbor frequent mutations in genes responsible for epigenetic modifications. Increasing evidence of clinical role of DNMT3A and IDH1/2 mutations highlights the need for a robust and inexpensive test to identify these mutations in routine diagnostic work-up. Herein, we compared routinely used direct sequencing method with high-resolution melting (HRM) assay for screening DNMT3A and IDH1/2 mutations in patients with AML. We show very high concordance between HRM and Sanger sequencing (100% samples for IDH2-R140 and DNMT3-R882 mutations, 99% samples for IDH1-R132 and IDH2-R172 mutations). HRM method reported no false-negative results, suggesting that it can be used for mutations screening. Moreover, HRM displayed much higher sensitivity in comparison with DNA sequencing in all assessed loci. With Sanger sequencing, robust calls were observed when the sample contained 50% of mutant DNA in the background of wild-type DNA. In marked contrast, the detection limit of HRM improved down to 10% of mutated DNA. Given the ubiquitous presence of wild-type DNA background in bone marrow aspirates and clonal variations regarding mutant allele burden, these results favor HRM as a sensitive, specific, labor-, and cost-effective tool for screening and detection of mutations in IDH1/2 and DNMT3A genes in patients with AML.

  16. DNA signals at isoform promoters

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  17. Genetic Polymorphism of DNA Methyltransferase 3A rs1550117 A>G and Risk of Cancer: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbo; Xu, Ying; Ma, Gui; Qi, Weidong; Gu, Haiyong; Jiang, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the association between DNMT3A rs1550117 A>G polymorphism and cancer risk, but the results are inconsistent. To obtain a more precise evaluation of the relationship, we performed a meta-analysis of 10 case-control studies involving a total of 2184 cancer cases and 3420 controls. Our findings demonstrated a significant association between DNMT3A rs1550117 A>G polymorphism and increased risk of cancer in three genetic models: AA vs. AG + GG (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.12-2.88; p = 0.015), AA vs. GG (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.11-2.95; p = 0.018) and AA vs. AG (OR 1.77; 95% CI 1.13-2.79; p = 0.013). In a stratified analysis by cancer type, significant association between DNMT3A rs1550117 A>G polymorphism and increased risk of colorectal cancer was identified in four genetic models: AA vs. AG + GG (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.56-6.06; p = 0.001), AA vs. GG (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.58-6.29; p = 0.001), AA vs. AG (OR, 2.87; 95% CI, 1.41-5.84; p = 0.004), A vs. G (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.11-1.83; p = 0.005). Furthermore, a stratified analysis by ethnicity, significant increased risk of cancer was found among Asians in three genetic models: AA vs. AG + GG (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.09-2.88; p = 0.022), AA vs. GG (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.08-2.96; p = 0.025), AA vs. AG (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.10-2.79; p = 0.019). No significant publication bias was revealed for the meta-analysis. Sensitivity analysis suggested the reliability of our findings. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that DNMT3A rs1550117 A>G polymorphism may be associated with cancer susceptibility.

  18. Discrete model for DNA-promoter dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Mario

    1991-10-01

    We introduce a discrete model for DNA that takes into account the information about specific base sequences along the double helix. We use this model to study nonlinear wave dynamics of the T7A1 DNA promoter. As results we show the existence in the promoter of a dynamically active region in which static solitons acquire finite velocities, which contrasts with regions where solitons simply remain static. Furthermore, when they pass through this region moving solitons are accelerated, decelerated, or reflected, depending on their initial velocities. The possibility that these dynamical effects play a role in the mechanism of genetic activation is suggested.

  19. A promoter DNA demethylation landscape of human hematopoietic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Fernández, Agustín F.; Urdinguio, Rocío G.; Suárez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Mangas, Cristina; Pérez-García, Vicente; Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Ferrero, Cecilia; Assenov, Yassen; Bock, Christoph; Menendez, Pablo; Carrera, Ana Clara; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Fraga, Mario F.

    2012-01-01

    Global mechanisms defining the gene expression programs specific for hematopoiesis are still not fully understood. Here, we show that promoter DNA demethylation is associated with the activation of hematopoietic-specific genes. Using genome-wide promoter methylation arrays, we identified 694 hematopoietic-specific genes repressed by promoter DNA methylation in human embryonic stem cells and whose loss of methylation in hematopoietic can be associated with gene expression. The association between promoter methylation and gene expression was studied for many hematopoietic-specific genes including CD45, CD34, CD28, CD19, the T cell receptor (TCR), the MHC class II gene HLA-DR, perforin 1 and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and results indicated that DNA demethylation was not always sufficient for gene activation. Promoter demethylation occurred either early during embryonic development or later on during hematopoietic differentiation. Analysis of the genome-wide promoter methylation status of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from somatic CD34+ HSPCs and differentiated derivatives from CD34+ HSPCs confirmed the role of DNA methylation in regulating the expression of genes of the hemato-immune system, and indicated that promoter methylation of these genes may be associated to stemness. Together, these data suggest that promoter DNA demethylation might play a role in the tissue/cell-specific genome-wide gene regulation within the hematopoietic compartment. PMID:21911366

  20. Compilation and analysis of Escherichia coli promoter DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, D K; McClure, W R

    1983-01-01

    The DNA sequence of 168 promoter regions (-50 to +10) for Escherichia coli RNA polymerase were compiled. The complete listing was divided into two groups depending upon whether or not the promoter had been defined by genetic (promoter mutations) or biochemical (5' end determination) criteria. A consensus promoter sequence based on homologies among 112 well-defined promoters was determined that was in substantial agreement with previous compilations. In addition, we have tabulated 98 promoter mutations. Nearly all of the altered base pairs in the mutants conform to the following general rule: down-mutations decrease homology and up-mutations increase homology to the consensus sequence. PMID:6344016

  1. Finding human promoter groups based on DNA physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jia; Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Hongya; Yan, Hong

    2009-10-01

    DNA rigidity is an important physical property originating from the DNA three-dimensional structure. Although the general DNA rigidity patterns in human promoters have been investigated, their distinct roles in transcription are largely unknown. In this paper, we discover four highly distinct human promoter groups based on similarity of their rigidity profiles. First, we find that all promoter groups conserve relatively rigid DNAs at the canonical TATA box [a consensus TATA(A/T)A(A/T) sequence] position, which are important physical signals in binding transcription factors. Second, we find that the genes activated by each group of promoters share significant biological functions based on their gene ontology annotations. Finally, we find that these human promoter groups correlate with the tissue-specific gene expression.

  2. Finding human promoter groups based on DNA physical properties.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Hongya; Yan, Hong

    2009-10-01

    DNA rigidity is an important physical property originating from the DNA three-dimensional structure. Although the general DNA rigidity patterns in human promoters have been investigated, their distinct roles in transcription are largely unknown. In this paper, we discover four highly distinct human promoter groups based on similarity of their rigidity profiles. First, we find that all promoter groups conserve relatively rigid DNAs at the canonical TATA box [a consensus TATA(A/T)A(A/T) sequence] position, which are important physical signals in binding transcription factors. Second, we find that the genes activated by each group of promoters share significant biological functions based on their gene ontology annotations. Finally, we find that these human promoter groups correlate with the tissue-specific gene expression.

  3. Equilibrious Strand Exchange Promoted by DNA Conformational Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiguo; Xie, Xiao; Li, Puzhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Huang, Lili; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Most of DNA strand exchange reactions in vitro are based on toehold strategy which is generally nonequilibrium, and intracellular strand exchange mediated by proteins shows little sequence specificity. Herein, a new strand exchange promoted by equilibrious DNA conformational switching is verified. Duplexes containing c-myc sequence which is potentially converted into G-quadruplex are designed in this strategy. The dynamic equilibrium between duplex and G4-DNA is response to the specific exchange of homologous single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The SER is enzyme free and sequence specific. No ATP is needed and the displaced ssDNAs are identical to the homologous ssDNAs. The SER products and exchange kenetics are analyzed by PAGE and the RecA mediated SER is performed as the contrast. This SER is a new feature of G4-DNAs and a novel strategy to utilize the dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations.

  4. The motor activity of DNA2 functions as an ssDNA translocase to promote DNA end resection.

    PubMed

    Levikova, Maryna; Pinto, Cosimo; Cejka, Petr

    2017-03-01

    DNA2 nuclease-helicase functions in DNA replication and recombination. This requires the nuclease of DNA2, while, in contrast, the role of the helicase activity has been unclear. We now show that the motor activity of both recombinant yeast and human DNA2 promotes efficient degradation of long stretches of ssDNA, particularly in the presence of the replication protein A. This degradation is further stimulated by a direct interaction with a cognate RecQ family helicase, which functions with DNA2 in DNA end resection to initiate homologous recombination. Consequently, helicase-deficient yeast dna2 K1080E cells display reduced resection speed of HO-induced DNA double-strand breaks. These results support a model of DNA2 and the RecQ family helicase partner forming a bidirectional motor machine, where the RecQ family helicase is the lead helicase, and the motor of DNA2 functions as a ssDNA translocase to promote degradation of 5'-terminated DNA. © 2017 Levikova et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. The motor activity of DNA2 functions as an ssDNA translocase to promote DNA end resection

    PubMed Central

    Levikova, Maryna; Pinto, Cosimo; Cejka, Petr

    2017-01-01

    DNA2 nuclease–helicase functions in DNA replication and recombination. This requires the nuclease of DNA2, while, in contrast, the role of the helicase activity has been unclear. We now show that the motor activity of both recombinant yeast and human DNA2 promotes efficient degradation of long stretches of ssDNA, particularly in the presence of the replication protein A. This degradation is further stimulated by a direct interaction with a cognate RecQ family helicase, which functions with DNA2 in DNA end resection to initiate homologous recombination. Consequently, helicase-deficient yeast dna2 K1080E cells display reduced resection speed of HO-induced DNA double-strand breaks. These results support a model of DNA2 and the RecQ family helicase partner forming a bidirectional motor machine, where the RecQ family helicase is the lead helicase, and the motor of DNA2 functions as a ssDNA translocase to promote degradation of 5′-terminated DNA. PMID:28336515

  6. Prediction of fine-tuned promoter activity from DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Siwo, Geoffrey; Rider, Andrew; Tan, Asako; Pinapati, Richard; Emrich, Scott; Chawla, Nitesh; Ferdig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative prediction of transcriptional activity of genes using promoter sequence is fundamental to the engineering of biological systems for industrial purposes and understanding the natural variation in gene expression. To catalyze the development of new algorithms for this purpose, the Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM) organized a community challenge seeking predictive models of promoter activity given normalized promoter activity data for 90 ribosomal protein promoters driving expression of a fluorescent reporter gene. By developing an unbiased modeling approach that performs an iterative search for predictive DNA sequence features using the frequencies of various k-mers, inferred DNA mechanical properties and spatial positions of promoter sequences, we achieved the best performer status in this challenge. The specific predictive features used in the model included the frequency of the nucleotide G, the length of polymeric tracts of T and TA, the frequencies of 6 distinct trinucleotides and 12 tetranucleotides, and the predicted protein deformability of the DNA sequence. Our method accurately predicted the activity of 20 natural variants of ribosomal protein promoters (Spearman correlation r = 0.73) as compared to 33 laboratory-mutated variants of the promoters (r = 0.57) in a test set that was hidden from participants. Notably, our model differed substantially from the rest in 2 main ways: i) it did not explicitly utilize transcription factor binding information implying that subtle DNA sequence features are highly associated with gene expression, and ii) it was entirely based on features extracted exclusively from the 100 bp region upstream from the translational start site demonstrating that this region encodes much of the overall promoter activity. The findings from this study have important implications for the engineering of predictable gene expression systems and the evolution of gene expression in naturally occurring

  7. Prediction of fine-tuned promoter activity from DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Siwo, Geoffrey; Rider, Andrew; Tan, Asako; Pinapati, Richard; Emrich, Scott; Chawla, Nitesh; Ferdig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative prediction of transcriptional activity of genes using promoter sequence is fundamental to the engineering of biological systems for industrial purposes and understanding the natural variation in gene expression. To catalyze the development of new algorithms for this purpose, the Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM) organized a community challenge seeking predictive models of promoter activity given normalized promoter activity data for 90 ribosomal protein promoters driving expression of a fluorescent reporter gene. By developing an unbiased modeling approach that performs an iterative search for predictive DNA sequence features using the frequencies of various k-mers, inferred DNA mechanical properties and spatial positions of promoter sequences, we achieved the best performer status in this challenge. The specific predictive features used in the model included the frequency of the nucleotide G, the length of polymeric tracts of T and TA, the frequencies of 6 distinct trinucleotides and 12 tetranucleotides, and the predicted protein deformability of the DNA sequence. Our method accurately predicted the activity of 20 natural variants of ribosomal protein promoters (Spearman correlation r = 0.73) as compared to 33 laboratory-mutated variants of the promoters (r = 0.57) in a test set that was hidden from participants. Notably, our model differed substantially from the rest in 2 main ways: i) it did not explicitly utilize transcription factor binding information implying that subtle DNA sequence features are highly associated with gene expression, and ii) it was entirely based on features extracted exclusively from the 100 bp region upstream from the translational start site demonstrating that this region encodes much of the overall promoter activity. The findings from this study have important implications for the engineering of predictable gene expression systems and the evolution of gene expression in naturally occurring

  8. Regularities in the E. coli promoters composition in connection with the DNA strands interaction and promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Berezhnoy, Andrey Yu; Shckorbatov, Yuriy G.; Hisanori, Kiryu

    2006-01-01

    The energy of interaction between DNA strands in promoters is of great functional importance. Visualization of the energy of DNA strands distribution in promoter sequences was achieved. The separation of promoters in groups by their energetic properties enables evaluation of the dependence of promoter strength on the energetic properties. The analysis of groups (clusters) of promoters distributed by the energy of DNA strands interaction in −55, −35, −10 and +6 sequences indicates their connection with the transcriptional activity. PMID:17111465

  9. Selective cleavage of kinetoplast DNA minicircles promoted by antitrypanosomal drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, T A; Englund, P T

    1990-01-01

    Pentamidine, diminazene aceturate (Berenil), isometamidium chloride (Samorin), and ethidium bromide, which are important antitrypanosomal drugs, promote linearization of Trypanosoma equiperdum minicircle DNA (the principal component of kinetoplast DNA, the mitochondrial DNA in these parasites). This effect occurs at therapeutically relevant concentrations. The linearized minicircles are protease sensitive and are not digested by lambda exonuclease (a 5' to 3' exonuclease), indicating that the break is double stranded and that protein is bound to both 5' ends of the molecule. The cleavage sites map to discrete positions in the minicircle sequence, and the cleavage pattern varies with different drugs. These findings are characteristic for type II topoisomerase inhibitors, and they mimic the effects of the antitumor drug etoposide (VP16-213, a semisynthetic podophyllotoxin analog) on T. equiperdum minicircles. However, the antitrypanosomal drugs differ dramatically from etoposide in that they do not promote detectable formation of nuclear DNA-protein complexes or of strand breaks in nuclear DNA. Selective inhibition of a mitochondrial type II topoisomerase may explain why these antitrypanosomal drugs preferentially disrupt mitochondrial DNA structure and generate dyskinetoplastic trypanosomes (which lack mitochondrial DNA). Images PMID:2153980

  10. A dual promoter system regulating λ DNA replication initiation

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Paweł; Szambowska, Anna; Barańska, Sylwia; Narajczyk, Magdalena; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Glinkowska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Transcription and DNA replication are tightly regulated to ensure coordination of gene expression with growth conditions and faithful transmission of genetic material to progeny. A large body of evidence has accumulated, indicating that encounters between protein machineries carrying out DNA and RNA synthesis occur in vivo and may have important regulatory consequences. This feature may be exacerbated in the case of compact genomes, like the one of bacteriophage λ, used in our study. Transcription that starts at the rightward pR promoter and proceeds through the λ origin of replication and downstream of it was proven to stimulate the initiation of λ DNA replication. Here, we demonstrate that the activity of a convergently oriented pO promoter decreases the efficiency of transcription starting from pR. Our results show, however, that a lack of the functional pO promoter negatively influences λ phage and λ-derived plasmid replication. We present data, suggesting that this effect is evoked by the enhanced level of the pR-driven transcription, occurring in the presence of the defective pO, which may result in the impeded formation of the replication initiation complex. Our data suggest that the cross talk between the two promoters regulates λ DNA replication and coordinates transcription and replication processes. PMID:24500197

  11. Mechanism of promoter repression by Lac repressor-DNA loops.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Peters, Justin P; Maher, L James; Lionberger, Troy A

    2013-01-07

    The Escherichia coli lactose (lac) operon encodes the first genetic switch to be discovered, and lac remains a paradigm for studying negative and positive control of gene expression. Negative control is believed to involve competition of RNA polymerase and Lac repressor for overlapping binding sites. Contributions to the local Lac repressor concentration come from free repressor and repressor delivered to the operator from remote auxiliary operators by DNA looping. Long-standing questions persist concerning the actual role of DNA looping in the mechanism of promoter repression. Here, we use experiments in living bacteria to resolve four of these questions. We show that the distance dependence of repression enhancement is comparable for upstream and downstream auxiliary operators, confirming the hypothesis that repressor concentration increase is the principal mechanism of repression loops. We find that as few as four turns of DNA can be constrained in a stable loop by Lac repressor. We show that RNA polymerase is not trapped at repressed promoters. Finally, we show that constraining a promoter in a tight DNA loop is sufficient for repression even when promoter and operator do not overlap.

  12. DDX59 promotes DNA replication in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    You, Jin; Wang, Xingshun; Wang, Jiuling; Yuan, Baolei; Zhang, Yandong

    2017-01-01

    DEAD box proteins are multifunctional proteins involved in every aspect in RNA metabolism and have essential roles in many cellular activities. Despite their importance, many DEAD box proteins remain uncharacterized. In this report, we found DDX59 overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. DDX59 knockdown reduced cell proliferation, anchorage-independent cell growth, and caused reduction of tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. In multiple lung cancer cells, we found that DDX59 knockdown inhibits DNA synthesis; wild-type DDX59 but not helicase-defective mutant of DDX59 enhances DNA synthesis. DDX59 knockdown caused reduction of MCM protein levels, decreased the loading of MCM ring protein onto chromatin, and therefore inhibited DNA replication. Our study reveals for the first time that DDX59 has an important role in lung cancer development through promoting DNA replication. PMID:28090355

  13. Impaired DNA replication within progenitor cell pools promotes leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bilousova, Ganna; Marusyk, Andriy; Porter, Christopher C; Cardiff, Robert D; DeGregori, James

    2005-12-01

    Impaired cell cycle progression can be paradoxically associated with increased rates of malignancies. Using retroviral transduction of bone marrow progenitors followed by transplantation into mice, we demonstrate that inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation impairs competition, promoting the expansion of progenitors that acquire oncogenic mutations which restore cell cycle progression. Conditions that impair DNA replication dramatically enhance the proliferative advantage provided by the expression of Bcr-Abl or mutant p53, which provide no apparent competitive advantage under conditions of healthy replication. Furthermore, for the Bcr-Abl oncogene the competitive advantage in contexts of impaired DNA replication dramatically increases leukemogenesis. Impaired replication within hematopoietic progenitor cell pools can select for oncogenic events and thereby promote leukemia, demonstrating the importance of replicative competence in the prevention of tumorigenesis. The demonstration that replication-impaired, poorly competitive progenitor cell pools can promote tumorigenesis provides a new rationale for links between tumorigenesis and common human conditions of impaired DNA replication such as dietary folate deficiency, chemotherapeutics targeting dNTP synthesis, and polymorphisms in genes important for DNA metabolism.

  14. DNA methylation and structural and functional bimodality of vertebrate promoters.

    PubMed

    Elango, Navin; Yi, Soojin V

    2008-08-01

    Human promoters divide into 2 classes, the low CpG (LCG) and the high CpG (HCG), based on their CpG dinucleotide content. The LCG class of promoters is hypermethylated and is associated with tissue-specific genes, whereas the HCG class is hypomethylated and associated with broadly expressed genes. By analyzing several chordate genomes separated for hundreds of millions of years, here we show that the divide between low CpG and high CpG promoters is conserved in several distantly related vertebrate taxa (including human, chicken, frog, lizard, and fish) but not in close invertebrate outgroups (sea squirts). Furthermore, LCG and HCG promoters are distinctively associated with tissue-specific and broadly expressed genes in these distantly related vertebrate taxa. Our results indicate that the function of DNA methylation on gene expression is conserved across these vertebrate taxa and suggest that the 2 classes of promoters have evolved early in vertebrate evolution, as a consequence of the advent of global DNA methylation.

  15. Predicting promoter activities of primary human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Takuma; Park, Sung-Joon; Yamashita, Riu; Seki, Masahide; Yada, Tetsushi; Sugano, Sumio; Nakai, Kenta; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We developed a computer program that can predict the intrinsic promoter activities of primary human DNA sequences. We observed promoter activity using a quantitative luciferase assay and generated a prediction model using multiple linear regression. Our program achieved a prediction accuracy correlation coefficient of 0.87 between the predicted and observed promoter activities. We evaluated the prediction accuracy of the program using massive sequencing analysis of transcriptional start sites in vivo. We found that it is still difficult to predict transcript levels in a strictly quantitative manner in vivo; however, it was possible to select active promoters in a given cell from the other silent promoters. Using this program, we analyzed the transcriptional landscape of the entire human genome. We demonstrate that many human genomic regions have potential promoter activity, and the expression of some previously uncharacterized putatively non-protein-coding transcripts can be explained by our prediction model. Furthermore, we found that nucleosomes occasionally formed open chromatin structures with RNA polymerase II recruitment where the program predicted significant promoter activities, although no transcripts were observed. PMID:21486745

  16. Lithium promotes DNA stability and survival of ischemic retinal neurocytes by upregulating DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Nandan; Tian, Sijia; Li, Fan; Hu, Huan; Chen, Pei; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Lijun; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zhao; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-11-17

    Neurons display genomic fragility and show fragmented DNA in pathological degeneration. A failure to repair DNA breaks may result in cell death or apoptosis. Lithium protects retinal neurocytes following nutrient deprivation or partial nerve crush, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Here we demonstrate that pretreatment with lithium protects retinal neurocytes from ischemia-induced damage and enhances light response in rat retina following ischemia-reperfusion injury. Moreover, we found that DNA nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair is implicated in this process because in ischemic retinal neurocytes, lithium significantly reduces the number of γ-H2AX foci (well-characterized markers of DNA double-strand breaks in situ) and increases the DNA ligase IV expression level. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf-1) and phosphorylated cyclic AMP-response element binding protein-1 (P-CREB1) bind to ligase IV promoter to cause upregulation of ligase IV in neurocytes. The ischemic upregulation of Nrf-1 and lithium-induced increase of P-CREB1 cooperate to promote transcription of ligase IV. Short hairpin RNAs against Nrf-1 and CREB1 could significantly inhibit the increase in promoter activity and expression of ligase IV observed in the control oligos following lithium treatment in retinal neurocytes. More importantly, ischemic stimulation triggers the expression of ligase IV. Taken together, our results thus reveal a novel mechanism that lithium offers neuroprotection from ischemia-induced damage by enhancing DNA NHEJ repair.

  17. Lithium promotes DNA stability and survival of ischemic retinal neurocytes by upregulating DNA ligase IV

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Nandan; Tian, Sijia; Li, Fan; Hu, Huan; Chen, Pei; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Lijun; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zhao; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Neurons display genomic fragility and show fragmented DNA in pathological degeneration. A failure to repair DNA breaks may result in cell death or apoptosis. Lithium protects retinal neurocytes following nutrient deprivation or partial nerve crush, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Here we demonstrate that pretreatment with lithium protects retinal neurocytes from ischemia-induced damage and enhances light response in rat retina following ischemia–reperfusion injury. Moreover, we found that DNA nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair is implicated in this process because in ischemic retinal neurocytes, lithium significantly reduces the number of γ-H2AX foci (well-characterized markers of DNA double-strand breaks in situ) and increases the DNA ligase IV expression level. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf-1) and phosphorylated cyclic AMP-response element binding protein-1 (P-CREB1) bind to ligase IV promoter to cause upregulation of ligase IV in neurocytes. The ischemic upregulation of Nrf-1 and lithium-induced increase of P-CREB1 cooperate to promote transcription of ligase IV. Short hairpin RNAs against Nrf-1 and CREB1 could significantly inhibit the increase in promoter activity and expression of ligase IV observed in the control oligos following lithium treatment in retinal neurocytes. More importantly, ischemic stimulation triggers the expression of ligase IV. Taken together, our results thus reveal a novel mechanism that lithium offers neuroprotection from ischemia-induced damage by enhancing DNA NHEJ repair. PMID:27853172

  18. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation in serum DNA from patients with silicosis.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Shigeki; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Hiraki, Akio; Gemba, Kenichi; Takigawa, Nagio; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Fujii, Masanori; Umemura, Hiroshi; Satoh, Mamoru; Tabata, Masahiro; Ueoka, Hiroshi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2008-09-01

    It is well established that patients with silicosis are at high risk for lung cancer; however, it is difficult to detect lung cancer by chest radiography during follow-up treatment of patients with silicosis because of preexisting diffuse pulmonary shadows. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of detection of serum DNA methylation for early detection of lung cancer in silicosis. Serum samples from healthy controls (n = 20) and silicosis patients with (n = 11) and without (n = 67) lung cancer were tested for aberrant hypermethylation at the promoters of the DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p16(INK4a), ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A), the apoptosis-related gene death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) and retinoic acid receptor beta (RARbeta) by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Aberrant promoter methylation in at least one of five tumor suppressor genes was detected more frequently in the serum DNA of silicosis patients with lung cancer than in that of patients without it (P = 0.006). Furthermore, the odds ratio of having lung cancer was 9.77 (P = 0.009) for those silicosis patients with methylation of at least one gene. Extended exposure to silica (>30 years) was correlated with an increased methylation frequency (P = 0.017); however, methylation status did not correlate with age, smoking history or radiographic findings of silicosis. These results suggest that testing for aberrant promoter methylation of tumor suppressor genes using serum DNA may facilitate early detection of lung cancer in patients with silicosis.

  19. Leptin gene promoter DNA methylation in WNIN obese mutant rats.

    PubMed

    Kalashikam, Rajender Rao; Inagadapa, Padmavathi J N; Thomas, Anju Elizabeth; Jeyapal, Sugeetha; Giridharan, Nappan Veettil; Raghunath, Manchala

    2014-02-05

    Obesity has become an epidemic in worldwide population. Leptin gene defect could be one of the causes for obesity. Two mutant obese rats WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GROb, isolated at National Centre for Laboratory Animal Sciences (NCLAS), Hyderabad, India, were found to be leptin resistant. The present study aims to understand the regulatory mechanisms underlying the resistance by promoter DNA methylation of leptin gene in these mutant obese rats. Male obese mutant homozygous, carrier and heterozygous rats of WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GROb strain of 6 months old were studied to check the leptin gene expression (RT-PCR) and promoter DNA methylation (MassARRAY Compact system, SEQUENOM) of leptin gene by invivo and insilico approach. Homozygous WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GROb showed significantly higher leptin gene expression compared to carrier and lean counterparts. Leptin gene promoter DNA sequence region was analyzed ranging from transcription start site (TSS) to-550 bp length and found four CpGs in this sequence among them only three CpG loci (-309, -481, -502) were methylated in these WNIN mutant rat phenotypes. The increased percentage of methylation in WNIN mutant lean and carrier phenotypes is positively correlated with transcription levels. Thus genetic variation may have effect on methylation percentages and subsequently on the regulation of leptin gene expression which may lead to obesity in these obese mutant rat strains.

  20. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  1. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining.

    PubMed

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Tainer, John A; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation.

  2. DNA Methylation in Promoter Region as Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mihi; Park, Jong Y.

    2013-01-01

    The prostate gland is the most common site of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. Recent emerging molecular biological technologies help us to know that epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation within the regulatory (promoter) regions of genes are associated with transcriptional silencing in cancer. Promoter hypermethylation of critical pathway genes could be potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. In this chapter, we updated current information on methylated genes associated with the development and progression of prostate cancer. Over 40 genes have been investigated for methylation in promoter region in prostate cancer. These methylated genes are involved in critical pathways, such as DNA repair, metabolism, and invasion/metastasis. The role of hypermethylated genes in regulation of critical pathways in prostate cancer is discussed. These findings may provide new information of the pathogenesis, the exciting potential to be predictive and to provide personalized treatment of prostate cancer. Indeed, some epigenetic alterations in prostate tumors are being translated into clinical practice for therapeutic use. PMID:22359288

  3. Identifying division symmetry of mouse embryonic stem cells: negative impact of DNA methyltransferases on symmetric self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Jasnos, Lukasz; Aksoy, Fatma Betül; Hersi, Hersi Mohamed; Wantuch, Slawomir; Sawado, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Cell division is a process by which a mother cell divides into genetically identical sister cells, although sister cells often display considerable diversity. In this report, over 350 sister embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were isolated through a microdissection method, and then expression levels of 48 key genes were examined for each sister cell. Our system revealed considerable diversities between sister ESCs at both pluripotent and differentiated states, whereas the similarity between sister ESCs was significantly elevated in a 2i (MEK and GSK3b inhibitors) condition, which is believed to mimic the ground state of pluripotency. DNA methyltransferase 3a/3b were downregulated in 2i-grown ESCs, and the loss of DNA methyltransferases was sufficient to generate nearly identical sister cells. These results suggest that DNA methylation is a major cause of the diversity between sister cells at the pluripotent states, and thus demethylation per se plays an important role in promoting ESC's self-renewal.

  4. Transcriptional activation by mitochondrial transcription factor A involves preferential distortion of promoter DNA

    PubMed Central

    Malarkey, Christopher S.; Bestwick, Megan; Kuhlwilm, Jane E.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Churchill, Mair E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA/TFAM) is a nucleus-encoded, high-mobility-group-box (HMG-box) protein that regulates transcription of the mitochondrial genome by specifically recognizing light-strand and heavy-strand promoters (LSP, HSP1). TFAM also binds mitochondrial DNA in a non-sequence specific (NSS) fashion and facilitates its packaging into nucleoid structures. However, the requirement and contribution of DNA-bending for these two different binding modes has not been addressed in detail, which prompted this comparison of binding and bending properties of TFAM on promoter and non-promoter DNA. Promoter DNA increased the stability of TFAM to a greater degree than non-promoter DNA. However, the thermodynamic properties of DNA binding for TFAM with promoter and non-specific (NS) DNA were similar to each other and to other NSS HMG-box proteins. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays showed that TFAM bends promoter DNA to a greater degree than NS DNA. In contrast, TFAM lacking the C-terminal tail distorted both promoter and non-promoter DNA to a significantly reduced degree, corresponding with markedly decreased transcriptional activation capacity at LSP and HSP1 in vitro. Thus, the enhanced bending of promoter DNA imparted by the C-terminal tail is a critical component of the ability of TFAM to activate promoter-specific initiation by the core mitochondrial transcription machinery. PMID:21948790

  5. SA1 and TRF1 synergistically bind to telomeric DNA and promote DNA-DNA pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Jiangguo; Countryman, Preston; Pan, Hai; Parminder Kaur Team; Robert Riehn Team; Patricia Opresko Team; Jane Tao Team; Susan Smith Team

    Impaired telomere cohesion leads to increased aneuploidy and early onset of tumorigenesis. Cohesion is thought to occur through the entrapment of two DNA strands within tripartite cohesin ring(s), along with a fourth subunit (SA1/SA2). Surprisingly, cohesion rings are not essential for telomere cohesion, which instead requires SA1 and shelterin proteins including TRF1. However, neither this unique cohesion mechanism at telomeres or DNA-binding properties of SA1 is understood. Here, using single-molecule fluorescence imaging of quantum dot-labeled proteins on DNA we discover that while SA1 diffuses across multiple telomeric and non-telomeric regions, the diffusion mediated through its N-terminal domain is slower at telomeric regions. However, addition of TRF1 traps SA1 within telomeric regions, which form longer DNA-DNA pairing tracts than with TRF1 alone, as revealed by atomic force microscopy. Together, these experimental results and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations suggest that TRF1 and SA1 synergistically interact with DNA to support telomere cohesion without cohesin rings.

  6. Strain-promoted "click" chemistry for terminal labeling of DNA.

    PubMed

    Marks, Isaac S; Kang, Jun Sung; Jones, Brady T; Landmark, Kevin J; Cleland, Andrew J; Taton, T Andrew

    2011-07-20

    1,3-Dipolar [3 + 2] cycloaddition between azides and alkynes--an archetypal "click" chemistry--has been used increasingly for the functionalization of nucleic acids. Copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions between alkyne-tagged DNA molecules and azides work well, but they require optimization of multiple reagents, and Cu ions are known to mediate DNA cleavage. For many applications, it would be preferable to eliminate the Cu(I) catalyst from these reactions. Here, we describe the solid-phase synthesis and characterization of 5'-dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified oligonucleotides, using a new DIBO phosphoramidite, which react with azides via copper-free, strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC). We found that the DIBO group not only survived the standard acidic and oxidative reactions of solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis (SPOS), but that it also survived the thermal cycling and standard conditions of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). As a result, PCR with DIBO-modified primers yielded "clickable" amplicons that could be tagged with azide-modified fluorophores or immobilized on azide-modified surfaces. Given its simplicity, SPAAC on DNA could streamline the bioconjugate chemistry of nucleic acids in a number of modern biotechnologies.

  7. DNA helicases Sgs1 and BLM promote DNA double-strand break resection.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Serge; Chapman, J Ross; Magill, Christine; Jackson, Stephen P

    2008-10-15

    A key cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is 5'-to-3' DSB resection by nucleases to generate regions of ssDNA that then trigger cell cycle checkpoint signaling and DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR). Here, we reveal that in the absence of exonuclease Exo1 activity, deletion or mutation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RecQ-family helicase, Sgs1, causes pronounced hypersensitivity to DSB-inducing agents. Moreover, we establish that this reflects severely compromised DSB resection, deficient DNA damage signaling, and strongly impaired HR-mediated repair. Furthermore, we show that the mammalian Sgs1 ortholog, BLM--whose deficiency causes cancer predisposition and infertility in people--also functions in parallel with Exo1 to promote DSB resection, DSB signaling and resistance to DSB-generating agents. Collectively, these data establish evolutionarily conserved roles for the BLM and Sgs1 helicases in DSB processing, signaling, and repair.

  8. Upstream promoter sequences and αCTD mediate stable DNA wrapping within the RNA polymerase–promoter open complex

    PubMed Central

    Cellai, Sara; Mangiarotti, Laura; Vannini, Nicola; Naryshkin, Nikolai; Kortkhonjia, Ekaterine; Ebright, Richard H; Rivetti, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    We show that the extent of stable DNA wrapping by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the RNAP–promoter open complex depends on the sequence of the promoter and, in particular, on the sequence of the upstream region of the promoter. We further show that the extent of stable DNA wrapping depends on the presence of the RNAP α-subunit carboxy-terminal domain and on the presence and length of the RNAP α-subunit interdomain linker. Our results indicate that the extensive stable DNA wrapping observed previously in the RNAP–promoter open complex at the λ PR promoter is not a general feature of RNAP–promoter open complexes. PMID:17290289

  9. Upstream promoter sequences and alphaCTD mediate stable DNA wrapping within the RNA polymerase-promoter open complex.

    PubMed

    Cellai, Sara; Mangiarotti, Laura; Vannini, Nicola; Naryshkin, Nikolai; Kortkhonjia, Ekaterine; Ebright, Richard H; Rivetti, Claudio

    2007-03-01

    We show that the extent of stable DNA wrapping by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the RNAP-promoter open complex depends on the sequence of the promoter and, in particular, on the sequence of the upstream region of the promoter. We further show that the extent of stable DNA wrapping depends on the presence of the RNAP alpha-subunit carboxy-terminal domain and on the presence and length of the RNAP alpha-subunit interdomain linker. Our results indicate that the extensive stable DNA wrapping observed previously in the RNAP-promoter open complex at the lambda P(R) promoter is not a general feature of RNAP-promoter open complexes.

  10. Identification of procollagen promoter DNA-binding proteins: effects of dexamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, C.; Cutroneo, K.R.

    1987-05-01

    Glucocorticoids selectively decrease procollagen synthesis by decreasing procollagen mRNA transcription. Dexamethasone coordinately decreased total cellular type I and type III procollagen mRNAs in mouse embryonic skin fibroblasts. Since sequence specific DNA-binding proteins are known to modulate eukaryotic gene expression the authors identified in mouse fibroblasts nuclear proteins which bind to types I and III procollagen promoter DNAs. Nuclear proteins were electrophoresed, blotted onto nitrocellulose and probed with /sup 32/P-end-labeled type I and type III procollagen promoter DNAs in the presence of equimolar amounts of /sup 32/P-end-labeled vector DNA. Differences in total DNA binding were noted by the densitometric scans of the nuclear proteins. Dexamethasone treatment enhanced total DNA binding. Increasing the NaCl concentration decreased the number of promoter DNA-binding proteins without altering the relative specificity for the promoter DNAs. Promoter DNA binding to nuclear proteins was also inhibited by increasing concentrations of E. coli DNA. The number of DNA-binding proteins was greater for type III procollagen promoter DNA. The effect of dexamethasone treatment on promoter DNA binding to nuclear proteins was determined.

  11. Degradation of poly(glycoamidoamine) DNA delivery vehicles: polyamide hydrolysis at physiological conditions promotes DNA release.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yemin; Reineke, Theresa M

    2010-02-08

    Poly(glycoamidoamine)s (PGAAs) are a group of efficient and degradable gene delivery vehicles that consist of three main functionalities: carbohydrate groups, secondary amines, and amide bonds. Herein, we have created nonhydroxylated models to these structures by polymerizing oxylate, succinate, or adipate groups with pentaethylenehexamine. The resulting polymers (named O4, S4, and A4, respectively) were created to understand how the absence of hydroxyl groups and changes in the amide bond spacing affect polymer degradation, plasmid DNA (pDNA) complexation, toxicity, and transfection efficiency in vitro. An additional model was also created that retains a galactaramide unit, but we have replaced the secondary amines with ethyleneoxide units (GO2) to understand the effects of the amine groups on polymer degradation. We have found that the secondary amines and hydroxyls are necessary to facilitate rapid degradation of these polymers, and analogues lacking hydroxyls or amines did not degrade over the time course of the study. Through electron-withdrawing and hydrogen bonding, the hydroxyls appear to activate the carbonyls of the amide bond to hydrolysis via an inductive electron withdrawing effect. Through titration experiments, PGAA degradation appears not to affect the polymer buffering capacity. Furthermore, we have found that PGAA degradation may enhance gene expression by releasing pDNA from polyplexes (polymer-pDNA complexes) and, thus, exposing it to undergo transcription and translation. The difference in the optimal pH that promotes degradation of the PGAAs and the hydroxyl-free analogues may prove to be a useful means to achieve pH-regulated DNA release from polyplexes by specifically modulating the chemical structures.

  12. Promoters responsive to DNA bending: a common theme in prokaryotic gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, J; Rojo, F; de Lorenzo, V

    1994-01-01

    The early notion of DNA as a passive target for regulatory proteins has given way to the realization that higher-order DNA structures and DNA-protein complexes are at the basis of many molecular processes, including control of promoter activity. Protein binding may direct the bending of an otherwise linear DNA, exacerbate the angle of an intrinsic bend, or assist the directional flexibility of certain sequences within prokaryotic promoters. The important, sometimes essential role of intrinsic or protein-induced DNA bending in transcriptional regulation has become evident in virtually every system examined. As discussed throughout this article, not every function of DNA bends is understood, but their presence has been detected in a wide variety of bacterial promoters subjected to positive or negative control. Nonlinear DNA structures facilitate and even determine proximal and distal DNA-protein and protein-protein contacts involved in the various steps leading to transcription initiation. PMID:8078436

  13. nifH promoter activity is regulated by DNA supercoiling in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jie; Hu, Biao; Zhu, Jia-Bi; Shen, Shan-Jiong; Yu, Guan-Qiao

    2005-04-01

    In prokaryotes, DNA supercoiling regulates the expression of many genes; for example, the expression of Klebsiella pneumoniae nifLA operon depends on DNA negative supercoiling in anaerobically grown cells, which indicates that DNA supercoiling might play a role in gene regulation of the anaerobic response. Since the expression of the nifH promoter in Sinorhizobium meliloti is not repressed by oxygen, it is proposed that the status of DNA supercoiling may not affect the expression of the nifH promoter. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing nifH promoter activity in wild-type and gyr- Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of DNA gyrase inhibitors. Our results show that gene expression driven by the S. meliloti nifH promoter requires the presence of active DNA gyrase. Because DNA gyrase increases the number of negative superhelical turns in DNA in the presence of ATP, our data indicate that negative supercoiling is also important for nifH promoter activity. Our study also shows that the DNA supercoiling-dependent S. meliloti nifH promoter activity is related to the trans-acting factors NtrC and NifA that activate it. DNA supercoiling appeared to have a stronger effect on NtrC-activated nifH promoter activity than on NifA-activated promoter activity. Collectively, these results from the S. meliloti nifH promoter model system seem to indicate that, in addition to regulating gene expression during anaerobic signaling, DNA supercoiling may also provide a favorable topology for trans-acting factor binding and promoter activation regardless of oxygen status.

  14. The FACT complex promotes avian leukosis virus DNA integration.

    PubMed

    Winans, Shelby; Larue, Ross C; Abraham, Carly M; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Skopp, Amelie; Winkler, Duane; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Beemon, Karen L

    2017-01-25

    All retroviruses need to integrate a DNA copy of their genome into the host chromatin. Cellular proteins regulating and targeting lentiviral and gammaretroviral integration in infected cells have been discovered, but the factors that mediate alpharetroviral avian leukosis virus (ALV) integration are unknown. Here, we have identified the FACT protein complex, which consists of SSRP1 and Spt16, as a principal cellular binding partner of ALV integrase (IN). Biochemical experiments with purified recombinant proteins show that SSRP1 and Spt16 are able to individually bind ALV IN, but only the FACT complex effectively stimulates ALV integration activity in vitro Likewise, in infected cells, the FACT complex promotes ALV integration activity with proviral integration frequency varying directly with cellular expression levels of the FACT complex. An increase in 2-LTR circles in the depleted FACT complex cell line indicates that this complex regulates the ALV life cycle at the level of integration. This regulation is shown to be specific to ALV, as disruption of the FACT complex did not inhibit either lentiviral or gammaretroviral integration in infected cells.

  15. Genome-wide mapping reveals conservation of promoter DNA methylation following chicken domestication.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-03-04

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues.

  16. Structured DNA promotes phosphorylation of p53 by DNA-dependent protein kinase at serine 9 and threonine 18.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, Sébastien; Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Haché, Robert J G

    2004-09-01

    Phosphorylation at multiple sites within the N-terminus of p53 promotes its dissociation from hdm2/mdm2 and stimulates its transcriptional regulatory potential. The large phosphoinositide 3-kinase-like kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene product and the ataxia telangectasia and RAD-3-related kinase promote phosphorylation of human p53 at Ser15 and Ser20, and are required for the activation of p53 following DNA damage. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is another large phosphoinositide 3-kinase-like kinase with the potential to phosphorylate p53 at Ser15, and has been proposed to enhance phosphorylation of these sites in vivo. Moreover, recent studies support a role for DNA-PK in the regulation of p53-mediated apoptosis. We have shown previously that colocalization of p53 and DNA-PK to structured single-stranded DNA dramatically enhances the potential for p53 phosphorylation by DNA-PK. We report here the identification of p53 phosphorylation at two novel sites for DNA-PK, Thr18 and Ser9. Colocalization of p53 and DNA-PK on structured DNA was required for efficient phosphorylation of p53 at multiple sites, while specific recognition of Ser9 and Thr18 appeared to be dependent upon additional determinants of p53 beyond the N-terminal 65 amino acids. Our results suggest a role for DNA-PK in the modulation of p53 activity resultant from the convergence of p53 and DNA-PK on structured DNA.

  17. Genistein promotes DNA demethylation of the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) promoter in endometrial stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, Hiroshi; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Matsushima, Yuko; Kanno, Jun; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Sudo, Katsuko; Sato, Noriko

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. {yields} GEN demethylated/unsilenced the steroidogenic factor 1 gene in endometrial tissue. {yields} GEN thus altered mRNA expression in uteri of ovariectomized (OVX) mice. {yields} A high-resolution melting assay was used to screen for epigenetic change. {yields} We isolated an endometrial cell clone that was epigenetically modulated by GEN. -- Abstract: It has recently been demonstrated that genistein (GEN), a phytoestrogen in soy products, is an epigenetic modulator in various types of cells; but its effect on endometrium has not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of GEN on mouse uterine cells, in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of GEN for 1 week induced mild proliferation of the endometrium in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, which was accompanied by the induction of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene expression. GEN administration induced demethylation of multiple CpG sites in the SF-1 promoter; these sites are extensively methylated and thus silenced in normal endometrium. The GEN-mediated promoter demethylation occurred predominantly on the luminal side, as opposed to myometrium side, indicating that the epigenetic change was mainly shown in regenerated cells. Primary cultures of endometrial stromal cell colonies were screened for GEN-mediated alterations of DNA methylation by a high-resolution melting (HRM) method. One out of 20 colony-forming cell clones showed GEN-induced demethylation of SF-1. This clone exhibited a high proliferation capacity with continuous colony formation activity through multiple serial clonings. We propose that only a portion of endometrial cells are capable of receiving epigenetic modulation by GEN.

  18. Amphetamines promote mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-I; Cao, Aiqin; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tojais, Nancy F.; Hennigs, Jan K.; Li, Caiyun G.; Sweeney, Nathaly M.; Inglis, Audrey S.; Wang, Lingli; Li, Dan; Ye, Matthew; Feldman, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) or methamphetamine (METH) abuse can cause oxidative damage and is a risk factor for diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from AMPH-associated-PAH patients show DNA damage as judged by γH2AX foci and DNA comet tails. We therefore hypothesized that AMPH induces DNA damage and vascular pathology by interfering with normal adaptation to an environmental perturbation causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this, we found that AMPH alone does not cause DNA damage in normoxic PAECs, but greatly amplifies DNA damage in hypoxic PAECs. The mechanism involves AMPH activation of protein phosphatase 2A, which potentiates inhibition of Akt. This increases sirtuin 1, causing deacetylation and degradation of HIF1α, thereby impairing its transcriptional activity, resulting in a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and impaired cytochrome c oxidase 4 isoform switch. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is inappropriately enhanced and, as a result of impaired electron transport and mitochondrial ROS increase, caspase-3 is activated and DNA damage is induced. In mice given binge doses of METH followed by hypoxia, HIF1α is suppressed and pulmonary artery DNA damage foci are associated with worse pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, chronic AMPH/METH can induce DNA damage associated with vascular disease by subverting the adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:28138562

  19. Sine oculis homeobox homolog 1 promotes DNA replication and cell proliferation in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xiao-Xue; Xi, Bi-Xin; Wan, Dong-Yi; Li, Li; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Wei; Ma, Ding; Wang, Hui; Gao, Qing-Lei

    2014-09-01

    Malignant proliferation is the fundamental trait of tumor cells. The initiation of DNA replication represents a key process for cell proliferation, and has a marked impact on tumorigenesis and progression. Here we report that Sine oculis homeobox homolog 1 (SIX1) functions as a master regulator in DNA replication of cervical cancer cells. The expression of SIX1 was induced by the E7 oncoprotein of human papillomaviruses in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer. The increase of SIX1 expression resulted in the upregulation of multiple genes related to the initiation of DNA replication, including the genes coding for the proteins in minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM2, MCM3, MCM6), DNA polymerase α-primase complex (POLA1, PRIM1, PRIM2), clamp loader (RFC3, RFC4, RFC5), DNA polymerase δ complex (POLD3) and DNA polymerase ε complex (POLE2). In line with this, the increase of SIX1 expression enhanced DNA synthesis, accelerated G1 to S phase progression, and promoted the proliferation of cervical cancer cells and the growth of cervical cancer. Consistently, knockdown of SIX1 could hamper DNA synthesis, slow down G1 to S phase progression, and suppress tumor cell proliferation and tumor growth. Importantly, SIX1 could more efficiently promote anchorage-independent cell growth. These results suggest that the increase of SIX1 expression could promote tumorigenesis, progression and invasive growth of cervical cancer by promoting DNA replication, and that targeting SIX1 may have significant therapeutic value in cervical cancer treatment.

  20. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Taggart, David J; Dayeh, Daniel M; Fredrickson, Saul W; Suo, Zucai

    2014-10-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5'-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphate lyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or an 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated -1 or -2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of -2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of -1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase within the non

  1. Defective removal of ribonucleotides from DNA promotes systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Claudia; Kind, Barbara; Reijns, Martin A.M.; Berndt, Nicole; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Wolf, Christine; Tüngler, Victoria; Chara, Osvaldo; Lee, Young Ae; Hübner, Norbert; Bicknell, Louise; Blum, Sophia; Krug, Claudia; Schmidt, Franziska; Kretschmer, Stefanie; Koss, Sarah; Astell, Katy R.; Ramantani, Georgia; Bauerfeind, Anja; Morris, David L.; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Bubeck, Doryen; Leitch, Andrea; Ralston, Stuart H.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Gahr, Manfred; Witte, Torsten; Vyse, Timothy J.; Melchers, Inga; Mangold, Elisabeth; Nöthen, Markus M.; Aringer, Martin; Kuhn, Annegret; Lüthke, Kirsten; Unger, Leonore; Bley, Annette; Lorenzi, Alice; Isaacs, John D.; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Conrad, Karsten; Dahl, Andreas; Roers, Axel; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is continuously challenged by the DNA damage that arises during normal cell metabolism. Biallelic mutations in the genes encoding the genome surveillance enzyme ribonuclease H2 (RNase H2) cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), a pediatric disorder that shares features with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we determined that heterozygous parents of AGS patients exhibit an intermediate autoimmune phenotype and demonstrated a genetic association between rare RNASEH2 sequence variants and SLE. Evaluation of patient cells revealed that SLE- and AGS-associated mutations impair RNase H2 function and result in accumulation of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA. The ensuing chronic low level of DNA damage triggered a DNA damage response characterized by constitutive p53 phosphorylation and senescence. Patient fibroblasts exhibited constitutive upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes and an enhanced type I IFN response to the immunostimulatory nucleic acid polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and UV light irradiation, linking RNase H2 deficiency to potentiation of innate immune signaling. Moreover, UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation was markedly enhanced in ribonucleotide-containing DNA, providing a mechanism for photosensitivity in RNase H2–associated SLE. Collectively, our findings implicate RNase H2 in the pathogenesis of SLE and suggest a role of DNA damage–associated pathways in the initiation of autoimmunity. PMID:25500883

  2. DNA entropy reveals a significant difference in complexity between housekeeping and tissue specific gene promoters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David; Finan, Chris; Newport, Melanie J; Jones, Susan

    2015-10-01

    The complexity of DNA can be quantified using estimates of entropy. Variation in DNA complexity is expected between the promoters of genes with different transcriptional mechanisms; namely housekeeping (HK) and tissue specific (TS). The former are transcribed constitutively to maintain general cellular functions, and the latter are transcribed in restricted tissue and cells types for specific molecular events. It is known that promoter features in the human genome are related to tissue specificity, but this has been difficult to quantify on a genomic scale. If entropy effectively quantifies DNA complexity, calculating the entropies of HK and TS gene promoters as profiles may reveal significant differences. Entropy profiles were calculated for a total dataset of 12,003 human gene promoters and for 501 housekeeping (HK) and 587 tissue specific (TS) human gene promoters. The mean profiles show the TS promoters have a significantly lower entropy (p<2.2e-16) than HK gene promoters. The entropy distributions for the 3 datasets show that promoter entropies could be used to identify novel HK genes. Functional features comprise DNA sequence patterns that are non-random and hence they have lower entropies. The lower entropy of TS gene promoters can be explained by a higher density of positive and negative regulatory elements, required for genes with complex spatial and temporary expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. DNA regions essential for the function of a bacteriophage fd promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, T; Sugimoto, K; Sugisaki, H; Takanami, M

    1977-01-01

    The promoter for the major coat protein gene of bacteriophage fd contains a unique sequence. TATAAT, in the non-transcribed region corresponding to the Pribnow box. A R-Hha I cleavage site which destroys functions is located five pairs upstream from the TATAAT sequence (fifteen base pairs upstream from the RNA initiation site). The promoter was cleaved into two fragments by R-Hha I and each promoter fragment was joined to DNA fragments derived from other regions. Ligation of the TATAAT-containing fragment to any of the DNA fragments examined resulted in recovery of promoter function. The results suggest for this type of promoter that no unique sequence is necessary upstream from the R-Hha I cleavage site although a contiguous DNA chain must be present in this area. Images PMID:909770

  4. Photocleavage of DNA and photofootprinting of E. coli RNA polymerase bound to promoter DNA by azido-9-acridinylamines.

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, C; Buchardt, O; Henriksen, U; Nielsen, P E

    1988-01-01

    The long-wavelength ultraviolet (lambda approximately 420 nm) radiation induced reaction between 6-azido-2-methoxy-9-acridinylamines and supercoiled plasmid DNA results in single strand scissions and formation of covalent adducts (ratio approximately 1:10). By treating azidoacridine-photomodified DNA with piperidine at 90 degrees C, additional strand scissions are observed in a complex sequence dependent manner with an overall preference for T greater than or equal to G greater than C much greater than A. The resulting DNA fragments migrate as 5'-phosphates in polyacrylamide gels. Photofootprinting of the binding site of RNA-polymerase on promoter DNA is demonstrated with an azido-9-acridinylamino-octamethylene-9-aminoacridine. Similar experiments using 9-amino-6-azido-2-methoxyacridine indicate that this reagent recognizes changes in the DNA conformation induced by RNA polymerase binding, in relation to open complex formation. Images PMID:3041368

  5. The yeast telomere-binding protein RAP1 binds to and promotes the formation of DNA quadruplexes in telomeric DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, R; Rhodes, D

    1994-01-01

    The protein RAP1 is essential for the maintenance of the telomeres of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and binds in vitro to multiple sites found within the TG1-3 telomeric repeats. We show here that, in addition to its known binding activity for double-stranded DNA, RAP1 binds sequence-specifically to the GT-strands. This indicates that RAP1 is the protein that binds to the telomeric terminal GT-tails. Furthermore, we have found that RAP1 binds to and promotes the formation of G-tetrads, i.e. DNA quadruplexes, in GT-strand oligonucleotides at nanomolar concentrations. The formation of DNA quadruplexes appears to involve the intermolecular association of GT-strands. The minimal DNA-binding domain of RAP1 (DBD) binds only to double-stranded DNA, so that the novel DNA-binding activity we have found involves regions of the protein located outside of the DBD. The finding that a telomeric protein promotes the formation of G-tetrads argues for the use of DNA quadruplexes in telomere association. Images PMID:8194531

  6. E2F1 promotes the recruitment of DNA repair factors to sites of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Zhu, Feng; Weaks, Regina L; Biswas, Anup K; Guo, Ruifeng; Li, Yanjie

    2011-01-01

    The E2F1 transcription factor is post-translationally modified and stabilized in response to various forms of DNA damage to regulate the expression of cell cycle and pro-apoptotic genes. E2F1 also forms foci at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) but the function of E2F1 at sites of damage is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the absence of E2F1 leads to spontaneous DNA breaks and impaired recovery following exposure to ionizing radiation. E2F1 deficiency results in defective NBS1 phosphorylation and foci formation in response to DSBs but does not affect NBS1 expression levels. Moreover, an increased association between NBS1 and E2F1 is observed in response to DNA damage, suggesting that E2F1 may promote NBS1 foci formation through a direct or indirect interaction at sites of DNA breaks. E2F1 deficiency also impairs RPA and Rad51 foci formation indicating that E2F1 is important for DNA end resection and the formation of single-stranded DNA at DSBs. These findings establish new roles for E2F1 in the DNA damage response, which may directly contribute to DNA repair and genome maintenance. PMID:21512314

  7. Agrobacterium T-DNA integration in Arabidopsis is correlated with DNA sequence compositions that occur frequently in gene promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Richard G; Zhang, Ke; Tatarinova, Tatiana; Troukhan, Max; Kwok, Shing F; Drais, Josh; Klinger, Kevin; Orejudos, Francis; Macy, Kimberly; Bhakta, Amit; Burns, James; Subramanian, Gopal; Donson, Jonathan; Flavell, Richard; Feldmann, Kenneth A

    2005-10-01

    Mobile insertion elements such as transposons and T-DNA generate useful genetic variation and are important tools for functional genomics studies in plants and animals. The spectrum of mutations obtained in different systems can be highly influenced by target site preferences inherent in the mechanism of DNA integration. We investigated the target site preferences of Agrobacterium T-DNA insertions in the chromosomes of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The relative frequencies of insertions in genic and intergenic regions of the genome were calculated and DNA composition features associated with the insertion site flanking sequences were identified. Insertion frequencies across the genome indicate that T-strand integration is suppressed near centromeres and rDNA loci, progressively increases towards telomeres, and is highly correlated with gene density. At the gene level, T-DNA integration events show a statistically significant preference for insertion in the 5' and 3' flanking regions of protein coding sequences as well as the promoter region of RNA polymerase I transcribed rRNA gene repeats. The increased insertion frequencies in 5' upstream regions compared to coding sequences are positively correlated with gene expression activity and DNA sequence composition. Analysis of the relationship between DNA sequence composition and gene activity further demonstrates that DNA sequences with high CG-skew ratios are consistently correlated with T-DNA insertion site preference and high gene expression. The results demonstrate genomic and gene-specific preferences for T-strand integration and suggest that DNA sequences with a pronounced transition in CG- and AT-skew ratios are preferred targets for T-DNA integration.

  8. Exporting DNA - striking a balance between preventing exploitation and promoting innovation.

    PubMed

    Pepper, M S

    2017-01-30

    DNA contains the blueprint of life. Variations in the script determine the great diversity that characterises our planet. As the analysis of large datasets derived from DNA reveals the hidden secrets of normal and abnormal structure and function as well as our ancestry, the movement of DNA between research laboratories is becoming commonplace. DNA is a resource that can be used for the benefit or to the detriment of the individuals and communities from which it is derived. But can DNA be treated as a simple commodity? How do we deal with questions such as sovereignty, discrimination and commercialisation? What underlies the current trends in attempting to regulate the movement of DNA? And how can we achieve a balance between preventing exploitation and promoting innovation? This brief overview attempts to contextualise the current landscape in South Africa with regard to the DNA that is destined to leave our shores.

  9. Human FAN1 promotes strand incision in 5'-flapped DNA complexed with RPA.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Sato, Koichi; Hirayama, Emiko; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a human infantile recessive disorder. Seventeen FA causal proteins cooperatively function in the DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair pathway. Dual DNA strand incisions around the crosslink are critical steps in ICL repair. FA-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1) is a DNA structure-specific endonuclease that is considered to be involved in DNA incision at the stalled replication fork. Replication protein A (RPA) rapidly assembles on the single-stranded DNA region of the stalled fork. However, the effect of RPA on the FAN1-mediated DNA incision has not been determined. In this study, we purified human FAN1, as a bacterially expressed recombinant protein. FAN1 exhibited robust endonuclease activity with 5'-flapped DNA, which is formed at the stalled replication fork. We found that FAN1 efficiently promoted DNA incision at the proper site of RPA-coated 5'-flapped DNA. Therefore, FAN1 possesses the ability to promote the ICL repair of 5'-flapped DNA covered by RPA. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  10. FANCJ promotes DNA synthesis through G-quadruplex structures.

    PubMed

    Castillo Bosch, Pau; Segura-Bayona, Sandra; Koole, Wouter; van Heteren, Jane T; Dewar, James M; Tijsterman, Marcel; Knipscheer, Puck

    2014-11-03

    Our genome contains many G-rich sequences, which have the propensity to fold into stable secondary DNA structures called G4 or G-quadruplex structures. These structures have been implicated in cellular processes such as gene regulation and telomere maintenance. However, G4 sequences are prone to mutations particularly upon replication stress or in the absence of specific helicases. To investigate how G-quadruplex structures are resolved during DNA replication, we developed a model system using ssDNA templates and Xenopus egg extracts that recapitulates eukaryotic G4 replication. Here, we show that G-quadruplex structures form a barrier for DNA replication. Nascent strand synthesis is blocked at one or two nucleotides from the G4. After transient stalling, G-quadruplexes are efficiently unwound and replicated. In contrast, depletion of the FANCJ/BRIP1 helicase causes persistent replication stalling at G-quadruplex structures, demonstrating a vital role for this helicase in resolving these structures. FANCJ performs this function independently of the classical Fanconi anemia pathway. These data provide evidence that the G4 sequence instability in FANCJ(-/-) cells and Fancj/dog1 deficient C. elegans is caused by replication stalling at G-quadruplexes.

  11. FANCJ promotes DNA synthesis through G-quadruplex structures

    PubMed Central

    Castillo Bosch, Pau; Segura-Bayona, Sandra; Koole, Wouter; van Heteren, Jane T; Dewar, James M; Tijsterman, Marcel; Knipscheer, Puck

    2014-01-01

    Our genome contains many G-rich sequences, which have the propensity to fold into stable secondary DNA structures called G4 or G-quadruplex structures. These structures have been implicated in cellular processes such as gene regulation and telomere maintenance. However, G4 sequences are prone to mutations particularly upon replication stress or in the absence of specific helicases. To investigate how G-quadruplex structures are resolved during DNA replication, we developed a model system using ssDNA templates and Xenopus egg extracts that recapitulates eukaryotic G4 replication. Here, we show that G-quadruplex structures form a barrier for DNA replication. Nascent strand synthesis is blocked at one or two nucleotides from the G4. After transient stalling, G-quadruplexes are efficiently unwound and replicated. In contrast, depletion of the FANCJ/BRIP1 helicase causes persistent replication stalling at G-quadruplex structures, demonstrating a vital role for this helicase in resolving these structures. FANCJ performs this function independently of the classical Fanconi anemia pathway. These data provide evidence that the G4 sequence instability in FANCJ−/− cells and Fancj/dog1 deficient C. elegans is caused by replication stalling at G-quadruplexes. PMID:25193968

  12. Efficacy of DNA vaccines expressing the type F botulinum toxin Hc fragment using different promoters.

    PubMed

    Jathoul, Amit P; Holley, Jane L; Garmory, Helen S

    2004-09-28

    DNA vaccines which expressed the Hc fragment of the Clostridium botulinum type F neurotoxin (BoNT/F Hc) fused to a signal peptide downstream of four different eukaryotic promoters were prepared. Subsequently, the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccines and protection afforded in mice against challenge with 10(4) MLD of type F botulinum toxin was evaluated. The DNA vaccine containing the human ubiquitin gene (UbC) promoter induced the highest BoNT/F Hc-specific antibody concentration following two intramuscular immunisations and afforded 90% protection against challenge. The results from this study indicate that the selection of promoter used in DNA vaccination studies may be of importance in designing optimised vaccines.

  13. The DNA helicase Pfh1 promotes fork merging at replication termination sites to ensure genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Steinacher, Roland; Osman, Fekret; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectionally moving DNA replication forks merge at termination sites composed of accidental or programmed DNA–protein barriers. If merging fails, then regions of unreplicated DNA can result in the breakage of DNA during mitosis, which in turn can give rise to genome instability. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms that promote the final stages of fork merging in eukaryotes. Here we show that the Pif1 family DNA helicase Pfh1 plays a dual role in promoting replication fork termination. First, it facilitates replication past DNA–protein barriers, and second, it promotes the merging of replication forks. A failure of these processes in Pfh1-deficient cells results in aberrant chromosome segregation and heightened genome instability. PMID:22426535

  14. Delta DNMT3B variants regulate DNA methylation in a promoter-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Bhutani, Manisha; Pathak, Ashutosh K; Lang, Wenhua; Ren, Hening; Jelinek, Jaroslav; He, Rong; Shen, Lanlan; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Mao, Li

    2007-11-15

    DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) is critical in de novo DNA methylation during development and tumorigenesis. We recently reported the identification of a DNMT3B subfamily, DeltaDNMT3B, which contains at least seven variants, resulting from alternative pre-mRNA splicing. DeltaDNMT3Bs are the predominant expression forms of DNMT3B in human lung cancer. A strong correlation was observed between the promoter methylation of RASSF1A gene but not p16 gene (both frequently inactivated by promoter methylation in lung cancer) and expression of DeltaDNMT3B4 in primary lung cancer, suggesting a role of DeltaDNMT3B in regulating promoter-specific methylation of common tumor suppressor genes in tumorigenesis. In this report, we provide first experimental evidence showing a direct involvement of DeltaDNMT3B4 in regulating RASSF1A promoter methylation in human lung cancer cells. Knockdown of DeltaDNMT3B4 expression by small interfering RNA resulted in a rapid demethylation of RASSF1A promoter and reexpression of RASSF1A mRNA but had no effect on p16 promoter in the lung cancer cells. Conversely, normal bronchial epithelial cells with stably transfected DeltaDNMT3B4 gained an increased DNA methylation in RASSF1A promoter but not p16 promoter. We conclude that promoter DNA methylation can be differentially regulated and DeltaDNMT3Bs are involved in regulation of such promoter-specific de novo DNA methylation.

  15. Evolutionary Transition of Promoter and Gene Body DNA Methylation across Invertebrate-Vertebrate Boundary.

    PubMed

    Keller, Thomas E; Han, Priscilla; Yi, Soojin V

    2016-04-01

    Genomes of invertebrates and vertebrates exhibit highly divergent patterns of DNA methylation. Invertebrate genomes tend to be sparsely methylated, and DNA methylation is mostly targeted to a subset of transcription units (gene bodies). In a drastic contrast, vertebrate genomes are generally globally and heavily methylated, punctuated by the limited local hypo-methylation of putative regulatory regions such as promoters. These genomic differences also translate into functional differences in DNA methylation and gene regulation. Although promoter DNA methylation is an important regulatory component of vertebrate gene expression, its role in invertebrate gene regulation has been little explored. Instead, gene body DNA methylation is associated with expression of invertebrate genes. However, the evolutionary steps leading to the differentiation of invertebrate and vertebrate genomic DNA methylation remain unresolved. Here we analyzed experimentally determined DNA methylation maps of several species across the invertebrate-vertebrate boundary, to elucidate how vertebrate gene methylation has evolved. We show that, in contrast to the prevailing idea, a substantial number of promoters in an invertebrate basal chordate Ciona intestinalis are methylated. Moreover, gene expression data indicate significant, epigenomic context-dependent associations between promoter methylation and expression in C. intestinalis. However, there is no evidence that promoter methylation in invertebrate chordate has been evolutionarily maintained across the invertebrate-vertebrate boundary. Rather, body-methylated invertebrate genes preferentially obtain hypo-methylated promoters among vertebrates. Conversely, promoter methylation is preferentially found in lineage- and tissue-specific vertebrate genes. These results provide important insights into the evolutionary origin of epigenetic regulation of vertebrate gene expression. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  16. A DNA probe based on phosphorescent resonance energy transfer for detection of transgenic 35S promoter DNA.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jinzhi; Miao, Yanming; Yang, Jiajia; Qin, Jin; Li, Dongxia; Yan, Guiqin

    2017-05-15

    A QDs-DNA nano-probe was made by combining Mn-doped ZnS room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) quantum dots (QDs) and DNA. Then an RTP sensor for quantitative detection of genetically-modified mark sequence cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (Ca MV 35S) DNA was built on basis of phosphorescent resonance energy transfer (PRET). The underlying principles were that a QDs-DNA water-soluble nano-probe was built by connecting single-strand DNA to the surfaces of QDs via a ligand exchange method. This probe had good RTP performance and could well identify Ca MV 35S. Thereby, the simple, rapid and efficient detection of genetically-modified organisms was realized. With the increase of target DNA sequence, the phosphorescent intensity of QDs was gradually reduced due to the energy transfer between QDs and the organic quencher BHQ2. This sensor had a detection limit of 4.03nM and a detection range of 12-300nM. Moreover, this sensor had high selectivity. This sensor could effectively detect the target DNA compared with mismatched and random sequences. Thus, this method is very promising for biological analysis.

  17. Carboxyl terminal domain basic amino acids of mycobacterial topoisomerase I bind DNA to promote strand passage.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Anuradha Gopal; Leelaram, Majety Naga; Menon, Shruti; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) carries out relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA through a series of orchestrated steps, DNA binding, cleavage, strand passage and religation. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of the type IA topoisomerases harbor DNA cleavage and religation activities, but the carboxyl terminal domain (CTD) is highly diverse. Most of these enzymes contain a varied number of Zn(2+) finger motifs in the CTD. The Zn(2+) finger motifs were found to be essential in Escherichia coli topoI but dispensable in the Thermotoga maritima enzyme. Although, the CTD of mycobacterial topoI lacks Zn(2+) fingers, it is indispensable for the DNA relaxation activity of the enzyme. The divergent CTD harbors three stretches of basic amino acids needed for the strand passage step of the reaction as demonstrated by a new assay. We also show that the basic amino acids constitute an independent DNA-binding site apart from the NTD and assist the simultaneous binding of two molecules of DNA to the enzyme, as required during the catalytic step. Although the NTD binds to DNA in a site-specific fashion to carry out DNA cleavage and religation, the basic residues in CTD bind to non-scissile DNA in a sequence-independent manner to promote the crucial strand passage step during DNA relaxation. The loss of Zn(2+) fingers from the mycobacterial topoI could be associated with Zn(2+) export and homeostasis.

  18. Structural Basis for DNA-Hairpin Promoter Recognition by the Bacteriophage N4 Virion RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Gleghorn, M.; Davydova, E; Rothman-Denes, L; Murakami, K

    2008-01-01

    Coliphage N4 virion-encapsidated RNA polymerase (vRNAP) is a member of the phage T7-like single-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) family. Its central domain (mini-vRNAP) contains all RNAP functions of the full-length vRNAP, which recognizes a 5 to 7 base pair stem and 3 nucleotide loop hairpin DNA promoter. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of mini-vRNAP bound to promoters. Mini-vRNAP uses four structural motifs to recognize DNA sequences at the hairpin loop and stem and to unwind DNA. Despite their low sequence similarity, three out of four motifs are shared with T7 RNAP that recognizes a double-stranded DNA promoter. The binary complex structure and results of engineered disulfide linkage experiments reveal that the plug and motif B loop, which block the access of template DNA to the active site in the apo-form mini-vRNAP, undergo a large-scale conformational change upon promoter binding, explaining the restricted promoter specificity that is critical for N4 phage early transcription.

  19. Structural basis for DNA-hairpin promoter recognition by the bacteriophage N4 virion RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Gleghorn, Michael L.; Davydova, Elena K.; Rothman-Denes, Lucia B.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2008-01-01

    Coliphage N4 virion-encapsidated RNA polymerase (vRNAP) is a member of the phage T7-like single-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) family. Its central domain (mini-vRNAP) contains all RNAP functions of the full-length vRNAP, which recognizes a five- to seven-base pair stem and three-nucleotide loop hairpin DNA promoter. Here we report the X-ray crystal structures of mini-vRNAP bound to promoters. Mini-vRNAP uses four structural motifs to recognize DNA sequences at the hairpin loop and stem, and to unwind DNA. Despite their low sequence similarity, three out of four motifs are shared with T7 RNAP that recognizes a double-stranded DNA promoter. The binary complex structure and results of engineered disulfide-linkage experiments reveal that the plug and motif B loop, which block the access of template DNA to the active site in the apo-form mini-vRNAP, undergo a large-scale conformational change upon promoter binding, explaining the restricted promoter specificity that is critical for N4 phage early transcription. PMID:19061645

  20. Arsenic Biotransformation as a Cancer Promoting Factor by Inducing DNA Damage and Disruption of Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Victor D.; Vucic, Emily A.; Adonis, Marta; Gil, Lionel; Lam, Wan L.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water poses a major global health concern. Populations exposed to high concentrations of arsenic-contaminated drinking water suffer serious health consequences, including alarming cancer incidence and death rates. Arsenic is biotransformed through sequential addition of methyl groups, acquired from s-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Metabolism of arsenic generates a variety of genotoxic and cytotoxic species, damaging DNA directly and indirectly, through the generation of reactive oxidative species and induction of DNA adducts, strand breaks and cross links, and inhibition of the DNA repair process itself. Since SAM is the methyl group donor used by DNA methyltransferases to maintain normal epigenetic patterns in all human cells, arsenic is also postulated to affect maintenance of normal DNA methylation patterns, chromatin structure, and genomic stability. The biological processes underlying the cancer promoting factors of arsenic metabolism, related to DNA damage and repair, will be discussed here. PMID:22091411

  1. Characterizations of Hirudo medicinalis DNA promoters for targeted gene expression.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael W; Macagno, Eduardo R

    2006-09-30

    The expression of exogenous genes in neurons and other cells has become a powerful means for studying the function of encoded proteins. We report here on the isolation and functional analysis of three Hirudo medicinalis actin gene promoters and the 5' UTR of a leech elongation factor-1alpha (HmEF-1alpha) gene. In situ hybridization labeling revealed that the EF-1alpha gene and one of the actins had pan-neuronal expression, whereas, the other two actin genes were expressed by the embryo's body wall musculature. Comparative analysis shows that they all display many features typical of actin and EF-1alpha promoters from other species, including canonical TATA box sequences and predicted general transcription factor binding sites (such as CCATT, CarB boxes and CG-rich regions). The ability of these 5' UTR sequences to drive expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), leech cytoplasmic actin and leech synaptobrevin was examined. Direct intracellular nuclear, but not cytoplasmic, microinjection of each of the promoter sequences was found to produce reliably cellular expression of the reporter construct in both neuronal and muscle cells. These results introduce reliable and effective methods to selectively express genes in individual cells of the leech in vivo during embryonic development.

  2. The G-quadruplex DNA stabilizing drug pyridostatin promotes DNA damage and downregulates transcription of Brca1 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Moruno-Manchon, Jose F; Koellhoffer, Edward C; Gopakumar, Jayakrishnan; Hambarde, Shashank; Kim, Nayun; McCullough, Louise D; Tsvetkov, Andrey S

    2017-09-12

    The G-quadruplex is a non-canonical DNA secondary structure formed by four DNA strands containing multiple runs of guanines. G-quadruplexes play important roles in DNA recombination, replication, telomere maintenance, and regulation of transcription. Small molecules that stabilize the G-quadruplexes alter gene expression in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesized that the G-quadruplexes regulate transcription in neurons. We discovered that pyridostatin, a small molecule that specifically stabilizes G-quadruplex DNA complexes, induced neurotoxicity and promoted the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cultured neurons. We also found that pyridostatin downregulated transcription of the Brca1 gene, a gene that is critical for DSB repair. Importantly, in an in vitro gel shift assay, we discovered that an antibody specific to the G-quadruplex structure binds to a synthetic oligonucleotide, which corresponds to the first putative G-quadruplex in the Brca1 gene promoter. Our results suggest that the G-quadruplex complexes regulate transcription in neurons. Studying the G-quadruplexes could represent a new avenue for neurodegeneration and brain aging research.

  3. Dnmt3L antagonizes DNA methylation at bivalent promoters and favors DNA methylation at gene bodies in ESCs.

    PubMed

    Neri, Francesco; Krepelova, Anna; Incarnato, Danny; Maldotti, Mara; Parlato, Caterina; Galvagni, Federico; Matarese, Filomena; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Oliviero, Salvatore

    2013-09-26

    The de novo DNA methyltransferase 3-like (Dnmt3L) is a catalytically inactive DNA methyltransferase that cooperates with Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b to methylate DNA. Dnmt3L is highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), but its function in these cells is unknown. Through genome-wide analysis of Dnmt3L knockdown in ESCs, we found that Dnmt3L is a positive regulator of methylation at the gene bodies of housekeeping genes and, more surprisingly, is also a negative regulator of methylation at promoters of bivalent genes. Dnmt3L is required for the differentiation of ESCs into primordial germ cells (PGCs) through the activation of the homeotic gene Rhox5. We demonstrate that Dnmt3L interacts with the Polycomb PRC2 complex in competition with the DNA methyltransferases Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b to maintain low methylation levels at the H3K27me3 regions. Thus, in ESCs, Dnmt3L counteracts the activity of de novo DNA methylases to maintain hypomethylation at promoters of bivalent developmental genes.

  4. Neil DNA glycosylases promote substrate turnover by Tdg during DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Khelifa; Kienhöfer, Sabine; von Seggern, Annika; Niehrs, Christof

    2016-01-01

    DNA 5-methylcytosine is a dynamic epigenetic mark which plays important roles in development and disease. In the Tet-Tdg demethylation pathway, methylated cytosine is iteratively oxidized by Tet dioxygenases and unmodified cytosine is restored via thymine DNA glycosylase (Tdg). Here we show that human NEIL1 and NEIL2 DNA glycosylases coordinate abasic site processing during TET–TDG DNA demethylation. NEIL1 and NEIL2 cooperate with TDG during base excision: TDG occupies the abasic site and is displaced by NEILs, which further process the baseless sugar, thereby stimulating TDG substrate turnover. In early Xenopus embryos Neil2 cooperates with Tdg to remove oxidized methylcytosines and to specify neural crest development together with Tet3. Thus, Neils function as AP lyases in the coordinated AP site hand-over during oxidative DNA demethylation. PMID:26751644

  5. Non-B-DNA structures on the interferon-beta promoter?

    PubMed

    Robbe, K; Bonnefoy, E

    1998-01-01

    The high mobility group (HMG) I protein intervenes as an essential factor during the virus induced expression of the interferon-beta (IFN-beta) gene. It is a non-histone chromatine associated protein that has the dual capacity of binding to a non-B-DNA structure such as cruciform-DNA as well as to AT rich B-DNA sequences. In this work we compare the binding affinity of HMGI for a synthetic cruciform-DNA to its binding affinity for the HMGI-binding-site present in the positive regulatory domain II (PRDII) of the IFN-beta promoter. Using gel retardation experiments, we show that HMGI protein binds with at least ten times more affinity to the synthetic cruciform-DNA structure than to the PRDII B-DNA sequence. DNA hairpin sequences are present in both the human and the murine PRDII-DNAs. We discuss in this work the presence of, yet putative, non-B-DNA structures in the IFN-beta promoter.

  6. DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A associates with viral proteins and impacts HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Rowles, Daniell L; Tsai, Yuan-Chin; Greco, Todd M; Lin, Aaron E; Li, Minghao; Yeh, Justin; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-06-01

    Viral infections can alter the cellular epigenetic landscape, through modulation of either DNA methylation profiles or chromatin remodeling enzymes and histone modifications. These changes can act to promote viral replication or host defense. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a prominent human pathogen, which relies on interactions with host factors for efficient replication and spread. Nevertheless, the knowledge regarding its modulation of epigenetic factors remains limited. Here, we used fluorescently-labeled viruses in conjunction with immunoaffinity purification and MS to study virus-virus and virus-host protein interactions during HSV-1 infection in primary human fibroblasts. We identified interactions among viral capsid and tegument proteins, detecting phosphorylation of the capsid protein VP26 at sites within its UL37-binding domain, and an acetylation within the major capsid protein VP5. Interestingly, we found a nuclear association between viral capsid proteins and the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), which we confirmed by reciprocal isolations and microscopy. We show that drug-induced inhibition of DNA methyltransferase activity, as well as siRNA- and shRNA-mediated DNMT3A knockdowns trigger reductions in virus titers. Altogether, our results highlight a functional association of viral proteins with the mammalian DNA methyltransferase machinery, pointing to DNMT3A as a host factor required for effective HSV-1 infection.

  7. TDP1 promotes assembly of non-homologous end joining protein complexes on DNA.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinho; Li, Jing; Summerlin, Matthew; Hays, Annette; Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J; Nitiss, Karin C; Nitiss, John L; Hanakahi, Leslyn A

    2015-06-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is central to the maintenance of genomic integrity. In tumor cells, the ability to repair DSBs predicts response to radiation and many cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs. DSB repair pathways include homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). NHEJ is a template-independent mechanism, yet many NHEJ repair products carry limited genetic changes, which suggests that NHEJ includes mechanisms to minimize error. Proteins required for mammalian NHEJ include Ku70/80, the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), XLF/Cernunnos and the XRCC4:DNA ligase IV complex. NHEJ also utilizes accessory proteins that include DNA polymerases, nucleases, and other end-processing factors. In yeast, mutations of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP1) reduced NHEJ fidelity. TDP1 plays an important role in repair of topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage and 3'-blocking DNA lesions, and mutation of the human TDP1 gene results in an inherited human neuropathy termed SCAN1. We found that human TDP1 stimulated DNA binding by XLF and physically interacted with XLF to form TDP1:XLF:DNA complexes. TDP1:XLF interactions preferentially stimulated TDP1 activity on dsDNA as compared to ssDNA. TDP1 also promoted DNA binding by Ku70/80 and stimulated DNA-PK activity. Because Ku70/80 and XLF are the first factors recruited to the DSB at the onset of NHEJ, our data suggest a role for TDP1 during the early stages of mammalian NHEJ.

  8. TDP1 promotes assembly of non-homologous end joining protein complexes on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinho; Li, Jing; Summerlin, Matthew; Hays, Annette; Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J.; Nitiss, Karin C.; Nitiss, John L.; Hanakahi, Leslyn A.

    2015-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is central to the maintenance of genomic integrity. In tumor cells, the ability to repair DSBs predicts response to radiation and many cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs. DSB repair pathways include homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). NHEJ is a template-independent mechanism, yet many NHEJ repair products carry limited genetic changes, which suggests that NHEJ includes mechanisms to minimize error. Proteins required for mammalian NHEJ include Ku70/80, the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), XLF/Cernunnos and the XRCC4:DNA ligase IV complex. NHEJ also utilizes accessory proteins that include DNA polymerases, nucleases, and other end-processing factors. In yeast, mutations of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP1) reduced NHEJ fidelity. TDP1 plays an important role in repair of topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage and 3′-blocking DNA lesions, and mutation of the human TDP1 gene results in an inherited human neuropathy termed SCAN1. We found that human TDP1 stimulated DNA binding by XLF and physically interacted with XLF to form TDP1:XLF:DNA complexes. TDP1:XLF interactions preferentially stimulated TDP1 activity on dsDNA as compared to ssDNA. TDP1 also promoted DNA binding by Ku70/80 and stimulated DNA-PK activity. Because Ku70/80 and XLF are the first factors recruited to the DSB at the onset of NHEJ, our data suggest a role for TDP1 during the early stages of mammalian NHEJ. PMID:25841101

  9. The telomerase essential N-terminal domain promotes DNA synthesis by stabilizing short RNA–DNA hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Benjamin M.; Parks, Joseph W.; Stone, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is an enzyme that adds repetitive DNA sequences to the ends of chromosomes and consists of two main subunits: the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein and an associated telomerase RNA (TER). The telomerase essential N-terminal (TEN) domain is a conserved region of TERT proposed to mediate DNA substrate interactions. Here, we have employed single molecule telomerase binding assays to investigate the function of the TEN domain. Our results reveal telomeric DNA substrates bound to telomerase exhibit a dynamic equilibrium between two states: a docked conformation and an alternative conformation. The relative stabilities of the docked and alternative states correlate with the number of basepairs that can be formed between the DNA substrate and the RNA template, with more basepairing favoring the docked state. The docked state is further buttressed by the TEN domain and mutations within the TEN domain substantially alter the DNA substrate structural equilibrium. We propose a model in which the TEN domain stabilizes short RNA–DNA duplexes in the active site of the enzyme, promoting the docked state to augment telomerase processivity. PMID:25940626

  10. FANCM interacts with PCNA to promote replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Rohleder, Florian; Huang, Jing; Xue, Yutong; Kuper, Jochen; Round, Adam; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong; Kisker, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    FANCM is a highly conserved DNA remodeling enzyme that promotes the activation of the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway and facilitates replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks. However, how FANCM interacts with the replication machinery to promote traverse remains unclear. Here, we show that FANCM and its archaeal homolog Hef from Thermoplasma acidophilum interact with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential co-factor for DNA polymerases in both replication and repair. The interaction is mediated through a conserved PIP-box; and in human FANCM, it is strongly stimulated by replication stress. A FANCM variant carrying a mutation in the PIP-box is defective in promoting replication traverse of interstrand crosslinks and is also inefficient in promoting FANCD2 monoubiquitination, a key step of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Our data reveal a conserved interaction mode between FANCM and PCNA during replication stress, and suggest that this interaction is essential for FANCM to aid replication machines to traverse DNA interstrand crosslinks prior to post-replication repair. PMID:26825464

  11. Transient and dynamic DNA supercoiling potently stimulates the leu-500 promoter in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoduo; Dages, Samantha; Dages, Kelley; Liu, Yingting; Hua, Zi-Chun; Makemson, John; Leng, Fenfei

    2017-09-01

    The inactive prokaryotic leu-500 promoter (Pleu-500) contains a single A-to-G point mutation in the -10 region of the leucine operon promoter, which causes leucine auxotrophy. This promoter can be activated by (-) DNA supercoiling in Escherichia coli topA strains. However, whether this activation arises from global, permanent, or transient, dynamic supercoiling is still not fully understood. In this article, using a newly established in vivo system carrying a pair of divergently coupled promoters, i.e. an IPTG-inducible promoter and Pleu-500 that control the expression of lacZ and luc (the firefly luciferase gene), respectively, we demonstrate that transient, dynamic (-) DNA supercoiling provided by divergent transcription in both wild-type and topA strains can potently activate Pleu-500 We found that this activation depended on the promoter strength and the length of RNA transcripts, which are functional characteristics of transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling (TCDS) precisely predicted by the twin-supercoiled domain model of transcription in which a (+) supercoiled domain is produced ahead of the RNA polymerase and a (-) supercoiled domain behind it. We also demonstrate that TCDS can be generated on topologically open DNA molecules, i.e. linear DNA molecules, in Escherichia coli, suggesting that topological boundaries or barriers are not required for the production of TCDS in vivo This work demonstrates that transient, dynamic TCDS by RNA polymerases is a major chromosome remodeling force in E. coli and greatly influences the nearby, coupled promoters/transcription. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. AP1 enhances polyomavirus DNA replication by promoting T-antigen-mediated unwinding of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W; Tang, W J; Bu, X; Bermudez, V; Martin, M; Folk, W R

    1996-01-01

    An early step in the initiation of polyomavirus DNA replication is viral large-T-antigen-mediated unwinding of the origin. We report that components of the AP1 transcription factor, Fos and Jun, interact with T antigen in vitro to enhance unwinding of the viral origin. This provides a biochemical basis for the capacity of AP1 to activate viral DNA replication in vivo. PMID:8763994

  13. DNA demethylation of the TIM-3 promoter is critical for its stable expression on T cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, F-C; Kuo, C-C; Chen, H-Y; Chen, H-H; Sytwu, H-K

    2016-04-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing protein 3 (TIM-3) is selectively expressed on terminally differentiated T helper 1 (Th1) cells and acts as a negative regulator that terminates Th1 responses. The dysregulation of TIM-3 expression on T cells is associated with several autoimmune phenotypes and with chronic viral infections; however, the mechanism of this regulation is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of DNA methylation on the expression of TIM-3. By analyzing the sequences of TIM-3 promoter regions in human and mouse, we identified a CpG island within the TIM-3 promoter and demonstrated that the promoter activity was controlled by DNA methylation. Furthermore, treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine enhanced TIM-3 expression on mouse primary CD4(+) T cells under Th0-, Th1- or Th2-polarizing conditions. Finally, pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the methylation level of the TIM-3 promoter gradually decreased after each round of T-cell polarization, and this decrease was inversely correlated with TIM-3 expression. These data suggest that the DNA methylation of the TIM-3 promoter cooperates with lineage-specific transcription factors in the control of Th-cell development. In conclusion, DNA methylation-based regulation of TIM-3 may provide novel insights into understanding the dysregulation of TIM-3 expression under pathogenic conditions.

  14. A neo-Darwinian algorithm: asymmetrical mutations due to semiconservative DNA-type replication promote evolution.

    PubMed

    Wada, K N; Doi, H; Tanaka, S; Wada, Y; Furusawa, M

    1993-12-15

    Evolution is, in a sense, to resolve optimization problems. Our neo-Darwinian algorithm based on the mechanics of inheritance and natural selection uses double-stranded DNA-type genetic information to resolve the "knap-sack problem." The algorithm with asymmetrical mutations due to semiconservative DNA-type replication most effectively resolved the problem. Our results strongly suggest that disparity in mutations caused by the asymmetric machinery of DNA replication promotes evolution, in particular of diploid organisms with a high mutation rate, in a small population, and under strong selection pressure.

  15. APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in double-strand DNA break repair and cancer promotion.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions was identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with single-strand DNA (ssDNA), double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs, and clustered mutations. Cancer Res; 73(12); 3494-8. ©2013 AACR. ©2013 AACR.

  16. The splicing machinery promotes RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cui-Jun; Zhou, Jin-Xing; Liu, Jun; Ma, Ze-Yang; Zhang, Su-Wei; Dou, Kun; Huang, Huan-Wei; Cai, Tao; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; He, Xin-Jian

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation in transposons and other DNA repeats is conserved in plants as well as in animals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, an RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway directs de novo DNA methylation. We performed a forward genetic screen for suppressors of the DNA demethylase mutant ros1 and identified a novel Zinc-finger and OCRE domain-containing Protein 1 (ZOP1) that promotes Pol IV-dependent siRNA accumulation, DNA methylation, and transcriptional silencing. Whole-genome methods disclosed the genome-wide effects of zop1 on Pol IV-dependent siRNA accumulation and DNA methylation, suggesting that ZOP1 has both RdDM-dependent and -independent roles in transcriptional silencing. We demonstrated that ZOP1 is a pre-mRNA splicing factor that associates with several typical components of the splicing machinery as well as with Pol II. Immunofluorescence assay revealed that ZOP1 overlaps with Cajal body and is partially colocalized with NRPE1 and DRM2. Moreover, we found that the other development-defective splicing mutants tested including mac3a3b, mos4, mos12 and mos14 show defects in RdDM and transcriptional silencing. We propose that the splicing machinery rather than specific splicing factors is involved in promoting RdDM and transcriptional silencing. PMID:23524848

  17. CanScript, an 18-Base pair DNA sequence, boosts tumor cell-specific promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Cozzitorto, Joseph A; Richards, Nathan G; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Yeo, Charles J; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Brody, Jonathan R

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy protocols for the treatment of cancer often employ gene promoter sequences that are known to be overexpressed in specific tumor cell types relative to normal cells. These promoters, while specific, are often weakly active. It would be desirable to increase the activity of such promoters, while at the same time retain specificity, so that the therapeutic gene is more robustly expressed. Using a luciferase reporter DNA construct in both in vitro cell transfection assays and in vivo mouse tumor models, we have determined that in the absence of any other DNA sequence, a previously identified 18-base pair enhancer sequence called CanScript, lying upstream of the MSLN gene, has ∼25% of the promoter activity of CAG, a very strong non-specific promoter/enhancer, in tumor cells in which MSLN is highly expressed. Furthermore, tandem repeat copies of CanScript enhance transcription in a dose-dependent manner and, when coupled with promoter sequences that are active in tumor cells, increase promoter activity. These findings suggest that the incorporation of CanScript into gene constructs may have application in enhancing activity of promoters used in cancer-targeting gene therapy strategies, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20798601

  18. Identification of functional DNA variants in the constitutive promoter region of MDM2.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Ouimet, Manon; Larivière, Mathieu; Kritikou, Ekaterini A; Sinnett, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Although mutations in the oncoprotein murine double minute 2 (MDM2) are rare, MDM2 gene overexpression has been observed in several human tumors. Given that even modest changes in MDM2 levels might influence the p53 tumor suppressor signaling pathway, we postulated that sequence variation in the promoter region of MDM2 could lead to disregulated expression and variation in gene dosage. Two promoters have been reported for MDM2; an internal promoter (P2), which is located near the end of intron 1 and is p53-responsive, and an upstream constitutive promoter (P1), which is p53-independent. Both promoter regions contain DNA variants that could influence the expression levels of MDM2, including the well-studied single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) SNP309, which is located in the promoter P2; i.e., upstream of exon 2. In this report, we screened the promoter P1 for DNA variants and assessed the functional impact of the corresponding SNPs. Using the dbSNP database and genotyping validation in individuals of European descent, we identified three common SNPs (-1494 G > A; indel 40 bp; and -182 C > G). Three major promoter haplotypes were inferred by using these three promoter SNPs together with rs2279744 (SNP309). Following subcloning into a gene reporter system, we found that two of the haplotypes significantly influenced MDM2 promoter activity in a haplotype-specific manner. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that the 40 bp insertion/deletion variation is causing the observed allelic promoter activity. This study suggests that part of the variability in the MDM2 expression levels could be explained by allelic p53-independent P1 promoter activity.

  19. Laser controlled singlet oxygen generation in mitochondria to promote mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, Yupei; Si, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Gan, Lu; Di, Cuixia; Xie, Yi; Zhang, Hong

    2015-11-18

    Reports have shown that a certain level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. However, it is unclear whether it is the mitochondrial ROS that stimulate mtDNA replication and this requires further investigation. Here we employed a photodynamic system to achieve controlled mitochondrial singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation. HeLa cells incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were exposed to laser irradiation to induce (1)O2 generation within mitochondria. Increased mtDNA copy number was detected after low doses of 630 nm laser light in ALA-treated cells. The stimulated mtDNA replication was directly linked to mitochondrial (1)O2 generation, as verified using specific ROS scavengers. The stimulated mtDNA replication was regulated by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA polymerase γ. MtDNA control region modifications were induced by (1)O2 generation in mitochondria. A marked increase in 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) level was detected in ALA-treated cells after irradiation. HeLa cell growth stimulation and G1-S cell cycle transition were also observed after laser irradiation in ALA-treated cells. These cellular responses could be due to a second wave of ROS generation detected in mitochondria. In summary, we describe a controllable method of inducing mtDNA replication in vitro.

  20. Nuclear GIT2 Is an ATM Substrate and Promotes DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Daoyuan; Cai, Huan; Park, Sung-Soo; Siddiqui, Sana; Premont, Richard T.; Schmalzigaug, Robert; Paramasivam, Manikandan; Seidman, Michael; Bodogai, Ionoa; Biragyn, Arya; Daimon, Caitlin M.; Martin, Bronwen

    2015-01-01

    Insults to nuclear DNA induce multiple response pathways to mitigate the deleterious effects of damage and mediate effective DNA repair. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting protein 2 (GIT2) regulates receptor internalization, focal adhesion dynamics, cell migration, and responses to oxidative stress. Here we demonstrate that GIT2 coordinates the levels of proteins in the DNA damage response (DDR). Cellular sensitivity to irradiation-induced DNA damage was highly associated with GIT2 expression levels. GIT2 is phosphorylated by ATM kinase and forms complexes with multiple DDR-associated factors in response to DNA damage. The targeting of GIT2 to DNA double-strand breaks was rapid and, in part, dependent upon the presence of H2AX, ATM, and MRE11 but was independent of MDC1 and RNF8. GIT2 likely promotes DNA repair through multiple mechanisms, including stabilization of BRCA1 in repair complexes; upregulation of repair proteins, including HMGN1 and RFC1; and regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. Furthermore, GIT2-knockout mice demonstrated a greater susceptibility to DNA damage than their wild-type littermates. These results suggest that GIT2 plays an important role in MRE11/ATM/H2AX-mediated DNA damage responses. PMID:25605334

  1. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  2. Mesoscopic model and free energy landscape for protein-DNA binding sites: analysis of cyanobacterial promoters.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rojo, Rafael; Mazo, Juan José; Hernández, José Ángel; Peleato, María Luisa; Fillat, María F; Falo, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    The identification of protein binding sites in promoter sequences is a key problem to understand and control regulation in biochemistry and biotechnological processes. We use a computational method to analyze promoters from a given genome. Our approach is based on a physical model at the mesoscopic level of protein-DNA interaction based on the influence of DNA local conformation on the dynamics of a general particle along the chain. Following the proposed model, the joined dynamics of the protein particle and the DNA portion of interest, only characterized by its base pair sequence, is simulated. The simulation output is analyzed by generating and analyzing the Free Energy Landscape of the system. In order to prove the capacity of prediction of our computational method we have analyzed nine promoters of Anabaena PCC 7120. We are able to identify the transcription starting site of each of the promoters as the most populated macrostate in the dynamics. The developed procedure allows also to characterize promoter macrostates in terms of thermo-statistical magnitudes (free energy and entropy), with valuable biological implications. Our results agree with independent previous experimental results. Thus, our methods appear as a powerful complementary tool for identifying protein binding sites in promoter sequences.

  3. Hydrolytic cleavage of DNA-model substrates promoted by polyoxovanadates.

    PubMed

    Steens, Nele; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Absillis, Gregory; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2010-01-14

    Hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate (NPP) and bis-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (BNPP), two commonly used DNA model substrates, was examined in vanadate solutions by means of (1)H, (31)P and (51)V NMR spectroscopy. The hydrolysis of the phosphoester bond in NPP at 50 degrees C and pH 5.0 proceeds with a rate constant of 1.74 x 10(-5) s(-1). The cleavage of the phosphoester bond in BNPP at 70 degrees C and pH 5.0 proceeds with a rate constant of 3.32 x 10(-6) s(-1), representing an acceleration of four orders of magnitude compared to the uncatalyzed cleavage. Inorganic phosphate and nitrophenol (NP) were the only products of hydrolysis. The NMR spectra did not show evidence of any paramagnetic species, excluding the possibility of V(V) reduction to V(IV), indicating that the cleavage of the phosphoester bond is purely hydrolytic. The pH dependence of k(obs) revealed that the hydrolysis proceeds fastest in solutions of pH 5.5. Comparison of the rate profile with the concentration profile of polyoxovanadates shows a striking overlap of the k(obs) profile with the concentration of decavanadate (V(10)). Kinetic experiments at 37 degrees C using a fixed amount of NPP and increasing amounts of V(10) permitted the calculation of catalytic (k(c) = 5.67 x 10(-6) s(-1)) and formation constants for the NPP-V(10) complex (K(f) = 71.53 M(-1)). Variable temperature (31)P NMR spectra of a reaction mixture revealed broadening and shifting of the (31)P resonance upon addition of increasing amounts of decavanadate and upon increasing temperature, implying the dynamic exchange process between free and bound NPP at higher temperatures. The origin of the hydrolytic activity of V(10) is most likely due its high lability and its dissociation into smaller fragments which may allow the attachment of NPP and BNPP into the polyoxovanadate framework.

  4. Screening of promoters from metagenomic DNA and their use for the construction of expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Soo; Lee, Jin-Young; Kim, Won-Ho; Shin, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2008-10-01

    This study was focused on the screening of valuable genetic resources, such as promoters from metagenome, and describes a promoter trapping system with a bidirectional probe concept, which can select promoters or operons from various biological resources including metagenomic DNA. A pair of reporters, GFP and DsRed, facing the opposite direction without promoters, is an effective system that can function regardless of the direction of inserted promoters. The feasibility of this system was tested for the isolation of constitutively expressed promoters in E. coli from a soil metagenome, resulting in a potential pool of various promoters for practical application. The analyses of structural organization of the trapped genes demonstrated that constitutively expressible promoters in E. coli were broadly distributed within the metagenome, and suggested that some promoters were useful for the construction of expression vectors. Based on these observations, three constitutive promoters were employed in the expression vector system and their potentials for practical application were evaluated in terms of expression level, protein solubility, and effects on host growth.

  5. Oxidative stress-induced CREB upregulation promotes DNA damage repair prior to neuronal cell death protection.

    PubMed

    Pregi, Nicolás; Belluscio, Laura María; Berardino, Bruno Gabriel; Castillo, Daniela Susana; Cánepa, Eduardo Tomás

    2017-01-01

    cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein is a cellular transcription factor that mediates responses to different physiological and pathological signals. Using a model of human neuronal cells we demonstrate herein, that CREB is phosphorylated after oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide. This phosphorylation is largely independent of PKA and of the canonical phosphoacceptor site at ser-133, and is accompanied by an upregulation of CREB expression at both mRNA and protein levels. In accordance with previous data, we show that CREB upregulation promotes cell survival and that its silencing results in an increment of apoptosis after oxidative stress. Interestingly, we also found that CREB promotes DNA repair after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. Using a cDNA microarray we found that CREB is responsible for the regulation of many genes involved in DNA repair and cell survival after oxidative injury. In summary, the neuroprotective effect mediated by CREB appears to follow three essential steps following oxidative injury. First, the upregulation of CREB expression that allows sufficient level of activated and phosphorylated protein is the primordial event that promotes the induction of genes of the DNA Damage Response. Then and when the DNA repair is effective, CREB induces detoxification and survival genes. This kinetics seems to be important to completely resolve oxidative-induced neuronal damages.

  6. Effect of oxidative DNA damage in promoter elements on transcription factor binding.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, R; Mitchell, D L

    1999-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species produced by endogenous metabolic activity and exposure to a multitude of exogenous agents impact cells in a variety of ways. The DNA base damage 8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) is a prominent indicator of oxidative stress and has been well-characterized as a premutagenic lesion in mammalian cells and putative initiator of the carcinogenic process. Commensurate with the recent interest in epigenetic pathways of cancer causation we investigated how 8-oxodG alters the interaction between cis elements located on gene promoters and sequence-specific DNA binding proteins associated with these promoters. Consensus binding sequences for the transcription factors AP-1, NF-kappaB and Sp1 were modified site-specifically at guanine residues and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed to assess DNA-protein interactions. Our results indicate that whereas a single 8-oxodG was sufficient to inhibit transcription factor binding to AP-1 and Sp1 sequences it had no effect on binding to NF-kappaB, regardless of its position. We conclude from these data that minor alterations in base composition at a crucial position within some, but not all, promoter elements have the ability to disrupt transcription factor binding. The lack of inhibition by damaged NF-kappaB sequences suggests that DNA-protein contact sites may not be as determinative for stable p50 binding to this promoter as other, as yet undefined, structural parameters.

  7. DNA supercoiling-dependent transcriptional coupling between the divergently transcribed promoters of the ilvYC operon of Escherichia coli is proportional to promoter strengths and transcript lengths.

    PubMed

    Opel, M L; Hatfield, G W

    2001-01-01

    The twin-domain model of Liu and Wang suggested that high levels of DNA supercoiling generated in the region between closely spaced divergently transcribed promoters could serve to couple the activities of these promoters transcriptionally. In this report, we use topoisomer sets of defined superhelical densities as DNA templates in a purified in vitro transcription system to demonstrate transcriptional coupling between the divergently transcribed ilvY and ilvC promoters of the ilvYC operon of Escherichia coli. Current evidence for this type of DNA supercoiling-dependent transcriptional coupling, based largely on the in vivo activities of promoters contained in engineered DNA constructs, suggests that the transcription complex must be physically hindered to generate DNA supercoils and to prevent their diffusion throughout the DNA duplex. However, the in vitro results presented here demonstrate that (i) transcriptional coupling is observed between the divergent promoters of the ilvYC operon in the absence of transcript anchoring; (ii) the magnitude of the negative DNA supercoiling generated in the divergent promoter region is proportional to the sum of the global and transcription-induced superhelicity; and (iii) the magnitude of this transcription-induced superhelicity is proportional to promoter strengths and transcript lengths.

  8. Rad25p, a DNA helicase subunit of yeast transcription factor TFIIH, is required for promoter escape in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, D; Gileadi, O

    2000-03-07

    The general transcription factor TFIIH is required for initial DNA unwinding and promoter escape by RNA polymerase II in vitro. We examined whether Rad25p, a DNA helicase subunit of TFIIH, mediates promoter opening and promoter escape in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA unwinding was probed with an in vivo permanganate reactivity assay, in a temperature-sensitive mutant of RAD25. The consequences of Rad25p inactivation were promoter-specific. Whereas in the TDH2 promoter permanganate reactivity was entirely abolished, the reactivity at the GAL1 and GAL10 promoter regions was only moderately affected. In the GAL genes permanganate reactivity uniformly decreased downstream of the transcription start site, indicating that progression of RNA polymerase II to this region was impaired. Our results suggest that in yeast cells, promoter opening is not sufficient for productive initiation and that Rad25p-mediated promoter escape may be a limiting step in the transcription of some promoters.

  9. DNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter induced by folate deficiency is a potential noninvasive circulating biomarker for colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Xue, Geng; Lu, Chao-Jing; Pan, Shu-Jun; Zhang, Yin-Ling; Miao, Hui; Shan, Shi; Zhu, Xiao-Ting; Zhang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation patterns, which induced by folate deficiency, play important roles in tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Some DNA methylation alterations can also be detected in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of patients' plasma, making cfDNA an ideal noninvasive circulating biomarker. However, exact DNA methylation alterations induced by folate deficiency in tumorigenesis of CRC and exact potential circulating cfDNA methylation biomarker are still unclear. Therefore, DNA methylation patterns of the normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line (NCM460), cultured with normal or low folate content, were screened and the DNA hypomethylation of cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) promoter was further validated in vitro and vivo. Then, the correlation analysis between folate level, DNA methylation alteration in promoter and expression of CBS was carried out in vitro and vivo. Further, the methylation patterns of CBS promoter in plasma cfDNA were detected and statistically correlated with pathological parameters and clinical outcome. Our study showed that DNA hypomethylation in CBS promoter, induced by folate deficiency, would lead to up-regulation of CBS both in vitro and vivo. Patients with cfDNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter in plasma were correlated with high tumor stage and poor clinical outcome. In addition, cfDNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter in plasma was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for recurrence and cancer-related death in CRC. Our results indicated that DNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter induced by folate deficiency could serve as a potential noninvasive circulating biomarker and may be helpful in developing more effective prognostic markers for CRC.

  10. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing, and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position, and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster's developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5′-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment. PMID:24778620

  12. Forks on the Run: Can the Stalling of DNA Replication Promote Epigenetic Changes?

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Hollie; Dhavarasa, Piriththiv; Cheng, Ashley; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2017-01-01

    Built of DNA polymerases and multiple associated factors, the replication fork steadily progresses along the DNA template and faithfully replicates DNA. This model can be found in practically every textbook of genetics, with the more complex situation of chromatinized DNA in eukaryotes often viewed as a variation. However, the replication-coupled disassembly/reassembly of chromatin adds significant complexity to the whole replication process. During the course of eukaryotic DNA replication the forks encounter various conditions and numerous impediments. These include nucleosomes with a variety of post-translational modifications, euchromatin and heterochromatin, differentially methylated DNA, tightly bound proteins, active gene promoters and DNA loops. At such positions the forks slow down or even stall. Dedicated factors stabilize the fork and prevent its rotation or collapse, while other factors resolve the replication block and facilitate the resumption of elongation. The fate of histones during replication stalling and resumption is not well understood. In this review we briefly describe recent advances in our understanding of histone turnover during DNA replication and focus on the possible mechanisms of nucleosome disassembly/reassembly at paused replication forks. We propose that replication pausing provides opportunities for an epigenetic change of the associated locus.

  13. Forks on the Run: Can the Stalling of DNA Replication Promote Epigenetic Changes?

    PubMed Central

    Rowlands, Hollie; Dhavarasa, Piriththiv; Cheng, Ashley; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2017-01-01

    Built of DNA polymerases and multiple associated factors, the replication fork steadily progresses along the DNA template and faithfully replicates DNA. This model can be found in practically every textbook of genetics, with the more complex situation of chromatinized DNA in eukaryotes often viewed as a variation. However, the replication-coupled disassembly/reassembly of chromatin adds significant complexity to the whole replication process. During the course of eukaryotic DNA replication the forks encounter various conditions and numerous impediments. These include nucleosomes with a variety of post-translational modifications, euchromatin and heterochromatin, differentially methylated DNA, tightly bound proteins, active gene promoters and DNA loops. At such positions the forks slow down or even stall. Dedicated factors stabilize the fork and prevent its rotation or collapse, while other factors resolve the replication block and facilitate the resumption of elongation. The fate of histones during replication stalling and resumption is not well understood. In this review we briefly describe recent advances in our understanding of histone turnover during DNA replication and focus on the possible mechanisms of nucleosome disassembly/reassembly at paused replication forks. We propose that replication pausing provides opportunities for an epigenetic change of the associated locus. PMID:28690636

  14. ATP hydrolysis Promotes Duplex DNA Release by the RecA Presynaptic Complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja Yil; Qi, Zhi; Greene, Eric C

    2016-10-14

    Homologous recombination is an important DNA repair pathway that plays key roles in maintaining genome stability. Escherichia coli RecA is an ATP-dependent DNA-binding protein that catalyzes the DNA strand exchange reactions in homologous recombination. RecA assembles into long helical filaments on single-stranded DNA, and these presynaptic complexes are responsible for locating and pairing with a homologous duplex DNA. Recent single molecule studies have provided new insights into RecA behavior, but the potential influence of ATP in the reactions remains poorly understood. Here we examine how ATP influences the ability of the RecA presynaptic complex to interact with homologous dsDNA. We demonstrate that over short time regimes, RecA presynaptic complexes sample heterologous dsDNA similarly in the presence of either ATP or ATPγS, suggesting that initial interactions do not depend on ATP hydrolysis. In addition, RecA stabilizes pairing intermediates in three-base steps, and stepping energetics is seemingly unaltered in the presence of ATP. However, the overall dissociation rate of these paired intermediates with ATP is ∼4-fold higher than with ATPγS. These experiments suggest that ATP plays an unanticipated role in promoting the turnover of captured duplex DNA intermediates as RecA attempts to align homologous sequences during the early stages of recombination.

  15. ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of MEF2D Promotes Neuronal Survival after DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shing Fai; Sances, Sam; Brill, Laurence M.; Okamoto, Shu-ichi; Zaidi, Rameez; McKercher, Scott R.; Akhtar, Mohd W.; Nakanishi, Nobuki

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, which encodes a kinase critical for the normal DNA damage response, cause the neurodegenerative disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). The substrates of ATM in the brain are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ATM phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), which plays a critical role in promoting survival of cerebellar granule cells. ATM associates with MEF2D after DNA damage and phosphorylates the transcription factor at four ATM consensus sites. Knockdown of endogenous MEF2D with a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) increases sensitivity to etoposide-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death. Interestingly, substitution of endogenous MEF2D with an shRNA-resistant phosphomimetic MEF2D mutant protects cerebellar granule cells from cell death after DNA damage, whereas an shRNA-resistant nonphosphorylatable MEF2D mutant does not. In vivo, cerebella in Mef2d knock-out mice manifest increased susceptibility to DNA damage. Together, our results show that MEF2D is a substrate for phosphorylation by ATM, thus promoting survival in response to DNA damage. Moreover, dysregulation of the ATM–MEF2D pathway may contribute to neurodegeneration in AT. PMID:24672010

  16. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MEF2D promotes neuronal survival after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chan, Shing Fai; Sances, Sam; Brill, Laurence M; Okamoto, Shu-Ichi; Zaidi, Rameez; McKercher, Scott R; Akhtar, Mohd W; Nakanishi, Nobuki; Lipton, Stuart A

    2014-03-26

    Mutations in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, which encodes a kinase critical for the normal DNA damage response, cause the neurodegenerative disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). The substrates of ATM in the brain are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ATM phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), which plays a critical role in promoting survival of cerebellar granule cells. ATM associates with MEF2D after DNA damage and phosphorylates the transcription factor at four ATM consensus sites. Knockdown of endogenous MEF2D with a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) increases sensitivity to etoposide-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death. Interestingly, substitution of endogenous MEF2D with an shRNA-resistant phosphomimetic MEF2D mutant protects cerebellar granule cells from cell death after DNA damage, whereas an shRNA-resistant nonphosphorylatable MEF2D mutant does not. In vivo, cerebella in Mef2d knock-out mice manifest increased susceptibility to DNA damage. Together, our results show that MEF2D is a substrate for phosphorylation by ATM, thus promoting survival in response to DNA damage. Moreover, dysregulation of the ATM-MEF2D pathway may contribute to neurodegeneration in AT.

  17. DNA structural variation affects complex formation and promoter melting in ribosomal RNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Marilley, M; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Laybourn, P J; Paule, M R

    2002-08-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomal RNA promoters exhibit an unusual conservation of non-canonical DNA structure (curvature, twist angle and duplex stability) despite a lack of primary sequence conservation. This raises the possibility that rRNA transcription factors might utilize structural anomalies in their sequence recognition process. We have analyzed in detail the interaction of the polymerase I transcription factor TIF-IB from Acanthmoeba castellanii with the CORE promoter. TIF-IB interacts primarily with the minor groove of the promoter. By correlating the effects on transcription and on DNA structure of promoter point mutations, we show that the TIF-IB interaction is strongly inhibited by increases in minor groove width. This suggests that a particular DNA structure is required for interaction with the transcription factor. In addition, TIF-IB induces a small bend in the promoter upon binding. Modeling of this bend reveals that it requires an additional narrowing of the minor groove, which would favor binding to mutants with narrower grooves. We also discuss how this narrowing would induce a small destabilization of the helix upstream of the transcription start site. Telestability predicts this would result in destabilization of the sequence that melts during initiation, suggesting that TIF-IB may have a role in stimulating melting.

  18. Hematopoietic gene promoters subjected to a group-combinatorial study of DNA samples: identification of a megakaryocytic selective DNA signature

    PubMed Central

    Hazony, Yehonathan; Lu, Jun; St. Hilaire, Cynthia; Ravid, Katya

    2006-01-01

    Identification of common sub-sequences for a group of functionally related DNA sequences can shed light on the role of such elements in cell-specific gene expression. In the megakaryocytic lineage, no one single unique transcription factor was described as linage specific, raising the possibility that a cluster of gene promoter sequences presents a unique signature. Here, the megakaryocytic gene promoter group, which consists of both human and mouse 5′ non-coding regions, served as a case study. A methodology for group-combinatorial search has been implemented as a customized software platform. It extracts the longest common sequences for a group of related DNA sequences and allows for single gaps of varying length, as well as double- and multiple-gap sequences. The results point to common DNA sequences in a group of genes that is selectively expressed in megakaryocytes, and which does not appear in a large group of control, random and specific sequences. This suggests a role for a combination of these sequences in cell-specific gene expression in the megakaryocytic lineage. The data also point to an intrinsic cross-species difference in the organization of 5′ non-coding sequences within the mammalian genomes. This methodology may be used for the identification of regulatory sequences in other lineages. PMID:16936310

  19. APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases in Double-Strand DNA Break Repair and Cancer Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions were identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with ssDNA, double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs and clustered mutations. PMID:23598277

  20. Promoter of a salinity and cold stress-induced MCM6 DNA helicase from pea.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hung Quang; Tran, Ngoc Quang; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2011-07-01

    The eukaryotic hetrohexameric mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM2-7) proteins complex provides DNA unwinding function during the DNA replication. The complex also functions as DNA replication licensing factor which ensures that the DNA in genome is replicated only once per cell division cycle. Recently, a single subunit MCM6 from pea has been shown to contain helicase and ATPase activities in vitro. Recently, the transcript of a single subunit was reported to be upregulated in pea plant in response to high salinity and cold stress and not with ABA, drought and heat stress. The first direct evidence that overexpression of single subunit MCM6 confers salinity stress tolerance without yield loss has also been reported. Here we report the promoter of the pea MCM6 single subunit that contains stress responsive elements which may be responsible for regulating the MCM6 under abiotic stress conditions.

  1. Phosphorylation of PCNA by EGFR inhibits mismatch repair and promotes misincorporation during DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Janice; Li, Jessie Y.; Lee, Sanghee; Tong, Dan; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2015-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays essential roles in eukaryotic cells during DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair (MMR), and other events at the replication fork. Earlier studies show that PCNA is regulated by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation of tyrosine 211 (Y211) by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, the functional significance of Y211-phosphorylated PCNA remains unknown. Here, we show that PCNA phosphorylation by EGFR alters its interaction with mismatch-recognition proteins MutSα and MutSβ and interferes with PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, thereby inhibiting MMR at the initiation step. Evidence is also provided that Y211-phosphorylated PCNA induces nucleotide misincorporation during DNA synthesis. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which Y211-phosphorylated PCNA promotes cancer development and progression via facilitating error-prone DNA replication and suppressing the MMR function. PMID:25825764

  2. A new compound, withangulatin A, promotes type II DNA topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Juang, J K; Huang, H W; Chen, C M; Liu, H J

    1989-03-31

    Withangulatin A, a new compound with a known chemical structure and from the antitumor Chinese herb Physalis angulata L, was found to act on topoisomerase II to induce topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage in vitro. It has two effective dosage ranges of approximate 0.5 and 20 microM, with about one-third the activity of 20 microM VM-26.

  3. The POLD3 subunit of DNA polymerase δ can promote translesion synthesis independently of DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Kouji; Yoshikiyo, Kazunori; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Murai, Junko; Tsuda, Masataka; Phillips, Lara G.; Narita, Takeo; Nishihara, Kana; Kobayashi, Kaori; Yamada, Kouich; Nakamura, Jun; Pommier, Yves; Lehmann, Alan; Sale, Julian E.; Takeda, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    The replicative DNA polymerase Polδ consists of a catalytic subunit POLD1/p125 and three regulatory subunits POLD2/p50, POLD3/p66 and POLD4/p12. The ortholog of POLD3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pol32, is required for a significant proportion of spontaneous and UV-induced mutagenesis through its additional role in translesion synthesis (TLS) as a subunit of DNA polymerase ζ. Remarkably, chicken DT40 B lymphocytes deficient in POLD3 are viable and able to replicate undamaged genomic DNA with normal kinetics. Like its counterpart in yeast, POLD3 is required for fully effective TLS, its loss resulting in hypersensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents, a diminished ability to maintain replication fork progression after UV irradiation and a significant decrease in abasic site-induced mutagenesis in the immunoglobulin loci. However, these defects appear to be largely independent of Polζ, suggesting that POLD3 makes a significant contribution to TLS independently of Polζ in DT40 cells. Indeed, combining polη, polζ and pold3 mutations results in synthetic lethality. Additionally, we show in vitro that POLD3 promotes extension beyond an abasic by the Polδ holoenzyme suggesting that while POLD3 is not required for normal replication, it may help Polδ to complete abasic site bypass independently of canonical TLS polymerases. PMID:25628356

  4. RAGE is a nucleic acid receptor that promotes inflammatory responses to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sirois, Cherilyn M.; Jin, Tengchuan; Miller, Allison L.; Bertheloot, Damien; Nakamura, Hirotaka; Horvath, Gabor L.; Mian, Abubakar; Jiang, Jiansheng; Schrum, Jacob; Bossaller, Lukas; Pelka, Karin; Garbi, Natalio; Brewah, Yambasu; Tian, Jane; Chang, ChewShun; Chowdhury, Partha S.; Sims, Gary P.; Kolbeck, Roland; Coyle, Anthony J.; Humbles, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of DNA and RNA molecules derived from pathogens or self-antigen is one way the mammalian immune system senses infection and tissue damage. Activation of immune signaling receptors by nucleic acids is controlled by limiting the access of DNA and RNA to intracellular receptors, but the mechanisms by which endosome-resident receptors encounter nucleic acids from the extracellular space are largely undefined. In this study, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) promoted DNA uptake into endosomes and lowered the immune recognition threshold for the activation of Toll-like receptor 9, the principal DNA-recognizing transmembrane signaling receptor. Structural analysis of RAGE–DNA complexes indicated that DNA interacted with dimers of the outermost RAGE extracellular domains, and could induce formation of higher-order receptor complexes. Furthermore, mice deficient in RAGE were unable to mount a typical inflammatory response to DNA in the lung, indicating that RAGE is important for the detection of nucleic acids in vivo. PMID:24081950

  5. Association between DNA Methylation of the BDNF Promoter Region and Clinical Presentation in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Jumpei; Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Nakayama, Ritsuko; Shibata, Nobuto; Kuerban, Bolati; Ohnuma, Tohru; Kondo, Kazuhiro; Arai, Heii; Yamada, Hisashi; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims In the present study, we examined whether DNA methylation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter is associated with the manifestation and clinical presentation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods Of 20 patients with AD and 20 age-matched normal controls (NCs), the DNA methylation of the BDNF promoter (measured using peripheral blood samples) was completely analyzed in 12 patients with AD and 6 NCs. The resulting methylation levels were compared statistically. Next, we investigated the correlation between the DNA methylation levels and the clinical presentation of AD. Results The total methylation ratio (in %) of the 20 CpG sites was significantly higher in the AD patients (5.08 ± 5.52%) than in the NCs (2.09 ± 0.81%; p < 0.05). Of the 20 CpG sites, the methylation level at the CpG4 site was significantly higher in the AD subjects than in the NCs (p < 0.05). Moreover, the methylation level was significantly and negatively correlated with some neuropsychological test subscores (registration, recall, and prehension behavior scores; p < 0.05). Conclusion These results suggest that the DNA methylation of the BDNF promoter may significantly influence the manifestation of AD and might be associated with its neurocognitive presentation. PMID:25873928

  6. RMI1 Promotes DNA Replication Fork Progression and Recovery from Replication Fork Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jay; O'Donnell, Lara; Durocher, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    RMI1 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved complex composed of BLM and topoisomerase IIIα (TopoIIIα). This complex exhibits strand passage activity in vitro, which is likely important for DNA repair and DNA replication in vivo. The inactivation of RMI1 causes genome instability, including elevated levels of sister chromatid exchange and accelerated tumorigenesis. Using molecular combing to analyze DNA replication at the single-molecule level, we show that RMI1 is required to promote normal replication fork progression. The fork progression defect in RMI1-depleted cells is alleviated in cells lacking BLM, indicating that RMI1 functions downstream of BLM in promoting replication elongation. RMI1 localizes to subnuclear foci with BLM and TopoIIIα in response to replication stress. The proper localization of the complex requires a BLM-TopoIIIα-RMI1 interaction and is essential for RMI1 to promote recovery from replication stress. These findings reveal direct roles of RMI1 in DNA replication and the replication stress response, which could explain the molecular basis for its involvement in suppressing sister chromatid exchange and tumorigenesis. PMID:22645306

  7. The effect of smoking on MAOA promoter methylation in DNA prepared from lymphoblasts and whole blood.

    PubMed

    Philibert, Robert A; Beach, Steven R H; Gunter, Tracy D; Brody, Gene H; Madan, Anup; Gerrard, Meg

    2010-03-05

    Prior work using lymphoblast DNA prepared from 192 subjects from the Iowa Adoption Studies (IAS) demonstrated that decreased MAOA promoter methylation was associated with lifetime symptom count for nicotine dependence (ND) and provided suggestive evidence that the amount of methylation is genotype dependent. In the current investigation, we replicate and extend these prior findings in three ways using another 289 IAS subjects and the same methodologies. First, we show that methylation is dependent on current smoking status. Second, we introduce a factor analytic approach to DNA methylation, highlighting three distinct regions of the promoter that may function in somewhat different ways for males and females. Third, we directly compare the methylation signatures in DNA prepared from whole blood and lymphoblasts from a subset of these subjects and provide suggestive evidence favoring the use of lymphoblast DNA. We conclude that smoking reliably decreases MAOA methylation, but exact characterization of effects on level of methylation depend on genotype, smoking history, current smoking status, gender, and region of the promoter-associated CpG Island examined.

  8. The Conjugative Relaxase TrwC Promotes Integration of Foreign DNA in the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    González-Prieto, Coral; Gabriel, Richard; Dehio, Christoph; Schmidt, Manfred; Llosa, Matxalen

    2017-06-15

    -specific integrase activity in bacteria, as an integrase in human cells. Although it is not efficient as a site-specific integrase, we found that TrwC is active in human cells and promotes random integration of the transferred DNA in the human genome, probably acting as a DNA chaperone until it is integrated by host mechanisms. TrwC-DNA complexes can be delivered to human cells through a type IV secretion system involved in pathogenesis. Thus, TrwC could be used in vivo to transfer the DNA of interest into the appropriate cell and promote its integration. If used in combination with a site-specific nuclease, it could lead to site-specific integration of the incoming DNA by homologous recombination. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. The mechanism of regulation of bacteriophage lambda pR promoter activity by Escherichia coli DnaA protein.

    PubMed

    Glinkowska, Monika; Majka, Jerzy; Messer, Walter; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2003-06-20

    Apart from its function as an initiator of DNA replication, the Escherichia coli DnaA protein is also a specific transcription factor. It activates and represses a number of promoters. However, mechanisms of transcription stimulation by DnaA remained unknown. Bacteriophage lambda pR promoter is one of the promoters activated by DnaA. It was reported previously that DnaA binds downstream of the pR promoter and perhaps interacts with the RNA polymerase beta subunit. Here we demonstrate that DnaA positively regulates transcription from pR by stimulation of two steps in transcription initiation: RNA polymerase binding to the promoter region and promoter escape. For this transcription activation, two weak DnaA boxes located downstream of pR are necessary and sufficient. Such a mechanism of transcription activation and location of the activator-binding sites relative to the transcription start point are unusual in prokaryotes. Changes in the distance between the transcription start point and the first DnaA box by 5 and 10 bp and alterations in the orientation of these boxes did not abolish the stimulation of transcription by DnaA, but the efficiency of the promoter activation was different for various mutations. It seems plausible that formation of higher order nucleoprotein structures, involving DNA looping, is necessary for effective stimulation of the pR promoter. At high concentrations, DnaA is a repressor of pR rather than an activator. This repression was found to be because of inhibition of RNA polymerase binding to the promoter region.

  10. The NEIL glycosylases remove oxidized guanine lesions from telomeric and promoter quadruplex DNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia; Fleming, Aaron M.; Averill, April M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex is a four-stranded G-rich DNA structure that is highly susceptible to oxidation. Despite the important roles that G-quadruplexes play in telomere biology and gene transcription, neither the impact of guanine lesions on the stability of quadruplexes nor their repair are well understood. Here, we show that the oxidized guanine lesions 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) reduce the thermostability and alter the folding of telomeric quadruplexes in a location-dependent manner. Also, the NEIL1 and NEIL3 DNA glycosylases can remove hydantoin lesions but none of the glycosylases, including OGG1, are able to remove 8-oxoG from telomeric quadruplexes. Interestingly, a hydantoin lesion at the site most prone to oxidation in quadruplex DNA is not efficiently removed by NEIL1 or NEIL3. However, NEIL1, NEIL2 and NEIL3 remove hydantoins from telomeric quadruplexes formed by five TTAGGG repeats much more rapidly than the commonly studied four-repeat quadruplex structures. We also show that APE1 cleaves furan in selected positions in Na+-coordinated telomeric quadruplexes. In promoter G-quadruplex DNA, the NEIL glycosylases primarily remove Gh from Na+-coordinated antiparallel quadruplexes but not K+-coordinated parallel quadruplexes containing VEGF or c-MYC promoter sequences. Thus, the NEIL DNA glycosylases may be involved in both telomere maintenance and in gene regulation. PMID:25813041

  11. The Fun30 nucleosome remodeller promotes resection of DNA double-strand break ends.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuefeng; Cui, Dandan; Papusha, Alma; Zhang, Xiaotian; Chu, Chia-Dwo; Tang, Jiangwu; Chen, Kaifu; Pan, Xuewen; Ira, Grzegorz

    2012-09-27

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) are resected by 5' nucleases to form 3' single-stranded DNA substrates for binding by homologous recombination and DNA damage checkpoint proteins. Two redundant pathways of extensive resection have been described both in cells and in vitro, one relying on Exo1 exonuclease and the other on Sgs1 helicase and Dna2 nuclease. However, it remains unknown how resection proceeds within the context of chromatin, where histones and histone-bound proteins represent barriers for resection enzymes. Here we identify the yeast nucleosome-remodelling enzyme Fun30 as a factor promoting DSB end resection. Fun30 is the major nucleosome remodeller promoting extensive Exo1- and Sgs1-dependent resection of DSBs. The RSC and INO80 chromatin-remodelling complexes and Fun30 have redundant roles in resection adjacent to DSB ends. ATPase and helicase domains of Fun30, which are needed for nucleosome remodelling, are also required for resection. Fun30 is robustly recruited to DNA breaks and spreads along the DSB coincident with resection. Fun30 becomes less important for resection in the absence of the histone-bound Rad9 checkpoint adaptor protein known to block 5' strand processing and in the absence of either histone H3 K79 methylation or γ-H2A, which mediate recruitment of Rad9 (refs 9, 10). Together these data suggest that Fun30 helps to overcome the inhibitory effect of Rad9 on DNA resection.

  12. Metal-responsive promoter DNA compaction by the ferric uptake regulator

    PubMed Central

    Roncarati, Davide; Pelliciari, Simone; Doniselli, Nicola; Maggi, Stefano; Vannini, Andrea; Valzania, Luca; Mazzei, Luca; Zambelli, Barbara; Rivetti, Claudio; Danielli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Short-range DNA looping has been proposed to affect promoter activity in many bacterial species and operator configurations, but only few examples have been experimentally investigated in molecular detail. Here we present evidence for a metal-responsive DNA condensation mechanism controlled by the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an orthologue of the widespread Fur family of prokaryotic metal-dependent regulators. H. pylori Fur represses the transcription of the essential arsRS acid acclimation operon through iron-responsive oligomerization and DNA compaction, encasing the arsR transcriptional start site in a repressive macromolecular complex. A second metal-dependent regulator NikR functions as nickel-dependent anti-repressor at this promoter, antagonizing the binding of Fur to the operator elements responsible for the DNA condensation. The results allow unifying H. pylori metal ion homeostasis and acid acclimation in a mechanistically coherent model, and demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a selective metal-responsive DNA compaction mechanism controlling bacterial transcriptional regulation. PMID:27558202

  13. Condensin promotes the juxtaposition of DNA flanking its loading site in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xindan; Le, Tung B.K.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Dekker, Job; Laub, Michael T.; Rudner, David Z.

    2015-01-01

    SMC condensin complexes play a central role in compacting and resolving replicated chromosomes in virtually all organisms, yet how they accomplish this remains elusive. In Bacillus subtilis, condensin is loaded at centromeric parS sites, where it encircles DNA and individualizes newly replicated origins. Using chromosome conformation capture and cytological assays, we show that condensin recruitment to origin-proximal parS sites is required for the juxtaposition of the two chromosome arms. Recruitment to ectopic parS sites promotes alignment of large tracks of DNA flanking these sites. Importantly, insertion of parS sites on opposing arms indicates that these “zip-up” interactions only occur between adjacent DNA segments. Collectively, our data suggest that condensin resolves replicated origins by promoting the juxtaposition of DNA flanking parS sites, drawing sister origins in on themselves and away from each other. These results are consistent with a model in which condensin encircles the DNA flanking its loading site and then slides down, tethering the two arms together. Lengthwise condensation via loop extrusion could provide a generalizable mechanism by which condensin complexes act dynamically to individualize origins in B. subtilis and, when loaded along eukaryotic chromosomes, resolve them during mitosis. PMID:26253537

  14. Identification of a novel DNA-binding protein to osmotin promoter.

    PubMed

    Xu, P; Ling, J; Li, D; Hasegawa, P M; Bressan, R A

    1998-12-01

    One novel osmotin promoter, binding-protein (OPBP1) gene, was isolated from salt-adapted tobacco suspension cells using yeast one-hybrid system. The OPBP1 interacted specifically in vivo with FA, a DNA sequence from the 5 upstream region of osmotin gene, which was essential for osmotin responsiveness. The deduced amino acid sequence of OPBP1 contained a conserved motif of a new gene family, AP2 family. This protein did not contain the typical motif found in the most known DNA-binding proteins and transcription factors.

  15. DNA methylation analysis of chromosome 21 gene promoters at single base pair and single allele resolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Rohde, Christian; Tierling, Sascha; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Bock, Christoph; Santacruz, Diana; Ragozin, Sergey; Reinhardt, Richard; Groth, Marco; Walter, Jörn; Jeltsch, Albert

    2009-03-01

    Differential DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic signal for gene regulation, development, and disease processes. We mapped DNA methylation patterns of 190 gene promoter regions on chromosome 21 using bisulfite conversion and subclone sequencing in five human cell types. A total of 28,626 subclones were sequenced at high accuracy using (long-read) Sanger sequencing resulting in the measurement of the DNA methylation state of 580427 CpG sites. Our results show that average DNA methylation levels are distributed bimodally with enrichment of highly methylated and unmethylated sequences, both for amplicons and individual subclones, which represent single alleles from individual cells. Within CpG-rich sequences, DNA methylation was found to be anti-correlated with CpG dinucleotide density and GC content, and methylated CpGs are more likely to be flanked by AT-rich sequences. We observed over-representation of CpG sites in distances of 9, 18, and 27 bps in highly methylated amplicons. However, DNA sequence alone is not sufficient to predict an amplicon's DNA methylation status, since 43% of all amplicons are differentially methylated between the cell types studied here. DNA methylation in promoter regions is strongly correlated with the absence of gene expression and low levels of activating epigenetic marks like H3K4 methylation and H3K9 and K14 acetylation. Utilizing the single base pair and single allele resolution of our data, we found that i) amplicons from different parts of a CpG island frequently differ in their DNA methylation level, ii) methylation levels of individual cells in one tissue are very similar, and iii) methylation patterns follow a relaxed site-specific distribution. Furthermore, iv) we identified three cases of allele-specific DNA methylation on chromosome 21. Our data shed new light on the nature of methylation patterns in human cells, the sequence dependence of DNA methylation, and its function as epigenetic signal in gene regulation

  16. Seed storage protein gene promoters contain conserved DNA motifs in Brassicaceae, Fabaceae and Poaceae

    PubMed Central

    Fauteux, François; Strömvik, Martina V

    2009-01-01

    Background Accurate computational identification of cis-regulatory motifs is difficult, particularly in eukaryotic promoters, which typically contain multiple short and degenerate DNA sequences bound by several interacting factors. Enrichment in combinations of rare motifs in the promoter sequence of functionally or evolutionarily related genes among several species is an indicator of conserved transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. This provides a basis for the computational identification of cis-regulatory motifs. Results We have used a discriminative seeding DNA motif discovery algorithm for an in-depth analysis of 54 seed storage protein (SSP) gene promoters from three plant families, namely Brassicaceae (mustards), Fabaceae (legumes) and Poaceae (grasses) using backgrounds based on complete sets of promoters from a representative species in each family, namely Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.), soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) respectively. We have identified three conserved motifs (two RY-like and one ACGT-like) in Brassicaceae and Fabaceae SSP gene promoters that are similar to experimentally characterized seed-specific cis-regulatory elements. Fabaceae SSP gene promoter sequences are also enriched in a novel, seed-specific E2Fb-like motif. Conserved motifs identified in Poaceae SSP gene promoters include a GCN4-like motif, two prolamin-box-like motifs and an Skn-1-like motif. Evidence of the presence of a variant of the TATA-box is found in the SSP gene promoters from the three plant families. Motifs discovered in SSP gene promoters were used to score whole-genome sets of promoters from Arabidopsis, soybean and rice. The highest-scoring promoters are associated with genes coding for different subunits or precursors of seed storage proteins. Conclusion Seed storage protein gene promoter motifs are conserved in diverse species, and different plant families are characterized by a distinct combination of conserved motifs

  17. MGMT DNA repair gene promoter/enhancer haplotypes alter transcription factor binding and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meixiang; Cross, Courtney E; Speidel, Jordan T; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2016-10-01

    The O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) protein removes O(6)-alkyl-guanine adducts from DNA. MGMT expression can thus alter the sensitivity of cells and tissues to environmental and chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. Previously, we defined the haplotype structure encompassing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MGMT promoter/enhancer (P/E) region and found that haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, alter MGMT promoter activity. The exact mechanism(s) by which these haplotypes exert their effect on MGMT promoter activity is currently unknown, but we noted that many of the SNPs comprising the MGMT P/E haplotypes are located within or in close proximity to putative transcription factor binding sites. Thus, these haplotypes could potentially affect transcription factor binding and, subsequently, alter MGMT promoter activity. In this study, we test the hypothesis that MGMT P/E haplotypes affect MGMT promoter activity by altering transcription factor (TF) binding to the P/E region. We used a promoter binding TF profiling array and a reporter assay to evaluate the effect of different P/E haplotypes on TF binding and MGMT expression, respectively. Our data revealed a significant difference in TF binding profiles between the different haplotypes evaluated. We identified TFs that consistently showed significant haplotype-dependent binding alterations (p ≤ 0.01) and revealed their role in regulating MGMT expression using siRNAs and a dual-luciferase reporter assay system. The data generated support our hypothesis that promoter haplotypes alter the binding of TFs to the MGMT P/E and, subsequently, affect their regulatory function on MGMT promoter activity and expression level.

  18. CaMV-35S promoter sequence-specific DNA methylation in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Azusa; Shimada, Asahi; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Horino, Takuya; Iwata, Yuji; Koizumi, Nozomu; Nishihara, Masahiro; Mishiba, Kei-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We found 35S promoter sequence-specific DNA methylation in lettuce. Additionally, transgenic lettuce plants having a modified 35S promoter lost methylation, suggesting the modified sequence is subjected to the methylation machinery. We previously reported that cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter-specific DNA methylation in transgenic gentian (Gentiana triflora × G. scabra) plants occurs irrespective of the copy number and the genomic location of T-DNA, and causes strong gene silencing. To confirm whether 35S-specific methylation can occur in other plant species, transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) plants with a single copy of the 35S promoter-driven sGFP gene were produced and analyzed. Among 10 lines of transgenic plants, 3, 4, and 3 lines showed strong, weak, and no expression of sGFP mRNA, respectively. Bisulfite genomic sequencing of the 35S promoter region showed hypermethylation at CpG and CpWpG (where W is A or T) sites in 9 of 10 lines. Gentian-type de novo methylation pattern, consisting of methylated cytosines at CpHpH (where H is A, C, or T) sites, was also observed in the transgenic lettuce lines, suggesting that lettuce and gentian share similar methylation machinery. Four of five transgenic lettuce lines having a single copy of a modified 35S promoter, which was modified in the proposed core target of de novo methylation in gentian, exhibited 35S hypomethylation, indicating that the modified sequence may be the target of the 35S-specific methylation machinery.

  19. Characterisation of the promoter region of the human DNA-repair gene Rad51.

    PubMed

    Hasselbach, L; Haase, S; Fischer, D; Kolberg, H C; Stürzbecher, H W

    2005-01-01

    Regulatory elements of the 5'-flanking region of the DNA-repair gene Rad51 were analysed to characterise pathological alterations of Rad51 mRNA expression during tumour development. Various fragments of the Rad51 promoter were cloned into the pGL3 reporter vector and the respective promoter activity was determined by luciferase assays in transfected U2-OS cells. Transcription factor binding was identified using Protein/DNA arrays. The region encompassing base pairs -204 to -58 was identified as crucial for Rad51 gene transcription. Down regulator sequences are present upstream (-305 to -204) and downstream (-48 and +204) of this core promoter element. Promoter activity is significantly enhanced by substituting G at the polymorphic positions +135 and +172 for C and T, respectively. Transcription factors Ets1/PEA3, E2F1, p53, EGR1, and Stat5 were identified as relevant for regulating expression of Rad51. We identified three separate cis-sequence elements within the Rad51 transcriptional promoter, one ensuring basal levels of expression and two elements limiting expression to relatively low levels. The characterisation of transcription factor binding might help to explain high-level expression of Rad51 in a variety of solid tumours. The polymorphic sites appear important for the increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  20. Promotion of evolution by intracellular coexistence of mutator and normal DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Aoki, K; Furusawa, M

    2001-03-21

    The efficient evolution of a population requires both genetic diversity and stable reproduction of advantageous genotypes. The accuracy of DNA replication guarantees the stable reproduction, while errors during DNA replication produce the genetic diversity. Thus, one key to the promotion of evolution is inherent in DNA replication. In bacteria, replication forks progress bidirectionally from the single origin of replication on a genome. One replication fork contains two DNA polymerase molecules so that four DNA polymerases simultaneously carry out the replication of a genome. It is generally believed that the fidelity of the intracellular DNA polymerases is identical (parity strategy). To test this, we examined the effects of the intracellular coexistence of a mutator polymerase with low fidelity and a normal polymerase with high fidelity on adaptive evolution (disparity strategy). From the analysis using genetic algorithms based on the bacterial replication, it was found that the population using the disparity strategy could further expand its genetic diversity and preserve the advantageous genotypes more profoundly than the parity population. This strongly suggests that bacteria replicating with a disparity strategy may undergo rapid evolution, particularly during severe environmental changes. The implications of the conspicuous adaptability of Escherichia coli mutator strains are discussed in this context.

  1. Large conserved domains of low DNA methylation maintained by Dnmt3a

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mira; Sun, Deqiang; Luo, Min; Huang, Yun; Challen, Grant A.; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Chavez, Lukas; Wang, Hui; Hannah, Rebecca; Kim, Sang-Bae; Yang, Liubin; Ko, Myunggon; Chen, Rui; Göttgens, Berthold; Lee, Ju-Seog; Gunaratne, Preethi; Godley, Lucy A.; Darlington, Gretchen J.; Rao, Anjana; Li, Wei; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Gains and losses in DNA methylation are prominent features of mammalian cell types. To gain insight into mechanisms that could promote shifts in DNA methylation and contribute to cell fate changes, including malignant transformation, we performed genome-wide mapping of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in purified murine hematopoietic stem cells. We discovered extended regions of low methylation (Canyons) that span conserved domains frequently containing transcription factors and are distinct from CpG islands and shores. The genes in about half of these methylation Canyons are coated with repressive histone marks while the remainder are covered by activating histone marks and are highly expressed in HSCs. Canyon borders are demarked by 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and become eroded in the absence of DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a). Genes dysregulated in human leukemias are enriched for Canyon-associated genes. The novel epigenetic landscape we describe may provide a mechanism for the regulation of hematopoiesis and may contribute to leukemia development. PMID:24270360

  2. Decreased DNA Methylations at the Progesterone Receptor Promoter A Induce Functional Progesterone Withdrawal in Human Parturition.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Chen, Cheng; Luo, Hui; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C; Ni, Bing; Chang, Qing

    2014-07-01

    The functional interaction of progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms PRA and PRB regulates myometrial transition from the resting state to excitation-contraction to initiate parturition. However, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for maintenance and functional alteration of the PRA and PRB expression levels during human pregnancy and term labor, respectively, remain unknown. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate whether and how epigenetic DNA modifications, specifically methylations, at the PRs' promoter regions contribute to the differential expression of PRA and PRB in laboring term myometrium of humans. Comparative analysis of PRA and PRB messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels and accompanying changes in their promoters' methylation status was carried out using human myometrial samples from women undergoing singleton, term deliveries by cesarean section, either in the absence of labor (designated as NIL for not-in-labor) or in active labor (designated as IL for in labor). The PRA gene expression was shown to be elevated significantly during labor, while PRB gene expression was unaltered, and this differential expression was accompanied by decreased DNA methylation at the PRA promoter and not at the PRB promoter. In addition, labor-related decreased mRNA expression of the DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) family members DNMT1 and DNMT3a was found, however whether the increased expression of DNMTs directly supports the functional withdrawal of progesterone needs further investigation. Collectively, these data indicate that DNA methylation might represent an important epigenetic mechanism of labor-related differential expression of PRs, thereby mediating the biological process of functional PR withdrawal at term for parturition. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival.

    PubMed

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; Stemler, Kristina M; White, Lynn S; Loza, Andrew J; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-12-22

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy.

  4. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Tinkum, Kelsey L.; Stemler, Kristina M.; White, Lynn S.; Loza, Andrew J.; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M.; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy. PMID:26644583

  5. Characterization of EBV Promoters and Coding Regions by Sequencing PCR-Amplified DNA Fragments.

    PubMed

    Szenthe, Kalman; Bánáti, Ferenc

    2017-01-01

    DNA sequencing approaches originally developed in two directions, the chemical degradation method and the chain-termination method. The latter one became more widespread and a huge amount of sequencing data including whole genome sequences accumulated, based on the use of capillary sequencer systems and the application of a modified chain-termination method which proved to be relatively easy, fast, and reliable. In addition, relatively long, up to 1000 bp sequences could be obtained with a single read with high per-base accuracy. Although the recent appearance of next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technologies enabled high-throughput and low cost analysis of DNA, the modified chain-terminating methods are often applied in research until now. In the following, we shall present the application of capillary sequencing for the sequence characterization of viral genomes in case of partial and whole genome sequencing, and demonstrate it on the BARF1 promoter of Epstein Barr virus (EBV).

  6. FAN1 acts with FANCI-FANCD2 to promote DNA interstrand cross-link repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Ghosal, Gargi; Yuan, Jingsong; Chen, Junjie; Huang, Jun

    2010-08-06

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is caused by mutations in 13 Fanc genes and renders cells hypersensitive to DNA interstrand cross-linking (ICL) agents. A central event in the FA pathway is mono-ubiquitylation of the FANCI-FANCD2 (ID) protein complex. Here, we characterize a previously unrecognized nuclease, Fanconi anemia-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1), that promotes ICL repair in a manner strictly dependent on its ability to accumulate at or near sites of DNA damage and that relies on mono-ubiquitylation of the ID complex. Thus, the mono-ubiquitylated ID complex recruits the downstream repair protein FAN1 and facilitates the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links.

  7. Recombination promoted by DNA viruses: phage λ to herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Weller, Sandra K; Sawitzke, James A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for understanding viral origins as well as the dynamic nature of viral-host interactions. Both bacteriophage λ and herpes simplex virus (HSV) display high rates of recombination, both utilizing their own proteins and commandeering cellular proteins to promote recombination reactions. We focus primarily on λ and HSV, as they have proven amenable to both genetic and biochemical analysis and have recently been shown to exhibit some surprising similarities that will guide future studies.

  8. Recombination Promoted by DNA Viruses: Phage λ to Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Sandra K.; Sawitzke, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for understanding viral origins as well as the dynamic nature of viral-host interactions. Both bacteriophage λ and herpes simplex virus (HSV) display high rates of recombination, both utilizing their own proteins and commandeering cellular proteins to promote recombination reactions. We focus primarily on λ and HSV, as they have proven amenable to both genetic and biochemical analysis and have recently been shown to exhibit some surprising similarities that will guide future studies. PMID:25002096

  9. Incorrect DNA methylation of the DAZL promoter CpG island associates with defective human sperm†

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Costa, Paulo; Nogueira, Paulo; Carvalho, Marta; Leal, Fernanda; Cordeiro, Isabel; Calhaz-Jorge, Carlos; Gonçalves, João; Plancha, Carlos E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Successful gametogenesis requires the establishment of an appropriate epigenetic state in developing germ cells. Nevertheless, an association between abnormal spermatogenesis and epigenetic disturbances in germline-specific genes remains to be demonstrated. METHODS In this study, the DNA methylation pattern of the promoter CpG island (CGI) of two germline regulator genes—DAZL and DAZ, was characterized by bisulphite genomic sequencing in quality-fractioned ejaculated sperm populations from normozoospermic (NZ) and oligoasthenoteratozoospermic (OAT) men. RESULTS OAT patients display increased methylation defects in the DAZL promoter CGI when compared with NZ controls. Such differences are recorded when analyzing sperm fractions enriched either in normal or defective germ cells (P< 0.001 in both cases). Significant differences in DNA methylation profiles are also observable when comparing the qualitatively distinct germ cell fractions inside the NZ and OAT groups (P= 0.003 and P= 0.007, respectively). Contrastingly, the unmethylation pattern of the DAZ promoter CGI remains correctly established in all experimental groups. CONCLUSIONS An association between disrupted DNA methylation of a key spermatogenesis gene and abnormal human sperm is described here for the first time. These results suggest that incorrect epigenetic marks in germline genes may be correlated with male gametogenic defects. PMID:20685756

  10. Decoupling of DNA methylation and activity of intergenic LINE-1 promoters in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vafadar-Isfahani, Natasha; Parr, Christina; McMillan, Lara E.; Sanner, Juliane; Yeo, Zhao; Saddington, Stephen; Peacock, Oliver; Cruickshanks, Hazel A.; Meehan, Richard R.; Lund, Jonathan N.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypomethylation of LINE-1 repeats in cancer has been proposed as the main mechanism behind their activation; this assumption, however, was based on findings from early studies that were biased toward young and transpositionally active elements. Here, we investigate the relationship between methylation of 2 intergenic, transpositionally inactive LINE-1 elements and expression of the LINE-1 chimeric transcript (LCT) 13 and LCT14 driven by their antisense promoters (L1-ASP). Our data from DNA modification, expression, and 5′RACE analyses suggest that colorectal cancer methylation in the regions analyzed is not always associated with LCT repression. Consistent with this, in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells lacking DNA methyltransferases DNMT1 or DNMT3B, LCT13 expression decreases, while cells lacking both DNMTs or treated with the DNMT inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-aza) show no change in LCT13 expression. Interestingly, levels of the H4K20me3 histone modification are inversely associated with LCT13 and LCT14 expression. Moreover, at these LINE-1s, H4K20me3 levels rather than DNA methylation seem to be good predictor of their sensitivity to 5-aza treatment. Therefore, by studying individual LINE-1 promoters we have shown that in some cases these promoters can be active without losing methylation; in addition, we provide evidence that other factors (e.g., H4K20me3 levels) play prominent roles in their regulation. PMID:28300471

  11. G9a coordinates with the RPA complex to promote DNA damage repair and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Qian; Lu, Xiaopeng; Du, Yipeng; Cao, Linlin; Shen, Changchun; Hou, Tianyun; Li, Meiting; Li, Zhiming; Liu, Chaohua; Wu, Di; Xu, Xingzhi; Wang, Lina; Wang, Haiying; Zhao, Ying; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Histone methyltransferase G9a has critical roles in promoting cancer-cell growth and gene suppression, but whether it is also associated with the DNA damage response is rarely studied. Here, we report that loss of G9a impairs DNA damage repair and enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapeutics. In response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), G9a is phosphorylated at serine 211 by casein kinase 2 (CK2) and recruited to chromatin. The chromatin-enriched G9a can then directly interact with replication protein A (RPA) and promote loading of the RPA and Rad51 recombinase to DSBs. This mechanism facilitates homologous recombination (HR) and cell survival. We confirmed the interaction between RPA and G9a to be critical for RPA foci formation and HR upon DNA damage. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a regulatory pathway based on CK2–G9a–RPA that permits HR in cancer cells and provide further rationale for the use of G9a inhibitors as a cancer therapeutic. PMID:28698370

  12. DNA Methylation Analysis of BRD1 Promoter Regions and the Schizophrenia rs138880 Risk Allele

    PubMed Central

    Dyrvig, Mads; Qvist, Per; Lichota, Jacek; Larsen, Knud; Nyegaard, Mette; Børglum, Anders D.

    2017-01-01

    The bromodomain containing 1 gene, BRD1 is essential for embryogenesis and CNS development. It encodes a protein that participates in histone modifying complexes and thereby regulates the expression of a large number of genes. Genetic variants in the BRD1 locus show association with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and risk alleles in the promoter region correlate with reduced BRD1 expression. Insights into the transcriptional regulation of BRD1 and the pathogenic mechanisms associated with BRD1 risk variants, however, remain sparse. By studying transcripts in human HeLa and SH-SY5Y cells we provide evidence for differences in relative expression of BRD1 transcripts with three alternative 5’ UTRs (exon 1C, 1B, and 1A). We further show that expression of these transcript variants covaries negatively with DNA methylation proportions in their upstream promoter regions suggesting that promoter usage might be regulated by DNA methylation. In line with findings that the risk allele of the rs138880 SNP in the BRD1 promoter region correlates with reduced BRD1 expression, we find that it is also associated with moderate regional BRD1 promoter hypermethylation in both adipose tissue and blood. Importantly, we demonstrate by inspecting available DNA methylation and expression data that these regions undergo changes in methylation during fetal brain development and that differences in their methylation proportions in fetal compared to postnatal frontal cortex correlate significantly with BRD1 expression. These findings suggest that BRD1 may be dysregulated in both the developing and mature brain of risk allele carriers. Finally, we demonstrate that commonly used mood stabilizers Lithium, Valproate, and Carbamazepine affect the expression of BRD1 in SH-SY5Y cells. Altogether this study indicates a link between genetic risk and epigenetic dysregulation of BRD1 which raises interesting perspectives for targeting the mechanisms pharmacologically. PMID:28095495

  13. Sequence Features and Transcriptional Stalling within Centromere DNA Promote Establishment of CENP-A Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Catania, Sandra; Pidoux, Alison L.; Allshire, Robin C.

    2015-01-01

    Centromere sequences are not conserved between species, and there is compelling evidence for epigenetic regulation of centromere identity, with location being dictated by the presence of chromatin containing the histone H3 variant CENP-A. Paradoxically, in most organisms CENP-A chromatin generally occurs on particular sequences. To investigate the contribution of primary DNA sequence to establishment of CENP-A chromatin in vivo, we utilised the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. CENP-ACnp1 chromatin is normally assembled on ∼10 kb of central domain DNA within these regional centromeres. We demonstrate that overproduction of S. pombe CENP-ACnp1 bypasses the usual requirement for adjacent heterochromatin in establishing CENP-ACnp1 chromatin, and show that central domain DNA is a preferred substrate for de novo establishment of CENP-ACnp1 chromatin. When multimerised, a 2 kb sub-region can establish CENP-ACnp1 chromatin and form functional centromeres. Randomization of the 2 kb sequence to generate a sequence that maintains AT content and predicted nucleosome positioning is unable to establish CENP-ACnp1 chromatin. These analyses indicate that central domain DNA from fission yeast centromeres contains specific information that promotes CENP-ACnp1 incorporation into chromatin. Numerous transcriptional start sites were detected on the forward and reverse strands within the functional 2 kb sub-region and active promoters were identified. RNAPII is enriched on central domain DNA in wild-type cells, but only low levels of transcripts are detected, consistent with RNAPII stalling during transcription of centromeric DNA. Cells lacking factors involved in restarting transcription—TFIIS and Ubp3—assemble CENP-ACnp1 on central domain DNA when CENP-ACnp1 is at wild-type levels, suggesting that persistent stalling of RNAPII on centromere DNA triggers chromatin remodelling events that deposit CENP-ACnp1. Thus, sequence-encoded features of centromeric DNA create an

  14. Bidirectional promoter trapping T-DNA for insertional mutagenesis in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Sheng; Wang, Cai-yue; Zhang, Xin; Lin, Ling

    2014-07-01

    Transfer DNA (T-DNA)-based random insertional mutagenesis is a universal forward genetic approach for gene identification and cloning in many phytopathogenic fungi. In a large number of randomly selected transformants, screening for mutants with a specific phenotype is laborious, especially for pathogenicity-defective mutants. To accelerate mutant screening and gene identification, a bidirectional promoter-trapping Ti binary vector, 1300-bisGFP-hyg, was constructed and deployed in this study. More than 6000 Verticillium dahliae transformants were obtained by the mediation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the vector. One thousand randomly selected transformants were cultured on Czapek-Dox and on Czapek-Dox plus cotton root extract media plates. The cultured transformants with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression or changes in phenotype were selected and used in virulence or promoter-trapping assays. Based on the virulence assay of 60 transformants, the pathogenicity of 17 of these mutants was compromised. Ten pathogenicity-defective mutants were found with GFP expression, and 6 with expression in Czapek-Dox plus cotton root extract media specifically. Using TAIL-PCR (thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction), the T-DNA insertion sites were identified in 8 GFP-expressing transformants, including 5 pathogenicity-defective mutants and 3 unaffected transformants. Promoters of 6 genes were successfully trapped using the T-DNA method in this study. The nonpathogenic transformant 24C9 was the subject of additional investigation. It displayed strong GFP expression on water agar medium supplemented with cotton root extracts and on cotton seedling stems. The results obtained by Southern blot and quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that the transcription level of VdUGPU (encoding UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase) was significantly reduced owing to T-DNA insertion in the gene promoter region. These results indicate that the bidirectional

  15. Physical activity, black carbon exposure, and DNA methylation in the FOXP3 promoter.

    PubMed

    Lovinsky-Desir, Stephanie; Jung, Kyung Hwa; Jezioro, Jacqueline R; Torrone, David Z; de Planell-Saguer, Mariangels; Yan, Beizhan; Perera, Frederica P; Rundle, Andrew G; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Chillrud, Steven N; Miller, Rachel L

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with improvement in lung function; however, pollution exposure during physical activity can lead to a transient reduction in lung function. This paradoxical relationship may be linked to altered T regulatory (Treg) cell activity, which increases with exercise and suppresses airway inflammation, but decreases in association with exposure to air pollution. To clarify these relationships, we investigated buccal cell DNA methylation of the forkhead box p3 (FOXP3) gene promoter, a proposed biomarker of Treg activity. We hypothesized that active urban children would have lower FOXP3 promoter methylation, associated with better lung function compared to non-active children. We also hypothesized that this relationship would be attenuated by high exposure to the air pollutant black carbon (BC). We performed a cross-sectional study of 135 children ages 9-14 who live in New York City. Activity was measured across 6 days. BC exposure was assessed by personal monitors worn for two 24-h periods, followed by lung function assessment. Buccal swabs were collected for DNA methylation analysis of three regions (six CpG sites) in the FOXP3 promoter. In multivariable regression models, overall, there was no significant relationship between physical activity and FOXP3 promoter methylation (p > 0.05). However, in stratified analyses, among children with higher BC exposure (≥1200 ng/m(3)), physical activity was associated with 2.37% lower methylation in promoter 2 (CpGs -77, -65, and -58) (βestimate = -2.37%, p < 0.01) but not among those with lower BC exposure (βestimate = 0.54%, p > 0.05). Differences across strata were statistically significant (pinteraction = 0.04). Among all children, after controlling for BC concentration, promoter 2 methylation was associated with reduced FEV1/FVC (βestimate = -0.40%, p < 0.01) and reduced FEF25-75% (βestimate = -1.46%, p < 0.01). Physical activity in urban children

  16. Viral DNA Replication Orientation and hnRNPs Regulate Transcription of the Human Papillomavirus 18 Late Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Liu, Haibin; Ge, Hui; Ajiro, Masahiko; Sharma, Nishi R.; Meyers, Craig; Morozov, Pavel; Tuschl, Thomas; Klar, Amar; Court, Donald

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is tightly linked to keratinocyte differentiation. Although expression of viral early genes is initiated immediately upon virus infection of undifferentiated basal cells, viral DNA amplification and late gene expression occur only in the mid to upper strata of the keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In this report, we show that the relative activity of HPV18 TATA-less late promoter P811 depends on its orientation relative to that of the origin (Ori) of viral DNA replication and is sensitive to the eukaryotic DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin. Additionally, transfected 70-nucleotide (nt)-long single-strand DNA oligonucleotides that are homologous to the region near Ori induce late promoter activity. We also found that promoter activation in raft cultures leads to production of the late promoter-associated, sense-strand transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs) and splice-site small RNAs (spliRNAs). Finally, a cis-acting AAGTATGCA core element that functions as a repressor to the promoter was identified. This element interacts with hnRNP D0B and hnRNP A/B factors. Point mutations in the core prevented binding of hnRNPs and increased the promoter activity. Confirming this result, knocking down the expression of both hnRNPs in keratinocytes led to increased promoter activity. Taking the data together, our study revealed the mechanism of how the HPV18 late promoter is regulated by DNA replication and host factors. PMID:28559488

  17. Altered regulation of DNA ligase IV activity by aberrant promoter DNA methylation and gene amplification in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuhmann, Christine; Li, Carmen; Kloor, Matthias; Salou, Mariam; Weigel, Christoph; Schmidt, Christopher R; Ng, Linda W C; Tsui, Wendy W Y; Leung, Suet Y; Yuen, Siu T; Becker, Natalia; Weichenhan, Dieter; Plass, Christoph; Schmezer, Peter; Chan, Tsun L; Popanda, Odilia

    2014-04-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) presents as a very heterogeneous disease which cannot sufficiently be characterized with the currently known genetic and epigenetic markers. To identify new markers for CRC we scrutinized the methylation status of 231 DNA repair-related genes by methyl-CpG immunoprecipitation followed by global methylation profiling on a CpG island microarray, as altered expression of these genes could drive genomic and chromosomal instability observed in these tumors. We show for the first time hypermethylation of MMP9, DNMT3A and LIG4 in CRC which was confirmed in two CRC patient groups with different ethnicity. DNA ligase IV (LIG4) showed strong differential promoter methylation (up to 60%) which coincided with downregulation of mRNA in 51% of cases. This functional association of LIG4 methylation and gene expression was supported by LIG4 re-expression in 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated colon cancer cell lines, and reduced ligase IV amounts and end-joining activity in extracts of tumors with hypermethylation. Methylation of LIG4 was not associated with other genetic and epigenetic markers of CRC in our study. As LIG4 is located on chromosome 13 which is frequently amplified in CRC, two loci were tested for gene amplification in a subset of 47 cases. Comparison of amplification, methylation and expression data revealed that, in 30% of samples, the LIG4 gene was amplified and methylated, but expression was not changed. In conclusion, hypermethylation of the LIG4 promoter is a new mechanism to control ligase IV expression. It may represent a new epigenetic marker for CRC independent of known markers.

  18. Dissociation of tumor promoter-stimulated ornithine decarboxylase activity and DNA synthesis in mouse epidermis in vivo and in vitro by fluocinolone acetonide, a tumor-promotion inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Lichti, U; Slaga, T J; Ben, T; Patterson, E; Hennings, H; Yuspa, S H

    1977-01-01

    12-O-Tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a tumor promoter, stimulates DNA synthesis in mouse epidermal cells in vivo and in vitro. This response appears to be mediated through polyamine metabolism because ornithine decarboxylase (L-ornithine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.17)activity is markedly increased shortly after promoter exposure and this induction varies in magnitude according to dose and promoter potency of a series of phorbol esters. In vitro, exogenous putrescine (0.01-10 mM) results in a dose-related increase and prolongation of promoter-stimulated DNA DNA synthesis, a phenomenon noted in other systems of polyamine-mediated growth stimulation. The anti-inflammatory steroid fluocinolone acetonide (FA), an inhibitor of tumor promotion, prevents TPA stimulation of epidermal proliferation in vivo and in vitro. In vitro, FA most effectively prevents stimulation of DNA synthesis when applied is not required. Paradoxially, FA potentiates the increase in ornithine decarboxylase activity after TPA administeration both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the inhibition of TPA-stimulated DNA synthesis by FA in vitro can be reversed by exogenous putrescine. These results suggestthat FA exerts its antipromotion effect by reducing the sensitivity of the cell to polyamines or by reducing intracellular polyamine levels. PMID:269443

  19. Aneuploid nuclear DNA content in some enzyme-altered rat liver foci during tumor promotion

    SciTech Connect

    Sudilovsky, O.; Hei, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    Most rat hepatomas are aneuploid. To determine if ploidy changes can be detected also during hepatocarcinogenesis, male F344 rats were partially hepatectomized; 18 hrs later they were given 50 mg/kg weight diethylnitrosamine i.p. and fed a promoting choline-deficient diet containing 0.05% phenobarbital. Controls received partial hepatectomy, i.p. saline, and choline-supplemented diet. Rats were sacrificed at various times and liver sections were stained with a combined Feulgen-..gamma..-glutamyl transferase stain. DNA content of hepatocytes in enzyme-altered foci (EAF) thus identified was measured by microspectrophotometry. No EAF were found in control animals. Nuclear DNA values of control hepatocytes had a trimodal distribution, with peaks corresponding to 2N, 4N, and 8N ploidy. A similar pattern was seen in most EAF from treated rats. However, at each treatment time a minority of EAF (23, 14, and 36% at 10, 16 and 29 wks, respectively) evinced an aneuploid pattern. Out of a total of 59 EAF counted in 10 rats, 15 were aneuploid. Although aneuploidy is essential in the progression stage of cancer, this finding indicates it is already present during promotion, long before hepatomas can be diagnosed. More important, it demonstrates that EAF heterogeneity is not only phenotypic but also genomic. Aneuploid DNA content in some EAF may be a marker for abnormal cell populations from which carcinomas are most likely to arise.

  20. Suppression of CHK1 by ETS Family Members Promotes DNA Damage Response Bypass and Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Andrea; Varmeh, Shohreh; Chen, Ming; Taulli, Riccardo; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Ala, Ugo; Seitzer, Nina; Ishikawa, Tomoki; Carver, Brett S; Hobbs, Robin M; Quarantotti, Valentina; Ng, Christopher; Berger, Alice H; Nardella, Caterina; Poliseno, Laura; Montironi, Rodolfo; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Signoretti, Sabina; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2015-05-01

    The ETS family of transcription factors has been repeatedly implicated in tumorigenesis. In prostate cancer, ETS family members, such as ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5, are frequently overexpressed due to chromosomal translocations, but the molecular mechanisms by which they promote prostate tumorigenesis remain largely undefined. Here, we show that ETS family members, such as ERG and ETV1, directly repress the expression of the checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1), a key DNA damage response cell-cycle regulator essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. Critically, we find that ERG expression correlates with CHK1 downregulation in human patients and demonstrate that Chk1 heterozygosity promotes the progression of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia into prostatic invasive carcinoma in Pten(+) (/-) mice. Importantly, CHK1 downregulation sensitizes prostate tumor cells to etoposide but not to docetaxel treatment. Thus, we identify CHK1 as a key functional target of the ETS proto-oncogenic family with important therapeutic implications. Genetic translocation and aberrant expression of ETS family members is a common event in different types of human tumors. Here, we show that through the transcriptional repression of CHK1, ETS factors may favor DNA damage accumulation and consequent genetic instability in proliferating cells. Importantly, our findings provide a rationale for testing DNA replication inhibitor agents in ETS-positive TP53-proficient tumors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. A novel DNA replication origin identified in the human heat shock protein 70 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Taira, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1994-01-01

    A general and sensitive method for the mapping of initiation sites of DNA replication in vivo, developed by Vassilev and Johnson, has revealed replication origins in the region of simian virus 40 ori, in the regions upstream from the human c-myc gene and downstream from the Chinese hamster dihydrofolate reductase gene, and in the enhancer region of the mouse immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene. Here we report that the region containing the promoter of the human heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene was identified as a DNA replication origin in HeLa cells by this method. Several segments of the region were cloned into pUC19 and examined for autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) activity. The plasmids carrying the segments replicated episomally and semiconservatively when transfected into HeLa cells. The segments of ARS activity contained the sequences previously identified as binding sequences for a c-myc protein complex (T. Taira, Y. Negishi, F. Kihara, S. M. M. Iguchi-Ariga, and H. Ariga, Biochem. Biophys. Acta 1130:166-174, 1992). Mutations introduced within the c-myc protein complex binding sequences abolished the ARS activity. Moreover, the ARS plasmids stably replicated at episomal state for a long time in established cell lines. The results suggest that the promoter region of the human hsp70 gene plays a role in DNA replication as well as in transcription. Images PMID:8065368

  2. Pre-B cell to macrophage transdifferentiation without significant promoter DNA methylation changes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Ciudad, Laura; Gómez-Cabrero, David; Parra, Maribel; Bussmann, Lars H; di Tullio, Alessandro; Kallin, Eric M; Tegnér, Jesper; Graf, Thomas; Ballestar, Esteban

    2012-03-01

    Transcription factor-induced lineage reprogramming or transdifferentiation experiments are essential for understanding the plasticity of differentiated cells. These experiments helped to define the specific role of transcription factors in conferring cell identity and played a key role in the development of the regenerative medicine field. We here investigated the acquisition of DNA methylation changes during C/EBPα-induced pre-B cell to macrophage transdifferentiation. Unexpectedly, cell lineage conversion occurred without significant changes in DNA methylation not only in key B cell- and macrophage-specific genes but also throughout the entire set of genes differentially methylated between the two parental cell types. In contrast, active and repressive histone modification marks changed according to the expression levels of these genes. We also demonstrated that C/EBPα and RNA Pol II are associated with the methylated promoters of macrophage-specific genes in reprogrammed macrophages without inducing methylation changes. Our findings not only provide insights about the extent and hierarchy of epigenetic events in pre-B cell to macrophage transdifferentiation but also show an important difference to reprogramming towards pluripotency where promoter DNA demethylation plays a pivotal role.

  3. DNA promoter and histone H3 methylation downregulate NGX6 in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Zhu, Xinjiang; Xu, Xiaoyang; Dai, Dongqiu

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma-associated gene 6 (NGX6) is a novel candidate tumor metastasis suppressor gene. Our study was to determine whether DNA hypermethylation and histone modification at the NGX6 gene promoter play important roles in silencing NGX6 expression in gastric cancer. NGX6 expression was downregulated in all gastric cancer cells and 76.19 % tissues. In three GC cell lines, hypermethylated NGX6 loci were characterized by histone H3-K9 hypoacetylation and hypermethylation. Trichostatin A treatment could moderately increase H3-K9 acetylation at the silenced loci; however, it had no effect on DNA and H3-K9 methylation and minimal effects on NGX6 expression. In contrast, 5'aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment could rapidly decrease DNA and H3-K9 methylation at the silenced loci, leading to the reexpression of NGX6. Combined treatment with 5'aza-2'-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A had synergistic effects on the reexpression of NGX6 at the hypermethylation loci. Our current study shows that NGX6 expression is downregulated in GC cancer cells and tissues due to NGX6 promoter methylation and H3-K9 methylation, but not H3-K9 acetylation. Our findings indicate that the downregulation of NGX6 expression contributes to the development and progression of gastric cancer. More studies are needed to determine the precise mechanism of NGX6 in the progression of gastric cancer.

  4. DNA promoter methylation in breast tumors: No association with genetic polymorphisms in MTHFR and MTR

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Meng Hua; Shields, Peter G.; Nie, Jing; Marian, Catalin; Ambrosone, Christine B.; McCann, Susan E.; Platek, Mary; Krishnan, Shiva S.; Xie, Bin; Edge, Stephen B.; Winston, Janet; Vito, Dominica; Trevisan, Maurizio; Freudenheim, Jo L.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant promoter methylation is recognized as an important feature of breast carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation of genes for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase (MTR), two critical enzymes in one-carbon metabolism, may alter DNA methylation levels, and thus influence DNA methylation in breast cancer. We evaluated case-control association of MTHFR C677T, A1298C, and MTR A2756G polymorphisms for cases strata defined by promoter methylation status for each of three genes, E- cadherin, p16, and RAR-β2 in breast cancer; in addition, we evaluated case-case comparisons of likelihood of promoter methylation in relation to genotypes using a population-based case-control study conducted in Western New York State. Methylation was evaluated with real time methylation-specific PCRs for 803 paraffin embedded breast tumor tissues from women with primary, incident breast cancer. We applied unordered polytomous regression and unconditional logistic regression to derive adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We did not find any association of MTHFR and MTR polymorphisms with breast cancer risk stratified by methylation status nor between polymorphisms and likelihood of promoter methylation of any of the genes. There was no evidence of difference within strata defined by menopausal status, ER status, folate intake and lifetime alcohol consumption. Overall, we found no evidence that these common polymorphisms of the MTHFR and MTR genes are associated with promoter methylation of E- cadherin, p16, and RAR-β2 genes in breast cancer. PMID:19240236

  5. Protein-DNA Interactions at the Opossum Npt2a Promoter are Dependent upon NHERF-1.

    PubMed

    Clark, Barbara J; Murray, Rebecca D; Salyer, Sarah A; Tyagi, Samuel C; Arumugam, Cibi; Khundmiri, Syed J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is controlled by the renal reabsorption of Pi by the type IIa sodium phosphate cotransporter, Npt2a, which is localized in the proximal tubule brush border membrane. Regulation of Npt2a expression is a key control point to maintain phosphate homeostasis with most studies focused on regulating protein levels in the brush border membrane. Molecular mechanisms that control Npt2a mRNA, however, remain to be defined. We have reported that Npt2a mRNA and protein levels correlate directly with the expression of the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF-1) using opossum kidney (OK) cells and the NHERF-1-deficient OK-H cells. The goal of this study was to determine whether NHERF-1 contributes to transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional mechanisms controlling Npt2a mRNA levels. Npt2a mRNA half-life was compared between OK and NHERF-1 deficient OK-H cell lines. oNpt2a promoter-reporter gene assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) were used identify a NHERF-1 responsive region within the oNpt2a proximal promoter. Npt2a mRNA half-life is the same in OK and OK-H cells. The NHERF-1 responsive region lies within the proximal promoter in a region that contains a highly conserved CAATT box and G-rich element. Specific protein-DNA complex formation with the CAATT element is altered by the absence of NHERF-1 (OK v OK-H EMSA) although NHERF-1 does not directly contribute to complex formation. NHERF-1 helps maintain steady-state Npt2a mRNA levels in OK cells through indirect mechanisms that help promote protein-DNA interactions at the Npt2a proximal promoter. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. DNA promoter methylation in breast tumors: no association with genetic polymorphisms in MTHFR and MTR.

    PubMed

    Tao, Meng Hua; Shields, Peter G; Nie, Jing; Marian, Catalin; Ambrosone, Christine B; McCann, Susan E; Platek, Mary; Krishnan, Shiva S; Xie, Bin; Edge, Stephen B; Winston, Janet; Vito, Dominica; Trevisan, Maurizio; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2009-03-01

    Aberrant promoter methylation is recognized as an important feature of breast carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation of genes for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase (MTR), two critical enzymes in the one-carbon metabolism, may alter DNA methylation levels and thus influence DNA methylation in breast cancer. We evaluated case-control association of MTHFR C677T, A1298C, and MTR A2756G polymorphisms for cases strata-defined by promoter methylation status for each of three genes, E-cadherin, p16, and RAR-beta2 in breast cancer; in addition, we evaluated case-case comparisons of the likelihood of promoter methylation in relation to genotypes using a population-based case-control study conducted in Western New York State. Methylation was evaluated with real-time methylation-specific PCRs for 803 paraffin-embedded breast tumor tissues from women with primary, incident breast cancer. We applied unordered polytomous regression and unconditional logistic regression to derive adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We did not find any association of MTHFR and MTR polymorphisms with breast cancer risk stratified by methylation status nor between polymorphisms and likelihood of promoter methylation of any of the genes. There was no evidence of difference within strata defined by menopausal status, estrogen receptor status, folate intake, and lifetime alcohol consumption. Overall, we found no evidence that these common polymorphisms of the MTHFR and MTR genes are associated with promoter methylation of E-cadherin, p16, and RAR-beta2 genes in breast cancer.

  7. The complete sequence of soybean chlorotic mottle virus DNA and the identification of a novel promoter.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, A; Verver, J; Shimada, A; Saito, M; Goldbach, R; Van Kammen, A; Miki, K; Kameya-Iwaki, M; Hibi, T

    1989-12-11

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of soybean chlorotic mottle virus (SoyCMV) DNA was determined and compared with those of three other caulimoviruses, cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), carnation etched ring virus and figwort mosaic virus. The double-stranded DNA genome of SoyCMV (8,175 bp) contained nine open reading frames (ORFs) and one large intergenic region. The primer binding sites, gene organization and size of ORFs were similar to those of the other caulimoviruses, except for ORF I, which was split into ORF Ia and Ib. The amino acid sequences deduced from each ORF showed only short, highly homologous regions in several of the corresponding ORFs of the three other caulimoviruses. A promoter fragment of 378 bp in SoyCMV ORF III showed a strong expression activity, comparable to that of the CaMV 35S promoter, in tobacco mesophyll protoplasts as determined by a beta-glucuronidase assay using electrotransfection. The fragment contained CAAT and TATA boxes but no transcriptional enhancer signal as reported for the CaMV 35S promoter. Instead, it had sequences homologous to a part of the translational enhancer signal reported for the 5'-leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA.

  8. Identification of the functional elements in the promoter region of human DNA topoisomerase IIIbeta gene.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Hoon; Park, Jee Young; Han, Sang Youp; Chung, In Kwon

    2004-09-17

    In this study, we have isolated and characterized the promoter region of the human DNA topoisomerase IIIbeta (hTOP3beta) gene. The 5' RACE assay showed a short exon 1 encoding only the 35-bp untranslated region and suggested the presence of multiple transcription initiation sites. The hTOP3beta gene promoter lacks a canonical TATA box or initiation element and is moderately high in GC content. Transient expression of a luciferase reporter gene under the control of serially deleted 5'-flanking sequence identified an activator element between -141 and -119 upstream of the transcription initiation site and a second regulatory element between -91 and -71. On the basis of scanning mutations of triple nucleotides, we demonstrated that a 5'GGAACC3' element between -117 and -112 plays a critical role in the up-regulation of the basal transcription activity. Changing the 5'GGAACC3' sequence leads to markedly reduced promoter activity. Gel mobility shift assays revealed that the 5'GGAACC3' element is required for DNA binding by the transcription factor complex. These observations lead to the conclusion that the positive regulatory region including the 5'GGAACC3' core element is essential for efficient expression of the hTOP3beta gene as well as for the binding of as yet unidentified regulatory factor(s).

  9. Rarity of DNA sequence alterations in the promoter region of the human androgen receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Cabral, D F; Santos, A; Ribeiro, M L; Mesquita, J C; Carvalho-Salles, A B; Hackel, C

    2004-12-01

    The human androgen receptor (AR) gene promoter lies in a GC-rich region containing two principal sites of transcription initiation and a putative Sp1 protein-binding site, without typical "TATA" and "CAAT" boxes. It has been suggested that mutations within the 5'untranslated region (5'UTR) may contribute to the development of prostate cancer by changing the rates of gene transcription and/or translation. In order to investigate this question, the aim of the present study was to search for the presence of mutations or polymorphisms at the AR-5'UTR in 92 prostate cancer patients, where histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma was established in specimens obtained from transurethral resection or after prostatectomy. The AR-5'UTR was amplified by PCR from genomic DNA samples of the patients and of 100 healthy male blood donors, included as controls. Conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was used for DNA sequence alteration screening. Only one band shift was detected in one individual from the blood donor group. Sequencing revealed a new single nucleotide deletion (T) in the most conserved portion of the promoter region at position +36 downstream from the transcription initiation site I. Although the effect of this specific mutation remains unknown, its rarity reveals the high degree of sequence conservation of the human androgen promoter region. Moreover, the absence of detectable variation within the critical 5'UTR in prostate cancer patients indicates a low probability of its involvement in prostate cancer etiology.

  10. A polymorphic dinucleotide repeat in the rat nucleolin gene forms Z-DNA and inhibits promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Rothenburg, Stefan; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Rich, Alexander; Haag, Friedrich

    2001-01-01

    Many sequences in eukaryotic genomes have the potential to adopt a left-handed Z-DNA conformation. We used a previously described assay based on the binding of a mAb to Z-DNA to inquire whether Z-DNA is formed in the rat nucleolin (Ncl) gene in metabolically active, permeabilized nuclei. Using real-time PCR to measure Z-DNA formation, the potential Z-DNA sequence element Z1 [(CA)10(CG)8] in the promoter region was found to be enriched 571- to 4,040-fold in different cell lines, whereas Z2 [AC(GC)5CCGT(CG)2] in the first intron was enriched 12- to 34-fold. Ncl promoter activity was 1.5- to 16-fold stronger than that of the simian virus 40 promoter and enhancer. This activity was further increased 36–54% when Z1 was deleted. The inhibitory effect of Z1 on Ncl promoter activity was independent of location and orientation. The Ncl Z1 element is identical to the genetic marker D9Arb5. Five allelic variants of Z1 were identified by sequence analysis of genomic DNA from various rats. The two most common alleles differed significantly (up to 27%) in their capacity to inhibit Ncl promoter activity. This finding suggests that differences in Z-DNA formation by polymorphic dinucleotide repeats may be one of the factors contributing to genetic variation. PMID:11447254

  11. Overexpression of Ribosomal RNA in the Development of Human Cervical Cancer Is Associated with rDNA Promoter Hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Wang, Yapei; Lv, Qiongying; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Qing; Gao, Fei; Hou, Haoli; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Li, Lijia

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene encodes rRNA for protein synthesis. Aberrant expression of the rRNA gene has been generally observed in tumor cells and levels of its promoter methylation as an epigenetic regulator affect rRNA gene transcription. The possible relationship between expression and promoter methylation of rDNA has not been examined in human clinical cervical cancer. Here we investigate rRNA gene expression by quantitative real time PCR, and promoter methylation levels by HpaII/MspI digestion and sodium bisulfite sequencing in the development of human cervical cancer. We find that indeed rRNA levels are elevated in most of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) specimens as compared with non-cancer tissues. The rDNA promoter region in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) tissues reveals significant hypomethylation at cytosines in the context of CpG dinucleotides, accompanied with rDNA chromatin decondensation. Furthermore treatment of HeLa cells with the methylation inhibitor drug 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (DAC) demonstrates the negative correlation between the expression of 45S rDNA and the methylation level in the rDNA promoter region. These data suggest that a decrease in rDNA promoter methylation levels can result in an increase of rRNA synthesis in the development of human cervical cancer. PMID:27695092

  12. Nonhomologous end-joining promotes resistance to DNA damage in the absence of an ADP-ribosyltransferase that signals DNA single strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Couto, C Anne-Marie; Hsu, Duen-Wei; Teo, Regina; Rakhimova, Alina; Lempidaki, Styliana; Pears, Catherine J; Lakin, Nicholas D

    2013-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation of proteins at DNA lesions by ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) is an early response to DNA damage. The best defined role of ADP-ribosylation in the DNA damage response is in repair of single strand breaks (SSBs). Recently, we initiated a study of how ADP-ribosylation regulates DNA repair in Dictyostelium and found that two ARTs (Adprt1b and Adprt2) are required for tolerance of cells to SSBs, and a third ART (Adprt1a) promotes nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Here we report that disruption of adprt2 results in accumulation of DNA damage throughout the cell cycle following exposure to agents that induce base damage and DNA SSBs. Although ADP-ribosylation is evident in adprt2(-) cells exposed to methylmethanesulfonate (MMS), disruption of adprt1a and adprt2 in combination abolishes this response and further sensitises cells to this agent, indicating that in the absence of Adprt2, Adprt1a signals MMS-induced DNA lesions to promote resistance of cells to DNA damage. As a consequence of defective signalling of SSBs by Adprt2, Adprt1a is required to assemble NHEJ factors in chromatin, and disruption of the NHEJ pathway in combination with adprt2 increases sensitivity of cells to MMS. Taken together, these data indicate overlapping functions of different ARTs in signalling DNA damage, and illustrate a critical requirement for NHEJ in maintaining cell viability in the absence of an effective SSB response.

  13. Quantitative analysis of DNA methylation in the promoter region of the methylguanine-O(6) -DNA-methyltransferase gene by COBRA and subsequent native capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Goedecke, Simon; Mühlisch, Jörg; Hempel, Georg; Frühwald, Michael C; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2015-12-01

    Along with histone modifications, RNA interference and delayed replication timing, DNA methylation belongs to the key processes in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Therefore, reliable information about the methylation level of particular DNA fragments is of major interest. Herein the methylation level at two positions of the promoter region of the gene methylguanine-O(6) -DNA-Methyltransferase (MGMT) was investigated. Previously, it was demonstrated that the epigenetic status of this DNA region correlates with response to alkylating anticancer agents. An automated CGE method with LIF detection was established to separate the six DNA fragments resulting from combined bisulfite restriction analysis of the methylated and non-methylated MGMT promoter. In COBRA, the DNA was treated with bisulfite converting cytosine into uracil. During PCR uracil pairs with adenine, which changes the original recognition site of the restriction enzyme Taql. Artificial probes generated by mixing appropriate amounts of DNA after bisulfite treatment and PCR amplification were used for validation of the method. The methylation levels of these samples could be determined with high accuracy and precision. DNA samples prepared by mixing the corresponding clones first and then performing PCR amplification led to non-linear correlation between the corrected peak areas and the methylation levels. This effect is explained by slightly different PCR amplification of DNA with different sequences present in the mixture. The superiority of CGE over PAGE was clearly demonstrated. Finally, the established method was used to analyze the methylation levels of human brain tumor tissue samples.

  14. Global genome nucleotide excision repair is organized into domains that promote efficient DNA repair in chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shirong; Evans, Katie; Bennett, Mark; Webster, Richard M.; Leadbitter, Matthew; Teng, Yumin; Waters, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The rates at which lesions are removed by DNA repair can vary widely throughout the genome, with important implications for genomic stability. To study this, we measured the distribution of nucleotide excision repair (NER) rates for UV-induced lesions throughout the budding yeast genome. By plotting these repair rates in relation to genes and their associated flanking sequences, we reveal that, in normal cells, genomic repair rates display a distinctive pattern, suggesting that DNA repair is highly organized within the genome. Furthermore, by comparing genome-wide DNA repair rates in wild-type cells and cells defective in the global genome–NER (GG-NER) subpathway, we establish how this alters the distribution of NER rates throughout the genome. We also examined the genomic locations of GG-NER factor binding to chromatin before and after UV irradiation, revealing that GG-NER is organized and initiated from specific genomic locations. At these sites, chromatin occupancy of the histone acetyl-transferase Gcn5 is controlled by the GG-NER complex, which regulates histone H3 acetylation and chromatin structure, thereby promoting efficient DNA repair of UV-induced lesions. Chromatin remodeling during the GG-NER process is therefore organized into these genomic domains. Importantly, loss of Gcn5 significantly alters the genomic distribution of NER rates; this has implications for the effects of chromatin modifiers on the distribution of mutations that arise throughout the genome. PMID:27470111

  15. Promoter targeted bisulfite sequencing reveals DNA methylation profiles associated with low sperm motility in asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Du, Ye; Li, Meiyan; Chen, Jing; Duan, Yonggang; Wang, Xuebin; Qiu, Yong; Cai, Zhiming; Gui, Yaoting; Jiang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Is there an association between sperm DNA methylation profiles and asthenozoospermia? DNA methylation, at specific CpGs but not at the global level, was significantly different between low motile sperm cells of asthenozoospermic individuals and high motile sperm cells of normozoospermic controls. Aberrant DNA methylation, both globally and restricted to a specific gene locus, has been associated with male infertility and abnormal semen parameters. This was a case-control study investigating the differences in DNA methylation at CpGs in promoter regions between high and low motile sperm cells from eight normozoospermic controls and seven asthenozoospermic patients. The liquid hybridization capture-based bisulfite sequencing method was used to determine DNA methylation at CpGs in promoter regions. The global inter-individual and intra-individual methylation variability were estimated by evaluating the methylation variance between and within different motile sperm fractions from the same or different individuals. Asthenozoospermia-associated differentially methylated or variable CpGs and differentially methylated regions were identified by comparing the DNA methylation of high motile sperm cells from normozoospermic controls with that of low motile sperm cells from asthenozoospermic patients. In this study, we determined the global DNA methylation level (24.7%), inter-individual variance (14.4%) and intra-individual differences between high and low motile sperm fractions (3.9%). We demonstrated that there were no statistically significant differences in either the global DNA methylation level or global methylation variability between sperm from men with normozoospermia or asthenozoospermia. Between high motile sperm from men with normozoospermia and low motile sperm from men with asthenozoospermia, we identified 134 differentially methylated CpGs, 41 differentially methylated regions and 134 differentially variable CpGs. The genomic distribution patterns of the

  16. PKBalpha/Akt1 acts downstream of DNA-PK in the DNA double-strand break response and promotes survival.

    PubMed

    Bozulic, Lana; Surucu, Banu; Hynx, Debby; Hemmings, Brian A

    2008-04-25

    Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) is a well-established regulator of several essential cellular processes. Here, we report a route by which activated PKB promotes survival in response to DNA insults in vivo. PKB activation following DNA damage requires 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Active PKB localizes in the nucleus of gamma-irradiated cells adjacent to DNA double-strand breaks, where it colocalizes and interacts with DNA-PK. Levels of active PKB inversely correlate with DNA damage-induced apoptosis. A significant portion of p53- and DNA damage-regulated genes are misregulated in cells lacking PKBalpha. PKBalpha knockout mice show impaired DNA damage-dependent induction of p21 and increased tissue apoptosis after single-dose whole-body irradiation. Our findings place PKB downstream of DNA-PK in the DNA damage response signaling cascade, where it provides a prosurvival signal, in particular by affecting transcriptional p21 regulation. Furthermore, this function is apparently restricted to the PKBalpha isoform.

  17. c-Myc inhibits TP53INP1 expression via promoter methylation in esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Wenhao; Yang, Qinyuan; Huang, Miaolong; Qiao, Yongxia; Xie, Yuan; Yu, Yongchun; Jing, An; Li, Zhi

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} TP53INP1 expression is down-regulated in esophageal carcinoma and is associated with CGI-131 methylation. {yields} Inhibition of CGI-131 methylation upregulates TP53INP1 expression in ESCC cell lines. {yields} Ectopic expression of TP53INP1 inhibits growth of ESCC cells by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting cell cycle progression. {yields} c-Myc binds to the promoter of TP53INP1 in vivo and vitro and recruits DNMT3A to TP53INP1 promoter for CGI-131 methylation. -- Abstract: Tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) is a well known stress-induced protein that plays a role in both cell cycle arrest and p53-mediated apoptosis. Loss of TP53INP1 expression has been reported in human melanoma, breast carcinoma, and gastric cancer. However, TP53INP1 expression and its regulatory mechanism in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain unclear. Our findings are in agreement with previous reports in that the expression of TP53INP1 was downregulated in 28% (10/36 cases) of ESCC lesions, and this was accompanied by significant promoter methylation. Overexpression of TP53INP1 induced G1 cell cycle arrest and increased apoptosis in ESCC cell lines (EC-1, EC-109, EC-9706). Furthermore, our study showed that the oncoprotein c-Myc bound to the core promoter of TP53INP1 and recruited DNA methyltransferase 3A to methylate the local promoter region, leading to the inhibition of TP53INP1 expression. Our findings revealed that TP53INP1 is a tumor suppressor in ESCC and that c-Myc-mediated DNA methylation-associated silencing of TP53INP1 contributed to the pathogenesis of human ESCC.

  18. Artificial restriction DNA cutters to promote homologous recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    Katada, Hitoshi; Komiyama, Makoto

    2011-02-01

    Homologous recombination is almost the only way to modify the genome in a predetermined fashion, despite its quite low frequency in mammalian cells. It has been already reported that the frequency of this biological process can be notably increased by inducing a double strand break (DSB) at target site. This article presents completely chemistry-based artificial restriction DNA cutter (ARCUT) for the promotion of homologous recombination in human cells. This cutter is composed of Ce(IV)/EDTA complex (molecular scissors) and two strands of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and contains no proteins. Its scission site in the genome is determined simply by Watson-Crick rule so that ARCUT for desired homologous recombination is easily and straightforwardly designed and synthesized. The site-specificity of the scission is high enough to cut human genome at one target site. The DSB induced by this cutter is satisfactorily recognized by the repair system in human cells and promotes the targeted homologous recombination.

  19. Promoter Recognition by Extracytoplasmic Function σ Factors: Analyzing DNA and Protein Interaction Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Guzina, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors are the largest and the most diverse group of alternative σ factors, but their mechanisms of transcription are poorly studied. This subfamily is considered to exhibit a rigid promoter structure and an absence of mixing and matching; both −35 and −10 elements are considered necessary for initiating transcription. This paradigm, however, is based on very limited data, which bias the analysis of diverse ECF σ subgroups. Here we investigate DNA and protein recognition motifs involved in ECF σ factor transcription by a computational analysis of canonical ECF subfamily members, much less studied ECF σ subgroups, and the group outliers, obtained from recently sequenced bacteriophages. The analysis identifies an extended −10 element in promoters for phage ECF σ factors; a comparison with bacterial σ factors points to a putative 6-amino-acid motif just C-terminal of domain σ2, which is responsible for the interaction with the identified extension of the −10 element. Interestingly, a similar protein motif is found C-terminal of domain σ2 in canonical ECF σ factors, at a position where it is expected to interact with a conserved motif further upstream of the −10 element. Moreover, the phiEco32 ECF σ factor lacks a recognizable −35 element and σ4 domain, which we identify in a homologous phage, 7-11, indicating that the extended −10 element can compensate for the lack of −35 element interactions. Overall, the results reveal greater flexibility in promoter recognition by ECF σ factors than previously recognized and raise the possibility that mixing and matching also apply to this group, a notion that remains to be biochemically tested. IMPORTANCE ECF σ factors are the most numerous group of alternative σ factors but have been little studied. Their promoter recognition mechanisms are obscured by the large diversity within the ECF σ factor group and the limited similarity with the well

  20. DNA Topoisomerases Maintain Promoters in a State Competent for Transcriptional Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Roedgaard, Morten; Andreasen, Lotte; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Brinch, Marie; Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Andersen, Anni Hangaard

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down-regulation upon lack of the enzymes, which correlates with gene activity but not gene length. Furthermore, our data reveal a distinct subclass of genes with a strong requirement for topoisomerases. These genes are characterized by high transcriptional plasticity, chromatin regulation, TATA box presence, and enrichment of a nucleosome at a critical position in the promoter region, in line with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation. Single-gene studies with a range of genes belonging to this group demonstrate that topoisomerases play an important role during activation of these genes. Subsequent in-depth analysis of the inducible PHO5 gene reveals that topoisomerases are essential for binding of the Pho4p transcription factor to the PHO5 promoter, which is required for promoter nucleosome removal during activation. In contrast, topoisomerases are dispensable for constitutive transcription initiation and elongation of PHO5, as well as the nuclear entrance of Pho4p. Finally, we provide evidence that topoisomerases are required to maintain the PHO5 promoter in a superhelical state, which is competent for proper activation. In conclusion, our results reveal a hitherto unknown function of topoisomerases during transcriptional activation of genes with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation. PMID:23284296

  1. A Composite Method Based on Formal Grammar and DNA Structural Features in Detecting Human Polymerase II Promoter Region

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2013-01-01

    An important step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the promoter regions where the transcription factor binding takes place. Predicting a promoter region de novo has been a theoretical goal for many researchers for a long time. There exists a number of in silico methods to predict the promoter region de novo but most of these methods are still suffering from various shortcomings, a major one being the selection of appropriate features of promoter region distinguishing them from non-promoters. In this communication, we have proposed a new composite method that predicts promoter sequences based on the interrelationship between structural profiles of DNA and primary sequence elements of the promoter regions. We have shown that a Context Free Grammar (CFG) can formalize the relationships between different primary sequence features and by utilizing the CFG, we demonstrate that an efficient parser can be constructed for extracting these relationships from DNA sequences to distinguish the true promoter sequences from non-promoter sequences. Along with CFG, we have extracted the structural features of the promoter region to improve upon the efficiency of our prediction system. Extensive experiments performed on different datasets reveals that our method is effective in predicting promoter sequences on a genome-wide scale and performs satisfactorily as compared to other promoter prediction techniques. PMID:23437045

  2. Dependence of transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling on promoter strength in Escherichia coli topoisomerase I deficient strains.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoduo; Leng, Fenfei

    2013-02-10

    Transcription by RNA polymerase can induce the formation of hypernegatively supercoiled DNA in vitro and in vivo. This phenomenon has been nicely explained by a "twin-supercoiled-domain" model of transcription where a positively supercoiled domain is generated ahead of the RNA polymerase and a negatively supercoiled domain behind it. In Escherichia coli topA strains, DNA gyrase selectively converts the positively supercoiled domain into negative supercoils to produce hypernegatively supercoiled DNA. In this article, in order to examine whether promoter strength affects transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling (TCDS), we developed a two-plasmid system in which a linear, non-supercoiled plasmid was used to express lac repressor constitutively while a circular plasmid was used to gage TCDS in E. coli cells. Using this two-plasmid system, we found that TCDS in topA strains is dependent on promoter strength. We also demonstrated that transcription-coupled hypernegative supercoiling of plasmid DNA did not need the expression of a membrane-insertion protein for strong promoters; however, it might require co-transcriptional synthesis of a polypeptide. Furthermore, we found that for weak promoters the expression of a membrane-insertion tet gene was not sufficient for the production of hypernegatively supercoiled DNA. Our results can be explained by the "twin-supercoiled-domain" model of transcription where the friction force applied to E. coli RNA polymerase plays a critical role in the generation of hypernegatively supercoiled DNA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulation of Hox orthologues in the oyster Crassostrea gigas evidences a functional role for promoter DNA methylation in an invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Saint-Carlier, Emma; Riviere, Guillaume

    2015-06-04

    DNA methylation within promoter regions (PRDM) controls vertebrate early gene transcription and thereby development, but is neglected outside this group. However, epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggest functional significance of PDRM in invertebrates. To investigate this, reporter constructs containing in vitro methylated oyster Hox gene promoters were transfected into oyster embryos. The influence of in vivo methylation was studied using bisulfite sequencing and DNA methyltransferase inhibition during development. Our results demonstrate that methylation controls the transcriptional activity of the promoters investigated, unraveling a functional role for PRDM in a lophotrochozoan, an important finding regarding the evolution of epigenetic regulation.

  4. USP7/HAUSP promotes the sequence-specific DNA binding activity of p53.

    PubMed

    Sarkari, Feroz; Sheng, Yi; Frappier, Lori

    2010-09-27

    The p53 tumor suppressor invokes cellular responses to stressful stimuli by coordinating distinct gene expression programs. This function relies heavily on the ability of p53 to function as a transcription factor by binding promoters of target genes in a sequence specific manner. The DNA binding activity of the core domain of p53 is subject to regulation via post-translational modifications of the C-terminal region. Here we show that the ubiquitin specific protease, USP7 or HAUSP, known to stabilize p53, also regulates the sequence-specific DNA binding mediated by the core domain of p53 in vitro. This regulation is contingent upon interaction between USP7 and the C-terminal regulatory region of p53. However, our data suggest that this effect is not mediated through the N-terminal domain of USP7 previously shown to bind p53, but rather involves the USP7 C-terminal domain and is independent of the deubiquitylation activity of USP7. Consistent with our in vitro observations, we found that overexpression of catalytically inactive USP7 in cells promotes p53 binding to its target sequences and p21 expression, without increasing the levels of p53 protein. We also found that the USP7 C-terminal domain was sufficient for p21 induction. Our results suggest a novel mode of regulation of p53 function by USP7, which is independent of USP7 deubiquitylating activity.

  5. USP7/HAUSP Promotes the Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Activity of p53

    PubMed Central

    Sarkari, Feroz; Sheng, Yi; Frappier, Lori

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor invokes cellular responses to stressful stimuli by coordinating distinct gene expression programs. This function relies heavily on the ability of p53 to function as a transcription factor by binding promoters of target genes in a sequence specific manner. The DNA binding activity of the core domain of p53 is subject to regulation via post-translational modifications of the C-terminal region. Here we show that the ubiquitin specific protease, USP7 or HAUSP, known to stabilize p53, also regulates the sequence-specific DNA binding mediated by the core domain of p53 in vitro. This regulation is contingent upon interaction between USP7 and the C-terminal regulatory region of p53. However, our data suggest that this effect is not mediated through the N-terminal domain of USP7 previously shown to bind p53, but rather involves the USP7 C-terminal domain and is independent of the deubiquitylation activity of USP7. Consistent with our in vitro observations, we found that overexpression of catalytically inactive USP7 in cells promotes p53 binding to its target sequences and p21 expression, without increasing the levels of p53 protein. We also found that the USP7 C-terminal domain was sufficient for p21 induction. Our results suggest a novel mode of regulation of p53 function by USP7, which is independent of USP7 deubiquitylating activity. PMID:20885946

  6. Promoter DNA Methylation Pattern Identifies Prognostic Subgroups in Childhood T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Borssén, Magnus; Palmqvist, Lars; Karrman, Kristina; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Behrendtz, Mikael; Heldrup, Jesper; Forestier, Erik; Roos, Göran; Degerman, Sofie

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) has improved, but there is a considerable fraction of patients experiencing a poor outcome. There is a need for better prognostic markers and aberrant DNA methylation is a candidate in other malignancies, but its potential prognostic significance in T-ALL is hitherto undecided. Design and Methods Genome wide promoter DNA methylation analysis was performed in pediatric T-ALL samples (n = 43) using arrays covering >27000 CpG sites. Clinical outcome was evaluated in relation to methylation status and compared with a contemporary T-ALL group not tested for methylation (n = 32). Results Based on CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), T-ALL samples were subgrouped as CIMP+ (high methylation) and CIMP− (low methylation). CIMP− T-ALL patients had significantly worse overall and event free survival (p = 0.02 and p = 0.001, respectively) compared to CIMP+ cases. CIMP status was an independent factor for survival in multivariate analysis including age, gender and white blood cell count. Analysis of differently methylated genes in the CIMP subgroups showed an overrepresentation of transcription factors, ligands and polycomb target genes. Conclusions We identified global promoter methylation profiling as being of relevance for subgrouping and prognostication of pediatric T-ALL. PMID:23762353

  7. SIRT6 Depletion Suppresses Tumor Growth by Promoting Cellular Senescence Induced by DNA Damage in HCC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Namgyu; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kwon, Jung-Hee; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Sae Rom; Wang, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2016-01-01

    The role of Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in liver cancer remains controversial. Thus, we identified the specific role of SIRT6 in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SIRT6 expression was significantly higher in HCC cell lines and HCC tissues from 138 patients than in an immortalized hepatocyte cell line, THLE-2 and non-tumor tissues, respectively. SIRT6 knockdown by shRNA suppressed the growth of HCC cells and inhibited HCC tumor growth in vivo. In addition, SIRT6 silencing significantly prevented the growth of HCC cell lines by inducing cellular senescence in the p16/Rb- and p53/p21-pathway independent manners. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of genes involved in nucleosome assembly was apparently altered in SIRT6-depleted Hep3B cells. SIRT6 knockdown promoted G2/M phase arrest and downregulation of genes encoding histone variants associated with nucleosome assembly, which could be attributed to DNA damage. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT6 acts as a tumor promoter by preventing DNA damage and cellular senescence, indicating that SIRT6 represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HCC.

  8. SIRT6 Depletion Suppresses Tumor Growth by Promoting Cellular Senescence Induced by DNA Damage in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Namgyu; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kwon, Jung-Hee; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Sae Rom; Wang, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2016-01-01

    The role of Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in liver cancer remains controversial. Thus, we identified the specific role of SIRT6 in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SIRT6 expression was significantly higher in HCC cell lines and HCC tissues from 138 patients than in an immortalized hepatocyte cell line, THLE-2 and non-tumor tissues, respectively. SIRT6 knockdown by shRNA suppressed the growth of HCC cells and inhibited HCC tumor growth in vivo. In addition, SIRT6 silencing significantly prevented the growth of HCC cell lines by inducing cellular senescence in the p16/Rb- and p53/p21-pathway independent manners. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of genes involved in nucleosome assembly was apparently altered in SIRT6-depleted Hep3B cells. SIRT6 knockdown promoted G2/M phase arrest and downregulation of genes encoding histone variants associated with nucleosome assembly, which could be attributed to DNA damage. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT6 acts as a tumor promoter by preventing DNA damage and cellular senescence, indicating that SIRT6 represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HCC. PMID:27824900

  9. Endothelial cells mitigate DNA damage and promote the regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells after radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Zachman, Derek K.; Leon, Ronald P.; Das, Prerna; Goldman, Devorah C.; Hamlin, Kimberly L.; Guha, Chandan; Fleming, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an essential component of the hematopoietic microenvironment, which maintains and regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although ECs can support the regeneration of otherwise lethally-irradiated HSCs, the mechanisms are not well understood. To further understand this phenomenon, we studied HSC regeneration from irradiated bone marrow using co-culture with human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Co-culture with HAECs induced a 24-fold expansion of long-term HSCs (CD150+, lineagelo, Sca-1+, c-Kit+; CD150+LSK cells) in vitro. These cells gave rise to functional hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with colony-forming activity, multilineage reconstitution and serial transplantation potential. Furthermore, HAECs significantly reduced DNA damage in irradiated LSK cells within 24 hours. Remarkably, we were able to delay the exposure of irradiated bone marrow to the regenerative, HAEC-derived signals for up to 48 hours and still rescue functional HSCs. G-CSF is the gold standard for promoting hematopoietic regeneration in vivo. However, when compared to HAECs, in vitro G-CSF treatment promoted lineage differentiation and regenerated 5-fold fewer CD150+LSK cells. Together, our results show that HAECs are powerful, direct mitigators of HSC injury and DNA damage. Identification of the HAEC-derived factors that rescue HSCs may lead to improved therapies for hematopoietic regeneration after radiation injury. PMID:23939266

  10. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chung-ke; Wu, Tzong-Huah; Wu, Chu-Ya; Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon; Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng; Liao, Yu-heng; Huang, Tai-huang; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  11. Selective DNA methylation of BDNF promoter in bipolar disorder: differences among patients with BDI and BDII.

    PubMed

    D'Addario, Claudio; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Palazzo, Maria Carlotta; Benatti, Beatrice; Lietti, Licia; Cattaneo, Elisabetta; Galimberti, Daniela; Fenoglio, Chiara; Cortini, Francesca; Scarpini, Elio; Arosio, Beatrice; Di Francesco, Andrea; Di Benedetto, Manuela; Romualdi, Patrizia; Candeletti, Sanzio; Mari, Daniela; Bergamaschini, Luigi; Bresolin, Nereo; Maccarrone, Mauro; Altamura, A Carlo

    2012-06-01

    The etiology of bipolar disorder (BD) is still poorly understood, involving genetic and epigenetic mechanisms as well as environmental contributions. This study aimed to investigate the degree of DNA methylation at the promoter region of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, as one of the candidate genes associated with major psychoses, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 94 patients with BD (BD I=49, BD II=45) and 52 healthy controls. A significant BDNF gene expression downregulation was observed in BD II 0.53±0.11%; P<0.05), but not in BD I (1.13±0.19%) patients compared with controls (CONT: 1±0.2%). Consistently, an hypermethylation of the BDNF promoter region was specifically found in BD II patients (CONT: 24.0±2.1%; BDI: 20.4±1.7%; BDII: 33.3±3.5%, P<0.05). Of note, higher levels of DNA methylation were observed in BD subjects on pharmacological treatment with mood stabilizers plus antidepressants (34.6±4.2%, predominantly BD II) compared with those exclusively on mood-stabilizing agents (21.7±1.8%; P<0.01, predominantly BD I). Moreover, among the different pharmacological therapies, lithium (20.1±3.8%, P<0.05) and valproate (23.6±2.9%, P<0.05) were associated with a significant reduction of DNA methylation compared with other drugs (35.6±4.6%). Present findings suggest selective changes in DNA methylation of BDNF promoter in subjects with BD type II and highlight the importance of epigenetic factors in mediating the onset and/or susceptibility to BD, providing new insight into the mechanisms of gene expression. Moreover, they shed light on possible mechanisms of action of mood-stabilizing compounds vs antidepressants in the treatment of BD, pointing out that BDNF regulation might be a key target for their effects.

  12. DNMT3A R882 mutations promote anthracycline resistance in acute myeloid leukemia through impaired nucleosome remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Guryanova, Olga A.; Shank, Kaitlyn; Spitzer, Barbara; Luciani, Luisa; Koche, Richard P.; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E.; Ganzel, Chezi; Durham, Benjamin H.; Mohanty, Abhinita; Hoermann, Gregor; Rivera, Sharon A.; Chramiec, Alan G.; Pronier, Elodie; Bastian, Lennart; Keller, Matthew D.; Tovbin, Daniel; Loizou, Evangelia; Weinstein, Abby R.; Gonzalez, Adriana Rodriguez; Lieu, Yen; Rowe, Jacob M.; Pastore, Friederike; McKenney, Anna Sophia; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Cross, Justin R.; Mason, Christopher E.; Tallman, Martin S.; Arcila, Maria E.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Armstrong, Scott A.; Kubicek, Stefan; Staber, Philipp B.; Gönen, Mithat; Paietta, Elisabeth M.; Melnick, Ari M.; Nimer, Stephen D.; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Levine, Ross L.

    2017-01-01

    Although the majority of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients initially respond to chemotherapy, many patients subsequently relapse; the mechanistic basis for AML persistence following chemotherapy has not been delineated. Recurrent somatic mutations in DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), most frequently at arginine 882 (DNMT3Amut), are observed in AML1–3 and in individuals with clonal hematopoiesis in the absence of leukemic transformation4,5. DNMT3Amut AML patients have an inferior outcome when treated with standard-dose daunorubicin-based induction chemotherapy6,7, suggesting that DNMT3Amut cells persist and drive relapse8. Here we show that Dnmt3amut induces hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion, cooperates with Flt3ITD and Npm1c to induce AML in vivo, and promotes resistance to anthracycline chemotherapy. In AML patients, DNMT3AR882 mutations predict for minimal residual disease (MRD), underscoring their role in AML chemoresistance. DNMT3Amut cells show impaired nucleosome eviction and chromatin remodeling in response to anthracyclines, resulting from attenuated recruitment of histone chaperone SPT-16 following anthracycline exposure. This defect leads to an inability to sense and repair DNA torsional stress, which results in increased mutagenesis. Our studies identify a critical role for DNMT3AR882 mutations in driving AML chemoresistance, and highlight the importance of chromatin remodeling in response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:27841873

  13. Tumor suppressor and deubiquitinase BAP1 promotes DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Helen; Pak, Helen; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Ghram, Mehdi; Rodrigue, Amélie; Daou, Salima; Barbour, Haithem; Corbeil, Luc; Hébert, Josée; Drobetsky, Elliot; Masson, Jean Yves; Di Noia, Javier M.; Affar, El Bachir

    2014-01-01

    The cellular response to highly genotoxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) involves the exquisite coordination of multiple signaling and repair factors. Here, we conducted a functional RNAi screen and identified BAP1 as a deubiquitinase required for efficient assembly of the homologous recombination (HR) factors BRCA1 and RAD51 at ionizing radiation (IR) -induced foci. BAP1 is a chromatin-associated protein frequently inactivated in cancers of various tissues. To further investigate the role of BAP1 in DSB repair, we used a gene targeting approach to knockout (KO) this deubiquitinase in chicken DT40 cells. We show that BAP1-deficient cells are (i) sensitive to IR and other agents that induce DSBs, (ii) defective in HR-mediated immunoglobulin gene conversion, and (iii) exhibit an increased frequency of chromosomal breaks after IR treatment. We also show that BAP1 is recruited to chromatin in the proximity of a single site-specific I-SceI–induced DSB. Finally, we identified six IR-induced phosphorylation sites in BAP1 and showed that mutation of these residues inhibits BAP1 recruitment to DSB sites. We also found that both BAP1 catalytic activity and its phosphorylation are critical for promoting DNA repair and cellular recovery from DNA damage. Our data reveal an important role for BAP1 in DSB repair by HR, thereby providing a possible molecular basis for its tumor suppressor function. PMID:24347639

  14. HyCCAPP as a tool to characterize promoter DNA-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guillen-Ahlers, Hector; Rao, Prahlad K; Levenstein, Mark E; Kennedy-Darling, Julia; Perumalla, Danu S; Jadhav, Avinash Y L; Glenn, Jeremy P; Ludwig-Kubinski, Amy; Drigalenko, Eugene; Montoya, Maria J; Göring, Harald H; Anderson, Corianna D; Scalf, Mark; Gildersleeve, Heidi I S; Cole, Regina; Greene, Alexandra M; Oduro, Akua K; Lazarova, Katarina; Cesnik, Anthony J; Barfknecht, Jared; Cirillo, Lisa A; Gasch, Audrey P; Shortreed, Michael R; Smith, Lloyd M; Olivier, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Currently available methods for interrogating DNA-protein interactions at individual genomic loci have significant limitations, and make it difficult to work with unmodified cells or examine single-copy regions without specific antibodies. In this study, we describe a physiological application of the Hybridization Capture of Chromatin-Associated Proteins for Proteomics (HyCCAPP) methodology we have developed. Both novel and known locus-specific DNA-protein interactions were identified at the ENO2 and GAL1 promoter regions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and revealed subgroups of proteins present in significantly different levels at the loci in cells grown on glucose versus galactose as the carbon source. Results were validated using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Overall, our analysis demonstrates that HyCCAPP is an effective and flexible technology that does not require specific antibodies nor prior knowledge of locally occurring DNA-protein interactions and can now be used to identify changes in protein interactions at target regions in the genome in response to physiological challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of DNA methylation promotes breast tumor sensitivity to netrin-1 interference.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Mélodie; Mathot, Pauline; Devailly, Guillaume; Bidet, Yannick; Ghantous, Akram; Favrot, Clementine; Gibert, Benjamin; Gadot, Nicolas; Puisieux, Isabelle; Herceg, Zdenko; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick; Dante, Robert

    2016-08-01

    In a number of human cancers, NTN1 upregulation inhibits apoptosis induced by its so-called dependence receptors DCC and UNC5H, thus promoting tumor progression. In other cancers however, the selective inhibition of this dependence receptor death pathway relies on the silencing of pro-apoptotic effector proteins. We show here that a substantial fraction of human breast tumors exhibits simultaneous DNA methylation-dependent loss of expression of NTN1 and of DAPK1, a serine threonine kinase known to transduce the netrin-1 dependence receptor pro-apoptotic pathway. The inhibition of DNA methylation by drugs such as decitabine restores the expression of both NTN1 and DAPK1 in netrin-1-low cancer cells. Furthermore, a combination of decitabine with NTN1 silencing strategies or with an anti-netrin-1 neutralizing antibody potentiates tumor cell death and efficiently blocks tumor growth in different animal models. Thus, combining DNA methylation inhibitors with netrin-1 neutralizing agents may be a valuable strategy for combating cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  16. Asymmetric Arginine dimethylation of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 promotes DNA targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Henrik; Barth, Stephanie; Mamiani, Alfredo; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; West, Michelle J.; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Graesser, Friedrich A.

    2010-02-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) growth-transforms B-lymphocytes. The virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) is essential for transformation and activates gene expression by association with DNA-bound transcription factors such as RBPJkappa (CSL/CBF1). We have previously shown that EBNA2 contains symmetrically dimethylated Arginine (sDMA) residues. Deletion of the RG-repeat results in a reduced ability of the virus to immortalise B-cells. We now show that the RG repeat also contains asymmetrically dimethylated Arginines (aDMA) but neither non-methylated (NMA) Arginines nor citrulline residues. We demonstrate that only aDMA-containing EBNA2 is found in a complex with DNA-bound RBPJkappa in vitro and preferentially associates with the EBNA2-responsive EBV C, LMP1 and LMP2A promoters in vivo. Inhibition of methylation in EBV-infected cells results in reduced expression of the EBNA2-regulated viral gene LMP1, providing additional evidence that methylation is a prerequisite for DNA-binding by EBNA2 via association with the transcription factor RBPJkappa.

  17. Possible function of the c-myc product: promotion of cellular DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Itani, T; Kiji, Y; Ariga, H

    1987-01-01

    We have recently cloned a plasmid, pARS65, containing the sequences derived from mouse liver DNA which can autonomously replicate in mouse and human cells (Ariga et al., 1987). In this report, we show that replication of pARS65 in HL-60 cells can be inhibited by co-transfection with anti-c-myc antibody. In an in-vitro replication system using HL-60 nuclear extract, pARS65 functioned as a template. This in-vitro replication was also blocked by addition of anti-c-myc antibody. Specific binding activity of the c-myc product to pARS65 was detected by an immunobinding assay, suggesting that the c-myc protein promotes DNA replication through binding to the initiation site of replication. This has been substantiated using the antibody to help isolate a human DNA segment that can autonomously replicate in the cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3665880

  18. Strain-promoted “click” chemistry for terminal labeling of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Isaac S.; Kang, Jun Sung; Jones, Brady T.; Landmark, Kevin J.; Cleland, Andrew J.; Taton, T. Andrew

    2011-01-01

    1,3-Dipolar [3+2] cycloaddition between azides and alkynes—an archetypal “click” chemistry—has been used increasingly for the functionalization of nucleic acids. Copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions between alkyne-tagged DNA molecules and azides work well, but they require optimization of multiple reagents, and Cu ions are known to mediate DNA cleavage. For many applications, it would be preferable to eliminate the Cu(I) catalyst from these reactions. Here we describe the solid-phase synthesis and characterization of 5’-dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified oligonucleotides, using a new DIBO phosphoramidite, which react with azides via copper-free, strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC). We found that the DIBO group not only survived the standard acidic and oxidative reactions of solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis SPOS, but that it also survived the thermal cycling and standard conditions of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). As a result, PCR with DIBO-modified primers yielded “clickable” amplicons that could be tagged with azide-modified fluorophores or immobilized on azide-modified surfaces. Given its simplicity, SPAAC on DNA could streamline the bioconjugate chemistry of nucleic acids in a number of modern biotechnologies. PMID:21539391

  19. SIRT7 promotes genome integrity and modulates non-homologous end joining DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Berta N; Thackray, Joshua K; Simonet, Nicolas G; Kane-Goldsmith, Noriko; Martinez-Redondo, Paloma; Nguyen, Trang; Bunting, Samuel; Vaquero, Alejandro; Tischfield, Jay A; Serrano, Lourdes

    2016-07-15

    Sirtuins, a family of protein deacetylases, promote cellular homeostasis by mediating communication between cells and environment. The enzymatic activity of the mammalian sirtuin SIRT7 targets acetylated lysine in the N-terminal tail of histone H3 (H3K18Ac), thus modulating chromatin structure and transcriptional competency. SIRT7 deletion is associated with reduced lifespan in mice through unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that SirT7-knockout mice suffer from partial embryonic lethality and a progeroid-like phenotype. Consistently, SIRT7-deficient cells display increased replication stress and impaired DNA repair. SIRT7 is recruited in a PARP1-dependent manner to sites of DNA damage, where it modulates H3K18Ac levels. H3K18Ac in turn affects recruitment of the damage response factor 53BP1 to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), thereby influencing the efficiency of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). These results reveal a direct role for SIRT7 in DSB repair and establish a functional link between SIRT7-mediated H3K18 deacetylation and the maintenance of genome integrity. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  20. Role of CDH1 promoter polymorphism and DNA methylation in bladder carcinogenesis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Kong, Chui-Ze; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Chun-Ming; Li, Jun

    2014-04-01

    Increasing scientific evidences suggest that CDH1 gene promoter polymorphism and DNA methylation may contribute to the development and progression of bladder cancer, but many existing studies have yielded inconclusive results. This meta-analysis aims to assess the role of CDH1 gene promoter polymorphism and methylation in bladder carcinogenesis. An extensive literature search for relevant studies was conducted in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and CBM databases from their inception through April 1, 2013. This meta-analysis was performed using the STATA 12.0 software. The crude odds ratio with 95% confidence interval was calculated. Fifteen studies were included in this meta-analysis with a total of 824 bladder cancer patients and 818 healthy controls being assessed. Our meta-analysis revealed that the A variant of CDH1 -160C/A polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. Further analysis by pathological subtype indicated that patients with invasive carcinoma had a higher frequency of CDH1 -160A variant than those with superficial carcinoma. We analyzed the methylation frequency of CDH1 gene in 608 bladder cancer samples and 338 normal bladder samples. Our data strongly suggest that the CDH1 promoter methylation frequencies in bladder cancer tissues were greater than those in normal control tissues. In conclusion, our meta-analysis indicates that promoter polymorphism and methylation of CDH1 gene may be involved in the development and progression of bladder cancer. CDH1 gene promoter polymorphism and methylation might be promising biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of bladder cancer.

  1. Src Family Kinases Promote Silencing of ATR-Chk1 Signaling in Termination of DNA Damage Checkpoint*

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Yasunori; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Kubota, Sho; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Honda, Takuya; Okamoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Iwama, Atsushi; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage checkpoint arrests cell cycle progression to allow time for repair. Once DNA repair is completed, checkpoint signaling is terminated. Currently little is known about the mechanism by which checkpoint signaling is terminated, and the disappearance of DNA lesions is considered to induce the end of checkpoint signaling; however, here we show that the termination of checkpoint signaling is an active process promoted by Src family tyrosine kinases. Inhibition of Src activity delays recovery from the G2 phase DNA damage checkpoint following DNA repair. Src activity is required for the termination of checkpoint signaling, and inhibition of Src activity induces persistent activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and Rad3-related (ATR) and Chk1 kinases. Src-dependent nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation and v-Src expression suppress the ATR-mediated Chk1 and Rad17 phosphorylation induced by DNA double strand breaks or DNA replication stress. Thus, Src family kinases promote checkpoint recovery through termination of ATR- and Chk1-dependent G2 DNA damage checkpoint. These results suggest a model according to which Src family kinases send a termination signal between the completion of DNA repair and the initiation of checkpoint termination. PMID:24634213

  2. DAF-16/FoxO and EGL-27/GATA promote developmental growth in response to persistent somatic DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Vipin; Ermolaeva, Maria A.; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Frommolt, Peter; Williams, Ashley B.; Greiss, Sebastian; Schneider, Jennifer I.; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Genome maintenance defects cause complex disease phenotypes characterized by developmental failure, cancer susceptibility, and premature aging. It remains poorly understood how DNA damage responses function during organismal development and maintain tissue functionality when DNA damage accumulates with aging. Here we show that the FoxO transcription factor DAF-16 is activated in response to DNA damage during development while the DNA damage responsiveness of DAF-16 declines with aging. We find that in contrast to its established role in mediating starvation arrest, DAF-16 alleviates DNA damage-induced developmental arrest and even in the absence of DNA repair promotes developmental growth and enhances somatic tissue functionality. We demonstrate that the GATA transcription factor EGL-27 co-regulates DAF-16 target genes in response to DNA damage and together with DAF-16 promotes developmental growth. We propose that EGL-27/GATA activity specifies DAF-16 mediated DNA damage responses to enable developmental progression and to prolong tissue functioning when DNA damage persists. PMID:25419847

  3. RNA Pol II Promotes Transcription of Centromeric Satellite DNA in Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Pezer, Željka; Ugarković, Đurđica

    2008-01-01

    Transcripts of centromeric satellite DNAs are known to play a role in heterochromatin formation as well as in establishment of the kinetochore. However, little is known about basic mechanisms of satellite DNA expression within constitutive heterochromatin and its regulation. Here we present comprehensive analysis of transcription of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, PRAT from beetle Palorus ratzeburgii (Coleoptera). This satellite is characterized by preservation and extreme sequence conservation among evolutionarily distant insect species. PRAT is expressed in all three developmental stages: larvae, pupae and adults at similar level. Transcripts are abundant comprising 0.033% of total RNA and are heterogeneous in size ranging from 0.5 kb up to more than 5 kb. Transcription proceeds from both strands but with 10 fold different expression intensity and transcripts are not processed into siRNAs. Most of the transcripts (80%) are not polyadenylated and remain in the nucleus while a small portion is exported to the cytoplasm. Multiple, irregularly distributed transcription initiation sites as well as termination sites have been mapped within the PRAT sequence using primer extension and RLM-RACE. The presence of cap structure as well as poly(A) tails in a portion of the transcripts indicate RNA polymerase II–dependent transcription and a putative polymerase II promoter site overlaps the most conserved part of the PRAT sequence. The treatment of larvae with alpha-amanitin decreases the level of PRAT transcripts at concentrations that selectively inhibit pol II activity. In conclusion, stable, RNA polymerase II dependant transcripts of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, not regulated by RNAi, have been identified and characterized. This study offers a basic understanding of expression of highly abundant heterochromatic DNA which in beetle species constitutes up to 50% of the genome. PMID:18270581

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase POLG1 Disease Mutations and Germline Variants Promote Tumorigenic Properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Owens, Kjerstin M; Bajpai, Prachi; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Tiwari, Hemant K; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG1) induce mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, depletion, and decrease oxidative phosphorylation. Earlier, we identified somatic mutations in POLG1 and the contribution of these mutations in human cancer. However, a role for germline variations in POLG1 in human cancers is unknown. In this study, we examined a role for disease associated germline variants of POLG1, POLG1 gene expression, copy number variation and regulation in human cancers. We analyzed the mutations, expression and copy number variation in POLG1 in several cancer databases and validated the analyses in primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. We discovered 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine led epigenetic regulation of POLG1, mtDNA-encoded genes and increased mitochondrial respiration. We conducted comprehensive race based bioinformatics analyses of POLG1 gene in more than 33,000 European-Americans and 5,000 African-Americans. We identified a mitochondrial disease causing missense variation in polymerase domain of POLG1 protein at amino acid 1143 (E1143G) to be 25 times more prevalent in European-Americans (allele frequency 0.03777) when compared to African-American (allele frequency 0.00151) population. We identified T251I and P587L missense variations in exonuclease and linker region of POLG1 also to be more prevalent in European-Americans. Expression of these variants increased glucose consumption, decreased ATP production and increased matrigel invasion. Interestingly, conditional expression of these variants revealed that matrigel invasion properties conferred by these germline variants were reversible suggesting a role of epigenetic regulators. Indeed, we identified a set of miRNA whose expression was reversible after variant expression was turned off. Together, our studies demonstrate altered genetic and epigenetic regulation of POLG1 in human cancers and suggest a role for POLG1 germline variants in promoting tumorigenic

  5. MAPK15 upregulation promotes cell proliferation and prevents DNA damage in male germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ilardi, Gennaro; Acunzo, Mario; Nigita, Giovanni; Sasdelli, Federica; Celetti, Angela; Strambi, Angela; Staibano, Stefania; Croce, Carlo Maria; Chiariello, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are the most common malignancies in males between 15 and 35 years of age. Despite the high cure rate, achieved through chemotherapy and/or surgery, the molecular basis of GCT etiology is still largely obscure. Here, we show a positive correlation between MAPK15 (ERK8; ERK7) expression and specific GCT subtypes, with the highest levels found in the aggressive embryonal carcinomas (EC). Indeed, in corresponding cellular models for EC, MAPK15 enhanced tumorigenicity in vivo and promoted cell proliferation in vitro, supporting a role for this kinase in human GCT. At molecular level, we demonstrated that endogenous MAPK15 is necessary to sustain cell cycle progression of EC cells, by limiting p53 activation and preventing the triggering of p53-dependent mechanisms resulting in cell cycle arrest. To understand MAPK15-dependent mechanisms impinging on p53 activation, we demonstrate that this kinase efficiently protects cells from DNA damage. Moreover, we show that the ability of MAPK15 to control the autophagic process is necessary for basal management of DNA damage and for tumor formation controlled by the kinase. In conclusion, our findings suggest that MAPK15 overexpression may contribute to the malignant transformation of germ cells by controlling a “stress support” autophagic pathway, able to prevent DNA damage and the consequent activation of the p53 tumor suppressor. Moreover, in light of these results, MAPK15-specific inhibitors might represent new tools to enhance the therapeutic index of cytotoxic therapy in GCT treatment, and to increase the sensitivity to DNA-damaging drugs in other chemotherapy-resistant human tumors. PMID:26988910

  6. Chronic exposure to trichloroethylene increases DNA methylation of the Ifng promoter in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Blossom, Sarah J; Erickson, Stephen W; Broadfoot, Brannon; West, Kirk; Bai, Shasha; Li, Jingyun; Cooney, Craig A

    2016-10-17

    CD4(+) T cells in female MRL+/+ mice exposed to solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) skew toward effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, and demonstrate seemingly non-monotonic alterations in IFN-γ production. In the current study we examined the mechanism for this immunotoxicity using effector/memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells isolated every 6 weeks during a 40 week exposure to TCE (0.5mg/ml in drinking water). A time-dependent effect of TCE exposure on both Ifng gene expression and IFN-γ protein production was observed in effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, with an increase after 22 weeks of exposure and a decrease after 40 weeks of exposure. No such effect of TCE was observed in naïve CD4(+) T cells. A cumulative increase in DNA methylation in the CpG sites of the promoter of the Ifng gene was observed in effector/memory, but not naïve, CD4(+) T cells over time. Also unique to the Ifng promoter was an increase in methylation variance in effector/memory compared to naïve CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, the CpG sites of the Ifng promoter in effector/memory CD4(+) T cells were especially sensitive to the effects of TCE exposure, which may help explain the regulatory effect of the chemical on this gene.

  7. Chromatin inactivation precedes de novo dna methylation during the progressive epigenetic silencing of the rassf1a promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Strunnikova Maria; Schagdarsurengin, Undraga; Kehlen, Astrid; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Dammann, Reinhard

    2005-02-23

    Epigenetic inactivation of the RASSF1A tumor suppressor by CpG island methylation was frequently detected in cancer. However, the mechanisms of this aberrant DNA methylation are unknown. In the RASSF1A promoter, we characterized four Sp1 sites, which are frequently methylated in cancer. We examined the functional relationship between DNA methylation, histone modification, Sp1 binding, and RASSF1A expression in proliferating human mammary epithelial cells. With increasing passages, the transcription of RASSF1A was dramatically silenced. This inactivation was associated with deacetylation and lysine 9 trimethylation of histone H3 and an impaired binding of Sp1 at the RASSF1A promoter. In mammary epithelial cells that had overcome a stress-associated senescence barrier, a spreading of DNA methylation in the CpG island promoter was observed. When the RASSF1A-silenced cells were treated with inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase, binding of Sp1 and expression of RASSF1 A reoccurred. In summary, we observed that histone H3 deacetylation and H3 lysine 9 trimethylation occur in the same time window as gene inactivation and precede DNA methylation. Our data suggest that in epithelial cells, histone inactivation may trigger de novo DNA methylation of the RASSF1A promoter and this system may serve as a model for CpG island inactivation of tumor suppressor genes.

  8. SUVH1, a Su(var)3–9 family member, promotes the expression of genes targeted by DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaofang; Liu, Lin; Li, Shengben; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Kim, Yun Ju; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements are found throughout the genomes of all organisms. Repressive marks such as DNA methylation and histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation silence these elements and maintain genome integrity. However, how silencing mechanisms are themselves regulated to avoid the silencing of genes remains unclear. Here, an anti-silencing factor was identified using a forward genetic screen on a reporter line that harbors a LUCIFERASE (LUC) gene driven by a promoter that undergoes DNA methylation. SUVH1, a Su(var)3–9 homolog, was identified as a factor promoting the expression of the LUC gene. Treatment with a cytosine methylation inhibitor completely suppressed the LUC expression defects of suvh1, indicating that SUVH1 is dispensable for LUC expression in the absence of DNA methylation. SUVH1 also promotes the expression of several endogenous genes with promoter DNA methylation. However, the suvh1 mutation did not alter DNA methylation levels at the LUC transgene or on a genome-wide scale; thus, SUVH1 functions downstream of DNA methylation. Histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) trimethylation was reduced in suvh1; in contrast, H3K9 methylation levels remained unchanged. This work has uncovered a novel, anti-silencing function for a member of the Su(var)3–9 family that has previously been associated with silencing through H3K9 methylation. PMID:26400170

  9. A temperature-induced narrow DNA curvature range sustains the maximum activity of a bacterial promoter in vitro.

    PubMed

    Prosseda, Gianni; Mazzola, Alessia; Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Tielker, Denis; Micheli, Gioacchino; Colonna, Bianca

    2010-04-06

    Among the molecular strategies bacteria have set up to quickly match their transcriptional program to new environments, changes in sequence-mediated DNA curvature play a crucial role. Bacterial promoters, especially those of mesophilic bacteria, are in general preceded by a curved region. The marked thermosensitivity of curved DNA stretches allows bacteria to rapidly sense outer temperature variations and affects transcription by favoring the binding of activators or repressors. Curved DNA is also able to influence the transcriptional activity of a bacterial promoter directly, without the involvement of trans-acting regulators. This study attempts to quantitatively analyze the role of DNA curvature in thermoregulated gene expression using a real-time in vitro transcription model system based on a specific fluorescence molecular beacon. By analyzing the temperature-dependent expression of a reporter gene in a construct carrying a progressively decreasing bent sequence upstream from the promoter, we show that with a decrease in temperature a narrow curvature range accounts for a significant enhancement of promoter activity. This strengthens the view that DNA curvature-mediated regulation of gene expression is likely a strategy offering fine-tuning control possibilities and that, considering the widespread presence of curved sequences upstream from bacterial promoters, it may represent one of the most primitive forms of gene regulation.

  10. Characterization of an inducible promoter in different DNA copy number conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The bottom-up programming of living organisms to implement novel user-defined biological capabilities is one of the main goals of synthetic biology. Currently, a predominant problem connected with the construction of even simple synthetic biological systems is the unpredictability of the genetic circuitry when assembled and incorporated in living cells. Copy number, transcriptional/translational demand and toxicity of the DNA-encoded functions are some of the major factors which may lead to cell overburdening and thus to nonlinear effects on system output. It is important to disclose the linearity working boundaries of engineered biological systems when dealing with such phenomena. Results The output of an N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (HSL)-inducible RFP-expressing device was studied in Escherichia coli in different copy number contexts, ranging from 1 copy per cell (integrated in the genome) to hundreds (via multicopy plasmids). The system is composed by a luxR constitutive expression cassette and a RFP gene regulated by the luxI promoter, which is activated by the HSL-LuxR complex. System output, in terms of promoter activity as a function of HSL concentration, was assessed relative to the one of a reference promoter in identical conditions by using the Relative Promoter Units (RPU) approach. Nonlinear effects were observed in the maximum activity, which is identical in single and low copy conditions, while it decreases for higher copy number conditions. In order to properly compare the luxI promoter strength among all the conditions, a mathematical modeling approach was used to relate the promoter activity to the estimated HSL-LuxR complex concentration, which is the actual activator of transcription. During model fitting, a correlation between the copy number and the dissociation constant of HSL-LuxR complex and luxI promoter was observed. Conclusions Even in a simple inducible system, nonlinear effects are observed and non-trivial data

  11. Characterization of an inducible promoter in different DNA copy number conditions.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Susanna; Pasotti, Lorenzo; Mazzini, Giuliano; De Angelis, Maria Gabriella Cusella; Magni, Paolo

    2012-03-28

    The bottom-up programming of living organisms to implement novel user-defined biological capabilities is one of the main goals of synthetic biology. Currently, a predominant problem connected with the construction of even simple synthetic biological systems is the unpredictability of the genetic circuitry when assembled and incorporated in living cells. Copy number, transcriptional/translational demand and toxicity of the DNA-encoded functions are some of the major factors which may lead to cell overburdening and thus to nonlinear effects on system output. It is important to disclose the linearity working boundaries of engineered biological systems when dealing with such phenomena. The output of an N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (HSL)-inducible RFP-expressing device was studied in Escherichia coli in different copy number contexts, ranging from 1 copy per cell (integrated in the genome) to hundreds (via multicopy plasmids). The system is composed by a luxR constitutive expression cassette and a RFP gene regulated by the luxI promoter, which is activated by the HSL-LuxR complex. System output, in terms of promoter activity as a function of HSL concentration, was assessed relative to the one of a reference promoter in identical conditions by using the Relative Promoter Units (RPU) approach. Nonlinear effects were observed in the maximum activity, which is identical in single and low copy conditions, while it decreases for higher copy number conditions. In order to properly compare the luxI promoter strength among all the conditions, a mathematical modeling approach was used to relate the promoter activity to the estimated HSL-LuxR complex concentration, which is the actual activator of transcription. During model fitting, a correlation between the copy number and the dissociation constant of HSL-LuxR complex and luxI promoter was observed. Even in a simple inducible system, nonlinear effects are observed and non-trivial data processing is necessary to fully

  12. Poly(dA-dT) promoter elements increase the equilibrium accessibility of nucleosomal DNA target sites.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J D; Widom, J

    2001-06-01

    Polypurine tracts are important elements of eukaryotic promoters. They are believed to somehow destabilize chromatin, but the mechanism of their action is not known. We show that incorporating an A(16) element at an end of the nucleosomal DNA and further inward destabilizes histone-DNA interactions by 0.1 +/- 0.03 and 0.35 +/- 0.04 kcal mol(-1), respectively, and is accompanied by 1.5- +/- 0.1-fold and 1.7- +/- 0.1-fold increases in position-averaged equilibrium accessibility of nucleosomal DNA target sites. These effects are comparable in magnitude to effects of A(16) elements that correlate with transcription in vivo, suggesting that our system may capture most of their physiological role. These results point to two distinct but interrelated models for the mechanism of action of polypurine tract promoter elements in vivo. Given a nucleosome positioned over a promoter region, the presence of a polypurine tract in that nucleosome's DNA decreases the stability of the DNA wrapping, increasing the equilibrium accessibility of other DNA target sites buried inside that nucleosome. Alternatively (if nucleosomes are freely mobile), the presence of a polypurine tract provides a free energy bias for the nucleosome to move to alternative locations, thereby changing the equilibrium accessibilities of other nearby DNA target sites.

  13. Paradox of sonic hedgehog (SHH) transcriptional regulation: Alternative transcription initiation overrides the effect of downstream promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    ten Haaf, Anette; Franken, Laura; Heymann, Caroline; von Serenyi, Sonja; Cornelissen, Christian; de Hoon, Joep P J; Veeck, Jürgen; Lüscher, Bernhard; Knüchel, Ruth; Dahl, Edgar

    2011-04-01

    Recently, DNA methylation has been suggested as a potential mechanism involved in the transcriptional regulation of SHH gene expression in cancer. However, detailed analyses on the underlying transcriptional mechanisms of SHH expression have not been presented so far and were therefore the focus of this study. We found that the genomic region of SHH contains two different transcriptional start sites and four CpG islands spread from the 5' promoter region to the 3' end of the SHH gene. Based on this CpG island topology we analyzed the influence of DNA methylation within the promoter region as well as in exon 2 and exon 3 on SHH mRNA expression in a large set (n = 14) of benign and malignant human cell lines, and further elucidated the functionality of the two identified SHH transcription initiation sites. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) clearly showed that SHH is expressed independently of DNA methylation within exon 2 and exon 3 of its genomic region, while methylation of the promoter region is able to abrogate SHH expression. Most interesting, we found activation of the upstream SHH promoter in several breast cancer cell lines when the downstream SHH promoter is methylated. These observations lead us to propose a transcriptional model for the SHH gene, in which combined mechanisms of DNA methylation and alternative promoter usage coordinate the transcriptional activity of this important developmental gene.

  14. Pdx-1 regulation of the INGAP promoter involves sequestration of NeuroD into a non-DNA-binding complex.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Fishwick, David A; Shi, Wenjing; Hughes, Laura; Vinik, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Islet neogenesis-associated protein (INGAP) can enhance beta-cell mass to offset progression of diabetes. Identifying how transcription factors regulate INGAP gene expression could reveal key checkpoints governing islet neogenesis. Protein complex interactions at the INGAP promoter were detected using a beta-galactosidase reporter, these protein-DNA complexes being validated in competitive electrophoresis mobility shift assays. The relevance of the revealed promoter interactions was confirmed in small interfering RNA (siRNA) gene knockdown studies. Pdx-1 negatively regulates stimulation of the INGAP promoter by Pan-1/NeuroD. Independently, Pdx-1, Pan-1, and NeuroD bind to the INGAP promoter as revealed by electrophoresis mobility shift assay studies. In combination, Pdx-1 selectively displaces NeuroD from a DNA-binding complex with Pan-1 to form a non-DNA-binding unit. The importance of this interaction is shown in HIT cells that have a forced reduction of Pdx-1 expression. In siRNA/Pdx-1-depleted HIT cells, the interaction of Pan-1/NeuroD with the INGAP promoter is increased 6-fold. Furthermore, endogenous INGAP expression is detected in Pdx-1-depleted cells. These data reveal a dynamic interaction between Pdx-1, NeuroD, and Pan-1 for the regulation of INGAP promoter activity. Modulating molecular regulators of DNA expression may be a consideration in diabetic therapies that translate exogenous stimuli into new endogenous beta-cell mass.

  15. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Jha, Jyoti K; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid-the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication of Vibrio cholerae Chr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that promotes initiation by reducing

  16. Cardiac structure/function, protein expression, and DNA methylation are changed in adult female mice exposed to diethylstilbestrol in utero.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Rami; Kasneci, Amanda; Sebag, Igal A; Chalifour, Lorraine E

    2013-09-01

    The detrimental effects of in utero exposure to the non-steroidal estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) are particularly marked in women. Fetal hearts express estrogen receptors, making them potentially responsive to DES. To examine whether gestational exposure to DES would impact the heart, we exposed pregnant C57bl/6n dams to DES (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg·(kg body mass)(-1)·day(-1)) on gestation days 11.5-14.5, and examined the measured cardiac structure/function and calcium homeostasis protein expression in adult females. At baseline, echocardiography revealed eccentric hypertrophy in mice treated with 10.0 μg·(kg body mass)(-1)·day(-1) DES, and immunoblots showed increased SERCA2a in all DES-treated mice. Mice were swim-trained to assess cardiac remodeling. Swim-trained vehicle-treated mice developed eccentric hypertrophy without changing SERCA2 or calsequestrin 2 expression. In contrast, no DES-treated mice hypertrophied, and all increased in SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 expression after training. To determine whether DES-induced changes in DNA methylation is part of the mechanism for its long-term effects, we measured DNA methyltransferase expression and DNA methylation. Global DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase 3a expression were unchanged. However, DES-treated mice had increased DNA methylation in the calsequestrin 2 promoter. Thus, gestational exposure to DES altered female ventricular DNA, cardiac structure/function, and calcium homeostasis protein expression. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing compounds may impact cardiac structure/function in adult females.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Red1 protein exhibits nonhomologous DNA end-joining activity and potentiates Hop1-promoted pairing of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Rucha; Ghodke, Indrajeet; Muniyappa, K

    2017-08-18

    Elucidation of the function of synaptonemal complex (SC) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has mainly focused on in vivo analysis of recombination-defective meiotic mutants. Consequently, significant gaps remain in the mechanistic understanding of the activities of various SC proteins and the functional relationships among them. S. cerevisiae Hop1 and Red1 are essential structural components of the SC axial/lateral elements. Previous studies have demonstrated that Hop1 is a structure-selective DNA-binding protein exhibiting high affinity for the Holliday junction and promoting DNA bridging, condensation, and pairing between double-stranded DNA molecules. However, the exact mode of action of Red1 remains unclear, although it is known to interact with Hop1 and to suppress the spore viability defects of hop1 mutant alleles. Here, we report the purification and functional characterization of the full-length Red1 protein. Our results revealed that Red1 forms a stable complex with Hop1 in vitro and provided quantitative insights into their physical interactions. Mechanistically, Red1 preferentially associated with the Holliday junction and 3-way junction rather than with single- or double-stranded DNA with overhangs. Although Hop1 and Red1 exhibited similar binding affinities toward several DNA substrates, the two proteins displayed some significant differences. Notably, Red1, by itself, lacked DNA-pairing ability; however, it potentiated Hop1-promoted intermolecular pairing between double-stranded DNA molecules. Moreover, Red1 exhibited nonhomologous DNA end-joining activity, thus revealing an unexpected role for Red1 in recombination-based DNA repair. Collectively, this study presents the first direct insights into Red1's mode of action and into the mechanism underlying its role in chromosome synapsis and recombination. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Establishment of a promoter-based chromatin architecture on recently replicated DNA can accommodate variable inter-nucleosome spacing

    PubMed Central

    Fennessy, Ross T.; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes, the fundamental subunits of eukaryotic chromatin, are organized with respect to transcriptional start sites. A major challenge to the persistence of this organization is the disassembly of nucleosomes during DNA replication. Here, we use complimentary approaches to map the locations of nucleosomes on recently replicated DNA. We find that nucleosomes are substantially realigned with promoters during the minutes following DNA replication. As a result, the nucleosomal landscape is largely re-established before newly replicated chromosomes are partitioned into daughter cells and can serve as a platform for the re-establishment of gene expression programmes. When the supply of histones is disrupted through mutation of the chaperone Caf1, a promoter-based architecture is generated, but with increased inter-nucleosomal spacing. This indicates that the chromatin remodelling enzymes responsible for spacing nucleosomes are capable of organizing nucleosomes with a range of different linker DNA lengths. PMID:27106059

  19. The EEL-1 ubiquitin ligase promotes DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ross, A J; Li, M; Yu, B; Gao, M X; Derry, W B

    2011-07-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases target a growing number of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, including tumour suppressor p53, caspases, and the Bcl-2 family. The core apoptosis pathway is well conserved between mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, but the extent to which ubiquitin ligases regulate apoptotic cell death is not known. To investigate the role of E3 ligases in apoptosis, we inhibited 108 of the 165 predicted E3 ubiquitin ligase genes by RNA interference and quantified apoptosis in the C. elegans germline after genotoxic stress. From this screen, we identified the homologous to E6-associated protein C terminus-domain E3 ligase EEL-1 as a positive regulator of apoptosis. Intriguingly, the human homologue of EEL-1, Huwe1/ARF-BP1/Mule/HectH9, has been reported to possess both pro- and anti-apoptotic functions through its ability to stimulate Mcl-1 and p53 degradation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that eel-1 is required to promote DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis, but does not have a role in physiological germ cell apoptosis or developmental apoptosis in somatic tissue. Furthermore, eel-1 acts in parallel to the p53-like gene cep-1 and intersects the core apoptosis pathway upstream of the Bcl-2/Mcl-1 orthologue ced-9. Although ee1-1 mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to genotoxic stress they do not appear to be defective in DNA repair, suggesting a distinct role for EEL-1 in promoting damage-induced apoptosis in the germline.

  20. The EEL-1 ubiquitin ligase promotes DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A J; Li, M; Yu, B; Gao, M X; Derry, W B

    2011-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases target a growing number of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, including tumour suppressor p53, caspases, and the Bcl-2 family. The core apoptosis pathway is well conserved between mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, but the extent to which ubiquitin ligases regulate apoptotic cell death is not known. To investigate the role of E3 ligases in apoptosis, we inhibited 108 of the 165 predicted E3 ubiquitin ligase genes by RNA interference and quantified apoptosis in the C. elegans germline after genotoxic stress. From this screen, we identified the homologous to E6-associated protein C terminus-domain E3 ligase EEL-1 as a positive regulator of apoptosis. Intriguingly, the human homologue of EEL-1, Huwe1/ARF-BP1/Mule/HectH9, has been reported to possess both pro- and anti-apoptotic functions through its ability to stimulate Mcl-1 and p53 degradation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that eel-1 is required to promote DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis, but does not have a role in physiological germ cell apoptosis or developmental apoptosis in somatic tissue. Furthermore, eel-1 acts in parallel to the p53-like gene cep-1 and intersects the core apoptosis pathway upstream of the Bcl-2/Mcl-1 orthologue ced-9. Although ee1-1 mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to genotoxic stress they do not appear to be defective in DNA repair, suggesting a distinct role for EEL-1 in promoting damage-induced apoptosis in the germline. PMID:21233842

  1. Early Detection of Lung Cancer Using DNA Promoter Hypermethylation in Plasma and Sputum.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, Alicia; Jusue-Torres, Ignacio; Stark, Alejandro; Chen, Chen; Rodgers, Kristen; Lee, Beverly; Griffin, Candace; Yang, Andrew; Huang, Peng; Wrangle, John; Belinsky, Steven A; Wang, Tza-Huei; Yang, Stephen C; Baylin, Stephen B; Brock, Malcolm V; Herman, James G

    2017-04-15

    Purpose: CT screening can reduce death from lung cancer. We sought to improve the diagnostic accuracy of lung cancer screening using ultrasensitive methods and a lung cancer-specific gene panel to detect DNA methylation in sputum and plasma.Experimental Design: This is a case-control study of subjects with suspicious nodules on CT imaging. Plasma and sputum were obtained preoperatively. Cases (n = 150) had pathologic confirmation of node-negative (stages I and IIA) non-small cell lung cancer. Controls (n = 60) had non-cancer diagnoses. We detected promoter methylation using quantitative methylation-specific real-time PCR and methylation-on-beads for cancer-specific genes (SOX17, TAC1, HOXA7, CDO1, HOXA9, and ZFP42).Results: DNA methylation was detected in plasma and sputum more frequently in people with cancer compared with controls (P < 0.001) for five of six genes. The sensitivity and specificity for lung cancer diagnosis using the best individual genes was 63% to 86% and 75% to 92% in sputum, respectively, and 65% to 76% and 74% to 84% in plasma, respectively. A three-gene combination of the best individual genes has sensitivity and specificity of 98% and 71% using sputum and 93% and 62% using plasma. Area under the receiver operating curve for this panel was 0.89 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.80-0.98] in sputum and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.68-0.86) in plasma. Independent blinded random forest prediction models combining gene methylation with clinical information correctly predicted lung cancer in 91% of subjects using sputum detection and 85% of subjects using plasma detection.Conclusions: High diagnostic accuracy for early-stage lung cancer can be obtained using methylated promoter detection in sputum or plasma. Clin Cancer Res; 23(8); 1998-2005. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Cocaine-mediated downregulation of microglial miR-124 expression involves promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Liao, Ke; Kook, Yeon Hee; Niu, Fang; Callen, Shannon E; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-11-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the development of reward-related behavior in cocaine self-administration rodents. Cocaine, one of most commonly abused drugs, has been shown to activate microglia both in vitro and in vivo. Detailed molecular mechanisms underlying cocaine-mediated microglial activation remain poorly understood. microRNAs (miRs) belonging to a class of small noncoding RNA superfamily have been shown to modulate the activation status of microglia. miR-124, one of the microglia-enriched miRs, functions as an anti-inflammatory regulator that maintains microglia in a quiescent state. To date, the possible effects of cocaine on microglial miR-124 levels and the associated underlying mechanisms have not been explored. In the current study, we demonstrated that cocaine exposure decreased miR-124 levels in both BV-2 cells and rat primary microglia. These findings were further validated in vivo, wherein we demonstrated decreased abundance of miR-124 in purified microglia isolated from cocaine-administered mice brains compared with cells from saline administered animals. Molecular mechanisms underlying these effects involved cocaine-mediated increased mRNA and protein expression of DNMTs in microglia. Consistently, cocaine substantially increased promoter DNA methylation levels of miR-124 precursors (pri-miR-124-1 and -2), but not that of pri-miR-124-3, both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, our findings demonstrated that cocaine exposure increased DNA methylation of miR-124 promoter resulting into its downregulation, which, in turn, led to microglial activation. Our results thus implicate that epigenetic modulation of miR-124 could be considered as a potential therapeutic approach to ameliorate microglial activation and, possibly, the development of cocaine addiction.

  3. Interleukin-6 promotes tumorigenesis by altering DNA methylation in oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gasche, Jacqueline A; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Boland, C Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2011-09-01

    Worldwide oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) accounts for more than 100,000 deaths each year. Chronic inflammation constitutes one of the key risk factors for OSCC. Accumulating evidence suggests that aberrant DNA methylation may contribute to OSCC tumorigenesis. This study investigated whether chronic inflammation alters DNA methylation and expression of cancer-associated genes in OSCC. We established an in vitro model of interleukin (IL)-6 mediating chronic inflammation in OSCC cell lines. Thereafter, we measured the ability of IL-6 to induce global hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) sequences, as well as CpG methylation changes using multiple methodologies including quantitative pyrosequencing, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and sensitive melting analysis after real-time-methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Gene expression was investigated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. IL-6 induced significant global LINE-1 hypomethylation (p=0.016) in our in vitro model of inflammatory stress in OSCC cell lines. Simultaneously, IL-6 induced CpG promoter methylation changes in several important putative tumor suppressor genes including CHFR, GATA5 and PAX6. Methylation changes correlated inversely with the changes in the expression of corresponding genes. Our results indicate that IL-6-induced inflammation promotes tumorigenesis in the oral cavity by altering global LINE-1 hypomethylation. In addition, concurrent hypermethylation of multiple tumor suppressor genes by IL-6 suggests that epigenetic gene silencing may be an important consequence of chronic inflammation in the oral cavity. These findings have clinical relevance, as both methylation and inflammation are suitable targets for developing novel preventive and therapeutic measures. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  4. Nascent DNA synthesis during homologous recombination is synergistically promoted by the rad51 recombinase and DNA homology.

    PubMed

    Mundia, Maureen M; Desai, Vatsal; Magwood, Alissa C; Baker, Mark D

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we exploited a plasmid-based assay that detects the new DNA synthesis (3' extension) that accompanies Rad51-mediated homology searching and strand invasion steps of homologous recombination to investigate the interplay between Rad51 concentration and homology length. Mouse hybridoma cells that express endogenous levels of Rad51 display an approximate linear increase in the frequency of 3' extension for homology lengths of 500 bp to 2 kb. At values below ∼500 bp, the frequency of 3' extension declines markedly, suggesting that this might represent the minimal efficient processing segment for 3' extension. Overexpression of wild-type Rad51 stimulated the frequency of 3' extension by ∼3-fold for homology lengths <900 bp, but when homology was >2 kb, 3' extension frequency increased by as much as 10-fold. Excess wild-type Rad51 did not increase the average 3' extension tract length. Analysis of cell lines expressing N-terminally FLAG-tagged Rad51 polymerization mutants F86E, A89E, or F86E/A89E established that the 3' extension process requires Rad51 polymerization activity. Mouse hybridoma cells that have reduced Brca2 (Breast cancer susceptibility 2) due to stable expression of small interfering RNA show a significant reduction in 3' extension efficiency; expression of wild-type human BRCA2, but not a BRCA2 variant devoid of BRC repeats 1-8, rescues the 3' extension defect in these cells. Our results suggest that increased Rad51 concentration and homology length interact synergistically to promote 3' extension, presumably as a result of enhanced Brca2-mediated Rad51 polymerization.

  5. Nascent DNA Synthesis During Homologous Recombination Is Synergistically Promoted by the Rad51 Recombinase and DNA Homology

    PubMed Central

    Mundia, Maureen M.; Desai, Vatsal; Magwood, Alissa C.; Baker, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we exploited a plasmid-based assay that detects the new DNA synthesis (3′ extension) that accompanies Rad51-mediated homology searching and strand invasion steps of homologous recombination to investigate the interplay between Rad51 concentration and homology length. Mouse hybridoma cells that express endogenous levels of Rad51 display an approximate linear increase in the frequency of 3′ extension for homology lengths of 500 bp to 2 kb. At values below ∼500 bp, the frequency of 3′ extension declines markedly, suggesting that this might represent the minimal efficient processing segment for 3′ extension. Overexpression of wild-type Rad51 stimulated the frequency of 3′ extension by ∼3-fold for homology lengths <900 bp, but when homology was >2 kb, 3′ extension frequency increased by as much as 10-fold. Excess wild-type Rad51 did not increase the average 3′ extension tract length. Analysis of cell lines expressing N-terminally FLAG-tagged Rad51 polymerization mutants F86E, A89E, or F86E/A89E established that the 3′ extension process requires Rad51 polymerization activity. Mouse hybridoma cells that have reduced Brca2 (Breast cancer susceptibility 2) due to stable expression of small interfering RNA show a significant reduction in 3′ extension efficiency; expression of wild-type human BRCA2, but not a BRCA2 variant devoid of BRC repeats 1–8, rescues the 3′ extension defect in these cells. Our results suggest that increased Rad51 concentration and homology length interact synergistically to promote 3′ extension, presumably as a result of enhanced Brca2-mediated Rad51 polymerization. PMID:24583581

  6. Tunable DNA cleavage activity promoted by copper(ii) ternary complexes with N-donor heterocyclic ligands.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, T; Silva-Caldeira, P P; Pich, C T; Pereira-Maia, E C; Terenzi, H

    2016-06-04

    Several small molecules have the capacity to cleave DNA promptly at high yields, even under mild conditions. Usually, this activity has no constraints, occurring without external or user control. Here, we demonstrate that UV-light exposure can greatly enhance the DNA cleavage activity promoted by four ternary copper(ii) complexes. A remarkable photocontrolled activity was achieved, which may be interesting for chemical and biochemical applications.

  7. Tousled-like kinases phosphorylate Asf1 to promote histone supply during DNA replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimovskaia, Ilnaz M.; Young, Clifford; Strømme, Caroline B.; Menard, Patrice; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Mejlvang, Jakob; Ask, Katrine; Ploug, Michael; Nielsen, Michael L.; Jensen, Ole N.; Groth, Anja

    2014-03-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes are rapidly assembled on newly synthesized DNA to restore chromatin organization. Asf1, a key histone H3-H4 chaperone required for this process, is phosphorylated by Tousled-like kinases (TLKs). Here, we identify TLK phosphorylation sites by mass spectrometry and dissect how phosphorylation has an impact on human Asf1 function. The divergent C-terminal tail of Asf1a is phosphorylated at several sites, and this is required for timely progression through S phase. Consistent with this, biochemical analysis of wild-type and phospho-mimetic Asf1a shows that phosphorylation enhances binding to histones and the downstream chaperones CAF-1 and HIRA. Moreover, we find that TLK phosphorylation of Asf1a is induced in cells experiencing deficiency of new histones and that TLK interaction with Asf1a involves its histone-binding pocket. We thus propose that TLK signalling promotes histone supply in S phase by targeting histone-free Asf1 and stimulating its ability to shuttle histones to sites of chromatin assembly.

  8. Purification of a liver DNA-synthesis promoter from plasma of partially hepatectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Gil, J J; Escartín, P; García-Cañero, R; Trilla, C; Veloso, J J; Sánchez, G; Moreno-Caparrós, A; Enrique de Salamanca, C; Lozano, R; Gavilanes, J G

    1986-01-01

    A protein was isolated from plasma of partially (70%) hepatectomized rats that, injected in mice, increases the uptake of [3H]thymidine by liver DNA by 200-300% over that by injected control saline. The purification procedure consists essentially of three chromatography steps, employing Sephadex G-75, DEAE-cellulose and hydroxyapatite. The hepatic promoter (HP) preparation shows a single band in SDS/polyacrylamide (15%)-gel electrophoresis (silver stained), with an Mr of 64 000; its activity is suppressed by trypsin or pepsin and is unaffected by deoxyribonuclease or ribonuclease. On injection into mice (150 ng/mouse), it increases the mitotic index of the liver. It shows organ-specificity, acting on liver but not on spleen, kidney, lung or brain. In primary liver cultures, it produces an increase in uptake of [3H]thymidine into DNA in the range 1-10 ng/ml. In this system in vitro, it increases the uptake of 22Na+ immediately after addition. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3741389

  9. 53BP1 and the LINC Complex Promote Microtubule-Dependent DSB Mobility and DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Lottersberger, Francisca; Karssemeijer, Roos Anna; Dimitrova, Nadya; de Lange, Titia

    2015-11-05

    Increased mobility of chromatin surrounding double-strand breaks (DSBs) has been noted in yeast and mammalian cells but the underlying mechanism and its contribution to DSB repair remain unclear. Here, we use a telomere-based system to track DNA damage foci with high resolution in living cells. We find that the greater mobility of damaged chromatin requires 53BP1, SUN1/2 in the linker of the nucleoskeleton, and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex and dynamic microtubules. The data further demonstrate that the excursions promote non-homologous end joining of dysfunctional telomeres and implicated Nesprin-4 and kinesins in telomere fusion. 53BP1/LINC/microtubule-dependent mobility is also evident at irradiation-induced DSBs and contributes to the mis-rejoining of drug-induced DSBs in BRCA1-deficient cells showing that DSB mobility can be detrimental in cells with numerous DSBs. In contrast, under physiological conditions where cells have only one or a few lesions, DSB mobility is proposed to prevent errors in DNA repair.

  10. RNF168 promotes noncanonical K27 ubiquitination to signal DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Marco; Pinato, Sabrina; Maiolica, Alessio; Rocchio, Francesca; Prato, Maria Giulia; Aebersold, Ruedi; Penengo, Lorenza

    2015-01-13

    Ubiquitination regulates numerous cellular processes by generating a versatile communication system based on eight structurally and functionally different chains linked through distinct residues. Except for K48 and K63, the biological relevance of different linkages is largely unclear. Here, we show that RNF168 ubiquitin ligase promotes noncanonical K27-linked ubiquitination both in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrate that residue K27 of ubiquitin (UbK27) is required for RNF168-dependent chromatin ubiquitination, by targeting histones H2A/H2A.X, and that it is the major ubiquitin-based modification marking chromatin upon DNA damage. Indeed, UbK27 is strictly required for the proper activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and is directly recognized by crucial DDR mediators, namely 53BP1, Rap80, RNF168, and RNF169. Mutation of UbK27 has dramatic consequences on DDR activation, preventing the recruitment of 53BP1 and BRCA1 to DDR foci. Similarly to the DDR, atypical ubiquitin chains could play unanticipated roles in other crucial ubiquitin-mediated biological processes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Kynurenine signaling increases DNA polymerase kappa expression and promotes genomic instability in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bostian, April C.L.; Maddukuri, Leena; Reed, Megan R.; Savenka, Tatsiana; Hartman, Jessica H.; Davis, Lauren; Pouncey, Dakota L.; Miller, Grover P.; Eoff, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of the translesion synthesis polymerase (TLS pol) hpol κ in glioblastomas has been linked to a poor patient prognosis; however, the mechanism promoting higher expression in these tumors remains unknown. We determined that activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway in glioblastoma cells leads to increased hpol κ mRNA and protein levels. We blocked nuclear translocation and DNA binding by the AhR in glioblastoma cells using a small-molecule and observed decreased hpol κ expression. Pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), the enzyme largely responsible for activating the AhR in glioblastomas, led to a decrease in the endogenous AhR agonist kynurenine (Kyn) and a corresponding decrease in hpol κ protein levels. Importantly, we discovered that inhibiting TDO activity, AhR signaling, or suppressing hpol κ expression with RNA interference led to decreased chromosomal damage in glioblastoma cells. Epistasis assays further supported the idea that TDO activity, activation of AhR signaling and the resulting over-expression of hpol κ function primarily in the same pathway to increase endogenous DNA damage. These findings indicate that up-regulation of hpol κ through glioblastoma-specific TDO activity and activation of AhR signaling likely contributes to the high levels of replication stress and genomic instability observed in these tumors. PMID:26651356

  12. Interaction of Individual Structural Domains of hnRNP LL with the BCL2 Promoter i-Motif DNA.

    PubMed

    Roy, Basab; Talukder, Poulami; Kang, Hyun-Jin; Tsuen, Shujian S; Alam, Mohammad P; Hurley, Laurence H; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-08-31

    The recently discovered role of the BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2 gene) promoter i-motif DNA in modulation of gene expression via interaction with the ribonucleoprotein hnRNP L-like (hnRNP LL) has prompted a more detailed study of the nature of this protein-DNA interaction. The RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) of hnRNP LL were expressed individually, and both RRM1 and RRM2 were found to bind efficiently to the BCL2 i-motif DNA, as well as being critical for transcriptional activation, whereas RRM3-4 bound only weakly to this DNA. Binding was followed by unfolding of the DNA as monitored by changes in the CD spectrum. Mutational analysis of the i-motif DNA revealed that binding involved primarily the lateral loops of the i-motif. The kinetics of binding of the DNA with RRM1 was explored by recording CD spectra at predetermined times following admixture of the protein and DNA. The change in molar ellipticity was readily apparent after 30 s and largely complete within 1 min. A more detailed view of protein-DNA interaction was obtained by introducing the fluorescence donor 6-CNTrp in RRM1 at position 137, and the acceptor 4-aminobenzo[g]quinazoline-2-one (Cf) in lieu of cytidine22 in the i-motif DNA. The course of binding of the two species was monitored by FRET, which reflected a steady increase in energy transfer over a period of several minutes. The FRET signal could be diminished by the further addition of (unlabeled) RRM2, no doubt reflecting competition for binding to the i-motif DNA. These experiments using the individual RRM domains from hnRNP LL confirm the role of this transcription factor in activation of BCL2 transcription via the i-motif in the promoter element.

  13. DNA methylation of heparanase promoter influences its expression and associated with the progression of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Fei; Bai, Shi-Yu; Ma, Ying; Yan, Zhong-Hai; Yue, Zhen; Yu, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Heparanase promotes tumor invasion and metastasis in several malignancies including breast cancer. However, the roles and regulation mechanisms of heparanase during breast cancer progression are still not fully understood. The aim of this study is to determine the differential regulation of heparanase gene expression in specific stages of breast cancer by DNA methylation. We detected levels of heparanase expression and DNA methylation patterns of its promoter in breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-435) and clinical tissues, respectively. It has been observed that heparanase is highly expressed in the invasive MDA-MB-435 cells with low methylation modification in the heparanase promoter. In contrast, lower expression of heparanase in MCF-7 cells is accompanied by higher methylation in the promoter. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), a potent demethylating agent, results in induction of heparanase expression and higher invasion potential in vitro and leads to an advantage of tumor formation in vivo. In 54 tissue samples, cancer samples at late stages (stage IV) showed the highest heparanase expression accomplished by little DNA methylation. On the contrary, methylation prevalence is highest in normal tissue and inversely correlated with heparanase expression. A significant correlation between DNA methylation and clinical stage was demonstrated (p = 0.012). Collectively, these results demonstrate that DNA methylation play the regulation role in heparanase gene in different stages of breast cancer and present a direct effect on tumor progression.

  14. BRUCE regulates DNA double-strand break response by promoting USP8 deubiquitination of BRIT1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chunmin; Che, Lixiao; Ren, Jinyu; Pandita, Raj K; Lu, Jing; Li, Kaiyi; Pandita, Tej K; Du, Chunying

    2015-03-17

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is crucial for genomic integrity. BRIT1 (breast cancer susceptibility gene C terminus-repeat inhibitor of human telomerase repeat transcriptase expression), a tumor suppressor and early DDR factor, is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by phosphorylated H2A histone family, member X (γ-H2AX), where it promotes chromatin relaxation by recruiting the switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI-SNF) chromatin remodeler to facilitate DDR. However, regulation of BRIT1 recruitment is not fully understood. The baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (BRUCE) is an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP). Here, we report a non-IAP function of BRUCE in the regulation of the BRIT1-SWI-SNF DSB-response pathway and genomic stability. We demonstrate that BRIT1 is K63 ubiquitinated in unstimulated cells and that deubiquitination of BRIT1 is a prerequisite for its recruitment to DSB sites by γ-H2AX. We show mechanistically that BRUCE acts as a scaffold, bridging the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8) and BRIT1 in a complex to coordinate USP8-catalyzed deubiquitination of BRIT1. Loss of BRUCE or USP8 impairs BRIT1 deubiquitination, BRIT1 binding with γ-H2AX, the formation of BRIT1 DNA damage foci, and chromatin relaxation. Moreover, BRUCE-depleted cells display reduced homologous recombination repair, and BRUCE-mutant mice exhibit repair defects and genomic instability. These findings identify BRUCE and USP8 as two hitherto uncharacterized critical DDR regulators and uncover a deubiquitination regulation of BRIT1 assembly at damaged chromatin for efficient DDR and genomic stability.

  15. BRUCE regulates DNA double-strand break response by promoting USP8 deubiquitination of BRIT1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Chunmin; Che, Lixiao; Ren, Jinyu; Pandita, Raj K.; Lu, Jing; Li, Kaiyi; Pandita, Tej K.; Du, Chunying

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is crucial for genomic integrity. BRIT1 (breast cancer susceptibility gene C terminus-repeat inhibitor of human telomerase repeat transcriptase expression), a tumor suppressor and early DDR factor, is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by phosphorylated H2A histone family, member X (γ-H2AX), where it promotes chromatin relaxation by recruiting the switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI–SNF) chromatin remodeler to facilitate DDR. However, regulation of BRIT1 recruitment is not fully understood. The baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (BRUCE) is an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP). Here, we report a non-IAP function of BRUCE in the regulation of the BRIT1–SWI–SNF DSB-response pathway and genomic stability. We demonstrate that BRIT1 is K63 ubiquitinated in unstimulated cells and that deubiquitination of BRIT1 is a prerequisite for its recruitment to DSB sites by γ-H2AX. We show mechanistically that BRUCE acts as a scaffold, bridging the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8) and BRIT1 in a complex to coordinate USP8-catalyzed deubiquitination of BRIT1. Loss of BRUCE or USP8 impairs BRIT1 deubiquitination, BRIT1 binding with γ-H2AX, the formation of BRIT1 DNA damage foci, and chromatin relaxation. Moreover, BRUCE-depleted cells display reduced homologous recombination repair, and BRUCE-mutant mice exhibit repair defects and genomic instability. These findings identify BRUCE and USP8 as two hitherto uncharacterized critical DDR regulators and uncover a deubiquitination regulation of BRIT1 assembly at damaged chromatin for efficient DDR and genomic stability. PMID:25733871

  16. Differentiated, Promoter-specific Response of [4Fe-4S] NsrR DNA Binding to Reaction with Nitric Oxide*

    PubMed Central

    Crack, Jason C.; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Munnoch, John; Thomson, Andrew J.; Hutchings, Matthew I.; Le Brun, Nick E.

    2016-01-01

    NsrR is an iron-sulfur cluster protein that regulates the nitric oxide (NO) stress response of many bacteria. NsrR from Streptomyces coelicolor regulates its own expression and that of only two other genes, hmpA1 and hmpA2, which encode HmpA enzymes predicted to detoxify NO. NsrR binds promoter DNA with high affinity only when coordinating a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Here we show that reaction of [4Fe-4S] NsrR with NO affects DNA binding differently depending on the gene promoter. Binding to the hmpA2 promoter was abolished at ∼2 NO per cluster, although for the hmpA1 and nsrR promoters, ∼4 and ∼8 NO molecules, respectively, were required to abolish DNA binding. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the NO reaction revealed a rapid, multi-phase, non-concerted process involving up to 8–10 NO molecules per cluster, leading to the formation of several iron-nitrosyl species. A distinct intermediate was observed at ∼2 NO per cluster, along with two further intermediates at ∼4 and ∼6 NO. The NsrR nitrosylation reaction was not significantly affected by DNA binding. These results show that NsrR regulates different promoters in response to different concentrations of NO. Spectroscopic evidence indicates that this is achieved by different NO-FeS complexes. PMID:26887943

  17. Developmental and organ-specific changes in promoter DNA-protein interactions in the tomato rbcS gene family.

    PubMed

    Manzara, T; Carrasco, P; Gruissem, W

    1991-12-01

    The five genes encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcS) from tomato are differentially expressed. Transcription of the genes is organ specific and developmentally regulated in fruit and light regulated in cotyledons and leaves. DNase I footprinting assays were used to map multiple sites of DNA-protein interaction in the promoter regions of all five genes and to determine whether the differential transcriptional activity of each gene correlated with developmental or organ-specific changes in DNA-protein interactions. We show organ-specific differences in DNase I protection patterns, suggesting that differential transcription of rbcS genes is controlled at least in part at the level of DNA-protein interactions. In contrast, no changes were detected in the DNase I footprint pattern generated with nuclear extracts from dark-grown cotyledons versus cotyledons exposed to light, implying that light-dependent regulation of rbcS transcription is controlled by protein-protein interactions or modification of DNA binding proteins. During development of tomato fruit, most DNA-protein interactions in the rbcS promoter regions disappear, coincident with the transcriptional inactivation of the rbcS genes. In nuclear extracts from nonphotosynthetic roots and red fruit, the only detectable DNase I protection corresponds to a G-box binding activity. Detection of other DNA binding proteins in extracts from these organs and expression of nonphotosynthetic genes exclude the possibility that roots and red fruit are transcriptionally inactive. The absence of complex promoter protection patterns in these organs suggests either that cooperative interactions between different DNA binding proteins are necessary to form functional transcription complexes or that there is developmental and organ-specific regulation of several rbcS-specific transcription factors in these organs. The DNase I-protected DNA sequences defined in this study are discussed in the context of conserved DNA

  18. Next-generation sequencing-based 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends for alternative promoters.

    PubMed

    Perera, Bambarendage P U; Kim, Joomyeong

    2016-02-01

    Mammalian genomes contain many unknown alternative first exons and promoters. Thus, we have modified the existing 5'RACE (5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends) approach into a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based new protocol that can identify these alternative promoters. This protocol has incorporated two main ideas: (i) 5'RACE starting from the known second exons of genes and (ii) NGS-based sequencing of the subsequent cDNA products. This protocol also provides a bioinformatics strategy that processes the sequence reads from NGS runs. This protocol has successfully identified several alternative promoters for an imprinted gene, PEG3. Overall, this NGS-based 5'RACE protocol is a sensitive and reliable method for detecting low-abundant transcripts and promoters.

  19. Mapping of an Origin of DNA Replication in the Promoter of Fragile X Gene FMR1

    PubMed Central

    Brylawski, Bruna P.; Chastain, Paul D.; Cohen, Stephanie M.; Cordeiro-Stone, Marila; Kaufman, David G.

    2007-01-01

    An origin of bidirectional DNA replication was mapped to the promoter of the FMR1 gene in human chromosome Xq27.3, which has been linked to the fragile X syndrome. This origin is adjacent to a CpG island and overlaps the site of expansion of the triplet repeat (CGG) at the fragile X instability site, FRAXA. The promoter region of FMR2 in the FRAXE site (approximately 600 kb away, in chromosome band Xq28) also includes an origin of replication, as previously described. FMR1 transcripts were detected in foreskin and male fetal lung fibroblasts, while FMR2 transcripts were not. However, both FMR1 and FMR2 were found to replicate late in S phase (approximately six hours into the S phase of normal human fibroblasts). The position of the origin of replication relative to the CGG repeat, and perhaps the late replication of these genes, might be important factors in the susceptibility to triplet repeat amplification at the FRAXA and FRAXE sites. PMID:17196195

  20. A dynamic CTCF chromatin binding landscape promotes DNA hydroxymethylation and transcriptional induction of adipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Oger, Frédérik; Dehondt, Hélène; Firmin, François F.; Gheeraert, Céline; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional transcription factor characterized by chromatin binding patterns often described as largely invariant. In this context, how CTCF chromatin recruitment and functionalities are used to promote cell type-specific gene expression remains poorly defined. Here, we show that, in addition to constitutively bound CTCF binding sites (CTS), the CTCF cistrome comprises a large proportion of sites showing highly dynamic binding patterns during the course of adipogenesis. Interestingly, dynamic CTCF chromatin binding is positively linked with changes in expression of genes involved in biological functions defining the different stages of adipogenesis. Importantly, a subset of these dynamic CTS are gained at cell type-specific regulatory regions, in line with a requirement for CTCF in transcriptional induction of adipocyte differentiation. This relates to, at least in part, CTCF requirement for transcriptional activation of both the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and its target genes. Functionally, we show that CTCF interacts with TET methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET) enzymes and promotes adipogenic transcriptional enhancer DNA hydroxymethylation. Our study reveals a dynamic CTCF chromatin binding landscape required for epigenomic remodeling of enhancers and transcriptional activation driving cell differentiation. PMID:25183525

  1. Acute DNA damage activates the tumour suppressor p53 to promote radiation-induced lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Castle, Katherine D.; Moding, Everett J.; Blum, Jordan M.; Williams, Nerissa; Luo, Lixia; Ma, Yan; Borst, Luke B.; Kim, Yongbaek; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic cancer therapies, such as chemoradiation, cause haematological toxicity primarily by activating the tumour suppressor p53. While inhibiting p53-mediated cell death during cancer therapy ameliorates haematologic toxicity, whether it also impacts carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of inducible p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to show that temporarily blocking p53 during total-body irradiation (TBI) not only ameliorates acute toxicity, but also improves long-term survival by preventing lymphoma development. Using KrasLA1 mice, we show that TBI promotes the expansion of a rare population of thymocytes that express oncogenic KrasG12D. However, blocking p53 during TBI significantly suppresses the expansion of KrasG12D-expressing thymocytes. Mechanistically, bone marrow transplant experiments demonstrate that TBI activates p53 to decrease the ability of bone marrow cells to suppress lymphoma development through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism. Together, our results demonstrate that the p53 response to acute DNA damage promotes the development of radiation-induced lymphoma. PMID:26399548

  2. Phosphoryl Transfer Processes Promoted by a Trifunctional Calix[4]arene Inspired by DNA Topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Salvio, Riccardo; Volpi, Stefano; Cacciapaglia, Roberta; Sansone, Francesco; Mandolini, Luigi; Casnati, Alessandro

    2016-10-07

    The cone-calix[4]arene derivative (1H3)(2+), decorated at the upper rim with two guanidinium units and a phenolic hydroxyl in an ABAH functionalization pattern, effectively promotes the cleavage of the DNA model compound bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) in 80% DMSO solution at pH values in the range 8.5-12.0. The pH dependence of the kinetics was found to be fully consistent with the results of the potentiometric titration of the triprotic acid (1H3)(2+). At pH 9.5, the rate enhancement of p-nitrophenol liberation from BNPP relative to background hydrolysis is 6.5 × 10(4)-fold at 1 mM concentration of the calix[4]arene derivative. Experimental data clearly point to the effective cooperation of the three active units and to the involvement of the phenolate moiety as a nucleophile in the phosphoryl transfer step. Subsequent liberation of a second equivalent of p-nitrophenol from the phosphorylated calixarene intermediate is conceivably promoted by the "built-in" guanidine/guanidinium catalytic dyad.

  3. DAI (DLM-1/ZBP1) as a genetic adjuvant for DNA vaccines that promotes effective antitumor CTL immunity.

    PubMed

    Lladser, Alvaro; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Tufvesson, Helena; Ligtenberg, Maarten A; Quest, Andrew Fg; Kiessling, Rolf; Ljungberg, Karl

    2011-03-01

    DNA vaccination is an attractive approach to induce antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs), which can mediate protective antitumor immunity. The potency of DNA vaccines encoding weakly immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) can be enhanced by codelivering gene-encoded adjuvants. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that sense intracellular DNA could potentially be used to harness intrinsic immune-stimulating properties of plasmid DNA vaccines. Consequently, the cytosolic DNA sensor, DNA-dependent activator of interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (DAI), was used as a genetic adjuvant. In vivo electroporation (EP) of mice with a DAI-encoding plasmid (pDAI) promoted transcription of genes encoding type I IFNs, proinflammatory cytokines, and costimulatory molecules. Coimmunization with pDAI and antigen-encoding plasmids enhanced in vivo antigen-specific proliferation, and induction of effector and memory CTLs. Moreover, codelivery of pDAI effectively promoted CTL and CD4(+) Th1 responses to the TAA survivin. The DAI-enhanced CTL induction required nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation and type I IFN signaling, but did not involve the IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Codelivery of pDAI also increased CTL responses to the melanoma-associated antigen tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP2), enhanced tumor rejection and conferred long-term protection against B16 melanoma challenge. This study constitutes "proof-of-principle" validating the use of intracellular PRRs as genetic adjuvants to enhance DNA vaccine potency.

  4. Promoter demethylation of cystathionine-β-synthetase gene contributes to inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feihu; Zhou, Youlang; Xiao, Ying; Tao, Jin; Gu, Jianguo; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), an endogenous gas molecule synthesized by cystathionine-β-synthetase (CBS), is involved in inflammation and nociceptive signaling. However, the molecular and epigenetic mechanisms of CBS-H(2)S signaling in peripheral nociceptive processing remain unknown. We demonstrated that peripheral inflammation induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund adjuvant significantly up-regulated expression of CBS at both protein and mRNA levels in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The CBS inhibitors hydroxylamine and aminooxyacetic acid attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner and reversed hyperexcitability of DRG neurons in inflamed rats. Intraplantar administration of NaHS (its addition mimics CBS production of H(2)S) or l-cysteine in healthy rats elicited mechanical hyperalgesia. Application of NaHS in vitro enhanced excitability and tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium current of DRG neurons from healthy rats, which was attenuated by pretreatment of protein kinase A inhibitor H89. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing demonstrated that promoter region of cbs gene was less methylated in DRG samples from inflamed rats than that from controls. Peripheral inflammation did not alter expression of DNA methyltransferase 3a and 3b, the 2 major enzymes for DNA methylation, but led to a significant up-regulation of methyl-binding domain protein 4 and growth arrest and DNA damage inducible protein 45α, the enzymes involved in active DNA demethylation. Our findings suggest that epigenetic regulation of CBS expression may contribute to inflammatory hyperalgesia. H(2)S seems to increase TTX-resistant sodium channel current, which may be mediated by protein kinase A pathway, thus identifying a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of chronic pain.

  5. RSC facilitates Rad59-dependent homologous recombination between sister chromatids by promoting cohesin loading at DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Oum, Ji-Hyun; Seong, Changhyun; Kwon, Youngho; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Sid, Amy; Ramakrishnan, Sreejith; Ira, Grzegorz; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Lee, Sang Eun; Shim, Eun Yong

    2011-10-01

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks by searching for, invading, and copying information from a homologous template, typically the homologous chromosome or sister chromatid. Tight wrapping of DNA around histone octamers, however, impedes access of repair proteins to DNA damage. To facilitate DNA repair, modifications of histones and energy-dependent remodeling of chromatin are required, but the precise mechanisms by which chromatin modification and remodeling enzymes contribute to homologous DNA repair are unknown. Here we have systematically assessed the role of budding yeast RSC (remodel structure of chromatin), an abundant, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, in the cellular response to spontaneous and induced DNA damage. RSC physically interacts with the recombination protein Rad59 and functions in homologous recombination. Multiple recombination assays revealed that RSC is uniquely required for recombination between sister chromatids by virtue of its ability to recruit cohesin at DNA breaks and thereby promoting sister chromatid cohesion. This study provides molecular insights into how chromatin remodeling contributes to DNA repair and maintenance of chromatin fidelity in the face of DNA damage.

  6. Long-Term Pancreatic Beta Cell Exposure to High Levels of Glucose but Not Palmitate Induces DNA Methylation within the Insulin Gene Promoter and Represses Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kota; Tsunekawa, Shin; Ikeniwa, Makoto; Izumoto, Takako; Iida, Atsushi; Ogata, Hidetada; Uenishi, Eita; Seino, Yusuke; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Hamada, Yoji; Kuroda, Akio; Shinjo, Keiko; Kondo, Yutaka; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated epigenetics in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Furthermore, DNA methylation, which irreversibly deactivates gene transcription, of the insulin promoter, particularly the cAMP response element, is increased in diabetes patients. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to investigate insulin promoter DNA methylation in an over-nutrition state. INS-1 cells, the rat pancreatic beta cell line, were cultured under normal-culture-glucose (11.2 mmol/l) or experimental-high-glucose (22.4 mmol/l) conditions for 14 days, with or without 0.4 mmol/l palmitate. DNA methylation of the rat insulin 1 gene (Ins1) promoter was investigated using bisulfite sequencing and pyrosequencing analysis. Experimental-high-glucose conditions significantly suppressed insulin mRNA and increased DNA methylation at all five CpG sites within the Ins1 promoter, including the cAMP response element, in a time-dependent and glucose concentration-dependent manner. DNA methylation under experimental-high-glucose conditions was unique to the Ins1 promoter; however, palmitate did not affect DNA methylation. Artificial methylation of Ins1 promoter significantly suppressed promoter-driven luciferase activity, and a DNA methylation inhibitor significantly improved insulin mRNA suppression by experimental-high-glucose conditions. Experimental-high-glucose conditions significantly increased DNA methyltransferase activity and decreased ten-eleven-translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase activity. Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress did not affect DNA methylation of the Ins1 promoter. High glucose but not palmitate increased ectopic triacylglycerol accumulation parallel to DNA methylation. Metformin upregulated insulin gene expression and suppressed DNA methylation and ectopic triacylglycerol accumulation. Finally, DNA methylation of the Ins1 promoter increased in isolated islets from Zucker diabetic fatty rats. This study helps to clarify the

  7. Polycomb CBX7 Promotes Initiation of Heritable Repression of Genes Frequently Silenced with Cancer Specific DNA Hypermethylation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Helai P.; Cai, Yi; McGarvey, Kelly M.; Easwaran, Hariharan; Van Neste, Leander; Ohm, Joyce E.; O’Hagan, Heather M.; Baylin, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of genes in association with aberrant promoter DNA hypermethylation has emerged as a significant mechanism in the development of human cancers. Such genes are also often targets of the Polycomb group repressive complexes in embryonic cells. The Polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 2 has been best studied in this regard. We now examine a link between PRC1 and cancer specific gene silencing. Here we show a novel and direct association between a constituent of the PRC1 complex, CBX7, with gene repression and promoter DNA hypermethylation of genes frequently silenced in cancer. CBX7 is able to complex with DNA methyltransferase enzymes leading us to explore a role for CBX7 in maintenance and initiation of gene silencing. Knockdown of CBX7 was unable to relieve suppression of deeply silenced genes in cancer cells, however, in embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells, CBX7 can initiate stable repression of genes that are frequently silenced in adult cancers. Furthermore, we are able to observe assembly of DNA methyltransferases at CBX7 target gene promoters. Sustained expression of CBX7 in EC cells confers a growth advantage and resistance to retinoic acid induced differentiation. In this setting, especially, there is increased promoter DNA hypermethylation for many genes by analysis of specific genes as well as through epigenomic studies. Our results allow us to propose a potential mechanism, through assembly of novel repressive complexes, by which the Pc component of PRC1 can promote the initiation of epigenetic changes involving abnormal DNA hypermethylation of genes frequently silenced in adult cancers. PMID:19602592

  8. Endothelial Cell–Specific Expression of Roundabout 4 Is Regulated by Differential DNA Methylation of the Proximal Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yoshiaki; Funahashi, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Toru; Nishiyama, Yuji; Yuan, Lei; Shirakura, Keisuke; Turjman, Alexis S.; Kano, Yoshihiro; Naruse, Hiroki; Suzuki, Ayano; Sakai, Miki; Zhixia, Jiang; Kitajima, Kenji; Ishimoto, Kenji; Hino, Nobumasa; Kondoh, Masuo; Mukai, Yohei; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; García-Cardeña, Guillermo; Aird, William C.; Doi, Takefumi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The molecular basis of endothelial cell (EC)–specific gene expression is poorly understood. Roundabout 4 (Robo4) is expressed exclusively in ECs. We previously reported that the 3-kb 5′-flanking region of the human Robo4 gene contains information for lineage-specific expression in the ECs. Our studies implicated a critical role for GA-binding protein and specificity protein 1 (SP1) in mediating overall expression levels. However, these transcription factors are also expressed in non-ECs. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms contribute to EC-specific Robo4 gene expression. Methods and Results Bisulfite sequencing analysis indicated that the proximal promoter of Robo4 is methylated in non-ECs but not in ECs. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased Robo4 gene expression in non-ECs but not in ECs. Proximal promoter methylation significantly decreased the promoter activity in ECs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that DNA methylation of the proximal promoter inhibited SP1 binding to the −42 SP1 site. In DNase hypersensitivity assays, chromatin condensation of the Robo4 promoter was observed in some but not all nonexpressing cell types. In Hprt (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase)-targeted mice, a 0.3-kb proximal promoter directed cell-type–specific expression in the endothelium. Bisulfite sequencing analysis using embryonic stem cell–derived mesodermal cells and ECs indicated that the EC-specific methylation pattern of the promoter is determined by demethylation during differentiation and that binding of GA-binding protein and SP1 to the proximal promoter is not essential for demethylation. Conclusions The EC-specific DNA methylation pattern of the Robo4 proximal promoter is determined during cell differentiation and contributes to regulation of EC-specific Robo4 gene expression. PMID:24855053

  9. DNA damage induces nuclear actin filament assembly by Formin -2 and Spire-½ that promotes efficient DNA repair. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Belin, Brittany J; Lee, Terri; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-08-19

    Actin filaments assemble inside the nucleus in response to multiple cellular perturbations, including heat shock, protein misfolding, integrin engagement, and serum stimulation. We find that DNA damage also generates nuclear actin filaments-detectable by phalloidin and live-cell actin probes-with three characteristic morphologies: (i) long, nucleoplasmic filaments; (ii) short, nucleolus-associated filaments; and (iii) dense, nucleoplasmic clusters. This DNA damage-induced nuclear actin assembly requires two biologically and physically linked nucleation factors: Formin-2 and Spire-1/Spire-2. Formin-2 accumulates in the nucleus after DNA damage, and depletion of either Formin-2 or actin's nuclear import factor, importin-9, increases the number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), linking nuclear actin filaments to efficient DSB clearance. Nuclear actin filaments are also required for nuclear oxidation induced by acute genotoxic stress. Our results reveal a previously unknown role for nuclear actin filaments in DNA repair and identify the molecular mechanisms creating these nuclear filaments.

  10. DNA demethylation in PD-1 gene promoter induced by 5-azacytidine activates PD-1 expression on Molt-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xiao, Xin Q; Jiang, Yong F; Liang, Yun S; Peng, Min Y; Xu, Yun; Gong, Guo Z

    2011-01-01

    The expression of the programmed death 1 (PD-1) gene is an indicator of exhausted T-cells with decreased activation and function. It remains unknown, however, whether the methylation status of the PD-1 gene promoter is associated with PD-1 expression level. This study shows the changes of PD-1 expression levels and the demethylation status of the PD-1 promoter region in Molt-4 cells under different concentrations of 5-azacytidine (5-Zac). The result demonstrated that DNA demethylation at PD-1 promoter may contribute to PD-1 overexpression.

  11. Fast copper-free click DNA ligation by the ring-strain promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Shelbourne, Montserrat; Chen, Xiong; Brown, Tom; El-Sagheer, Afaf H

    2011-06-14

    Templated DNA strand ligation by the ring-strain promoted alkyne-azide [3+2] cycloaddition reaction is very fast; with dibenzocyclooctyne, the reaction is essentially complete in 1 min. It is inhibited by the presence of a single mismatched base pair suggesting applications in genetic analysis. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  12. Clinical significance of Stratifin, ERalpha and PR promoter methylation in tumor and serum DNA in Indian breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Sameer; Sharma, Gayatri; Parshad, Rajinder; Srivastava, Anurag; Gupta, Siddartha Datta; Ralhan, Ranju

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concordance of promoter methylation of stratifin, ERalpha and PR in tumor and circulating DNA in breast cancer patients and their association with clinicopathological parameters and disease prognosis. Methylation specific PCR were carried out to investigate the promoter methylation status of stratifin, ERalpha and PR in tumor and circulating DNA in 100 breast cancer patients in a prospective study. The effect of promoter methylation on protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Significant association was observed between promoter methylation of stratifin in tumors (61%) and paired sera (56%) (r=0.78; p < or = 0.001). Loss of stratifin expression was observed in 47% tumors and was associated with poor overall survival (p=0.05). Significant correlation was observed between methylation status of ERalpha with PRB (p<0.0001, OR=20.8, 95% CI=7.4-58.0) and stratifin (p=0.003, OR=2.0, 95% CI=0.8-4.4). This study underscores the potential utility of serum DNA methylation of these genes as surrogate for tumor DNA methylation as a promising tool for cancer diagnosis. Copyright 2010 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystal Structure of Mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding Domain in Complex with Type II TGF-[beta] Receptor Promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-08-18

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-{beta} receptor gene (T{beta}R-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, the A-site and the B-site. Here, we report the 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter DNA (mT{beta}R-II{sub DNA}). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from a major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity.

  14. Electronic promotion effect of double proton transfer on conduction of DNA through improvement of transverse electronic communication of base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Li, Genqin; Zhang, Laibin; Li, Jilai; Wang, Meishan; Bu, Yuxiang

    2011-10-01

    The effect of double proton transfer (DPT) on charge migration of DNA was investigated by the nonequilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory. The results revealed that DPT not only lowers ionization potentials, but also improves the delocalization of the localized π-orbitals at each base moiety through adjusting energy levels and spatial distributions of their molecular orbitals. Furthermore, DPT leads to both the strengthening of the second-order interactions of the Watson-Crick H-bond zones, and the promotion of the charge transfer transitions between two pairing bases in the UV absorption spectra. Electronic transport calculations indicated that DPT can improve the charge migration along the DNA duplex for specific sequences through enhancing transverse base-to-base electronic communication. This work will provide a new insight into the understanding of DNA charge conduction which can be electronically promoted or regulated by DPT.

  15. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Yasunori Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint.

  16. MISCORE: a new scoring function for characterizing DNA regulatory motifs in promoter sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational approaches for finding DNA regulatory motifs in promoter sequences are useful to biologists in terms of reducing the experimental costs and speeding up the discovery process of de novo binding sites. It is important for rule-based or clustering-based motif searching schemes to effectively and efficiently evaluate the similarity between a k-mer (a k-length subsequence) and a motif model, without assuming the independence of nucleotides in motif models or without employing computationally expensive Markov chain models to estimate the background probabilities of k-mers. Also, it is interesting and beneficial to use a priori knowledge in developing advanced searching tools. Results This paper presents a new scoring function, termed as MISCORE, for functional motif characterization and evaluation. Our MISCORE is free from: (i) any assumption on model dependency; and (ii) the use of Markov chain model for background modeling. It integrates the compositional complexity of motif instances into the function. Performance evaluations with comparison to the well-known Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) score and Information Content (IC) have shown that MISCORE has promising capabilities to separate and recognize functional DNA motifs and its instances from non-functional ones. Conclusions MISCORE is a fast computational tool for candidate motif characterization, evaluation and selection. It enables to embed priori known motif models for computing motif-to-motif similarity, which is more advantageous than IC and MAP score. In addition to these merits mentioned above, MISCORE can automatically filter out some repetitive k-mers from a motif model due to the introduction of the compositional complexity in the function. Consequently, the merits of our proposed MISCORE in terms of both motif signal modeling power and computational efficiency will make it more applicable in the development of computational motif discovery tools. PMID:23282090

  17. Orientation-specific joining of AID-initiated DNA breaks promotes antibody class switching.

    PubMed

    Dong, Junchao; Panchakshari, Rohit A; Zhang, Tingting; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Jiazhi; Volpi, Sabrina A; Meyers, Robin M; Ho, Yu-Jui; Du, Zhou; Robbiani, Davide F; Meng, Feilong; Gostissa, Monica; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Manis, John P; Alt, Frederick W

    2015-09-03

    During B-cell development, RAG endonuclease cleaves immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) V, D, and J gene segments and orchestrates their fusion as deletional events that assemble a V(D)J exon in the same transcriptional orientation as adjacent Cμ constant region exons. In mice, six additional sets of constant region exons (CHs) lie 100-200 kilobases downstream in the same transcriptional orientation as V(D)J and Cμ exons. Long repetitive switch (S) regions precede Cμ and downstream CHs. In mature B cells, class switch recombination (CSR) generates different antibody classes by replacing Cμ with a downstream CH (ref. 2). Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates CSR by promoting deamination lesions within Sμ and a downstream acceptor S region; these lesions are converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by general DNA repair factors. Productive CSR must occur in a deletional orientation by joining the upstream end of an Sμ DSB to the downstream end of an acceptor S-region DSB. However, the relative frequency of deletional to inversional CSR junctions has not been measured. Thus, whether orientation-specific joining is a programmed mechanistic feature of CSR as it is for V(D)J recombination and, if so, how this is achieved is unknown. To address this question, we adapt high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing into a highly sensitive DSB end-joining assay and apply it to endogenous AID-initiated S-region DSBs in mouse B cells. We show that CSR is programmed to occur in a productive deletional orientation and does so via an unprecedented mechanism that involves in cis Igh organizational features in combination with frequent S-region DSBs initiated by AID. We further implicate ATM-dependent DSB-response factors in enforcing this mechanism and provide an explanation of why CSR is so reliant on the 53BP1 DSB-response factor.

  18. The DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B promotes tamoxifen resistance in ER-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Law, Emily K.; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; LaPara, Kelly; Leonard, Brandon; Starrett, Gabriel J.; Molan, Amy M.; Temiz, Nuri A.; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Span, Paul N.; Foekens, John A.; Martens, John W. M.; Yee, Douglas; Harris, Reuben S.

    2016-01-01

    Breast tumors often display extreme genetic heterogeneity characterized by hundreds of gross chromosomal aberrations and tens of thousands of somatic mutations. Tumor evolution is thought to be ongoing and driven by multiple mutagenic processes. A major outstanding question is whether primary tumors have preexisting mutations for therapy resistance or whether additional DNA damage and mutagenesis are necessary. Drug resistance is a key measure of tumor evolvability. If a resistance mutation preexists at the time of primary tumor presentation, then the intended therapy is likely to fail. However, if resistance does not preexist, then ongoing mutational processes still have the potential to undermine therapeutic efficacy. The antiviral enzyme APOBEC3B (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3B) preferentially deaminates DNA C-to-U, which results in signature C-to-T and C-to-G mutations commonly observed in breast tumors. We use clinical data and xenograft experiments to ask whether APOBEC3B contributes to ongoing breast tumor evolution and resistance to the selective estrogen receptor modulator, tamoxifen. First, APOBEC3B levels in primary estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast tumors inversely correlate with the clinical benefit of tamoxifen in the treatment of metastatic ER+ disease. Second, APOBEC3B depletion in an ER+ breast cancer cell line results in prolonged tamoxifen responses in murine xenograft experiments. Third, APOBEC3B overexpression accelerates the development of tamoxifen resistance in murine xenograft experiments by a mechanism that requires the enzyme’s catalytic activity. These studies combine to indicate that APOBEC3B promotes drug resistance in breast cancer and that inhibiting APOBEC3B-dependent tumor evolvability may be an effective strategy to improve efficacies of targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27730215

  19. Co-operative DNA binding by GAGA transcription factor requires the conserved BTB/POZ domain and reorganizes promoter topology.

    PubMed Central

    Katsani, K R; Hajibagheri, M A; Verrijzer, C P

    1999-01-01

    The POZ domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif present in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodelling and human cancers. Here, we study the role of the POZ domain of the GAGA transcription factor in promoter recognition. Natural target promoters for GAGA typically contain multiple GAGA-binding elements. Our results show that the POZ domain mediates strong co-operative binding to multiple sites but inhibits binding to single sites. Protein cross-linking and gel filtration chromatography experiments established that the POZ domain is required for GAGA oligomerization into higher order complexes. Thus, GAGA oligomerization increases binding specificity by selecting only promoters with multiple sites. Electron microscopy revealed that GAGA binds to multiple sites as a large oligomer and induces bending of the promoter DNA. Our results indicate a novel mode of DNA binding by GAGA, in which a large GAGA complex binds multiple GAGA elements that are spread out over a region of a few hundred base pairs. We suggest a model in which the promoter DNA is wrapped around a GAGA multimer in a conformation that may exclude normal nucleosome formation. PMID:9927429

  20. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  1. Activation of transcription initiation from a stable RNA promoter by a Fis protein-mediated DNA structural transmission mechanism.

    PubMed

    Opel, Michael L; Aeling, Kimberly A; Holmes, Walter M; Johnson, Reid C; Benham, Craig J; Hatfield, G Wesley

    2004-07-01

    The leuV operon of Escherichia coli encodes three of the four genes for the tRNA1Leu isoacceptors. Transcription from this and other stable RNA promoters is known to be affected by a cis-acting UP element and by Fis protein interactions with the carboxyl-terminal domain of the alpha-subunits of RNA polymerase. In this report, we suggest that transcription from the leuV promoter also is activated by a Fis-mediated, DNA supercoiling-dependent mechanism similar to the IHF-mediated mechanism described previously for the ilvP(G) promoter (S. D. Sheridan et al., 1998, J Biol Chem 273: 21298-21308). We present evidence that Fis binding results in the translocation of superhelical energy from the promoter-distal portion of a supercoiling-induced DNA duplex destabilized (SIDD) region to the promoter-proximal portion of the leuV promoter that is unwound within the open complex. A mutant Fis protein, which is defective in contacting the carboxyl-terminal domain of the alpha-subunits of RNA polymerase, remains competent for stimulating open complex formation, suggesting that this DNA supercoiling-dependent component of Fis-mediated activation occurs in the absence of specific protein interactions between Fis and RNA polymerase. Fis-mediated translocation of superhelical energy from upstream binding sites to the promoter region may be a general feature of Fis-mediated activation of transcription at stable RNA promoters, which often contain A+T-rich upstream sequences.

  2. DNA methylation in the Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) promoter in relation to asthma and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Reinius, Lovisa E; Gref, Anna; Sääf, Annika; Acevedo, Nathalie; Joerink, Maaike; Kupczyk, Maciej; D'Amato, Mauro; Bergström, Anna; Melén, Erik; Scheynius, Annika; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Söderhäll, Cilla; Kere, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Asthma and allergy are complex disorders influenced by both inheritance and environment, a relationship that might be further clarified by epigenetics. Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) has been associated with asthma and allergy and a study suggested modulation of the genetic risk by environmental factors. We aimed to study DNA methylation in the promoter region of NPSR1 in relation to asthma and environmental exposures. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) was used to investigate potential functional roles of both genotypes and methylation status in the NPSR1 promoter. DNA methylation was analysed using EpiTYPER in blood samples from two well-characterized cohorts; the BIOAIR study of severe asthma in adults and the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE. We observed that DNA methylation and genetic variants in the promoter influenced the binding of nuclear proteins to DNA, suggesting functional relevance. Significant, although small, differences in methylation were related to both adult severe asthma (p = 0.0001) and childhood allergic asthma (p = 0.01). Furthermore, DNA methylation was associated with exposures such as current smoking in adults for two CpG sites (p = 0.005 and 0.04), parental smoking during infancy in the children (p = 0.02) and in which month the sample was taken (p = 0.01). In summary, DNA methylation levels in the promoter of NPSR1 showed small but significant associations with asthma, both in adults and in children, and to related traits such as allergy and certain environmental exposures. Both genetic variation and the methylated state of CpG sites seem to have an effect on the binding of nuclear proteins in the regulatory region of NPSR1 suggesting complex regulation of this gene in asthma and allergy.

  3. DNA Methylation in the Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) Promoter in Relation to Asthma and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Reinius, Lovisa E.; Gref, Anna; Sääf, Annika; Acevedo, Nathalie; Joerink, Maaike; Kupczyk, Maciej; D'Amato, Mauro; Bergström, Anna; Melén, Erik; Scheynius, Annika; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Söderhäll, Cilla; Kere, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Asthma and allergy are complex disorders influenced by both inheritance and environment, a relationship that might be further clarified by epigenetics. Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) has been associated with asthma and allergy and a study suggested modulation of the genetic risk by environmental factors. We aimed to study DNA methylation in the promoter region of NPSR1 in relation to asthma and environmental exposures. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) was used to investigate potential functional roles of both genotypes and methylation status in the NPSR1 promoter. DNA methylation was analysed using EpiTYPER in blood samples from two well-characterized cohorts; the BIOAIR study of severe asthma in adults and the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE. We observed that DNA methylation and genetic variants in the promoter influenced the binding of nuclear proteins to DNA, suggesting functional relevance. Significant, although small, differences in methylation were related to both adult severe asthma (p = 0.0001) and childhood allergic asthma (p = 0.01). Furthermore, DNA methylation was associated with exposures such as current smoking in adults for two CpG sites (p = 0.005 and 0.04), parental smoking during infancy in the children (p = 0.02) and in which month the sample was taken (p = 0.01). In summary, DNA methylation levels in the promoter of NPSR1 showed small but significant associations with asthma, both in adults and in children, and to related traits such as allergy and certain environmental exposures. Both genetic variation and the methylated state of CpG sites seem to have an effect on the binding of nuclear proteins in the regulatory region of NPSR1 suggesting complex regulation of this gene in asthma and allergy. PMID:23372674

  4. TP53INP2/DOR, a mediator of cell autophagy, promotes rDNA transcription via facilitating the assembly of the POLR1/RNA polymerase I preinitiation complex at rDNA promoters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yinfeng; Wan, Wei; Shou, Xin; Huang, Rui; You, Zhiyuan; Shou, Yanhong; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Tianhua; Liu, Wei

    2016-07-02

    Cells control their metabolism through modulating the anabolic and catabolic pathways. TP53INP2/DOR (tumor protein p53 inducible nuclear protein 2), participates in cell catabolism by serving as a promoter of autophagy. Here we uncover a novel function of TP53INP2 in protein synthesis, a major biosynthetic and energy-consuming anabolic process. TP53INP2 localizes to the nucleolus through its nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) located at the C-terminal domain. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays detected an association of TP53INP2 with the ribosomal DNA (rDNA), when exclusion of TP53INP2 from the nucleolus repressed rDNA promoter activity and the production of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and proteins. The removal of TP53INP2 also impaired the association of the POLR1/RNA polymerase I preinitiation complex (PIC) with rDNA. Further, TP53INP2 interacts directly with POLR1 PIC, and is required for the assembly of the complex. These data indicate that TP53INP2 promotes ribosome biogenesis through facilitating rRNA synthesis at the nucleolus, suggesting a dual role of TP53INP2 in cell metabolism, assisting anabolism on the nucleolus, and stimulating catabolism off the nucleolus.

  5. Hepatitis B virus X protein promotes hypermethylation of p16(INK4A) promoter through upregulation of DNA methyltransferases in hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Zhen; Zhu, Rong; Shi, Lian-Guo; Mao, Yi; Zheng, Guang-Juan; Chen, Qi; Zhu, Hong-Guang

    2010-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus×protein (HBx) has been implicated as a potential trigger of the epigenetic deregulation of some genes, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. The aim of this study is to identify underlying mechanisms involved in HBx-mediated epigenetic modification in the process of HBx induced p16(INK4A) promoter hypermethylation. Liver cell lines were stably transfected with HBx-expressing vector. The methylation status of p16(INK4A) was examined by methyl-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) and bisulfite sequencing. Reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze the expression of HBx, HBx-mediated DNA methylation abnormalities and p16(INK4A). Some cases of HCC and corresponding noncancerous liver tissues were studied. HBx up-regulates DNMT1 and DNMT3A expression in both mRNA level and protein level, and HBx represses p16(INK4A) expression through inducing hypermethylation of p16(INK4A) promoter. Moreover, HBx induces hypermethylation of p16(INK4A) promoter through DNMT1 and DNMT3A. Regulation of DNMT1 and DNMT3A by HBx promoted hypermethylation of p16(INK4A) promoter region. HBx-DNMTs-p16(INK4A) promoter hypermethylation may suggest a mechanism for tumorigenesis during hepatocarcinogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gastric cancer associated variant of DNA polymerase beta (Leu22Pro) promotes DNA replication associated double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Rozacky, Jenna; Nemec, Antoni A.; Sweasy, Joann B.; Kidane, Dawit

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase beta (Pol β) is a key enzymefor the protection against oxidative DNA lesions via itsrole in base excision repair (BER). Approximately 1/3 of tumors studied to date express Pol β variant proteins, and several tumors overexpress Pol β. Pol β possesses DNA polymerase and dRP lyase activities, both of which are known to be important for efficient BER. The dRP lyase activity resides within the 8kDa amino terminal domain of Pol β, is responsible for removal of the 5′ phosphate group (5′-dRP). The DNA polymerase subsequently fills the gaps. Previously, we demonstrated that the human gastric cancer-associated variant of Pol β (Leu22Pro (L22P)) lacks dRP lyase function in vitro. Here, we report that L22P-expressing cells harbor significantly increased replication associated DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and defective maintenance of the nascent DNA strand (NDS) during replication stress. Moreover, L22P-expressing cells are sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors, which suggests trapped PARP1 binds to the 5′-dRP group and blocks replications forks, resulting in fork collapse and DSBs. Our data suggest that the normal function of the dRP lyase is critical to maintain replication fork integrity and prevent replication fork collapse to DSBs and cellular transformation. PMID:26090616

  7. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-[beta] receptor promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-10-08

    Ets proteins are transcription factors that activate or repress the expression of genes that are involved in various biological processes, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, development, transformation and apoptosis. Like other Ets-family members, Elf3 functions as a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcriptional factor. A mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment (amino-acid residues 269-371) containing the DNA-binding domain has been crystallized in complex with mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter (TR-II) DNA. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.66, b = 52, c = 99.78 {angstrom}, and diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom}.

  8. Regulation of DNA-end resection by hnRNPU-like proteins promotes DNA double-strand break signaling and repair

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Sophie E.; Blackford, Andrew N.; Chapman, J. Ross; Baskcomb, Linda; Gravel, Serge; Rusch, Andre; Thomas, Anoushka; Blundred, Rachel; Smith, Philippa; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Dobner, Thomas; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Turnell, Andrew S.; Stewart, Grant S.; Grand, Roger J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair are critical for cell viability, and rely on highly coordinated pathways whose molecular organization is still incompletely understood. Here, we show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like (hnRNPUL) proteins 1 and 2 play key roles in cellular responses to DSBs. We identify human hnRNPUL1 and 2 as binding partners for the DSB sensor complex MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) and demonstrate that hnRNPUL1 and 2 are recruited to DNA damage in an interdependent manner that requires MRN. Moreover, we show that hnRNPUL1 and 2 stimulate DNA-end resection and promote ATR-dependent signaling and DSB repair by homologous recombination, thereby contributing to cell survival upon exposure to DSB-inducing agents. Finally, we establish that hnRNPUL1 and 2 function downstream of MRN and CtBP-interacting protein (CtIP) to promote recruitment of the BLM helicase to DNA breaks. Collectively, these results provide insights into how mammalian cells respond to DSBs. PMID:22365830

  9. Regulation of DNA-end resection by hnRNPU-like proteins promotes DNA double-strand break signaling and repair.

    PubMed

    Polo, Sophie E; Blackford, Andrew N; Chapman, J Ross; Baskcomb, Linda; Gravel, Serge; Rusch, Andre; Thomas, Anoushka; Blundred, Rachel; Smith, Philippa; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Dobner, Thomas; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Turnell, Andrew S; Stewart, Grant S; Grand, Roger J; Jackson, Stephen P

    2012-02-24

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair are critical for cell viability, and rely on highly coordinated pathways whose molecular organization is still incompletely understood. Here, we show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like (hnRNPUL) proteins 1 and 2 play key roles in cellular responses to DSBs. We identify human hnRNPUL1 and -2 as binding partners for the DSB sensor complex MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) and demonstrate that hnRNPUL1 and -2 are recruited to DNA damage in an interdependent manner that requires MRN. Moreover, we show that hnRNPUL1 and -2 stimulate DNA-end resection and promote ATR-dependent signaling and DSB repair by homologous recombination, thereby contributing to cell survival upon exposure to DSB-inducing agents. Finally, we establish that hnRNPUL1 and -2 function downstream of MRN and CtBP-interacting protein (CtIP) to promote recruitment of the BLM helicase to DNA breaks. Collectively, these results provide insights into how mammalian cells respond to DSBs.

  10. RB localizes to DNA double-strand breaks and promotes DNA end resection and homologous recombination through the recruitment of BRG1.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Cruz, Renier; Manickavinayaham, Swarnalatha; Biswas, Anup K; Clary, Regina Weaks; Premkumar, Tolkappiyan; Cole, Francesca; Johnson, David G

    2016-11-15

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor is recognized as a master regulator that controls entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. Its loss leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation and is a hallmark of cancer. RB works by binding to members of the E2F family of transcription factors and recruiting chromatin modifiers to the promoters of E2F target genes. Here we show that RB also localizes to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) dependent on E2F1 and ATM kinase activity and promotes DSB repair through homologous recombination (HR), and its loss results in genome instability. RB is necessary for the recruitment of the BRG1 ATPase to DSBs, which stimulates DNA end resection and HR. A knock-in mutation of the ATM phosphorylation site on E2F1 (S29A) prevents the interaction between E2F1 and TopBP1 and recruitment of RB, E2F1, and BRG1 to DSBs. This knock-in mutation also impairs DNA repair, increases genomic instability, and renders mice hypersensitive to IR. Importantly, depletion of RB in osteosarcoma and breast cancer cell lines results in sensitivity to DNA-damaging drugs, which is further exacerbated by poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. We uncovered a novel, nontranscriptional function for RB in HR, which could contribute to genome instability associated with RB loss.

  11. Salmonella Typhimurium Diarrhea Reveals Basic Principles of Enteropathogen Infection and Disease-Promoted DNA Exchange.

    PubMed

    Wotzka, Sandra Y; Nguyen, Bidong D; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2017-04-12

    Despite decades of research, efficient therapies for most enteropathogenic bacteria are still lacking. In this review, we focus on Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), a frequent cause of acute, self-limiting food-borne diarrhea and a model that has revealed key principles of enteropathogen infection. We review the steps of gut infection and the mucosal innate-immune defenses limiting pathogen burdens, and we discuss how inflammation boosts gut luminal S. Typhimurium growth. We also discuss how S. Typhimurium-induced inflammation accelerates the transfer of plasmids and phages, which may promote the transmission of antibiotic resistance and facilitate emergence of pathobionts and pathogens with enhanced virulence. The targeted manipulation of the microbiota and vaccination might offer strategies to prevent this evolution. As gut luminal microbes impact various aspects of the host's physiology, improved strategies for preventing enteropathogen infection and disease-inflicted DNA exchange may be of broad interest well beyond the acute infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prenatal stress-induced programming of genome-wide promoter DNA methylation in 5-HTT-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schraut, K G; Jakob, S B; Weidner, M T; Schmitt, A G; Scholz, C J; Strekalova, T; El Hajj, N; Eijssen, L M T; Domschke, K; Reif, A; Haaf, T; Ortega, G; Steinbusch, H W M; Lesch, K P; Van den Hove, D L

    2014-10-21

    The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT/SLC6A4)-linked polymorphic region has been suggested to have a modulatory role in mediating effects of early-life stress exposure on psychopathology rendering carriers of the low-expression short (s)-variant more vulnerable to environmental adversity in later life. The underlying molecular mechanisms of this gene-by-environment interaction are not well understood, but epigenetic regulation including differential DNA methylation has been postulated to have a critical role. Recently, we used a maternal restraint stress paradigm of prenatal stress (PS) in 5-HTT-deficient mice and showed that the effects on behavior and gene expression were particularly marked in the hippocampus of female 5-Htt+/- offspring. Here, we examined to which extent these effects are mediated by differential methylation of DNA. For this purpose, we performed a genome-wide hippocampal DNA methylation screening using methylated-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) on Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Promoter 1.0 R arrays. Using hippocampal DNA from the same mice as assessed before enabled us to correlate gene-specific DNA methylation, mRNA expression and behavior. We found that 5-Htt genotype, PS and their interaction differentially affected the DNA methylation signature of numerous genes, a subset of which showed overlap with the expression profiles of the corresponding transcripts. For example, a differentially methylated region in the gene encoding myelin basic protein (Mbp) was associated with its expression in a 5-Htt-, PS- and 5-Htt × PS-dependent manner. Subsequent fine-mapping of this Mbp locus linked the methylation status of two specific CpG sites to Mbp expression and anxiety-related behavior. In conclusion, hippocampal DNA methylation patterns and expression profiles of female prenatally stressed 5-Htt+/- mice suggest that distinct molecular mechanisms, some of which are promoter methylation-dependent, contribute to the behavioral effects of the 5-Htt

  13. Enhanced GSH synthesis by Bisphenol A exposure promoted DNA methylation process in the testes of adult rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cong; Zhang, Yingying; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Zaizhao

    2016-09-01

    DNA methylation is a commonly studied epigenetic modification. The mechanism of BPA on DNA methylation is poorly understood. The present study aims to explore whether GSH synthesis affects DNA methylation in the testes of adult male rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus in response to Bisphenol A (BPA). Male G. rarus was exposed to 1, 15 and 225μgL(-1) BPA for 7 days. The levels of global DNA methylation, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and glutathione (GSH) in the testes were analyzed. Meanwhile, the levels of enzymes involved in DNA methylation and de novo GSH synthesis, and the substrate contents for GSH production were measured. Furthermore, gene expression profiles of the corresponding genes of all studied enzymes were analyzed. Results indicated that BPA at 15 and 225μgL(-1) caused hypermethylation of global DNA in the testes. The 15μgL(-1) BPA resulted in significant decrease of ten-eleven translocation proteins (TETs) while 225μgL(-1) BPA caused significant increase of DNA methyltransferase proteins (DNMTs). Moreover, 225μgL(-1) BPA caused significant increase of H2O2 and GSH levels, and the de novo GSH synthesis was enhanced. These results indicated that the significant decrease of the level of TETs may be sufficient to cause the DNA hypermethylation by 15μgL(-1) BPA. However, the significantly increased of DNMTs contributed to the significant increase of DNA methylation levels by 225μgL(-1) BPA. Moreover, the elevated de novo GSH synthesis may promote the DNA methylation process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Poly(dA.dT) sequences exist as rigid DNA structures in nucleosome-free yeast promoters in vivo.

    PubMed

    Suter, B; Schnappauf, G; Thoma, F

    2000-11-01

    Poly(dA.dT) sequences (T-tracts) are abundant genomic DNA elements with unusual properties in vitro and an established role in transcriptional regulation of yeast genes. In vitro T-tracts are rigid, contribute to DNA bending, affect assembly in nucleosomes and generate a characteristic pattern of CPDs (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) upon irradiation with UV light (UV photofootprint). In eukaryotic cells, where DNA is packaged in chromatin, the DNA structure of T-tracts is unknown. Here we have used in vivo UV photofootprinting and DNA repair by photolyase to investigate the structure and accessibility of T-tracts in yeast promoters (HIS3, URA3 and ILV1). The same characteristic photofootprints were obtained in yeast and in naked DNA, demonstrating that the unusual T-tract structure exists in living cells. Rapid repair of CPDs in the T-tracts demonstrates that these T-tracts were not folded in nucleosomes. Moreover, neither datin, a T-tract binding protein, nor Gcn5p, a histone acetyltransferase involved in nucleosome remodelling, showed an influence on the structure and accessibility of T-tracts. The data support a contribution of this unusual DNA structure to transcriptional regulation.

  15. p53 coordinates DNA repair with nucleotide synthesis by suppressing PFKFB3 expression and promoting the pentose phosphate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Derek A.; He, Yizhou; Leslie, Patrick L.; Tikunov, Andrey P.; Fenger, Nick; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Zhang, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    Activation of p53 in response to DNA damage is essential for tumor suppression. Although previous studies have emphasized the importance of p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis for tumor suppression, recent studies have suggested that other areas of p53 regulation, such as metabolism and DNA damage repair (DDR), are also essential for p53-dependent tumor suppression. However, the intrinsic connections between p53-mediated DDR and metabolic regulation remain incompletely understood. Here, we present data suggesting that p53 promotes nucleotide biosynthesis in response to DNA damage by repressing the expression of the phosphofructokinase-2 (PFK2) isoform 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3), a rate-limiting enzyme that promotes glycolysis. PFKFB3 suppression increases the flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) to increase nucleotide production, which results in more efficient DNA damage repair and increased cell survival. Interestingly, although p53-mediated suppression of PFKFB3 could increase the two major PPP products, NADPH and nucleotides, only nucleotide production was essential to promote DDR. By identifying the novel p53 target PFKFB3, we report an important mechanistic connection between p53-regulated metabolism and DDR, both of which play crucial roles in tumor suppression. PMID:27901115

  16. Isolation and in silico analysis of promoter of a high salinity stress-regulated pea DNA helicase 45.

    PubMed

    Tajrishi, Marjan M; Tuteja, Narendra

    2011-10-01

    Helicases are motor proteins that can transiently catalyze the unwinding of energetically stable duplex DNA or RNA molecules by using ATP hydrolysis as the source of energy. Many helicases share a core region of highly conserved sequence motifs, and belong to the rapidly growing DEAD-box protein family. Pea DNA helicase 45 (PDH45), that exhibits striking homology with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A (eIF4A), contains ATP-dependent DNA and RNA helicase, DNA-dependent ATPase, and ATP-binding activities. The transcript of the PDH45 gene was reported to be upregulated in pea plant in response to high salinity, cold stress, abscisic acid (ABA), dehydration and early wounding. The first direct evidence that overexpression of PDH45 confers salinity stress tolerance without yield loss has also been reported. A promoter analysis of PDH45 gene has not been studied. The cis-regulatory elements present on promoter region of the gene act as binding sites for RNA polymerase and transcription factors and control the regulation of gene expression. Here we report the promoter of the PDH45 gene that contains stress-responsive cis-regulatory elements which may be responsible for regulating the expression of PDH45 under abiotic stress conditions.

  17. DNA looping-dependent autorepression of LEE1 P1 promoters by Ler in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC)

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Abhayprasad; Shin, Minsang; Jeong, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Lim, Hyung-Ju; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Paik, Soon-Young; Takeyasu, Kunio; Tobe, Toru; Yen, Hilo; Lee, Gwangrog; Choy, Hyon E.

    2014-01-01

    Ler, a homolog of H-NS in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), plays a critical role in the expression of virulence genes encoded by the pathogenic island, locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Although Ler acts as an antisilencer of multiple LEE operons by alleviating H-NS–mediated silencing, it represses its own expression from two LEE1 P1 promoters, P1A and P1B, that are separated by 10 bp. Various in vitro biochemical methods were used in this study to elucidate the mechanism underlying transcription repression by Ler. Ler acts through two AATT motifs, centered at position −111.5 on the coding strand and at +65.5 on the noncoding strand, by simultaneously repressing P1A and P1B through DNA-looping. DNA-looping was visualized using atomic force microscopy. It is intriguing that an antisilencing protein represses transcription, not by steric exclusion of RNA polymerase, but by DNA-looping. We propose that the DNA-looping prevents further processing of open promoter complex (RPO) at these promoters during transcription initiation. PMID:24920590

  18. Transcription initiation in vivo without classical transactivators: DNA kinks flanking the core promoter of the housekeeping yeast adenylate kinase gene, AKY2, position nucleosomes and constitutively activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, Michaela; Oechsner, Ulrich; Gregor, Kerstin; Schroth, Gary P; Bandlow, Wolfhard

    2002-10-01

    The housekeeping gene of the major adenylate kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (AKY2, ADK1) is constitutively transcribed at a moderate level. The promoter has been dissected in order to define elements that effect constitutive transcription. Initiation of mRNA synthesis at the AKY2 promoter is shown to be mediated by a non-canonic core promoter, (TA)(6). Nucleotide sequences 5' of this element only marginally affect transcription suggesting that promoter activation can dispense with transactivators and essentially involves basal transcription. We show that the core promoter of AKY2 is constitutively kept free of nucleosomes. Analyses of permutated AKY2 promoter DNA revealed the presence of bent DNA. DNA structure analysis by computer and by mutation identified two kinks flanking an interstitial stretch of 65 bp of moderately bent core promoter DNA. Kinked DNA is likely incompatible with packaging into nucleosomes and responsible for positioning nucleosomes at the flanks allowing unimpeded access of the basal transcription machinery to the core promoter. The data show that in yeast, constitutive gene expression can dispense with classical transcriptional activator proteins, if two prerequisites are met: (i) the core promoter is kept free of nucleosomes; this can be due to structural properties of the DNA as an alternative to chromatin remodeling factors; and (ii) the core promoter is pre-bent to allow a high rate of basal transcription initiation.

  19. Alternative DNA structure formation in the mutagenic human c-MYC promoter.

    PubMed

    Del Mundo, Imee Marie A; Zewail-Foote, Maha; Kerwin, Sean M; Vasquez, Karen M

    2017-05-05

    Mutation 'hotspot' regions in the genome are susceptible to genetic instability, implicating them in diseases. These hotspots are not random and often co-localize with DNA sequences potentially capable of adopting alternative DNA structures (non-B DNA, e.g. H-DNA and G4-DNA), which have been identified as endogenous sources of genomic instability. There are regions that contain overlapping sequences that may form more than one non-B DNA structure. The extent to which one structure impacts the formation/stability of another, within the sequence, is not fully understood. To address this issue, we investigated the folding preferences of oligonucleotides from a chromosomal breakpoint hotspot in the human c-MYC oncogene containing both potential G4-forming and H-DNA-forming elements. We characterized the structures formed in the presence of G4-DNA-stabilizing K+ ions or H-DNA-stabilizing Mg2+ ions using multiple techniques. We found that under conditions favorable for H-DNA formation, a stable intramolecular triplex DNA structure predominated; whereas, under K+-rich, G4-DNA-forming conditions, a plurality of unfolded and folded species were present. Thus, within a limited region containing sequences with the potential to adopt multiple structures, only one structure predominates under a given condition. The predominance of H-DNA implicates this structure in the instability associated with the human c-MYC oncogene. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Alternative DNA structure formation in the mutagenic human c-MYC promoter

    PubMed Central

    del Mundo, Imee Marie A.; Zewail-Foote, Maha; Kerwin, Sean M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mutation ‘hotspot’ regions in the genome are susceptible to genetic instability, implicating them in diseases. These hotspots are not random and often co-localize with DNA sequences potentially capable of adopting alternative DNA structures (non-B DNA, e.g. H-DNA and G4-DNA), which have been identified as endogenous sources of genomic instability. There are regions that contain overlapping sequences that may form more than one non-B DNA structure. The extent to which one structure impacts the formation/stability of another, within the sequence, is not fully understood. To address this issue, we investigated the folding preferences of oligonucleotides from a chromosomal breakpoint hotspot in the human c-MYC oncogene containing both potential G4-forming and H-DNA-forming elements. We characterized the structures formed in the presence of G4-DNA-stabilizing K+ ions or H-DNA-stabilizing Mg2+ ions using multiple techniques. We found that under conditions favorable for H-DNA formation, a stable intramolecular triplex DNA structure predominated; whereas, under K+-rich, G4-DNA-forming conditions, a plurality of unfolded and folded species were present. Thus, within a limited region containing sequences with the potential to adopt multiple structures, only one structure predominates under a given condition. The predominance of H-DNA implicates this structure in the instability associated with the human c-MYC oncogene. PMID:28334873

  1. Pif1 helicase and Polδ promote recombination-coupled DNA synthesis via bubble migration.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marenda A; Kwon, YoungHo; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Chi, Peter; Niu, Hengyao; Mayle, Ryan; Chen, Xuefeng; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Ira, Grzegorz

    2013-10-17

    During DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR), DNA synthesis copies information from a template DNA molecule. Multiple DNA polymerases have been implicated in repair-specific DNA synthesis, but it has remained unclear whether a DNA helicase is involved in this reaction. A good candidate DNA helicase is Pif1, an evolutionarily conserved helicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae important for break-induced replication (BIR) as well as HR-dependent telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase found in 10-15% of all cancers. Pif1 has a role in DNA synthesis across hard-to-replicate sites and in lagging-strand synthesis with polymerase δ (Polδ). Here we provide evidence that Pif1 stimulates DNA synthesis during BIR and crossover recombination. The initial steps of BIR occur normally in Pif1-deficient cells, but Polδ recruitment and DNA synthesis are decreased, resulting in premature resolution of DNA intermediates into half-crossovers. Purified Pif1 protein strongly stimulates Polδ-mediated DNA synthesis from a D-loop made by the Rad51 recombinase. Notably, Pif1 liberates the newly synthesized strand to prevent the accumulation of topological constraint and to facilitate extensive DNA synthesis via the establishment of a migrating D-loop structure. Our results uncover a novel function of Pif1 and provide insights into the mechanism of HR.

  2. Patterns of DNA Methylation Across the Leptin Core Promoter in Four Diverse Asian and North American Populations.

    PubMed

    Mosher, M J; Melton, P E; Stapleton, P; Schanfield, M S; Crawford, M H

    2016-04-01

    DNA methylation is the most widely studied of epigenetic mechanisms, with environmental effects recorded through patterned attachments of methyl groups along the DNA that are capable of modifying gene expression without altering the DNA sequencing. The degree to which these patterns of DNA methylation are heritable, the expected range of normality across populations, and the phenotypic relevance of pattern variation remain unclear. Genes regulating metabolic pathways appear to be vulnerable to ongoing nutritional programming over the life course, as dietary nutrients are significant environmental determinants of DNA methylation, supplying both the methyl groups and energy to generate the methylation process. Here we examine methylation patterns along a region of the metabolic gene leptin (LEP). LEP's putative functions include regulation of energy homeostasis, with its signals affecting energy intake and expenditure, adipogenesis and energy storage, lipid and glucose metabolism, bone metabolism, and reproductive endocrine function. A pattern of differential methylation across CpG sites of the LEP core promoter has been previously identified; however, any consistency of pattern or its phenotypic significance is not fully elucidated among populations. Using DNA extracted from unfractionated white blood cells of peripheral blood samples, our pilot study, divided into two parts, examined the significance of variation in DNA methylation patterns along the leptin core promoter in four populations (phase 1) and used biomarkers reflecting leptin's functional process in two of those populations, western Buryat of Siberia and the Mennonite of central Kansas, to investigate the relevance of the ethnic variation identified in the DNA methylation (phase 2). LEP's core promoter region contains both the binding site for C/EBPα (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha), which tempers the final step in adipocyte maturity and capacity to synthesize leptin, and the TATA motif

  3. DNA damage induces nuclear actin filament assembly by Formin-2 and Spire-1/2 that promotes efficient DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Belin, Brittany J; Lee, Terri; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments assemble inside the nucleus in response to multiple cellular perturbations, including heat shock, protein misfolding, integrin engagement, and serum stimulation. We find that DNA damage also generates nuclear actin filaments—detectable by phalloidin and live-cell actin probes—with three characteristic morphologies: (i) long, nucleoplasmic filaments; (ii) short, nucleolus-associated filaments; and (iii) dense, nucleoplasmic clusters. This DNA damage-induced nuclear actin assembly requires two biologically and physically linked nucleation factors: Formin-2 and Spire-1/Spire-2. Formin-2 accumulates in the nucleus after DNA damage, and depletion of either Formin-2 or actin's nuclear import factor, importin-9, increases the number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), linking nuclear actin filaments to efficient DSB clearance. Nuclear actin filaments are also required for nuclear oxidation induced by acute genotoxic stress. Our results reveal a previously unknown role for nuclear actin filaments in DNA repair and identify the molecular mechanisms creating these nuclear filaments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07735.001 PMID:26287480

  4. Bloom syndrome complex promotes FANCM recruitment to stalled replication forks and facilitates both repair and traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Huang, Jing; Yan, Zhijiang; Li, Yongjiang; Ohzeki, Mioko; Ishiai, Masamichi; Xu, Dongyi; Takata, Minoru; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of FANCM, a conserved DNA translocase and key component of several DNA repair protein complexes, to replication forks stalled by DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is a step upstream of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. However, detection of the FANCM recruitment has been technically challenging so that its mechanism remains exclusive. Here, we successfully observed recruitment of FANCM at stalled forks using a newly developed protocol. We report that the FANCM recruitment depends upon its intrinsic DNA translocase activity, and its DNA-binding partner FAAP24. Moreover, it is dependent on the replication checkpoint kinase, ATR; but is independent of the FA core and FANCD2–FANCI complexes, two essential components of the FA pathway, indicating that the FANCM recruitment occurs downstream of ATR but upstream of the FA pathway. Interestingly, the recruitment of FANCM requires its direct interaction with Bloom syndrome complex composed of BLM helicase, Topoisomerase 3α, RMI1 and RMI2; as well as the helicase activity of BLM. We further show that the FANCM–BLM complex interaction is critical for replication stress-induced FANCM hyperphosphorylation, for normal activation of the FA pathway in response to ICLs, and for efficient traverse of ICLs by the replication machinery. Epistasis studies demonstrate that FANCM and BLM work in the same pathway to promote replication traverse of ICLs. We conclude that FANCM and BLM complex work together at stalled forks to promote both FA repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. PMID:28058110

  5. Bloom syndrome complex promotes FANCM recruitment to stalled replication forks and facilitates both repair and traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Huang, Jing; Yan, Zhijiang; Li, Yongjiang; Ohzeki, Mioko; Ishiai, Masamichi; Xu, Dongyi; Takata, Minoru; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of FANCM, a conserved DNA translocase and key component of several DNA repair protein complexes, to replication forks stalled by DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is a step upstream of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. However, detection of the FANCM recruitment has been technically challenging so that its mechanism remains exclusive. Here, we successfully observed recruitment of FANCM at stalled forks using a newly developed protocol. We report that the FANCM recruitment depends upon its intrinsic DNA translocase activity, and its DNA-binding partner FAAP24. Moreover, it is dependent on the replication checkpoint kinase, ATR; but is independent of the FA core and FANCD2-FANCI complexes, two essential components of the FA pathway, indicating that the FANCM recruitment occurs downstream of ATR but upstream of the FA pathway. Interestingly, the recruitment of FANCM requires its direct interaction with Bloom syndrome complex composed of BLM helicase, Topoisomerase 3α, RMI1 and RMI2; as well as the helicase activity of BLM. We further show that the FANCM-BLM complex interaction is critical for replication stress-induced FANCM hyperphosphorylation, for normal activation of the FA pathway in response to ICLs, and for efficient traverse of ICLs by the replication machinery. Epistasis studies demonstrate that FANCM and BLM work in the same pathway to promote replication traverse of ICLs. We conclude that FANCM and BLM complex work together at stalled forks to promote both FA repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs.

  6. P16-specific DNA methylation by engineered zinc finger methyltransferase inactivates gene transcription and promotes cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chenghua; Gan, Ying; Gu, Liankun; Wilson, James; Liu, Zhaojun; Zhang, Baozhen; Deng, Dajun

    2015-11-23

    P16 DNA methylation is well known to be the most frequent event in cancer development. It has been reported that genetic inactivation of P16 drives cancer growth and metastasis, however, whether P16 DNA methylation is truly a driver in cancer metastasis remains unknown. A P16-specific DNA methyltransferase (P16-dnmt) expression vector is designed using a P16 promoter-specific engineered zinc finger protein fused with the catalytic domain of dnmt3a. P16-dnmt transfection significantly decreases P16 promoter activity, induces complete methylation of P16 CpG islands, and inactivates P16 transcription in the HEK293T cell line. The P16-Dnmt coding fragment is integrated into an expression controllable vector and used to induce P16-specific DNA methylation in GES-1 and BGC823 cell lines. Transwell assays show enhanced migration and invasion of these cancer cells following P16-specific DNA methylation. Such effects are not observed in the P16 mutant A549 cell line. These results are confirmed using an experimental mouse pneumonic metastasis model. Moreover, enforced overexpression of P16 in these cells reverses the migration phenotype. Increased levels of RB phosphorylation and NFκB subunit P65 expression are also seen following P16-specific methylation and might further contribute to cancer metastasis. P16 methylation could directly inactivate gene transcription and drive cancer metastasis.

  7. Structure and dynamics of polymyxin-resistance-associated response regulator PmrA in complex with promoter DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yuan-Chao; Weng, Tsai-Hsuan; Li, Yi-Chuan; Kao, Yi-Fen; Lin, Wei-Feng; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chou, Shan-Ho; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Chen, Chinpan

    2015-01-01

    PmrA, an OmpR/PhoB family response regulator, manages genes for antibiotic resistance. Phosphorylation of OmpR/PhoB response regulator induces the formation of a symmetric dimer in the N-terminal receiver domain (REC), promoting two C-terminal DNA-binding domains (DBDs) to recognize promoter DNA to elicit adaptive responses. Recently, determination of the KdpE–DNA complex structure revealed an REC–DBD interface in the upstream protomer that may be necessary for transcription activation. Here, we report the 3.2-Å-resolution crystal structure of the PmrA–DNA complex, which reveals a similar yet different REC–DBD interface. However, NMR studies show that in the DNA-bound state, two domains tumble separately and an REC–DBD interaction is transiently populated in solution. Reporter gene analyses of PmrA variants with altered interface residues suggest that the interface is not crucial for supporting gene expression. We propose that REC–DBD interdomain dynamics and the DBD–DBD interface help PmrA interact with RNA polymerase holoenzyme to activate downstream gene transcription. PMID:26564787

  8. Screen identifies bromodomain protein ZMYND8 in chromatin recognition of transcription-associated DNA damage that promotes homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fade; Chiu, Li-Ya; Cox, Ben; Aymard, François; Clouaire, Thomas; Leung, Justin W; Cammarata, Michael; Perez, Mercedes; Agarwal, Poonam; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Legube, Gaëlle; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-01-15

    How chromatin shapes pathways that promote genome-epigenome integrity in response to DNA damage is an issue of crucial importance. We report that human bromodomain (BRD)-containing proteins, the primary "readers" of acetylated chromatin, are vital for the DNA damage response (DDR). We discovered that more than one-third of all human BRD proteins change localization in response to DNA damage. We identified ZMYND8 (zinc finger and MYND [myeloid, Nervy, and DEAF-1] domain containing 8) as a novel DDR factor that recruits the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation (NuRD) complex to damaged chromatin. Our data define a transcription-associated DDR pathway mediated by ZMYND8 and the NuRD complex that targets DNA damage, including when it occurs within transcriptionally active chromatin, to repress transcription and promote repair by homologous recombination. Thus, our data identify human BRD proteins as key chromatin modulators of the DDR and provide novel insights into how DNA damage within actively transcribed regions requires chromatin-binding proteins to orchestrate the appropriate response in concordance with the damage-associated chromatin context. © 2015 Gong et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. Screen identifies bromodomain protein ZMYND8 in chromatin recognition of transcription-associated DNA damage that promotes homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Fade; Chiu, Li-Ya; Cox, Ben; Aymard, François; Clouaire, Thomas; Leung, Justin W.; Cammarata, Michael; Perez, Mercedes; Agarwal, Poonam; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Legube, Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    How chromatin shapes pathways that promote genome–epigenome integrity in response to DNA damage is an issue of crucial importance. We report that human bromodomain (BRD)-containing proteins, the primary “readers” of acetylated chromatin, are vital for the DNA damage response (DDR). We discovered that more than one-third of all human BRD proteins change localization in response to DNA damage. We identified ZMYND8 (zinc finger and MYND [myeloid, Nervy, and DEAF-1] domain containing 8) as a novel DDR factor that recruits the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation (NuRD) complex to damaged chromatin. Our data define a transcription-associated DDR pathway mediated by ZMYND8 and the NuRD complex that targets DNA damage, including when it occurs within transcriptionally active chromatin, to repress transcription and promote repair by homologous recombination. Thus, our data identify human BRD proteins as key chromatin modulators of the DDR and provide novel insights into how DNA damage within actively transcribed regions requires chromatin-binding proteins to orchestrate the appropriate response in concordance with the damage-associated chromatin context. PMID:25593309

  10. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methyltransferase contributes to p16 promoter CpG island methylation in lung adenocarcinoma with smoking.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongju; Liu, Jiahong; Wang, Bo; Ma, Lingyun; Quan, Xiaojiao; Chu, Zhixiang; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between CpG island methylation and smoking and DNA methyltransferase in the occurrence and development of lung adenocarcinoma was explored by detecting p16 promoter methylation status. Protein and mRNA levels of p16 were detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization assays. p16 gene promoter and exon 1 CpG island locus Hap II sites methylation status was analyzed with the methylation-specific PCR. Only 4 of 40 p16-positive cases were detected to methylate on CpG islands with 10% methylating rate whereas 18 of p16-negative cases were methylated up to 36.73% of methylating rate. The methylating rates of both p16-positive and p16-negative groups were significantly different. 17 of 50 cases with smoking from total 89 lung adenocarcinoma cases were detected to methylate on CpG islands while only 5 of the remaining 39 non-smokers to methylate. The difference of the methylating rates in both smokers and non-smokers was significant to suggest the closely association of CpG island methylation of p16 with smoking. Furthermore, p16 promoter CpG islands were detected to methylate in 15 of 35 cases with higher DNA methyltransferase activity whereas only 7 detected to methylate in the remaining 54 cases with lower DNA methyltransferase activity. p16 promoter CpG island methylation likely made p16 expressing silence thus contributed to the tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma. Smoking is likely to promote p16 CpG island methylation or by its effect of the activity and metabolism of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT) on CpG island methylation status.

  11. DNA hydrolysis promoted by 1,7-dimethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shu-Hui; Liang, Feng; Xiong, Xiao-Qin; Yang, Li; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Xiang; Wu, Cheng-Tai

    2006-05-15

    Several acyclic and macrocyclic polyamines were evaluated for their ability to cleave DNA. 1,7-Dimethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (DMC) could hydrolyze double-strand DNA at a concentration of 25microM. pH 7.2 was the optimal condition to cleave DNA in the presence of DMC. Supercoiled DNA hydrolytic cleavage by DMC was supported by the evidence from free radical quenching and T4 ligase ligation.

  12. Orientation-Specific Joining of AID-initiated DNA Breaks Promotes Antibody Class Switching

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Jiazhi; Volpi, Sabrina A.; Meyers, Robin M.; Ho, Yu-Jui; Du, Zhou; Robbiani, Davide F.; Meng, Feilong; Gostissa, Monica; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Manis, John P.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2015-01-01

    During B cell development, RAG endonuclease cleaves immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) V, D, and J gene segments and orchestrates their fusion as deletional events that assemble a V(D)J exon in the same transcriptional orientation as adjacent Cμ constant region exons1,2. In mice, six additional sets of constant region exons (CHs) lie 100-200 kb downstream in the same transcriptional orientation as V(D)J and Cμ exons2. Long repetitive switch (S) regions precede Cμ and downstream CHs. In mature B cells, class switch recombination (CSR) generates different antibody classes by replacing Cμ with a downstream CH2. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) initiates CSR by promoting deamination lesions within Sμ and a downstream acceptor S region2,3; these lesions are converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by general DNA repair factors3. Productive CSR must occur in a deletional orientation by joining the upstream end of an Sμ DSB to the downstream end of an acceptor S region DSB (Fig. 1a). However, the relative frequency of deletional to inversional CSR junctions had not been measured. Thus, whether orientation-specific joining is a programmed mechanistic feature of CSR as it is for V(D)J recombination and, if so, how this is achieved was unknown. To address this question, we adapted high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS)4 into a highly sensitive DSB end-joining assay and applied it to endogenous AID-initiated S region DSBs. We find that CSR indeed is programmed to occur in a productive deletional orientation and does so via an unprecedented mechanism that involves in cis IgH organizational features in combination with frequent S region DSBs initiated by AID. We further implicate ATM-dependent DSB response (DSBR) factors in enforcing this mechanism and provide a solution to the enigma of why CSR is so reliant on the 53BP1 DSBR factor. PMID:26308889

  13. Cohesin promotes the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in replicated chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Bauerschmidt, Christina; Arrichiello, Cecilia; Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Woodcock, Michael; Hill, Mark A.; Stevens, David L.; Rothkamm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin protein complex holds sister chromatids together after synthesis until mitosis. It also contributes to post-replicative DNA repair in yeast and higher eukaryotes and accumulates at sites of laser-induced damage in human cells. Our goal was to determine whether the cohesin subunits SMC1 and Rad21 contribute to DNA double-strand break repair in X-irradiated human cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. RNA interference-mediated depletion of SMC1 sensitized HeLa cells to X-rays. Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, measured by γH2AX/53BP1 foci analysis, was slower in SMC1- or Rad21-depleted cells than in controls in G2 but not in G1. Inhibition of the DNA damage kinase DNA-PK, but not ATM, further inhibited foci loss in cohesin-depleted cells in G2. SMC1 depletion had no effect on DNA single-strand break repair in either G1 or late S/G2. Rad21 and SMC1 were recruited to sites of X-ray-induced DNA damage in G2-phase cells, but not in G1, and only when DNA damage was concentrated in subnuclear stripes, generated by partially shielded ultrasoft X-rays. Our results suggest that the cohesin complex contributes to cell survival by promoting the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in G2-phase cells in an ATM-dependent pathway. PMID:19906707

  14. 5-azacytidine promotes microspore embryogenesis initiation by decreasing global DNA methylation, but prevents subsequent embryo development in rapeseed and barley

    PubMed Central

    Solís, María-Teresa; El-Tantawy, Ahmed-Abdalla; Cano, Vanesa; Risueño, María C.; Testillano, Pilar S.

    2015-01-01

    Microspores are reprogrammed by stress in vitro toward embryogenesis. This process is an important tool in breeding to obtain double-haploid plants. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that changes in differentiation and proliferation. We have shown changes in global DNA methylation during microspore reprogramming. 5-Azacytidine (AzaC) cannot be methylated and leads to DNA hypomethylation. AzaC is a useful demethylating agent to study DNA dynamics, with a potential application in microspore embryogenesis. This work analyzes the effects of short and long AzaC treatments on microspore embryogenesis initiation and progression in two species, the dicot Brassica napus and the monocot Hordeum vulgare. This involved the quantitative analyses of proembryo and embryo production, the quantification of DNA methylation, 5-methyl-deoxy-cytidine (5mdC) immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the analysis of chromatin organization (condensation/decondensation) by light and electron microscopy. Four days of AzaC treatments (2.5 μM) increased embryo induction, response associated with a decrease of DNA methylation, modified 5mdC, and heterochromatin patterns compared to untreated embryos. By contrast, longer AzaC treatments diminished embryo production. Similar effects were found in both species, indicating that DNA demethylation promotes microspore reprogramming, totipotency acquisition, and embryogenesis initiation, while embryo differentiation requires de novo DNA methylation and is prevented by AzaC. This suggests a role for DNA methylation in the repression of microspore reprogramming and possibly totipotency acquisition. Results provide new insights into the role of epigenetic modifications in microspore embryogenesis and suggest a potential benefit of inhibitors, such as AzaC, to improve the process efficiency in biotechnology and breeding programs. PMID:26161085

  15. Correlation between quantified promoter methylation and enzymatic activity of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase in glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Yugo; Natsume, Atsushi; Toda, Hiroshi; Toi, Yuki; Motomura, Kazuya; Koyama, Hiroko; Matsuda, Keiji; Nakayama, Osamu; Sato, Makoto; Suzuki, Masaaki; Kondo, Yutaka; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2012-04-01

    The DNA repair protein O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, AGT) is a determinant of the resistance of tumor cells to alkylating anticancer agents that target the O(6) position of guanine. MGMT promoter methylation in tumors is regarded as the most common predictor of the responsiveness of glioblastoma to alkylating agents. However, MGMT promoter methylation status has been investigated mainly by methylation-specific PCR, which is a qualitative and subjective assay. In addition, the actual enzymatic activities associated with the methylation status of MGMT have not been explored. In the present study, MGMT promoter methylation in glioblastomas was quantified by bisulfite pyrosequencing, and its correlation with enzymatic activity was determined using a novel quantitative assay for studying the functional activity of MGMT. MGMT enzymatic activity was assessed using fluorometrically labeled oligonucleotide substrates containing MGMT-specific DNA lesions and capillary electrophoresis to detect and quantify these lesions. In comparison with existing traditional assays, this assay was equally sensitive but less time consuming and easier to perform. MGMT promoter methylation was assessed in 41 glioblastomas by bisulfite pyrosequencing, and five samples with different values were chosen for comparison with enzymatic assays. Bisulfite pyrosequencing using primers designed to work in the upstream promoter regions of MGMT demonstrated high quantitative capability and reproducibility in triplicate measurements. In comparative studies, MGMT promoter methylation values obtained by bisulfite pyrosequencing were inversely proportional to the measured enzymatic activity. The present results indicate that the quantification of MGMT methylation by bisulfite pyrosequencing represents its enzymatic activity and thus, its therapeutic responsiveness to alkylating agents.

  16. Septin 9 promoter region methylation in free circulating DNA-potential role in noninvasive diagnosis of lung cancer: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Powrózek, Tomasz; Krawczyk, Paweł; Kucharczyk, Tomasz; Milanowski, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    Currently, there are no sensitive diagnostic tests that could allow early detection of lung cancer. Among some cancer patients, epigenetic changes in the nature of methylation of different gene promoter regions are observed, which affect expression of suppressor genes such as septin 9 (SEPT9). Due to the ability of detecting these changes in free circulating DNA in peripheral blood, such genes may become ideal markers in early and noninvasive diagnostics of cancer. Methylation of SEPT9 promoter region in plasma DNA is observed frequently in colorectal cancer patients. The aim of the study was to define the frequency of SEPT9 promoter methylation in lung cancer patients and evaluation of usefulness of this marker in early diagnostic of lung cancer. Plasma samples were obtained from 70 untreated patients with different lung cancer pathological diagnosis and disease stage and from 100 healthy individuals. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood plasma and was then subjected to bisulfitation, purification and elution using Abbott mSEPT9 Detection Kit. Methylation level was assessed by real-time PCR with the use of specific SEPT9 promoter methylation probe. Each sample was assayed in the presence of positive and negative control. SEPT9 promoter methylation was detected in 31 (44.3% of the whole studied group) of lung cancer patients finding the result positive when methylation was detected in 1 out of 3 repetitions of each test sample determinations. The marker was present in patients with different pathological diagnosis and disease stage. Analysis of SEPT9 promoter region methylation may be useful in early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  17. Rare k-mer DNA: Identification of sequence motifs and prediction of CpG island and promoter.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Hashim, Ezzeddin Kamil; Abdullah, Rosni

    2015-12-21

    Empirical analysis on k-mer DNA has been proven as an effective tool in finding unique patterns in DNA sequences which can lead to the discovery of potential sequence motifs. In an extensive study of empirical k-mer DNA on hundreds of organisms, the researchers found unique multi-modal k-mer spectra occur in the genomes of organisms from the tetrapod clade only which includes all mammals. The multi-modality is caused by the formation of the two lowest modes where k-mers under them are referred as the rare k-mers. The suppression of the two lowest modes (or the rare k-mers) can be attributed to the CG dinucleotide inclusions in them. Apart from that, the rare k-mers are selectively distributed in certain genomic features of CpG Island (CGI), promoter, 5' UTR, and exon. We correlated the rare k-mers with hundreds of annotated features using several bioinformatic tools, performed further intrinsic rare k-mer analyses within the correlated features, and modeled the elucidated rare k-mer clustering feature into a classifier to predict the correlated CGI and promoter features. Our correlation results show that rare k-mers are highly associated with several annotated features of CGI, promoter, 5' UTR, and open chromatin regions. Our intrinsic results show that rare k-mers have several unique topological, compositional, and clustering properties in CGI and promoter features. Finally, the performances of our RWC (rare-word clustering) method in predicting the CGI and promoter features are ranked among the top three, in eight of the CGI and promoter evaluations, among eight of the benchmarked datasets. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization and isolation of a T-DNA tagged banana promoter active during in vitro culture and low temperature stress

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Efrén; Remy, Serge; Thiry, Els; Windelinckx, Saskia; Swennen, Rony; Sági, László

    2009-01-01

    Background Next-generation transgenic plants will require a more precise regulation of transgene expression, preferably under the control of native promoters. A genome-wide T-DNA tagging strategy was therefore performed for the identification and characterization of novel banana promoters. Embryogenic cell suspensions of a plantain-type banana were transformed with a promoterless, codon-optimized luciferase (luc+) gene and low temperature-responsive luciferase activation was monitored in real time. Results Around 16,000 transgenic cell colonies were screened for baseline luciferase activity at room temperature 2 months after transformation. After discarding positive colonies, cultures were re-screened in real-time at 26°C followed by a gradual decrease to 8°C. The baseline activation frequency was 0.98%, while the frequency of low temperature-responsive luciferase activity was 0.61% in the same population of cell cultures. Transgenic colonies with luciferase activity responsive to low temperature were regenerated to plantlets and luciferase expression patterns monitored during different regeneration stages. Twenty four banana DNA sequences flanking the right T-DNA borders in seven independent lines were cloned via PCR walking. RT-PCR analysis in one line containing five inserts allowed the identification of the sequence that had activated luciferase expression under low temperature stress in a developmentally regulated manner. This activating sequence was fused to the uidA reporter gene and back-transformed into a commercial dessert banana cultivar, in which its original expression pattern was confirmed. Conclusion This promoter tagging and real-time screening platform proved valuable for the identification of novel promoters and genes in banana and for monitoring expression patterns throughout in vitro development and low temperature treatment. Combination of PCR walking techniques was efficient for the isolation of candidate promoters even in a multicopy T-DNA

  19. Characterization and isolation of a T-DNA tagged banana promoter active during in vitro culture and low temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Santos, Efrén; Remy, Serge; Thiry, Els; Windelinckx, Saskia; Swennen, Rony; Sági, László

    2009-06-24

    Next-generation transgenic plants will require a more precise regulation of transgene expression, preferably under the control of native promoters. A genome-wide T-DNA tagging strategy was therefore performed for the identification and characterization of novel banana promoters. Embryogenic cell suspensions of a plantain-type banana were transformed with a promoterless, codon-optimized luciferase (luc+) gene and low temperature-responsive luciferase activation was monitored in real time. Around 16,000 transgenic cell colonies were screened for baseline luciferase activity at room temperature 2 months after transformation. After discarding positive colonies, cultures were re-screened in real-time at 26 degrees C followed by a gradual decrease to 8 degrees C. The baseline activation frequency was 0.98%, while the frequency of low temperature-responsive luciferase activity was 0.61% in the same population of cell cultures. Transgenic colonies with luciferase activity responsive to low temperature were regenerated to plantlets and luciferase expression patterns monitored during different regeneration stages. Twenty four banana DNA sequences flanking the right T-DNA borders in seven independent lines were cloned via PCR walking. RT-PCR analysis in one line containing five inserts allowed the identification of the sequence that had activated luciferase expression under low temperature stress in a developmentally regulated manner. This activating sequence was fused to the uidA reporter gene and back-transformed into a commercial dessert banana cultivar, in which its original expression pattern was confirmed. This promoter tagging and real-time screening platform proved valuable for the identification of novel promoters and genes in banana and for monitoring expression patterns throughout in vitro development and low temperature treatment. Combination of PCR walking techniques was efficient for the isolation of candidate promoters even in a multicopy T-DNA line

  20. Systematic E2 screening reveals a UBE2D-RNF138-CtIP axis promoting DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Sczaniecka-Clift, Matylda; Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Demir, Mukerrem; Cornwell, Matthew; Beli, Petra; Jackson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is crucial for proper cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). If unrepaired, these highly cytotoxic lesions cause genome instability, tumourigenesis, neurodegeneration or premature ageing. Here, we conduct a comprehensive, multilayered screen to systematically profile all human ubiquitin E2-enzymes for impacts on cellular DSB responses. Applying a widely applicable approach, we use an exemplary E2 family, UBE2Ds, to identify ubiquitylation-cascade components downstream of E2s. Thus, we uncover the nuclear E3-ligase RNF138 as a key homologous recombination (HR)-promoting factor that functions with UBE2Ds in cells. Mechanistically, UBE2Ds and RNF138 accumulate at DNA-damage sites and act at early resection stages by promoting CtIP ubiquitylation and accrual. This work supplies insights into regulation of DSB repair by HR. Moreover, it provides a rich information resource on E2s that can be exploited by follow-on studies. PMID:26502057

  1. Tbf1 and Vid22 promote resection and non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand break ends.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Diego; Anbalagan, Savani; Lucchini, Giovanna; Clerici, Michela; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2013-01-23

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is crucial for maintaining genome stability. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Tbf1, which is characterized by a Myb domain and is related to mammalian TRF1 and TRF2, has been proposed to act as a transcriptional activator. Here, we show that Tbf1 and its interacting protein Vid22 are new players in the response to DSBs. Inactivation of either TBF1 or VID22 causes hypersensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and shows strong negative interactions with mutations affecting homologous recombination. Furthermore, Tbf1 and Vid22 are recruited to an HO-induced DSB, where they promote both resection of DNA ends and repair by non-homologous end joining. Finally, inactivation of either Tbf1 or Vid22 impairs nucleosome eviction around the DSB, suggesting that these proteins promote efficient repair of the break by influencing chromatin identity in its surroundings.

  2. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  3. Ca2+ Promoted the Low Transformation Efficiency of Plasmid DNA Exposed to PAH Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanzheng; Long, Jian; Wang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The effects of interactions between genetic materials and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on gene expression in the extracellular environment remain to be elucidated and little information is currently available on the effect of ionic strength on the transformation of plasmid DNA exposed to PAHs. Phenanthrene and pyrene were used as representative PAHs to evaluate the transformation of plasmid DNA after PAH exposure and to determine the role of Ca2+ during the transformation. Plasmid DNA exposed to the test PAHs demonstrated low transformation efficiency. In the absence of PAHs, the transformation efficiency was 4.7 log units; however, the efficiency decreased to 3.72–3.14 log units with phenanthrene/pyrene exposures of 50 µg·L–1. The addition of Ca2+ enhanced the low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAHs. Based on the co-sorption of Ca2+ and phenanthrene/pyrene by DNA, we employed Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the mechanisms involved in PAH-induced DNA transformation. The observed low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to either phenanthrene or pyrene can be attributed to a broken hydrogen bond in the double helix caused by planar PAHs. Added Ca2+ formed strong electrovalent bonds with “–POO––” groups in the DNA, weakening the interaction between PAHs and DNA based on weak molecular forces. This decreased the damage of PAHs to hydrogen bonds in double-stranded DNA by isolating DNA molecules from PAHs and consequently enhanced the transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAH contaminants. The findings provide insight into the effects of anthropogenic trace PAHs on DNA transfer in natural environments. PMID:23484001

  4. Methylation of the BRCA1 promoter in peripheral blood DNA is associated with triple-negative and medullary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Satish; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Narod, Steven A; Lubinski, Jan; Wojdacz, Tomasz K; Jakubowska, Anna

    2014-12-01

    It has been proposed that methylation signatures in blood-derived DNA may correlate with cancer risk. In this study, we evaluated whether methylation of the promoter region of the BRCA1 gene detectable in DNA from peripheral blood cells is a risk factor for breast cancer, in particular for tumors with pathologic features characteristic for cancers with BRCA1 gene mutations. We conducted a case-control study of 66 breast cancer cases and 36 unaffected controls. Cases were triple-negative or of medullary histology, or both; 30 carried a constitutional BRCA1 mutation and 36 did not carry a mutation. Blood for DNA methylation analysis was taken within three months of diagnosis. Methylation of the promoter of the BRCA1 gene was measured in cases and controls using methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM). A sample with any detectable level of methylation was considered to be positive. Methylation of the BRCA1 promoter was detected in 15 of 66 cases and in 2 of 36 controls (OR 5.0, p = 0.03). Methylation was present in 15 of 36 women with breast cancer and without germline BRCA1 mutation, but in none of 30 women with breast cancer and a germline mutation (p < 0.01). The association between methylation and breast cancer was restricted to women with no constitutional BRCA1 mutation (OR 12.1, p = 0.0006). Methylation of the promoter of the BRCA1 gene detectable in peripheral blood DNA may be a marker of increased susceptibility to triple-negative or medullary breast cancer.

  5. Characterization of various promoter regions of the human DNA helicase-encoding genes and identification of duplicated ets (GGAA) motifs as an essential transcription regulatory element.

    PubMed

    Uchiumi, Fumiaki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Tanuma, Sei-ichi

    2010-05-15

    DNA helicases are important in the regulation of DNA transaction and thereby various cellular functions. In this study, we developed a cost-effective multiple DNA transfection assay with DEAE-dextran reagent and analyzed the promoter activities of the human DNA helicases. The 5'-flanking regions of the human DNA helicase-encoding genes were isolated and subcloned into luciferase (Luc) expression plasmids. They were coated onto 96-well plate and used for co-transfection with a renilla-Luc expression vector into various cells, and dual-Luc assays were performed. The profiles of promoter activities were dependent on cell lines used. Among these human DNA helicase genes, XPB, RecQL5, and RTEL promoters were activated during TPA-induced HL-60 cell differentiation. Interestingly, duplicated ets (GGAA) elements are commonly located around the transcription start sites of these genes. The duplicated GGAA motifs are also found in the promoters of DNA replication/repair synthesis factor genes including PARG, ATR, TERC, and Rb1. Mutation analyses suggested that the duplicated GGAA-motifs are necessary for the basal promoter activity in various cells and some of them positively respond to TPA in HL-60 cells. TPA-induced response of 44-bp in the RTEL promoter was attenuated by co-transfection of the PU.1 expression vector. These findings suggest that the duplicated ets motifs regulate DNA-repair associated gene expressions during macrophage-like differentiation of HL-60 cells.

  6. PAXX, a paralog of XRCC4 and XLF, interacts with Ku to promote DNA double-strand break repair**

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Mehmood, Shahid; Tamura, Naoka; Travers, Jon; Wu, Qian; Draviam, Viji M.; Robinson, Carol V.; Blundell, Tom L.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4 and XLF are two structurally-related proteins that function in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we identify human PAXX (PAralog of XRCC4 and XLF; also called C9orf142) as a new XRCC4-superfamily member, and show that its crystal structure resembles that of XRCC4. PAXX interacts directly with the DSB-repair protein Ku and is recruited to DNA-damage sites in cells. Using RNA interference and CRISPR-Cas9 to generate PAXX−/− cells, we demonstrate that PAXX functions with XRCC4 and XLF to mediate DSB repair and cell survival in response to DSB-inducing agents. Finally, we reveal that PAXX promotes Ku-dependent DNA ligation in vitro, and assembly of core non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) factors on damaged chromatin in cells. These findings identify PAXX as a new component of the NHEJ machinery. PMID:25574025

  7. T(H)17 cells promote microbial killing and innate immune sensing of DNA via interleukin 26.

    PubMed

    Meller, Stephan; Di Domizio, Jeremy; Voo, Kui S; Friedrich, Heike C; Chamilos, Georgios; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Conrad, Curdin; Gregorio, Josh; Le Roy, Didier; Roger, Thierry; Ladbury, John E; Homey, Bernhard; Watowich, Stanley; Modlin, Robert L; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Liu, Yong-Jun; Arold, Stefan T; Gilliet, Michel

    2015-09-01

    Interleukin 17-producing helper T cells (T(H)17 cells) have a major role in protection against infections and in mediating autoimmune diseases, yet the mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. We found that interleukin 26 (IL-26), a human T(H)17 cell-derived cytokine, is a cationic amphipathic protein that kills extracellular bacteria via membrane-pore formation. Furthermore, T(H)17 cell-derived IL-26 formed complexes with bacterial DNA and self-DNA released by dying bacteria and host cells. The resulting IL-26-DNA complexes triggered the production of type I interferon by plasmacytoid dendritic cells via activation of Toll-like receptor 9, but independently of the IL-26 receptor. These findings provide insights into the potent antimicrobial and proinflammatory function of T(H)17 cells by showing that IL-26 is a natural human antimicrobial that promotes immune sensing of bacterial and host cell death.

  8. Smc5–Smc6 mediate DNA double-strand-break repair by promoting sister-chromatid recombination

    PubMed Central

    De Piccoli, Giacomo; Cortes-Ledesma, Felipe; Ira, Gregory; Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Uhle, Stefan; Farmer, Sarah; Hwang, Ji-Young; Machin, Felix; Ceschia, Audrey; McAleenan, Alexandra; Cordon-Preciado, Violeta; Clemente-Blanco, Andrés; Vilella-Mitjana, Felip; Ullal, Pranav; Jarmuz, Adam; Leitao, Beatriz; Bressan, Debra; Dotiwala, Farokh; Papusha, Alma; Zhao, Xiaolan; Myung, Kyungjae; Haber, James E.; Aguilera, Andrés; Aragón, Luis

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can arise during DNA replication, or after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, and their correct repair is fundamental for cell survival and genomic stability. Here, we show that the Smc5–Smc6 complex is recruited to DSBs de novo to support their repair by homologous recombination between sister chromatids. In addition, we demonstrate that Smc5–Smc6 is necessary to suppress gross chromosomal rearrangements. Our findings show that the Smc5–Smc6 complex is essential for genome stability as it promotes repair of DSBs by error-free sister-chromatid recombination (SCR), thereby suppressing inappropriate non-sister recombination events. PMID:16892052

  9. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Lynn C; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2016-09-13

    -strand regions may be created during DNA replication or by single-strand exonuclease digestion of linear duplex DNA. Previously, in vitro studies reported that these recombinases promote the single-strand annealing of two complementary DNAs and also strand invasion of a single DNA strand into duplex DNA to create a three-stranded region. Here, in vivo experiments show that recombinase-mediated annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA is the predominant recombination pathway in E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Thomason et al.

  10. TAF4/4b·TAF12 Displays a Unique Mode of DNA Binding and Is Required for Core Promoter Function of a Subset of Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Kfir; Moshonov, Sandra; Elfakess, Rofa; Sharon, Michal; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin; Dikstein, Rivka

    2009-01-01

    The major core promoter-binding factor in polymerase II transcription machinery is TFIID, a complex consisting of TBP, the TATA box-binding protein, and 13 to 14 TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Previously we found that the histone H2A-like TAF paralogs TAF4 and TAF4b possess DNA-binding activity. Whether TAF4/TAF4b DNA binding directs TFIID to a specific core promoter element or facilitates TFIID binding to established core promoter elements is not known. Here we analyzed the mode of TAF4b·TAF12 DNA binding and show that this complex binds DNA with high affinity. The DNA length required for optimal binding is ∼70 bp. Although the complex displays a weak sequence preference, the nucleotide composition is less important than the length of the DNA for high affinity binding. Comparative expression profiling of wild-type and a DNA-binding mutant of TAF4 revealed common core promoter features in the down-regulated genes that include a TATA-box and an Initiator. Further examination of the PEL98 gene from this group showed diminished Initiator activity and TFIID occupancy in TAF4 DNA-binding mutant cells. These findings suggest that DNA binding by TAF4/4b-TAF12 facilitates the association of TFIID with the core promoter of a subset of genes. PMID:19635797

  11. Autophagy Promotes the Repair of Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Cells via Enhanced STAT3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Li, Xin; Yan, Lili; Yuan, Na; Fang, Yixuan; Cao, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xu, Lan; Ge, Chaorong; An, Ni; Jiang, Gaoyue; Xie, Jialing; Zhang, Han; Jiang, Jiayi; Li, Xiaotian; Yao, Lei; Zhang, Suping; Zhou, Daohong; Wang, Jianrong

    2017-03-01

    Autophagy protects hematopoietic cells from radiation damage in part by promoting DNA damage repair. However, the molecular mechanisms by which autophagy regulates DNA damage repair remain largely elusive. Here, we report that this radioprotective effect of autophagy depends on STAT3 signaling in murine bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs). Specifically, we found that STAT3 activation and nuclear translocation in BM-MNCs were increased by activation of autophagy with an mTOR inhibitor and decreased by knockout of the autophagy gene Atg7. The autophagic regulation of STAT3 activation is likely mediated by induction of KAP1 degradation, because we showed that KAP1 directly interacted with STAT3 in the cytoplasm and knockdown of KAP1 increased the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT3. Subsequently, activated STAT3 transcriptionally upregulated the expression of BRCA1, which increased the ability of BM-MNCs to repair radiation-induced DNA damage. This novel finding that activation of autophagy can promote DNA damage repair in BM-MNCs via the ATG-KAP1-STAT3-BRCA1 pathway suggests that autophagy plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity of BM-MNCs and its activation may confer protection of BM-MNCs against radiation-induced genotoxic stress.

  12. Perlecan and vascular endothelial growth factor-encoding DNA-loaded chitosan scaffolds promote angiogenesis and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lord, Megan S; Ellis, April L; Farrugia, Brooke L; Whitelock, John M; Grenett, Hernan; Li, Chuanyu; O'Grady, Robert L; DeCarlo, Arthur A

    2017-03-28

    The repair of dermal wounds, particularly in the diabetic population, poses a significant healthcare burden. The impaired wound healing of diabetic wounds is attributed to low levels of endogenous growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), that normally stimulate multiple phases of wound healing. In this study, chitosan scaffolds were prepared via freeze drying and loaded with plasmid DNA encoding perlecan domain I and VEGF189 and analyzed in vivo for their ability to promote dermal wound healing. The plasmid DNA encoding perlecan domain I and VEGF189 loaded scaffolds promoted dermal wound healing in normal and diabetic rats. This treatment resulted in an increase in the number of blood vessels and sub-epithelial connective tissue matrix components within the wound beds compared to wounds treated with chitosan scaffolds containing control DNA or wounded controls. These results suggest that chitosan scaffolds containing plasmid DNA encoding VEGF189 and perlecan domain I have the potential to induce angiogenesis and wound healing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Inactivation of ATM/ATR DNA Damage Checkpoint Promotes Androgen Induced Chromosomal Instability in Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Liu, Ji; Tang, Kaidun; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2012-01-01

    The ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint functions in the maintenance of genetic stability and some missense variants of the ATM gene have been shown to confer a moderate increased risk of prostate cancer. However, whether inactivation of this checkpoint contributes directly to prostate specific cancer predisposition is still unknown. Here, we show that exposure of non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (HPr-1AR) to androgen led to activation of the ATM/ATR DNA damage response and induction of cellular senescence. Notably, knockdown of the ATM gene expression in HPr-1AR cells can promote androgen-induced TMPRSS2: ERG rearrangement, a prostate-specific chromosome translocation frequently found in prostate cancer cells. Intriguingly, unlike the non-malignant prostate epithelial cells, the ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint appears to be defective in prostate cancer cells, since androgen treatment only induced a partial activation of the DNA damage response. This mechanism appears to preserve androgen induced autophosphorylation of ATM and phosphorylation of H2AX, lesion processing and repair pathway yet restrain ATM/CHK1/CHK2 and p53 signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that ATM/ATR inactivation is a crucial step in promoting androgen-induced genomic instability and prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:23272087

  14. Cdc6 ATPase activity disengages Cdc6 from the pre-replicative complex to promote DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Chang, FuJung; Riera, Alberto; Evrin, Cecile; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Speck, Christian; Weinreich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To initiate DNA replication, cells first load an MCM helicase double hexamer at origins in a reaction requiring ORC, Cdc6, and Cdt1, also called pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) assembly. The essential mechanistic role of Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis in this reaction is still incompletely understood. Here, we show that although Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is essential to initiate DNA replication, it is not essential for MCM loading. Using purified proteins, an ATPase-defective Cdc6 mutant ‘Cdc6-E224Q’ promoted MCM loading on DNA. Cdc6-E224Q also promoted MCM binding at origins in vivo but cells remained blocked in G1-phase. If after loading MCM, Cdc6-E224Q was degraded, cells entered an apparently normal S-phase and replicated DNA, a phenotype seen with two additional Cdc6 ATPase-defective mutants. Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is therefore required for Cdc6 disengagement from the pre-RC after helicase loading to advance subsequent steps in helicase activation in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05795.001 PMID:26305410

  15. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation reveals a class of normally methylated CpG island promoters.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lanlan; Kondo, Yutaka; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Jiexin; Zhang, Li; Ahmed, Saira; Shu, Jingmin; Chen, Xinli; Waterland, Robert A; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2007-10-01

    The role of CpG island methylation in normal development and cell differentiation is of keen interest, but remains poorly understood. We performed comprehensive DNA methylation profiling of promoter regions in normal peripheral blood by methylated CpG island amplification in combination with microarrays. This technique allowed us to simultaneously determine the methylation status of 6,177 genes, 92% of which include dense CpG islands. Among these 5,549 autosomal genes with dense CpG island promoters, we have identified 4.0% genes that are nearly completely methylated in normal blood, providing another exception to the general rule that CpG island methylation in normal tissue is limited to X inactivation and imprinted genes. We examined seven genes in detail, including ANKRD30A, FLJ40201, INSL6, SOHLH2, FTMT, C12orf12, and DPPA5. Dense promoter CpG island methylation and gene silencing were found in normal tissues studied except testis and sperm. In both tissues, bisulfite cloning and sequencing identified cells carrying unmethylated alleles. Interestingly, hypomethylation of several genes was associated with gene activation in cancer. Furthermore, reactivation of silenced genes could be induced after treatment with a DNA demethylating agent or in a cell line lacking DNMT1 and/or DNMT3b. Sequence analysis identified five motifs significantly enriched in this class of genes, suggesting that cis-regulatory elements may facilitate preferential methylation at these promoter CpG islands. We have identified a group of non-X-linked bona fide promoter CpG islands that are densely methylated in normal somatic tissues, escape methylation in germline cells, and for which DNA methylation is a primary mechanism of tissue-specific gene silencing.

  16. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved. PMID:25414342

  17. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2014-12-16

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved.

  18. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  19. DNA polymerase beta promoter mutations affect gene transcription, translation and the sensitivity of esophageal cancer cells to cisplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zang, Wenqiao; Ma, Yunyun; Li, Min; Xuan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Na; Wu, Rui; Li, Yuebai; Dong, Ziming; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2013-02-01

    The ability of a promoter to initiate transcription is important for the control of gene expression. Mutations in the DNA polymerase beta (po1β) promoter may affect the transcription of this gene; however, the relationship between these mutations and the upregulation of the expression of po1β remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, three po1β promoter mutants (M1, -37 C→A; M2, -114 G→A, -37 C→A; M3, -194 T→C) were generated to examine the effect of promoter mutations on polβ gene expression and sensitivity to cisplatin. We found that the M1 and M2 mutant polβ promoter constructs showed higher RLA than the wild-type polβ promoter (P < 0.01), whereas the activity of the M3 polβ promoter did not differ significantly from that of the wild-type polβ promoter (P > 0.05). The expression levels of polβ mRNA and protein were significantly higher (P < 0.01) and the sensitivity to cisplatin was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in Eca9706(-/-)-M1 and Eca9706(-/-)-M2 cells than in Eca9706(-/-)-W. The expression levels of polβ mRNA and protein and the sensitivity to cisplatin were not significantly different between Eca9706(-/-)-M3 and Eca9706(-/-)-W cells (P > 0.05).These results revealed that specific mutations of the polymerase beta gene promoter significantly enhanced the gene's transcriptional activity. These mutations correspondingly increased the gene's mRNA and protein product, at the same time reduced the esophageal cancer cells' sensitivity to cisplatin.

  20. Meningeal hemangiopericytomas: a clinicopathological study with emphasis on MGMT (O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) promoter methylation status.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Kumar, Anupam; Jha, Prerana; Goyal, Nishant; Mallick, Supriya; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Suri, Ashish; Singh, Manmohan; Kale, Shashank S; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Sarkar, Chitra; Suri, Vaishali

    2014-08-01

    Meningeal hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are aggressive dural-based tumors, for which no prognostic or predictive marker has been identified. Gross total resection is treatment of choice, but not easily achieved; hence, alkylating agents like temozolomide (TMZ) are now being tried. O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation has proven prognostic and predictive value in glioblastomas. This study evaluates MGMT promoter methylation in meningeal HPCs to determine its role in HPC oncogenesis and its association with patient outcome. Meningeal HPCs diagnosed between 2002 and 2011 were retrieved and clinicopathological features reviewed. MGMT promoter methylation status was assessed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for MGMT protein. HPCs accounted for 1.1% of all CNS tumors. Forty cases were analyzed; the majority were adults (mean age = 41.4 years). Seventy percent were primary and 30% were recurrent tumors; 60% were grade II and 40% were grade III. MGMT promoter methylation was identified in 45% of cases, including Grade II (54.2%) and Grade III (31.3%) (P = 0.203). Promoter methylation was significantly (P = 0.035) more frequent in primary (57.1%) than in recurrent (16.7%) tumors. No correlation was noted between MGMT promoter methylation by MSP and MGMT protein expression by IHC, or with progression-free survival. Thus, a significant proportion of HPCs demonstrate MGMT promoter methylation, suggesting possible susceptibility to TMZ. As promoter methylation is more frequent in primary tumors, TMZ may serve as a therapeutic option in residual primary tumors. Epigenetic inactivation of MGMT in HPCs necessitates the assessment of prognostic and predictive value of MGMT promoter methylation in HPCs in larger clinical trials.

  1. Promoter elements of the PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and their roles in the response to DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Sancar, G B; Ferris, R; Smith, F W; Vandeberg, B

    1995-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the apoenzyme for the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. PHR1 transcription is induced in response to 254 nm radiation and a variety of chemical damaging agents. We report here the identification of promoter elements required for PHR1 expression. Transcription is regulated primarily through three sequence elements clustered within a 120 bp region immediately upstream of the translational start site. A 20 bp interrupted palindrome comprises UASPHR1 and is responsible for 80-90% of basal and induced expression. UASPHR1 alone can activate transcription of a CYC1 minimal promoter but does not confer damage responsiveness. In the intact PHR1 promoter UAS function is dependent upon an upstream essential sequence (UES). URSPHR1 contains a binding site for the damage-responsive repressor Prp; consistent with this role, deletion or specific mutations of the URS increase basal level expression and decrease the induction ratio. Deletion of URSPHR1 also eliminates the requirement for UESPHR1 for promoter activation, indicating that the UES attenuates Prp-mediated repression. Sequences within UASPHR1 are similar to regulatory sequences found upstream of both damage responsive and nonresponsive genes involved in DNA repair and metabolism. PMID:7501452

  2. Methyl Supplementation Attenuates Cocaine-Seeking Behaviors and Cocaine-Induced c-Fos Activation in a DNA Methylation-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Katherine N.; Hollis, Fiona; Duclot, Florian; Dossat, Amanda M.; Strong, Caroline E.; Francis, T. Chase; Mercer, Roger; Feng, Jian; Dietz, David M.; Lobo, Mary Kay; Nestler, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications, regulate responsiveness to drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, but relatively little is known about the regulation of addictive-like behaviors by DNA methylation. To investigate the influence of DNA methylation on the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and on drug-seeking behavior, rats receiving methyl supplementation via chronic l-methionine (MET) underwent either a sensitization regimen of intermittent cocaine injections or intravenous self-administration of cocaine, followed by cue-induced and drug-primed reinstatement. MET blocked sensitization to the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and attenuated drug-primed reinstatement, with no effect on cue-induced reinstatement or sucrose self-administration and reinstatement. Furthermore, upregulation of DNA methyltransferase 3a and 3b and global DNA hypomethylation were observed in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc), but not in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), of cocaine-pretreated rats. Glutamatergic projections from the mPFC to the NAc are critically involved in the regulation of cocaine-primed reinstatement, and activation of both brain regions is seen in human addicts when reexposed to the drug. When compared with vehicle-pretreated rats, the immediate early gene c-Fos (a marker of neuronal activation) was upregulated in the NAc and mPFC of cocaine-pretreated rats after cocaine-primed reinstatement, and chronic MET treatment blocked its induction in both regions. Cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in the NAc was associated with reduced methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the c-Fos gene promoter, effects reversed by MET treatment. Overall, these data suggest that drug-seeking behaviors are, in part, attributable to a DNA methylation-dependent process, likely occurring at specific gene loci (e.g., c-Fos) in the reward pathway. PMID:26063926

  3. Methyl supplementation attenuates cocaine-seeking behaviors and cocaine-induced c-Fos activation in a DNA methylation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wright, Katherine N; Hollis, Fiona; Duclot, Florian; Dossat, Amanda M; Strong, Caroline E; Francis, T Chase; Mercer, Roger; Feng, Jian; Dietz, David M; Lobo, Mary Kay; Nestler, Eric J; Kabbaj, Mohamed

    2015-06-10

    Epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications, regulate responsiveness to drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, but relatively little is known about the regulation of addictive-like behaviors by DNA methylation. To investigate the influence of DNA methylation on the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and on drug-seeking behavior, rats receiving methyl supplementation via chronic l-methionine (MET) underwent either a sensitization regimen of intermittent cocaine injections or intravenous self-administration of cocaine, followed by cue-induced and drug-primed reinstatement. MET blocked sensitization to the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and attenuated drug-primed reinstatement, with no effect on cue-induced reinstatement or sucrose self-administration and reinstatement. Furthermore, upregulation of DNA methyltransferase 3a and 3b and global DNA hypomethylation were observed in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc), but not in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), of cocaine-pretreated rats. Glutamatergic projections from the mPFC to the NAc are critically involved in the regulation of cocaine-primed reinstatement, and activation of both brain regions is seen in human addicts when reexposed to the drug. When compared with vehicle-pretreated rats, the immediate early gene c-Fos (a marker of neuronal activation) was upregulated in the NAc and mPFC of cocaine-pretreated rats after cocaine-primed reinstatement, and chronic MET treatment blocked its induction in both regions. Cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in the NAc was associated with reduced methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the c-Fos gene promoter, effects reversed by MET treatment. Overall, these data suggest that drug-seeking behaviors are, in part, attributable to a DNA methylation-dependent process, likely occurring at specific gene loci (e.g., c-Fos) in the reward pathway.

  4. Effects of genome architecture and epigenetic factors on susceptibility of promoter CpG islands to aberrant DNA methylation induction.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Hideyuki; Yamashita, Satoshi; Shimazu, Taichi; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2011-09-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is induced at specific promoter CpG islands (CGIs) in contrast with mutations. The specificity is influenced by genome architecture and epigenetic factors, but their relationship is still unknown. In this study, we isolated promoter CGIs susceptible and resistant to aberrant methylation induction during prostate and breast carcinogenesis. The effect of genome architecture was more evident for promoter CGIs susceptible in both of the two tissues than for promoter CGIs susceptible only in one tissue. Multivariate analysis of promoter CGIs with tissue-nonspecific susceptibility showed that genome architecture, namely a remote location from SINE (OR=5.98; 95% CI=2.33-15.34) and from LINE (OR=2.08; 95% CI=1.03-4.21), was associated with increased susceptibility, independent of epigenetic factors such as the presence of RNA polymerase II (OR=0.09; 95% CI=0.02-0.48) and H3K27me3 (OR=3.28; 95% CI=1.17-9.21). These results showed that methylation susceptibility of promoter CGIs is determined both by genome architecture and epigenetic factors, independently. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Promoted interaction of nuclear factor-κB with demethylated cystathionine-β-synthetase gene contributes to gastric hypersensitivity in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Hong; Hu, Ji; Zhou, You-Lang; Hu, Shufen; Wang, Yong-Meng; Chen, Wei; Xiao, Ying; Huang, Li-Yen Mae; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-05-22

    Patients with long-standing diabetes frequently demonstrate gastric hypersensitivity with an unknown mechanism. The present study was designed to investigate roles for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the endogenous H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine-β-synthetase (CBS) signaling pathways by examining cbs gene methylation status in adult rats with diabetes. Intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) produced gastric hypersensitivity in female rats in response to gastric balloon distention. Treatment with the CBS inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid significantly attenuated STZ-induced gastric hypersensitivity in a dose-dependent fashion. Aminooxyacetic acid treatment also reversed hyperexcitability of gastric-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons labeled by the dye DiI in diabetic rats. Conversely, the H2S donor NaHS enhanced neuronal excitability of gastric DRG neurons. Expression of CBS and p65 were markedly enhanced in gastric DRGs in diabetic rats. Blockade of NF-κB signaling using pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate reversed the upregulation of CBS expression. Interestingly, STZ treatment led to a significant demethylation of CpG islands in the cbs gene promoter region, as determined by methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing. STZ treatment also remarkably downregulated the expression of DNA methyltransferase 3a and 3b. More importantly, STZ treatment significantly enhanced the ability of cbs to bind DNA at the p65 consensus site, as shown by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Our findings suggest that upregulation of cbs expression is attributed to cbs promoter DNA demethylation and p65 activation and that the enhanced interaction of the cbs gene and p65 contributes to gastric hypersensitivity in diabetes. This finding may guide the development and evaluation of new treatment modalities for patients with diabetic gastric hypersensitivity.

  6. Development and Functional Analysis of Novel Genetic Promoters Using DNA Shuffling, Hybridization and a Combination Thereof

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Rajiv; Patro, Sunita; Pradhan, Bhubaneswar; Kumar, Alok; Maiti, Indu B.; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of novel synthetic promoters with enhanced regulatory activity is of great value for a diverse range of plant biotechnology applications. Methodology Using the Figwort mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter (F) and the sub-genomic transcript promoter (FS) sequences, we generated two single shuffled promoter libraries (LssF and LssFS), two multiple shuffled promoter libraries (LmsFS-F and LmsF-FS), two hybrid promoters (FuasFScp and FSuasFcp) and two hybrid-shuffled promoter libraries (LhsFuasFScp and LhsFSuasFcp). Transient expression activities of approximately 50 shuffled promoter clones from each of these libraries were assayed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) protoplasts. It was observed that most of the shuffled promoters showed reduced activity compared to the two parent promoters (F and FS) and the CaMV35S promoter. In silico studies (computer simulated analyses) revealed that the reduced promoter activities of the shuffled promoters could be due to their higher helical stability. On the contrary, the hybrid promoters FuasFScp and FSuasFcp showed enhanced activities compared to F, FS and CaMV 35S in both transient and transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis plants. Northern-blot and qRT-PCR data revealed a positive correlation between transcription and enzymatic activity in transgenic tobacco plants expressing hybrid promoters. Histochemical/X-gluc staining of whole transgenic seedlings/tissue-sections and fluorescence images of ImaGene Green™ treated roots and stems expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the FuasFScp and FSuasFcp promoters also support the above findings. Furthermore, protein extracts made from protoplasts expressing the human defensin (HNP-1) gene driven by hybrid promoters showed enhanced antibacterial activity compared to the CaMV35S promoter. Significance/Conclusion Both shuffled and hybrid promoters developed in the present study can be used as molecular tools to study the

  7. Development and functional analysis of novel genetic promoters using DNA shuffling, hybridization and a combination thereof.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Rajiv; Patro, Sunita; Pradhan, Bhubaneswar; Kumar, Alok; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-01-01

    Development of novel synthetic promoters with enhanced regulatory activity is of great value for a diverse range of plant biotechnology applications. Using the Figwort mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter (F) and the sub-genomic transcript promoter (FS) sequences, we generated two single shuffled promoter libraries (LssF and LssFS), two multiple shuffled promoter libraries (LmsFS-F and LmsF-FS), two hybrid promoters (FuasFScp and FSuasFcp) and two hybrid-shuffled promoter libraries (LhsFuasFScp and LhsFSuasFcp). Transient expression activities of approximately 50 shuffled promoter clones from each of these libraries were assayed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) protoplasts. It was observed that most of the shuffled promoters showed reduced activity compared to the two parent promoters (F and FS) and the CaMV35S promoter. In silico studies (computer simulated analyses) revealed that the reduced promoter activities of the shuffled promoters could be due to their higher helical stability. On the contrary, the hybrid promoters FuasFScp and FSuasFcp showed enhanced activities compared to F, FS and CaMV 35S in both transient and transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis plants. Northern-blot and qRT-PCR data revealed a positive correlation between transcription and enzymatic activity in transgenic tobacco plants expressing hybrid promoters. Histochemical/X-gluc staining of whole transgenic seedlings/tissue-sections and fluorescence images of ImaGene Green™ treated roots and stems expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the FuasFScp and FSuasFcp promoters also support the above findings. Furthermore, protein extracts made from protoplasts expressing the human defensin (HNP-1) gene driven by hybrid promoters showed enhanced antibacterial activity compared to the CaMV35S promoter. Both shuffled and hybrid promoters developed in the present study can be used as molecular tools to study the regulation of ectopic gene expression in plants.

  8. PICH promotes mitotic chromosome segregation: Identification of a novel role in rDNA disjunction.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian F; Hickson, Ian D

    2016-10-17

    PICH is an SNF2-family DNA translocase that appears to play a role specifically in mitosis. Characterization of PICH in human cells led to the initial discovery of "ultra-fine DNA bridges" (UFBs) that connect the 2 segregating DNA masses in the anaphase of mitosis. These bridge structures, which arise from specific regions of the genome, are a normal feature of anaphase but had escaped detection previously because they do not stain with commonly used DNA dyes. Nevertheless, UFBs are important for genome maintenance because defects in UFB resolution can lead to cytokinesis failure. We reported recently that PICH stimulates the unlinking (decatenation) of entangled DNA by Topoisomerase IIα (Topo IIα), and is important for the resolution of UFBs. We also demonstrated that PICH and Topo IIα co-localize at the rDNA (rDNA). In this Extra View article, we discuss the mitotic roles of PICH and explore further the role of PICH in the timely segregation of the rDNA locus.

  9. PICH promotes mitotic chromosome segregation: Identification of a novel role in rDNA disjunction

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Christian F.; Hickson, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT PICH is an SNF2-family DNA translocase that appears to play a role specifically in mitosis. Characterization of PICH in human cells led to the initial discovery of “ultra-fine DNA bridges” (UFBs) that connect the 2 segregating DNA masses in the anaphase of mitosis. These bridge structures, which arise from specific regions of the genome, are a normal feature of anaphase but had escaped detection previously because they do not stain with commonly used DNA dyes. Nevertheless, UFBs are important for genome maintenance because defects in UFB resolution can lead to cytokinesis failure. We reported recently that PICH stimulates the unlinking (decatenation) of entangled DNA by Topoisomerase IIα (Topo IIα), and is important for the resolution of UFBs. We also demonstrated that PICH and Topo IIα co-localize at the rDNA (rDNA). In this Extra View article, we discuss the mitotic roles of PICH and explore further the role of PICH in the timely segregation of the rDNA locus. PMID:27565185

  10. Listeria monocytogenes induces host DNA damage and delays the host cell cycle to promote infection

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Elsa; Costa, Ana Catarina; Brito, Cláudia; Costa, Lionel; Pombinho, Rita; Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a human intracellular pathogen widely used to uncover the mechanisms evolved by pathogens to establish infection. However, its capacity to perturb the host cell cycle was never reported. We show that Lm infection affects the host cell cycle progression, increasing its overall duration but allowing consecutive rounds of division. A complete Lm infectious cycle induces a S-phase delay accompanied by a slower rate of DNA synthesis and increased levels of host DNA strand breaks. Additionally, DNA damage/replication checkpoint responses are triggered in an Lm dose-dependent manner through the phosphorylation of DNA-PK, H2A.X, and CDC25A and independently from ATM/ATR. While host DNA damage induced exogenously favors Lm dissemination, the override of checkpoint pathways limits infection. We propose that host DNA replication disturbed by Lm infection culminates in DNA strand breaks, triggering DNA damage/replication responses, and ensuring a cell cycle delay that favors Lm propagation. PMID:24552813

  11. Ubiquitylation of Ku80 by RNF126 Promotes Completion of Nonhomologous End Joining-Mediated DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Noriko; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Yasui, Akira; Shima, Hiroki; Katoh, Yasutake; Nagasawa, Yuko; Natsume, Toru; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Nakayama, Keiko

    2017-02-15

    Repair of damaged DNA is critical for maintenance of genetic information. In eukaryotes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are recognized by the Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer, which then recruits proteins that mediate repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Prolonged retention of Ku70/80 at DSBs prevents completion of repair, however, with ubiquitylation of Ku80 having been implicated in Ku70/80 dissociation from DNA. Here, we identify RNF126 as a ubiquitin ligase that is recruited to DSBs and ubiquitylates Ku80, with UBE2D3 serving as an E2 enzyme. Knockdown of RNF126 prevented Ku70/80 dissociation from DSBs and inhibited break repair. Attenuation of Ku80 ubiquitylation by replacement of ubiquitylation site lysines with arginine residues delayed Ku70/80 release from chromatin after DSB induction by genotoxic insults. Together, our data indicate that RNF126 is a novel regulator of NHEJ that promotes completion of DNA repair by ubiquitylating Ku80 and releasing Ku70/80 from damaged DNA. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Huntingtin modulates transcription, occupies gene promoters in vivo and binds directly to DNA in a polyglutamine-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Caroline L.; Sun, Tingting; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; McFarland, Karen N.; DiRocco, Derek P.; Yohrling, George J.; Clark, Timothy W.; Bouzou, Bérengère; Cha, Jang-Ho J.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional dysregulation is a central pathogenic mechanism in Huntington’s disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder associated with polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. In this study, we show that mutant Htt alters the normal expression of specific mRNA species at least partly by disrupting the binding activities of many transcription factors which govern the expression of the dysregulated mRNA species. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrates Htt occupation of gene promoters in vivo in a polyQ-dependent manner and furthermore, ChIP-on-chip and ChIP subcloning reveal that wild-type and mutant Htt exhibit differential genomic distributions. Exon 1 Htt binds DNA directly in the absence of other proteins and alters DNA conformation. PolyQ expansion increases Htt-DNA interactions, with binding to recognition elements of transcription factors whose function is altered in HD. Taken together; these findings suggest mutant Htt modulates gene expression through abnormal interactions with genomic DNA, altering DNA conformation and transcription factor binding. PMID:18923047

  13. TRAIP promotes DNA damage response during genome replication and is mutated in primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Harley, Margaret E; Murina, Olga; Leitch, Andrea; Higgs, Martin R; Bicknell, Louise S; Yigit, Gökhan; Blackford, Andrew N; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Mackenzie, Karen J; Reddy, Kaalak; Halachev, Mihail; McGlasson, Sarah; Reijns, Martin A M; Fluteau, Adeline; Martin, Carol-Anne; Sabbioneda, Simone; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Chessa, Luciana; Maghnie, Mohamad; Salim, Mahmoud; Bober, Michael B; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P; Hurles, Matthew E; Wollnik, Bernd; Stewart, Grant S; Jackson, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions encountered by replicative polymerases threaten genome stability and cell cycle progression. Here we report the identification of mutations in TRAIP, encoding an E3 RING ubiquitin ligase, in patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism. We establish that TRAIP relocalizes to sites of DNA damage, where it is required for optimal phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA2 during S-phase in response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, as well as fork progression through UV-induced DNA lesions. TRAIP is necessary for efficient cell cycle progression and mutations in TRAIP therefore limit cellular proliferation, providing a potential mechanism for microcephaly and dwarfism phenotypes. Human genetics thus identifies TRAIP as a component of the DNA damage response to replication-blocking DNA lesions.

  14. TRAIP promotes DNA damage response during genome replication and is mutated in primordial dwarfism

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Andrea; Higgs, Martin R.; Bicknell, Louise S.; Yigit, Gökhan; Blackford, Andrew N.; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Mackenzie, Karen J.; Reddy, Kaalak; Halachev, Mihail; McGlasson, Sarah; Reijns, Martin A. M.; Fluteau, Adeline; Martin, Carol-Anne; Sabbioneda, Simone; Elcioglu, Nursel H.; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Chessa, Luciana; Maghnie, Mohamad; Salim, Mahmoud; Bober, Michael B.; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Wollnik, Bernd; Stewart, Grant S.; Jackson, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions encountered by replicative polymerases threaten genome stability and cell cycle progression. Here we report the identification of mutations in TRAIP, encoding an E3 RING ubiquitin ligase, in patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism/Seckel syndrome. We establish that TRAIP relocalizes to sites of DNA damage where it is required for optimal phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA2 during S-phase in response to UV irradiation, as well as fork progression through UV-induced DNA lesions. TRAIP is necessary for efficient cell cycle progression and mutations in TRAIP therefore limit cellular proliferation, providing a potential mechanism for microcephaly and dwarfism phenotypes. Human genetics thus identifies TRAIP as a novel component of the DNA damage response to replication-blocking DNA lesions. PMID:26595769

  15. Dynamic DNA methylation orchestrates cardiomyocyte development, maturation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Grüning, Björn A.; Schnick, Tilman; Burger, Lukas; Benes, Vladimir; Würch, Andreas; Bönisch, Ulrike; Günther, Stefan; Backofen, Rolf; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Schübeler, Dirk; Hein, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a highly specialized organ with essential function for the organism throughout life. The significance of DNA methylation in shaping the phenotype of the heart remains only partially known. Here we generate and analyse DNA methylomes from highly purified cardiomyocytes of neonatal, adult healthy and adult failing hearts. We identify large genomic regions that are differentially methylated during cardiomyocyte development and maturation. Demethylation of cardiomyocyte gene bodies correlates strongly with increased gene expression. Silencing of demethylated genes is characterized by the polycomb mark H3K27me3 or by DNA methylation. De novo methylation by DNA methyltransferases 3A/B causes repression of fetal cardiac genes, including essential components of the cardiac sarcomere. Failing cardiomyocytes partially resemble neonatal methylation patterns. This study establishes DNA methylation as a highly dynamic process during postnatal growth of cardiomyocytes and their adaptation to pathological stress in a process tightly linked to gene regulation and activity. PMID:25335909

  16. Dynamic DNA methylation orchestrates cardiomyocyte development, maturation and disease.

    PubMed

    Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Grüning, Björn A; Schnick, Tilman; Burger, Lukas; Benes, Vladimir; Würch, Andreas; Bönisch, Ulrike; Günther, Stefan; Backofen, Rolf; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Schübeler, Dirk; Hein, Lutz

    2014-10-22

    The heart is a highly specialized organ with essential function for the organism throughout life. The significance of DNA methylation in shaping the phenotype of the heart remains only partially known. Here we generate and analyse DNA methylomes from highly purified cardiomyocytes of neonatal, adult healthy and adult failing hearts. We identify large genomic regions that are differentially methylated during cardiomyocyte development and maturation. Demethylation of cardiomyocyte gene bodies correlates strongly with increased gene expression. Silencing of demethylated genes is characterized by the polycomb mark H3K27me3 or by DNA methylation. De novo methylation by DNA methyltransferases 3A/B causes repression of fetal cardiac genes, including essential components of the cardiac sarcomere. Failing cardiomyocytes partially resemble neonatal methylation patterns. This study establishes DNA methylation as a highly dynamic process during postnatal growth of cardiomyocytes and their adaptation to pathological stress in a process tightly linked to gene regulation and activity.

  17. Identification of Fic-1 as an enzyme that inhibits bacterial DNA replication by AMPylating GyrB, promoting filament formation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Canhua; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Zhang, Li-Qun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-26

    The morphology of bacterial cells is important for virulence, evasion of the host immune system, and coping with environmental stresses. The widely distributed Fic proteins (filamentation induced by cAMP) are annotated as proteins involved in cell division because of the presence of the HPFx[D/E]GN[G/K]R motif. We showed that the presence of Fic-1 from Pseudomonas fluorescens significantly reduced the yield of plasmid DNA when expressed in Escherichia coli or P. fluorescens. Fic-1 interacted with GyrB, a subunit of DNA gyrase, which is essential for bacterial DNA replication. Fic-1 catalyzed the AMPylation of GyrB at Tyr(109), a residue critical for binding ATP, and exhibited auto-AMPylation activity. Mutation of the Fic-1 auto-AMPylated site greatly reduced AMPylation activity toward itself and toward GyrB. Fic-1-dependent AMPylation of GyrB triggered the SOS response, indicative of DNA replication stress or DNA damage. Fic-1 also promoted the formation of elongated cells when the SOS response was blocked. We identified an α-inhibitor protein that we named anti-Fic-1 (AntF), encoded by a gene immediately upstream of Fic-1. AntF interacted with Fic-1, inhibited the AMPylation activity of Fic-1 for GyrB in vitro, and blocked Fic-1-mediated inhibition of DNA replication in bacteria, suggesting that Fic-1 and AntF comprise a toxin-antitoxin module. Our work establishes Fic-1 as an AMPylating enzyme that targets GyrB to inhibit DNA replication and may target other proteins to regulate bacterial morphology.

  18. Differential promoter methylation of kinesin family member 1a in plasma is associated with breast cancer and DNA repair capacity

    PubMed Central

    GUERRERO-PRESTON, RAFAEL; HADAR, TAL; OSTROW, KIMBERLY LASKIE; SOUDRY, ETHAN; ECHENIQUE, MIGUEL; ILI-GANGAS, CARMEN; PÉREZ, GABRIELA; PEREZ, JIMENA; BREBI-MIEVILLE, PRISCILLA; DESCHAMPS, JOSÉ; MORALES, LUISA; BAYONA, MANUEL; SIDRANSKY, DAVID; MATTA, JAIME

    2014-01-01

    Methylation alterations of CpG islands, CpG island shores and first exons are key events in the formation and progression of human cancer, and an increasing number of differentially methylated regions and genes have been identified in breast cancer. Recent studies of the breast cancer methylome using deep sequencing and microarray platforms are providing a novel insight on the different roles aberrant methylation plays in molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Accumulating evidence from a subset of studies suggests that promoter methylation of tumor-suppressor genes associated with breast cancer can be quantified in circulating DNA. However, there is a paucity of studies that examine the combined presence of genetic and epigenetic alterations associated with breast cancer using blood-based assays. Dysregulation of DNA repair capacity (DRC) is a genetic risk factor for breast cancer that has been measured in lymphocytes. We isolated plasma DNA from 340 participants in a breast cancer case control project to study promoter methylation levels of five genes previously shown to be associated with breast cancer in frozen tissue and in cell line DNA: MAL, KIF1A, FKBP4, VGF and OGDHL. Methylation of at least one gene was found in 49% of the cases compared to 20% of the controls. Three of the four genes had receiver characteristic operator curve values of ≥0.50: MAL (0.64), KIF1A (0.51) and OGDHL (0.53). KIF1A promoter methylation was associated with breast cancer and inversely associated with DRC. This is the first evidence of a significant association between genetic and epigenetic alterations in breast cancer using blood-based tests. The potential diagnostic utility of these biomarkers and their relevance for breast cancer risk prediction should be examined in larger cohorts. PMID:24927296

  19. Differential promoter methylation of kinesin family member 1a in plasma is associated with breast cancer and DNA repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Hadar, Tal; Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Soudry, Ethan; Echenique, Miguel; Ili-Gangas, Carmen; Pérez, Gabriela; Perez, Jimena; Brebi-Mieville, Priscilla; Deschamps, José; Morales, Luisa; Bayona, Manuel; Sidransky, David; Matta, Jaime

    2014-08-01

    Methylation alterations of CpG islands, CpG island shores and first exons are key events in the formation and progression of human cancer, and an increasing number of differentially methylated regions and genes have been identified in breast cancer. Recent studies of the breast cancer methylome using deep sequencing and microarray platforms are providing a novel insight on the different roles aberrant methylation plays in molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Accumulating evidence from a subset of studies suggests that promoter methylation of tumor-suppressor genes associated with breast cancer can be quantified in circulating DNA. However, there is a paucity of studies that examine the combined presence of genetic and epigenetic alterations associated with breast cancer using blood-based assays. Dysregulation of DNA repair capacity (DRC) is a genetic risk factor for breast cancer that has been measured in lymphocytes. We isolated plasma DNA from 340 participants in a breast cancer case control project to study promoter methylation levels of five genes previously shown to be associated with breast cancer in frozen tissue and in cell line DNA: MAL, KIF1A, FKBP4, VGF and OGDHL. Methylation of at least one gene was found in 49% of the cases compared to 20% of the controls. Three of the four genes had receiver characteristic operator curve values of ≥ 0.50: MAL (0.64), KIF1A (0.51) and OGDHL (0.53). KIF1A promoter methylation was associated with breast cancer and inversely associated with DRC. This is the first evidence of a significant association between genetic and epigenetic alterations in breast cancer using blood-based tests. The potential diagnostic utility of these biomarkers and their relevance for breast cancer risk prediction should be examined in larger cohorts.

  20. DNA methylation abnormalities at gene promoters are extensive and variable in the elderly and phenocopy cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gautrey, Hannah E; van Otterdijk, Sanne D; Cordell, Heather J; Mathers, John C; Strathdee, Gordon

    2014-07-01

    Abnormal patterns of DNA methylation are one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. The process of aging has also been associated with similar, albeit less dramatic, changes in methylation patterns, leading to the hypothesis that age-related changes in DNA methylation may partially underlie the increased risk of cancer in the elderly. Here we studied 377 participants aged 85 yr from the Newcastle 85+ Study to investigate the extent of, and interindividual variation in, age-related changes in DNA methylation at specific CpG islands. Using highly quantitative pyrosequencing analysis, we found extensive and highly variable methylation of promoter-associated CpG islands with levels ranging from 4% to 35%, even at known tumor suppressor genes such as TWIST2. Furthermore, the interindividual differences in methylation seen across this elderly population phenocopies multiple features of the altered methylation patterns seen in cancer cells. Both aging- and cancer-related methylation can occur at similar sets of genes, both result in the formation of densely methylated, and likely transcriptionally repressed, alleles, and both exhibit coordinate methylation across multiple loci. In addition, high methylation levels were associated with subsequent diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma during a 3-yr follow-up period (P=0.00008). These data suggest that the accumulation of age-related changes in promoter-associated CpG islands may contribute to the increased cancer risk seen during aging.-Gautrey, H. E., van Otterdijk, S. D., Cordell, H. J., Newcastle 85+ study core team, Mathers, J. C., Strathdee, G. DNA methylation abnormalities at gene promoters are extensive and variable in the elderly and phenocopy cancer cells.

  1. Comparative analysis of synthetic DNA promoters for high-level gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Sarkar, Shayan; Raha, Sumita; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2014-10-01

    We have designed two near- constitutive and stress-inducible promoters (CmYLCV9.11 and CmYLCV4); those are highly efficient in both dicot and monocot plants and have prospective to substitute the CaMV 35S promoter. We performed structural and functional studies of the full-length transcript promoter from Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus (CmYLCV) employing promoter/leader deletion and activating cis-sequence analysis. We designed a 465-bp long CmYLCV9.11 promoter fragment (-329 to +137 from transcription start site) that showed enhanced promoter activity and was highly responsive to both biotic and abiotic stresses. The CmYLCV9.11 promoter was about 28-fold stronger than the CaMV35S promoter in transient and stable transgenic assays using β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The CmYLCV9.11 promoter also demonstrated stronger activity than the previously reported CmYLCV promoter fragments, CmpC (-341 to +5) and CmpS (-349 to +59) in transient systems like maize protoplasts and onion epidermal cells as well as transgenic systems. A good correlation between CmYLCV9.11 promoter-driven GUS-accumulation/enzymatic activities with corresponding uidA-mRNA level in transgenic tobacco plants was shown. Histochemical (X-Gluc) staining of transgenic seedlings, root and floral parts expressing the GUS under the control of CmYLCV9.11, CaMV35S, CmpC and CmpS promoters also support the above findings. The CmYLCV9.11 promoter is a constitutive promoter and the expression level in tissues of transgenic tobacco plants was in the following order: root > leaf > stem. The tobacco transcription factor TGA1a was found to bind strongly to the CmYLCV9.11 promoter region, as shown by Gel-shift assay and South-Western blot analysis. In addition, the CmYLCV9.11 promoter was regulated by a number of abiotic and biotic stresses as studied in transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. The newly derived CmYLCV9.11 promoter is an efficient tool for biotechnological applications.

  2. Evaluation of INK4A promoter methylation using pyrosequencing and circulating cell-free DNA from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Jason L.; Merwat, Shehzad N.; Ju, Hyunsu; Soloway, Roger D.; Wieck, Lucas R.; Li, Albert; Okorodudu, Anthony O.; Petersen, John R.; Abdulla, Nihal E.; Duchini, Andrea; Cicalese, Luca; Rastellini, Cristiana; Hu, Peter C.; Dong, Jianli

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyper-methylation of CpG dinucleotides in the promoter region of inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4A (INK4A) has been reported in 60%–80% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As INK4A promoter hypermethylation event occurs early in HCC progression, the quantification of INK4A promoter methylation in blood sample may represent a useful biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis and prediction of response to therapy. Methods We examined INK4A promoter methylation using circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) in a total of 109 serum specimens, including 66 HCC and 43 benign chronic liver diseases. Methylation of the individual seven CpG sites was examined using pyrosequencing. Results Our results showed that there were significantly higher levels of methylated INK4A in HCC specimens than controls and that the seven CpG sites had different levels of methylation and might exist in different PCR amplicons. The area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.82, with 65.3% sensitivity and 87.2% specificity at 5% (LOD), 39.0% sensitivity and 96.5% specificity at 7% LOD, and 20.3% sensitivity and 98.8% specificity at 10% LOD, respectively. Conclusions Our results support additional studies incorporating INK4A methylation testing of ccfDNA to further validate the diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic characteristics of this biomarker in HCC patients. The knowledge of the existence of epi-alleles should help improve assay design to maximize detection. PMID:24406287

  3. High fructose consumption induces DNA methylation at PPARα and CPT1A promoter regions in the rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Koji; Munetsuna, Eiji; Yamada, Hiroya; Ando, Yoshitaka; Yamazaki, Mirai; Taromaru, Nao; Nagura, Ayuri; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Koji; Teradaira, Ryoji; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2015-12-04

    DNA methylation status is affected by environmental factors, including nutrition. Fructose consumption is considered a risk factor for the conditions that make up metabolic syndrome such as dyslipidemia. However, the pathogenetic mechanism by which fructose consumption leads to metabolic syndrome is unclear. Based on observations that epigenetic modifications are closely related to induction of metabolic syndrome, we hypothesized that fructose-induced metabolic syndrome is caused by epigenetic alterations. Male SD rats were designated to receive water or 20% fructose solution for 14 weeks. mRNA levels for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) was analyzed using Real-time PCR. Restriction digestion and real-time PCR (qAMP) was used for the analysis of DNA methylation status. Hepatic lipid accumulation was also observed by fructose intake. Fructose feeding also significantly decreased mRNA levels for PPARα and CPT1A. qAMP analysis demonstrated the hypermethylation of promoter regions of PPARα and CTP1A genes. Fructose-mediated attenuated gene expression may be mediated by alterations of DNA methylation status, and pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome induced by fructose relates to DNA methylation status. - Highlights: • No general consensus has been reached regarding the molecular mechanisms of the pathogenesis of fructose-induced diseases. • Significant increase in hepatic total methylation level was observed after fructose-supplemented feeding. • Fructose feeding significantly decreased mRNA levels for PPARα and CPT1A. • qAMP analysis demonstrated the hypermethylation of promoter regions of PPARα and CTP1A genes. • Fructose-mediated attenuated gene expression may be mediated by alterations of DNA methylation status in rat liver.

  4. Two Subclasses of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Cycle Promoters Distinguished by Open Reading Frame 50 Mutant Proteins That Are Deficient in Binding to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-01-01

    A transcriptional activator encoded in open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome initiates the viral lytic cycle. Here we classify four lytic cycle genes on the basis of several characteristics of the ORF50 response elements (ORF50 REs) in their promoters: nucleotide sequence homology, the capacity to bind ORF50 protein in vitro, the ability to bind the cellular protein RBP-Jκ in vitro, and the capacity to confer activation by DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein. ORF50 expressed in human cells binds the promoters of PAN and K12 but does not bind ORF57 or vMIP-1 promoters. Conversely, the RBP-Jκ protein binds ORF57 and vMIP-1 but not PAN or K12 promoters. DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein differentiate these two subclasses of promoters in reporter assays; the PAN and K12 promoters cannot be activated, while the ORF57 and vMIP-1 promoters are responsive. Although DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein are defective in activating direct targets, they are nonetheless capable of activating the lytic cascade of KSHV. Significantly, DNA binding-deficient ORF50 mutants are competent to autostimulate expression of endogenous ORF50 and to autoactivate ORF50 promoter reporters. The experiments show that ORF50 protein activates downstream targets by at least two distinct mechanisms: one involves direct binding of ORF50 REs in promoter DNA; the other mechanism employs interactions with the RBP-Jκ cellular protein bound to promoter DNA in the region of the ORF50 RE. The DNA binding-deficient mutants allow classification of ORF50-responsive genes and will facilitate study of the several distinct mechanisms of activation of KSHV lytic cycle genes that are under the control of ORF50 protein. PMID:15994769

  5. Two subclasses of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic cycle promoters distinguished by open reading frame 50 mutant proteins that are deficient in binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-07-01

    A transcriptional activator encoded in open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome initiates the viral lytic cycle. Here we classify four lytic cycle genes on the basis of several characteristics of the ORF50 response elements (ORF50 REs) in their promoters: nucleotide sequence homology, the capacity to bind ORF50 protein in vitro, the ability to bind the cellular protein RBP-Jkappa in vitro, and the capacity to confer activation by DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein. ORF50 expressed in human cells binds the promoters of PAN and K12 but does not bind ORF57 or vMIP-1 promoters. Conversely, the RBP-Jkappa protein binds ORF57 and vMIP-1 but not PAN or K12 promoters. DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein differentiate these two subclasses of promoters in reporter assays; the PAN and K12 promoters cannot be activated, while the ORF57 and vMIP-1 promoters are responsive. Although DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein are defective in activating direct targets, they are nonetheless capable of activating the lytic cascade of KSHV. Significantly, DNA binding-deficient ORF50 mutants are competent to autostimulate expression of endogenous ORF50 and to autoactivate ORF50 promoter reporters. The experiments show that ORF50 protein activates downstream targets by at least two distinct mechanisms: one involves direct binding of ORF50 REs in promoter DNA; the other mechanism employs interactions with the RBP-Jkappa cellular protein bound to promoter DNA in the region of the ORF50 RE. The DNA binding-deficient mutants allow classification of ORF50-responsive genes and will facilitate study of the several distinct mechanisms of activation of KSHV lytic cycle genes that are under the control of ORF50 protein.

  6. Cdt2-mediated XPG degradation promotes gap-filling DNA synthesis in nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chunhua; Wani, Gulzar; Zhao, Ran; Qian, Jiang; Sharma, Nidhi; He, Jinshan; Zhu, Qianzheng; Wang, Qi-En; Wani, Altaf A

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group G (XPG) protein is a structure-specific repair endonuclease, which cleaves DNA strands on the 3′ side of the DNA damage during nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG also plays a crucial role in initiating DNA repair synthesis through recruitment of PCNA to the repair sites. However, the fate of XPG protein subsequent to the excision of DNA damage has remained unresolved. Here, we show that XPG, following its action on bulky lesions resulting from exposures to UV irradiation and cisplatin, is subjected to proteasome-mediated proteolytic degradation. Productive NER processing is required for XPG degradation as both UV and cisplatin treatment-induced XPG degradation is compromised in NER-deficient XP-A, XP-B, XP-C, and XP-F cells. In addition, the NER-related XPG degradation requires Cdt2, a component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, CRL4Cdt2. Micropore local UV irradiation and in situ Proximity Ligation assays demonstrated that Cdt2 is recruited to the UV-damage sites and interacts with XPG in the presence of PCNA. Importantly, Cdt2-mediated XPG degradation is crucial to the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerase δ and DNA repair synthesis. Collectively, our data support the idea of PCNA recruitment to damage sites which occurs in conjunction with XPG, recognition of the PCNA-bound XPG by CRL4Cdt2 for specific ubiquitylation and finally the protein degradation. In essence, XPG elimination from DNA damage sites clears the chromatin space needed for the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerase δ to the damage site and completion of gap-filling DNA synthesis during the final stage of NER. PMID:25483071

  7. Sequence-dependent upstream DNA-RNA polymerase interactions in the open complex with λPR λPRM promoters and implications for the mechanism of promoter interference

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, Laura; Cellai, Sara; Ross, Wilma; Bustamante, Carlos; Rivetti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The upstream interactions of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in open complex (RPo) formed at the PR and PRM promoters of bacteriophage lambda, have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate that the previously described 30 nm DNA compaction observed upon RPo formation at PR1 is a consequence of the specific interaction of the RNAP with two AT-rich sequence determinants positioned from −36 to −59 and from −80 to −100. Likewise, RPos formed at PRM showed a specific contact between the RNAP and the DNA sequence from −36 to −60. We further demonstrate that this interaction, which results in DNA wrapping against the polymerase surface, is mediated by the C-terminal domains of the alpha subunits (αCTD). Substitution of these AT-rich sequences with heterologous DNA reduces DNA wrapping but has little effect on the activity of the PR promoter. We find, however, that the frequency of DNA templates with both PR and PRM occupied by an RNAP significantly increases upon loss of DNA wrapping. These results suggest that αCTD interactions with upstream DNA can also play a role in regulating the expression of closely spaced promoters. Finally, a model for a possible mechanism of promoter interference between PR and PRM is proposed. PMID:19061900

  8. Adenovirus-based strategies overcome temozolomide resistance by silencing the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Marta M; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Bekele, B Nebiyou; Yung, W K Alfred; Fueyo, Juan

    2007-12-15

    Currently, the most efficacious treatment for malignant gliomas is temozolomide; however, gliomas expressing the DNA repair enzyme O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are resistant to this drug. Strong clinical evidence shows that gliomas with methylation and subsequent silencing of the MGMT promoter are sensitive to temozolomide. Based on the fact that adenoviral proteins directly target and inactivate key DNA repair genes, we hypothesized that the oncolytic adenovirus Delta-24-RGD could be successfully combined with temozolomide to overcome the reported MGMT-mediated resistance. Our studies showed that the combination of Delta-24-RGD and temozolomide induces a profound therapeutic synergy in glioma cells. We observed that Delta-24-RGD treatment overrides the temozolomide-mediated G(2)-M arrest. Furthermore, Delta-24-RGD infection was followed by down-modulation of the RNA levels of MGMT. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Delta-24-RGD prevented the recruitment of p300 to the MGMT promoter. Importantly, using mutant adenoviruses and wild-type and dominant-negative forms of the p300 protein, we showed that Delta-24-RGD interaction with p300 was required to induce silencing of the MGMT gene. Of further clinical relevance, the combination of Delta-24-RGD and temozolomide significantly improved the survival of glioma-bearing mice. Collectively, our data provide a strong mechanistic rationale for the combination of oncolytic adenoviruses and temozolomide, and should propel the clinical testing of this therapy approach in patients with malignant gliomas.

  9. Homocysteine Triggers Inflammatory Responses in Macrophages through Inhibiting CSE-H2S Signaling via DNA Hypermethylation of CSE Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao-Jiao; Li, Qian; Du, Hua-Ping; Wang, Ya-Li; You, Shou-Jiang; Wang, Fen; Xu, Xing-Shun; Cheng, Jian; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng; Hu, Li-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. Unfortunately, Hcy-lowering strategies were found to have limited effects in reducing cardiovascular events. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Increasing evidence reveals a role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of HHcy. Homocysteine (Hcy) is a precursor of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is formed via the transsulfuration pathway catalyzed by cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and serves as a novel modulator of inflammation. In the present study, we showed that methionine supplementation induced mild HHcy in mice, associated with the elevations of TNF-α and IL-1β in the plasma and reductions of plasma H2S level and CSE expression in the peritoneal macrophages. H2S-releasing compound GYY4137 attenuated the increases of TNF-α and IL-1β in the plasma of HHcy mice and Hcy-treated raw264.7 cells while CSE inhibitor PAG exacerbated it. Moreover, the in vitro study showed that Hcy inhibited CSE expression and H2S production in macrophages, accompanied by the increases of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) expression and DNA hypermethylation in cse promoter region. DNMT inhibition or knockdown reversed the decrease of CSE transcription induced by Hcy in macrophages. In sum, our findings demonstrate that Hcy may trigger inflammation through inhibiting CSE-H2S signaling, associated with increased promoter DNA methylation and transcriptional repression of cse in macrophages. PMID:26047341

  10. TIPRL Inhibits Protein Phosphatase 4 Activity and Promotes H2AX Phosphorylation in the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Kimberly Romero; Reid, Michael A; Yang, Ying; Tran, Thai Q; Wang, Wen-I; Lowman, Xazmin; Pan, Min; Kong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of protein kinase regulation in the DNA damage response, the mechanism that controls protein phosphatase activity in this pathway is unclear. Unlike kinases, the activity and specificity of serine/threonine phosphatases is governed largely by their associated proteins. Here we show that Tip41-like protein (TIPRL), an evolutionarily conserved binding protein for PP2A-family phosphatases, is a negative regulator of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4). Knockdown of TIPRL resulted in increased PP4 phosphatase activity and formation of the active PP4-C/PP4R2 complex known to dephosphorylate γ-H2AX. Thus, overexpression of TIPRL promotes phosphorylation of H2AX, and increases γ-H2AX positive foci in response to DNA damage, whereas knockdown of TIPRL inhibits γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In correlation with γ-H2AX levels, we found that TIPRL overexpression promotes cell death in response to genotoxic stress, and knockdown of TIPRL protects cells from genotoxic agents. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TIPRL inhibits PP4 activity to allow for H2AX phosphorylation and the subsequent DNA damage response.

  11. AZD1775 sensitizes T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to cytarabine by promoting apoptosis over DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Ford, James B; Baturin, Dmitry; Burleson, Tamara M; Van Linden, Annemie A; Kim, Yong-Mi; Porter, Christopher C

    2015-09-29

    While some children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have excellent prognoses, the prognosis for adults and children with T cell ALL is more guarded. Treatment for T-ALL is heavily dependent upon antimetabolite chemotherapeutics, including cytarabine. Targeted inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 has emerged as a strategy to sensitize cancer cells to cytarabine and other chemotherapeutics. We sought to determine if this strategy would be effective for T-ALL with clinically relevant anti-leukemia agents. We found that AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL cells to several traditional anti-leukemia agents, acting synergistically with cytarabine by enhancing DNA damage and apoptosis. In addition to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX), AZD1775 led to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at tyrosine 142, a signaling event associated with promotion of apoptosis over DNA repair. In a xenograft model of T-ALL, the addition of AZD1775 to cytarabine slowed leukemia progression and prolonged survival. Inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL to several anti-leukemia agents, particularly cytarabine and that mechanistically, AZD1775 promotes apoptosis over DNA repair in cells treated with cytarabine. These data support the development of clinical trials including AZD1775 in combination with conventional chemotherapy for acute leukemia.

  12. A DNA break– and phosphorylation-dependent positive feedback loop promotes immunoglobulin class-switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Bao Q; Ucher, Anna J; Donghia, Nina M; Gu, Xiwen; Nicolas, Laura; Nowak, Urszula; Rahman, Numa; Strout, Matthew P; Mills, Kevin D; Stavnezer, Janet; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    The ability of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to efficiently mediate class-switch recombination (CSR) is dependent on its phosphorylation at Ser38; however, the trigger that induces AID phosphorylation and the mechanism by which phosphorylated AID drives CSR have not been elucidated. Here we found that phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 was induced by DNA breaks. Conversely, in the absence of AID phosphorylation, DNA breaks were not efficiently generated at switch (S) regions in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus (Igh), consistent with a failure of AID to interact with the endonuclease APE1. Additionally, deficiency in the DNA-damage sensor ATM impaired the phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 and the interaction of AID with APE1. Our results identify a positive feedback loop for the amplification of DNA breaks at S regions through the phosphorylation- and ATM-dependent interaction of AID with APE1. PMID:24097111

  13. Nongenic, bidirectional transcription precedes and may promote developmental DNA deletion in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Chalker, Douglas L.; Yao, Meng-Chao

    2001-01-01

    A large number of DNA segments are excised from the chromosomes of the somatic nucleus during development of Tetrahymena thermophila. How these germline-limited sequences are recognized and excised is still poorly understood. We have found that many of these noncoding DNAs are transcribed during nuclear development. Transcription of the germline-limited M element occurs from both DNA strands and results in heterogeneous transcripts of < 200 b to > 1 kb. Transcripts are most abundant when developing micro- and macronuclei begin their differentiation. Transcription is normally restricted to unrearranged DNA of micronuclei and/or developing nuclei, but germline-limited DNAs can induce their own transcription when placed into somatic macronuclei. Brief actinomycin D treatment of conjugating cells blocked M-element excision, providing evidence that transcription is important for efficient DNA rearrangement. We propose that transcription targets these germline-limited sequences for elimination by altering chromatin to ensure their accessibility to the excision machinery. PMID:11358871

  14. Lamin A/C-dependent interaction with 53BP1 promotes cellular responses to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Markiewicz, Ewa; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Lamins A/C have been implicated in DNA damage response pathways. We show that the DNA repair protein 53BP1 is a lamin A/C binding protein. In undamaged human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), 53BP1 is a nucleoskeleton protein. 53BP1 binds to lamins A/C via its Tudor domain, and this is abrogated by DNA damage. Lamins A/C regulate 53BP1 levels and consequently lamin A/C-null HDF display a 53BP1 null-like phenotype. Our data favour a model in which lamins A/C maintain a nucleoplasmic pool of 53BP1 in order to facilitate its rapid recruitment to sites of DNA damage and could explain why an absence of lamin A/C accelerates aging. PMID:25645366

  15. Altered DNA Methylation of Long Noncoding RNA H19 in Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Promotes Mineralization by Silencing NOTCH1.

    PubMed

    Hadji, Fayez; Boulanger, Marie-Chloé; Guay, Simon-Pierre; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Amellah, Soumiya; Mkannez, Guada; Bouchareb, Rihab; Marchand, Joël Tremblay; Nsaibia, Mohamed Jalloul; Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Pibarot, Philippe; Bouchard, Luigi; Bossé, Yohan; Mathieu, Patrick

    2016-12-06

    Calcific aortic valve disease is characterized by an abnormal mineralization of the aortic valve. Osteogenic activity in the aortic valve is under the control of NOTCH1, which regulates the expression of key pro-osteogenic genes such as RUNX2 and BMP2. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) may reprogram cells by altering the gene expression pattern. Multidimensional genomic profiling was performed in human aortic valves to document the expression of lncRNAs and the DNA methylation pattern in calcific aortic valve disease. In-depth functional assays were carried out to document the impact of lncRNA on the mineralization of the aortic valve. We documented that lncRNA H19 (H19) was increased in calcific aortic valve disease. Hypomethylation of the promoter region was observed in mineralized aortic valves and was inversely associated with H19 expression. Knockdown and overexpression experiments showed that H19 induces a strong osteogenic phenotype by altering the NOTCH1 pathway. Gene promoter analyses showed that H19 silenced NOTCH1 by preventing the recruitment of p53 to its promoter. A knockdown of H19 in valve interstitial cells (VICs) increased the expression of NOTCH1 and decreased the level of RUNX2 and BMP2, 2 downstream targets repressed by NOTCH1. In rescue experiments, the transfection of a vector encoding for the active Notch intracellular domain prevented H19-induced mineralization of valve interstitial cells. These findings indicate that a dysregulation of DNA methylation in the promoter of H19 during calcific aortic valve disease is associated with a higher expression of this lncRNA, which promotes an osteogenic program by interfering with the expression of NOTCH1. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Baculoviruses modulate a proapoptotic DNA damage response to promote virus multiplication.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan K; Friesen, Paul D

    2012-12-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) initiates apoptosis in diverse insects through events triggered by virus DNA (vDNA) replication. To define the proapoptotic pathway and its role in antivirus defense, we investigated the link between the host's DNA damage response (DDR) and apoptosis. We report here that AcMNPV elicits a DDR in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Replication of vDNA activated DDR kinases, as evidenced by ATM-driven phosphorylation of the Drosophila histone H2AX homolog (H2Av), a critical regulator of the DDR. Ablation or inhibition of ATM repressed H2Av phosphorylation and blocked virus-induced apoptosis. The DDR kinase inhibitors caffeine and KU55933 also prevented virus-induced apoptosis in cells derived from the permissive AcMNPV host, Spodoptera frugiperda. This block occurred at a step upstream of virus-mediated depletion of the cellular inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein, an event that initiates apoptosis in Spodoptera and Drosophila. Thus, the DDR is a conserved, proapoptotic response to baculovirus infection. DDR inhibition also repressed vDNA replication and reduced virus yields 100,000-fold, demonstrating that the DDR contributes to virus production, despite its recognized antivirus role. In contrast to virus-induced phosphorylation of Drosophila H2Av, AcMNPV blocked phosphorylation of the Spodoptera H2AX homolog (SfH2AX). Remarkably, AcMNPV also suppressed SfH2AX phosphorylation following pharmacologically induced DNA damage. These findings indicate that AcMNPV alters canonical DDR signaling in permissive cells. We conclude that AcMNPV triggers a proapoptotic DDR that is subsequently modified, presumably to stimulate vDNA replication. Thus, manipulation of the DDR to facilitate multiplication is an evolutionarily conserved strategy among DNA viruses of insects and mammals.

  17. NR4A2 Promotes DNA Double-strand Break Repair Upon Exposure to UVR.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kelvin; Chhabra, Yash; Tropée, Romain; Lim, Yi Chieh; Fane, Mitchell; Dray, Eloise; Sturm, Richard A; Smith, Aaron G

    2017-09-01

    Exposure of melanocytes to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces the formation of UV lesions that can produce deleterious effects in genomic DNA. Encounters of replication forks with unrepaired UV lesions can lead to several complex phenomena, such as the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The NR4A family of nuclear receptors are transcription factors that have been associated with mediating DNA repair functions downstream of the MC1R signaling pathway in melanocytes. In particular, emerging evidence shows that upon DNA damage, the NR4A2 receptor can translocate to sites of UV lesion by mechanisms requiring post-translational modifications within the N-terminal domain and at a serine residue in the DNA-binding domain at position 337. Following this, NR4A2 aids in DNA repair by facilitating chromatin relaxation, allowing accessibility for DNA repair machinery. Using A2058 and HT144 melanoma cells engineered to stably express wild-type or mutant forms of the NR4A2 proteins, we reveal that the expression of functional NR4A2 is associated with elevated cytoprotection against UVR. Conversely, knockdown of NR4A2 expression by siRNA results in a significant loss of cell viability after UV insult. By analyzing the kinetics of the ensuing 53BP1 and RAD51 foci following UV irradiation, we also reveal that the expression of mutant NR4A2 isoforms, lacking the ability to translocate, transactivate, or undergo phosphorylation, display compromised repair capacity.Implications: These data expand the understanding of the mechanism by which the NR4A2 nuclear receptor can facilitate DNA DSB repair. Mol Cancer Res; 15(9); 1184-96. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. DNA hairpins destabilize duplexes primarily by promoting melting rather than by inhibiting hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, John S.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Romano, Flavio; Šulc, Petr; Shaw, Liam P.; Louis, Ard A.; Doye, Jonathan P.K.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of secondary structure on DNA duplex formation is poorly understood. Using oxDNA, a nucleotide level coarse-grained model of DNA, we study how hairpins influence the rate and reaction pathways of DNA hybridzation. We compare to experimental systems studied by Gao et al. (1) and find that 3-base pair hairpins reduce the hybridization rate by a factor of 2, and 4-base pair hairpins by a factor of 10, compared to DNA with limited secondary structure, which is in good agreement with experiments. By contrast, melting rates are accelerated by factors of ∼100 and ∼2000. This surprisingly large speed-up occurs because hairpins form during the melting process, and significantly lower the free energy barrier for dissociation. These results should assist experimentalists in designing sequences to be used in DNA nanotechnology, by putting limits on the suppression of hybridization reaction rates through the use of hairpins and offering the possibility of deliberately increasing dissociation rates by incorporating hairpins into single strands. PMID:26056172

  19. DNA hairpins destabilize duplexes primarily by promoting melting rather than by inhibiting hybridization.

    PubMed

    Schreck, John S; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Romano, Flavio; Šulc, Petr; Shaw, Liam P; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K

    2015-07-27

    The effect of secondary structure on DNA duplex formation is poorly understood. Using oxDNA, a nucleotide level coarse-grained model of DNA, we study how hairpins influence the rate and reaction pathways of DNA hybridzation. We compare to experimental systems studied by Gao et al. (1) and find that 3-base pair hairpins reduce the hybridization rate by a factor of 2, and 4-base pair hairpins by a factor of 10, compared to DNA with limited secondary structure, which is in good agreement with experiments. By contrast, melting rates are accelerated by factors of ∼100 and ∼2000. This surprisingly large speed-up occurs because hairpins form during the melting process, and significantly lower the free energy barrier for dissociation. These results should assist experimentalists in designing sequences to be used in DNA nanotechnology, by putting limits on the suppression of hybridization reaction rates through the use of hairpins and offering the possibility of deliberately increasing dissociation rates by incorporating hairpins into single strands. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Caspase-2 deficiency promotes aberrant DNA-damage response and genetic instability.

    PubMed

    Dorstyn, L; Puccini, J; Wilson, C H; Shalini, S; Nicola, M; Moore, S; Kumar, S

    2012-08-01

    Caspase-2 is an initiator caspase, which has been implicated to function in apoptotic and non-apoptotic signalling pathways, including cell-cycle regulation, DNA-damage signalling and tumour suppression. We previously demonstrated that caspase-2 deficiency enhances E1A/Ras oncogene-induced cell transformation and augments lymphomagenesis in the EμMyc mouse model. Caspase-2(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (casp2(-/-) MEFs) show aberrant cell-cycle checkpoint regulation and a defective apoptotic response following DNA damage. Disruption of cell-cycle checkpoints often leads to genomic instability (GIN), which is a common phenotype of cancer cells and can contribute to cellular transformation. Here we show that caspase-2 deficiency results in increased DNA damage and GIN in proliferating cells. Casp2(-/-) MEFs readily escape senescence in culture and exhibit increased micronuclei formation and sustained DNA damage during cell culture and following γ-irradiation. Metaphase analyses demonstrated that a lack of caspase-2 is associated with increased aneuploidy in both MEFs and in EμMyc lymphoma cells. In addition, casp2(-/-) MEFs and lymphoma cells exhibit significantly decreased telomere length. We also noted that loss of caspase-2 leads to defective p53-mediated signalling and decreased trans-activation of p53 target genes upon DNA damage. Our findings suggest that loss of caspase-2 serves as a key function in maintaining genomic integrity, during cell proliferation and following DNA damage.

  1. A Transcriptional Repressor ZBTB1 Promotes Chromatin Remodeling and Translesion DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Adelmant, Guillaume; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Yang, Kailin; Marto, Jarrod A.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Timely DNA replication across damaged DNA is critical for maintaining genomic integrity. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) allows bypass of DNA lesions using error-prone TLS polymerases. The E3 ligase RAD18 is necessary for PCNA monoubiquitination and TLS polymerase recruitment; however, the regulatory steps upstream of RAD18 activation are less understood. Here, we show that the UBZ4 domain-containing transcriptional repressor ZBTB1 is a critical upstream regulator of TLS. The UBZ4 motif is required for PCNA monoubiquitination and survival after UV damage. ZBTB1 associates with KAP-1, a transcriptional repressor whose phosphorylation relaxes chromatin after DNA damage. ZBTB1 depletion impairs formation of phospho-KAP-1 at UV damage sites and reduces RAD18 recruitment. Furthermore, phosphorylation of KAP-1 is necessary for efficient PCNA modification. We propose that ZBTB1 is required for PCNA monoubiquitination, by localizing phospho-KAP-1 to chromatin and enhancing RAD18 accessibility. Collectively, our study implicates a new ubiquitin-binding protein in orchestrating chromatin remodeling during DNA repair. PMID:24657165

  2. Multilayered polyelectrolyte films promote the direct and localized delivery of DNA to cells.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Christopher M; Zhang, Jingtao; Fredin, Nathaniel J; Lynn, David M

    2005-08-18

    Multilayered polyelectrolyte films fabricated from plasmid DNA and a hydrolytically degradable synthetic polycation can be used to direct the localized transfection of cells without the aid of a secondary transfection agent. Multilayered assemblies 100 nm thick consisting of alternating layers of synthetic polymer and plasmid DNA encoding for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were deposited on quartz substrates using a layer-by-layer fabrication procedure. The placement of film-coated slides in contact with COS-7 cells growing in serum-containing culture medium resulted in gene expression in cells localized under the film-coated portion of the slides. The average percentage of cells expressing EGFP relative to the total number of cells ranged from 4.6% to 37.9%, with an average of 18.6%+/-8.2%, as determined by fluorescence microscopy. In addition to providing a mechanism for the immobilization of DNA at the cell/surface interface, a preliminary analysis of film topography by atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated that polymer /DNA films undergo significant structural rearrangements upon incubation to present surface bound condensed plasmid DNA nanoparticles. These data suggest that the presence of the cationic polymer in these materials may also contribute to the internalization and expression of plasmid. The materials and design principles reported here present an attractive framework for the local or non-invasive delivery of DNA from the surfaces of implantable materials or biomedical devices.

  3. BLM helicase measures DNA unwound before switching strands and hRPA promotes unwinding reinitiation.

    PubMed

    Yodh, Jaya G; Stevens, Benjamin C; Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan; Janscak, Pavel; Ha, Taekjip

    2009-02-18

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by genomic instability and a high predisposition to cancer. The gene defective in BS, BLM, encodes a member of the RecQ family of 3'-5' DNA helicases, and is proposed to function in recombinational repair during DNA replication. Here, we have utilized single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy to examine the behaviour of BLM on forked DNA substrates. Strikingly, BLM unwound individual DNA molecules in a repetitive manner, unwinding a short length of duplex DNA followed by rapid reannealing and reinitiation of unwinding in several successions. Our results show that a monomeric BLM can 'measure' how many base pairs it has unwound, and once it has unwound a critical length, it reverses the unwinding reaction through strand switching and translocating on the opposing strand. Repetitive unwinding persisted even in the presence of hRPA, and interaction between wild-type BLM and hRPA was necessary for unwinding reinitiation on hRPA-coated DNA. The reported activities may facilitate BLM processing of stalled replication forks and illegitimately formed recombination intermediates.

  4. COX-2 gene promoter DNA methylation status in eutopic and ectopic endometrium of Egyptian women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Zidan, Haidy E; Rezk, Noha A; Alnemr, Amr Abd Almohsen; Abd El Ghany, Amany M

    2015-11-01

    The pathophysiology of COX-2 expression in endometriosis is a matter of debate. The aim was to investigate the role of DNA methylation of the NF-IL6 site within the promoter of COX-2 gene in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. The endometrial tissues (ectopic and eutopic) were collected from 60 women with endometriosis and 30 women without endometriosis (control group). The methylation status of COX-2 was examined by methylation-specific PCR. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was performed to measure COX-2 mRNA levels in endometrial tissues. We found significantly higher levels of COX-2 in ectopic endometriotic tissue compared with eutopic tissue. Also, we found that the frequencies of methylation status of the NF-IL6 site within the COX-2 promoter in the eutopic and ectopic endometrial tissues of endometriosis groups were significantly decreased in comparison to controls (P=0.002, P=0.000 respectively). Our study demonstrated that DNA hypomethylation of the NF-IL6 site within the promoter of COX-2 gene could be a key mechanism for its elevated expression in the eutopic and ectopic tissues of endometriosis.

  5. Sequence-dependent upstream DNA-RNA polymerase interactions in the open complex with lambdaPR and lambdaPRM promoters and implications for the mechanism of promoter interference.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, Laura; Cellai, Sara; Ross, Wilma; Bustamante, Carlos; Rivetti, Claudio

    2009-01-23

    Upstream interactions of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) in an open promoter complex (RPo) formed at the P(R) and P(RM) promoters of bacteriophage lambda have been studied by atomic force microscopy. We demonstrate that the previously described 30-nm DNA compaction observed upon RPo formation at P(R) [Rivetti, C., Guthold, M. & Bustamante, C. (1999). Wrapping of DNA around the E. coli RNA polymerase open promoter complex. EMBO J., 18, 4464-4475.] is a consequence of the specific interaction of the RNAP with two AT-rich sequence determinants positioned from -36 to -59 and from -80 to -100. Likewise, RPos formed at P(RM) showed a specific contact between RNAP and the upstream DNA sequence. We further demonstrate that this interaction, which results in DNA wrapping against the polymerase surface, is mediated by the C-terminal domains of alpha-subunits (carboxy-terminal domain). Substitution of these AT-rich sequences with heterologous DNA reduces DNA wrapping but has only a small effect on the activity of the P(R) promoter. We find, however, that the frequency of DNA templates with both P(R) and P(RM) occupied by an RNAP significantly increases upon loss of DNA wrapping. These results suggest that alpha carboxy-terminal domain interactions with upstream DNA can also play a role in regulating the expression of closely spaced promoters. Finally, a model for a possible mechanism of promoter interference between P(R) and P(RM) is proposed.

  6. Alcohol and nicotine codependence-associated DNA methylation changes in promoter regions of addiction-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongqin; Wang, Fan; Kranzler, Henry R.; Gelernter, Joel; Zhang, Huiping

    2017-01-01

    Altered DNA methylation in addiction-related genes may modify the susceptibility to alcohol or drug dependence (AD or ND). We profiled peripheral blood DNA methylation levels of 384 CpGs in promoter regions of 82 addiction-related genes in 256 African Americans (AAs) (117 cases with AD-ND codependence and 139 controls) and 196 European Americans (103 cases with AD-ND codependence and 93 controls) using Illumina’s GoldenGate DNA methylation array assays. AD-ND codependence-associated DNA methylation changes were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models with consideration of batch effects and covariates age, sex, and ancestry proportions. Seventy CpGs (in 41 genes) showed nominally significant associations (P < 0.05) with AD-ND codependence in both AAs and EAs. One CpG (HTR2B cg27531267) was hypomethylated in AA cases (P = 7.2 × 10−5), while 17 CpGs in 16 genes (including HTR2B cg27531267) were hypermethylated in EA cases (5.6 × 10−9 ≤ P ≤ 9.5 × 10−5). Nevertheless, 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) nearby HTR2B cg27531267 and the interaction of these SNPs and cg27531267 did not show significant effects on AD-ND codependence in either AAs or EAs. Our study demonstrated that DNA methylation changes in addiction-related genes could be potential biomarkers for AD-ND co-dependence. Future studies need to explore whether DNA methylation alterations influence the risk of AD-ND codependence or the other way around. PMID:28165486

  7. Role of Bacillus subtilis Error Prevention Oxidized Guanine System in Counteracting Hexavalent Chromium-Promoted Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Escobar, Fernando; Gutiérrez-Corona, J. Félix

    2014-01-01

    Chromium pollution is potentially detrimental to bacterial soil communities, compromising carbon and nitrogen cycles that are essential for life on earth. It has been proposed that intracellular reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] may cause bacterial death by a mechanism that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage; the molecular basis of the phenomenon was investigated in this work. Here, we report that Bacillus subtilis cells lacking a functional error prevention oxidized guanine (GO) system were significantly more sensitive to Cr(VI) treatment than cells of the wild-type (WT) strain, suggesting that oxidative damage to DNA is involved in the deleterious effects of the oxyanion. In agreement with this suggestion, Cr(VI) dramatically increased the ROS concentration and induced mutagenesis in a GO-deficient B. subtilis strain. Alkaline gel electrophoresis (AGE) analysis of chromosomal DNA of WT and ΔGO mutant strains subjected to Cr(VI) treatment revealed that the DNA of the ΔGO strain was more susceptible to DNA glycosylase Fpg attack, suggesting that chromium genotoxicity is associated with 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-G) lesions. In support of this notion, specific monoclonal antibodies detected the accumulation of 8-oxo-G lesions in the chromosomes of B. subtilis cells subjected to Cr(VI) treatment. We conclude that Cr(VI) promotes mutagenesis and cell death in B. subtilis by a mechanism that involves radical oxygen attack of DNA, generating 8-oxo-G, and that such effects are counteracted by the prevention and repair GO system. PMID:24973075

  8. Repetitive elements and enforced transcriptional repression co-operate to enhance DNA methylation spreading into a promoter CpG-island

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Shu, Jingmin; Si, Jiali; Shen, Lanlan; Estecio, Marcos R.H.; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2012-01-01

    Repression of many tumor suppressor genes in cancer is concurrent with aberrantly increased DNA methylation levels at promoter CpG islands (CGIs). About one-fourth of empirically defined human promoters are surrounded by or contain clustered repetitive elements. It was previously observed that a sharp transition of methylation exists between highly methylated repetitive elements and unmethylated promoter-CGIs in normal tissues. The factors that lead to aberrant CGI hypermethylation in cancer remain poorly understood. Here, we established a site-specific integration system with enforced local transcriptional repression in colorectal cancer cells and monitored the occurrence of initial de novo methylation at specific CG sites adjacent to the CGI of the INSL6 promoter, which could be accelerated by binding a KRAB-containing transcriptional factor. Additional repetitive elements from P16 and RIL (PDLIM4), if situated adjacent to the promoter of INSL6, could confer DNA methylation spreading into the CGI particularly in the setting of KRAB-factor binding. However, a repressive chromatin alone was not sufficient to initiate DNA methylation, which required specific DNA sequences and was integration-site (and/or cell-line) specific. Overall, these results demonstrate a requirement for specific DNA sequences to trigger de novo DNA methylation, and repetitive elements as cis-regulatory factors to cooperate with advanced transcriptional repression in promoting methylation spreading. PMID:22600741

  9. Spindle Checkpoint Factors Bub1 and Bub2 Promote DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Nonhomologous End Joining.

    PubMed

    Jessulat, Matthew; Malty, Ramy H; Nguyen-Tran, Diem-Hang; Deineko, Viktor; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Vlasblom, James; Omidi, Katayoun; Jin, Ke; Minic, Zoran; Hooshyar, Mohsen; Burnside, Daniel; Samanfar, Bahram; Phanse, Sadhna; Freywald, Tanya; Prasad, Bhanu; Zhang, Zhaolei; Vizeacoumar, Franco; Krogan, Nevan J; Freywald, Andrew; Golshani, Ashkan; Babu, Mohan

    2015-07-01

    The nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway is essential for the preservation of genome integrity, as it efficiently repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Previous biochemical and genetic investigations have indicated that, despite the importance of this pathway, the entire complement of genes regulating NHEJ remains unknown. To address this, we employed a plasmid-based NHEJ DNA repair screen in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using 369 putative nonessential DNA repair-related components as queries. Among the newly identified genes associated with NHEJ deficiency upon disruption are two spindle assembly checkpoint kinases, Bub1 and Bub2. Both observation of resulting phenotypes and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Bub1 and -2, either alone or in combination with cell cycle regulators, are recruited near the DSB, where phosphorylated Rad53 or H2A accumulates. Large-scale proteomic analysis of Bub kinases phosphorylated in response to DNA damage identified previously unknown kinase substrates on Tel1 S/T-Q sites. Moreover, Bub1 NHEJ function appears to be conserved in mammalian cells. 53BP1, which influences DSB repair by NHEJ, colocalizes with human BUB1 and is recruited to the break sites. Thus, while Bub is not a core component of NHEJ machinery, our data support its dual role in mitotic exit and promotion of NHEJ repair in yeast and mammals. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Spindle Checkpoint Factors Bub1 and Bub2 Promote DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Nonhomologous End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Jessulat, Matthew; Malty, Ramy H.; Nguyen-Tran, Diem-Hang; Deineko, Viktor; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Vlasblom, James; Omidi, Katayoun; Jin, Ke; Minic, Zoran; Hooshyar, Mohsen; Burnside, Daniel; Samanfar, Bahram; Phanse, Sadhna; Freywald, Tanya; Prasad, Bhanu; Zhang, Zhaolei; Vizeacoumar, Franco; Krogan, Nevan J.; Freywald, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway is essential for the preservation of genome integrity, as it efficiently repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Previous biochemical and genetic investigations have indicated that, despite the importance of this pathway, the entire complement of genes regulating NHEJ remains unknown. To address this, we employed a plasmid-based NHEJ DNA repair screen in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using 369 putative nonessential DNA repair-related components as queries. Among the newly identified genes associated with NHEJ deficiency upon disruption are two spindle assembly checkpoint kinases, Bub1 and Bub2. Both observation of resulting phenotypes and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Bub1 and -2, either alone or in combination with cell cycle regulators, are recruited near the DSB, where phosphorylated Rad53 or H2A accumulates. Large-scale proteomic analysis of Bub kinases phosphorylated in response to DNA damage identified previously unknown kinase substrates on Tel1 S/T-Q sites. Moreover, Bub1 NHEJ function appears to be conserved in mammalian cells. 53BP1, which influences DSB repair by NHEJ, colocalizes with human BUB1 and is recruited to the break sites. Thus, while Bub is not a core component of NHEJ machinery, our data support its dual role in mitotic exit and promotion of NHEJ repair in yeast and mammals. PMID:25963654

  11. IFI16 is required for DNA sensing in human macrophages by promoting production and function of cGAMP

    PubMed Central

    Jønsson, K. L.; Laustsen, A.; Krapp, C.; Skipper, K. A.; Thavachelvam, K.; Hotter, D.; Egedal, J. H.; Kjolby, M.; Mohammadi, P.; Prabakaran, T.; Sørensen, L. K.; Sun, C.; Jensen, S. B.; Holm, C. K.; Lebbink, R. J.; Johannsen, M.; Nyegaard, M.; Mikkelsen, J. G.; Kirchhoff, F.; Paludan, S. R.; Jakobsen, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    Innate immune activation by macrophages is an essential part of host defence against infection. Cytosolic recognition of microbial DNA in macrophages leads to induction of interferons and cytokines through activation of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) and stimulator of interferon genes (STING). Other host factors, including interferon-gamma inducible factor 16 (IFI16), have been proposed to contribute to immune activation by DNA. However, their relation to the cGAS-STING pathway is not clear. Here, we show that IFI16 functions in the cGAS-STING pathway on two distinct levels. Depletion of IFI16 in macrophages impairs cGAMP production on DNA stimulation, whereas overexpression of IFI16 amplifies the function of cGAS. Furthermore, IFI16 is vital for the downstream signalling stimulated by cGAMP, facilitating recruitment and activation of TANK-binding kinase 1 in STING complex. Collectively, our results suggest that IFI16 is essential for efficient sensing and signalling upon DNA challenge in macrophages to promote interferons and antiviral responses. PMID:28186168

  12. Osmotic pressure: resisting or promoting DNA ejection from phage? Internal capsid-pressure dependence of viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evilevitch, Alex; Jeembaeva, Meerim; Koester, Sarah; Castelnovo, Martin; Weitz, David

    2009-03-01

    Recent in vitro experiments have shown that DNA ejection from phage can be partially stopped by surrounding osmotic pressure when ejected DNA is digested by DNase I on the course of ejection. We argue in this work by combination of experimental techniques (UV absorbance, pulse-field electrophoresis, and cryo-EM) that intact genome (i.e. undigested) ejection in a crowded environment is, on the contrary, enhanced or eventually complete with the help of a pulling force resulting from DNA condensation induced by the osmotic stress itself. This demonstrates that in vivo, the osmotically stressed cell cytoplasm will promote phage DNA ejection rather than resisting it. While, in vitro, the ejection depends sensitively on internal pressure within the virus capsid, the effect of internal pressure on infection of bacteria is unknown. We use microfluidics to monitor individual cells and determine the distribution of lysis due to infection as the capsid pressure is varied. The lysis probability decreases markedly with decreased capsid pressure.

  13. PAXX promotes KU accumulation at DNA breaks and is essential for end-joining in XLF-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangyu; Shao, Zhengping; Jiang, Wenxia; Lee, Brian J.; Zha, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the most prominent DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway in mammalian cells. PAXX is the newest NHEJ factor, which shares structural similarity with known NHEJ factors—XRCC4 and XLF. Here we report that PAXX is dispensable for physiological NHEJ in otherwise wild-type mice. Yet Paxx−/− mice require XLF and Xlf−/− mice require PAXX for end-ligation. As such, Xlf−/−Paxx−/− mice display severe genomic instability and neuronal apoptosis, which eventually lead to embryonic lethality. Despite their structural similarities, only Xlf−/− cells, but not Paxx−/− cells require ATM/DNA-PK kinase activity for end-ligation. Mechanistically, PAXX promotes the accumulation of KU at DSBs, while XLF enhances LIG4 recruitment without affecting KU dynamics at DNA breaks in vivo. Together these findings identify the molecular functions of PAXX in KU accumulation at DNA ends and reveal distinct, yet critically complementary functions of PAXX and XLF during NHEJ. PMID:28051062

  14. RhoB Promotes γH2AX Dephosphorylation and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mamouni, Kenza; Cristini, Agnese; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Monferran, Sylvie; Lemarié, Anthony; Faye, Jean-Charles; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other Rho GTPases, RhoB is rapidly induced by DNA damage, and its expression level decreases during cancer progression. Because inefficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can lead to cancer, we investigated whether camptothecin, an anticancer drug that produces DSBs, induces RhoB expression and examined its role in the camptothecin-induced DNA damage response. We show that in camptothecin-treated cells, DSBs induce RhoB expression by a mechanism that depends notably on Chk2 and its substrate HuR, which binds to RhoB mRNA and protects it against degradation. RhoB-deficient cells fail to dephosphorylate γH2AX following camptothecin removal and show reduced efficiency of DSB repair by homologous recombination. These cells also show decreased activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a phosphatase for γH2AX and other DNA damage and repair proteins. Thus, we propose that DSBs activate a Chk2-HuR-RhoB pathway that promotes PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of γH2AX and DSB repair. Finally, we show that RhoB-deficient cells accumulate endogenous γH2AX and chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting that RhoB loss increases DSB-mediated genomic instability and tumor progression. PMID:24912678

  15. DNA methylation patterns of behavior-related gene promoter regions dissect the gray wolf from domestic dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Banlaki, Zsofia; Cimarelli, Giulia; Viranyi, Zsofia; Kubinyi, Eniko; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt

    2017-06-01

    A growing body of evidence highlights the relationship between epigenetics, especially DNA methylation, and population divergence as well as speciation. However, little is known about how general the phenomenon of epigenetics-wise separation of different populations is, or whether population assignment is, possible based on solely epigenetic marks. In the present study, we compared DNA methylation profiles between four different canine populations: three domestic dog breeds and their ancestor the gray wolf. Altogether, 79 CpG sites constituting the 65 so-called CpG units located in the promoter regions of genes affecting behavioral and temperamental traits (COMT, HTR1A, MAOA, OXTR, SLC6A4, TPH1, WFS1)-regions putatively targeted during domestication and breed selection. Methylation status of buccal cells was assessed using EpiTYPER technology. Significant inter-population methylation differences were found in 52.3% of all CpG units investigated. DNA methylation profile-based hierarchical cluster analysis indicated an unambiguous segregation of wolf from domestic dog. In addition, one of the three dog breeds (Golden Retriever) investigated also formed a separate, autonomous group. The findings support that population segregation is interrelated with shifts in DNA methylation patterns, at least in putative selection target regions, and also imply that epigenetic profiles could provide a sufficient basis for population assignment of individuals.

  16. Genome-wide DNA promoter methylation and transcriptome analysis in human adipose tissue unravels novel candidate genes for obesity.

    PubMed

    Keller, Maria; Hopp, Lydia; Liu, Xuanshi; Wohland, Tobias; Rohde, Kerstin; Cancello, Raffaella; Klös, Matthias; Bacos, Karl; Kern, Matthias; Eichelmann, Fabian; Dietrich, Arne; Schön, Michael R; Gärtner, Daniel; Lohmann, Tobias; Dreßler, Miriam; Stumvoll, Michael; Kovacs, Peter; DiBlasio, Anna-Maria; Ling, Charlotte; Binder, Hans; Blüher, Matthias; Böttcher, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in obesity and related metabolic complications. We examined genome-wide DNA promoter methylation along with mRNA profiles in paired samples of human subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and omental visceral adipose tissue (OVAT) from non-obese vs. obese individuals. We identified negatively correlated methylation and expression of several obesity-associated genes in our discovery dataset and in silico replicated ETV6 in two independent cohorts. Further, we identified six adipose tissue depot-specific genes (HAND2, HOXC6, PPARG, SORBS2, CD36, and CLDN1). The effects were further supported in additional independent cohorts. Our top hits might play a role in adipogenesis and differentiation, obesity, lipid metabolism, and adipose tissue expandability. Finally, we show that in vitro methylation of SORBS2 directly represses gene expression. Taken together, our data show distinct tissue specific epigenetic alterations which associate with obesity.

  17. Transcription of human 7S K DNA in vitro and in vivo is exclusively controlled by an upstream promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinert, H; Benecke, B J

    1988-01-01

    We have analyzed the transcription of a recently isolated human 7S K RNA gene in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to hitherto characterized class III genes (genes transcribed by RNA polymerase III), the coding sequence of this gene is not required for faithful and efficient transcription by RNA polymerase III. In fact, a procaryotic vector DNA sequence was efficiently transcribed by RNA polymerase III under the control of the 7S K RNA gene upstream sequence in vitro and in vivo. S1-nuclease protection analyses confirmed that the 7S K 5'flanking sequence was sufficient for accurate transcription initiation. These data demonstrate that 7S K DNA represents a novel class III gene, the promoter elements of which are located outside the coding sequence. Images PMID:2450332

  18. Guanylate-binding proteins promote AIM2 inflammasome activation during Francisella novicida infection by inducing cytosolic bacteriolysis and DNA release

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Roland F.; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Anton, Leonie; Rühl, Sebastian; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Dick, Mathias S.; Kistner, Anne; Rigard, Mélanie; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Henry, Thomas; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The AIM2 inflammasome detects double-stranded DNA in the cytosol and induces caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis as well as release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. AIM2 is critical for host defense against DNA viruses and bacteria that replicate in the cytosol, such as Francisella novicida. AIM2 activation by F. novicida requires bacteriolysis, yet whether this process is accidental or a host-driven immune mechanism remained unclear. Using siRNA screening for nearly 500 interferon-stimulated genes, we identified guanylate-binding proteins GBP2 and GBP5 as key AIM2 activators during F. novicida infection. Their prominent role was validated in vitro and in a mouse model of tularemia. Mechanistically, these two GBPs target cytosolic F. novicida and promote bacteriolysis. Thus, besides their role in host defense against vacuolar pathogens, GBPs also facilitate the presentation of ligands by directly attacking cytosolic bacteria. PMID:25774716

  19. The Vaccine Adjuvant Chitosan Promotes Cellular Immunity via DNA Sensor cGAS-STING-Dependent Induction of Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jin, Lei; Mori, Andres; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Oleszycka, Ewa; Moran, Hannah B T; Mansouri, Samira; McEntee, Craig P; Lambe, Eimear; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Cunningham, Colm; Hertzog, Paul; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bowie, Andrew G; Lavelle, Ed C

    2016-03-15

    The cationic polysaccharide chitosan is an attractive candidate adjuvant capable of driving potent cell-mediated immunity, but the mechanism by which it acts is not clear. We show that chitosan promotes dendritic cell maturation by inducing type I interferons (IFNs) and enhances antigen-specific T helper 1 (Th1) responses in a type I IFN receptor-dependent manner. The induction of type I IFNs, IFN-stimulated genes and dendritic cell maturation by chitosan required the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS and STING, implicating this pathway in dendritic cell activation. Additionally, this process was dependent on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and the presence of cytoplasmic DNA. Chitosan-mediated enhancement of antigen specific Th1 and immunoglobulin G2c responses following vaccination was dependent on both cGAS and STING. These findings demonstrate that a cationic polymer can engage the STING-cGAS pathway to trigger innate and adaptive immune responses.

  20. Frataxin Deficiency Promotes Excess Microglial DNA Damage and Inflammation that Is Rescued by PJ34.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; McMackin, Marissa Z; Shan, Yuxi; Raetz, Alan; David, Sheila; Cortopassi, Gino

    2016-01-01

    An inherited deficiency in the frataxin protein causes neurodegeneration of the dorsal root ganglia and Friedreich's ataxia (FA). Frataxin deficiency leads to oxidative stress and inflammatory changes in cell and animal models; however, the cause of the inflammatory changes, and especially what causes brain microglial activation is unclear. Here we investigated: 1) the mechanism by which frataxin deficiency activates microglia, 2) whether a brain-localized inflammatory stimulus provokes a greater microglial response in FA animal models, and 3) whether an anti-inflammatory treatment improves their condition. Intracerebroventricular administration of LPS induced higher amounts of microglial activation in the FA mouse model vs controls. We also observed an increase in oxidative damage in the form of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) and the DNA repair proteins MUTYH and PARP-1 in cerebellar microglia of FA mutant mice. We hypothesized that frataxin deficiency increases DNA damage and DNA repair genes specifically in microglia, activating them. siRNA-mediated frataxin knockdown in microglial BV2 cells clearly elevated DNA damage and the expression of DNA repair genes MUTYH and PARP-1. Frataxin knockdown also induced a higher level of PARP-1 in MEF cells, and this was suppressed in MUTYH-/- knockout cells. Administration of the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ34 attenuated the microglial activation induced by intracerebroventricular injection of LPS. The combined administration of LPS and angiotensin II provoke an even stronger activation of microglia and neurobehavioral impairment. PJ34 treatment attenuated the neurobehavioral impairments in FA mice. These results suggest that the DNA repair proteins MUTYH and PARP-1 may form a pathway regulating microglial activation initiated by DNA damage, and inhibition of microglial PARP-1 induction could be an important therapeutic target in Friedreich's ataxia.

  1. Frataxin Deficiency Promotes Excess Microglial DNA Damage and Inflammation that Is Rescued by PJ34

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; McMackin, Marissa Z.; Shan, Yuxi; Raetz, Alan; David, Sheila; Cortopassi, Gino

    2016-01-01

    An inherited deficiency in the frataxin protein causes neurodegeneration of the dorsal root ganglia and Friedreich's ataxia (FA). Frataxin deficiency leads to oxidative stress and inflammatory changes in cell and animal models; however, the cause of the inflammatory changes, and especially what causes brain microglial activation is unclear. Here we investigated: 1) the mechanism by which frataxin deficiency activates microglia, 2) whether a brain-localized inflammatory stimulus provokes a greater microglial response in FA animal models, and 3) whether an anti-inflammatory treatment improves their condition. Intracerebroventricular administration of LPS induced higher amounts of microglial activation in the FA mouse model vs controls. We also observed an increase in oxidative damage in the form of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) and the DNA repair proteins MUTYH and PARP-1 in cerebellar microglia of FA mutant mice. We hypothesized that frataxin deficiency increases DNA damage and DNA repair genes specifically in microglia, activating them. siRNA-mediated frataxin knockdown in microglial BV2 cells clearly elevated DNA damage and the expression of DNA repair genes MUTYH and PARP-1. Frataxin knockdown also induced a higher level of PARP-1 in MEF cells, and this was suppressed in MUTYH-/- knockout cells. Administration of the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ34 attenuated the microglial activation induced by intracerebroventricular injection of LPS. The combined administration of LPS and angiotensin II provoke an even stronger activation of microglia and neurobehavioral impairment. PJ34 treatment attenuated the neurobehavioral impairments in FA mice. These results suggest that the DNA repair proteins MUTYH and PARP-1 may form a pathway regulating microglial activation initiated by DNA damage, and inhibition of microglial PARP-1 induction could be an important therapeutic target in Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:26954031

  2. DNA methylation signatures of the AIRE promoter in thymic epithelial cells, thymomas and normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kont, Vivian; Murumägi, Astrid; Tykocinski, Lars-Oliver; Kinkel, Sarah A; Webster, Kylie E; Kisand, Kai; Tserel, Liina; Pihlap, Maire; Ströbel, Philipp; Scott, Hamish S; Marx, Alexander; Kyewski, Bruno; Peterson, Pärt

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in the AIRE gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), which is associated with autoimmunity towards several peripheral organs. The AIRE protein is almost exclusively expressed in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) and CpG methylation in the promoter of the AIRE gene has been suggested to control its tissue-specific expression pattern. We found that in human AIRE-positive medullary and AIRE-negative cortical epithelium, the AIRE promoter is hypomethylated, whereas in thymocytes, the promoter had high level of CpG methylation. Likewise, in mouse mTECs the AIRE promoter was uniformly hypomethylated. In the same vein, the AIRE promoter was hypomethylated in AIRE-negative thymic epithelial tumors (thymomas) and in several peripheral tissues. Our data are compatible with the notion that promoter hypomethylation is necessary but not sufficient for tissue-specific regulation of the AIRE gene. In contrast, a positive correlation between AIRE expression and histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, an active chromatin mark, was found in the AIRE promoter in human and mouse TECs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sex-dichotomous effects of NOS1AP promoter DNA methylation on intracranial aneurysm and brain arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhepei; Zhao, Jikuang; Sun, Jie; Nie, Sheng; Li, Keqing; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Tiefeng; Duan, Shiwei; Di, Yazhen; Huang, Yi; Gao, Xiang

    2016-05-16

    The goal of this study was to investigate the contribution of NOS1AP-promoter DNA methylation to the risk of intracranial aneurysm (IA) and brain arteriovenous malformation (BAVM) in a Han Chinese population. A total of 48 patients with IAs, 22 patients with BAVMs, and 26 control individuals were enrolled in the study. DNA methylation was tested using bisulfite pyrosequencing technology. We detected significantly higher DNA methylation levels in BAVM patients than in IA patients based on the multiple testing correction (CpG4-5 methylation: 5.86±1.04% vs. 4.37±2.64%, P=0.006). In women, CpG4-5 methylation levels were much lower in IA patients (3.64±1.97%) than in BAVM patients (6.11±1.20%, P<0.0001). However, in men, CpG1-3 methylation levels were much higher in the controls (6.92±0.78%) than in BAVM patients (5.99±0.70%, P=0.008). Additionally, there was a gender-based difference in CpG1 methylation within the controls (men vs. women: 5.75±0.50% vs. 4.99±0.53%, P=0.003) and BAVM patients (men vs. women: 4.70±0.74% vs. 5.50±0.87%, P=0.026). A subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher CpG3 methylation in patients who smoked than in those who did not (P=0.041). Our results suggested that gender modulated the interaction between NOS1AP promoter DNA methylation in IA and BAVM patients. Our results also confirmed that regular tobacco smoking was associated with increased NOS1AP methylation in humans. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to replicate and extend these findings.

  4. Identification of animals produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer using DNA methylation in the retrotransposon-like 1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Couldrey, Christine; Maclean, Paul; Wells, David N

    2014-12-01

    Public perception of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in the production of agricultural animals is surrounded by fear, which is exacerbated by the inability to differentiate animals generated by SCNT from those generated by natural mating or artificial insemination (AI). Unfortunately, the DNA sequence of animals produced by SCNT is indistinguishable from those generated by fertilization. With the current banning of all SCNT animal products from entering the food supply in some countries, the lack of a diagnostic test to identify SCNT animals may jeopardize market access for producers. The aim of this research was to exploit differences in epigenetic reprogramming that occur during SCNT and fertilization in the early embryo. The resulting differences in epigenetic signatures that persist to adulthood are proposed as the basis for a diagnostic test to identify animals generated by SCNT. Here we describe differences in DNA methylation at eight CpG sites in the retrotransposon-like 1 (Rtl1) promoter region in cattle blood and test whether these differences could be used as a diagnostic tool. For a definitive diagnosis, it is critical that no overlap in DNA methylation levels is observed between individuals produced by SCNT and fertilization. This was the case for the cohort of SCNT animals studied, their female half-siblings generated by AI, and a collection of unrelated cows also generated by AI. Further rigorous testing is required to determine what effects donor cell type, age, sex, genetic background, SCNT methods, and the environment have on the DNA methylation across this region, but the Rtl1 promoter is currently a promising candidate for the identification of SCNT generated cattle.

  5. Stably integrated mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat DNA requires the octamer motifs for basal promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Buetti, E

    1994-01-01

    In the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter, a tandem of octamer motifs, recognized by ubiquitous and tissue-restricted Oct transcription factors, is located upstream of the TATA box and next to a binding site for the transcription factor nuclear factor I (NF-I). Their function was investigated with mutant long terminal repeats under different transfection conditions in mouse Ltk- cells and quantitative S1 nuclease mapping of the transcripts. In stable transfectants, which are most representative of the state of proviral DNA with respect to both number of integrated DNA templates and chromatin organization, a long terminal repeat mutant of both octamer sites showed an average 50-fold reduction of the basal transcription level, while the dexamethasone-stimulated level was unaffected. DNase I in vitro footprinting assays with L-cell nuclear protein extracts showed that the mutant DNA was unable to bind octamer factors but had a normal footprint in the NF-I site. I conclude that mouse mammary tumor virus employs the tandem octamer motifs of the viral promoter, recognized by the ubiquitous transcription factor Oct-1, for its basal transcriptional activity and the NF-I binding site, as previously shown, for glucocorticoid-stimulated transcription. A deletion mutant with only one octamer site showed a marked base-level reduction at high copy number but little reduction at low copies of integrated plasmids. The observed transcription levels may depend both on the relative ratio of transcription factors to DNA templates and on the relative affinity of binding sites, as determined by oligonucleotide competition footprinting. Images PMID:8289800

  6. Smoking-promoted oxidative DNA damage response is highly correlated to lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chao; Lai, Tianwen; Li, Miao; Zhou, Hongbin; Lv, Dan; Deng, Zaichun; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao

    2016-04-05

    Oxidative stress induced by tobacco smoking is one of the main causes of DNA damage and is known to be involved in various cancers. Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, while the role of cigarette smoke-induced oxidative DNA damage response during lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated oxidative DNA damage response levels in smoking and nonsmoking patients with lung cancer, and evaluated the potential diagnostic value of 8-OHdG for lung cancer. We observed a higher level of 8-OHdG expression and secretion in airways of lung cancer patients than that of noncancer controls. 8-OHdG expression was associated with the TNM stages. Additionally, cigarette smoke-induced oxidative DNA damage response was observed in bronchial epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. A statistical significance correlation was found between the levels of 8-OHdG and smoking index. With a cut-off value of 2.86 ng/ml, 8-OHdG showed a sensitivity and specificity of 70.0% and 73.7%, respectively, to identify a patient with lung cancer. These findings not only underscore the importance of smoking in oxidative DNA damage response of lung cancer patients, but also suggest 8-OHdG as a potential diagnostic biomarker for lung cancer.

  7. Target DNA bending by the Mu transpososome promotes careful transposition and prevents its reversal

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, James R; Rice, Phoebe A

    2017-01-01

    The transposition of bacteriophage Mu serves as a model system for understanding DDE transposases and integrases. All available structures of these enzymes at the end of the transposition reaction, including Mu, exhibit significant bends in the transposition target site DNA. Here we use Mu to investigate the ramifications of target DNA bending on the transposition reaction. Enhancing the flexibility of the target DNA or prebending it increases its affinity for transpososomes by over an order of magnitude and increases the overall reaction rate. This and FRET confirm that flexibility is interrogated early during the interaction between the transposase and a potential target site, which may be how other DNA binding proteins can steer selection of advantageous target sites. We also find that the conformation of the target DNA after strand transfer is involved in preventing accidental catalysis of the reverse reaction, as conditions that destabilize this conformation also trigger reversal. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21777.001 PMID:28177285

  8. In vitro incubation of human spermatozoa promotes reactive oxygen species generation and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Cicaré, J; Caille, A; Zumoffen, C; Ghersevich, S; Bahamondes, L; Munuce, M J

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative process associated with sperm capacitation and its impact on DNA fragmentation and sperm function. Redox activity and lipid peroxidation were analysed in human spermatozoa after 3, 6 and 22 h of incubation in Ham's F10 medium plus bovine albumin at 37° and 5% CO2 for capacitation. DNA status, tyrosine phosphorylation pattern and induced acrosome reaction were evaluated after capacitating conditions. At 22 h of incubation, there was a significant (P < 0.05) increase in oxygen-free radicals and lipid peroxidation, with no effect on sperm viability. There also was a significant (P < 0.001) increase in fragmented DNA in capacitated spermatozoa compared to semen values with higher rates being found after the occurrence of the induced acrosome reaction. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation pattern confirms that capacitation took place in parallel with the occurrence of DNA fragmentation. These results indicate that when spermatozoa are incubated for several hours (22 h), a common practice in assisted reproductive techniques, an increase in oxidative sperm metabolism and in the proportion of fragmented DNA should be expected. However, there was no effect on any of the other functional parameters associated with sperm fertilising capacity. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. The Rad9 protein enhances survival and promotes DNA repair following exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Patrick D.; Helt, Christopher E.; Keng, Peter C.; Bambara, Robert A. . E-mail: robert_bambara@urmc.rochester.edu

    2006-08-18

    Following DNA damage cells initiate cell cycle checkpoints to allow time to repair sustained lesions. Rad9, Rad1, and Hus1 proteins form a toroidal complex, termed the 9-1-1 complex, that is involved in checkpoint signaling. 9-1-1 shares high structural similarity to the DNA replication protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and 9-1-1 has been shown in vitro to stimulate steps of the repair process known as long patch base excision repair. Using a system that allows conditional repression of the Rad9 protein in human cell culture, we show that Rad9, and by extension, the 9-1-1 complex, enhances cell survival, is required for efficient exit from G2-phase arrest, and stimulates the repair of damaged DNA following ionizing radiation. These data provide in vivo evidence that the human 9-1-1 complex participates in DNA repair in addition to its previously described role in DNA damage sensing.

  10. The Werner's Syndrome protein collaborates with REV1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lara G.; Sale, Julian E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance pathways facilitate the bypass of DNA lesions encountered during replication. These pathways can be mechanistically divided into recombinational damage avoidance and translesion synthesis, in which the lesion is directly bypassed by specialised DNA polymerases. We have recently shown distinct genetic dependencies for lesion bypass at and behind the replication fork in the avian cell line DT40, bypass at the fork requiring REV1 and bypass at post-replicative gaps requiring PCNA ubiquitination by RAD18. The WRN helicase/exonuclease, which is mutated in the progeroid and cancer predisposition disorder Werner's Syndrome, has previously been implicated in a RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathway. However, WRN has also been shown to be required to maintain normal replication fork progression on a damaged DNA template, a defect reminiscent of REV1-deficient cells. Here we use the avian cell line DT40 to demonstrate that WRN assists REV1-dependent translesion synthesis at the replication fork and that PCNA ubiquitination-dependent post-replicative lesion bypass provides an important backup mechanism for damage tolerance in the absence of WRN protein. PMID:20691646

  11. High Levels of Intracellular Cysteine Promote Oxidative DNA Damage by Driving the Fenton Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunny; Imlay, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Escherichia coli is generally resistant to H2O2, with >75% of cells surviving a 3-min challenge with 2.5 mM H2O2. However, when cells were cultured with poor sulfur sources and then exposed to cystine, they transiently exhibited a greatly increased susceptibility to H2O2, with <1% surviving the challenge. Cell death was due to an unusually rapid rate of DNA damage, as indicated by their filamentation, a high rate of mutation among the survivors, and DNA lesions by a direct assay. Cell-permeable iron chelators eliminated sensitivity, indicating that intracellular free iron mediated the conversion of H2O2 into a hydroxyl radical, the direct effector of DNA damage. The cystine treatment caused a temporary loss of cysteine homeostasis, with intracellular pools increasing about eightfold. In vitro analysis demonstrated that cysteine reduces ferric iron with exceptional speed. This action permits free iron to redox cycle rapidly in the presence of H2O2, thereby augmenting the rate at which hydroxyl radicals are formed. During routine growth, cells maintain small cysteine pools, and cysteine is not a major contributor to DNA damage. Thus, the homeostatic control of cysteine levels is important in conferring resistance to oxidants. More generally, this study provides a new example of a situation in which the vulnerability of cells to oxidative DNA damage is strongly affected by their physiological state. PMID:12618458

  12. The thyroid transcription factor 2 (TTF-2) is a promoter-specific DNA-binding independent transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Perrone, L; Pasca di Magliano, M; Zannini, M; Di Lauro, R

    2000-08-18

    The thyroid transcription factor TTF-2 is a forkhead-containing protein involved in thyroid-specific gene expression and necessary for thyroid morphogenesis. In this paper, we demonstrate that TTF-2 is able to inhibit the activity of the thyroid-specific transcription factors TTF-1 and Pax-8 only on certain promoters. We identified the minimal protein domain responsible for repressor activity, which behaves as an independent functional domain, and we show that repression by TTF-2 is DNA-binding independent. We suggest that TTF-2 is able to interfere with a specific cofactor required for TTF-1 and Pax-8 activity. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  13. Usefulness of DNA Methylation Levels in COASY and SPINT1 Gene Promoter Regions as Biomarkers in Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Nagata, Tomoyuki; Shimada, Kazuya; Shibata, Nobuto; Ohnuma, Tohru; Kasanuki, Koji; Arai, Heii; Yamada, Hisashi; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    In order to conduct early therapeutic interventions for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), convenient, early diagnosis markers are required. We previously reported that changes in DNA methylation levels were associated with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and AD. As the results suggested changes in DNA methylation levels in the COASY and SPINT1 gene promoter regions, in the present study we examined DNA methylation in these regions in normal controls (NCs, n = 30), aMCI subjects (n = 28) and AD subjects (n = 30) using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis. The results indicated that DNA methylation in the two regions was significantly increased in AD and aMCI as compared to NCs (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, ANOVA). Further analysis suggested that DNA methylation in the COASY gene promoter region in particular could be a high sensitivity, high specificity diagnosis biomarker (COASY: sensitivity 96.6%, specificity 96.7%; SPINT1: sensitivity 63.8%, specificity 83.3%). DNA methylation in the COASY promoter region was associated with CDR Scale Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB), an indicator of dementia severity. In the SPINT1 promoter region, DNA methylation was negatively associated with age in NCs and elevated in aMCI and AD subjects positive for antibodies to Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). These findings suggested that changes in DNA methylation in the COASY and SPINT1 promoter regions are influenced by various factors. In conclusion, DNA methylation levels in the COASY and SPINT1 promoter regions were considered to potentially be a convenient and useful biomarker for diagnosis of AD and aMCI. PMID:27992572

  14. p53 isoform Δ113p53/Δ133p53 promotes DNA double-strand break repair to protect cell from death and senescence in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lu; Gong, Hongjian; Pan, Xiao; Chang, Changqing; Ou, Zhao; Ye, Shengfan; Yin, Le; Yang, Lina; Tao, Ting; Zhang, Zhenhai; Liu, Cong; Lane, David P; Peng, Jinrong; Chen, Jun

    2015-03-01

    The inhibitory role of p53 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair seems contradictory to its tumor-suppressing property. The p53 isoform Δ113p53/Δ133p53 is a p53 target gene that antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity. However, information on its functions in DNA damage repair is lacking. Here we report that Δ113p53 expression is strongly induced by γ-irradiation, but not by UV-irradiation or heat shock treatment. Strikingly, Δ113p53 promotes DNA DSB repair pathways, including homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining and single-strand annealing. To study the biological significance of Δ113p53 in promoting DNA DSB repair, we generated a zebrafish Δ113p53(M/M) mutant via the transcription activator-like effector nuclease technique and found that the mutant is more sensitive to γ-irradiation. The human ortholog, Δ133p53, is also only induced by γ-irradiation and functions to promote DNA DSB repair. Δ133p53-knockdown cells were arrested at the G2 phase at the later stage in response to γ-irradiation due to a high level of unrepaired DNA DSBs, which finally led to cell senescence. Furthermore, Δ113p53/Δ133p53 promotes DNA DSB repair via upregulating the transcription of repair genes rad51, lig4 and rad52 by binding to a novel type of p53-responsive element in their promoters. Our results demonstrate that Δ113p53/Δ133p53 is an evolutionally conserved pro-survival factor for DNA damage stress by preventing apoptosis and promoting DNA DSB repair to inhibit cell senescence. Our data also suggest that the induction of Δ133p53 expression in normal cells or tissues provides an important tolerance marker for cancer patients to radiotherapy.

  15. Multiple DNA sequence elements are necessary for the function of an immunoglobulin heavy chain promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, S; Calame, K

    1987-01-01

    Sequences required for the function of the mouse V1 immunoglobulin heavy chain variable-region (VH) promoter were identified by transient transfection of the normal and mutated promoters into plasmacytoma cells. Our results identify four regions required for normal promoter function: (i) the octamer ATGCAAAT, previously identified by others; (ii) a heptamer, CTAATGA; (iii) a pyrimidine-rich region; and (iv) a region between positions -125 and -251 relative to the transcription start site. Sequence analysis of 19 mouse and human VH 5' flanking regions shows that the heptamer and pyrimidine stretch are strongly conserved. We have also demonstrated that the octamer functions in an orientation independent manner in the VH promoter. Images PMID:3118372

  16. Multiple DNA sequence elements are necessary for the function of an immunoglobulin heavy chain promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, S.; Calame, K.

    1987-11-01

    Sequences required for the function of the mouse V1 immunoglobulin heavy chain variable-region (V/sub H/) promoter were identified by transient transfection of the normal and mutated promoters into plasmacytoma cells. The results identify four regions required for normal promoter function: (i) the octamer ATGCAAAT, previously identified by others; (ii) a heptamer, CTAATGA; (iii) a pyrimidine-rich region; and (iv) a region between positions -125 and -251 relative to the transcription start site. Sequence analysis of 19 mouse and human V/sub H/ 5' flanking regions shows that the heptamer and pyrimidine stretch are strongly conserved. The authors have also demonstrated that the octamer functions in an orientation independent manner in the V/sub H/ promoter.

  17. ATRX loss promotes tumor growth and impairs nonhomologous end joining DNA repair in glioma.

    PubMed

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Nunez, Felipe J; Mackay, Alan; Fazal-Salom, Janet; Thomas, Daniel; Mendez, Flor; Kamran, Neha; Dzaman, Marta; Mulpuri, Lakshman; Krasinkiewicz, Johnathon; Doherty, Robert; Lemons, Rosemary; Brosnan-Cashman, Jacqueline A; Li, Youping; Roh, Soyeon; Zhao, Lili; Appelman, Henry; Ferguson, David; Gorbunova, Vera; Meeker, Alan; Jones, Chris; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2016-03-02

    Recent work in human glioblastoma (GBM) has documented recurrent mutations in the histone chaperone protein ATRX. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM and showed that loss of ATRX reduces median survival and increases genetic instability. Further, analysis of genome-wide data for human gliomas showed that ATRX mutation is associated with increased mutation rate at the single-nucleotide variant (SNV) level. In mouse tumors, ATRX deficiency impairs nonhomologous end joining and increases sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks. We propose that ATRX loss results in a genetically unstable tumor, which is more aggressive when left untreated but is more responsive to double-stranded DNA-damaging agents, resulting in improved overall survival. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. ATRX Loss Promotes Tumor Growth and Impairs Non-Homologous End Joining DNA Repair in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Nunez, Felipe J.; Mackay, Alan; Fazal-Salom, Janet; Thomas, Daniel; Mendez, Flor; Kamran, Neha; Dzaman, Marta; Mulpuri, Lakshman; Krasinkiewicz, Johnathon; Doherty, Robert; Lemons, Rosemary; Brosnan-Cashman, Jackie A.; Li, Youping; Roh, Soyeon; Zhao, Lili; Appelman, Henry; Ferguson, David; Gorbunova, Vera; Meeker, Alan; Jones, Chris; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work in human glioblastoma (GBM) has documented recurrent mutations in the histone chaperone protein ATRX. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM and show that loss of ATRX reduces median survival and increases genetic instability. Further, analysis of genome-wide data for human gliomas showed that ATRX mutation is associated with increased mutation rate at the single nucleotide variant (SNV) level. In mouse tumors, ATRX deficiency impairs non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and increases sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks. We propose that ATRX loss results in a genetically unstable tumor, which is more aggressive when left untreated, but is more responsive to double-stranded DNA-damaging agents, resulting in improved overall survival. PMID:26936505

  19. Involvement of DNA methylation in memory processing in the honey bee.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Gabrielle A; Helliwell, Paul; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2010-08-23

    DNA methylation, an important and evolutionarily conserved epigenetic mechanism, is implicated in learning and memory processes in vertebrates, but its role in behaviour in invertebrates is unknown. We examined the role of DNA methylation in memory in the honey bee using an appetitive Pavlovian olfactory discrimination task, and by assessing the expression of DNA methyltransferase3, a key driver of epigenetic reprogramming. Here we report that DNA methyltransferase inhibition reduces acquisition retention and alters the extinction depending on treatment time, and DNA methyltransferase3 is upregulated after training. Our findings add to the understanding of epigenetic mechanisms in learning and memory, extending known roles of DNA methylation to appetitive and extinction memory, and for the first time implicate DNA methylation in memory in invertebrates.

  20. DNA ligase III promotes alternative nonhomologous end-joining during chromosomal translocation formation.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Deniz; Brunet, Erika; Wong, Sunnie Yan-Wai; Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Yankun; McKinnon, Peter J; Lou, Jacqueline; Zhang, Lei; Li, James; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Jasin, Maria

    2011-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4), suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1.

  1. DNA Ligase III Promotes Alternative Nonhomologous End-Joining during Chromosomal Translocation Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sunnie Yan-Wai; Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Yankun; McKinnon, Peter J.; Lou, Jacqueline; Zhang, Lei; Li, James; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Jasin, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4), suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1. PMID:21655080

  2. Modulation of Promoter Occupancy by Cooperative DNA Binding and Activation-Domain Function is a Major Determinant of Transcriptional Regulation by Activators in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masafumi

    1996-04-01

    Binding of transcriptional activators to a promoter is a prerequisite process in transcriptional activation. It is well established that the efficiency of activator binding to a promoter is determined by the affinity of direct interactions between the DNA-binding domain of an activator and its specific target sequences. However, I describe here that activator binding to a promoter is augmented in vivo by the effects of two other determinants that have not been generally appreciated: (i) the number of activator binding sites present in a promoter and (ii) the potency of activation domains of activators. Multiple sites within a promoter can cooperatively recruit cognate factors regardless of whether they contain an effective activation domain. This cooperativity can result in the synergistic activation of transcription. The second effect is the enhancement of activator binding to a promoter by the presence of activation domains. In this case, activation domains are not simply tethered to the promoter by the DNA-binding domain but instead assist the DNA-binding domain being tethered onto the promoter. This effect of activation domains on DNA binding is instrumental in determining how potent activators can induce steep transcriptional increases at low concentrations.

  3. Repetitive elements and enforced transcriptional repression co-operate to enhance DNA methylation spreading into a promoter CpG-island

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Repression of many tumor suppressor genes in cancer is concurrent with aberrantly increased DNA methylation levels at promoter CpG islands (CGIs). About one-fourth of empirically defined human promoters are surrounded by or contain clustered repetitive elements. It was previously observed that a sha...

  4. Characterization of sequence elements from Malvastrum yellow vein betasatellite regulating promoter activity and DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many monopartite begomoviruses are associated with betasatellites, but only several promoters from which were isolated and studied. In this study, the βC1 promoter from Malvastrum yellow vein betasatellite (MYVB) was characterized and important sequence elements were identified to modulate promoter activity and replication of MYVB. Results A 991 nucleotide (nt) fragment upstream of the translation start site of the βC1 open reading frame of MYVB and a series of deletions within this fragment were constructed and fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter genes, respectively. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression assays showed that the 991 nt fragment was functional and that a 28 nt region (between −390 nt and −418 nt), which includes a 5′UTR Py-rich stretch motif, was important for promoter activity. Replication assays using Nicotiana benthamiana leaf discs and whole plants showed that deletion of the 5′UTR Py-rich stretch impaired viral satellite replication in the presence of the helper virus. Transgenic assays demonstrated that the 991 nt fragment conferred a constitutive expression pattern in transgenic tobacco plants and that a 214 nt fragment at the 3'-end of this sequence was sufficient to drive this expression pattern. Conclusion Our results showed that the βC1 promoter of MYVB displayed a constitutive expression pattern and a 5′UTR Py-rich stretch motif regulated both βC1 promoter activity and MYVB replication. PMID:23057573

  5. Crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus σ(N) bound to promoter DNA and the structure of σ(N)-holoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elizabeth A; Kamath, Shreya; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Wu, Mengyu; Darst, Seth A

    2017-03-07

    The bacterial σ factors confer promoter specificity to the RNA polymerase (RNAP). One alternative σ factor, σ(N), is unique in its structure and functional mechanism, forming transcriptionally inactive promoter complexes that require activation by specialized AAA(+) ATPases. We report a 3.4-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a σ(N) fragment in complex with its cognate promoter DNA, revealing the molecular details of promoter recognition by σ(N) The structure allowed us to build and refine an improved σ(N)-holoenzyme model based on previously published 3.8-Å resolution X-ray data. The improved σ(N)-holoenzyme model reveals a conserved interdomain interface within σ(N) that, when disrupted by mutations, leads to transcription activity without activator intervention (so-called bypass mutants). Thus, the structure and stability of this interdomain interface are crucial for the role of σ(N) in blocking transcription activity and in maintaining the activator sensitivity of σ(N).

  6. Rescue from oculocutaneous albinism type 4 using medaka slc45a2 cDNA driven by its own promoter.

    PubMed

    Fukamachi, Shoji; Kinoshita, Masato; Tsujimura, Taro; Shimada, Atsuko; Oda, Shoji; Shima, Akihiro; Meyer, Axel; Kawamura, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    Patients and vertebrate mutants with oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4) have mutations in the solute carrier family 45 member 2 (slc45a2) gene. However, there is no empirical evidence for this gene-phenotype relationship. There is a unique OCA4 mutant in medaka (b) that exhibits albinism only in the skin, but the mechanism underlying this phenotype is also unknown. In this study, we rescued medaka OCA4 phenotypes, in both the eyes and the skin, by micro-injection of an slc45a2-containing genomic fragment or slc45a2 cDNA driven by its own 0.9-kb promoter. We also identified a spontaneous nucleotide change of 339 bp in the promoter as the b mutation. There are multiple transcription start sites in medaka slc45a2, as in its human ortholog, and only the shortest and eye-specific mRNA is transcribed with the b mutation. Interestingly, we further revealed a conserved pyrimidine (Py)-rich sequence of approximately 10 bp in the promoter by medaka-pufferfish comparative genomics and verified that it plays an indispensable role for expression of slc45a2 in the skin. Further studies of the 0.9-kb promoter identified in this study should provide insights into the cis/trans-regulatory mechanisms underlying the ocular and cutaneous expression of slc45a2.

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 ICP4 Promotes Transcription Preinitiation Complex Formation by Enhancing the Binding of TFIID to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Grondin, Benoit; DeLuca, Neal

    2000-01-01

    Infected-cell polypeptide 4 (ICP4) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) activates the expression of many HSV genes during infection. It functions along with the cellular general transcription factors to increase the transcription rates of genes. In this study, an HSV late promoter consisting of only a TATA box and an INR element was immobilized on a magnetic resin and incubated with nuclear extracts or purified TFIID in the presence and absence of ICP4. Analysis of the complexes formed on these promoters revealed that ICP4 increased the formation of transcription preinitiation complexes (PICs) in a TATA box-dependent manner, as determined by the presence of ICP4, TFIID, TFIIB, and polymerase II on the promoter. With both nuclear extract and purified TFIID, it was determined that ICP4 helped TFIID bind to the promoter and the TATA box. These observations differed from those for the activator Gal4-VP16. As previously observed by others, Gal4-VP16 also increased the formation of PICs without helping TFIID bind to the promoter, suggesting that ICP4 and VP16 differ in their mechanism of activation and that ICP4 functions to facilitate PIC formation at an earlier step in the formation of PICs. We also observed that the DNA binding activity of ICP4 was not sufficient to help TFIID bind to the promoter and that the region of ICP4 that was responsible for this activity is located between residues 30 and 274. Taken together these results demonstrate that a specific region of ICP4 helps TFIID bind to the TATA box and that this in turn facilitates the formation of transcription PICs. PMID:11090147

  8. Rescue of the 1947 Zika Virus Prototype Strain with a Cytomegalovirus Promoter-Driven cDNA Clone

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Megan C.; Sourisseau, Marion; Espino, Michael M.; Gray, Essanna S.; Chambers, Matthew T.; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has been linked to severe pathogenesis. Here, we report the construction of a plasmid carrying a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-expressed prototype 1947 Uganda MR766 ZIKV cDNA that can initiate infection following direct plasmid DNA transfection of mammalian cells. Incorporation of a synthetic intron in the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) region of the ZIKV polyprotein reduced viral cDNA-associated toxicity in bacteria. High levels of infectious virus were produced following transfection of the plasmid bearing the wild-type MR766 ZIKV genome, but not one with a disruption to the viral nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) polymerase active site. Multicycle growth curve and plaque assay experiments indicated that the MR766 virus resulting from plasmid transfection exhibited growth characteristics that were more similar to its parental isolate than previously published 2010 Cambodia and 2015 Brazil cDNA-rescued ZIKV. This ZIKV infectious clone will be useful for investigating the genetic determinants of ZIKV infection and pathogenesis and should be amenable to construction of diverse infectious clones expressing reporter proteins and representing a range of ZIKV isolates. IMPORTANCE The study of ZIKV, which has become increasingly important with the recent association of this virus with microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, would benefit from an efficient strategy to genetically manipulate the virus. This work describes a model system to produce infectious virus in cell culture. We created a plasmid carrying the prototype 1947 Uganda MR766 ZIKV genome that both was stable in bacteria and could produce high levels of infectious virus in mammalian cells through direct delivery of this DNA. Furthermore, growth properties of this rescued virus closely resembled those of the viral isolate from which it was derived. This model system will provide a simple and effective means to study how ZIKV genetics impact viral replication and

  9. Structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (SMCHD1) promotes non-homologous end joining and inhibits homologous recombination repair upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mengfan; Li, Yujing; Zhang, Xiya; Deng, Tingting; Zhou, Zhifen; Ma, Wenbin; Songyang, Zhou

    2014-12-05

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (SMCHD1) has been shown to be involved in gene silencing and DNA damage. However, the exact mechanisms of how SMCHD1 participates in DNA damage remains largely unknown. Here we present evidence that SMCHD1 recruitment to DNA damage foci is regulated by 53BP1. Knocking out SMCHD1 led to aberrant γH2AX foci accumulation and compromised cell survival upon DNA damage, demonstrating the critical role of SMCHD1 in DNA damage repair. Following DNA damage induction, SMCHD1 depletion resulted in reduced 53BP1 foci and increased BRCA1 foci, as well as less efficient non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and elevated levels of homologous recombination (HR). Taken together, these results suggest an important function of SMCHD1 in promoting NHEJ and repressing HR repair in response to DNA damage. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Debra L.; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4Cdt2) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression. PMID:26771714

  11. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  12. Nuclear localization of Beclin 1 promotes radiation-induced DNA damage repair independent of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Fang, Yixuan; Yan, Lili; Xu, Lan; Zhang, Suping; Cao, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xie, Jialing; Jiang, Gaoyue; Ge, Chaorong; An, Ni; Zhou, Daohong; Yuan, Na; Wang, Jianrong

    2017-03-27

    Beclin 1 is a well-established core mammalian autophagy protein that is embryonically indispensable and has been presumed to suppress oncogenesis via an autophagy-mediated mechanism. Here, we show that Beclin 1 is a prenatal primary cytoplasmic protein but rapidly relocated into the nucleus during postnatal development in mice. Surprisingly, deletion of beclin1 in in vitro human cells did not block an autophagy response, but attenuated the expression of several DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair proteins and formation of repair complexes, and reduced an ability to repair DNA in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Overexpressing Beclin 1 improved the repair of IR-induced DSB, but did not restore an autophagy response in cells lacking autophagy gene Atg7, suggesting that Beclin 1 may regulate DSB repair independent of autophagy in the cells exposed to IR. Indeed, we found that Beclin 1 could directly interact with DNA topoisomerase IIβ and was recruited to the DSB sites by the interaction. These findings reveal a novel function of Beclin 1 in regulation of DNA damage repair independent of its role in autophagy particularly when the cells are under radiation insult.

  13. ATM-dependent Phosphorylation of the Fanconi Anemia Protein PALB2 Promotes the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yingying; Feng, Wanjuan; Sy, Shirley M H; Huen, Michael S Y

    2015-11-13

    The Fanconi anemia protein PALB2, also known as FANCN, protects genome integrity by regulating DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints. Exactly how PALB2 functions may be temporally coupled with detection and signaling of DNA damage is not known. Intriguingly, we found that PALB2 is transformed into a hyperphosphorylated state in response to ionizing radiation (IR). IR treatment specifically triggered PALB2 phosphorylation at Ser-157 and Ser-376 in manners that required the master DNA damage response kinase Ataxia telangiectasia mutated, revealing potential mechanistic links between PALB2 and the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated-dependent DNA damage responses. Consistently, dysregulated PALB2 phosphorylation resulted in sustained activation of DDRs. Full-blown PALB2 phosphorylation also required the breast and ovarian susceptible gene product BRCA1, highlighting important roles of the BRCA1-PALB2 interaction in orchestrating cellular responses to genotoxic stress. In summary, our phosphorylation analysis of tumor suppressor protein PALB2 uncovers new layers of regulatory mechanisms in the maintenance of genome stability and tumor suppression. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Nuclear localization of Beclin 1 promotes radiation-induced DNA damage repair independent of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Fang, Yixuan; Yan, Lili; Xu, Lan; Zhang, Suping; Cao, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xie, Jialing; Jiang, Gaoyue; Ge, Chaorong; An, Ni; Zhou, Daohong; Yuan, Na; Wang, Jianrong

    2017-01-01

    Beclin 1 is a well-established core mammalian autophagy protein that is embryonically indispensable and has been presumed to suppress oncogenesis via an autophagy-mediated mechanism. Here, we show that Beclin 1 is a prenatal primary cytoplasmic protein but rapidly relocated into the nucleus during postnatal development in mice. Surprisingly, deletion of beclin1 in in vitro human cells did not block an autophagy response, but attenuated the expression of several DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair proteins and formation of repair complexes, and reduced an ability to repair DNA in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Overexpressing Beclin 1 improved the repair of IR-induced DSB, but did not restore an autophagy response in cells lacking autophagy gene Atg7, suggesting that Beclin 1 may regulate DSB repair independent of autophagy in the cells exposed to IR. Indeed, we found that Beclin 1 could directly interact with DNA topoisomerase IIβ and was recruited to the DSB sites by the interaction. These findings reveal a novel function of Beclin 1 in regulation of DNA damage repair independent of its role in autophagy particularly when the cells are under radiation insult. PMID:28345663

  15. Heterogeneous DNA Methylation Patterns in the GSTP1 Promoter Lead to Discordant Results between Assay Technologies and Impede Its Implementation as Epigenetic Biomarkers in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Ronneberg, Jo Anders; Kristensen, Vessela N; Tost, Jörg

    2015-09-17

    Altered DNA methylation patterns are found in many diseases, particularly in cancer, where the analysis of DNA methylation holds the promise to provide diagnostic, prognostic and predictive information of great clinical value. Methylation of the promoter-associated CpG island of GSTP1 occurs in many hormone-sensitive cancers, has been shown to be a biomarker for the early detection of cancerous lesions and has been associated with important clinical parameters, such as survival and response to treatment. In the current manuscript, we assessed the performance of several widely-used sodium bisulfite conversion-dependent methods (methylation-specific PCR, MethyLight, pyrosequencing and MALDI mass-spectrometry) for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns in the GSTP1 promoter. We observed large discordances between the results obtained by the different technologies. Cloning and sequencing of the investigated region resolved single-molecule DNA methylation patterns and identified heterogeneous DNA methylation patterns as the underlying cause of the differences. Heterogeneous DNA methylation patterns in the GSTP1 promoter constitute a major obstacle to the implementation of DNA methylation-based analysis of GSTP1 and might explain some of the contradictory findings in the analysis of the significance of GSTP1 promoter methylation in breast cancer.

  16. The 53BP1 Homolog in C. elegans Influences DNA Repair and Promotes Apoptosis in Response to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyeon-Sook

    2013-01-01

    53BP1 contributes to activation of the G2/M checkpoint downstream of ATM and MDC1 in response to ionizing radiation and promotes nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) in mammalian cells. In order to determine whether the cellular activities of 53BP1 are conserved in the model organism C. elegans, we analyzed the function of its homolog, HSR-9 in response to DNA damage. Deletion or Mos1-insertion in hsr-9 did not affect the sensitivity of worms to double strand DNA breaks (DSBs), as reflected in embryonic survival and larval development. Nevertheless, the hsr-9 mutations, as well as a lig-4 deletion, reversed the hypersensitivity of rad-54-deficient worms to DSBs. In addition, oocyte chromosomal aberrations, which were increased by rad-54 knockdown in response to DSBs, were also reduced by the hsr-9 mutations. The hsr-9 mutations did not prevent the cell cycle arrest induced by DSBs in mitotically proliferating germ cells. However, they attenuated apoptosis induced by DSBs, but not when CEP-1 (a p53 ortholog) was absent, suggesting that HSR-9 functions in the same pathway as CEP-1. We concluded that the 53BP1 homolog in C. elegans is not directly involved in cell cycle arrest in response to DSBs, but that it promotes apoptosis and also a form of NHEJ that occurs only when rad-54 is deficient. PMID:23667696

  17. Polymorphic tandem repeats within gene promoters act as modifiers of gene expression and DNA methylation in humans.

    PubMed

    Quilez, Javier; Guilmatre, Audrey; Garg, Paras; Highnam, Gareth; Gymrek, Melissa; Erlich, Yaniv; Joshi, Ricky S; Mittelman, David; Sharp, Andrew J

    2016-05-05

    Despite representing an important source of genetic variation, tandem repeats (TRs) remain poorly studied due to technical difficulties. We hypothesized that TRs can operate as expression (eQTLs) and methylation (mQTLs) quantitative trait loci. To test this we analyzed the effect of variation at 4849 promoter-associated TRs, genotyped in 120 individuals, on neighboring gene expression and DNA methylation. Polymorphic promoter TRs were associated with increased variance in local gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting functional consequences related to TR variation. We identified >100 TRs associated with expression/methylation levels of adjacent genes. These potential eQTL/mQTL TRs were enriched for overlaps with transcription factor binding and DNaseI hypersensitivity sites, providing a rationale for their effects. Moreover, we showed that most TR variants are poorly tagged by nearby single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) markers, indicating that many functional TR variants are not effectively assayed by SNP-based approaches. Our study assigns biological significance to TR variations in the human genome, and suggests that a significant fraction of TR variations exert functional effects via alterations of local gene expression or epigenetics. We conclude that targeted studies that focus on genotyping TR variants are required to fully ascertain functional variation in the genome. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Mechanism of promoter melting by the xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B helicase of transcription factor IIH revealed by protein-DNA photo-cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Douziech, M; Coin, F; Chipoulet, J M; Arai, Y; Ohkuma, Y; Egly, J M; Coulombe, B

    2000-11-01

    The p89/xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B (XPB) ATPase-helicase of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is essential for promoter melting prior to transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). By studying the topological organization of the initiation complex using site-specific protein-DNA photo-cross-linking, we have shown that p89/XPB makes promoter contacts both upstream and downstream of the initiation site. The upstream contact, which is in the region where promoter melting occurs (positions -9 to +2), requires tight DNA wrapping around RNAPII. The addition of hydrolyzable ATP tethers the template strand at positions -5 and +1 to RNAPII subunits. A mutation in p89/XPB found in a xeroderma pigmentosum patient impairs the ability of TFIIH to associate correctly with the complex and thereby melt promoter DNA. A model for open complex formation is proposed.

  19. Mechanism of Promoter Melting by the Xeroderma Pigmentosum Complementation Group B Helicase of Transcription Factor IIH Revealed by Protein-DNA Photo-Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Douziech, Maxime; Coin, Frédéric; Chipoulet, Jean-Marc; Arai, Yoko; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki; Egly, Jean-Marc; Coulombe, Benoit

    2000-01-01

    The p89/xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B (XPB) ATPase-helicase of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is essential for promoter melting prior to transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). By studying the topological organization of the initiation complex using site-specific protein-DNA photo-cross-linking, we have shown that p89/XPB makes promoter contacts both upstream and downstream of the initiation site. The upstream contact, which is in the region where promoter melting occurs (positions −9 to +2), requires tight DNA wrapping around RNAPII. The addition of hydrolyzable ATP tethers the template strand at positions −5 and +1 to RNAPII subunits. A mutation in p89/XPB found in a xeroderma pigmentosum patient impairs the ability of TFIIH to associate correctly with the complex and thereby melt promoter DNA. A model for open complex formation is proposed. PMID:11027286

  20. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  1. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  2. E2F mediates induction of the Sp1-controlled promoter of the human DNA polymerase ɛ B-subunit gene POLE2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Deqi; Jokela, Maarit; Tuusa, Jussi; Skog, Sven; Poikonen, Kari; Syväoja, Juhani E.

    2001-01-01

    The B-subunits of replicative DNA polymerases from Archaea to humans belong to the same protein family, suggesting that they share a common fundamental function. We report here the gene structure for the B-subunit of human DNA polymerase ɛ (POLE2), whose expression and transcriptional regulation is typical for replication proteins with some unique features. The 75 bp core promoter region, located within exon 1, contains an Sp1 element that is a critical determinant of promoter activity as shown by the luciferase reporter, electrophoretic mobility shift and DNase I footprinting assays. Two overlapping E2F elements adjacent to the Sp1 element are essential for full promoter activity and serum response. Binding sites for E2F1 and NF-1 reside immediately downstream from the core promoter region. Our results suggest that human POLE2 is regulated by two E2F–pocket protein complexes, one associated with Sp1 and the other with NF-1. So far, only one replicative DNA polymerase B-subunit gene promoter, POLA2 encoding the B-subunit of DNA polymerase α, has been characterized. Mitogenic activation of the POLE2 promoter by an E2F-mediated mechanism resembles that of POLA2, but the regulation of basal promoter activity is different between these two genes. PMID:11433027

  3. A human TATA binding protein-related protein with altered DNA binding specificity inhibits transcription from multiple promoters and activators.

    PubMed

    Moore, P A; Ozer, J; Salunek, M; Jan, G; Zerby, D; Campbell, S; Lieberman, P M

    1999-11-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) plays a central role in eukaryotic and archael transcription initiation. We describe the isolation of a novel 23-kDa human protein that displays 41% identity to TBP and is expressed in most human tissue. Recombinant TBP-related protein (TRP) displayed barely detectable binding to consensus TATA box sequences but bound with slightly higher affinities to nonconsensus TATA sequences. TRP did not substitute for TBP in transcription reactions in vitro. However, addition of TRP potently inhibited basal and activated transcription from multiple promoters in vitro and in vivo. General transcription factors TFIIA and TFIIB bound glutathione S-transferase-TRP in solution but failed to stimulate TRP binding to DNA. Preincubation of TRP with TFIIA inhibited TBP-TFIIA-DNA complex formation and addition of TFIIA overcame TRP-mediated transcription repression. TRP transcriptional repression activity was specifically reduced by mutations in TRP that disrupt the TFIIA binding surface but not by mutations that disrupt the TFIIB or DNA binding surface of TRP. These results suggest that TFIIA is a primary target of TRP transcription inhibition and that TRP may modulate transcription by a novel mechanism involving the partial mimicry of TBP functions.

  4. DNA hairpins promote temperature controlled cargo encapsulation in a truncated octahedral nanocage structure family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franch, Oskar; Iacovelli, Federico; Falconi, Mattia; Juul, Sissel; Ottaviani, Alessio; Benvenuti, Claudia; Biocca, Silvia; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Desideri, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we investigate the mechanism behind temperature controlled cargo uptake using a truncated octahedral DNA cage scaffold functionalized with one, two, three or four hairpin forming DNA strands inserted in one corner of the structure. This investigation was inspired by our previous demonstration of temperature controlled reversible encapsulation of the cargo enzyme, horseradish peroxidase, in the cage with four hairpin forming strands. However, in this previous study the mechanism of cargo uptake was not directly addressed (Juul, et al., Temperature-Controlled Encapsulation and Release of an Active Enzyme in the Cavity of a Self-Assembled DNA Nanocage, ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 9724-9734). In the present study we use a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and in vitro analyses to unravel the mechanism of cargo uptake in hairpin containing DNA cages. We find that two hairpin forming strands are necessary and sufficient to facilitate efficient cargo uptake, which argues against a full opening-closing of one corner of the structure being responsible for encapsulation. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to evaluate the atomistic motions responsible for encapsulation and showed that the two hairpin forming strands facilitated extension of at least one of the face surfaces of the cage scaffold, allowing entrance of the cargo protein into the cavity of the structure. Hence, the presented data demonstrate that cargo uptake does not involve a full opening of the structure. Rather, the uptake mechanism represents a feature of increased flexibility integrated in this nanocage structure upon the addition of at least two hairpin-forming strands.In the present study we investigate the mechanism behind temperature controlled cargo uptake using a truncated octahedral DNA cage scaffold functionalized with one, two, three or four hairpin forming DNA strands inserted in one corner of the structure. This investigation was inspired by our previous

  5. DNA promoter methylation as a diagnostic and therapeutic biomarker in gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is an infrequent neoplasia with noticeable geographical variations in its incidence around the world. In Chile, it is the main cause of death owing to cancer in women over 40 years old, with mortality rates up to 16.5 per 100,000 cases. The prognosis is poor with few therapeutic options; in advanced cases there is only a 10% survival at 5 years. Several studies mention the possible role of DNA methylation in gallbladder carcinogenesis. This epigenetic modification affects tumor suppressor genes involved in regulation pathways, cell cycle control, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix degradation, in a sequential and cumulative way. Determining DNA methylation patterns would allow them to be used as biomarkers for the early detection, diagnosis, prognosis and/or therapeutic selection in gallbladder cancer. PMID:22794276

  6. BMI1-mediated histone ubiquitylation promotes DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ismail Hassan; Andrin, Christi; McDonald, Darin

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are major determinants of cell identity, stem cell pluripotency, and epigenetic gene silencing during development. The polycomb repressive complex 1, which contains BMI1, RING1, and RING2, functions as an E3-ubuiquitin ligase. We found that BMI1 and RING2 are recruited to sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) where they contribute to the ubiquitylation of γ-H2AX. In the absence of BMI1, several proteins dependent on ubiquitin signaling, including 53BP1, BRCA1, and RAP80, are impaired in recruitment to DSBs. Loss of BMI1 sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation to the same extent as loss of RNF8. The simultaneous depletion of both proteins revealed an additive increase in radiation sensitivity. These data uncover an unexpected link between the polycomb and the DNA damage response pathways, and suggest a novel function for BMI1 in maintaining genomic stability. PMID:20921134

  7. The Fanconi anemia pathway promotes replication-dependent DNA interstrand cross-link repair.

    PubMed

    Knipscheer, Puck; Räschle, Markus; Smogorzewska, Agata; Enoiu, Milica; Ho, The Vinh; Schärer, Orlando D; Elledge, Stephen J; Walter, Johannes C

    2009-12-18

    Fanconi anemia is a human cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in 13 Fanc genes. The disorder is characterized by genomic instability and cellular hypersensitivity to chemicals that generate DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). A central event in the activation of the Fanconi anemia pathway is the mono-ubiquitylation of the FANCI-FANCD2 complex, but how this complex confers ICL resistance remains enigmatic. Using a cell-free system, we showed that FANCI-FANCD2 is required for replication-coupled ICL repair in S phase. Removal of FANCD2 from extracts inhibits both nucleolytic incisions near the ICL and translesion DNA synthesis past the lesion. Reversal of these defects requires ubiquitylated FANCI-FANCD2. Our results show that multiple steps of the essential S-phase ICL repair mechanism fail when the Fanconi anemia pathway is compromised.

  8. Induction and maintenance of DNA methylation in plant promoter sequences by apple latent spherical virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Tatsuya; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) is an efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector in functional genomics analyses of a broad range of plant species. Here, an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation (agroinoculation) system was developed for the ALSV vector, and virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) is described in plants infected with the ALSV vector. The cDNAs of ALSV RNA1 and RNA2 were inserted between the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the NOS-T sequences in a binary vector pCAMBIA1300 to produce pCALSR1 and pCALSR2-XSB or pCALSR2-XSB/MN. When these vector constructs were agroinoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a construct expressing a viral silencing suppressor, the infection efficiency of the vectors was 100%. A recombinant ALSV vector carrying part of the 35S promoter sequence induced transcriptional gene silencing of the green fluorescent protein gene in a line of N. benthamiana plants, resulting in the disappearance of green fluorescence of infected plants. Bisulfite sequencing showed that cytosine residues at CG and CHG sites of the 35S promoter sequence were highly methylated in the silenced generation zero plants infected with the ALSV carrying the promoter sequence as well as in progeny. The ALSV-mediated VITGS state was inherited by progeny for multiple generations. In addition, induction of VITGS of an endogenous gene (chalcone synthase-A) was demonstrated in petunia plants infected with an ALSV vector carrying the native promoter sequence. These results suggest that ALSV-based vectors can be applied to study DNA methylation in plant genomes, and provide a useful tool for plant breeding via epigenetic modification. PMID:25426109

  9. Promoter DNA methylation of farnesoid X receptor and pregnane X receptor modulates the intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy phenotype.

    PubMed

    Cabrerizo, Romina; Castaño, Gustavo O; Burgueño, Adriana L; Fernández Gianotti, Tomas; Gonzalez Lopez Ledesma, María Mora; Flichman, Diego; Pirola, Carlos J; Sookoian, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a multifactorial liver disorder which pathogenesis involves the interplay among abnormal bile acid (BA) levels, sex hormones, environmental factors, and genetic susceptibility. The dynamic nature of ICP that usually resolves soon after delivery suggests the possibility that its pathobiology is under epigenetic modulation. We explored the status of white blood peripheral cells-DNA methylation of CpG-enriched sites at the promoter of targeted genes (FXR/NR1H4, PXR/NR1I2, NR1I3, ESR1, and ABCC2) in a sample of 88 ICP patients and 173 healthy pregnant women in the third trimester of their pregnancies. CpG dinucleotides at the gene promoter of nuclear receptors subfamily 1 members and ABCC2 transporter were highly methylated during healthy pregnancy. We observed significant differences at the distal (-1890) and proximal promoter (-358) CpG sites of the FXR/NR1H4 and at the distal PXR/NR1I2 (-1224) promoter, which were consistently less methylated in ICP cases when compared with controls. In addition, we observed that methylation at FXR/NR1H4-1890 and PXR/NR1I2-1224 promoter sites was highly and positively correlated with BA profiling, particularly, conjugated BAs. Conversely, methylation level at the proximal FXR/NR1H4-358 CpG site was significantly and negatively correlated with the primary cholic and secondary deoxycholic acid. In vitro exploration showed that epiallopregnanolone sulfate, a reported FXR inhibitor, regulates the transcriptional activity of FXR/NR1H4 but seems to be not involved in the methylation changes. In conclusion, the identification of epigenetic marks in target genes provides a basis for the understanding of adverse liver-related pregnancy outcomes, including ICP.

  10. Promoter DNA Methylation of Farnesoid X Receptor and Pregnane X Receptor Modulates the Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Cabrerizo, Romina; Castaño, Gustavo O.; Burgueño, Adriana L.; Fernández Gianotti, Tomas; Gonzalez Lopez Ledesma, María Mora; Flichman, Diego; Pirola, Carlos J.; Sookoian, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a multifactorial liver disorder which pathogenesis involves the interplay among abnormal bile acid (BA) levels, sex hormones, environmental factors, and genetic susceptibility. The dynamic nature of ICP that usually resolves soon after delivery suggests the possibility that its pathobiology is under epigenetic modulation. We explored the status of white blood peripheral cells-DNA methylation of CpG-enriched sites at the promoter of targeted genes (FXR/NR1H4, PXR/NR1I2, NR1I3, ESR1, and ABCC2) in a sample of 88 ICP patients and 173 healthy pregnant women in the third trimester of their pregnancies. CpG dinucleotides at the gene promoter of nuclear receptors subfamily 1 members and ABCC2 transporter were highly methylated during healthy pregnancy. We observed significant differences at the distal (−1890) and proximal promoter (−358) CpG sites of the FXR/NR1H4 and at the distal PXR/NR1I2 (−1224) promoter, which were consistently less methylated in ICP cases when compared with controls. In addition, we observed that methylation at FXR/NR1H4-1890 and PXR/NR1I2-1224 promoter sites was highly and positively correlated with BA profiling, particularly, conjugated BAs. Conversely, methylation level at the proximal FXR/NR1H4-358 CpG site was significantly and negatively correlated with the primary cholic and secondary deoxycholic acid. In vitro exploration showed that epiallopregnanolone sulfate, a reported FXR inhibitor, regulates the transcriptional activity of FXR/NR1H4 but seems to be not involved in the methylation changes. In conclusion, the identification of epigenetic marks in target genes provides a basis for the understanding of adverse liver-related pregnancy outcomes, including ICP. PMID:24498169

  11. Phosphodiester hydrolysis and specific DNA binding and cleavage promoted by guanidinium-functionalized zinc complexes.

    PubMed

    He, Juan; Sun, Jing; Mao, Zong-Wan; Ji, Liang-Nian; Sun, Hongzhe

    2009-05-01

    Two new Zn(II) complexes containing guanidinium groups, [Zn(L(1))Cl(2)](ClO(4))(2).H(2)O.CH(3)OH (1) and [Zn(L(2))Cl(2)](ClO(4))(2).0.5H(2)O (2), were synthesized and characterized (L(1)=5,5'-di[1-(guanidyl)methyl]-2,2'-bipyridyl bication and L(2)=6,6'-di[1-(guanidyl)methyl]-2,2'-bipyridyl bication). Both complexes are able to catalyze bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) hydrolysis efficiently. Obtained kinetic data reveal that both 1 and 2 show nearly 300- and 600-fold rate enhancement of BNPP hydrolysis, respectively, compared to their simple analogue without the guanidinium groups [Zn(bpy)Cl(2)] (bpy=2,2'-bipyridy) (3). Enhanced acceleration for cleavage of BNPP could be attributed to cooperative interaction between the Zn(II) ion and the guanidinium groups by electrostatic interaction and H-bonding. Studies on inhibition of sequence-specific endonucleases (DraI and SmaI) by complexes show that 1 and 2 are able to recognize nucleotide sequence, -TTT;AAA-, and highly effectively cleave the plasmid DNA in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, while 3 has no specific binding to the DNA target sequences and only shows low DNA cleavage activity.

  12. Cyclin A2 promotes DNA repair in the brain during both development and aging

    PubMed Central

    Gygli, Patrick E.; Chang, Joshua C.; Gokozan, Hamza N.; Catacutan, Fay P.; Schmidt, Theresa A.; Kaya, Behiye; Goksel, Mustafa; Baig, Faisal S.; Chen, Shannon; Griveau, Amelie; Michowski, Wojciech; Wong, Michael; Palanichamy, Kamalakannan; Sicinski, Piotr; Nelson, Randy J.; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José J.

    2016-01-01

    Various stem cell niches of the brain have differential requirements for Cyclin A2. Cyclin A2 loss results in marked cerebellar dysmorphia, whereas forebrain growth is retarded during early embryonic development yet achieves normal size at birth. To understand the differential requirements of distinct brain regions for Cyclin A2, we utilized neuroanatomical, transgenic mouse, and mathematical modeling techniques to generate testable hypotheses that provide insight into how Cyclin A2 loss results in compensatory forebrain growth during late embryonic development. Using unbiased measurements of the forebrain stem cell niche, we parameterized a mathematical model whereby logistic growth instructs progenitor cells as to the cell-types of their progeny. Our data was consistent with prior findings that progenitors proliferate along an auto-inhibitory growth curve. The growth retardation in CCNA2-null brains corresponded to cell cycle lengthening, imposing a developmental delay. We hypothesized that Cyclin A2 regulates DNA repair and that CCNA2-null progenitors thus experienced lengthened cell cycle. We demonstrate that CCNA2-null progenitors suffer abnormal DNA repair, and implicate Cyclin A2 in double-strand break repair. Cyclin A2's DNA repair functions are conserved among cell lines, neural progenitors, and hippocampal neurons. We further demonstrate that neuronal CCNA2 ablation results in learning and memory deficits in aged mice. PMID:27425845

  13. Overexpression of DEMETER, a DNA demethylase, promotes early apical bud maturation in poplar.

    PubMed

    Conde, Daniel; Moreno-Cortés, Alicia; Dervinis, Christopher; Ramos-Sánchez, José M; Kirst, Matias; Perales, Mariano; González-Melendi, Pablo; Allona, Isabel

    2017-08-15

    The transition from active growth to dormancy is critical for the survival of perennial plants. We identified a DEMETER-like (CsDML) cDNA from a winter-enriched cDNA subtractive library in chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.), an economically and ecologically important species. Next, we characterized this DNA demethylase and its putative orthologue in the more experimentally tractable hybrid poplar (Populus tremula x alba), under the signals that trigger bud dormancy in trees. We performed phylogenetic and protein sequence analysis, gene expression profiling and 5mC immunodetection studies to evaluate the role of CsDML and its homologue in poplar, PtaDML6. Transgenic hybrid poplars overexpressing CsDML were produced and analyzed. Short days (SD) and cold temperatures induced CsDML and PtaDML6. Overexpression of CsDML accelerated SD-induced bud formation, specifically from stage 1 to 0. Bud acquired a red-brown coloration earlier than wild type (WT) plants, alongside with the up regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis enzymes and accumulation of flavonoids in the SAM and bud scales. Our data shows that the CsDML gene induces bud formation needed for the survival of the apical meristem under the harsh conditions of winter. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. ATG5 is induced by DNA-damaging agents and promotes mitotic catastrophe independent of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Maskey, Dipak; Yousefi, Shida; Schmid, Inès; Zlobec, Inti; Perren, Aurel; Friis, Robert; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer drug therapy activates both molecular cell death and autophagy pathways. Here we show that even sublethal concentrations of DNA-damaging drugs, such as etoposide and cisplatin, induce the expression of autophagy-related protein 5 (ATG5), which is both necessary and sufficient for the subsequent induction of mitotic catastrophe. We demonstrate that ATG5 translocates to the nucleus, where it physically interacts with survivin in response to DNA-damaging agents both in vitro and in carcinoma tissues obtained from patients who had undergone radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. As a consequence, elements of the chromosomal passenger complex are displaced during mitosis, resulting in chromosom